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Sample records for slow binding inhibition

  1. Slow binding inhibition of phospho-N-acetylmuramyl-pentapeptide-translocase (Escherichia coli) by mureidomycin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandish, P E; Burnham, M K; Lonsdale, J T; Southgate, R; Inukai, M; Bugg, T D

    1996-03-29

    Enzymes of the membrane cycle of reactions in bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis remain as unexploited potential targets for antibacterial agents. The first of these enzymes, phospho-N-acetylmuramyl-pentapeptide-translocase (EC 2.7.8.13), has been overexpresed in Escherichia coli and solubilized from particulate fractions. The work of W.A. Weppner and F.C. Neuhaus ((1977) J. Biol. Chem. 252, 2296-303) has been extended to establish a usable routine fluorescence-based continuous assay for solubilized preparations. This assay has been used in the characterization of the natural product, mureidomycin A as a potent slow binding inhibitor of the enzyme with Ki and Ki* of 36 nM and 2 nM, respectively.

  2. Inhibition of Y-box binding protein-1 slows the growth of glioblastoma multiforme and sensitizes to temozolomide independent O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuanyuan; Fotovati, Abbas; Lee, Cathy; Wang, Michelle; Cote, Gilbert; Guns, Emma; Toyota, Brian; Faury, Damien; Jabado, Nada; Dunn, Sandra E

    2009-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive type of brain tumor where 5 years. In adults, GBM is the most common type of brain tumor. It is rarer in children, where it constitutes approximately 15% of all brain tumors diagnosed. These tumors are often invasive, making surgical resection difficult. Further, they can be refractory to current therapies such as temozolomide. The current dogma is that temozolomide resistance rests on the expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) because it cleaves methylated DNA adducts formed by the drug. Our laboratory recently reported that another drug resistance gene known as the Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1) is highly expressed in primary GBM but not in normal brain tissues based on the evaluation of primary tumors. We therefore questioned whether GBM depend on YB-1 for growth and/or response to temozolomide. Herein, we report that YB-1 inhibition reduced tumor cell invasion and growth in monolayer as well as in soft agar. Moreover, blocking this protein ultimately delayed tumor onset in mice. Importantly, inhibiting YB-1 enhanced temozolomide sensitivity in a manner that was independent of MGMT in models of adult and pediatric GBM. In conclusion, inhibiting YB-1 may be a novel way to improve the treatment of GBM.

  3. Zinc ions bind to and inhibit activated protein C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Tianqing; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Nickolaus, Noëlle

    2010-01-01

    fold enhanced, presumably due to the Ca2+-induced conformational change affecting the conformation of the Zn2+-binding site. The inhibition mechanism was non-competitive both in the absence and presence of Ca2+. Comparisons of sequences and structures suggested several possible sites for zinc binding...

  4. Differential Sensitivities of Fast- and Slow-Cycling Cancer Cells to Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase 2 Inhibition by Mycophenolic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kan; Cao, Wanlu; Li, Juan; Sprengers, Dave; Hernanda, Pratika Y; Kong, Xiangdong; van der Laan, Luc JW; Man, Kwan; Kwekkeboom, Jaap; Metselaar, Herold J; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Pan, Qiuwei

    2015-01-01

    As uncontrolled cell proliferation requires nucleotide biosynthesis, inhibiting enzymes that mediate nucleotide biosynthesis constitutes a rational approach to the management of oncological diseases. In practice, however, results of this strategy are mixed and thus elucidation of the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade the effect of nucleotide biosynthesis restriction is urgently needed. Here we explored the notion that intrinsic differences in cancer cell cycle velocity are important in the resistance toward inhibition of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) by mycophenolic acid (MPA). In short-term experiments, MPA treatment of fast-growing cancer cells effectively elicited G0/G1 arrest and provoked apoptosis, thus inhibiting cell proliferation and colony formation. Forced expression of a mutated IMPDH2, lacking a binding site for MPA but retaining enzymatic activity, resulted in complete resistance of cancer cells to MPA. In nude mice subcutaneously engrafted with HeLa cells, MPA moderately delayed tumor formation by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Importantly, we developed a lentiviral vector–based Tet-on label-retaining system that enables to identify, isolate and functionally characterize slow-cycling or so-called label-retaining cells (LRCs) in vitro and in vivo. We surprisingly found the presence of LRCs in fast-growing tumors. LRCs were superior in colony formation, tumor initiation and resistance to MPA as compared with fast-cycling cells. Thus, the slow-cycling compartment of cancer seems predominantly responsible for resistance to MPA. PMID:26467706

  5. Rational Modulation of the Induced-Fit Conformational Change for Slow-Onset Inhibition in Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng-Tsung; Li, Huei-Jiun; Yu, Weixuan; Shah, Sonam; Bommineni, Gopal R; Perrone, Victoria; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; Tonge, Peter J; Simmerling, Carlos

    2015-08-04

    Slow-onset enzyme inhibitors are the subject of considerable interest as an approach to increasing the potency of pharmaceutical compounds by extending the residence time of the inhibitor on the target (the lifetime of the drug-receptor complex). However, rational modulation of residence time presents significant challenges because it requires additional mechanistic insight, such as the nature of the transition state for postbinding isomerization. Our previous work, based on X-ray crystallography, enzyme kinetics, and molecular dynamics simulation, suggested that the slow step in inhibition of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl-ACP reductase InhA involves a change in the conformation of the substrate binding loop from an open state in the initial enzyme-inhibitor complex to a closed state in the final enzyme-inhibitor complex. Here, we use multidimensional free energy landscapes for loop isomerization to obtain a computational model for the transition state. The results suggest that slow-onset inhibitors crowd key side chains on helices that slide past each other during isomerization, resulting in a steric clash. The landscapes become significantly flatter when residues involved in the steric clash are replaced with alanine. Importantly, this lower barrier can be increased by rational inhibitor redesign to restore the steric clash. Crystallographic studies and enzyme kinetics confirm the predicted effects on loop structure and flexibility, as well as inhibitor residence time. These loss and regain of function studies validate our mechanistic hypothesis for interactions controlling substrate binding loop isomerization, providing a platform for the future design of inhibitors with longer residence times and better in vivo potency. Similar opportunities for slow-onset inhibition via the same mechanism are identified in other pathogens.

  6. High molecular weight polysaccharide that binds and inhibits virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konowalchuk, Thomas W

    2014-01-14

    This invention provides a high molecular weight polysaccharide capable of binding to and inhibiting virus and related pharmaceutical formulations and methods on inhibiting viral infectivity and/or pathogenicity, as well as immunogenic compositions. The invention further methods of inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and of ameliorating a symptom of aging. Additionally, the invention provides methods of detecting and/or quantifying and/or isolating viruses.

  7. High molecular weight polysaccharide that binds and inhibits virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konowalchuk, Thomas W.; Konowalchuk, Jack

    2017-07-18

    This invention provides a high molecular weight polysaccharide capable of binding to and inhibiting virus and related pharmaceutical formulations and methods of inhibiting viral infectivity and/or pathogenicity, as well as immunogenic compositions. The invention further includes methods of inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and of ameliorating a symptom of aging. Additionally, the invention provides methods of detecting and/or quantifying and/or isolating viruses.

  8. Bilirubin Binding to PPARα Inhibits Lipid Accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stec, David E.; John, Kezia; Trabbic, Christopher J.; Luniwal, Amarjit; Hankins, Michael W.; Baum, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical and population studies have demonstrated that increased serum bilirubin levels protect against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant, and the beneficial actions of moderate increases in plasma bilirubin have been thought to be due to the antioxidant effects of this bile pigment. In the present study, we found that bilirubin has a new function as a ligand for PPARα. We show that bilirubin can bind directly to PPARα and increase transcriptional activity. When we compared biliverdin, the precursor to bilirubin, on PPARα transcriptional activation to known PPARα ligands, WY 14,643 and fenofibrate, it showed that fenofibrate and biliverdin have similar activation properties. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with biliverdin suppressed lipid accumulation and upregulated PPARα target genes. We treated wild-type and PPARα KO mice on a high fat diet with fenofibrate or bilirubin for seven days and found that both signal through PPARα dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the effect of bilirubin on lowering glucose and reducing body fat percentage was blunted in PPARα KO mice. These data demonstrate a new function for bilirubin as an agonist of PPARα, which mediates the protection from adiposity afforded by moderate increases in bilirubin. PMID:27071062

  9. The inhibition of anti-DNA binding to DNA by nucleic acid binding polymers.

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    Nancy A Stearns

    Full Text Available Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and can mediate disease pathogenesis by the formation of immune complexes. Since blocking immune complex formation can attenuate disease manifestations, the effects of nucleic acid binding polymers (NABPs on anti-DNA binding in vitro were investigated. The compounds tested included polyamidoamine dendrimer, 1,4-diaminobutane core, generation 3.0 (PAMAM-G3, hexadimethrine bromide, and a β-cylodextrin-containing polycation. As shown with plasma from patients with SLE, NABPs can inhibit anti-DNA antibody binding in ELISA assays. The inhibition was specific since the NABPs did not affect binding to tetanus toxoid or the Sm protein, another lupus autoantigen. Furthermore, the polymers could displace antibody from preformed complexes. Together, these results indicate that NABPs can inhibit the formation of immune complexes and may represent a new approach to treatment.

  10. Menthol binding and inhibition of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

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    Abrar Ashoor

    Full Text Available Menthol is a common compound in pharmaceutical and commercial products and a popular additive to cigarettes. The molecular targets of menthol remain poorly defined. In this study we show an effect of menthol on the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh receptor function. Using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, menthol was found to reversibly inhibit α7-nACh receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Inhibition by menthol was not dependent on the membrane potential and did not involve endogenous Ca(2+-dependent Cl(- channels, since menthol inhibition remained unchanged by intracellular injection of the Ca(2+ chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca(2+-free bathing solution containing Ba(2+. Furthermore, increasing ACh concentrations did not reverse menthol inhibition and the specific binding of [(125I] α-bungarotoxin was not attenuated by menthol. Studies of α7- nACh receptors endogenously expressed in neural cells demonstrate that menthol attenuates α7 mediated Ca(2+ transients in the cell body and neurite. In conclusion, our results suggest that menthol inhibits α7-nACh receptors in a noncompetitive manner.

  11. Aptamers Binding to c-Met Inhibiting Tumor Cell Migration.

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    Birgit Piater

    Full Text Available The human receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met plays an important role in the control of critical cellular processes. Since c-Met is frequently over expressed or deregulated in human malignancies, blocking its activation is of special interest for therapy. In normal conditions, the c-Met receptor is activated by its bivalent ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF. Also bivalent antibodies can activate the receptor by cross linking, limiting therapeutic applications. We report the generation of the RNA aptamer CLN64 containing 2'-fluoro pyrimidine modifications by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX. CLN64 and a previously described single-stranded DNA (ssDNA aptamer CLN3 exhibited high specificities and affinities to recombinant and cellular expressed c-Met. Both aptamers effectively inhibited HGF-dependent c-Met activation, signaling and cell migration. We showed that these aptamers did not induce c-Met activation, revealing an advantage over bivalent therapeutic molecules. Both aptamers were shown to bind overlapping epitopes but only CLN3 competed with HGF binding to cMet. In addition to their therapeutic and diagnostic potential, CLN3 and CLN64 aptamers exhibit valuable tools to further understand the structural and functional basis for c-Met activation or inhibition by synthetic ligands and their interplay with HGF binding.

  12. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is a slow tight binding inhibitor of E. coli pyridoxal kinase.

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    Mohini S Ghatge

    Full Text Available Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP is a cofactor for dozens of B(6 requiring enzymes. PLP reacts with apo-B(6 enzymes by forming an aldimine linkage with the ε-amino group of an active site lysine residue, thus yielding the catalytically active holo-B(6 enzyme. During protein turnover, the PLP is salvaged by first converting it to pyridoxal by a phosphatase and then back to PLP by pyridoxal kinase. Nonetheless, PLP poses a potential toxicity problem for the cell since its reactive 4'-aldehyde moiety forms covalent adducts with other compounds and non-B(6 proteins containing thiol or amino groups. The regulation of PLP homeostasis in the cell is thus an important, yet unresolved issue. In this report, using site-directed mutagenesis, kinetic, spectroscopic and chromatographic studies we show that pyridoxal kinase from E. coli forms a complex with the product PLP to form an inactive enzyme complex. Evidence is presented that, in the inhibited complex, PLP has formed an aldimine bond with an active site lysine residue during catalytic turnover. The rate of dissociation of PLP from the complex is very slow, being only partially released after a 2-hour incubation with PLP phosphatase. Interestingly, the inactive pyridoxal kinase•PLP complex can be partially reactivated by transferring the tightly bound PLP to an apo-B(6 enzyme. These results open new perspectives on the mechanism of regulation and role of pyridoxal kinase in the Escherichia coli cell.

  13. Serum protein inhibition of thyrotropin binding to human thyroid tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beall, G.N.; Chopra, I.J.; Solomon, D.H.; Kruger, S.R.

    1978-01-01

    We used a modificaton of the TSH radioreceptor assay to detect TSH-binding inhibition (TBI) activity in serum and serum fractions from normal subjects and patients with Graves' disease. TBI activity is present in normal IgG prepared by DEAE-Sephadex chromatography and in normal globulins prepared by precipitation at 1.6 M ammonium sulfate. Other normal serum proteins also had TBI activity when large concentrations were tested. Gel filtration chromatography and powder block electrophoresis were used to prepare fractions of normal and Graves' disease sera. In these fractions from normal serum, TBI activity was found in both γ-globulin and α-globulin-albumin fractions electrophoretically and in both 7S and 4S peaks from gel filtration. TBI activity from Graves' disease patients' sera was similarly distributed, but relatively more TBI accompanied the electrophoretic γ-globulins. Sepharose Protein-A and anti-IgG were used as immunoabsorbents to isolate and purify IgG from normal and Graves' disease sera. TBI activity in IgG was proportional to the IgG concentration, indicating that the TBI which migrates as a γ-globulin electrophoretically is an IgG and thus may possibly be an antibody. Inhibitory activity found in normal serum globulins and in the non-IgG fractions of both normal and abnormal sera seriously interferes with attempts to use the TSH radioreceptor assay to study the hypothesized anti-TSH receptor antibody in the serum of patients with Graves' disease

  14. Lead inhibition of DNA-binding mechanism of Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanas, J S; Rodgers, J S; Bantle, J A; Cheng, Y G

    1999-11-01

    The association of lead with chromatin in cells suggests that deleterious metal effects may in part be mediated through alterations in gene function. To elucidate if and how lead may alter DNA binding of cysteine-rich zinc finger proteins, lead ions were analyzed for their ability to alter the DNA binding mechanism of the Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger protein transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA). As assayed by DNase I protection, the interaction of TFIIIA with the 50-bp internal control region of the 5S ribosomal gene was partially inhibited by 5 microM lead ions and completely inhibited by 10 to 20 microM lead ions. Preincubation of free TFIIIA with lead resulted in DNA-binding inhibition, whereas preincubation of a TFIIIA/5S RNA complex with lead did not result in DNA-binding inhibition. Because 5S RNA binds TFIIIA zinc fingers, this result is consistent with an inhibition mechanism via lead binding to zinc fingers. The complete loss of DNase I protection on the 5S gene indicates the mechanism of inhibition minimally involves the N-terminal fingers of TFIIIA. Inhibition was not readily reversible and occurred in the presence of an excess of beta-mercaptoethanol. Inhibition kinetics were fast, progressing to completion in approximately 5 min. Millimolar concentrations of sulfhydryl-specific arsenic ions were not inhibitory for TFIIIA binding. Micromolar concentrations of lead inhibited DNA binding by Sp1, another Cys(2)His(2) finger protein, but not by the nonfinger protein AP2. Inhibition of Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger transcription factors by lead ions at concentrations near those known to have deleterious physiological effects points to new molecular mechanisms for lead toxicity in promoting disease.

  15. TAF(II)170 interacts with the concave surface of TATA-binding protein to inhibit its DNA binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, L A; van der Knaap, J A; van den Boom, V; van den Heuvel, F A; Timmers, H T

    2001-11-01

    The human RNA polymerase II transcription factor B-TFIID consists of TATA-binding protein (TBP) and the TBP-associated factor (TAF) TAF(II)170 and can rapidly redistribute over promoter DNA. Here we report the identification of human TBP-binding regions in human TAF(II)170. We have defined the TBP interaction domain of TAF(II)170 within three amino-terminal regions: residues 2 to 137, 290 to 381, and 380 to 460. Each region contains a pair of Huntington-elongation-A subunit-Tor repeats and exhibits species-specific interactions with TBP family members. Remarkably, the altered-specificity TBP mutant (TBP(AS)) containing a triple mutation in the concave surface is defective for binding the TAF(II)170 amino-terminal region of residues 1 to 504. Furthermore, within this region the TAF(II)170 residues 290 to 381 can inhibit the interaction between Drosophila TAF(II)230 (residues 2 to 81) and TBP through competition for the concave surface of TBP. Biochemical analyses of TBP binding to the TATA box indicated that TAF(II)170 region 290-381 inhibits TBP-DNA complex formation. Importantly, the TBP(AS) mutant is less sensitive to TAF(II)170 inhibition. Collectively, our results support a mechanism in which TAF(II)170 induces high-mobility DNA binding by TBP through reversible interactions with its concave DNA binding surface.

  16. Different mechanisms are involved in the antibody mediated inhibition of ligand binding to the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, K; Høyer-Hansen, G; Rønne, E

    1999-01-01

    Certain monoclonal antibodies are capable of inhibiting the biological binding reactions of their target proteins. At the molecular level, this type of effect may be brought about by completely different mechanisms, such as competition for common binding determinants, steric hindrance or interfer......Certain monoclonal antibodies are capable of inhibiting the biological binding reactions of their target proteins. At the molecular level, this type of effect may be brought about by completely different mechanisms, such as competition for common binding determinants, steric hindrance......) can be employed as a highly useful tool to characterize the inhibitory mechanism of specific antagonist antibodies. Two inhibitory antibodies against uPAR, mAb R3 and mAb R5, were shown to exhibit competitive and non-competitive inhibition, respectively, of ligand binding to the receptor. The former...

  17. Competitive inhibition of [3H]dexamethasone binding to mammary glucocorticoid receptor by leupeptin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, L.C.C.; Su, C.; Markland, F.S. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of leupeptin on [ 3 H]dexamethasone binding to the glucocorticoid receptor from lactating goat mammary cytosol has been studied. Leupeptin (10 mM) caused a significant (about 35%) inhibition of [ 3 H]dexamethasone binding to glucocorticoid receptor. Binding inhibition is further increased following filtration of unlabeled cytosolic receptor through a Bio-Gel A 0.5-m column. Binding inhibition was partially reversed by monothioglycerol at 10 mM concentration. A double reciprocal plot revealed that leupeptin appears to be a competitive inhibitor of [ 3 H]dexamethasone binding to the glucocorticoid receptor. Low salt sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed that the leupeptin-treated sample formed a slightly larger (approximately 9 S) receptor complex (leupeptin-free complex sediments at 8 S)

  18. Study of deutero-isotopomer-induced inhibition of caffeine and phenobarbitone binding to human serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherrah, Y.; Falconnet, J.B.; Desage, M.; Brazier, J.L.; Zini, R.; Tillement, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The present study of inhibition provides confirmation to previously observed deuterium isotope effects on in vitro caffeine and phenobarbitone binding to human serum albumin (HSA). Addition of either 3,7(C(/sup 2/H)/sub 3/)/sub 2/ or 1,3,7(C(/sup 2/H)/sub 3/)/sub 3/ caffeine induces a 50% loss in both the extent of binding and binding parameters of the unlabelled analog. As concerns caffeine displacement from its HSA sites, it is shown that phenobarbitone and its 5-pentadeuterophenyl analog are equally potent inhibitors of caffeine binding, though individual HSA binding profiles differ. As for HSA binding interactions between phenobarbitone isotopomers, a 50% decrease in unlabelled phenobarbitone extent of binding is observed in the presence of its 5-pentadeuterophenyl analog. Results favor the hypothesis of differing binding sites for each isotopomer.

  19. Slow and sustained nitric oxide releasing compounds inhibit multipotent vascular stem cell proliferation and differentiation without causing cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Brandon M.; Leix, Kyle Alexander [Department of Chemistry, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Ji, Yajing [Department of Biomedical Science and Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Glaves, Richard Samuel Elliot [Department of Biology, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Ash, David E. [Department of Chemistry, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Mohanty, Dillip K., E-mail: Mohan1dk@cmich.edu [Department of Chemistry, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Multipotent vascular stem cells (MVSCs) proliferate and differentiate. • Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of MVSCs. • Nitric oxide inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs). • Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) neither de-differentiate nor proliferate. - Abstract: Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of cerebral and myocardial infarction. It is believed that neointimal growth common in the later stages of atherosclerosis is a result of vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) de-differentiation in response to endothelial injury. However, the claims of the SMC de-differentiation theory have not been substantiated by monitoring the fate of mature SMCs in response to such injuries. A recent study suggests that atherosclerosis is a consequence of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) differentiation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known mediator against atherosclerosis, in part because of its inhibitory effect on SMC proliferation. Using three different NO-donors, we have investigated the effects of NO on MVSC proliferation. Results indicate that NO inhibits MVSC proliferation in a concentration dependent manner. A slow and sustained delivery of NO proved to inhibit proliferation without causing cell death. On the other hand, larger, single-burst NO concentrations, inhibits proliferation, with concurrent significant cell death. Furthermore, our results indicate that endogenously produced NO inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs) and subsequently to SMC as well.

  20. Slow and sustained nitric oxide releasing compounds inhibit multipotent vascular stem cell proliferation and differentiation without causing cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, Brandon M.; Leix, Kyle Alexander; Ji, Yajing; Glaves, Richard Samuel Elliot; Ash, David E.; Mohanty, Dillip K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Multipotent vascular stem cells (MVSCs) proliferate and differentiate. • Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of MVSCs. • Nitric oxide inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs). • Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) neither de-differentiate nor proliferate. - Abstract: Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of cerebral and myocardial infarction. It is believed that neointimal growth common in the later stages of atherosclerosis is a result of vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) de-differentiation in response to endothelial injury. However, the claims of the SMC de-differentiation theory have not been substantiated by monitoring the fate of mature SMCs in response to such injuries. A recent study suggests that atherosclerosis is a consequence of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) differentiation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known mediator against atherosclerosis, in part because of its inhibitory effect on SMC proliferation. Using three different NO-donors, we have investigated the effects of NO on MVSC proliferation. Results indicate that NO inhibits MVSC proliferation in a concentration dependent manner. A slow and sustained delivery of NO proved to inhibit proliferation without causing cell death. On the other hand, larger, single-burst NO concentrations, inhibits proliferation, with concurrent significant cell death. Furthermore, our results indicate that endogenously produced NO inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs) and subsequently to SMC as well

  1. Aptamer-Conjugated Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles for Reducing Diabetes Risk via Retinol Binding Protein 4 Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Raheleh; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Amanlou, Massoud; Pasalar, Parvin

    2017-06-01

    Inhibition of the binding of retinol to its carrier, retinol binding protein 4, is a new strategy for treating type 2 diabetes; for this purpose, we have provided an aptamer-functionalized multishell calcium phosphate nanoparticle. First, calcium phosphate nanoparticles were synthesized and conjugated to the aptamer. The cytotoxicity of nanoparticles releases the process of aptamer from nanoparticles and their inhibition function of binding retinol to retinol binding protein 4. After synthesizing and characterizing the multishell calcium phosphate nanoparticles and observing the noncytotoxicity of conjugate, the optimum time (48 hours) and the pH (7.4) for releasing the aptamer from the nanoparticles was determined. The half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) value for inhibition of retinol binding to retinol binding protein 4 was 210 femtomolar (fmol). The results revealed that the aptamer could prevent connection between retinol and retinol binding protein 4 at a very low IC 50 value (210 fmol) compared to other reported inhibitors. It seems that this aptamer could be used as an efficient candidate not only for decreasing the insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes, but also for inhibiting the other retinol binding protein 4-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Improving Density Functional Tight Binding Predictions of Free Energy Surfaces for Slow Chemical Reactions in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew; Goldman, Nir

    2017-06-01

    First principles molecular dynamics using highly accurate density functional theory (DFT) is a common tool for predicting chemistry, but the accessible time and space scales are often orders of magnitude beyond the resolution of experiments. Semi-empirical methods such as density functional tight binding (DFTB) offer up to a thousand-fold reduction in required CPU hours and can approach experimental scales. However, standard DFTB parameter sets lack good transferability and calibration for a particular system is usually necessary. Force matching the pairwise repulsive energy term in DFTB to short DFT trajectories can improve the former's accuracy for reactions that are fast relative to DFT simulation times (Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. MDM2 binds and inhibits vitamin D receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Heyne, Kristina; Heil, Tessa-Carina; Bette, Birgit; Reichrath, Jörg; Roemer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase and transcriptional repressor MDM2 is a potent inhibitor of the p53 family of transcription factors and tumor suppressors. Herein, we report that vitamin D receptor (VDR), another transcriptional regulator and probably, tumor suppressor, is also bound and inhibited by MDM2. This interaction was not affected by vitamin D ligand. VDR was ubiquitylated in the cell and its steady-state level was controlled by the proteasome. Strikingly, overproduced MDM2 reduced the level ...

  4. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R [Berkeley, CA; Song, Jie [Shrewsbury, MA; Lee, Seung-Wuk [Walnut Creek, CA

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  5. Inhibition of benzodiazepine binding in vitro by amentoflavone, a constituent of various species of Hypericum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baureithel, K H; Büter, K B; Engesser, A; Burkard, W; Schaffner, W

    1997-06-01

    Flower extracts of Hypericum perforatum, Hypericum hirsutum, Hypericum patulum and Hypericum olympicum efficiently inhibited binding of [3H]flumazenil to rat brain benzodiazepine binding sites of the GABAA-receptor in vitro with IC50 values of 6.83, 6.97, 13.2 and 6.14 micrograms/ml, respectively. Single constituents of the extracts like hypericin, the flavones quercetin and luteolin, the glycosylated flavonoides rutin, hyperoside and quercitrin and the biflavone 13, II8-biapigenin did not inhibit binding up to concentrations of 1 microM. In contrast, amentoflavone revealed an IC50 = 14.9 +/- 1.9 nM on benzodiazepine binding in vitro. Comparative HPLC analyses of hypericin and amentoflavone in extracts of different Hypericum species revealed a possible correlation between the amentoflavone concentration and the inhibition of flumazenil binding. For hypericin no such correlation was observed. Our experimental data demonstrate that amentoflavone, in contrast to hypericin, presents a very active compound with regard to the inhibition of [3H]-flumazenil binding in vitro and thus might be involved in the antidepressant effects of Hypericum perforatum extracts.

  6. Adenovirus DNA binding protein inhibits SrCap-activated CBP and CREB-mediated transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiequn; Tarakanova, Vera; Chrivia, John; Yaciuk, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The SNF2-related CBP activator protein (SrCap) is a potent activator of transcription mediated by CBP and CREB. We have previously demonstrated that the Adenovirus 2 DNA Binding Protein (DBP) binds to SrCap and inhibits the transcription mediated by the carboxyl-terminal region of SrCap (amino acids 1275-2971). We report here that DBP inhibits the ability of full-length SrCap (1-2971) to activate transcription mediated by Gal-CREB and Gal-CBP. In addition, DBP also inhibits the ability of SrCap to enhance Protein Kinase A (PKA) activated transcription of the enkaphalin promoter. DBP was found to dramatically inhibit transcription of a mammalian two-hybrid system that was dependent on the interaction of SrCap and CBP binding domains. We also found that DBP has no effect on transcription mediated by a transcriptional activator that is not related to SrCap, indicating that our reported transcriptional inhibition is specific for SrCap and not due to nonspecific effects of DBP's DNA binding activity on the CAT reporter plasmid. Taken together, these results suggest a model in which DBP inhibits cellular transcription mediated by the interaction between SrCap and CBP

  7. A unique bivalent binding and inhibition mechanism by the yatapoxvirus interleukin 18 binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Krumm

    Full Text Available Interleukin 18 (IL18 is a cytokine that plays an important role in inflammation as well as host defense against microbes. Mammals encode a soluble inhibitor of IL18 termed IL18 binding protein (IL18BP that modulates IL18 activity through a negative feedback mechanism. Many poxviruses encode homologous IL18BPs, which contribute to virulence. Previous structural and functional studies on IL18 and IL18BPs revealed an essential binding hot spot involving a lysine on IL18 and two aromatic residues on IL18BPs. The aromatic residues are conserved among the very diverse mammalian and poxviruses IL18BPs with the notable exception of yatapoxvirus IL18BPs, which lack a critical phenylalanine residue. To understand the mechanism by which yatapoxvirus IL18BPs neutralize IL18, we solved the crystal structure of the Yaba-Like Disease Virus (YLDV IL18BP and IL18 complex at 1.75 Å resolution. YLDV-IL18BP forms a disulfide bonded homo-dimer engaging IL18 in a 2∶2 stoichiometry, in contrast to the 1∶1 complex of ectromelia virus (ECTV IL18BP and IL18. Disruption of the dimer interface resulted in a functional monomer, however with a 3-fold decrease in binding affinity. The overall architecture of the YLDV-IL18BP:IL18 complex is similar to that observed in the ECTV-IL18BP:IL18 complex, despite lacking the critical lysine-phenylalanine interaction. Through structural and mutagenesis studies, contact residues that are unique to the YLDV-IL18BP:IL18 binding interface were identified, including Q67, P116 of YLDV-IL18BP and Y1, S105 and D110 of IL18. Overall, our studies show that YLDV-IL18BP is unique among the diverse family of mammalian and poxvirus IL-18BPs in that it uses a bivalent binding mode and a unique set of interacting residues for binding IL18. However, despite this extensive divergence, YLDV-IL18BP binds to the same surface of IL18 used by other IL18BPs, suggesting that all IL18BPs use a conserved inhibitory mechanism by blocking a putative receptor-binding

  8. Inhibition of transcription of abscisic acid in relation to the binding with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basak, Sukla; Basu, P.S.; Biswas, B.B.

    1976-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a plant substance inhibits RNA synthesis in vivo and vitro. In vitro inhibition by ABA has been demonstrated in isolated RNA polymerase system from coconut endosperm chromatin. This inhibition can be partly reversible with indole acetic acid-receptor protein complex if added in the system. To find the mechanism of inhibition of transcription by ABA, it has been found that ABA (10 -4 -10 -5 M) can bind with DNA and can prevent strand separation. This binding increases the Tm value. ABA binds with DNA but not with RNA. Moreover, ABA can equally bind and prevent denaturation of calfthymus DNA and E. coli DNA. pH optimum for this binding is 8.0. The bound complex is resistant to alkali and alcohol but susceptible to acid below pH 5.0. It has further been demonstrated that free aBA at this pH is changed to another component which has tentatively been identified as lactone form of ABA. (author)

  9. Inhibition of platelet [3H]- imipramine binding by human plasma protein fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strijewski, A.; Chudzik, J.; Tang, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of high-affinity [ 3 H]-imipramine binding to platelet membranes by human plasma fractions and isolated plasma proteins was investigated. Several plasma proteins were found to contribute to the observed apparent inhibition and this contribution was assessed in terms of inhibitor units. Alpha 1 acid glycoprotein, high density and low density lipoprotein, IgG and α 1 -antitrypsin were identified as effective non-specific inhibitors. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein was confirmed to be the most potent plasma protein inhibitor. Cohn fractions were evaluated for the presence of the postulated endocoid of [ 3 H]-imipramine binding site

  10. Protein Synthesis Inhibition in the Peri-Infarct Cortex Slows Motor Recovery in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubring-Giese, Maximilian; Leemburg, Susan; Luft, Andreas Rüdiger; Hosp, Jonas Aurel

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplasticity and reorganization of brain motor networks are thought to enable recovery of motor function after ischemic stroke. Especially in the cortex surrounding the ischemic scar (i.e., peri-infarct cortex), evidence for lasting reorganization has been found at the level of neurons and networks. This reorganization depends on expression of specific genes and subsequent protein synthesis. To test the functional relevance of the peri-infarct cortex for recovery we assessed the effect of protein synthesis inhibition within this region after experimental stroke. Long-Evans rats were trained to perform a skilled-reaching task (SRT) until they reached plateau performance. A photothrombotic stroke was induced in the forelimb representation of the primary motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the trained paw. The SRT was re-trained after stroke while the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin (ANI) or saline were injected into the peri-infarct cortex through implanted cannulas. ANI injections reduced protein synthesis within the peri-infarct cortex by 69% and significantly impaired recovery of reaching performance through re-training. Improvement of motor performance within a single training session remained intact, while improvement between training sessions was impaired. ANI injections did not affect infarct size. Thus, protein synthesis inhibition within the peri-infarct cortex impairs recovery of motor deficits after ischemic stroke by interfering with consolidation of motor memory between training sessions but not short-term improvements within one session.

  11. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, [ 125 I]iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30 degree C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing [ 125 I]iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus

  12. Anterior cingulate serotonin 1B receptor binding is associated with emotional response inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Hjordt, Liv Vadskjær; Dam, Vibeke Høyrup

    2017-01-01

    -offender controls, completed an emotional Go/NoGo task requiring inhibition of prepotent motor responses to emotional facial expressions. We also measured cerebral serotonin 1B receptor (5-HT1BR) binding with [11C]AZ10419369 positron emission tomography within regions of the frontal cortex. We hypothesized that 5......-HT1BR would be positively associated with false alarms (failures to inhibit nogo responses) in the context of aversive (angry and fearful) facial expressions. Across groups, we found that frontal cortex 5-HT1BR binding was positively correlated with false alarms when angry faces were go stimuli......Serotonin has a well-established role in emotional processing and is a key neurotransmitter in impulsive aggression, presumably by facilitating response inhibition and regulating subcortical reactivity to aversive stimuli. In this study 44 men, of whom 19 were violent offenders and 25 were non...

  13. Binding of fluorescently labeled cholera toxin subunit B to glycolipids in the human submandibular gland and inhibition of binding by periodate oxidation and by galactose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S

    2016-01-01

    FITC-labeled cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) stained the surfaces of cells of mucous acini in the submandibular gland. CTB, also called choleragenoid, binds to the GM1 glycolipid in the cell membrane. The binding in most acini was inhibited by periodic acid oxidation of the sections, while some acini...... to the internal galactose residue linked to GalNAc, as in the GM1 glycolipid. Inhibition of the GM1 receptor binding to cholera toxin has potential for protection of humans against cholera. Galactose and agents that modify sialic acid inhibit the accessibility of the toxin to the GM1 carbohydrate receptor. Human...

  14. Structural specificity of chloroquine-hematin binding related to inhibition of hematin polymerization and parasite growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vippagunta, S R; Dorn, A; Matile, H; Bhattacharjee, A K; Karle, J M; Ellis, W Y; Ridley, R G; Vennerstrom, J L

    1999-11-04

    Considerable data now support the hypothesis that chloroquine (CQ)-hematin binding in the parasite food vacuole leads to inhibition of hematin polymerization and parasite death by hematin poisoning. To better understand the structural specificity of CQ-hematin binding, 13 CQ analogues were chosen and their hematin binding affinity, inhibition of hematin polymerization, and inhibition of parasite growth were measured. As determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), the stoichiometry data and exothermic binding enthalpies indicated that, like CQ, these analogues bind to two or more hematin mu-oxo dimers in a cofacial pi-pi sandwich-type complex. Association constants (K(a)'s) ranged from 0.46 to 2.9 x 10(5) M(-1) compared to 4.0 x 10(5) M(-1) for CQ. Remarkably, we were not able to measure any significant interaction between hematin mu-oxo dimer and 11, the 6-chloro analogue of CQ. This result indicates that the 7-chloro substituent in CQ is a critical structural determinant in its binding affinity to hematin mu-oxo dimer. Molecular modeling experiments reinforce the view that the enthalpically favorable pi-pi interaction observed in the CQ-hematin mu-oxo dimer complex derives from a favorable alignment of the out-of-plane pi-electron density in CQ and hematin mu-oxo dimer at the points of intermolecular contact. For 4-aminoquinolines related to CQ, our data suggest that electron-withdrawing functional groups at the 7-position of the quinoline ring are required for activity against both hematin polymerization and parasite growth and that chlorine substitution at position 7 is optimal. Our results also confirm that the CQ diaminoalkyl side chain, especially the aliphatic tertiary nitrogen atom, is an important structural determinant in CQ drug resistance. For CQ analogues 1-13, the lack of correlation between K(a) and hematin polymerization IC(50) values suggests that other properties of the CQ-hematin mu-oxo dimer complex, rather than its association

  15. Synergistic inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activation by protein S and C4b-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    The complement protein C4b-binding protein plays an important role in the regulation of the protein C anticoagulant pathway. C4b-binding protein can bind to protein S, thereby inhibiting the cofactor activity of protein S for activated protein C. In this report, we describe a new role for

  16. Extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) from staphylococcus aureus Inhibits the formation of platelet-leukocyte complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posner, M.G; Upadhyay, A.; Abubaker, A.A.; Fortunato, T.M.; Vara, D.; Canobbio, I.; Bagby, S.; Pula, G.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) from Staphylococcus aureus inhibits platelet activation, although its mechanism of action has not been established. In this study, we discovered that the N-terminal region of Efb (Efb-N) promotes platelet binding of fibrinogen and that Efb-N binding to

  17. Ebselen inhibits hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase binding to nucleic acid and prevents viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sourav; Weiner, Warren S; Schroeder, Chad E; Simpson, Denise S; Hanson, Alicia M; Sweeney, Noreena L; Marvin, Rachel K; Ndjomou, Jean; Kolli, Rajesh; Isailovic, Dragan; Schoenen, Frank J; Frick, David N

    2014-10-17

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is both a protease, which cleaves viral and host proteins, and a helicase that separates nucleic acid strands, using ATP hydrolysis to fuel the reaction. Many antiviral drugs, and compounds in clinical trials, target the NS3 protease, but few helicase inhibitors that function as antivirals have been reported. This study focuses on the analysis of the mechanism by which ebselen (2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3-one), a compound previously shown to be a HCV antiviral agent, inhibits the NS3 helicase. Ebselen inhibited the abilities of NS3 to unwind nucleic acids, to bind nucleic acids, and to hydrolyze ATP, and about 1 μM ebselen was sufficient to inhibit each of these activities by 50%. However, ebselen had no effect on the activity of the NS3 protease, even at 100 times higher ebselen concentrations. At concentrations below 10 μM, the ability of ebselen to inhibit HCV helicase was reversible, but prolonged incubation of HCV helicase with higher ebselen concentrations led to irreversible inhibition and the formation of covalent adducts between ebselen and all 14 cysteines present in HCV helicase. Ebselen analogues with sulfur replacing the selenium were just as potent HCV helicase inhibitors as ebselen, but the length of the linker between the phenyl and benzisoselenazol rings was critical. Modifications of the phenyl ring also affected compound potency over 30-fold, and ebselen was a far more potent helicase inhibitor than other, structurally unrelated, thiol-modifying agents. Ebselen analogues were also more effective antiviral agents, and they were less toxic to hepatocytes than ebselen. Although the above structure-activity relationship studies suggest that ebselen targets a specific site on NS3, we were unable to confirm binding to either the NS3 ATP binding site or nucleic acid binding cleft by examining the effects of ebselen on NS3 proteins lacking key cysteines.

  18. Red cell autoantibodies characterized by competitive inhibition of iodine 125 Rh alloantibody binding and by immunoprecipitation of membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, S.W.; Victoria, E.J.; Masouredis, S.P.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between determinants recognized by warm-type immunoglobulin G red cell autoantibodies and the Rh antigens was characterized by autoantibody competitive inhibition of iodine 125 Rh alloantibody binding and autoantibody immunoprecipitation of iodine 125 red blood cell membrane proteins. The majority of blood donor autoantibody recognized epitopes that are closely related to Rh antigens as determined by competitive inhibition studies. Eighteen of 20 (90%) autoantibodies inhibited anti-Rh(c) binding, 15 inhibited anti-Rh(E), 5 inhibited anti-Rh(D), and only 2 failed to inhibit any of the three Rh alloantibodies tested. Autoantibodies that inhibited anti-Rh(D) also inhibited anti-Rh(c) and anti-Rh(E) and all those that inhibited anti-Rh(E) also inhibited anti-Rh(c). Autoantibodies that inhibited all three Rh alloantibodies immunoprecipitated 30 kd membrane polypeptides, as did two of the three autoantibodies that inhibited only anti-Rh(c) and anti-Rh(E). One autoantibody in this group and two autoantibodies that inhibited only anti-Rh(c), as well as an autoantibody that did not inhibit any of the Rh alloantibodies, immunoprecipitated only a single membrane polypeptide identified as band 3. The majority of normal donor red blood cell autoantibodies inhibited the binding of Rh alloantibodies, which indicates that they either bound to the Rh polypeptides or to epitopes on band 3 that were closely associated with the Rh complex

  19. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  20. Human-Phosphate-Binding-Protein inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription and replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candolfi Ermanno

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Human Phosphate-Binding protein (HPBP is a serendipitously discovered lipoprotein that binds phosphate with high affinity. HPBP belongs to the DING protein family, involved in various biological processes like cell cycle regulation. We report that HPBP inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription and replication in T cell line, primary peripherical blood lymphocytes and primary macrophages. We show that HPBP is efficient in naïve and HIV-1 AZT-resistant strains. Our results revealed HPBP as a new and potent anti HIV molecule that inhibits transcription of the virus, which has not yet been targeted by HAART and therefore opens new strategies in the treatment of HIV infection.

  1. Recombinant norovirus-specific scFv inhibit virus-like particle binding to cellular ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Michele E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses cause epidemic outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness in all age-groups. The rapid onset and ease of person-to-person transmission suggest that inhibitors of the initial steps of virus binding to susceptible cells have value in limiting spread and outbreak persistence. We previously generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb 54.6 that blocks binding of recombinant norovirus-like particles (VLP to Caco-2 intestinal cells and inhibits VLP-mediated hemagglutination. In this study, we engineered the antigen binding domains of mAb 54.6 into a single chain variable fragment (scFv and tested whether these scFv could function as cell binding inhibitors, similar to the parent mAb. Results The scFv54.6 construct was engineered to encode the light (VL and heavy (VH variable domains of mAb 54.6 separated by a flexible peptide linker, and this recombinant protein was expressed in Pichia pastoris. Purified scFv54.6 recognized native VLPs by immunoblot, inhibited VLP-mediated hemagglutination, and blocked VLP binding to H carbohydrate antigen expressed on the surface of a CHO cell line stably transfected to express α 1,2-fucosyltransferase. Conclusion scFv54.6 retained the functional properties of the parent mAb with respect to inhibiting norovirus particle interactions with cells. With further engineering into a form deliverable to the gut mucosa, norovirus neutralizing antibodies represent a prophylactic strategy that would be valuable in outbreak settings.

  2. RYBP Is a K63-Ubiquitin-Chain-Binding Protein that Inhibits Homologous Recombination Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A.M. Ali

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Ring1-YY1-binding protein (RYBP is a member of the non-canonical polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1, and like other PRC1 members, it is best described as a transcriptional regulator. However, several PRC1 members were recently shown to function in DNA repair. Here, we report that RYBP preferentially binds K63-ubiquitin chains via its Npl4 zinc finger (NZF domain. Since K63-linked ubiquitin chains are assembled at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, we examined the contribution of RYBP to DSB repair. Surprisingly, we find that RYBP is K48 polyubiquitylated by RNF8 and rapidly removed from chromatin upon DNA damage by the VCP/p97 segregase. High expression of RYBP competitively inhibits recruitment of BRCA1 repair complex to DSBs, reducing DNA end resection and homologous recombination (HR repair. Moreover, breast cancer cell lines expressing high endogenous RYBP levels show increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibition. These data suggest that RYBP negatively regulates HR repair by competing for K63-ubiquitin chain binding. : Ali et al. find that RYBP binds K63-linked ubiquitin chains and is removed from DNA damage sites. This K63-ubiquitin binding allows RYBP to hinder the recruitment of BRCA1 and Rad51 to DNA double-strand breaks, thus inhibiting homologous recombination repair. Accordingly, cancer cells expressing high RYBP are more sensitive to DNA-damaging therapies. Keywords: DNA damage response, homologous recombination, ubiquitylation, RYBP, polycomb proteins, double-strand break repair, chromatin, histone modification

  3. Slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation during non-rapid eye movement sleep improves behavioral inhibition in attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Tobias Munz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Behavioral inhibition, which is a later-developing executive function (EF and anatomically located in prefrontal areas, is impaired in attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. While optimal EFs have been shown to depend on efficient sleep in healthy subjects, the impact of sleep problems, frequently reported in ADHD, remains elusive. Findings of macroscopic sleep changes in ADHD are inconsistent, but there is emerging evidence for distinct microscopic changes with a focus on prefrontal cortical regions and non-rapid eye movement (non-REM slow-wave sleep. Recently, slow oscillations (SO during non-REM sleep were found to be less functional and, as such, may be involved in sleep-dependent memory impairments in ADHD. Objective: By augmenting slow-wave power through bilateral, slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation (so-tDCS, frequency = 0.75 Hz during non-REM sleep, we aimed to improve daytime behavioral inhibition in children with ADHD. Methods: 14 boys (10-14 yrs diagnosed with ADHD were included. In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design, patients received so-tDCS either in the first or in the second experimental sleep night. Inhibition control was assessed with a visuomotor go/no-go task. Intrinsic alertness was assessed with a simple stimulus response task. To control for visuomotor performance, motor memory was assessed with a finger sequence tapping task. Results: SO-power was enhanced during early non-REM sleep, accompanied by slowed reaction times and decreased standard deviations of reaction times, in the go/no-go task after so-tDCS. In contrast, intrinsic alertness and motor memory performance were not improved by so-tDCS. Conclusion: Since behavioral inhibition but not intrinsic alertness or motor memory was improved by so-tDCS, our results suggest that lateral prefrontal slow oscillations during sleep might play a specific role for executive functioning in ADHD.

  4. Curcumin inhibits Zika and chikungunya virus infection by inhibiting cell binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounce, Bryan C; Cesaro, Teresa; Carrau, Lucia; Vallet, Thomas; Vignuzzi, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Several compounds extracted from spices and herbs exhibit antiviral effects in vitro, suggesting potential pharmacological uses. Curcumin, a component of turmeric, has been used as a food additive and herbal supplement due to its potential medicinal properties. Previously, curcumin exhibited antiviral properties against several viruses, including dengue virus and hepatitis C virus, among others. Here, we describe the antiviral effect of curcumin on Zika and chikungunya viruses, two mosquito-borne outbreak viruses. Both viruses responded to treatment of cells with up to 5 μM curumin without impacting cellular viability. We observed that direct treatment of virus with curcumin reduced infectivity of virus in a dose- and time-dependent manner for these enveloped viruses, as well as vesicular stomatitis virus. In contrast, we found no change in infectivity for Coxsackievirus B3, a non-enveloped virus. Derivatives of curcumin also exhibited antiviral activity against enveloped viruses. Further examination revealed that curcumin interfered with the binding of the enveloped viruses to cells in a dose-dependent manner, though the integrity of the viral RNA was maintained. Together, these results expand the family of viruses sensitive to curcumin and provide a mechanism of action for curcumin's effect on these enveloped viruses. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibition of [3H]nitrendipine binding by phospholipase A2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.E.; Pisano, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    Phospholipase A 2 from several sources inhibited [ 3 H]nitrendipine binding to membranes from brain, heart and ileal longitudinal muscle. The enzymes from bee venom and Russell's viper venom were most potent, having IC 50 values of approximately 5 and 14 ng/ml, respectively, in all three membrane preparations. Inhibition of binding by bee venom phospholipase A 2 was time- and dose-dependent. Mastoparan, a known facilitator of phospholipase A 2 enzymatic activity, shifted the bee venom phospholipase A 2 dose-response curve to the left. Pretreatment of brain membranes with bee venom phospholipase A 2 (10 ng/ml) for 15 min caused a 2-fold increase in the K/sub d/ without changing the B/sub max/ compared with untreated membranes. Extension of the preincubation period to 30 min caused no further increase in the K/sub d/ but significantly decreased the B/sub max/ to 71% the value for untreated membranes. [ 3 H]Nitrendipine, preincubated with bee venom phospholipase A 2 , was recovered and found to be fully active, indicating that the phospholipase A 2 did not modify the ligand. It is concluded that phospholipase A 2 acts on the membrane at or near the [ 3 H]nitrendipine binding site and that phospholipids play a key role in the interactions of 1,4 dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists with the dihydropyridine binding site. 33 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  6. Inhibition of fatty acid binding proteins elevates brain anandamide levels and produces analgesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kaczocha

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA is an antinociceptive lipid that is inactivated through cellular uptake and subsequent catabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs are intracellular carriers that deliver AEA and related N-acylethanolamines (NAEs to FAAH for hydrolysis. The mammalian brain expresses three FABP subtypes: FABP3, FABP5, and FABP7. Recent work from our group has revealed that pharmacological inhibition of FABPs reduces inflammatory pain in mice. The goal of the current work was to explore the effects of FABP inhibition upon nociception in diverse models of pain. We developed inhibitors with differential affinities for FABPs to elucidate the subtype(s that contributes to the antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors. Inhibition of FABPs reduced nociception associated with inflammatory, visceral, and neuropathic pain. The antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors mirrored their affinities for FABP5, while binding to FABP3 and FABP7 was not a predictor of in vivo efficacy. The antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors were mediated by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα and FABP inhibition elevated brain levels of AEA, providing the first direct evidence that FABPs regulate brain endocannabinoid tone. These results highlight FABPs as novel targets for the development of analgesic and anti-inflammatory therapeutics.

  7. Identification of an allosteric binding site for RORγt inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheepstra, Marcel; Leysen, Seppe; vanAlmen, Geert C.; Miller, J. Richard; Piesvaux, Jennifer; Kutilek, Victoria; van Eenennaam, Hans; Zhang, Hongjun; Barr, Kenneth; Nagpal, Sunil; Soisson, Stephen M.; Kornienko, Maria; Wiley, Kristen; Elsen, Nathaniel; Sharma, Sujata; Correll, Craig C.; Trotter, B. Wesley; van der Stelt, Mario; Oubrie, Arthur; Ottmann, Christian; Parthasarathy, Gopal; Brunsveld, Luc (Merck); (Eindhoven)

    2015-12-07

    RORγt is critical for the differentiation and proliferation of Th17 cells associated with several chronic autoimmune diseases. We report the discovery of a novel allosteric binding site on the nuclear receptor RORγt. Co-crystallization of the ligand binding domain (LBD) of RORγt with a series of small-molecule antagonists demonstrates occupancy of a previously unreported allosteric binding pocket. Binding at this non-canonical site induces an unprecedented conformational reorientation of helix 12 in the RORγt LBD, which blocks cofactor binding. The functional consequence of this allosteric ligand-mediated conformation is inhibition of function as evidenced by both biochemical and cellular studies. RORγt function is thus antagonized in a manner molecularly distinct from that of previously described orthosteric RORγt ligands. This brings forward an approach to target RORγt for the treatment of Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases. The elucidation of an unprecedented modality of pharmacological antagonism establishes a mechanism for modulation of nuclear receptors.

  8. Small molecule inhibition of hepatitis C virus E2 binding to CD81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Compernolle, Scott E.; Wiznycia, Alexander V.; Rush, Jeremy R.; Dhanasekaran, Muthu; Baures, Paul W.; Todd, Scott C.

    2003-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a causal agent of chronic liver infection, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma infecting more than 170 million people. CD81 is a receptor for HCV envelope glycoprotein E2. Although the binding of HCV-E2 with CD81 is well documented the role of this interaction in the viral life cycle remains unclear. Host specificity and mutagenesis studies suggest that the helix D region of CD81 mediates binding to HCV-E2. Structural analysis of CD81 has enabled the synthesis of small molecules designed to mimic the space and hydrophobic features of the solvent-exposed face on helix D. Utilizing a novel bis-imidazole scaffold a series of over 100 compounds has been synthesized. Seven related, imidazole-based compounds were identified that inhibit binding of HCV-E2 to CD81. The inhibitory compounds have no short-term effect on cellular expression of CD81 or other tetraspanins, do not disrupt CD81 associations with other cell surface proteins, and bind reversibly to HCV-E2. These results provide an important proof of concept that CD81-based mimics can disrupt binding of HCV-E2 to CD81

  9. Triazoles inhibit cholesterol export from lysosomes by binding to NPC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Michael N; Lu, Feiran; Li, Xiaochun; Das, Akash; Liang, Qiren; De Brabander, Jef K; Brown, Michael S; Goldstein, Joseph L

    2017-01-03

    Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1), a membrane protein of lysosomes, is required for the export of cholesterol derived from receptor-mediated endocytosis of LDL. Lysosomal cholesterol export is reportedly inhibited by itraconazole, a triazole that is used as an antifungal drug [Xu et al. (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107:4764-4769]. Here we show that posaconazole, another triazole, also blocks cholesterol export from lysosomes. We prepared P-X, a photoactivatable cross-linking derivative of posaconazole. P-X cross-linked to NPC1 when added to intact cells. Cross-linking was inhibited by itraconazole but not by ketoconazole, an imidazole that does not block cholesterol export. Cross-linking of P-X was also blocked by U18666A, a compound that has been shown to bind to NPC1 and inhibit cholesterol export. P-X also cross-linked to purified NPC1 that was incorporated into lipid bilayer nanodiscs. In this in vitro system, cross-linking of P-X was inhibited by itraconazole, but not by U18666A. P-X cross-linking was not prevented by deletion of the N-terminal domain of NPC1, which contains the initial binding site for cholesterol. In contrast, P-X cross-linking was reduced when NPC1 contained a point mutation (P691S) in its putative sterol-sensing domain. We hypothesize that the sterol-sensing domain has a binding site that can accommodate structurally different ligands.

  10. Task-dependent inhibition of slow-twitch soleus and excitation of fast-twitch gastrocnemius do not require high movement speed and velocity-dependent sensory feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricky eMehta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Although individual heads of triceps surae, soleus (SO and medial gastrocnemius (MG muscles, are often considered close functional synergists, previous studies have shown distinct activity patterns between them in some motor behaviors. The goal of this study was to test two hypotheses explaining inhibition of slow SO with respect to fast MG: (1 inhibition occurs at high movement velocities and mediated by velocity-dependent sensory feedback and (2 inhibition depends on the ankle-knee joint moment combination and does not require high movement velocities. The hypotheses were tested by comparing the SO EMG/MG EMG ratio during fast and slow motor behaviors (cat paw shake responses vs. back, straight leg load lifting in humans, which had the same ankle extension-knee flexion moment combination; and during fast and slow behaviors with the ankle extension-knee extension moment combination (human vertical jumping and stance phase of walking in cats and leg load lifting in humans. In addition, SO EMG/MG EMG ratio was determined during cat paw shake responses and walking before and after removal of stretch velocity-dependent sensory feedback by self-reinnervating SO and/or gastrocnemius. We found the ratio SO EMG/MG EMG below 1 (p<0.05 during fast paw shake responses and slow back load lifting, requiring the ankle extension-knee flexion moment combination; whereas the ratio SO EMG/MG EMG was above 1 (p<0.05 during fast vertical jumping and slow tasks of walking and leg load lifting, requiring ankle extension-knee extension moments. Removal of velocity-dependent sensory feedback did not affect the SO EMG/MG EMG ratio in cats. We concluded that the relative inhibition of SO does not require high muscle velocities, depends on ankle-knee moment combinations, and is mechanically advantageous for allowing a greater MG contribution to ankle extension and knee flexion moments.

  11. Weak glycolipid binding of a microdomain-tracer peptide correlates with aggregation and slow diffusion on cell membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Lauterbach

    Full Text Available Organized assembly or aggregation of sphingolipid-binding ligands, such as certain toxins and pathogens, has been suggested to increase binding affinity of the ligand to the cell membrane and cause membrane reorganization or distortion. Here we show that the diffusion behavior of the fluorescently tagged sphingolipid-interacting peptide probe SBD (Sphingolipid Binding Domain is altered by modifications in the construction of the peptide sequence that both result in a reduction in binding to ganglioside-containing supported lipid membranes, and at the same time increase aggregation on the cell plasma membrane, but that do not change relative amounts of secondary structural features. We tested the effects of modifying the overall charge and construction of the SBD probe on its binding and diffusion behavior, by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR; Biacore analysis on lipid surfaces, and by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS on live cells, respectively. SBD binds preferentially to membranes containing the highly sialylated gangliosides GT1b and GD1a. However, simple charge interactions of the peptide with the negative ganglioside do not appear to be a critical determinant of binding. Rather, an aggregation-suppressing amino acid composition and linker between the fluorophore and the peptide are required for optimum binding of the SBD to ganglioside-containing supported lipid bilayer surfaces, as well as for interaction with the membrane. Interestingly, the strength of interactions with ganglioside-containing artificial membranes is mirrored in the diffusion behavior by FCS on cell membranes, with stronger binders displaying similar characteristic diffusion profiles. Our findings indicate that for aggregation-prone peptides, aggregation occurs upon contact with the cell membrane, and rather than giving a stronger interaction with the membrane, aggregation is accompanied by weaker binding and complex diffusion profiles indicative of heterogeneous

  12. FMRFamide: low affinity inhibition of opioid binding to rabbit brain membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, X.Z.; Raffa, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH 2 ) was first isolated from the ganglia of molluscs by Price and Greenberg in 1977. The peptide was subsequently shown to have diverse actions on various types of molluscan and mammalian tissues. The presence of immunoreactive FMRFamide-like material (irFMRF) in multiple areas of rat brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract suggests that irFMRF may have a physiological role in mammals. Tang, Yang and Costa recently demonstrated that FMRFamide attenuates morphine antinociception in rats and postulated, based on this and several other lines of evidence, that irFMRF might be an endogenous opioid antagonist. In the present study, they tested the ability of FMRFamide to inhibit the binding of opioid receptor ligands to rabbit membrane preparations. FMRFamide inhibited the specific binding of both 3 [H]-dihydromorphine and 3 [H]-ethylketocyclazocine (IC 50 = 14 μM and 320 μM, respectively) in a dose-related manner, suggesting that FMRFamide may affect binding to at least two types of opioid receptors (mu and kappa). These data are consistent with the concept that irFMRF might act as an endogenous opioid antagonist. However, the low affinity of FMRFamide leaves open the possibility of another mechanism of opioid antagonism, such as neuromodulation

  13. FMRFamide: low affinity inhibition of opioid binding to rabbit brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X.Z.; Raffa, R.B.

    1986-03-05

    FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH/sub 2/) was first isolated from the ganglia of molluscs by Price and Greenberg in 1977. The peptide was subsequently shown to have diverse actions on various types of molluscan and mammalian tissues. The presence of immunoreactive FMRFamide-like material (irFMRF) in multiple areas of rat brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract suggests that irFMRF may have a physiological role in mammals. Tang, Yang and Costa recently demonstrated that FMRFamide attenuates morphine antinociception in rats and postulated, based on this and several other lines of evidence, that irFMRF might be an endogenous opioid antagonist. In the present study, they tested the ability of FMRFamide to inhibit the binding of opioid receptor ligands to rabbit membrane preparations. FMRFamide inhibited the specific binding of both /sup 3/(H)-dihydromorphine and /sup 3/(H)-ethylketocyclazocine (IC/sub 50/ = 14 ..mu..M and 320 ..mu..M, respectively) in a dose-related manner, suggesting that FMRFamide may affect binding to at least two types of opioid receptors (mu and kappa). These data are consistent with the concept that irFMRF might act as an endogenous opioid antagonist. However, the low affinity of FMRFamide leaves open the possibility of another mechanism of opioid antagonism, such as neuromodulation.

  14. The relationship between functional inhibition and binding for K(Ca2 channel blockers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Charles Hammond Benton

    Full Text Available Small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa2.1,2.2,2.3 are blocked with high affinity by both peptide toxins (e.g. apamin and small molecule blockers (e.g. UCL 1848. In electrophysiological experiments, apamin shows subtype selectivity with IC50s of ∼100 pM and ∼1 nM for block KCa2.2 and KCa2.3 respectively. In binding studies, however, apamin appears not to discriminate between KCa2.2 and 2.3 and is reported to have a significantly higher (∼20-200-fold affinity (∼5 pM. This discrepancy between binding and block has been suggested to reflect an unusual mode of action of apamin. However, these binding and electrophysiological block experiments have not been conducted in the same ionic conditions, so it is also possible that the discrepancy arises simply because of differences in experimental conditions. We have now examined this latter possibility. Thus, we measured (125I-apamin binding to intact HEK 293 cells expressing KCa2 channels under the same ionic conditions (i.e. normal physiological conditions that we also used for current block measurements. We find that binding and block experiments agree well if the same ionic conditions are used. Further, the binding of apamin and other blockers showed subtype selectivity when measured in normal physiological solutions (e.g.(125I-apamin bound to KCa2.2 with K L 91±40 pM and to KCa2.3 with K L 711±126 pM, while inhibiting KCa2.2 current at IC50 103±2 pM. We also examined KCa2 channel block in Ca(2+ and Mg(2+ free solutions that mimic conditions reported in the literature for binding experiments. Under these (non-physiological conditions the IC50 for apamin block of KCa2.2 was reduced to 20±3 pM. Our results therefore suggest that the apparent discrepancy between blocking and binding reported in the literature can be largely accounted for by the use of non-physiological ionic conditions in binding experiments.

  15. Inhibition by Siomycin and Thiostrepton of Both Aminoacyl-tRNA and Factor G Binding to Ribosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ll, Juan Modole; Cabrer, Bartolomé; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Azquez, David V

    1971-01-01

    Siomycin, a peptide antibiotic that interacts with the 50S ribosomal subunit and inhibits binding of factor G, is shown also to inhibit binding of aminoacyl-tRNA; however, it does not impair binding of fMet-tRNA and completion of the initiation complex. Moreover, unlike other inhibitors of aminoacyl-tRNA binding (tetracycline, sparsomycin, and streptogramin A), siomycin completely abolishes the GTPase activity associated with the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA catalyzed by factor Tu. A single-site interaction of siomycin appears to be responsible for its effect on both the binding of the aminoacyl-tRNA-Tu-GTP complex and that of factor G. PMID:4331558

  16. Radioligand binding analysis of α 2 adrenoceptors with [11C]yohimbine in brain in vivo: Extended Inhibition Plot correction for plasma protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Jenny-Ann; Landau, Anne M; Jakobsen, Steen; Wong, Dean F; Gjedde, Albert

    2017-11-22

    We describe a novel method of kinetic analysis of radioligand binding to neuroreceptors in brain in vivo, here applied to noradrenaline receptors in rat brain. The method uses positron emission tomography (PET) of [ 11 C]yohimbine binding in brain to quantify the density and affinity of α 2 adrenoceptors under condition of changing radioligand binding to plasma proteins. We obtained dynamic PET recordings from brain of Spraque Dawley rats at baseline, followed by pharmacological challenge with unlabeled yohimbine (0.3 mg/kg). The challenge with unlabeled ligand failed to diminish radioligand accumulation in brain tissue, due to the blocking of radioligand binding to plasma proteins that elevated the free fractions of the radioligand in plasma. We devised a method that graphically resolved the masking of unlabeled ligand binding by the increase of radioligand free fractions in plasma. The Extended Inhibition Plot introduced here yielded an estimate of the volume of distribution of non-displaceable ligand in brain tissue that increased with the increase of the free fraction of the radioligand in plasma. The resulting binding potentials of the radioligand declined by 50-60% in the presence of unlabeled ligand. The kinetic unmasking of inhibited binding reflected in the increase of the reference volume of distribution yielded estimates of receptor saturation consistent with the binding of unlabeled ligand.

  17. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding by phospholipase A/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, M.E.; Pisano, J.J.

    1985-10-07

    Phospholipase A/sub 2/ from several sources inhibited (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding to membranes from brain, heart and ileal longitudinal muscle. The enzymes from bee venom and Russell's viper venom were most potent, having IC/sub 50/ values of approximately 5 and 14 ng/ml, respectively, in all three membrane preparations. Inhibition of binding by bee venom phospholipase A/sub 2/ was time- and dose-dependent. Mastoparan, a known facilitator of phospholipase A/sub 2/ enzymatic activity, shifted the bee venom phospholipase A/sub 2/ dose-response curve to the left. Pretreatment of brain membranes with bee venom phospholipase A/sub 2/ (10 ng/ml) for 15 min caused a 2-fold increase in the K/sub d/ without changing the B/sub max/ compared with untreated membranes. Extension of the preincubation period to 30 min caused no further increase in the K/sub d/ but significantly decreased the B/sub max/ to 71% the value for untreated membranes. (/sup 3/H)Nitrendipine, preincubated with bee venom phospholipase A/sub 2/, was recovered and found to be fully active, indicating that the phospholipase A/sub 2/ did not modify the ligand. It is concluded that phospholipase A/sub 2/ acts on the membrane at or near the (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding site and that phospholipids play a key role in the interactions of 1,4 dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists with the dihydropyridine binding site. 33 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  18. Selective chemical binding enhances cesium tolerance in plants through inhibition of cesium uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Eri; Chaban, Vitaly; Khandelia, Himanshu; Shin, Ryoung

    2015-03-05

    High concentrations of cesium (Cs(+)) inhibit plant growth but the detailed mechanisms of Cs(+) uptake, transport and response in plants are not well known. In order to identify small molecules with a capacity to enhance plant tolerance to Cs(+), chemical library screening was performed using Arabidopsis. Of 10,000 chemicals tested, five compounds were confirmed as Cs(+) tolerance enhancers. Further investigation and quantum mechanical modelling revealed that one of these compounds reduced Cs(+) concentrations in plants and that the imidazole moiety of this compound bound specifically to Cs(+). Analysis of the analogous compounds indicated that the structure of the identified compound is important for the effect to be conferred. Taken together, Cs(+) tolerance enhancer isolated here renders plants tolerant to Cs(+) by inhibiting Cs(+) entry into roots via specific binding to the ion thus, for instance, providing a basis for phytostabilisation of radiocesium-contaminated farmland.

  19. Aspirin and salicylate bind to immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP) and inhibit its ATPase activity in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, W G; Ruan, K H; Du, M; Saunders, M A; Wu, K K

    2001-11-01

    Salicylic acid (SA), an endogenous signaling molecule of plants, possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic actions in human. Its derivative, aspirin, is the most commonly used anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug. Aspirin and sodium salicylate (salicylates) have been reported to have multiple pharmacological actions. However, it is unclear whether they bind to a cellular protein. Here, we report for the first time the purification from human fibroblasts of a approximately 78 kDa salicylate binding protein with sequence identity to immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP). The Kd values of SA binding to crude extract and to recombinant BiP were 45.2 and 54.6 microM, respectively. BiP is a chaperone protein containing a polypeptide binding site recognizing specific heptapeptide sequence and an ATP binding site. A heptapeptide with the specific sequence displaced SA binding in a concentration-dependent manner whereas a control heptapeptide did not. Salicylates inhibited ATPase activity stimulated by this specific heptapeptide but did not block ATP binding or induce BiP expression. These results indicate that salicylates bind specifically to the polypeptide binding site of BiP in human cells that may interfere with folding and transport of proteins important in inflammation.

  20. Ropizine concurrently enhances and inhibits [3H] dextromethorpan binding to different structures of the guinea pig brain: Autoradiographic evidence for multiple binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canoll, P.D.; Smith, P.R.; and Musacchio, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Ropizine produces a simultaneous enhancement and inhibition of [ 3 H] dextromethorphan (DM) high-affinity binding to different areas of the guinea pig brain. These results imply that there are two distinct types of high-affinity [ 3 H]DM binding sites, which are present in variable proportions in different brain structures. The ropizine-enhances [ 3 H]DM binding type was preferentially inhibited by (+)-pentazocine. This is consistent with the presumption that the (+)-pentazocine-sensitive site is identical with the common site for DM and 3-(-3-Hydroxphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine ((+)-3-PPP). The second binding type, which is inhibited by ropizine and is not so sensitive to (+)- pentazocine, has not been fully characterized. This study demonstrates that the biphasic effects to ropizine are due, at least in part, to the effects of ropizine on two different types of [ 3 H]DM binding sites. However, this study does not rule out that the common DM/(+)-3-PPP site also might be inhibited by higher concentrations of ropizine

  1. CINPA1 binds directly to constitutive androstane receptor and inhibits its activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T; Chai, Sergio C; Wright, William C; Singh, Aman; Alexandra Casal, Morgan; Zheng, Jie; Wu, Jing; Lee, Richard E; Griffin, Patrick R; Chen, Taosheng

    2018-03-31

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic sensors that regulate the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters. CAR activation promotes drug elimination, thereby reducing therapeutic effectiveness, or causes adverse drug effects via toxic metabolites. CAR inhibitors could be used to attenuate these adverse drug effects. CAR and PXR share ligands and target genes, confounding the understanding of the regulation of receptor-specific activity. We previously identified a small-molecule inhibitor, CINPA1, that inhibits CAR (without activating PXR at lower concentrations) by altering CAR-coregulator interactions and reducing CAR recruitment to DNA response elements of regulated genes. However, solid evidence was not presented for the direct binding of CINPA1 to CAR. In this study, we demonstrate direct interaction of CINPA1 with the CAR ligand-binding domain (CAR-LBD) and identify key residues involved in such interactions through a combination of biophysical and computational methods. We found that CINPA1 resides in the ligand-binding pocket to stabilize the CAR-LBD in a more rigid, less fluid state. Molecular dynamics simulations, together with our previously reported docking model, enabled us to predict which CAR residues were critical for interactions with CINPA1. The importance of these residues for CINPA1 binding were then validated by directed mutations and testing the mutant CAR proteins in transcription reporter and coregulatory interaction assays. We demonstrated strong hydrogen bonding of CINPA1 with N165 and H203 and identified other residues involved in hydrophobic contacts with CINPA1. Overall, our data confirm that CINPA1 directly binds to CAR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Radioligand binding analysis of α 2 adrenoceptors with [11C]yohimbine in brain in vivo: Extended Inhibition Plot correction for plasma protein binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phan, Jenny-Ann; Landau, Anne M.; Jakobsen, Steen

    2017-01-01

    We describe a novel method of kinetic analysis of radioligand binding to neuroreceptors in brain in vivo, here applied to noradrenaline receptors in rat brain. The method uses positron emission tomography (PET) of [11C]yohimbine binding in brain to quantify the density and affinity of α 2...... Inhibition Plot introduced here yielded an estimate of the volume of distribution of non-displaceable ligand in brain tissue that increased with the increase of the free fraction of the radioligand in plasma. The resulting binding potentials of the radioligand declined by 50-60% in the presence of unlabeled...

  3. Direct Pore Binding as a Mechanism for Isoflurane Inhibition of the Pentameric Ligand-gated Ion Channel ELIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Kinde, Monica N; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Wells, Marta M; Cohen, Aina E; Xu, Yan; Tang, Pei

    2015-09-08

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are targets of general anesthetics, but molecular mechanisms underlying anesthetic action remain debatable. We found that ELIC, a pLGIC from Erwinia chrysanthemi, can be functionally inhibited by isoflurane and other anesthetics. Structures of ELIC co-crystallized with isoflurane in the absence or presence of an agonist revealed double isoflurane occupancies inside the pore near T237(6') and A244(13'). A pore-radius contraction near the extracellular entrance was observed upon isoflurane binding. Electrophysiology measurements with a single-point mutation at position 6' or 13' support the notion that binding at these sites renders isoflurane inhibition. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that isoflurane binding was more stable in the resting than in a desensitized pore conformation. This study presents compelling evidence for a direct pore-binding mechanism of isoflurane inhibition, which has a general implication for inhibitory action of general anesthetics on pLGICs.

  4. Phosphorylation inhibits DNA-binding of alternatively spliced aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kewley, Robyn J.; Whitelaw, Murray L.

    2005-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix/PER-ARNT-SIM homology (bHLH/PAS) transcription factor ARNT (aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator) is a key component of various pathways which induce the transcription of cytochrome P450 and hypoxia response genes. ARNT can be alternatively spliced to express Alt ARNT, containing an additional 15 amino acids immediately N-terminal to the DNA-binding basic region. Here, we show that ARNT and Alt ARNT proteins are differentially phosphorylated by protein kinase CKII in vitro. Phosphorylation had an inhibitory effect on DNA-binding to an E-box probe by Alt ARNT, but not ARNT, homodimers. This inhibitory phosphorylation occurs through Ser77. Moreover, a point mutant, Alt ARNT S77A, shows increased activity on an E-box reporter gene, consistent with Ser77 being a regulatory site in vivo. In contrast, DNA binding by an Alt ARNT/dioxin receptor heterodimer to the xenobiotic response element is not inhibited by phosphorylation with CKII, nor does Alt ARNT S77A behave differently from wild type Alt ARNT in the context of a dioxin receptor heterodimer

  5. Chemical Editing of Macrocyclic Natural Products and Kinetic Profiling Reveal Slow, Tight-Binding Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors with Picomolar Affinities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitir, Betül; Maolanon, Alex R.; Ohm, Ragnhild G.

    2017-01-01

    medicines. Therefore, detailed mechanistic information and precise characterization of the chemical probes used to investigate the effects of HDAC enzymes are vital. We interrogated Nature's arsenal of macrocyclic nonribosomal peptide HDAC inhibitors by chemical synthesis and evaluation of more than 30...... natural products and analogues. This furnished surprising trends in binding affinities for the various macrocycles, which were then exploited for the design of highly potent class I and IIb HDAC inhibitors. Furthermore, thorough kinetic investigation revealed unexpected inhibitory mechanisms of important...

  6. Bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus has differential effects on reactive and proactive inhibition and conflict-induced slowing in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeso, Ignacio; Wilkinson, Leonora; Rodríguez-Oroz, Maria-Cruz; Obeso, Jose A; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2013-05-01

    It has been proposed that the subthalamic nucleus (STN) mediates response inhibition and conflict resolution through the fronto-basal ganglia pathways. Our aim was to compare the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the STN on reactive and proactive inhibition and conflict resolution in Parkinson's disease using a single task. We used the conditional Stop signal reaction time task that provides the Stop signal reaction time (SSRT) as a measure of reactive inhibition, the response delay effect (RDE) as a measure of proactive inhibition and conflict-induced slowing (CIS) as a measure of conflict resolution. DBS of the STN significantly prolonged SSRT relative to stimulation off. However, while the RDE measure of proactive inhibition was not significantly altered by DBS of the STN, relative to healthy controls, RDE was significantly lower with DBS off but not DBS on. DBS of the STN did not alter the mean CIS but produced a significant differential effect on the slowest and fastest RTs on conflict trials, further prolonging the slowest RTs on the conflict trials relative to DBS off and to controls. These results are the first demonstration, using a single task in the same patient sample, that DBS of the STN produces differential effects on reactive and proactive inhibition and on conflict resolution, suggesting that these effects are likely to be mediated through the impact of STN stimulation on different fronto-basal ganglia pathways: hyperdirect, direct and indirect.

  7. Absence of specificity in inhibition of DNA repair replication by DNA-binding agents, cocarcinogens, and steroids in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.; Painter, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    Although many chemicals, including cocarcinogens, DNA-binding agents, and steroids, inhibit repair replication of ultraviolet-induced damage to DNA in human lymphocytes and proliferating cells in culture, none of these chemicals is specific. Our results show that all the chemicals we tested inhibit normal DNA synthesis as much as or more than they inhibit repair replication. There is thus no evidence in our results to support the hypothesis that cocarcinogens are specific inhibitors of DNA repair or that any of the chemicals studied might be useful adjuncts to tumor therapy merely because of specific inhibition of radiation repair mechanisms

  8. Surfactant protein D binds to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope protein gp120 and inhibits HIV replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meschi, Joseph; Crouch, Erika C; Skolnik, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The envelope protein (gp120) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) contains highly conserved mannosylated oligosaccharides. These glycoconjugates contribute to resistance to antibody neutralization, and binding to cell surface lectins on macrophages and dendritic cells. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL......) binds to gp120 and plays a role in defence against the virus. In this study it is demonstrated that surfactant protein D (SP-D) binds to gp120 and inhibits HIV infectivity at significantly lower concentrations than MBL. The binding of SP-D was mediated by its calcium-dependent carbohydrate......-binding activity and was dependent on glycosylation of gp120. Native dodecameric SP-D bound to HIV gp120 more strongly than native trimeric SP-D. Since one common polymorphic form of SP-D is predominantly expressed as trimers and associated with lower blood levels, these individuals may have less effective innate...

  9. Effects of radioiodine on thyrotrophin binding inhibiting immunoglobulins in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGregor, A.M.; Petersen, M.M.; Capiferri, R.; Evered, D.C.; Rees Smith, B.; Hall, R.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of 131 I therapy on thyrotrophin binding inhibiting immunoglobulins (TBII) were studied in fifty-five patients with Graves' disease and five patients with toxic multinodular goitre (MNG). A group of forty patients with Graves' disease and four patients with toxic MNG were treated with drugs and acted as controls. In 78% of patients treated with 131 I there was a dramatic increase in serum TBII activity during the 3 months following therapy, whereas drug-treated patients showed a decrease (77%) or no change in TBII activity over the same period. TBII activity was not detectable in patients with toxic MNG before or after drug or 131 I therapy. Consideration of the mechanisms involved in the changes in serum TBII activity after 131 I treatment or during drug treatment provide insight into the basic defects responsible for the development of Graves' disease and suggest that both the thyroid and immune system are involved. (author)

  10. DNA binding of the p21 repressor ZBTB2 is inhibited by cytosine hydroxymethylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafaye, Céline; Barbier, Ewa; Miscioscia, Audrey; Saint-Pierre, Christine [Laboratoire Lésions des Acides Nucléiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, UMR E_3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France); Kraut, Alexandra; Couté, Yohann [Etude de la Dynamique des Protéomes, Biologie à Grande Echelle, UMR S_1038 CEA/INSERM/UJF-Grenoble 1, iRTSV, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France); Plo, Isabelle [INSERM, U1009, Institut Gustave Roussy, Université Paris 11, 114 rue Edouard Vaillant, Villejuif F-94805 (France); Gasparutto, Didier; Ravanat, Jean-Luc [Laboratoire Lésions des Acides Nucléiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, UMR E_3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France); Breton, Jean, E-mail: jean.breton@cea.fr [Laboratoire Lésions des Acides Nucléiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, UMR E_3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • 5-hmC epigenetic modification is measurable in HeLa, SH-SY5Y and UT7-MPL cell lines. • ZBTB2 binds to DNA probes containing 5-mC but not to sequences containing 5-hmC. • This differential binding is verified with DNA sequences involved in p21 regulation. - Abstract: Recent studies have demonstrated that the modified base 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) is detectable at various rates in DNA extracted from human tissues. This oxidative product of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) constitutes a new and important actor of epigenetic mechanisms. We designed a DNA pull down assay to trap and identify nuclear proteins bound to 5-hmC and/or 5-mC. We applied this strategy to three cancerous cell lines (HeLa, SH-SY5Y and UT7-MPL) in which we also measured 5-mC and 5-hmC levels by HPLC-MS/MS. We found that the putative oncoprotein Zinc finger and BTB domain-containing protein 2 (ZBTB2) is associated with methylated DNA sequences and that this interaction is inhibited by the presence of 5-hmC replacing 5-mC. As published data mention ZBTB2 recognition of p21 regulating sequences, we verified that this sequence specific binding was also alleviated by 5-hmC. ZBTB2 being considered as a multifunctional cell proliferation activator, notably through p21 repression, this work points out new epigenetic processes potentially involved in carcinogenesis.

  11. DNA binding of the p21 repressor ZBTB2 is inhibited by cytosine hydroxymethylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" data-affiliation=" (Laboratoire Lésions des Acides Nucléiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, UMR E3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" >Lafaye, Céline; 3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" data-affiliation=" (Laboratoire Lésions des Acides Nucléiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, UMR E3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" >Barbier, Ewa; 3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" data-affiliation=" (Laboratoire Lésions des Acides Nucléiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, UMR E3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" >Miscioscia, Audrey; 3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" data-affiliation=" (Laboratoire Lésions des Acides Nucléiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, UMR E3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" >Saint-Pierre, Christine; 1038 CEA/INSERM/UJF-Grenoble 1, iRTSV, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" data-affiliation=" (Etude de la Dynamique des Protéomes, Biologie à Grande Echelle, UMR S1038 CEA/INSERM/UJF-Grenoble 1, iRTSV, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" >Kraut, Alexandra; 1038 CEA/INSERM/UJF-Grenoble 1, iRTSV, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" data-affiliation=" (Etude de la Dynamique des Protéomes, Biologie à Grande Echelle, UMR S1038 CEA/INSERM/UJF-Grenoble 1, iRTSV, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" >Couté, Yohann; Plo, Isabelle; 3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" data-affiliation=" (Laboratoire Lésions des Acides Nucléiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, UMR E3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" >Gasparutto, Didier; 3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" data-affiliation=" (Laboratoire Lésions des Acides Nucléiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, UMR E3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" >Ravanat, Jean-Luc; 3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" data-affiliation=" (Laboratoire Lésions des Acides Nucléiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, UMR E3 CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble F-38054 (France))" >Breton, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 5-hmC epigenetic modification is measurable in HeLa, SH-SY5Y and UT7-MPL cell lines. • ZBTB2 binds to DNA probes containing 5-mC but not to sequences containing 5-hmC. • This differential binding is verified with DNA sequences involved in p21 regulation. - Abstract: Recent studies have demonstrated that the modified base 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) is detectable at various rates in DNA extracted from human tissues. This oxidative product of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) constitutes a new and important actor of epigenetic mechanisms. We designed a DNA pull down assay to trap and identify nuclear proteins bound to 5-hmC and/or 5-mC. We applied this strategy to three cancerous cell lines (HeLa, SH-SY5Y and UT7-MPL) in which we also measured 5-mC and 5-hmC levels by HPLC-MS/MS. We found that the putative oncoprotein Zinc finger and BTB domain-containing protein 2 (ZBTB2) is associated with methylated DNA sequences and that this interaction is inhibited by the presence of 5-hmC replacing 5-mC. As published data mention ZBTB2 recognition of p21 regulating sequences, we verified that this sequence specific binding was also alleviated by 5-hmC. ZBTB2 being considered as a multifunctional cell proliferation activator, notably through p21 repression, this work points out new epigenetic processes potentially involved in carcinogenesis

  12. IgE binding to peanut allergens is inhibited by combined D-aspartic and D-glutamic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Si-Yin; Reed, Shawndrika

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if D-amino acids (D-aas) bind and inhibit immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding to peanut allergens. D-aas such as D-Asp (aspartic acid), D-Glu (glutamic acid), combined D-[Asp/Glu] and others were each prepared in a cocktail of 9 other D-aas, along with L-amino acids (L-aas) and controls. Each sample was mixed with a pooled plasma from peanut-allergic donors, and tested by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and Western blots for IgE binding to peanut allergens. Results showed that D-[Asp/Glu] (4 mg/ml) inhibited IgE binding (75%) while D-Glu, D-Asp and other D-aas had no inhibitory effect. A higher inhibition was seen with D-[Asp/Glu] than with L-[Asp/Glu]. We concluded that IgE was specific for D-[Asp/Glu], not D-Asp or D-Glu, and that D-[Asp/Glu] was more reactive than was L-[Asp/Glu] in IgE inhibition. The finding indicates that D-[Asp/Glu] may have the potential for removing IgE or reducing IgE binding to peanut allergens in vitro. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Cardiovirus Leader proteins bind exportins: Implications for virus replication and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J. [Institute for Molecular Virology and Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Basta, Holly A. [Department of Biology, Rocky Mountain College, Billings, MT (United States); Palmenberg, Ann C., E-mail: acpalmen@wisc.edu [Institute for Molecular Virology and Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Cardiovirus Leader proteins (L{sub X}) inhibit cellular nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by directing host kinases to phosphorylate Phe/Gly-containing nuclear pore proteins (Nups). Resolution of the Mengovirus L{sub M} structure bound to Ran GTPase, suggested this complex would further recruit specific exportins (karyopherins), which in turn mediate kinase selection. Pull-down experiments and recombinant complex reconstitution now confirm that Crm1 and CAS exportins form stable dimeric complexes with encephalomyocarditis virus L{sub E}, and also larger complexes with L{sub E}:Ran. shRNA knockdown studies support this idea. Similar activities could be demonstrated for recombinant L{sub S} and L{sub T} from Theiloviruses. When mutations were introduced to alter the L{sub E} zinc finger domain, acidic domain, or dual phosphorylation sites, there was reduced exportin selection. These regions are not involved in Ran interactions, so the Ran and Crm1 binding sites on L{sub E} must be non-overlapping. The involvement of exportins in this mechanism is important to viral replication and the observation of trafficking inhibition by L{sub E}.

  14. Calreticulin Binds to Fas Ligand and Inhibits Neuronal Cell Apoptosis Induced by Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beilei Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Calreticulin (CRT can bind to Fas ligand (FasL and inhibit Fas/FasL-mediated apoptosis of Jurkat T cells. However, its effect on neuronal cell apoptosis has not been investigated. Purpose. We aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of CRT following ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI. Methods. Mice underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO and SH-SY5Y cells subjected to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD were used as models for IRI. The CRT protein level was detected by Western blotting, and mRNA expression of CRT, caspase-3, and caspase-8 was measured by real-time PCR. Immunofluorescence was used to assess the localization of CRT and FasL. The interaction of CRT with FasL was verified by coimmunoprecipitation. SH-SY5Y cell viability was determined by MTT assay, and cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. The measurement of caspase-8 and caspase-3 activity was carried out using caspase activity assay kits. Results. After IRI, CRT was upregulated on the neuron surface and bound to FasL, leading to increased viability of OGD-exposed SH-SY5Y cells and decreased activity of caspase-8 and caspase-3. Conclusions. This study for the first time revealed that increased CRT inhibited Fas/FasL-mediated neuronal cell apoptosis during the early stage of ischemic stroke, suggesting it to be a potential protector activated soon after IRI.

  15. Collagen-binding peptidoglycans inhibit MMP mediated collagen degradation and reduce dermal scarring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Stuart

    Full Text Available Scarring of the skin is a large unmet clinical problem that is of high patient concern and impact. Wound healing is complex and involves numerous pathways that are highly orchestrated, leaving the skin sealed, but with abnormal organization and composition of tissue components, namely collagen and proteoglycans, that are then remodeled over time. To improve healing and reduce or eliminate scarring, more rapid restoration of healthy tissue composition and organization offers a unique approach for development of new therapeutics. A synthetic collagen-binding peptidoglycan has been developed that inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-1 and 13 (MMP-1 and MMP-13 mediated collagen degradation. We investigated the synthetic peptidoglycan in a rat incisional model in which a single dose was delivered in a hyaluronic acid (HA vehicle at the time of surgery prior to wound closure. The peptidoglycan treatment resulted in a significant reduction in scar tissue at 21 days as measured by histology and visual analysis. Improved collagen architecture of the treated wounds was demonstrated by increased tensile strength and transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis of collagen fibril diameters compared to untreated and HA controls. The peptidoglycan's mechanism of action includes masking existing collagen and inhibiting MMP-mediated collagen degradation while modulating collagen organization. The peptidoglycan can be synthesized at low cost with unique design control, and together with demonstrated preclinical efficacy in reducing scarring, warrants further investigation for dermal wound healing.

  16. C-peptide prevents SMAD3 binding to alpha promoters to inhibit collagen type IV synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanning; Zhong, Yan; Gong, Wenjian; Gao, Xuehan; Qi, Huanli; Liu, Kun; Qi, Jinsheng

    2018-07-01

    Activation of transforming growth factor β1 (TGFB1)/SMAD3 signaling may lead to additional synthesis of collagen type IV (COL4), which is a major contributor to extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in diabetic nephropathy (DN). C-peptide can attenuate fibrosis to have unique beneficial effects in DN. However, whether and how C-peptide affects TGFB1/SMAD3-activated COL4 synthesis is unclear. In this study, pathological changes, expression of COL4 a1-a5 chains ( Col4a1-a5 ), COL4 distribution and protein and TGFB1 and SMAD3 protein were first assessed in a rat model of diabetes. Then, rat mesangial cells were treated with high glucose (HG) and/or C-peptide to investigate the underlying mechanism. Col4a1-a5 expression, COL4 protein and secretion, TGFB1 protein, SMAD3 nuclear translocation and binding of SMAD3 to its cognate sites in the promoters of Col4a1a2 , Col4a3a4 and Col4a5 were measured. It was found that C-peptide attenuated glomerular pathological changes and suppressed renal Col4a1 -a5 mRNA expression, COL4 protein content and TGFB1 protein content. C-peptide had a dose-dependent effect to inhibit Col4a1-a5 mRNA expression, COL4 protein content and secretion, in HG-stimulated mesangial cells. In addition, the HG-induced increase in TGFB1 protein content was significantly reduced by C-peptide. Although not apparently affecting SMAD3 nuclear translocation, C-peptide prevented SMAD3 from binding to its sites in the Col4a1a2 , Col4a3a4 and Col4a5 promoters in HG-stimulated mesangial cells. In conclusion, C-peptide could prevent SMAD3 from binding to its sites in the Col4a1a2 , Col4a3a4 and Col4a5 promoters, to inhibit COL4 generation. These results may provide a mechanism for the alleviation of fibrosis in DN by C-peptide. © 2018 Society for Endocrinology.

  17. -NH-dansyl isocolchicine exhibits a significantly improved tubulin-binding affinity and microtubule inhibition in comparison to isocolchicine by binding tubulin through its A and B rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Lalita; Datta, Ajit B; Gupta, Suvroma; Poddar, Asim; Sengupta, Suparna; Janik, Mark E; Bhattacharyya, Bhabatarak

    2005-03-08

    Structure-activity relationship studies have established that the A and C rings of colchicine comprise the minimum structural feature necessary for high affinity drug-tubulin binding. Thus, colchicine acts as a bifunctional ligand by making two points of attachment to the protein. Furthermore, analogues belonging to the iso series of colchicine are virtually inactive in binding to tubulin and inhibiting microtubule assembly. In the present study, we found that the substitution of a hydrophobic dansyl group on the B-ring side chain (C7 position) of isocolchicine reverses the structural alterations at the C ring and the newly synthesized -NH-dansyl isocolchicine restores the lost biological activity of the compound. It inhibits microtubule assembly efficiently with an IC(50) value of 10 microM and competes with [(3)H]colchicine for binding to tubulin. Moreover, although -NH-dansyl colchicine binding to tubulin involves two steps, the -NH-dansyl isocolchicine-tubulin interaction has been found to occur via a one-step process. Also, the affinity constant of the -NH-dansyl isocolchicine-tubulin interaction is roughly only 3 times lower than that of the -NH-dansyl colchicine-tubulin interaction. These results suggest that the enhanced microtubule inhibitory ability of -NH-dansyl isocolchicine is therefore related to the affinity of the drug-tubulin interaction and not to any conformational changes upon binding tubulin. We also observed that the competition of -NH-dansyl isocolchicine with [(3)H]colchicine for binding to tubulin was dependent on the tubulin concentration. In conclusion, this paper for the first time indicates that a biologically active bifuntional colchicine analogue can be designed where the drug binds tubulin through its A and B rings, while the C ring remains inactive.

  18. Inhibition of iodine-125-labeled human follitropin binding to testicular receptor by epidermal growth factor and synthetic peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sluss, P.M.; Krystek, S.R. Jr.; Andersen, T.T.; Melson, B.E.; Huston, J.S.; Ridge, R.; Reichert, L.E. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Two tetrapeptide sequence homologies between mouse epidermal growth factor precursor (mEGFP) and human follitropin (FSH) were revealed by a computer program that identifies identical residues among polypeptide sequences. The two tetrapeptides, Lys-Thr-Cys-Thr (KTCT) and Thr-Arg-Asp-Leu (TRDL), are present in the hormone-specific beta subunit of FSH from all species studied. These tetrapeptides are not present in the alpha subunit, which is common to all pituitary glycoprotein hormones. Both tetrapeptides are also found in mEGFP, and one tetrapeptide, TRDL, is located within the 53-residue form of mEGF purified from mouse submaxillary glands. Computer-generated hydropathy profiles predicted that both tetrapeptides are located in hydrophilic portions of the FSH beta subunit and that TRDL is in a hydrophilic portion of commercially available mEGF. Therefore, the tetrapeptides might be accessible to receptor binding sites for FSH. We report that mEGF inhibits binding of 125 I-labeled human FSH to receptors in testis by 50% (I50) at a concentration of 1.8 X 10(-5) M. No binding inhibition was observed by GnRH or arginine-vasopressin at 10(-4) M, neither of which contain the tetrapeptide sequences. FSH beta subunit, which contains both tetrapeptides, also inhibited binding (I50 = 9 X 10(-8) M) of 125 I-labeled human FSH to testis receptor. Thus, it appears that FSH beta subunit and mEGF are capable of inhibiting binding of FSH to testicular FSH receptors, presumably through interactions that include the homologous tetrapeptides. This presumption was supported by the observation that the synthetic tetrapeptides (KTCT or TRDL) were also active in inhibiting binding of 125 I-labeled human FSH to testis receptor

  19. Molecular modeling reveals the novel inhibition mechanism and binding mode of three natural compounds to staphylococcal α-hemolysin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazhang Qiu

    Full Text Available α-Hemolysin (α-HL is a self-assembling, channel-forming toxin that is produced as a soluble monomer by Staphylococcus aureus strains. Until now, α-HL has been a significant virulence target for the treatment of S. aureus infection. In our previous report, we demonstrated that some natural compounds could bind to α-HL. Due to the binding of those compounds, the conformational transition of α-HL from the monomer to the oligomer was blocked, which resulted in inhibition of the hemolytic activity of α-HL. However, these results have not indicated how the binding of the α-HL inhibitors influence the conformational transition of the whole protein during the oligomerization process. In this study, we found that three natural compounds, Oroxylin A 7-O-glucuronide (OLG, Oroxin A (ORA, and Oroxin B (ORB, when inhibiting the hemolytic activity of α-HL, could bind to the "stem" region of α-HL. This was completed using conventional Molecular Dynamics (MD simulations. By interacting with the novel binding sites of α-HL, the ligands could form strong interactions with both sides of the binding cavity. The results of the principal component analysis (PCA indicated that because of the inhibitors that bind to the "stem" region of α-HL, the conformational transition of α-HL from the monomer to the oligomer was restricted. This caused the inhibition of the hemolytic activity of α-HL. This novel inhibition mechanism has been confirmed by both the steered MD simulations and the experimental data obtained from a deoxycholate-induced oligomerization assay. This study can facilitate the design of new antibacterial drugs against S. aureus.

  20. Chondroitin Sulfate-E Binds to Both Osteoactivin and Integrin αVβ3 and Inhibits Osteoclast Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Miyauchi, Satoshi; Anada, Takahisa; Tawada, Akira; Suzuki, Osamu

    2015-10-01

    Integrins and their ligands have been suggested to be associated with osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. The present study was designed to investigate whether chondroitin sulfate E (CS-E), which is one of the sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), is involved in osteoactivin (OA) activity, and osteoclast differentiation. The binding affinity of sulfated GAGs to integrin and its ligand was measured using biotin-labeled CS-E, and the osteoclast differentiation was evaluated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and a pit formation assay. CS-E as well as CS-B, synthetic chondroitin polysulfate, and heparin inhibited osteoclast differentiation of bone marrow-derived macrophages. Pre-coating of OA to synthetic calcium phosphate-coated plates enhanced the osteoclastic differentiation of RAW264 cells, and addition of a neutralizing antibody to OA inhibited its differentiation. CS-E bound not only to OA, fibronectin, and vitronectin, but also to its receptor integrin αVβ3, and inhibited the direct binding of OA to integrin αVβ3. Furthermore, CS-E blocked the binding of OA to cells and inhibited OA-induced osteoclastic differentiation. On the other hand, heparinase treatment of RAW264 cells inhibited osteoclastic differentiation. Since binding of OA to the cells was inhibited by the presence of heparan sulfate or heparinase treatment of cells, heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) was also considered to be an OA receptor. Taken together, the present results suggest that CS-E is capable of inhibiting OA-induced osteoclast differentiation by blocking the interaction of OA to integrin αVβ3 and HSPG. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. NifI inhibits nitrogenase by competing with Fe protein for binding to the MoFe protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Leigh, John A.

    2007-01-01

    Reduction of substrate by nitrogenase requires direct electron transfer from the Fe protein to the MoFe protein. Inhibition of nitrogenase activity in Methanococcus maripaludis occurs when the regulatory protein NifI 1,2 binds the MoFe protein. This inhibition is relieved by 2-oxoglutarate. Here we present evidence that NifI 1,2 binding prevents association of the two nitrogenase components. Increasing amounts of Fe protein competed with NifI 1,2 , decreasing its inhibitory effect. NifI 1,2 prevented the co-purification of MoFe protein with a mutant form of the Fe protein that forms a stable complex with the MoFe protein, and NifI 1,2 was unable to bind to an AlF 4 - -stabilized Fe protein:MoFe protein complex. NifI 1,2 inhibited ATP- and MoFe protein-dependent oxidation of the Fe protein, and 2OG relieved this inhibition. These results support a model where NifI 1,2 competes with the Fe protein for binding to MoFe protein and prevents electron transfer

  2. Colorectal mucus binds DC-SIGN and inhibits HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn J Stax

    Full Text Available Bodily secretions, including breast milk and semen, contain factors that modulate HIV-1 infection. Since anal intercourse caries one of the highest risks for HIV-1 transmission, our aim was to determine whether colorectal mucus (CM also contains factors interfering with HIV-1 infection and replication. CM from a number of individuals was collected and tested for the capacity to bind DC-SIGN and inhibit HIV-1 cis- or trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes. To this end, a DC-SIGN binding ELISA, a gp140 trimer competition ELISA and HIV-1 capture/ transfer assays were utilized. Subsequently we aimed to identify the DC-SIGN binding component through biochemical characterization and mass spectrometry analysis. CM was shown to bind DC-SIGN and competes with HIV-1 gp140 trimer for binding. Pre-incubation of Raji-DC-SIGN cells or immature dendritic cells (iDCs with CM potently inhibits DC-SIGN mediated trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes with CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains, while no effect on direct infection is observed. Preliminary biochemical characterization demonstrates that the component seems to be large (>100kDa, heat and proteinase K resistant, binds in a α1-3 mannose independent manner and is highly variant between individuals. Immunoprecipitation using DC-SIGN-Fc coated agarose beads followed by mass spectrometry indicated lactoferrin (fragments and its receptor (intelectin-1 as candidates. Using ELISA we showed that lactoferrin levels within CM correlate with DC-SIGN binding capacity. In conclusion, CM can bind the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and block HIV-1 trans-infection of both CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains. Furthermore, our data indicate that lactoferrin is a DC-SIGN binding component of CM. These results indicate that CM has the potential to interfere with pathogen transmission and modulate immune responses at the colorectal mucosa.

  3. Colorectal mucus binds DC-SIGN and inhibits HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stax, Martijn J; Mouser, Emily E I M; van Montfort, Thijs; Sanders, Rogier W; de Vries, Henry J C; Dekker, Henk L; Herrera, Carolina; Speijer, Dave; Pollakis, Georgios; Paxton, William A

    2015-01-01

    Bodily secretions, including breast milk and semen, contain factors that modulate HIV-1 infection. Since anal intercourse caries one of the highest risks for HIV-1 transmission, our aim was to determine whether colorectal mucus (CM) also contains factors interfering with HIV-1 infection and replication. CM from a number of individuals was collected and tested for the capacity to bind DC-SIGN and inhibit HIV-1 cis- or trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes. To this end, a DC-SIGN binding ELISA, a gp140 trimer competition ELISA and HIV-1 capture/ transfer assays were utilized. Subsequently we aimed to identify the DC-SIGN binding component through biochemical characterization and mass spectrometry analysis. CM was shown to bind DC-SIGN and competes with HIV-1 gp140 trimer for binding. Pre-incubation of Raji-DC-SIGN cells or immature dendritic cells (iDCs) with CM potently inhibits DC-SIGN mediated trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes with CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains, while no effect on direct infection is observed. Preliminary biochemical characterization demonstrates that the component seems to be large (>100kDa), heat and proteinase K resistant, binds in a α1-3 mannose independent manner and is highly variant between individuals. Immunoprecipitation using DC-SIGN-Fc coated agarose beads followed by mass spectrometry indicated lactoferrin (fragments) and its receptor (intelectin-1) as candidates. Using ELISA we showed that lactoferrin levels within CM correlate with DC-SIGN binding capacity. In conclusion, CM can bind the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and block HIV-1 trans-infection of both CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains. Furthermore, our data indicate that lactoferrin is a DC-SIGN binding component of CM. These results indicate that CM has the potential to interfere with pathogen transmission and modulate immune responses at the colorectal mucosa.

  4. Ferrocene-based guanidine derivatives: in vitro antimicrobial, DNA binding and docking supported urease inhibition studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Rukhsana; Rauf, Muhammad Khawar; Badshah, Amin; Azam, Syed Sikander; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Khan, Azim

    2014-10-06

    Some novel ferrocenyl guanidines 1-8 were synthesized and characterized by different spectroscopic methods, elemental analysis and single crystal X-rays diffraction techniques. The crystallographic studies revealed that the existence of the strong non-bonding interactions facilitate these molecules to interact with biological macro-molecules like DNA that described to inherit good biological activities. The DNA interaction studies carried out by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and UV-visible spectroscopy are in close agreement with the binding constants (K) (0.79-5.4) × 10(5) (CV) and (0.72-5.1) × 10(5) (UV-vis). The shift in peak potential, current and absorption maxima of the studied ferrocenyl guanidines in the presence of DNA revealed that CV coupled with UV-vis spectroscopy could provide an opportune to characterize metal-based compounds-DNA interaction mechanism, a prerequisite for the design of new anticancer agents and understanding the molecular basis of their action. The compounds 1-8 have been screened for their antibacterial, antifungal and urease inhibition potency. A concurrent in silico study has also been applied on ferrocene moiety impregnated guanidines 1-8 to identify most active compounds having for inhibiting the activity of urease (pdb id 3LA4). Most of the compounds were found as potent inhibitors of urease and the compound 1 was found to be the most active with an IC50 of 16.83 ± 0.03 μM. The docking scores are in close agreement with the in vitro obtained IC50 values of inhibitors 1-8. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Enzyme Mechanism and Slow-Onset Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase by an Inorganic Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Patrícia Soares de Maria; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; da Silva, Luiz Hildebrando Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Malaria continues to be a major cause of children's morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing nearly one million deaths annually. The human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, synthesizes fatty acids employing the Type II fatty acid biosynthesis system (FAS II), unlike humans that rely on the Type I (FAS I) pathway. The FAS II system elongates acyl fatty acid precursors of the cell membrane in Plasmodium. Enoyl reductase (ENR) enzyme is a member of the FAS II system. Here we present steady-state kinetics, pre-steady-state kinetics, and equilibrium fluorescence spectroscopy data that allowed proposal of P. falciparum ENR (PfENR) enzyme mechanism. Moreover, building on previous results, the present study also evaluates the PfENR inhibition by the pentacyano(isoniazid)ferrateII compound. This inorganic complex represents a new class of lead compounds for the development of antimalarial agents focused on the inhibition of PfENR. PMID:21603269

  6. miR-30a can inhibit DNA replication by targeting RPA1 thus slowing cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhenyou; Ni, Mengjie; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Yongfeng; Ma, Hongyu; Qian, Shihan; Tang, Longhua; Tang, Jiamei; Yao, Hailun; Zhao, Chengbin; Lu, Xiongwen; Sun, Hongyang; Qian, Jue; Mao, Xiaoting; Lu, Xulin; Liu, Qun; Zen, Juping; Wu, Hanbing; Bao, Zhaosheng; Lin, Shudan; Sheng, Hongyu; Li, Yunlong; Liang, Yong; Chen, Zhiqiang; Zong, Dan

    2016-07-15

    Cell proliferation was inhibited following forced over-expression of miR-30a in the ovary cancer cell line A2780DX5 and the gastric cancer cell line SGC7901R. Interestingly, miR-30a targets the DNA replication protein RPA1, hinders the replication of DNA and induces DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2) were phosphorylated after DNA damage, which induced p53 expression, thus triggering the S-phase checkpoint, arresting cell cycle progression and ultimately initiating cancer cell apoptosis. Therefore, forced miR-30a over-expression in cancer cells can be a potential way to inhibit tumour development. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  7. Mapping the binding interface between an HIV-1 inhibiting intrabody and the viral protein Rev.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Vercruysse

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Rev is the key protein in the nucleocytoplasmic export and expression of the late viral mRNAs. An important aspect for its function is its ability to multimerize on these mRNAs. We have recently identified a llama single-domain antibody (Nb190 as the first inhibitor targeting the Rev multimerization function in cells. This nanobody is a potent intracellular antibody that efficiently inhibits HIV-1 viral production. In order to gain insight into the Nb190-Rev interaction interface, we performed mutational and docking studies to map the interface between the nanobody paratope and the Rev epitope. Alanine mutants of the hyper-variable domains of Nb190 and the Rev multimerization domains were evaluated in different assays measuring Nb190-Rev interaction or viral production. Seven residues within Nb190 and five Rev residues are demonstrated to be crucial for epitope recognition. These experimental data were used to perform docking experiments and map the Nb190-Rev structural interface. This Nb190-Rev interaction model can guide further studies of the Nb190 effect on HIV-1 Rev function and could serve as starting point for the rational development of smaller entities binding to the Nb190 epitope, aimed at interfering with protein-protein interactions of the Rev N-terminal domain.

  8. Clinical experience with a radioreceptor assay for TSH-binding inhibiting immunoglobulins (TBII)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heberling, H.J.; Bierwolf, B.; Lohmann, D.

    1988-01-01

    The aim was evaluate the clinical value of a commercial kit for determination of TSH-binding inhibiting immunoglobulin (TBII). 47 of 50 patients with untreated hyperthyroid Graves' disease were TBII positive (sensitivity 94%). TBII was in the normal range in all normal volunteers and in patients with simple goiter, thyroid cancer and in most cases of nonimmunogenic hyperthyreoidism (19 of 22). After 12 months antithyroid drug therapy with methimazole of 21 patients the prevalence of positive TBII findings was 28%. In contrast to this, 50 percent of the patients had increased microsomal antibodies at the end of therapy. The determination of TBII by TRAK assay proved to be a sensitive, specific and practical method. The assay can be used to differentiate between hyperthyreoidism of autoimmune or nonimmunogenic origin. Even so this method seems to be helpful for the follow-up during medical treatment of patients with Graves' disease. The results indicate that persistence of increased TBII levels are markers of active Graves' disease and suggest that in this situation ablative measures should be performed. Normalization of TBII on the end of a longstanding antithyroid therapy does not exclude the possibility of relapse in the further course. (author)

  9. Bovine Lactoferrin Inhibits Toscana Virus Infection by Binding to Heparan Sulphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostina Pietrantoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Toscana virus is an emerging sandfly-borne bunyavirus in Mediterranean Europe responsible for neurological diseases in humans. It accounts for about 80% of paediatric meningitis cases during the summer. Despite the important impact of Toscana virus infection-associated disease on human health, currently approved vaccines or effective antiviral treatments are not available. In this research, we have analyzed the effect of bovine lactoferrin, a bi-globular iron-binding glycoprotein with potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities, on Toscana virus infection in vitro. Our results showed that lactoferrin was capable of inhibiting Toscana virus replication in a dose-dependent manner. Results obtained when lactoferrin was added to the cells during different phases of viral infection showed that lactoferrin was able to prevent viral replication when added during the viral adsorption step or during the entire cycle of virus infection, demonstrating that its action takes place in an early phase of viral infection. In particular, our results demonstrated that the anti-Toscana virus action of lactoferrin took place on virus attachment to the cell membrane, mainly through a competition for common glycosaminoglycan receptors. These findings provide further insights on the antiviral activity of bovine lactoferrin.

  10. Hsp70-GlcNAc-binding activity is released by stress, proteasome inhibition, and protein misfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinez, Celine; Mir, Anne-Marie; Leroy, Yves; Cacan, Rene; Michalski, Jean-Claude; Lefebvre, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Numerous recent works strengthen the idea that the nuclear and cytosolic-specific O-GlcNAc glycosylation protects cells against injuries. We have first investigated O-GlcNAc level and Hsp70-GlcNAc-binding activity (HGBA) behaviour after exposure of HeLa and HepG 2 cells to a wide variety of stresses. O-GlcNAc and HGBA responses were different according to the stress and according to the cell. HGBA was released for almost all stresses, while O-GlcNAc level was modified either upwards or downwards, depending to the stress. Against all expectations, we demonstrated that energy charge did not significantly vary with stress whereas UDP-GlcNAc pools were more dramatically affected even if differences in UDP-GlcNAc contents were not correlated with O-GlcNAc variations suggesting that O-GlcNAc transferase is itself finely regulated during cell injury. Finally, HGBA could be triggered by proteasome inhibition and by L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (a proline analogue) incorporation demonstrating that protein misfolding is one of the key-activator of this Hsp70 property

  11. Immunogenicity test of tetanus component in adsorbed vaccines by toxin binding inhibition test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Cristina Souza Matos

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Samples from 20 lots of diphtheria-tetanus (adult use dT vaccine and from 20 lots of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP vaccine were used to standardize and validate the in vitro toxin binding inhibition (ToBI test for the immunogenicity test of the tetanus component. The levels of tetanus antitoxin obtained by ToBI test were compared to those obtained using the toxin neutralization (TN test in mice routinely employed to perform the quality control of the tetanus component in adsorbed vaccines. The results ranged from 1.8 to 3.5 IU/ml for dT and 2 to 4 IU/ml for DTP by ToBI test and 1.4 to 3 IU/ml for dT and 1.8 to 3.5 IU/ml for DTP by TN in mice. These results were significantly correlated. From this study, it is concluded that the ToBI test is an alternative to the in vivo neutralization procedure in the immunogenicity test of the tetanus component in adsorbed vaccines. A substantial refinement and a reduction in use of animals can be achieved.

  12. Inhibition of [11C]mirtazapine binding by alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists studied by positron emission tomography in living porcine brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Donald F; Dyve, Suzan; Minuzzi, Luciano

    2006-01-01

    Inhibition of [11C]mirtazapine binding by alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists studied by positron emission tomography in living porcine brain......Inhibition of [11C]mirtazapine binding by alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists studied by positron emission tomography in living porcine brain...

  13. Ibuprofen slows migration and inhibits bowel colonization by enteric nervous system precursors in zebrafish, chick and mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, Ellen Merrick; Lake, Jonathan I.; Tusheva, Olga A.; Nagy, Nandor; Bery, Saya K.; Foster, Lynne; Avetisyan, Marina; Johnson, Stephen L.; Stenson, William F.; Goldstein, Allan M.; Heuckeroth, Robert O.

    2016-01-01

    Hirschsprung Disease (HSCR) is a potentially deadly birth defect characterized by the absence of the enteric nervous system (ENS) in distal bowel. Although HSCR has clear genetic causes, no HSCR-associated mutation is 100% penetrant, suggesting gene-gene and gene-environment interactions determine HSCR occurrence. To test the hypothesis that certain medicines might alter HSCR risk we treated zebrafish with medications commonly used during early human pregnancy and discovered that ibuprofen caused HSCR-like absence of enteric neurons in distal bowel. Using fetal CF-1 mouse gut slice cultures, we found that ibuprofen treated enteric neural crest-derived cells (ENCDC) had reduced migration, fewer lamellipodia and lower levels of active RAC1/CDC42. Additionally, inhibiting ROCK, a RHOA effector and known RAC1 antagonist, reversed ibuprofen effects on migrating mouse ENCDC in culture. Ibuprofen also inhibited colonization of Ret+/− mouse bowel by ENCDC in vivo and dramatically reduced bowel colonization by chick ENCDC in culture. Interestingly, ibuprofen did not affect ENCDC migration until after at least three hours of exposure. Furthermore, mice deficient in Ptgs1 (COX 1) and Ptgs2 (COX 2) had normal bowel colonization by ENCDC and normal ENCDC migration in vitro suggesting COX-independent effects. Consistent with selective and strain specific effects on ENCDC, ibuprofen did not affect migration of gut mesenchymal cells, NIH3T3, or WT C57BL/6 ENCDC, and did not affect dorsal root ganglion cell precursor migration in zebrafish. Thus, ibuprofen inhibits ENCDC migration in vitro and bowel colonization by ENCDC in vivo in zebrafish, mouse and chick, but there are cell type and strain specific responses. These data raise concern that ibuprofen may increase Hirschsprung disease risk in some genetically susceptible children. PMID:26586201

  14. An interspecies comparison of mercury inhibition on muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Niladri; Stamler, Christopher J.; Loua, Kovana Marcel; Chan, H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous pollutant that can disrupt neurochemical signaling pathways in mammals. It is well documented that inorganic Hg (HgCl 2 ) and methyl Hg (MeHg) can inhibit the binding of radioligands to the muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor in rat brains. However, little is known concerning this relationship in specific anatomical regions of the brain or in other species, including humans. The purpose of this study was to explore the inhibitory effects of HgCl 2 and MeHg on [ 3 H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([ 3 H]-QNB) binding to the mACh receptor in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex regions from human, rat, mouse, mink, and river otter brain tissues. Saturation binding curves were obtained from each sample to calculate receptor density (B max ) and ligand affinity (K d ). Subsequently, samples were exposed to HgCl 2 or MeHg to derive IC50 values and inhibition constants (K i ). Results demonstrate that HgCl 2 is a more potent inhibitor of mACh receptor binding than MeHg, and the receptors in the cerebellum are more sensitive to Hg-mediated mACh receptor inhibition than those in the cerebral cortex. Species sensitivities, irrespective of Hg type and brain region, can be ranked from most to least sensitive: river otter > rat > mink > mouse > humans. In summary, our data demonstrate that Hg can inhibit the binding [ 3 H]-QNB to the mACh receptor in a range of mammalian species. This comparative study provides data on interspecies differences and a framework for interpreting results from human, murine, and wildlife studies

  15. Inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 binding to endocytosis receptors of the low density lipoprotein receptor family by a peptide isolated from a phage displayed library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jan K.; Malmendal, Anders; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2006-01-01

    (DVPCFGWCQDA) was determined by NMR. A binding site in the so-called flexible joint region of PAI-1 was suggested by molecular modelling and validated through binding studies with various competitors and site-directed mutagenesis of PAI-1. The peptide with an N-terminal biotin inhibited the binding of the u...

  16. Myosin Binding Protein-C Slow Phosphorylation is Altered in Duchenne Dystrophy and Arthrogryposis Myopathy in Fast-Twitch Skeletal Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Maegen A; Ward, Christopher W; Gurnett, Christina; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2015-08-19

    Myosin Binding Protein-C slow (sMyBP-C), encoded by MYBPC1, comprises a family of regulatory proteins of skeletal muscles that are phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. MYBPC1 missense mutations are linked to the development of Distal Arthrogryposis-1 (DA-1). Although structure-function details for this myopathy are evolving, function is undoubtedly driven by sequence variations and post-translational modifications in sMyBP-C. Herein, we examined the phosphorylation profile of sMyBP-C in mouse and human fast-twitch skeletal muscles. We used Flexor Digitorum Brevis (FDB) isolated from young (~2-months old) and old (~14-months old) wild type and mdx mice, and human Abductor Hallucis (AH) and gastrocnemious muscles carrying the DA-1 mutations. Our results indicate both constitutive and differential phosphorylation of sMyBP-C in aged and diseased muscles. We report a 7-35% reduction in the phosphorylation levels of select sites in old wild type and young or old mdx FDB mouse muscles, compared to young wild type tissue. Similarly, we observe a 30-70% decrease in the phosphorylation levels of all PKA and PKC phospho-sites in the DA-1 AH, but not gastrocnemius, muscle. Overall, our studies show that the phosphorylation pattern of sMyBP-C is differentially regulated in response to age and disease, suggesting that phosphorylation plays important roles in these processes.

  17. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein from human decidua inhibits the binding and biological action of IGF-I in cultured choriocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritvos, O.; Ranta, T.; Jalkanen, J.; Suikkari, A.M.; Voutilainen, R.; Bohn, H.; Rutanen, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    The placenta expresses genes for insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and possesses IGF-receptors, suggesting that placental growth is regulated by IGFs in an autocrine manner. We have previously shown that human decidua, but not placenta, synthesizes and secretes a 34 K IGF-binding protein (34 K IGF-BP) called placental protein 12. We now used human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cell monolayer cultures and recombinant (Thr59)IGF-I as a model to study whether the decidual 34 K IGF-BP is able to modulate the receptor binding and biological activity of IGFs in trophoblasts. JEG-3 cells, which possess type I IGF receptors, were unable to produce IGF-BPs. Purified 34 K IGF-BP specifically bound [125I]iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I. Multiplication-stimulating activity had 2.5% the potency of (Thr59)IGF-I, and insulin had no effect on the binding of [125I] iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I. 34 K IGF-BP inhibited the binding of [125I] iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I to JEG-3 monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner by forming with the tracer a soluble complex that could not bind to the cell surface as demonstrated by competitive binding and cross-linking experiments. After incubating the cell monolayers with [125I]iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I in the presence of purified binding protein, followed by cross-linking, no affinity labeled bands were seen on autoradiography. In contrast, an intensely labeled band at 40 K was detected when the incubation medium was analyzed, suggesting that (Thr59)IGF-I and 34 K IGF-BP formed a complex in a 1:1 molar ratio. Also, 34 K IGF-BP inhibited both basal and IGF-I-stimulated uptake of alpha-[3H]aminoisobutyric acid in JEG-3 cells. RNA analysis revealed that IGF-II is expressed in JEG-3 cells

  18. Selective metal binding to Cys-78 within endonuclease V causes an inhibition of catalytic activities without altering nontarget and target DNA binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, M.A.; Friedman, B.; Gruskin, E.A.; Schrock, R.D. III; Lloyd, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    T4 endonuclease V is a pyrimidine dimer-specific DNA repair enzyme which has been previously shown not to require metal ions for either of its two catalytic activities or its DNA binding function. However, we have investigated whether the single cysteine within the enzyme was able to bind metal salts and influence the various activities of this repair enzyme. A series of metals (Hg2+, Ag+, Cu+) were shown to inactivate both endonuclease Vs pyrimidine dimer-specific DNA glycosylase activity and the subsequent apurinic nicking activity. The binding of metal to endonuclease V did not interfere with nontarget DNA scanning or pyrimidine dimer-specific binding. The Cys-78 codon within the endonuclease V gene was changed by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis to Thr-78 and Ser-78 in order to determine whether the native cysteine was directly involved in the enzyme's DNA catalytic activities and whether the cysteine was primarily responsible for the metal binding. The mutant enzymes were able to confer enhanced ultraviolet light (UV) resistance to DNA repair-deficient Escherichia coli at levels equal to that conferred by the wild type enzyme. The C78T mutant enzyme was purified to homogeneity and shown to be catalytically active on pyrimidine dimer-containing DNA. The catalytic activities of the C78T mutant enzyme were demonstrated to be unaffected by the addition of Hg2+ or Ag+ at concentrations 1000-fold greater than that required to inhibit the wild type enzyme. These data suggest that the cysteine is not required for enzyme activity but that the binding of certain metals to that amino acid block DNA incision by either preventing a conformational change in the enzyme after it has bound to a pyrimidine dimer or sterically interfering with the active site residue's accessibility to the pyrimidine dimer

  19. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester downregulates phospholipase D1 via direct binding and inhibition of NFκB transactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mi Hee; Kang, Dong Woo [Department of Molecular Biology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Yunjin [College of Pharmacy, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kang-Yell [Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, Do Sik, E-mail: minds@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Biology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •We found CAFÉ, a natural product that suppresses expression and activity of PLD1. •CAPE decreased PLD1 expression by inhibiting NFκB transactivation. •CAPE rapidly inhibited PLD activity via its binding to a Cys837 of PLD1. •PLD1 downregulation by CAPE inhibited invasion and proliferation of glioma cells. -- Abstract: Upregulation of phospholipase D (PLD) is functionally linked with oncogenic signals and tumorigenesis. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is an active compound of propolis extract that exhibits anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and antineoplastic properties. In this study, we demonstrated that CAPE suppressed the expression of PLD1 at the transcriptional level via inhibition of binding of NFκB to PLD1 promoter. Moreover, CAPE, but not its analogs, bound to a Cys837 residue of PLD1 and inhibited enzymatic activity of PLD. CAPE also decreased activation of matrix metalloproteinases-2 induced by phosphatidic acid, a product of PLD activity. Ultimately, CAPE-induced downregulation of PLD1 suppressed invasion and proliferation of glioma cells. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that CAPE might contribute to anti-neoplastic effect by targeting PLD1.

  20. Thyrotropin - Binding Inhibiting Immunoglobulin (TBII) in Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Dae Sung; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Sohn, Sang Kyun; Lee, Jae Tae; Lee, Kyu Bo

    1996-01-01

    In order to evaluate the significance of thyrotropin-binding inhibiting immunoglobulin (TBII) in the patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases, the authors investigated 402 cases of Graves' disease and 230 cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis comparing 30 cases of normal healthy adult at Kyung Pook University Hospital from February 1993 to August 1994. The TBII was tested by radioimmunoassay and assessed on the dynamic change with the disease course, thyroid functional parameters, and other thyroid autoantibodies; antithyroglobulin antibody(ATAb) and antimicrosomal antibody(AMAb) including thyroglobulin. The serum level of TBII was 40.82 ± 21.651(mean ± SD)% in hyperthyroid Graves' disease and 8.89 ± 14.522% in Hashimoto's thyroiditis and both were significant different from normal control of which was 3.21 ± 2.571%. The frequency of abnormally increased TBII level was 92.2% in hyperthyroid Craves' disease, 46.7% in euthyroid Graves' disease or remission state of hyperthyroidism, and 23.9% in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The serum levels of increased TBII in Graves' disease were positively correlated with RAIU, serum T3, T4, and FT4, but negatively correlated with serum TSH(each p<0.001). The TBII in Graves' disease had significant positive correlation with serum thyroglobulin and AMAb, but no significant correlation with ATAb. In the Hashimoto's thyroiditis, the serum levels of TBII were positively correlated with RAIU, serum T3, TSH and AMAb, but not significantly correlated with serum T4, FT4, thyroglobulin and ATAb. Therefore serum level of TBII seemed to be a useful mean of assessing the degree of hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease and correlated well with thyroidal stimulation. The serum level of TBII in Hashimoto's thyroiditis is meaningful for the degree of both functional abnormality reflecting either hyperfunction or hypofunction and the immunologic abnormality.

  1. Skin mucus of Cyprinus carpio inhibits cyprinid herpesvirus 3 binding to epidermal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Victor

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3 is the aetiological agent of a mortal and highly contagious disease in common and koi carp. The skin is the major portal of entry of CyHV-3 in carp after immersion in water containing the virus. In the present study, we used in vivo bioluminescence imaging to investigate the effect of skin mucus removal and skin epidermis lesion on CyHV-3 entry. Physical treatments inducing removal of the mucus up to complete erosion of the epidermis were applied on a defined area of carp skin just before inoculation by immersion in infectious water. CyHV-3 entry in carp was drastically enhanced on the area of the skin where the mucus was removed with or without associated epidermal lesion. To investigate whether skin mucus inhibits CyHV-3 binding to epidermal cells, tail fins with an intact mucus layer or without mucus were inoculated ex vivo. While electron microscopy examination revealed numerous viral particles bound on the fins inoculated after mucus removal, no particle could be detected after infection of mucus-covered fins. Finally, anti-CyHV-3 neutralising activity of mucus extract was tested in vitro. Incubation of CyHV-3 with mucus extract reduced its infectivity in a dose dependent manner. The present study demonstrates that skin mucus removal and epidermal lesions enhance CyHV-3 entry in carp. It highlights the role of fish skin mucus as an innate immune protection against viral epidermal entry.

  2. Skin mucus of Cyprinus carpio inhibits cyprinid herpesvirus 3 binding to epidermal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is the aetiological agent of a mortal and highly contagious disease in common and koi carp. The skin is the major portal of entry of CyHV-3 in carp after immersion in water containing the virus. In the present study, we used in vivo bioluminescence imaging to investigate the effect of skin mucus removal and skin epidermis lesion on CyHV-3 entry. Physical treatments inducing removal of the mucus up to complete erosion of the epidermis were applied on a defined area of carp skin just before inoculation by immersion in infectious water. CyHV-3 entry in carp was drastically enhanced on the area of the skin where the mucus was removed with or without associated epidermal lesion. To investigate whether skin mucus inhibits CyHV-3 binding to epidermal cells, tail fins with an intact mucus layer or without mucus were inoculated ex vivo. While electron microscopy examination revealed numerous viral particles bound on the fins inoculated after mucus removal, no particle could be detected after infection of mucus-covered fins. Finally, anti-CyHV-3 neutralising activity of mucus extract was tested in vitro. Incubation of CyHV-3 with mucus extract reduced its infectivity in a dose dependent manner. The present study demonstrates that skin mucus removal and epidermal lesions enhance CyHV-3 entry in carp. It highlights the role of fish skin mucus as an innate immune protection against viral epidermal entry. PMID:21816061

  3. Potent and specific inhibition of glycosidases by small artificial binding proteins (affitins).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Agustín; Pacheco, Sabino; Mechaly, Ariel E; Obal, Gonzalo; Béhar, Ghislaine; Mouratou, Barbara; Oppezzo, Pablo; Alzari, Pedro M; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Glycosidases are associated with various human diseases. The development of efficient and specific inhibitors may provide powerful tools to modulate their activity. However, achieving high selectivity is a major challenge given that glycosidases with different functions can have similar enzymatic mechanisms and active-site architectures. As an alternative approach to small-chemical compounds, proteinaceous inhibitors might provide a better specificity by involving a larger surface area of interaction. We report here the design and characterization of proteinaceous inhibitors that specifically target endoglycosidases representative of the two major mechanistic classes; retaining and inverting glycosidases. These inhibitors consist of artificial affinity proteins, Affitins, selected against the thermophilic CelD from Clostridium thermocellum and lysozyme from hen egg. They were obtained from libraries of Sac7d variants, which involve either the randomization of a surface or the randomization of a surface and an artificially-extended loop. Glycosidase binders exhibited affinities in the nanomolar range with no cross-recognition, with efficient inhibition of lysozyme (Ki = 45 nM) and CelD (Ki = 95 and 111 nM), high expression yields in Escherichia coli, solubility, and thermal stabilities up to 81.1°C. The crystal structures of glycosidase-Affitin complexes validate our library designs. We observed that Affitins prevented substrate access by two modes of binding; covering or penetrating the catalytic site via the extended loop. In addition, Affitins formed salt-bridges with residues essential for enzymatic activity. These results lead us to propose the use of Affitins as versatile selective glycosidase inhibitors and, potentially, as enzymatic inhibitors in general.

  4. Potent and specific inhibition of glycosidases by small artificial binding proteins (affitins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Correa

    Full Text Available Glycosidases are associated with various human diseases. The development of efficient and specific inhibitors may provide powerful tools to modulate their activity. However, achieving high selectivity is a major challenge given that glycosidases with different functions can have similar enzymatic mechanisms and active-site architectures. As an alternative approach to small-chemical compounds, proteinaceous inhibitors might provide a better specificity by involving a larger surface area of interaction. We report here the design and characterization of proteinaceous inhibitors that specifically target endoglycosidases representative of the two major mechanistic classes; retaining and inverting glycosidases. These inhibitors consist of artificial affinity proteins, Affitins, selected against the thermophilic CelD from Clostridium thermocellum and lysozyme from hen egg. They were obtained from libraries of Sac7d variants, which involve either the randomization of a surface or the randomization of a surface and an artificially-extended loop. Glycosidase binders exhibited affinities in the nanomolar range with no cross-recognition, with efficient inhibition of lysozyme (Ki = 45 nM and CelD (Ki = 95 and 111 nM, high expression yields in Escherichia coli, solubility, and thermal stabilities up to 81.1°C. The crystal structures of glycosidase-Affitin complexes validate our library designs. We observed that Affitins prevented substrate access by two modes of binding; covering or penetrating the catalytic site via the extended loop. In addition, Affitins formed salt-bridges with residues essential for enzymatic activity. These results lead us to propose the use of Affitins as versatile selective glycosidase inhibitors and, potentially, as enzymatic inhibitors in general.

  5. Thyrotropin - Binding Inhibiting Immunoglobulin (TBII) in Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Dae Sung; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Sohn, Sang Kyun; Lee, Jae Tae; Lee, Kyu Bo [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-15

    In order to evaluate the significance of thyrotropin-binding inhibiting immunoglobulin (TBII) in the patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases, the authors investigated 402 cases of Graves' disease and 230 cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis comparing 30 cases of normal healthy adult at Kyung Pook University Hospital from February 1993 to August 1994. The TBII was tested by radioimmunoassay and assessed on the dynamic change with the disease course, thyroid functional parameters, and other thyroid autoantibodies; antithyroglobulin antibody(ATAb) and antimicrosomal antibody(AMAb) including thyroglobulin. The serum level of TBII was 40.82 +- 21.651(mean +- SD)% in hyperthyroid Graves' disease and 8.89 +- 14.522% in Hashimoto's thyroiditis and both were significant different from normal control of which was 3.21 +- 2.571%. The frequency of abnormally increased TBII level was 92.2% in hyperthyroid Craves' disease, 46.7% in euthyroid Graves' disease or remission state of hyperthyroidism, and 23.9% in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The serum levels of increased TBII in Graves' disease were positively correlated with RAIU, serum T3, T4, and FT4, but negatively correlated with serum TSH(each p<0.001). The TBII in Graves' disease had significant positive correlation with serum thyroglobulin and AMAb, but no significant correlation with ATAb. In the Hashimoto's thyroiditis, the serum levels of TBII were positively correlated with RAIU, serum T3, TSH and AMAb, but not significantly correlated with serum T4, FT4, thyroglobulin and ATAb. Therefore serum level of TBII seemed to be a useful mean of assessing the degree of hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease and correlated well with thyroidal stimulation. The serum level of TBII in Hashimoto's thyroiditis is meaningful for the degree of both functional abnormality reflecting either hyperfunction or hypofunction and the immunologic abnormality.

  6. Heparin (GAG-hed) inhibits LCR activity of Human Papillomavirus type 18 by decreasing AP1 binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, Rita; Morales-Peza, Néstor; Castelán-Sánchez, Irma; García-Villa, Enrique; Tapia, Rocio; Cid-Arregui, Ángel; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; López-Bayghen, Esther; Gariglio, Patricio

    2006-01-01

    High risk HPVs are causative agents of anogenital cancers. Viral E6 and E7 genes are continuously expressed and are largely responsible for the oncogenic activity of these viruses. Transcription of the E6 and E7 genes is controlled by the viral Long Control Region (LCR), plus several cellular transcription factors including AP1 and the viral protein E2. Within the LCR, the binding and activity of the transcription factor AP1 represents a key regulatory event in maintaining E6/E7 gene expression and uncontrolled cell proliferation. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as heparin, can inhibit tumour growth; they have also shown antiviral effects and inhibition of AP1 transcriptional activity. The purpose of this study was to test the heparinoid GAG-hed, as a possible antiviral and antitumoral agent in an HPV18 positive HeLa cell line. Using in vivo and in vitro approaches we tested GAG-hed effects on HeLa tumour cell growth, cell proliferation and on the expression of HPV18 E6/E7 oncogenes. GAG-hed effects on AP1 binding to HPV18-LCR-DNA were tested by EMSA. We were able to record the antitumoral effect of GAG-hed in vivo by using as a model tumours induced by injection of HeLa cells into athymic female mice. The antiviral effect of GAG-hed resulted in the inhibition of LCR activity and, consequently, the inhibition of E6 and E7 transcription. A specific diminishing of cell proliferation rates was observed in HeLa but not in HPV-free colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. Treated HeLa cells did not undergo apoptosis but the percentage of cells in G 2 /M phase of the cell cycle was increased. We also detected that GAG-hed prevents the binding of the transcription factor AP1 to the LCR. Direct interaction of GAG-hed with the components of the AP1 complex and subsequent interference with its ability to correctly bind specific sites within the viral LCR may contribute to the inhibition of E6/E7 transcription and cell proliferation. Our data suggest that GAG-hed could have

  7. Binding of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator to its cell surface receptor is inhibited by low doses of suramin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Rønne, E; Danø, K

    1993-01-01

    micrograms/ml when using U937 cells and a ligand concentration of 0.3 nM. This concentration of the drug is well below the serum levels found in suramin-treated patients. Inhibition of binding was also demonstrated at the molecular level, using chemical cross-linking or an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay...... to the anti-invasive properties of suramin by destroying the cellular potential for localized plasminogen activation and proteolytic matrix degradation....

  8. Inhibition and Larvicidal Activity of Phenylpropanoids from Piper sarmentosum on Acetylcholinesterase against Mosquito Vectors and Their Binding Mode of Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshia Hematpoor

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus are vectors of dengue fever and West Nile virus diseases. This study was conducted to determine the toxicity, mechanism of action and the binding interaction of three active phenylpropanoids from Piper sarmentosum (Piperaceae toward late 3rd or early 4th larvae of above vectors. A bioassay guided-fractionation on the hexane extract from the roots of Piper sarmentosum led to the isolation and identification of three active phenylpropanoids; asaricin 1, isoasarone 2 and trans-asarone 3. The current study involved evaluation of the toxicity and acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibition of these compounds against Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 were highly potent against Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae causing up to 100% mortality at ≤ 15 μg/mL concentration. The ovicidal activity of asaricin 1, isoasarone 2 and trans-asarone 3 were evaluated through egg hatching. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 showed potent ovicidal activity. Ovicidal activity for both compounds was up to 95% at 25μg/mL. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 showed strong inhibition on acetylcholinesterase with relative IC50 values of 0.73 to 1.87 μg/mL respectively. These findings coupled with the high AChE inhibition may suggest that asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 are neuron toxic compounds toward Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus. Further computational docking with Autodock Vina elaborates the possible interaction of asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 with three possible binding sites of AChE which includes catalytic triads (CAS: S238, E367, H480, the peripheral sites (PAS: E72, W271 and anionic binding site (W83. The binding affinity of asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 were relatively strong with asaricin 1 showed a higher binding affinity in the anionic pocket.

  9. Inhibition and Larvicidal Activity of Phenylpropanoids from Piper sarmentosum on Acetylcholinesterase against Mosquito Vectors and Their Binding Mode of Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hematpoor, Arshia; Liew, Sook Yee; Chong, Wei Lim; Azirun, Mohd Sofian; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Awang, Khalijah

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus are vectors of dengue fever and West Nile virus diseases. This study was conducted to determine the toxicity, mechanism of action and the binding interaction of three active phenylpropanoids from Piper sarmentosum (Piperaceae) toward late 3rd or early 4th larvae of above vectors. A bioassay guided-fractionation on the hexane extract from the roots of Piper sarmentosum led to the isolation and identification of three active phenylpropanoids; asaricin 1, isoasarone 2 and trans-asarone 3. The current study involved evaluation of the toxicity and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition of these compounds against Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 were highly potent against Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae causing up to 100% mortality at ≤ 15 μg/mL concentration. The ovicidal activity of asaricin 1, isoasarone 2 and trans-asarone 3 were evaluated through egg hatching. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 showed potent ovicidal activity. Ovicidal activity for both compounds was up to 95% at 25μg/mL. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 showed strong inhibition on acetylcholinesterase with relative IC50 values of 0.73 to 1.87 μg/mL respectively. These findings coupled with the high AChE inhibition may suggest that asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 are neuron toxic compounds toward Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus. Further computational docking with Autodock Vina elaborates the possible interaction of asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 with three possible binding sites of AChE which includes catalytic triads (CAS: S238, E367, H480), the peripheral sites (PAS: E72, W271) and anionic binding site (W83). The binding affinity of asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 were relatively strong with asaricin 1 showed a higher binding affinity in the anionic pocket.

  10. Physiological slowing and upregulation of inhibition in cortex are correlated with behavioral deficits in protein malnourished rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Chaudhary

    Full Text Available Protein malnutrition during early development has been correlated with cognitive and learning disabilities in children, but the neuronal deficits caused by long-term protein deficiency are not well understood. We exposed rats from gestation up to adulthood to a protein-deficient (PD diet, to emulate chronic protein malnutrition in humans. The offspring exhibited significantly impaired performance on the 'Gap-crossing' (GC task after reaching maturity, a behavior that has been shown to depend on normal functioning of the somatosensory cortex. The physiological state of the somatosensory cortex was examined to determine neuronal correlates of the deficits in behavior. Extracellular multi-unit recording from layer 4 (L4 neurons that receive direct thalamocortical inputs and layers 2/3 (L2/3 neurons that are dominated by intracortical connections in the whisker-barrel cortex of PD rats exhibited significantly low spontaneous activity and depressed responses to whisker stimulation. L4 neurons were more severely affected than L2/3 neurons. The response onset was significantly delayed in L4 cells. The peak response latency of L4 and L2/3 neurons was delayed significantly. In L2/3 and L4 of the barrel cortex there was a substantial increase in GAD65 (112% over controls and much smaller increase in NMDAR1 (12-20%, suggesting enhanced inhibition in the PD cortex. These results show that chronic protein deficiency negatively affects both thalamo-cortical and cortico-cortical transmission during somatosensory information processing. The findings support the interpretation that sustained protein deficiency interferes with features of cortical sensory processing that are likely to underlie the cognitive impairments reported in humans who have suffered from prolonged protein deficiency.

  11. Conglutinin binds the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp 160 and inhibits its interaction with cell membrane CD4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Sørensen, A M; Svehag, S E

    1991-01-01

    The highly glycosylated envelope glycoprotein (gp 160) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) interacts with the CD4 molecule present on the membrane of CD4+ cells and is involved in the pathobiology of HIV infection. Lectins bind glycoproteins through non-covalent interactions with specific hexose...... residues. The mammalian C-type lectin bovine conglutinin was examined for its ability to interact with recombinant gp160 (rgp160) produced in vaccinia virus-infected BHK21 cells. Specific binding of conglutinin to rgp160 was demonstrated by ELISA. The interaction of bovine conglutinin with rgp160...... of the binding of rgp160 to the CD4 receptor on CEM 13 cells, as demonstrated by FACS analyses. These results indicate that conglutinin may inhibit the infection with HIV-1 through its interaction with the viral envelope glycoprotein....

  12. Anticonvulsants Based on the α-Substituted Amide Group Pharmacophore Bind to and Inhibit Function of Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoshein, Arcadius V

    2016-03-16

    Although the antiepileptic properties of α-substituted lactams, acetamides, and cyclic imides have been known for over 60 years, the mechanism by which they act remains unclear. I report here that these compounds bind to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and inhibit its function. Using transient kinetic measurements with functionally active, nondesensitized receptors, I have discovered that (i) α-substituted lactams and cyclic imides are noncompetitive inhibitors of heteromeric subtypes (such as α4β2 and α3β4) of neuronal nAChRs and (ii) the binding affinity of these compounds toward the nAChR correlates with their potency in preventing maximal electroshock (MES)-induced convulsions in mice. Based on the hypothesis that α-substituted amide group is the essential pharmacophore of these drugs, I found and tested a simple compound, 2-phenylbutyramide. This compound indeed inhibits nAChR and shows good anticonvulsant activity in mice. Molecular docking simulations suggest that α-substituted lactams, acetamides, and cyclic imides bind to the same sites on the extracellular domain of the receptor. These new findings indicate that inhibition of brain nAChRs may play an important role in the action of these antiepileptic drugs, a role that has not been previously recognized.

  13. A novel injection strategy of flurbiprofen axetil by inhibiting protein binding with 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Kenji; Takamura, Norito; Tokunaga, Jin; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Setoguchi, Nao; Tanda, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Tetsuo; Nishio, Toyotaka; Kawai, Keiichi

    2016-04-01

    Flurbiprofen axetil (FPA) is an injection product and a prodrug of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). After injection, it is rapidly hydrolyzed to the active form, flurbiprofen (FP). Since frequent injections of FPA can lead to abnormal physiology, an administration strategy is necessary to ensure there is enhancement of the analgesic efficiency of FP after a single dose and to reduce the total number of doses. FP strongly binds to site II of albumin, and thus the free (unbound) FP concentration is low. This study focused on 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA), the active metabolite of nabumetone (a prodrug of NSAID). We performed ultrafiltration experiments and pharmacokinetics analysis in rats to investigate whether the inhibitory effect of 6-MNA on FP binding to albumin increased the free FP concentration in vitro and in vivo. Results indicated that 6-MNA inhibited the binding of FP to albumin competitively. When 6-MNA was injected in rats, there was a significant increase in the free FP concentration and the area under concentration-time curve (AUC) calculated from the free FP concentration, while there was a significant decrease in the total (bound + free) FP concentration and the AUC calculated from the total FP concentration. These findings indicate that 6-MNA inhibits the protein binding of FP in vivo. This suggests that the frequency of FPA injections can be reduced when administered with nabumetone, as there is increase in the free FP concentration associated with pharmacological effect.

  14. Molecular modeling study on the allosteric inhibition mechanism of HIV-1 integrase by LEDGF/p75 binding site inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is essential for the integration of viral DNA into the host genome and an attractive therapeutic target for developing antiretroviral inhibitors. LEDGINs are a class of allosteric inhibitors targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site of HIV-1 IN. Yet, the detailed binding mode and allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs to HIV-1 IN is only partially understood, which hinders the structure-based design of more potent anti-HIV agents. A molecular modeling study combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation were performed to investigate the interaction details of HIV-1 IN catalytic core domain (CCD with two recently discovered LEDGINs BI-1001 and CX14442, as well as the LEDGF/p75 protein. Simulation results demonstrated the hydrophobic domain of BI-1001 and CX14442 engages one subunit of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer through hydrophobic interactions, and the hydrophilic group forms hydrogen bonds with HIV-1 IN CCD residues from other subunit. CX14442 has a larger tert-butyl group than the methyl of BI-1001, and forms better interactions with the highly hydrophobic binding pocket of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer interface, which can explain the stronger affinity of CX14442 than BI-1001. Analysis of the binding mode of LEDGF/p75 with HIV-1 IN CCD reveals that the LEDGF/p75 integrase binding domain residues Ile365, Asp366, Phe406 and Val408 have significant contributions to the binding of the LEDGF/p75 to HIV1-IN. Remarkably, we found that binding of BI-1001 and CX14442 to HIV-1 IN CCD induced the structural rearrangements of the 140 s loop and oration displacements of the side chains of the three conserved catalytic residues Asp64, Asp116, and Glu152 located at the active site. These results we obtained will be valuable not only for understanding the allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs but also for the rational design of allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site.

  15. Structural basis of metallo-β-lactamase, serine-β-lactamase and penicillin-binding protein inhibition by cyclic boronates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brem, Jürgen; Cain, Ricky; Cahill, Samuel; McDonough, Michael A.; Clifton, Ian J.; Jiménez-Castellanos, Juan-Carlos; Avison, Matthew B.; Spencer, James; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-08-01

    β-Lactamases enable resistance to almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Pioneering work revealed that acyclic boronic acids can act as `transition state analogue' inhibitors of nucleophilic serine enzymes, including serine-β-lactamases. Here we report biochemical and biophysical analyses revealing that cyclic boronates potently inhibit both nucleophilic serine and zinc-dependent β-lactamases by a mechanism involving mimicking of the common tetrahedral intermediate. Cyclic boronates also potently inhibit the non-essential penicillin-binding protein PBP 5 by the same mechanism of action. The results open the way for development of dual action inhibitors effective against both serine- and metallo-β-lactamases, and which could also have antimicrobial activity through inhibition of PBPs.

  16. Human TFDP3, a novel DP protein, inhibits DNA binding and transactivation by E2F

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Huan; Di Stefano, Luisa; Tian, Chan

    2006-01-01

    The two known DP proteins, TFDP1 and -2, bind E2Fs to form heterodimers essential for high affinity DNA binding and efficient transcriptional activation/repression. Here we report the identification of a new member of the DP family, human TFDP3. Despite the high degree of sequence similarity, TFD...

  17. Inhibition of the vitamin B12 binding capacity of proteins by the hydrolysis product of cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenrych, W.; Ignatowicz, E.; Szczodrowska, E.

    1993-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of cyclophosphamide hydrolysis product (CPHP) on vitamin B 12 binding ability to proteins has been established. The ester N-(2-chloroethyl)-N'-(3-phosphopropyl)-etheylenediamine hydrochloride is probably responsible, in vitro, for blocking the protein binding sites. Preincubation of proteins with vitamin B 12 prevents the inhibitory effect of CPHP. (au)

  18. Identification of an allosteric binding site for RORγt inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepstra, M.; Leysen, S.; van Almen, G.; Miller, J.R.; Piesvaux, J.; Kutilek, V.; van Eenennaam, H.; Zhang, H.; Barr, K.; Nagpal, S.; Soisson, S.M.; Kornienko, M.; Wiley, K.; Elsen, N.; Sharma, S.; Correll, C.C.; Trotter, B.W.; Stelt, van der M.; Oubrie, A.; Ottmann, C.; Parthasarathy, G.; Brunsveld, L.

    2015-01-01

    RORγt is critical for the differentiation and proliferation of Th17 cells associated with several chronic autoimmune diseases. We report the discovery of a novel allosteric binding site on the nuclear receptor RORγt. Co-crystallization of the ligand binding domain (LBD) of RORγt with a series of

  19. Binding of Nickel to Testicular Glutamate–Ammonia Ligase Inhibits Its Enzymatic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUN, YINGBIAO; OU, YOUNG; CHENG, MIN; RUAN, YIBING; VAN DER HOORN, FRANS A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Exposure to nickel has been shown to cause damage to the testis in several animal models. It is not known if the testis expresses protein(s) that can bind nickel. To test this, we used a nickel-binding assay to isolate testicular nickel-binding proteins. We identified glutamate–ammonia ligase (GLUL) as a prominent nickel-binding protein by mass spectrometry. Protein analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed that GLUL is expressed in the testis, predominantly in interstitial cells. We determined that GLUL has a higher affinity for nickel than for its regular co-factor manganese. We produced an enzymatically active, recombinant GLUL protein. Upon binding, nickel interferes with the manganese-catalyzed enzymatic activity of recombinant GLUL protein. We also determined that GLUL activity in testes of animals exposed to nickel sulfate is reduced. Our results identify testicular GLUL as the first testicular protein shown to be affected by nickel exposure. PMID:21254280

  20. Nucleolin inhibits Fas ligand binding and suppresses Fas-mediated apoptosis in vivo via a surface nucleolin-Fas complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Jillian F; Berkova, Zuzana; Mathur, Rohit; Zhu, Haifeng; Braun, Frank K; Tao, Rong-Hua; Sabichi, Anita L; Ao, Xue; Maeng, Hoyoung; Samaniego, Felipe

    2013-06-06

    Resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis is associated with poor cancer outcomes and chemoresistance. To elucidate potential mechanisms of defective Fas signaling, we screened primary lymphoma cell extracts for Fas-associated proteins that would have the potential to regulate Fas signaling. An activation-resistant Fas complex selectively included nucleolin. We confirmed the presence of nucleolin-Fas complexes in B-cell lymphoma cells and primary tissues, and the absence of such complexes in B-lymphocytes from healthy donors. RNA-binding domain 4 and the glycine/arginine-rich domain of nucleolin were essential for its association with Fas. Nucleolin colocalized with Fas on the surface of B-cell lymphoma cells. Nucleolin knockdown sensitized BJAB cells to Fas ligand (FasL)-induced and Fas agonistic antibody-induced apoptosis through enhanced binding, suggesting that nucleolin blocks the FasL-Fas interaction. Mice transfected with nucleolin were protected from the lethal effects of agonistic anti-mouse Fas antibody (Jo2) and had lower rates of hepatocyte apoptosis, compared with vector and a non-Fas-binding mutant of nucleolin. Our results show that cell surface nucleolin binds Fas, inhibits ligand binding, and thus prevents induction of Fas-mediated apoptosis in B-cell lymphomas and may serve as a new therapeutic target.

  1. Inhibition of the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of bromodomain and extraterminal domain proteins interferes with adipogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goupille, Olivier [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Penglong, Tipparat [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Thalassemia Research Center, Mahidol University (Thailand); Kadri, Zahra; Granger-Locatelli, Marine [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Fucharoen, Suthat [Thalassemia Research Center, Mahidol University (Thailand); Maouche-Chrétien, Leila [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); INSERM, Paris (France); Prost, Stéphane [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Leboulch, Philippe [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); Thalassemia Research Center, Mahidol University (Thailand); Chrétien, Stany, E-mail: stany.chretien@cea.fr [CEA, Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies (IMETI), Fontenay-aux-Roses and Université Paris-Saclay, UMR-E 007 (France); INSERM, Paris (France)

    2016-04-15

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) domain family proteins are epigenetic modulators involved in the reading of acetylated lysine residues. The first BET protein inhibitor to be identified, (+)-JQ1, a thienotriazolo-1, 4-diazapine, binds selectively to the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of BET proteins. We evaluated the impact on adipogenesis of this druggable targeting of chromatin epigenetic readers, by investigating the physiological consequences of epigenetic modifications through targeting proteins binding to chromatin. JQ1 significantly inhibited the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white and brown adipocytes by down-regulating the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis, particularly those encoding the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ), the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPα) and, STAT5A and B. The expression of a constitutively activated STAT5B mutant did not prevent inhibition by JQ1. Thus, the association of BET/STAT5 is required for adipogenesis but STAT5 transcription activity is not the only target of JQ1. Treatment with JQ1 did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue (BAT). BET protein inhibition thus interferes with generation of adipose tissue from progenitors, confirming the importance of the connections between epigenetic mechanisms and specific adipogenic transcription factors. - Highlights: • JQ1 prevented the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white adipocytes. • JQ1 affected clonal cell expansion and abolished lipid accumulation. • JQ1 prevented the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into brown adipocytes. • JQ1 treatment did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue. • JQ1 decreased STAT5 expression, but STAT5B{sup ca} expression did not restore adipogenesis.

  2. Inhibition of the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of bromodomain and extraterminal domain proteins interferes with adipogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goupille, Olivier; Penglong, Tipparat; Kadri, Zahra; Granger-Locatelli, Marine; Fucharoen, Suthat; Maouche-Chrétien, Leila; Prost, Stéphane; Leboulch, Philippe; Chrétien, Stany

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) domain family proteins are epigenetic modulators involved in the reading of acetylated lysine residues. The first BET protein inhibitor to be identified, (+)-JQ1, a thienotriazolo-1, 4-diazapine, binds selectively to the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of BET proteins. We evaluated the impact on adipogenesis of this druggable targeting of chromatin epigenetic readers, by investigating the physiological consequences of epigenetic modifications through targeting proteins binding to chromatin. JQ1 significantly inhibited the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white and brown adipocytes by down-regulating the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis, particularly those encoding the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ), the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPα) and, STAT5A and B. The expression of a constitutively activated STAT5B mutant did not prevent inhibition by JQ1. Thus, the association of BET/STAT5 is required for adipogenesis but STAT5 transcription activity is not the only target of JQ1. Treatment with JQ1 did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue (BAT). BET protein inhibition thus interferes with generation of adipose tissue from progenitors, confirming the importance of the connections between epigenetic mechanisms and specific adipogenic transcription factors. - Highlights: • JQ1 prevented the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white adipocytes. • JQ1 affected clonal cell expansion and abolished lipid accumulation. • JQ1 prevented the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into brown adipocytes. • JQ1 treatment did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue. • JQ1 decreased STAT5 expression, but STAT5B"c"a expression did not restore adipogenesis.

  3. Calicivirus 3C-like proteinase inhibits cellular translation by cleavage of poly(A)-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge; Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Green, Kim Y; Lloyd, Richard E

    2004-08-01

    Caliciviruses are single-stranded RNA viruses that cause a wide range of diseases in both humans and animals, but little is known about the regulation of cellular translation during infection. We used two distinct calicivirus strains, MD145-12 (genus Norovirus) and feline calicivirus (FCV) (genus Vesivirus), to investigate potential strategies used by the caliciviruses to inhibit cellular translation. Recombinant 3C-like proteinases (r3CL(pro)) from norovirus and FCV were found to cleave poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) in the absence of other viral proteins. The norovirus r3CL(pro) PABP cleavage products were indistinguishable from those generated by poliovirus (PV) 3C(pro) cleavage, while the FCV r3CL(pro) products differed due to cleavage at an alternate cleavage site 24 amino acids downstream of one of the PV 3C(pro) cleavage sites. All cleavages by calicivirus or PV proteases separated the C-terminal domain of PABP that binds translation factors eIF4B and eRF3 from the N-terminal RNA-binding domain of PABP. The effect of PABP cleavage by the norovirus r3CL(pro) was analyzed in HeLa cell translation extracts, and the presence of r3CL(pro) inhibited translation of both endogenous and exogenous mRNAs. Translation inhibition was poly(A) dependent, and replenishment of the extracts with PABP restored translation. Analysis of FCV-infected feline kidney cells showed that the levels of de novo cellular protein synthesis decreased over time as virus-specific proteins accumulated, and cleavage of PABP occurred in virus-infected cells. Our data indicate that the calicivirus 3CL(pro), like PV 3C(pro), mediates the cleavage of PABP as part of its strategy to inhibit cellular translation. PABP cleavage may be a common mechanism among certain virus families to manipulate cellular translation.

  4. Comparison of Chlorpyrifos-Oxon and Paraoxon Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition Dynamics: Potential role of a peripheral binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kousba, Ahmed A.; Sultatos, L G.; Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2004-08-02

    The primary mechanism of action for organophosphorus (OP) insecticides involves the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by oxygenated metabolites (oxons). This inhibition has been attributed to the phosphorylation of the serine hydroxyl group located in the active site of the AChE molecule. The rate of phosphorylation is described by the bimolecular inhibitory rate constant (ki), which has been utilized for quantification of OP inhibitory capacity. It has been previously proposed that a peripheral binding site exists on the AChE molecule, which when occupied, reduces the capacity of additional oxon molecules to phosphorylate the active site. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the interaction of chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) and paraoxon (PO) with rat brain AChE using a modified Ellman assay in conjunction with a pharmacodynamic model to further assess the dynamics of AChE inhibition and the potential role of a peripheral binding site. The ki for AChE inhibition determined at oxon concentrations of 5 x 10{sup -4} 100 nM were 0.212 and 0.0216 nM-1h-1 for CPO and PO, respectively. The spontaneous reactivation rates of the inhibited AChE for CPO and PO were 0.087 and 0.078 h-1, respectively. In contrast, the ki estimated at a low oxon concentration (1 pM) were {approx} 1,000 and 10,000 -fold higher than those determined at high CPO and PO concentrations, respectively. At these low concentrations, the ki estimates were approximately similar for both CPO and PO (180 and 250 nM-1h-1, respectively). This implies that at low exposure concentrations, both oxons exhibited similar inhibitory potency in contrast to the marked difference exhibited at higher concentrations, which is consistent with the presence of a peripheral binding site on the AChE enzyme. These results support the potential importance of a secondary binding site associated with AChE kinetics, particularly at low environmentally relevant concentrations.

  5. Alkylation of phosphorothioated thrombin binding aptamers improves the selectivity of inhibition of tumor cell proliferation upon anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiantao; Zhu, Yuejie; Wang, Chao; Guan, Zhu; Zhang, Lihe; Yang, Zhenjun

    2017-07-01

    Recently, aptamers have been extensively researched for therapy and diagnostic applications. Thrombin-binding aptamer is a 15nt deoxyribonucleic acid screened by SELEX, it can specifically bind to thrombin and inhibit blood coagulation. Since it is also endowed with excellent antitumor activity, the intrinsic anticoagulation advantage converted to a main potential side effect for its further application in antiproliferative therapy. Site-specific alkylation was conducted through nucleophilic reaction of phosphorothioated TBAs using bromide reagents. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements were used to evaluate anticoagulation activity, and a CCK-8 assay was used to determine cell proliferation activity. The CD spectra of the modified TBAs were weakened, and their affinity for thrombin was dramatically reduced, as reflected by the K D values. On the other hand, their inhibition of A549 cells was retained. Incorporation of different alkyls apparently disrupted the binding of TBA to thrombin while maintaining the antitumor activity. A new modification strategy was established for the use of TBA as a more selective antitumor agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A viral suppressor of RNA silencing inhibits ARGONAUTE 1 function by precluding target RNA binding to pre-assembled RISC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenesi, Erzsébet; Carbonell, Alberto; Lózsa, Rita; Vértessy, Beáta; Lakatos, Lóránt

    2017-07-27

    In most eukaryotes, RNA silencing is an adaptive immune system regulating key biological processes including antiviral defense. To evade this response, viruses of plants, worms and insects have evolved viral suppressors of RNA silencing proteins (VSRs). Various VSRs, such as P1 from Sweet potato mild mottle virus (SPMMV), inhibit the activity of RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) including an ARGONAUTE (AGO) protein loaded with a small RNA. However, the specific mechanisms explaining this class of inhibition are unknown. Here, we show that SPMMV P1 interacts with AGO1 and AGO2 from Arabidopsis thaliana, but solely interferes with AGO1 function. Moreover, a mutational analysis of a newly identified zinc finger domain in P1 revealed that this domain could represent an effector domain as it is required for P1 suppressor activity but not for AGO1 binding. Finally, a comparative analysis of the target RNA binding capacity of AGO1 in the presence of wild-type or suppressor-defective P1 forms revealed that P1 blocks target RNA binding to AGO1. Our results describe the negative regulation of RISC, the small RNA containing molecular machine. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Inhibition of DNA binding of Sox2 by the SUMO conjugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruzoe, Shu; Ishihara, Ko; Uchimura, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Sugiko; Sekita, Yoko; Aoto, Takahiro; Saitoh, Hisato; Yuasa, Yasuhito; Niwa, Hitoshi; Kawasuji, Michio; Baba, Hideo; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi

    2006-01-01

    Sox2 is a member of the high mobility group (HMG) domain DNA-binding proteins for transcriptional control and chromatin architecture. The HMG domain of Sox2 binds the DNA to facilitate transactivation by the cooperative transcription factors such as Oct3/4. We report that mouse Sox2 is modified by SUMO at lysine 247. Substitution of the target lysine to arginine lost the sumoylation but little affected transcriptional potential or nuclear localization of Sox2. By contrast with the unmodified form, Sox2 fused to SUMO-1 did not augment transcription via the Fgf4 enhancer in the presence of Oct3/4. Further, SUMO-1-conjugated Sox2 at the lysine 247 or at the carboxyl terminus reduced the binding to the Fgf4 enhancer. These indicate that Sox2 sumoylation negatively regulates its transcriptional role through impairing the DNA binding

  8. Azadirachtin Interacts with the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Binding Domain of Its Receptors and Inhibits TNF-induced Biological Responses*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoh, Maikho; Kumar, Pankaj; Nagarajaram, Hampathalu A.; Manna, Sunil K.

    2010-01-01

    The role of azadirachtin, an active component of a medicinal plant Neem (Azadirachta indica), on TNF-induced cell signaling in human cell lines was investigated. Azadirachtin blocks TNF-induced activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and also expression of NF-κB-dependent genes such as adhesion molecules and cyclooxygenase 2. Azadirachtin inhibits the inhibitory subunit of NF-κB (IκBα) phosphorylation and thereby its degradation and RelA (p65) nuclear translocation. It blocks IκBα kinase (IKK) activity ex vivo, but not in vitro. Surprisingly, azadirachtin blocks NF-κB DNA binding activity in transfected cells with TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF)2, TNF receptor-associated death domain (TRADD), IKK, or p65, but not with TNFR, suggesting its effect is at the TNFR level. Azadirachtin blocks binding of TNF, but not IL-1, IL-4, IL-8, or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) with its respective receptors. Anti-TNFR antibody or TNF protects azadirachtin-mediated down-regulation of TNFRs. Further, in silico data suggest that azadirachtin strongly binds in the TNF binding site of TNFR. Overall, our data suggest that azadirachtin modulates cell surface TNFRs thereby decreasing TNF-induced biological responses. Thus, azadirachtin exerts an anti-inflammatory response by a novel pathway, which may be beneficial for anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:20018848

  9. Azadirachtin interacts with the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) binding domain of its receptors and inhibits TNF-induced biological responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoh, Maikho; Kumar, Pankaj; Nagarajaram, Hampathalu A; Manna, Sunil K

    2010-02-19

    The role of azadirachtin, an active component of a medicinal plant Neem (Azadirachta indica), on TNF-induced cell signaling in human cell lines was investigated. Azadirachtin blocks TNF-induced activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and also expression of NF-kappaB-dependent genes such as adhesion molecules and cyclooxygenase 2. Azadirachtin inhibits the inhibitory subunit of NF-kappaB (IkappaB alpha) phosphorylation and thereby its degradation and RelA (p65) nuclear translocation. It blocks IkappaB alpha kinase (IKK) activity ex vivo, but not in vitro. Surprisingly, azadirachtin blocks NF-kappaB DNA binding activity in transfected cells with TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF)2, TNF receptor-associated death domain (TRADD), IKK, or p65, but not with TNFR, suggesting its effect is at the TNFR level. Azadirachtin blocks binding of TNF, but not IL-1, IL-4, IL-8, or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) with its respective receptors. Anti-TNFR antibody or TNF protects azadirachtin-mediated down-regulation of TNFRs. Further, in silico data suggest that azadirachtin strongly binds in the TNF binding site of TNFR. Overall, our data suggest that azadirachtin modulates cell surface TNFRs thereby decreasing TNF-induced biological responses. Thus, azadirachtin exerts an anti-inflammatory response by a novel pathway, which may be beneficial for anti-inflammatory therapy.

  10. Enhanced striatial 3H-spiroperidol binding induced by chronic haloperidol treatment inhibited by peptides administered during the withdrawal phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhargava, H.N.

    1984-01-01

    Chronic intragastric administration of haloperidol (1.5 mg/kg/day) for 21 days followed by a 3-day withdrawal period resulted in the development of enhanced locomotor activity response to apomorphine, and an increase in the number of binding sites for 3 H-spiroperidol in the striatal membranes of the rat brain. Subcutaneous administration of Pro-Leu-Gly-NH 2 or cyclo-(Leu-Gly) in doses of 2 mg/kg/day given for 3-days after termination of haloperidol treatment inhibited the enhanced response to apomorphine, as well as the increases in the number of 3 H-spiroperidol binding sites in the striatum. If indeed, the supersensitivity of striatal dopamine receptors is one of the mechanisms in the development of tardive dyskinesia symptoms, the present results suggest that the above peptides may be helpful in ameliorating some of the symptoms of tardive dyskinesia induced by neuroleptic drugs. 31 references, 3 figures

  11. Identification of an Arabidopsis thaliana protein that binds to tomato mosaic virus genomic RNA and inhibits its multiplication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisaki, Koki; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2008-01-01

    The genomic RNAs of positive-strand RNA viruses carry RNA elements that play positive, or in some cases, negative roles in virus multiplication by interacting with viral and cellular proteins. In this study, we purified Arabidopsis thaliana proteins that specifically bind to 5' or 3' terminal regions of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) genomic RNA, which contain important regulatory elements for translation and RNA replication, and identified these proteins by mass spectrometry analyses. One of these host proteins, named BTR1, harbored three heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K-homology RNA-binding domains and preferentially bound to RNA fragments that contained a sequence around the initiation codon of the 130K and 180K replication protein genes. The knockout and overexpression of BTR1 specifically enhanced and inhibited, respectively, ToMV multiplication in inoculated A. thaliana leaves, while such effect was hardly detectable in protoplasts. These results suggest that BTR1 negatively regulates the local spread of ToMV

  12. Pregnancy-specific glycoproteins bind integrin αIIbβ3 and inhibit the platelet-fibrinogen interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Daniel K; Kiely, Patrick A; Golla, Kalyan; Allen, Seamus; Martin, Kenneth; O'Riordan, Ronan T; Ball, Melanie; Aplin, John D; Singer, Bernhard B; Caplice, Noel; Moran, Niamh; Moore, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs) are immunoglobulin superfamily members encoded by multigene families in rodents and primates. In human pregnancy, PSGs are secreted by the syncytiotrophoblast, a fetal tissue, and reach a concentration of up to 400 ug/ml in the maternal bloodstream at term. Human and mouse PSGs induce release of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and TGFβ1 from monocytes, macrophages, and other cell types, suggesting an immunoregulatory function. RGD tri-peptide motifs in the majority of human PSGs suggest that they may function like snake venom disintegrins, which bind integrins and inhibit interactions with ligands. We noted that human PSG1 has a KGD, rather than an RGD motif. The presence of a KGD in barbourin, a platelet integrin αIIbβ3 antagonist found in snake venom, suggested that PSG1 may be a selective αIIbβ3 ligand. Here we show that human PSG1 binds αIIbβ3 and inhibits the platelet - fibrinogen interaction. Unexpectedly, however, the KGD is not critical as multiple PSG1 domains independently bind and inhibit αIIbβ3 function. Human PSG9 and mouse Psg23 are also inhibitory suggesting conservation of this function across primate and rodent PSG families. Our results suggest that in species with haemochorial placentation, in which maternal blood is in direct contact with fetal trophoblast, the high expression level of PSGs reflects a requirement to antagonise abundant (3 mg/ml) fibrinogen in the maternal circulation, which may be necessary to prevent platelet aggregation and thrombosis in the prothrombotic maternal environment of pregnancy.

  13. Amyloid-beta binds catalase with high affinity and inhibits hydrogen peroxide breakdown.

    OpenAIRE

    Milton, N G

    1999-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) specifically bound purified catalase with high affinity and inhibited catalase breakdown of H(2)O(2). The Abeta-induced catalase inhibition involved formation of the inactive catalase Compound II and was reversible. CatalaseAbeta interactions provide rapid functional assays for the cytotoxic domain of Abeta and suggest a mechanism for some of the observed actions of Abeta plus catalase in vitro.

  14. VP24-Karyopherin Alpha Binding Affinities Differ between Ebolavirus Species, Influencing Interferon Inhibition and VP24 Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Toni M; Edwards, Megan R; Diederichs, Audrey; Alinger, Joshua B; Leung, Daisy W; Amarasinghe, Gaya K; Basler, Christopher F

    2017-02-15

    Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV), Bundibugyo ebolavirus (BDBV), and Reston ebolavirus (RESTV) belong to the same genus but exhibit different virulence properties. VP24 protein, a structural protein present in all family members, blocks interferon (IFN) signaling and likely contributes to virulence. Inhibition of IFN signaling by EBOV VP24 (eVP24) involves its interaction with the NPI-1 subfamily of karyopherin alpha (KPNA) nuclear transporters. Here, we evaluated eVP24, BDBV VP24 (bVP24), and RESTV VP24 (rVP24) interactions with three NPI-1 subfamily KPNAs (KPNA1, KPNA5, and KPNA6). Using purified proteins, we demonstrated that each VP24 binds to each of the three NPI-1 KPNAs. bVP24, however, exhibited approximately 10-fold-lower KPNA binding affinity than either eVP24 or rVP24. Cell-based assays also indicate that bVP24 exhibits decreased KPNA interaction, decreased suppression of IFN induced gene expression, and a decreased half-life in transfected cells compared to eVP24 or rVP24. Amino acid sequence alignments between bVP24 and eVP24 also identified residues within and surrounding the previously defined eVP24-KPNA5 binding interface that decrease eVP24-KPNA affinity or bVP24-KPNA affinity. VP24 mutations that lead to reduced KPNA binding affinity also decrease IFN inhibition and shorten VP24 half-lives. These data identify novel functional differences in VP24-KPNA interaction and reveal a novel impact of the VP24-KPNA interaction on VP24 stability. The interaction of Ebola virus (EBOV) VP24 protein with host karyopherin alpha (KPNA) proteins blocks type I interferon (IFN) signaling, which is a central component of the host innate immune response to viral infection. Here, we quantitatively compared the interactions of VP24 proteins from EBOV and two members of the Ebolavirus genus, Bundibugyo virus (BDBV) and Reston virus (RESTV). The data reveal lower binding affinity of the BDBV VP24 (bVP24) for KPNAs and demonstrate that the interaction with KPNA modulates inhibition

  15. Ebselen and congeners inhibit NADPH oxidase 2-dependent superoxide generation by interrupting the binding of regulatory subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan M E; Min, Jaeki; Ganesh, Thota; Diebold, Becky; Kawahara, Tsukasa; Zhu, Yerun; McCoy, James; Sun, Aiming; Snyder, James P; Fu, Haian; Du, Yuhong; Lewis, Iestyn; Lambeth, J David

    2012-06-22

    NADPH oxidases (Nox) are a primary source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which function in normal physiology and, when overproduced, in pathophysiology. Recent studies using mice deficient in Nox2 identify this isoform as a novel target against Nox2-implicated inflammatory diseases. Nox2 activation depends on the binding of the proline-rich domain of its heterodimeric partner p22phox to p47phox. A high-throughput screen that monitored this interaction via fluorescence polarization identified ebselen and several of its analogs as inhibitors. Medicinal chemistry was performed to explore structure-activity relationships and to optimize potency. Ebselen and analogs potently inhibited Nox1 and Nox2 activity but were less effective against other isoforms. Ebselen also blocked translocation of p47phox to neutrophil membranes. Thus, ebselen and its analogs represent a class of compounds that inhibit ROS generation by interrupting the assembly of Nox2-activating regulatory subunits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inhibition of Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP-response Element-binding Protein (CREB-binding Protein (CBP/β-Catenin Reduces Liver Fibrosis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Osawa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Wnt/β-catenin is involved in every aspect of embryonic development and in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, and is also implicated in organ fibrosis. However, the role of β-catenin-mediated signaling on liver fibrosis remains unclear. To explore this issue, the effects of PRI-724, a selective inhibitor of the cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP/β-catenin interaction, on liver fibrosis were examined using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4- or bile duct ligation (BDL-induced mouse liver fibrosis models. Following repetitive CCl4 administrations, the nuclear translocation of β-catenin was observed only in the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. PRI-724 treatment reduced the fibrosis induced by CCl4 or BDL. C-82, an active form of PRI-724, inhibited the activation of isolated primary mouse quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs and promoted cell death in culture-activated HSCs. During the fibrosis resolution period, an increase in F4/80+ CD11b+ and Ly6Clow CD11b+ macrophages was induced by CCl4 and was sustained for two weeks thereafter, even after having stopped CCl4 treatment. PRI-724 accelerated the resolution of CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, and this was accompanied by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, MMP-2, and MMP-8 expression in intrahepatic leukocytes. In conclusion, targeting the CBP/β-catenin interaction may become a new therapeutic strategy in treating liver fibrosis.

  17. Harmaline competitively inhibits [3H]MK-801 binding to the NMDA receptor in rabbit brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, W; Aloyo, V J; Harvey, J A

    1997-10-03

    Harmaline, a beta-carboline derivative, is known to produce tremor through a direct activation of cells in the inferior olive. However, the receptor(s) through which harmaline acts remains unknown. It was recently reported that the tremorogenic actions of harmaline could be blocked by the noncompetitive NMDA channel blocker, MK-801. This study examined whether the blockade of harmaline's action, in the rabbit, by MK-801 was due to a pharmacological antagonism at the MK-801 binding site. This was accomplished by measurement of [3H]MK-801 binding in membrane fractions derived from tissue containing the inferior olivary nucleus and from cerebral cortex. Harmaline completely displaced saturable [3H]MK-801 binding in both the inferior olive and cortex with apparent IC50 values of 60 and 170 microM, respectively. These IC50 values are consistent with the high doses of harmaline required to produce tremor, e.g., 10-30 mg/kg. Non-linear curve fitting analysis of [3H]MK-801 saturation experiments indicated that [3H]MK-801 bound to a single site and that harmaline's displacement of [3H]MK-801 binding to the NMDA receptor was competitive as indicated by a shift in Kd but not in Bmax. In addition, a Schild plot gave a slope that was not significantly different from 1 indicating that harmaline was producing a displacement of [3H]MK-801 from its binding site within the NMDA cation channel and not through an action at the glutamate or other allosteric sites on the NMDA receptor. These findings provide in vitro evidence that the competitive blockade of harmaline-induced tremor by MK-801 occurs within the calcium channel coupled to the NMDA receptor. Our hypothesis is that harmaline produces tremor by acting as an inverse agonist at the MK-801 binding site and thus opening the cation channel.

  18. BART Inhibits Pancreatic Cancer Cell Invasion by Rac1 Inactivation through Direct Binding to Active Rac1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Taniuchi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We report that Binder of Arl Two (BART plays a role in inhibiting cell invasion by regulating the activity of the Rho small guanosine triphosphatase protein Rac1 in pancreatic cancer cells. BART was originally identified as a binding partner of ADP-ribosylation factor-like 2, a small G protein implicated as a regulator of microtubule dynamics and folding. BART interacts with active forms of Rac1, and the BART-Rac1 complex localizes at the leading edges of migrating cancer cells. Suppression of BART increases active Rac1, thereby increasing cell invasion. Treatment of pancreatic cancer cells in which BART is stably knocked down with a Rac1 inhibitor decreases invasiveness. Thus, BART-dependent inhibition of cell invasion is likely associated with decreased active Rac1. Suppression of BART induces membrane ruffling and lamellipodial protrusion and increases peripheral actin structures in membrane ruffles at the edges of lamellipodia. The Rac1 inhibitor inhibits the lamellipodia formation that is stimulated by suppression of BART. Our results imply that BART regulates actin-cytoskeleton rearrangements at membrane ruffles through modulation of the activity of Rac1, which, in turn, inhibits pancreatic cancer cell invasion.

  19. A Single-Domain Llama Antibody Potently Inhibits the Enzymatic Activity of Botulinum Neurotoxin by Binding to the Non-Catalytic [alpha]-Exosite Binding Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Jianbo; Thompson, Aaron A.; Fan, Yongfeng; Lou, Jianlong; Conrad, Fraser; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Marks, James D. (UIUC); (Scripps); (UCSF)

    2010-08-13

    Ingestion or inhalation of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) results in botulism, a severe and frequently fatal disease. Current treatments rely on antitoxins, which, while effective, cannot reverse symptoms once BoNT has entered the neuron. For treatments that can reverse intoxication, interest has focused on developing inhibitors of the enzymatic BoNT light chain (BoNT Lc). Such inhibitors typically mimic substrate and bind in or around the substrate cleavage pocket. To explore the full range of binding sites for serotype A light chain (BoNT/A Lc) inhibitors, we created a library of non-immune llama single-domain VHH (camelid heavy-chain variable region derived from heavy-chain-only antibody) antibodies displayed on the surface of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Library selection on BoNT/A Lc yielded 15 yeast-displayed VHH with equilibrium dissociation constants (K{sub d}) from 230 to 0.03 nM measured by flow cytometry. Eight of 15 VHH inhibited the cleavage of substrate SNAP25 (synaptosome-associated protein of 25,000 Da) by BoNT/A Lc. The most potent VHH (Aa1) had a solution K{sub d} for BoNT/A Lc of 1.47 x 10{sup -10} M and an IC{sub 50} (50% inhibitory concentration) of 4.7 x 10{sup -10} M and was resistant to heat denaturation and reducing conditions. To understand the mechanism by which Aa1 inhibited catalysis, we solved the X-ray crystal structure of the BoNT/A Lc-Aa1 VHH complex at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals that the Aa1 VHH binds in the {alpha}-exosite of the BoNT/A Lc, far from the active site for catalysis. The study validates the utility of non-immune llama VHH libraries as a source of enzyme inhibitors and identifies the BoNT/A Lc {alpha}-exosite as a target for inhibitor development.

  20. Synthesis, DNA Binding and Topoisomerase I Inhibition Activity of Thiazacridine and Imidazacridine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Almeida Lafayette

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Thiazacridine and imidazacridine derivatives have shown promising results as tumors suppressors in some cancer cell lines. For a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these compounds, binding studies of 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-3-amino-2-thioxo-thiazolidin-4-one, 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-thiazolidin-4-one, 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-imidazolidin-4-one and 3-acridin-9-ylmethyl-thiazolidin-2,4-dione with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA by electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy were performed. The binding constants ranged from 1.46 × 104 to 6.01 × 104 M−1. UV-Vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism measurements indicated that the compounds interact effectively with ctDNA, both by intercalation or external binding. They demonstrated inhibitory activities to human topoisomerase I, except for 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-4-one. These results provide insight into the DNA binding mechanism of imidazacridines and thiazacridines.

  1. Inhibition of E2F-1 transactivation by direct binding of the retinoblastoma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Harlow, E; Fattaey, A

    1993-01-01

    Loss of a functional retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene product, pRB, is a key step in the development of many human tumors. pRB is a negative regulator of cell proliferation and appears to participate in control of entry into the S phase of the cell cycle. The recent demonstration that pRB binds...

  2. High-Throughput Testing of Antibody-Dependent Binding Inhibition of Placental Malaria Parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten A; Salanti, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The particular virulence of Plasmodium falciparum manifests in diverse severe malaria syndromes as cerebral malaria, severe anemia and placental malaria. The cause of both the severity and the diversity of infection outcome, is the ability of the infected erythrocyte (IE) to bind a range......-throughput assay used in the preclinical and clinical development of a VAR2CSA based vaccine against placental malaria....

  3. A novel multiplex poliovirus binding inhibition assay applicable for large serosurveillance and vaccine studies, without the use of live poliovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepp, Rutger M; Berbers, Guy A M; Ferreira, José A; Reimerink, Johan H; van der Klis, Fiona R

    2017-03-01

    Large-scale serosurveillance or vaccine studies for poliovirus using the "gold standard" WHO neutralisation test (NT) are very laborious and time consuming. With the polio eradication at hand and with the removal of live attenuated Sabin strains from the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), starting with type 2 (as of April 2016), laboratories will need to conform to much more stringent laboratory biosafety regulations when handling live poliovirus strains. In this study, a poliovirus binding inhibition multiplex immunoassay (polio MIA) using inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV-Salk) was developed for simultaneous quantification of serum antibodies directed to all three poliovirus types. Our assay shows a good correlation with the NT and an excellent correlation with the ELISA-based binding inhibition assay (POBI). The assay is highly type-specific and reproducible. Additionally, serum sample throughput increases about fivefold relative to NT and POBI and the amount of serum needed is reduced by more than 90%. In conclusion, the polio MIA can be used as a safe and high throughput application, especially for large-scale surveillance and vaccine studies, reducing laboratory time and serum amounts needed. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibition of tumor metastasis by a growth factor receptor bound protein 2 Src homology 2 domain-binding antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubellino, Alessio; Gao, Yang; Lee, Sunmin; Lee, Min-Jung; Vasselli, James R; Medepalli, Sampath; Trepel, Jane B; Burke, Terrence R; Bottaro, Donald P

    2007-07-01

    Metastasis, the primary cause of death in most forms of cancer, is a multistep process whereby cells from the primary tumor spread systemically and colonize distant new sites. Blocking critical steps in this process could potentially inhibit tumor metastasis and dramatically improve cancer survival rates; however, our understanding of metastasis at the molecular level is still rudimentary. Growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2) is a widely expressed adapter protein with roles in epithelial cell growth and morphogenesis, as well as angiogenesis, making it a logical target for anticancer drug development. We have previously shown that a potent antagonist of Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-binding, C90, blocks growth factor-driven cell motility in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. We now report that C90 inhibits metastasis in vivo in two aggressive tumor models, without affecting primary tumor growth rate. These results support the potential efficacy of this compound in reducing the metastatic spread of primary solid tumors and establish a critical role for Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-mediated interactions in this process.

  5. Slow briefs: slow food....slow architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Crotch, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    We are moving too fast…fast lives, fast cars, fast food…..and fast architecture. We are caught up in a world that allows no time to stop and think; to appreciate and enjoy all the really important things in our lives. Recent responses to this seemingly unstoppable trend are the growing movements of Slow Food and Cittaslow. Both initiatives are, within their own realms, attempting to reverse speed, homogeny, expediency and globalisation, considering the values of regionality, patience, craft, ...

  6. RNA-binding protein Dnd1 inhibits microRNA access to target mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kedde, Martijn; Strasser, Markus J; Boldajipour, Bijan

    2007-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are inhibitors of gene expression capable of controlling processes in normal development and cancer. In mammals, miRNAs use a seed sequence of 6-8 nucleotides (nt) to associate with 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs) of mRNAs and inhibit their expression. Intriguingly, occasionally...

  7. Halide Binding and Inhibition of Laccase Copper Clusters: The Role of Reorganization Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2015-01-01

    Laccase-like proteins are multicopper oxidases involved in several biological and industrial processes. Their application is commonly limited due to inhibition by fluoride and chloride, and as-isolated proteins are often substantially activated by heat, suggesting that multiple redox states can c...

  8. Dietary flavonoids bind to mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 in nuclei, and inhibit chemical induced mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Fusao, E-mail: fhirata@wayne.edu; Harada, Takasuke; Corcoran, George B.; Hirata, Aiko

    2014-01-15

    Highlight: • Nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 is involved in DNA damage induced mutagenesis. • Dietary flavonoids bind to and inhibit purified mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 helicase. • Dietary flavonoids show anti-mutagenic action. • Annexin A1 may serve as a putative target of cancer chemoprevention by flavonoids. - Abstract: In order to investigate the mechanisms of anti-mutagenic action by dietary flavonoids, we investigated if they inhibit mutation of the thymidine kinase (tk) gene in L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells. Silibinin, quercetin and genistein suppressed mutation of the tk gene induced in L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and As{sup 3+}. Flavone and flavonol were less effective. To establish that mutation of the tk gene in L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells by MMS and As{sup 3+} is mediated through mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1, L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells were treated with annexin A1 anti-sense oligonucleotide. The treatment reduced mRNA as well as protein levels of annexin A1, and suppressed mutation of the tk gene. Nuclear extracts from L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells catalyzed translesion DNA synthesis with an oligonucleotide template containing 8-oxo-guanosine in an annexin A1 dependent manner. This translesion DNA synthesis was inhibited by the anti-mutagenic flavonoids, silibinin, quercetin and genistein, in a concentration dependent manner, but only slightly by flavone and flavonol. Because these observations implicate involvement of annexin A1 in mutagenesis, we examined if flavonoids suppress nuclear annexin A1 helicase activity. Silibinin, quercetin and genistein inhibited ssDNA binding, DNA chain annealing and DNA unwinding activities of purified nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1. Flavone and flavonol were ineffective. The apparent direct binding of anti-mutagenic flavonoids to the annexin A1 molecule was supported by fluorescence quenching. Taken together, these findings illustrate that nuclear annexin A1 may be

  9. Dietary flavonoids bind to mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 in nuclei, and inhibit chemical induced mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Fusao; Harada, Takasuke; Corcoran, George B.; Hirata, Aiko

    2014-01-01

    Highlight: • Nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 is involved in DNA damage induced mutagenesis. • Dietary flavonoids bind to and inhibit purified mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 helicase. • Dietary flavonoids show anti-mutagenic action. • Annexin A1 may serve as a putative target of cancer chemoprevention by flavonoids. - Abstract: In order to investigate the mechanisms of anti-mutagenic action by dietary flavonoids, we investigated if they inhibit mutation of the thymidine kinase (tk) gene in L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells. Silibinin, quercetin and genistein suppressed mutation of the tk gene induced in L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and As 3+ . Flavone and flavonol were less effective. To establish that mutation of the tk gene in L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells by MMS and As 3+ is mediated through mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1, L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells were treated with annexin A1 anti-sense oligonucleotide. The treatment reduced mRNA as well as protein levels of annexin A1, and suppressed mutation of the tk gene. Nuclear extracts from L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells catalyzed translesion DNA synthesis with an oligonucleotide template containing 8-oxo-guanosine in an annexin A1 dependent manner. This translesion DNA synthesis was inhibited by the anti-mutagenic flavonoids, silibinin, quercetin and genistein, in a concentration dependent manner, but only slightly by flavone and flavonol. Because these observations implicate involvement of annexin A1 in mutagenesis, we examined if flavonoids suppress nuclear annexin A1 helicase activity. Silibinin, quercetin and genistein inhibited ssDNA binding, DNA chain annealing and DNA unwinding activities of purified nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1. Flavone and flavonol were ineffective. The apparent direct binding of anti-mutagenic flavonoids to the annexin A1 molecule was supported by fluorescence quenching. Taken together, these findings illustrate that nuclear annexin A1 may be a novel

  10. Multi-site TBT binding skews the inhibition of oligomycin on the mitochondrial Mg-ATPase in Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesci, Salvatore; Ventrella, Vittoria; Trombetti, Fabiana; Pirini, Maurizio; Pagliarani, Alessandra

    2011-07-01

    Tributyltin (TBT), a persistent lipophilic contaminant found especially in the aquatic environment, is known to be toxic to mitochondria with the F(1)F(0)-ATPase as main target. Recently our research group pointed out that in mussel digestive gland mitochondria TBT, apart from decreasing the catalytic efficiency of Mg-ATPase activity, at concentrations ≥1.0 μM in the ATPase reaction medium lessens the enzyme inhibition promoted by the specific inhibitor oligomycin. The present work aims at casting light on the mechanisms involved in the TBT-driven enzyme desensitization to inhibitors, a poorly explored field. The mitochondrial Mg-ATPase desensitization is shown to be confined to inhibitors of transmembrane domain F(0), namely oligomycin and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD). Accordingly, quercetin, which binds to catalytic portion F(1), maintains its inhibitory efficiency in the presence of TBT. Among the possible mechanisms involved in the Mg-ATPase desensitization to oligomycin by ≥1.0 μM TBT concentrations, a structural detachment of the two F(1) and F(0) domains does not occur according to experimental data. On the other hand TBT covalently binds to thiol groups on the enzyme structure, which are apparently only available at TBT concentrations approaching 20 μM. TBT is able to interact with multiple sites on the enzyme structure by bonds of different nature. While electrostatic interactions with F(0) proton channel are likely to be responsible for the ATPase activity inhibition, possible changes in the redox state of thiol groups on the protein structure due to TBT binding may promote structural changes in the enzyme structure leading to the observed F(1)F(0)-ATPase oligomycin sensitivity loss. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. A Novel, “Double-Clamp” Binding Mode for Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mona N.; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A.; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-01-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be ∼15 times more potent (IC50 = 0.27±0.07 µM) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC50 = 4.0±1.8 µM). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This “double-clamp” binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors. PMID:22276118

  12. A novel, "double-clamp" binding mode for human heme oxygenase-1 inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona N Rahman

    Full Text Available The development of heme oxygenase (HO inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308. Using a carbon monoxide (CO formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be ∼15 times more potent (IC(50 = 0.27±0.07 µM than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC(50 = 4.0±1.8 µM. The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This "double-clamp" binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors.

  13. A novel, "double-clamp" binding mode for human heme oxygenase-1 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mona N; Vlahakis, Jason Z; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-01-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be ∼15 times more potent (IC(50) = 0.27±0.07 µM) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC(50) = 4.0±1.8 µM). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This "double-clamp" binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors.

  14. Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Binds Core Histones and Inhibits Nucleosome Formation in Human Liver Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Tonya M.; Barthel, Sebastian; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (re)emerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C) is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection. PMID:21909430

  15. Chicken galectin-1B inhibits Newcastle disease virus adsorption and replication through binding to hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junfeng; Han, Zongxi; Qi, Tianming; Zhao, Ran; Liu, Shengwang

    2017-12-08

    Galectin-1 is an important immunoregulatory factor and can mediate the host-pathogen interaction via binding glycans on the surface of various viruses. We previously reported that avian respiratory viruses, including lentogenic Newcastle disease virus (NDV), can induce up-regulation of chicken galectin (CG)-1B in the primary target organ. In this study, we investigated whether CG-1B participated in the infectious process of NDV in chickens. We demonstrated that velogenic NDV induced up-regulation of CG-1B in target organs. We also found that CG-1B directly bound to NDV virions and inhibited their hemagglutination activity in vitro We confirmed that CG-1B interacted with NDV hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein, in which the specific G4 N -glycans significantly contributed to the interaction between CG-1B and HN glycoprotein. The presence of extracellular CG-1B, rather than the internalization process, inhibited adsorption of NDV. The interaction between intracellular CG-1B and NDV HN glycoproteins inhibited cell-surface expression of HN glycoprotein and reduced the titer of progeny virus in NDV-infected DF-1 cells. Significantly, the replication of parental and HN glycosylation mutant viruses in CG-1B knockdown and overexpression cells demonstrated that the replication of NDV was correlated with the expression of CG-1B in a specific glycan-dependent manner. Collectively, our results indicate that CG-1B has anti-NDV activity by binding to N -glycans on HN glycoprotein. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Engineered chimeric peptides with antimicrobial and titanium-binding functions to inhibit biofilm formation on Ti implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hongjuan; Yuan, Yang; Adayi, Aidina; Zhang, Xu; Song, Xin; Gong, Lei; Zhang, Xi; Gao, Ping

    2018-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) implants have been commonly used in oral medicine. However, despite their widespread clinical application, these implants are susceptible to failure induced by microbial infection due to bacterial biofilm formation. Immobilization of chimeric peptides with antibacterial properties on the Ti surface may be a promising antimicrobial approach to inhibit biofilm formation. Here, chimeric peptides were designed by connecting three sequences (hBD-3-1/2/3) derived from human β-defensin-3 (hBD-3) with Ti-binding peptide-l (TBP-l: RKLPDAGPMHTW) via a triple glycine (G) linker to modify Ti surfaces. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the properties of individual domains of the chimeric peptides were evaluated for their binding activity toward the Ti surface. The antimicrobial and anti-biofilm efficacy of the peptides against initial settlers, Streptococcus oralis (S. oralis), Streptococcus gordonii (S. gordonii) and Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis), was evaluated with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) were used to study cell membrane changes and the underlying antimicrobial mechanism. Compared with the other two peptides, TBP-1-GGG-hBD3-3 presented stronger antibacterial activity and remained stable in saliva and serum. Therefore, it was chosen as the best candidate to modify Ti surfaces in this study. This peptide inhibited the growth of initial streptococci and biofilm formation on Ti surfaces with no cytotoxicity to MC3T3-E1 cells. Disruption of the integrity of bacterial membranes and decreased expression of adhesion protein genes from S. gordonii revealed aspects of the antibacterial mechanism of TBP-1-GGG-hBD3-3. We conclude that engineered chimeric peptides with antimicrobial activity provide a potential solution for inhibiting biofilm formation on Ti surfaces to reduce or prevent the occurrence of peri

  17. The galactose-binding lectin isolated from Bauhinia bauhinioides Mart seeds inhibits neutrophil rolling and adhesion via primary cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girão, Deysen Kerlla Fernandes Bezerra; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; de Freitas Pires, Alana; Martins, Timna Varela; Franco, Álvaro Xavier; Morais, Cecília Mendes; Santiago do Nascimento, Kyria; Delatorre, Plinio; da Silva, Helton Colares; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio; Soares, Pedro Marcos Gomes

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the amino acid sequence and anti-inflammatory effect of Bauhinia bauhinioides (BBL) lectin were evaluated. Tandem mass spectrometry revealed that BBL possesses 86 amino acid residues. BBL (1 mg/kg) intravenously injected in rats 30 min prior to inflammatory stimuli inhibited the cellular edema induced by carrageenan in only the second phase (21% - 3 h, 19% - 4 h) and did not alter the osmotic edema induced by dextran. BBL also inhibited carrageenan peritoneal neutrophil migration (51%), leukocyte rolling (58%) and adhesion (68%) and the neutrophil migration induced by TNF-α (64%). These effects were reversed by the association of BBL with galactose, demonstrating that the carbohydrate-binding domain is essential for lectin activity. In addition, BBL reduced myeloperoxidase activity (84%) and TNF-α (68%) and IL1-β (47%) levels. In conclusion, the present investigation demonstrated that BBL contains highly homologous isolectins, resulting in a total of 86 amino acid residues, and exhibits anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting neutrophil migration by reducing TNF-α and IL1-β levels via the lectin domain. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Culture medium, gas atmosphere and MAPK inhibition affect regulation of RNA-binding protein targets during mouse preimplantation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Michele D; Watson, Patricia H; Watson, Andrew J

    2011-11-01

    During oogenesis, mammalian oocytes accumulate maternal mRNAs that support the embryo until embryonic genome activation. RNA-binding proteins (RBP) may regulate the stability and turnover of maternal and embryonic mRNAs. We hypothesised that varying embryo culture conditions, such as culture medium, oxygen tension and MAPK inhibition, affects regulation of RBPs and their targets during preimplantation development. STAU1, ELAVL1, KHSRP and ZFP36 proteins and mRNAs were detected throughout mouse preimplantation development, whereas Elavl2 mRNA decreased after the two-cell stage. Potential target mRNAs of RBP regulation, Gclc, Slc2a1 and Slc7a1 were detected during mouse preimplantation development. Gclc mRNA was significantly elevated in embryos cultured in Whitten's medium compared with embryos cultured in KSOMaa, and Gclc mRNA was elevated under high-oxygen conditions. Inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway reduced Slc7a1 mRNA expression while inhibition of ERK increased Slc2a1 mRNA expression. The half-lives of the potential RBP mRNA targets are not regulated in parallel; Slc2a1 mRNA displayed the longest half-life. Our results indicate that mRNAs and proteins encoding five RBPs are present during preimplantation development and more importantly, demonstrate that expression of RBP target mRNAs are regulated by culture medium, gas atmosphere and MAPK pathways.

  19. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus infection by lactoferrin is dependent on interference with the virus binding to glycosaminoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, Magda; Trybala, Edward; Superti, Fabiana; Johansson, Maria; Bergstroem, Tomas

    2004-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that lactoferrin inhibits herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection during the very early phases of the viral replicative cycle. In the present work we investigated the mechanism of the antiviral activity of lactoferrin in mutant glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-deficient cells. Bovine lactoferrin (BLf) was a strong inhibitor of HSV-1 infection in cells expressing either heparan sulfate (HS) or chondroitin sulfate (CS) or both, but was ineffective or less efficient in GAG-deficient cells or in cells treated with GAG-degrading enzymes. In contrast to wild-type HSV-1, virus mutants devoid of glycoprotein C (gC) were significantly less inhibited by lactoferrin in GAG-expressing cells, indicating that lactoferrin interfered with the binding of viral gC to cell surface HS and/or CS. Finally, we demonstrated that lactoferrin bound directly to both HS and CS isolated from surfaces of the studied cells, as well as to commercial preparations of GAG chains. The results support the hypothesis that the inhibition of HSV-1 infectivity by lactoferrin is dependent on its interaction with cell surface GAG chains of HS and CS

  20. Cytoplasmic translocation of polypyrimidine tract-binding protein and its binding to viral RNA during Japanese encephalitis virus infection inhibits virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Bhullar

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV has a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA genome containing a single open reading frame flanked by the 5'- and 3'-non-coding regions (NCRs. The virus genome replicates via a negative-sense RNA intermediate. The NCRs and their complementary sequences in the negative-sense RNA are the sites for assembly of the RNA replicase complex thereby regulating the RNA synthesis and virus replication. In this study, we show that the 55-kDa polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB interacts in vitro with both the 5'-NCR of the positive-sense genomic RNA--5NCR(+, and its complementary sequence in the negative-sense replication intermediate RNA--3NCR(-. The interaction of viral RNA with PTB was validated in infected cells by JEV RNA co-immunoprecipitation and JEV RNA-PTB colocalization experiments. Interestingly, we observed phosphorylation-coupled translocation of nuclear PTB to cytoplasmic foci that co-localized with JEV RNA early during JEV infection. Our studies employing the PTB silencing and over-expression in cultured cells established an inhibitory role of PTB in JEV replication. Using RNA-protein binding assay we show that PTB competitively inhibits association of JEV 3NCR(- RNA with viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5 protein, an event required for the synthesis of the plus-sense genomic RNA. cAMP is known to promote the Protein kinase A (PKA-mediated PTB phosphorylation. We show that cells treated with a cAMP analogue had an enhanced level of phosphorylated PTB in the cytoplasm and a significantly suppressed JEV replication. Data presented here show a novel, cAMP-induced, PTB-mediated, innate host response that could effectively suppress JEV replication in mammalian cells.

  1. Nuclear Factor 90, a cellular dsRNA binding protein inhibits the HIV Rev-export function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St-Laurent Georges

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV Rev protein is known to facilitate export of incompletely spliced and unspliced viral transcripts to the cytoplasm, a necessary step in virus life cycle. The Rev-mediated nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of nascent viral transcripts, dependents on interaction of Rev with the RRE RNA structural element present in the target RNAs. The C-terminal variant of dsRNA-binding nuclear protein 90 (NF90ctv has been shown to markedly attenuate viral replication in stably transduced HIV-1 target cell line. Here we examined a mechanism of interference of viral life cycle involving Rev-NF90ctv interaction. Results Since Rev:RRE complex formations depend on protein:RNA and protein:protein interactions, we investigated whether the expression of NF90ctv might interfere with Rev-mediated export of RRE-containing transcripts. When HeLa cells expressed both NF90ctv and Rev protein, we observed that NF90ctv inhibited the Rev-mediated RNA transport. In particular, three regions of NF90ctv protein are involved in blocking Rev function. Moreover, interaction of NF90ctv with the RRE RNA resulted in the expression of a reporter protein coding sequences linked to the RRE structure. Moreover, Rev influenced the subcellular localization of NF90ctv, and this process is leptomycin B sensitive. Conclusion The dsRNA binding protein, NF90ctv competes with HIV Rev function at two levels, by competitive protein:protein interaction involving Rev binding to specific domains of NF90ctv, as well as by its binding to the RRE-RNA structure. Our results are consistent with a model of Rev-mediated HIV-1 RNA export that envisions Rev-multimerization, a process interrupted by NF90ctv.

  2. Binding and Inhibition of Spermidine Synthase from Plasmodium falciparum and Implications for In Vitro Inhibitor Testing.

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    Janina Sprenger

    Full Text Available The aminopropyltransferase spermidine synthase (SpdS is a promising drug target in cancer and in protozoan diseases including malaria. Plasmodium falciparum SpdS (PfSpdS transfers the aminopropyl group of decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine (dcAdoMet to putrescine or to spermidine to form spermidine or spermine, respectively. In an effort to understand why efficient inhibitors of PfSpdS have been elusive, the present study uses enzyme activity assays and isothermal titration calorimetry with verified or predicted inhibitors of PfSpdS to analyze the relationship between binding affinity as assessed by KD and inhibitory activity as assessed by IC50. The results show that some predicted inhibitors bind to the enzyme with high affinity but are poor inhibitors. Binding studies with PfSpdS substrates and products strongly support an ordered sequential mechanism in which the aminopropyl donor (dcAdoMet site must be occupied before the aminopropyl acceptor (putrescine site can be occupied. Analysis of the results also shows that the ordered sequential mechanism adequately accounts for the complex relationship between IC50 and KD and may explain the limited success of previous efforts at structure-based inhibitor design for PfSpdS. Based on PfSpdS active-site occupancy, we suggest a classification of ligands that can help to predict the KD-IC50 relations in future design of new inhibitors. The present findings may be relevant for other drug targets that follow an ordered sequential mechanism.

  3. Production of non-stimulatory immunoglobulins that inhibit TSH binding in Graves' disease after radioiodine administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bech, K.; Bliddal, H.; Siersbaek-Nielsen, K.; Friis, T.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of single dose of 131 I upon thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins has been studied in twenty-two patients with Graves' disease. The thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins were assessed by parallel measurements of thyrotrophin receptor binding inhibitory immunoglobulins (TBII) and of thyroid adenylate cyclase stimulating immunoglobulins (TACSI) in serum by radioreceptor assay and stimulation of adenylate cyclase respectively. The present study thus confirms that radioiodine therapy is followed by an increase of TBII and TACSI in most patients with Graves' disease. The level of TBII can probably provide a marker for development of hypothyroidism following 131 I therapy and might be involved in its pathogenesis. (author)

  4. Light-enhanced inhibition of ouabain binding to digitalis receptor in rat brain and guinea pig heart by the food dye erythrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hnatowich, M.; LaBella, F.S.

    1982-01-01

    Erythrosine (ERY) (FD and C red no. 3) inhibited specific binding of [ 3 H]ouabain to rat brain homogenates with an IC50 of 23 microM in the dark and 1 microM in ordinary fluorescent light. Competition studies demonstrated the presence of two components, only one of which was affected by light. Lineweaver-Burk analysis indicated that ERY preferentially antagonizes [ 3 H]ouabain binding at a high-affinity site in the light, whereas in the dark the dye inhibits binding in a manner qualitatively similar to inhibition by ouabain. Light enhancement of ERY potency occurred only when dye and tissue were present together in the incubation medium, pointing to participation of transient molecular species. However, neither superoxide dismutase nor catalase altered the effects of ERY in the light or dark, suggesting the absence of oxygen free radicals. When oxygen levels were raised, there was enhancement of inhibition by ERY at a high-affinity receptor accompanied by disappearance of [ 3 H]ouabain binding at one of lower affinity. In contrast to brain, membranes from guinea pig heart showed only one binding site for [ 3 H]ouabain, and antagonism by ERY at this site was markedly enhanced by light. Structural differences between classes of ouabain binding regions probably accounts for the discrimination exhibited by ERY in the presence of light and oxygen. Our findings also caution that metabolic transformation of this common food dye, light decomposition, or photoreaction with foodstuff may yield more toxic derivatives

  5. Cyclophilin A potentiates TRIM5α inhibition of HIV-1 nuclear import without promoting TRIM5α binding to the viral capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallori Burse

    Full Text Available The host immunophilin cyclophilin A (CypA binds to the capsid protein (CA of HIV-1 and regulates its infectivity. Depending on the target cell type, CypA can either promote or inhibit HIV-1 infection. The ability of CypA to promote HIV-1 infection has been extensively studied and linked to several steps in early replication including uncoating, reverse transcription and nuclear import. By contrast, the mechanism by which CypA inhibits infection is less well understood. We investigated the mechanism by which CypA potentiates restriction of HIV-1 by the tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5α. Depletion of TRIM5α in the African green monkey cell line Vero, resulted in a loss of inhibition of infection by CypA, demonstrating that inhibition by CypA is mediated by TRIM5α. Complementary genetic and biochemical assays failed to demonstrate an ability of CypA to promote binding of TRIM5α to the viral capsid. TRIM5α inhibits HIV-1 reverse transcription in a proteasome-dependent manner; however, we observed that inhibition of proteasome activity did not reduce the ability of CypA to inhibit infection, suggesting that CypA acts at a step after reverse transcription. Accordingly, we observed a CypA-dependent reduction in the accumulation of nuclear HIV-1 DNA, indicating that CypA specifically promotes TRIM5α inhibition of HIV-1 nuclear import. We also observed that the ability of CypA to inhibit HIV-1 infection is abolished by amino acid substitutions within the conserved CPSF6-binding surface in CA. Our results indicate that CypA inhibits HIV-1 infection in Vero cells not by promoting TRIM5α binding to the capsid but by blocking nuclear import of the HIV-1 preintegration complex.

  6. Maternal celiac disease autoantibodies bind directly to syncytiotrophoblast and inhibit placental tissue transglutaminase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Nicola J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease (CD occurs in as many as 1 in 80 pregnant women and is associated with poor pregnancy outcome, but it is not known if this is an effect on maternal nutrient absorption or, alternatively, if the placenta is an autoimmune target. The major autoantigen, tissue transglutaminase (tTG, has previously been shown to be present in the maternal-facing syncytiotrophoblast plasma membrane of the placenta. Methods ELISA was used to demonstrate the presence of antibodies to tissue transglutaminase in a panel of CD sera. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the binding of IgA autoantibodies from CD serum to term placenta. In addition, novel direct binding and activity assays were developed to mimic the in vivo exposure of the villous placenta to maternal autoantibody. Results and Discussion CD IgA autoantibodies located to the syncytial surface of the placenta significantly more than IgA antibodies in control sera (P Conclusion These data indicate that direct immune effects in untreated CD women may compromise placental function.

  7. The murine gammaherpesvirus-68 chemokine-binding protein M3 inhibits experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millward, Jason M; Holst, Peter J; Høgh-Petersen, Mette

    2010-01-01

    M3 (AdM3) directly to the CNS to evaluate the capacity of this protein to inhibit neuroinflammation using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. Treatment with the AdM3 vector significantly reduced the clinical severity of EAE, attenuated CNS histopathology, and reduced numbers......Chemokines are critical mediators of immune cell entry into the central nervous system (CNS), as occurs in neuroinflammatory disease such as multiple sclerosis. Chemokines are also implicated in the immune response to viral infections. Many viruses encode proteins that mimic or block chemokine...... of immune cells infiltrating the CNS. These results suggest that M3 may represent a novel therapeutic approach to neuroinflammatory disease....

  8. sigma opiates and certain antipsychotic drugs mutually inhibit (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 and [3H]haloperidol binding in guinea pig brain membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, S.W.; Cook, L.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between binding of antipsychotic drugs and sigma psychotomimetic opiates to binding sites for the sigma agonist (+)-[ 3 H]SKF 10,047 (N-allylnormetazocine) and to dopamine D 2 sites was investigated. In guinea pig brain membranes, (+)-[ 3 H]SKF 10,047 bound to single class of sites with a K/sub d/ of 4 x 10 -8 M and a B/sub max/ of 333 fmol/mg of protein. This binding was different from μ, kappa, or delta opiate receptor binding. It was inhibited by opiates that produce psychotomimetic activities but not by opiates that lack such activities. Some antipsychotic drugs inhibited (+)-[ 3 H]SKF 10,047 binding with high to moderate affinities in the following order of potency: haloperidol > perphenazine > fluphenazine > acetophenazine > trifluoperazine > molindone greater than or equal to pimozide greater than or equal to thioridazine greater than or equal to chlorpromazine greater than or equal to triflupromazine. However, there were other antipsychotic drugs such as spiperone and clozapine that showed low affinity for the (+)-[ 3 H]SKF 10,047 binding sites. Affinities of antipsychotic drugs for (+)-[ 3 H]SKF 10,047 binding sites did not correlate with those for [ 3 H]spiperone (dopamine D 2 ) sites. [ 3 H]-Haloperidol binding in whole brain membranes was also inhibited by the sigma opiates pentazocine, cyclazocine, and (+)-[ 3 H]SKF 10,047. In the striatum, about half of the saturable [ 3 H]haloperidol binding was to [ 3 H]spiperone (D 2 ) sites and the other half was to sites similar to (+)-[ 3 H]SKF 10,047 binding sites. 15 references, 4 figures, 1 table

  9. VP24-Karyopherin Alpha Binding Affinities Differ between Ebolavirus Species, Influencing Interferon Inhibition and VP24 Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Toni M.; Edwards, Megan R.; Diederichs, Audrey; Alinger, Joshua B.; Leung, Daisy W.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Basler, Christopher F.; Lyles, Douglas S.

    2016-12-14

    ABSTRACT

    Zaire ebolavirus(EBOV),Bundibugyo ebolavirus(BDBV), andReston ebolavirus(RESTV) belong to the same genus but exhibit different virulence properties. VP24 protein, a structural protein present in all family members, blocks interferon (IFN) signaling and likely contributes to virulence. Inhibition of IFN signaling by EBOV VP24 (eVP24) involves its interaction with the NPI-1 subfamily of karyopherin alpha (KPNA) nuclear transporters. Here, we evaluated eVP24, BDBV VP24 (bVP24), and RESTV VP24 (rVP24) interactions with three NPI-1 subfamily KPNAs (KPNA1, KPNA5, and KPNA6). Using purified proteins, we demonstrated that each VP24 binds to each of the three NPI-1 KPNAs. bVP24, however, exhibited approximately 10-fold-lower KPNA binding affinity than either eVP24 or rVP24. Cell-based assays also indicate that bVP24 exhibits decreased KPNA interaction, decreased suppression of IFN induced gene expression, and a decreased half-life in transfected cells compared to eVP24 or rVP24. Amino acid sequence alignments between bVP24 and eVP24 also identified residues within and surrounding the previously defined eVP24-KPNA5 binding interface that decrease eVP24-KPNA affinity or bVP24-KPNA affinity. VP24 mutations that lead to reduced KPNA binding affinity also decrease IFN inhibition and shorten VP24 half-lives. These data identify novel functional differences in VP24-KPNA interaction and reveal a novel impact of the VP24-KPNA interaction on VP24 stability.

    IMPORTANCEThe interaction of Ebola virus (EBOV) VP24 protein with host karyopherin alpha (KPNA) proteins blocks type I interferon (IFN) signaling, which is a central component of the host innate immune response to viral infection. Here, we quantitatively compared the

  10. Amblyomma americanum tick calreticulin binds C1q but does not inhibit activation of the classical complement cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Kwon; Ibelli, Adriana Mércia Guaratini; Mulenga, Albert

    2015-02-01

    In this study we characterized Amblyomma americanum (Aam) tick calreticulin (CRT) homolog in tick feeding physiology. In nature, different tick species can be found feeding on the same animal host. This suggests that different tick species found feeding on the same host can modulate the same host anti-tick defense pathways to successfully feed. From this perspective it's plausible that different tick species can utilize universally conserved proteins such as CRT to regulate and facilitate feeding. CRT is a multi-functional protein found in most taxa that is injected into the vertebrate host during tick feeding. Apart from it's current use as a biomarker for human tick bites, role(s) of this protein in tick feeding physiology have not been elucidated. Here we show that annotated functional CRT amino acid motifs are well conserved in tick CRT. However our data show that despite high amino acid identity levels to functionally characterized CRT homologs in other organisms, AamCRT is apparently functionally different. Pichia pastoris expressed recombinant (r) AamCRT bound C1q, the first component of the classical complement system, but it did not inhibit activation of this pathway. This contrast with reports of other parasite CRT that inhibited activation of the classical complement pathway through sequestration of C1q. Furthermore rAamCRT did not bind factor Xa in contrast to reports of parasite CRT binding factor Xa, an important protease in the blood clotting system. Consistent with this observation, rAamCRT did not affect plasma clotting or platelet aggregation. We discuss our findings in the context of tick feeding physiology.

  11. RNA binding protein RNPC1 inhibits breast cancer cells metastasis via activating STARD13-correlated ceRNA network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiting; Guo, Qianqian; Zhang, Shufang; Xiang, Chenxi; Guo, Xinwei; Zhang, Feng; Gao, Lanlan; Ni, Haiwei; Xi, Tao; Zheng, Lufeng

    2018-05-07

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) are pivotal post-transcriptional regulators. RNPC1, an RBP, acts as a tumor suppressor through binding and regulating the expression of target genes in cancer cells. This study disclosed that RNPC1 expression was positively correlated with breast cancer patients' relapse free and overall survival, and RNPC1suppressed breast cancer cells metastasis. Mechanistically, RNPC1 promoting a competing endogenous network (ceRNA) crosstalk between STARD13, CDH5, HOXD10, and HOXD1 (STARD13-correlated ceRNA network) that we previously confirmed in breast cancer cells through stabilizing the transcripts and thus facilitating the expression of these four genes in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, RNPC1 overexpression restrained the promotion of STARD13, CDH5, HOXD10, and HOXD1 knockdown on cell metastasis. Notably, RNPC1 expression was positively correlated with CDH5, HOXD1 and HOXD10 expression in breast cancer tissues, and attenuated adriamycin resistance. Taken together, these results identified that RNPC1 could inhibit breast cancer cells metastasis via promoting STARD13-correlated ceRNA network.

  12. Human milk containing specific secretory IgA inhibits binding of Giardia lamblia to nylon and glass surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, H K; Ganguly, N K; Mahajan, R C

    1991-06-01

    The effects of human milk, containing specific secretory IgA, on the adherence of Giardia lamblia trophozoites in the presence and in the absence of intestinal mucus in vitro were studied. It was found that the trophozoites treated with breast milk, containing specific secretory IgA to G. lamblia, showed a significant decrease (p less than 0.01) in adherence to nylon fibre columns and glass surfaces than did trophozoites treated with milk containing no SIgA antibodies. The adherence to glass surfaces was significantly more (p less than 0.01) in the presence of intestinal mucus than when the mucus was absent. Milk that did not contain specific secretory SIgA to G. lamblia did not decrease the adherence to glass surfaces either in the presence or in the absence of mucus. The fluorescence study revealed the binding of specific secretory IgA on the trophozoite surface. The results suggest that binding of SIgA antibodies in milk to G. lamblia trophozoites inhibits parasite adherence, thus protecting against this infection in breast-fed babies.

  13. Novel piperonal 1,3,4-thiadiazolium-2-phenylamines mesoionic derivatives: Synthesis, tyrosinase inhibition evaluation and HSA binding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Natália Drumond; Chaves, Otávio Augusto; de Oliveira, Márcia C C; Sant'Anna, Carlos Mauricio R; Sousa-Pereira, Danilo; Netto-Ferreira, José Carlos; Echevarria, Aurea

    2018-06-01

    A novel series of piperonal mesoionic derivatives (PMI 1-6) was synthesized. Tyrosinase inhibition in the presence of PMI-1, -2, -3, -4, -5 and -6 as well as human serum albumin (HSA) binding studies with PMI-5 and PMI-6 were done by spectroscopic and theoretical methods. The mesoionic compound PMI-5 is the most promising tyrosinase inhibitor with a noncompetitive inhibitory mechanism and an IC 50 =124μmolL -1 . In accordance with the kinetic profile, molecular docking results show that PMI-5 is able to interact favorably with the tyrosinase active site containing the substrate molecule, L-DOPA, interacting with Val-247, Phe-263 and Val-282 residues. The spectroscopic results for the interaction HSA:PMI-5 and HSA:PMI-6 indicated that these mesoionic compounds can associate with HSA in the ground state and energy transfer can occur with high probability. The binding was moderate, spontaneous and can perturb significantly the secondary structure of the albumin. The molecular docking results suggest that PMI-5 and PMI-6 are able to be accommodated inside the Sudlow's site I in HSA, interacting with hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acid residues. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Binds to E2F1 and Inhibits E2F1-induced Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Jennifer L.; Fan, Yunxia; Chang, Xiaoqing; Peng, Li; Knudsen, Erik S.; Xia, Ying

    2008-01-01

    Cellular stress by DNA damage induces checkpoint kinase-2 (CHK2)-mediated phosphorylation and stabilization of the E2F1 transcription factor, leading to induction of apoptosis by activation of a subset of proapoptotic E2F1 target genes, including Apaf1 and p73. This report characterizes an interaction between the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor (AHR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, and E2F1 that results in the attenuation of E2F1-mediated apoptosis. In Ahr−/− fibroblasts stably transfected with a doxycycline-regulated AHR expression vector, inhibition of AHR expression causes a significant elevation of oxidative stress, γH2A.X histone phosphorylation, and E2F1-dependent apoptosis, which can be blocked by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of E2F1 expression. In contrast, ligand-dependent AHR activation protects these cells from etoposide-induced cell death. In cells expressing both proteins, AHR and E2F1 interact independently of the retinoblastoma protein (RB), because AHR and E2F1 coimmunoprecipitate from extracts of RB-negative cells. Additionally, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicate that AHR and E2F1 bind to the Apaf1 promoter at a region containing a consensus E2F1 binding site but no AHR binding sites. AHR activation represses Apaf1 and TAp73 mRNA induction by a constitutively active CHK2 expression vector. Furthermore, AHR overexpression blocks the transcriptional induction of Apaf1 and p73 and the accumulation of sub-G0/G1 cells resulting from ectopic overexpression of E2F1. These results point to a proproliferative, antiapoptotic function of the Ah receptor that likely plays a role in tumor progression. PMID:18524851

  15. Mutation of androgen receptor N-terminal phosphorylation site Tyr-267 leads to inhibition of nuclear translocation and DNA binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Karaca

    Full Text Available Reactivation of androgen receptor (AR may drive recurrent prostate cancer in castrate patients. Ack1 tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in prostate cancer and promotes castrate resistant xenograft tumor growth and enhances androgen target gene expression and AR recruitment to enhancers. Ack1 phosphorylates AR at Tyr-267 and possibly Tyr-363, both in the N-terminal transactivation domain. In this study, the role of these phosphorylation sites was investigated by characterizing the phosphorylation site mutants in the context of full length and truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain. Y267F and Y363F mutants showed decreased transactivation of reporters. Expression of wild type full length and truncated AR in LNCaP cells increased cell proliferation in androgen-depleted conditions and increased colony formation. However, the Y267F mutant of full length and truncated AR was defective in stimulating cell proliferation. The Y363F mutant was less severely affected than the Y267F mutant. The full length AR Y267F mutant was defective in nuclear translocation induced by androgen or Ack1 kinase. The truncated AR was constitutively localized to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that it was recruited to the target enhancers without androgen. The truncated Y267F AR mutant did not exhibit constitutive nuclear localization and androgen enhancer binding activity. These results support the concept that phosphorylation of Tyr-267, and to a lesser extent Tyr-363, is required for AR nuclear translocation and recruitment and DNA binding and provide a rationale for development of novel approaches to inhibit AR activity.

  16. Arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xi; Zhou, Xixi [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Du, Libo [Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu, Wenlan [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Liu, Yang [Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Hudson, Laurie G. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Liu, Ke Jian, E-mail: kliu@salud.unm.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Inhibition of DNA repair is a recognized mechanism for arsenic enhancement of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage and carcinogenesis. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger DNA repair protein, has been identified as a sensitive molecular target for arsenic. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 protein function as a critical structure in DNA recognition and binding. Since cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity has been positively correlated with zinc status in cells, we hypothesize that arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of arsenite exposure with zinc deficiency, created by using the membrane-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, on 8-OHdG formation, PARP-1 activity and zinc binding to PARP-1 in HaCat cells. Our results show that arsenite exposure and zinc deficiency had similar effects on PARP-1 protein, whereas supplemental zinc reversed these effects. To investigate the molecular mechanism of zinc loss induced by arsenite, ICP-AES, near UV spectroscopy, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy were utilized to examine arsenite binding and occupation of a peptide representing the first zinc finger of PARP-1. We found that arsenite binding as well as zinc loss altered the conformation of zinc finger structure which functionally leads to PARP-1 inhibition. These findings suggest that arsenite binding to PARP-1 protein created similar adverse biological effects as zinc deficiency, which establishes the molecular mechanism for zinc supplementation as a potentially effective treatment to reverse the detrimental outcomes of arsenic exposure. - Highlights: • Arsenite binding is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 function. • Zinc reverses arsenic inhibition of PARP-1 activity and enhancement of DNA damage. • Arsenite binding and zinc loss alter the conformation of zinc finger

  17. Arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xi; Zhou, Xixi; Du, Libo; Liu, Wenlan; Liu, Yang; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of DNA repair is a recognized mechanism for arsenic enhancement of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage and carcinogenesis. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger DNA repair protein, has been identified as a sensitive molecular target for arsenic. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 protein function as a critical structure in DNA recognition and binding. Since cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity has been positively correlated with zinc status in cells, we hypothesize that arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of arsenite exposure with zinc deficiency, created by using the membrane-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, on 8-OHdG formation, PARP-1 activity and zinc binding to PARP-1 in HaCat cells. Our results show that arsenite exposure and zinc deficiency had similar effects on PARP-1 protein, whereas supplemental zinc reversed these effects. To investigate the molecular mechanism of zinc loss induced by arsenite, ICP-AES, near UV spectroscopy, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy were utilized to examine arsenite binding and occupation of a peptide representing the first zinc finger of PARP-1. We found that arsenite binding as well as zinc loss altered the conformation of zinc finger structure which functionally leads to PARP-1 inhibition. These findings suggest that arsenite binding to PARP-1 protein created similar adverse biological effects as zinc deficiency, which establishes the molecular mechanism for zinc supplementation as a potentially effective treatment to reverse the detrimental outcomes of arsenic exposure. - Highlights: • Arsenite binding is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 function. • Zinc reverses arsenic inhibition of PARP-1 activity and enhancement of DNA damage. • Arsenite binding and zinc loss alter the conformation of zinc finger

  18. Slow Off-rates and Strong Product Binding Are Required for Processivity and Efficient Degradation of Recalcitrant Chitin by Family 18 Chitinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurašin, Mihhail; Kuusk, Silja; Kuusk, Piret; Sørlie, Morten; Väljamäe, Priit

    2015-11-27

    Processive glycoside hydrolases are the key components of enzymatic machineries that decompose recalcitrant polysaccharides, such as chitin and cellulose. The intrinsic processivity (P(Intr)) of cellulases has been shown to be governed by the rate constant of dissociation from polymer chain (koff). However, the reported koff values of cellulases are strongly dependent on the method used for their measurement. Here, we developed a new method for determining koff, based on measuring the exchange rate of the enzyme between a non-labeled and a (14)C-labeled polymeric substrate. The method was applied to the study of the processive chitinase ChiA from Serratia marcescens. In parallel, ChiA variants with weaker binding of the N-acetylglucosamine unit either in substrate-binding site -3 (ChiA-W167A) or the product-binding site +1 (ChiA-W275A) were studied. Both ChiA variants showed increased off-rates and lower apparent processivity on α-chitin. The rate of the production of insoluble reducing groups on the reduced α-chitin was an order of magnitude higher than koff, suggesting that the enzyme can initiate several processive runs without leaving the substrate. On crystalline chitin, the general activity of the wild type enzyme was higher, and the difference was magnifying with hydrolysis time. On amorphous chitin, the variants clearly outperformed the wild type. A model is proposed whereby strong interactions with polymer in the substrate-binding sites (low off-rates) and strong binding of the product in the product-binding sites (high pushing potential) are required for the removal of obstacles, like disintegration of chitin microfibrils. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Identification of an hexapeptide that binds to a surface pocket in cyclin A and inhibits the catalytic activity of the complex cyclin-dependent kinase 2-cyclin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Núria; Orzáez, Mar; Fucho, Raquel; Mateo, Francesca; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Bachs, Oriol; Pérez-Payá, Enrique

    2006-11-24

    The protein-protein complexes formed between different cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are central to cell cycle regulation. These complexes represent interesting points of chemical intervention for the development of antineoplastic molecules. Here we describe the identification of an all d-amino acid hexapeptide, termed NBI1, that inhibits the kinase activity of the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk2)-cyclin A complex through selective binding to cyclin A. The mechanism of inhibition is non-competitive for ATP and non-competitive for protein substrates. In contrast to the existing CDKs peptide inhibitors, the hexapeptide NBI1 interferes with the formation of the cdk2-cyclin A complex. Furthermore, a cell-permeable derivative of NBI1 induces apoptosis and inhibits proliferation of tumor cell lines. Thus, the NBI1-binding site on cyclin A may represent a new target site for the selective inhibition of activity cdk2-cyclin A complex.

  20. Clinical value of determination of TSH-binding inhibiting immunoglobulins (TBII) by a radioreceptor assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heberling, H.J.; Bierwolf, B.; Lohmann, D.

    1986-01-01

    The clinical value of a commercial kit for determination of TBII was evaluated. 50 patients with untreated Graves' disease, 21 patients with Graves' disease before and during medical therapy, 18 patients after finishing medical therapy and 10 patients after surgical treatment were examined. Besides these, 41 patients with other thyroid diseases and 36 patients without any thyroid disorder were included. In 47 (94%) of 50 patients with untreated Graves' disease TBII were detectable in serum using a TSH standard curve. Binding activities exceeding 10 U/l TSH equivalents were regarded as positive. In other thyroid diseases TBII were negative with the exception of 3 of 22 patient with autonomously functioning thyroid nodules. After 12 months of antithyroid drug treatment of 19 patients the incidence of positive antibody findings was 26%. During follow-up after medical therapy (1-9 years) 7 of 18 patients had increased TBII in correlation with clinical and functional findings. The determination of TBII by TRAK assay proved to be a sensitive and specific method. The assay can be used to differentiate between hyperthyroidism of autoimmune or non-immunogenic origin. Thus the method seems to be helpful for the follow-up under medical treatment of patients with Graves' disease. (author)

  1. Proteochemometric model for predicting the inhibition of penicillin-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabu, Sunanta; Nantasenamat, Chanin; Owasirikul, Wiwat; Lawung, Ratana; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Lapins, Maris; Wikberg, Jarl E. S.; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2015-02-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection threatens to become an untreatable sexually transmitted disease in the near future owing to the increasing emergence of N. gonorrhoeae strains with reduced susceptibility and resistance to the extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs), i.e. ceftriaxone and cefixime, which are the last remaining option for first-line treatment of gonorrhea. Alteration of the penA gene, encoding penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2), is the main mechanism conferring penicillin resistance including reduced susceptibility and resistance to ESCs. To predict and investigate putative amino acid mutations causing β-lactam resistance particularly for ESCs, we applied proteochemometric modeling to generalize N. gonorrhoeae susceptibility data for predicting the interaction of PBP2 with therapeutic β-lactam antibiotics. This was afforded by correlating publicly available data on antimicrobial susceptibility of wild-type and mutant N. gonorrhoeae strains for penicillin-G, cefixime and ceftriaxone with 50 PBP2 protein sequence data using partial least-squares projections to latent structures. The generated model revealed excellent predictability ( R 2 = 0.91, Q 2 = 0.77, Q Ext 2 = 0.78). Moreover, our model identified amino acid mutations in PBP2 with the highest impact on antimicrobial susceptibility and provided information on physicochemical properties of amino acid mutations affecting antimicrobial susceptibility. Our model thus provided insight into the physicochemical basis for resistance development in PBP2 suggesting its use for predicting and monitoring novel PBP2 mutations that may emerge in the future.

  2. Grb-IR: A SH2-Domain-Containing Protein that Binds to the Insulin Receptor and Inhibits Its Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Roth, Richard A.

    1995-10-01

    To identify potential signaling molecules involved in mediating insulin-induced biological responses, a yeast two-hybrid screen was performed with the cytoplasmic domain of the human insulin receptor (IR) as bait to trap high-affinity interacting proteins encoded by human liver or HeLa cDNA libraries. A SH2-domain-containing protein was identified that binds with high affinity in vitro to the autophosphorylated IR. The mRNA for this protein was found by Northern blot analyses to be highest in skeletal muscle and was also detected in fat by PCR. To study the role of this protein in insulin signaling, a full-length cDNA encoding this protein (called Grb-IR) was isolated and stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing the human IR. Insulin treatment of these cells resulted in the in situ formation of a complex of the IR and the 60-kDa Grb-IR. Although almost 75% of the Grb-IR protein was bound to the IR, it was only weakly tyrosine-phosphorylated. The formation of this complex appeared to inhibit the insulin-induced increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of two endogenous substrates, a 60-kDa GTPase-activating-protein-associated protein and, to a lesser extent, IR substrate 1. The subsequent association of this latter protein with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase also appeared to be inhibited. These findings raise the possibility that Grb-IR is a SH2-domain-containing protein that directly complexes with the IR and serves to inhibit signaling or redirect the IR signaling pathway.

  3. Myosin binding protein-C activates thin filaments and inhibits thick filaments in heart muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampourakis, Thomas; Yan, Ziqian; Gautel, Mathias; Sun, Yin-Biao; Irving, Malcolm

    2014-12-30

    Myosin binding protein-C (MyBP-C) is a key regulatory protein in heart muscle, and mutations in the MYBPC3 gene are frequently associated with cardiomyopathy. However, the mechanism of action of MyBP-C remains poorly understood, and both activating and inhibitory effects of MyBP-C on contractility have been reported. To clarify the function of the regulatory N-terminal domains of MyBP-C, we determined their effects on the structure of thick (myosin-containing) and thin (actin-containing) filaments in intact sarcomeres of heart muscle. We used fluorescent probes on troponin C in the thin filaments and on myosin regulatory light chain in the thick filaments to monitor structural changes associated with activation of demembranated trabeculae from rat ventricle by the C1mC2 region of rat MyBP-C. C1mC2 induced larger structural changes in thin filaments than calcium activation, and these were still present when active force was blocked with blebbistatin, showing that C1mC2 directly activates the thin filaments. In contrast, structural changes in thick filaments induced by C1mC2 were smaller than those associated with calcium activation and were abolished or reversed by blebbistatin. Low concentrations of C1mC2 did not affect resting force but increased calcium sensitivity and reduced cooperativity of force and structural changes in both thin and thick filaments. These results show that the N-terminal region of MyBP-C stabilizes the ON state of thin filaments and the OFF state of thick filaments and lead to a novel hypothesis for the physiological role of MyBP-C in the regulation of cardiac contractility.

  4. Cation Coordination Alters the Conformation of a Thrombin-Binding G-Quadruplex DNA Aptamer That Affects Inhibition of Thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavyalova, Elena; Tagiltsev, Grigory; Reshetnikov, Roman; Arutyunyan, Alexander; Kopylov, Alexey

    2016-10-01

    Thrombin-binding aptamers are promising anticoagulants. HD1 is a monomolecular antiparallel G-quadruplex with two G-quartets linked by three loops. Aptamer-thrombin interactions are mediated with two TT-loops that bind thrombin exosite I. Several cations were shown to be coordinated inside the G-quadruplex, including K + , Na + , NH 4 + , Ba 2+ , and Sr 2+ ; on the contrary, Mn 2+ was coordinated in the grooves, outside the G-quadruplex. K + or Na + coordination provides aptamer functional activity. The effect of other cations on aptamer functional activity has not yet been described, because of a lack of relevant tests. Interactions between aptamer HD1 and a series of cations were studied. A previously developed enzymatic method was applied to evaluate aptamer inhibitory activity. The structure-function correlation was studied using the characterization of G-quadruplex conformation by circular dichroism spectroscopy. K + coordination provided the well-known high inhibitory activity of the aptamer, whereas Na + coordination supported low activity. Although NH 4 + coordination yielded a typical antiparallel G-quadruplex, no inhibitory activity was shown; a similar effect was observed for Ba 2+ and Sr 2+ coordination. Mn 2+ coordination destabilized the G-quadruplex that drastically diminished aptamer inhibitory activity. Therefore, G-quadruplex existence per se is insufficient for aptamer inhibitory activity. To elicit the nature of these effects, we thoroughly analyzed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray data on the structure of the HD1 G-quadruplex with various cations. The most reasonable explanation is that cation coordination changes the conformation of TT-loops, affecting thrombin binding and inhibition. HD1 counterparts, aptamers 31-TBA and NU172, behaved similarly with some distinctions. In 31-TBA, an additional duplex module stabilized antiparallel G-quadruplex conformation at high concentrations of divalent cations; whereas in NU172, a different

  5. Inhibition of 125I-labeled ristocetin binding to Micrococcus luteus cells by the peptides related to bacterial cell wall mucopeptide precursors: quantitative structure-activity relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.H.; Martin, Y.; Otis, E.; Mao, J.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) of N-Ac amino acids, N-Ac dipeptides, and N-Ac tripeptides in inhibition of 125 I-labeled ristocetin binding to Micrococcus luteus cell wall have been developed to probe the details of the binding between ristocetin and N-acetylated peptides. The correlation equations indicate that (1) the binding is stronger for peptides in which the side chain of the C-terminal amino acid has a large molar refractivity (MR) value, (2) the binding is weaker for peptides with polar than for those with nonpolar C-terminal side chains, (3) the N-terminal amino acid in N-Ac dipeptides contributes 12 times that of the C-terminal amino acid to binding affinity, and (4) the interactions between ristocetin and the N-terminal amino acid of N-acetyl tripeptides appear to be much weaker than those with the first two amino acids

  6. Selective albumin-binding surfaces modified with a thrombin-inhibiting peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Sidónio C; Maia, Sílvia; Figueiredo, Ana C; Gomes, Paula; Pereira, Pedro J B; Barbosa, Mário A; Martins, M Cristina L

    2014-03-01

    Blood-contacting medical devices have been associated with severe clinical complications, such as thrombus formation, triggered by the activation of the coagulation cascade due to the adsorption of certain plasma proteins on the surface of biomaterials. Hence, the coating of such surfaces with antithrombotic agents has been used to increase biomaterial haemocompatibility. Biomaterial-induced clotting may also be decreased by albumin adsorption from blood plasma in a selective and reversible way, since this protein is not involved in the coagulation cascade. In this context, this paper reports that the immobilization of the thrombin inhibitor D-Phe-Pro-D-Arg-D-Thr-CONH2 (fPrt) onto nanostructured surfaces induces selective and reversible adsorption of albumin, delaying the clotting time when compared to peptide-free surfaces. fPrt, synthesized with two glycine residues attached to the N-terminus (GGfPrt), was covalently immobilized onto self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) having different ratios of carboxylate-hexa(ethylene glycol)- and tri(ethylene glycol)-terminated thiols (EG6-COOH/EG3) that were specifically designed to control GGfPrt orientation, exposure and density at the molecular level. In solution, GGfPrt was able to inactivate the enzymatic activity of thrombin and to delay plasma clotting time in a concentration-dependent way. After surface immobilization, and independently of its concentration, GGfPrt lost its selectivity to thrombin and its capacity to inhibit thrombin enzymatic activity against the chromogenic substrate n-p-tosyl-Gly-Pro-Arg-p-nitroanilide. Nevertheless, surfaces with low concentrations of GGfPrt could delay the capacity of adsorbed thrombin to cleave fibrinogen. In contrast, GGfPrt immobilized in high concentrations was found to induce the procoagulant activity of the adsorbed thrombin. However, all surfaces containing GGfPrt have a plasma clotting time similar to the negative control (empty polystyrene wells), showing resistance to

  7. The lectins griffithsin, cyanovirin-N and scytovirin inhibit HIV-1 binding to the DC-SIGN receptor and transfer to CD4+ cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Alexandre, Kabamba B

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available It is generally believed that during the sexual transmission of HIV-1, the glycan-specific DC-SIGN receptor binds the virus and mediates its transfer to CD4(+) cells. The lectins griffithsin (GRFT), cyanovirin-N (CV-N) and scytovirin (SVN) inhibit...

  8. Inhibition of nuclear T3 binding by fatty acids: dependence on chain length, unsaturated bonds, cis-trans configuration and esterification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. M.; Platvoet-ter Schiphorst, M.

    1990-01-01

    1. Fatty acids have the capacity for inhibition of nuclear T3 binding (INB). The present studies were undertaken to describe the INB-activity of fatty acids as a function of chain length, unsaturated bonds, cis-trans configuration, and esterification. 2. Isolated rat liver nuclei were incubated with

  9. Acrolein inhibits cytokine gene expression by alkylating cysteine and arginine residues in the NF-kappaB1 DNA binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Cherie; Li, Jimei; Jonscher, Karen; Yang, Teng-Chieh; Reigan, Philip; Quintana, Megan; Harvey, Jean; Freed, Brian M

    2007-07-06

    Cigarette smoke is a potent inhibitor of pulmonary T cell responses, resulting in decreased immune surveillance and an increased incidence of respiratory tract infections. The alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes in cigarette smoke (acrolein and crotonaldehyde) inhibited production of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-10, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interferon-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha by human T cells but did not inhibit production of IL-8. The saturated aldehydes (acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, and butyraldehyde) in cigarette smoke were inactive. Acrolein inhibited induction of NF-kappaB DNA binding activity after mitogenic stimulation of T cells but had no effect on induction of NFAT or AP-1. Acrolein inhibited NF-kappaB1 (p50) binding to the IL-2 promoter in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay by >99%. Using purified recombinant p50 in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we demonstrated that acrolein was 2000-fold more potent than crotonaldehyde in blocking DNA binding to an NF-kappaB consensus sequence. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight and tandem mass spectrometry demonstrated that acrolein alkylated two amino acids (Cys-61 and Arg-307) in the DNA binding domain. Crotonaldehyde reacted with Cys-61, but not Arg-307, whereas the saturated aldehydes in cigarette smoke did not react with p50. These experiments demonstrate that aldehydes in cigarette smoke can regulate gene expression by direct modification of a transcription factor.

  10. Light-enhanced inhibition of ouabain binding to digitalis receptor in rat brain and guinea pig heart by the food dye erythrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hnatowich, M.; LaBella, F.S.

    1982-01-01

    Erythrosine (ERY) (FD and C red no. 3) inhibited specific binding of [ 3 H]ouabain to rat brain homogenates with an IC50 of 23 mM in the dark and 1 mM in ordinary fluorescent light. Competition studies demonstrated the presence of two components, only one of which was affected by light. Lineweaver-Burk analysis indicated that ERY preferentially antagonizes [ 3 H]ouabain binding at a high-affinity site in the light, whereas in the dark the dye inhibits binding in a manner qualitatively similar to inhibition by ouabain. Light enhancement of ERY potency occurred only when dye and tissue were present together in the incubation medium, pointing to participation of transient molecular species. However, neither superoxide dismutase nor catalase altered the effects of ERY in the light or dark, suggesting the absence of oxygen free radicals. In contrast to brain, membranes from guinea pig heart showed only one binding site for [ 3 H]ouabain, and antagonism by ERY at this site was markedly enhanced by light. Structural differences between classes of ouabain binding regions probably accounts for the discrimination exhibited by ERY in the presence of light and oxygen. Our findings also caution that metabolic transformation of this common food dye, light decomposition, or photoreaction with foodstuff may yield more toxic derivatives

  11. Borreliacidal activity of Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA binding small molecules by manganese transport inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagh D

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dhananjay Wagh,* Venkata Raveendra Pothineni,* Mohammed Inayathullah, Song Liu, Kwang-Min Kim, Jayakumar Rajadas Biomaterials and Advanced Drug Delivery Laboratory, Stanford Cardiovascular Pharmacology Division, Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work  Abstract: Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, utilizes manganese (Mn for its various metabolic needs. We hypothesized that blocking Mn transporter could be a possible approach to inhibit metabolic activity of this pathogen and eliminate the infection. We used a combination of in silico protein structure prediction together with molecular docking to target the Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA, a single known Mn transporter in Borrelia and screened libraries of FDA approved compounds that could potentially bind to the predicted BmtA structure with high affinity. Tricyclic antihistamines such as loratadine, desloratadine, and 3-hydroxydesloratadine as well as yohimbine and tadalafil demonstrated a tight binding to the in silico folded BmtA transporter. We, then, tested borreliacidal activity and dose response of the shortlisted compounds from this screen using a series of in vitro assays. Amongst the probed compounds, desloratadine exhibited potent borreliacidal activity in vitro at and above 78 µg/mL (250 µM. Borrelia treated with lethal doses of desloratadine exhibited a significant loss of intracellular Mn specifically and a severe structural damage to the bacterial cell wall. Our results support the possibility of developing a novel, targeted therapy to treat Lyme disease by targeting specific metabolic needs of Borrelia.  Keywords: Lyme disease, BmtA, Borrelia burgdorferi, desloratadine, Bac Titer-Glo assay

  12. Slow Antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrielse, G.; Speck, A.; Storry, C.H.; Le Sage, D.; Guise, N.; Larochelle, P.C.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Schepers, G.; Sefzick, T.; Pittner, H.; Herrmann, M.; Walz, J.; Haensch, T.W.; Comeau, D.; Hessels, E.A.

    2004-01-01

    Slow antihydrogen is now produced by two different production methods. In Method I, large numbers of H atoms are produced during positron-cooling of antiprotons within a nested Penning trap. In a just-demonstrated Method II, lasers control the production of antihydrogen atoms via charge exchange collisions. Field ionization detection makes it possible to probe the internal structure of the antihydrogen atoms being produced - most recently revealing atoms that are too tightly bound to be well described by the guiding center atom approximation. The speed of antihydrogen atoms has recently been measured for the first time. After the requested overview, the recent developments are surveyed

  13. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jun; Ren, Pingping; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xing Li; Chen, Li; Shen, Ying H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.

  14. Pharmacological inhibition of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor promotes peritoneal angiogenesis in a peritoneal dialysis rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenyuan; Yan, Hao; Yuan, Jiangzi; Cao, Liou; Lin, Aiwu; Dai, Huili; Ni, Zhaohui; Qian, Jiaqi; Fang, Wei

    2018-04-01

    Molecular mechanisms of peritoneal dialysis (PD) ultrafiltration failure, peritoneal neo-angiogenesis, and fibrosis remain to be determined. We aimed to determine the role of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) inhibition on angiogenesis of peritoneal membrane in a PD rat model. 32 male Wistar rats were assigned into (1) control group; (2) uremic non-PD group: subtotal nephrectomy-induced uremic rats without PD; (3) uremic rats subjected to PD: uremic rats that were dialyzed with Dianeal ® for 4 weeks; (4) CRM 197 group: dialyzed uremic rats were supplemented with CRM197, a specific HB-EGF inhibitor. Peritoneal transport function was examined by peritoneal equilibration test. Expression of HB-EGF and EGFR in peritoneal samples were examined by real-time PCR, immunohistochemical staining, and western blot. Progressive angiogenesis and fibrosis were observed in uremic PD rats, and there were associated with decreased net ultrafiltration (nUF), increased permeability of peritoneal membrane, and reduced expression of HB-EGF and EGFR protein and mRNA in uremic PD rats compared to uremic non-PD or control groups (both p CRM197 significantly induced peritoneal membrane permeability, decreased nUF, increased higher vessel density, and reduced pericyte count compared to that of uremic PD rats. The levels of HB-EGF and EGFR expression negatively correlated with vessel density in peritoneal membrane (both p < 0.001). PD therapy was associated with peritoneal angiogenesis, functional deterioration, and downregulation of HB-EGF/EGFR. Pharmacological inhibition of HB-EGF promoted PD-induced peritoneal angiogenesis and fibrosis and ultrafiltration decline, suggesting that HB-EGF downregulation contributes to peritoneal functional deterioration in the uremic PD rat model.

  15. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jun [Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Ren, Pingping; Zhang, Lin [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Wang, Xing Li [Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX (United States); Chen, Li [Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Shen, Ying H., E-mail: hyshen@bcm.edu [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-02-26

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.

  16. Tissue-type plasminogen activator-binding RNA aptamers inhibiting low-density lipoprotein receptor family-mediated internalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Nils; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A; Helsen, Nicky; Andreasen, Peter A; Dupont, Daniel M

    2015-07-01

    Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA, trade name Alteplase), currently the only drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of cerebral ischaemic stroke, has been implicated in a number of adverse effects reportedly mediated by interactions with the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) family receptors, including neuronal cell death and an increased risk of cerebral haemorrhage. The tissue-type plasminogen activator is the principal initiator of thrombolysis in human physiology, an effect that is mediated directly via localised activation of the plasmin zymogen plasminogen at the surface of fibrin clots in the vascular lumen. Here, we sought to identify a ligand to tPA capable of inhibiting the relevant LDL family receptors without interfering with the fibrinolytic activity of tPA. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) was employed to isolate tPA-binding RNA aptamers, which were characterised in biochemical assays of tPA association to low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1, an LDL receptor family member); tPA-mediated in vitro and ex vivo clot lysis; and tPA-mediated plasminogen activation in the absence and presence of a stimulating soluble fibrin fragment. Two aptamers, K18 and K32, had minimal effects on clot lysis, but were able to efficiently inhibit tPA-LRP-1 association and LDL receptor family-mediated endocytosis in human vascular endothelial cells and astrocytes. These observations suggest that coadministration alongside tPA may be a viable strategy to improve the safety of thrombolytic treatment of cerebral ischaemic stroke by restricting tPA activity to the vascular lumen.

  17. MicroRNA-141 inhibits migration of gastric cancer by targeting zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ying; Wang, Lingfei; Wu, Honghai; Zhang, Yiyin; Wang, Kan; Wu, Dingting

    2015-09-01

    Human microRNA (miR)-141 is a member of the miR‑200 family, which has been reported to be downregulated in gastric cancer, and involved in the proliferation of gastric cancer cells. However, little is currently known regarding its role in the migration of gastric cancer. The present study investigated the function of miR‑141 in gastric cancer cell migration, and evaluated the contribution of zinc finger E‑box‑binding homeobox 1 and 2 (ZEB1/2) in miR‑141 mediated migration of gastric cancer cells. The expression levels of miR‑141 and its potential ZEB1/2 targets were examined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western blotting, respectively. The migration of SGC‑7901 and HGC‑27 gastric cancer cells, which had been transfected with an miRNA precursor, was examined by cell migration and wound healing assays. A luciferase activity assay was used to validate whether ZEB1/2 was a direct target of miR‑141. The results demonstrated that overexpression of miR‑141 markedly inhibited the migration of gastric cancer cells in vitro. Forced overexpression of miR‑141 significantly reduced the luciferase activity of the 3'‑untranslated region of ZEB2 in gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression levels of ZEB2 were reduced in cells overexpressing miR‑141, whereas the protein expression levels of E‑cadherin were increased. In gastric tumor samples the expression levels of ZEB2 were inversely correlated with the expression of miR‑141. These results suggest that miR‑141 may be involved in the inhibition of gastric cancer cell migration, and that ZEB2 is a target gene of miR-141.

  18. Different sensitivities to competitive inhibition of benzodiazepine receptor binding of {sup 11}C-iomazenil and {sup 11}C-flumazenil in rhesus monkey brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Osamu; Hosoi, Rie; Kobayashi, Kaoru [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Medical School; Itoh, Takashi; Gee, A.; Suzuki, Kazutoshi

    2001-04-01

    The in vivo binding kinetics of {sup 11}C-iomazenil were compared with those of {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding in rhesus monkey brain. The monkey was anesthetized with ketamine and intravenously injected with either {sup 11}C-iomazenil or {sup 11}C-flumazenil in combination with the coadministration of different doses of non-radioactive flumazenil (0, 5 and 20 {mu}g/kg). The regional distribution of {sup 11}C-iomazenil in the brain was similar to that of {sup 11}C-flumazenil, but the sensitivity of {sup 11}C-iomazenil binding to competitive inhibition by non-radioactive flumazenil was much less than that of {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding. A significant reduction in {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding in the cerebral cortex was observed with 20 {mu}g/kg of flumazenil, whereas a relatively smaller inhibition of {sup 11}C-iomazenil binding in the same region was observed with the same dose of flumazenil. These results suggest that {sup 11}C-flumazenil may be a superior radiotracer for estimating benzodiazepine receptor occupancy in the intact brain. (author)

  19. The immunosuppressives FK 506 and cyclosporin A inhibit the generation of protein factors binding to the two purine boxes of the interleukin 2 enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabletz, T; Pietrowski, I; Serfling, E

    1991-01-11

    Like Cyclosporin A (CsA), the macrolide FK 506 is a potent immunosuppressive that inhibits early steps of T cell activation, including the synthesis of Interleukin 2 (II-2) and numerous other lymphokines. The block of II-2 synthesis occurs at the transcriptional level. At concentrations that block T cell activation, FK 506 and CsA inhibit the proto-enhancer activity of Purine boxes of the II-2 promoter and the generation of lymphocyte-specific factors binding to the Purine boxes. Under the same conditions, the DNA binding of other II-2 enhancer factors remains unaffected by both compounds. These results support the view that FK 506 and CsA, which both inhibit the activity of peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerases, suppress T cell activation by a similar, if not identical mechanism.

  20. Inflammation in the CNS and Th17 Responses Are Inhibited by IFN-{gamma}-Induced IL-18 Binding Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millward, Jason M; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Wheeler, Rachel D

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory responses are essential for immune protection but may also cause pathology and must be regulated. Both Th1 and Th17 cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune inflammatory diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. We show in this study that IL-18-binding protein (IL-18bp......), the endogenous inhibitor of the Th1-promoting cytokine IL-18, is upregulated by IFN-gamma in resident microglial cells in the CNS during multiple sclerosis-like disease in mice. Test of function by overexpression of IL-18bp in the CNS using a viral vector led to marked reduction in Th17 responses and robust...... inhibition of incidence, severity, and histopathology of disease, independently of IFN-gamma. The disease-limiting action of IL-18bp included suppression of APC-derived Th17-polarizing cytokines. IL-18bp thus acts as a sensor for IFN-gamma and can regulate both Th1 and Th17 responses in the CNS....

  1. The host antimicrobial peptide Bac71-35 binds to bacterial ribosomal proteins and inhibits protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardirossian, Mario; Grzela, Renata; Giglione, Carmela; Meinnel, Thierry; Gennaro, Renato; Mergaert, Peter; Scocchi, Marco

    2014-12-18

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are molecules from innate immunity with high potential as novel anti-infective agents. Most of them inactivate bacteria through pore formation or membrane barrier disruption, but others cross the membrane without damages and act inside the cells, affecting vital processes. However, little is known about their intracellular bacterial targets. Here we report that Bac71-35, a proline-rich AMP belonging to the cathelicidin family, can reach high concentrations (up to 340 μM) inside the E. coli cytoplasm. The peptide specifically and completely inhibits in vitro translation in the micromolar concentration range. Experiments of incorporation of radioactive precursors in macromolecules with E. coli cells confirmed that Bac71-35 affects specifically protein synthesis. Ribosome coprecipitation and crosslinking assays showed that the peptide interacts with ribosomes, binding to a limited subset of ribosomal proteins. Overall, these results indicate that the killing mechanism of Bac71-35 is based on a specific block of protein synthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Overproduction of single-stranded-DNA-binding protein specifically inhibits recombination of UV-irradiated bacteriophage DNA in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    Overproduction of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein (SSB) in uvr Escherichia coli mutants results in a wide range of altered phenotypes. (i) Cell survival after UV irradiation is decreased; (ii) expression of the recA-lexA regulon is slightly reduced after UV irradiation, whereas it is increased without irradiation; and (iii) recombination of UV-damaged lambda DNA is inhibited, whereas recombination of nonirradiated DNA is unaffected. These results are consistent with the idea that in UV-damaged bacteria, SSB is first required to allow the formation of short complexes of RecA protein and ssDNA that mediate cleavage of the LexA protein. However, in a second stage, SSB should be displaced from ssDNA to permit the production of longer RecA-ssDNA nucleoprotein filaments that are required for strand pairing and, hence, recombinational repair. Since bacteria overproducing SSB appear identical in physiological respects to recF mutant bacteria, it is suggested that the RecF protein (alone or with other proteins of the RecF pathway) may help RecA protein to release SSB from ssDNA

  3. Inhibition of β-bungarotoxin binding to brain membranes by mast cell degranulating peptide, toxin I, and ethylene glycol bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.R.; Betz, H.; Rehm, H.

    1988-01-01

    The presynaptically active snake venom neurotoxin β-bungarotoxin (β-Butx) is known to affect neurotransmitter release by binding to a subtype of voltage-activated K + channels. Here the authors show that mast cell degranulating (MCD) peptide from bee venom inhibits the binding of 125 I-labeled β-Butx to chick and rat brain membranes with apparent K/sub i/ values of 180 nM and 1100 nM, respectively. The mechanisms of inhibition of MCD peptide is noncompetitive, as is inhibition of 125 I-β-Butx binding by the protease inhibitor homologue from mamba venom, toxin I. β-Butx and its binding antagonists thus bind to different sites of the same membrane protein. Removal of Ca 2+ by ethylene glycol bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid inhibits the binding of 125 I-β-Butx by lowering its affinity to brain membranes

  4. Cyclic AMP Inhibits the Activity and Promotes the Acetylation of Acetyl-CoA Synthetase through Competitive Binding to the ATP/AMP Pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaobiao; Shen, Liqiang; Wang, Qijun; Cen, Xufeng; Wang, Jin; Wu, Meng; Li, Peng; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Guoping

    2017-01-27

    The high-affinity biosynthetic pathway for converting acetate to acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is catalyzed by the central metabolic enzyme acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase (Acs), which is finely regulated both at the transcriptional level via cyclic AMP (cAMP)-driven trans-activation and at the post-translational level via acetylation inhibition. In this study, we discovered that cAMP directly binds to Salmonella enterica Acs (SeAcs) and inhibits its activity in a substrate-competitive manner. In addition, cAMP binding increases SeAcs acetylation by simultaneously promoting Pat-dependent acetylation and inhibiting CobB-dependent deacetylation, resulting in enhanced SeAcs inhibition. A crystal structure study and site-directed mutagenesis analyses confirmed that cAMP binds to the ATP/AMP pocket of SeAcs, and restrains SeAcs in an open conformation. The cAMP contact residues are well conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, suggesting a general regulatory mechanism of cAMP on Acs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Hydroxysafflor Yellow A Inhibits LPS-Induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation via Binding to Xanthine Oxidase in Mouse RAW264.7 Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA is an effective therapeutic agent for inflammatory diseases and autoimmune disorders; however, its regulatory effect on NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages has not been investigated. In this study, we predicted the potential interaction between HSYA and xanthine oxidase (XO via PharmMapper inverse docking and confirmed the binding inhibition via inhibitory test (IC50 = 40.04 μM. Computation docking illustrated that, in this HSYA-XO complex, HSYA was surrounded by Leu 648, Leu 712, His 875, Leu 873, Ser 876, Glu 879, Phe 649, and Asn 650 with a binding energy of −5.77 kcal/M and formed hydrogen bonds with the hydroxyl groups of HSYA at Glu 879, Asn 650, and His 875. We then found that HSYA significantly decreased the activity of XO in RAW264.7 macrophages and suppressed LPS-induced ROS generation. Moreover, we proved that HSYA markedly inhibited LPS-induced cleaved caspase-1 activation via suppressing the sensitization of NLRP3 inflammasome and prevented the mature IL-1β formation from pro-IL-1β form. These findings suggest that XO may be a potential target of HSYA via direct binding inhibition and the combination of HSYA-XO suppresses LPS-induced ROS generation, contributing to the depression of NLRP3 inflammasome and inhibition of IL-1β secretion in macrophages.

  6. Programmable Oligomers Targeting 5′-GGGG-3′ in the Minor Groove of DNA and NF-κB Binding Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenoweth, David M.; Poposki, Julie A.; Marques, Michael A.; Dervan, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    A series of hairpin oligomers containing benzimidazole (Bi) and imidazopyridine (Ip) rings were synthesized and screened to target 5′-WGGGGW-3′, a core sequence in the DNA binding site of NF-κB, a prolific transcription factor important in biology and disease. Five Bi and Ip containing oligomers bound to the 5′-WGGGGW-3′ site with high affinity. One of the oligomers (Im-Im-Im-Im-γ-PyBi-PyBi-β-Dp) was able to inhibit DNA binding by the transcription factor NF-κB. PMID:17095230

  7. Transmission to interneurons is via slow excitatory synaptic potentials mediated by P2Y(1 receptors during descending inhibition in guinea-pig ileum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D J Thornton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The nature of synaptic transmission at functionally distinct synapses in intestinal reflex pathways has not been fully identified. In this study, we investigated whether transmission between interneurons in the descending inhibitory pathway is mediated by a purine acting at P2Y receptors to produce slow excitatory synaptic potentials (EPSPs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Myenteric neurons from guinea-pig ileum in vitro were impaled with intracellular microelectrodes. Responses to distension 15 mm oral to the recording site, in a separately perfused stimulation chamber and to electrical stimulation of local nerve trunks were recorded. A subset of neurons, previously identified as nitric oxide synthase immunoreactive descending interneurons, responded to both stimuli with slow EPSPs that were reversibly abolished by a high concentration of PPADS (30 μM, P2 receptor antagonist. When added to the central chamber of a three chambered organ bath, PPADS concentration-dependently depressed transmission through that chamber of descending inhibitory reflexes, measured as inhibitory junction potentials in the circular muscle of the anal chamber. Reflexes evoked by distension in the central chamber were unaffected. A similar depression of transmission was seen when the specific P2Y(1 receptor antagonist MRS 2179 (10 μM was in the central chamber. Blocking either nicotinic receptors (hexamethonium 200 μM or 5-HT(3 receptors (granisetron 1 μM together with P2 receptors had no greater effect than blocking P2 receptors alone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Slow EPSPs mediated by P2Y(1 receptors, play a primary role in transmission between descending interneurons of the inhibitory reflexes in the guinea-pig ileum. This is the first demonstration for a primary role of excitatory metabotropic receptors in physiological transmission at a functionally identified synapse.

  8. Acceleration of leaf senescence is slowed down in transgenic barley plants deficient in the DNA/RNA-binding protein WHIRLY1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharewicz, Weronika; Distelfeld, Assaf; Bilger, Wolfgang; Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Hensel, Götz; Krupinska, Karin

    2017-02-01

    WHIRLY1 in barley was isolated as a potential regulator of the senescence-associated gene HvS40. In order to investigate whether the plastid-nucleus-located DNA/RNA-binding protein WHIRLY1 plays a role in regulation of leaf senescence, primary foliage leaves from transgenic barley plants with an RNAi-mediated knockdown of the WHIRLY1 gene were characterized by typical senescence parameters, namely pigment contents, function and composition of the photosynthetic apparatus, as well as expression of selected genes known to be either down- or up-regulated during leaf senescence. When the plants were grown at low light intensity, senescence progression was similar between wild-type and RNAi-W1 plants. Likewise, dark-induced senescence of detached leaves was not affected by reduction of WHIRLY1. When plants were grown at high light intensity, however, senescence was induced prematurely in wild-type plants but was delayed in RNAi-W1 plants. This result suggests that WHIRLY1 plays a role in light sensing and/or stress communication between chloroplasts and the nucleus. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  9. Individual differences in heart rate variability predict the degree of slowing during response inhibition and initiation in the presence of emotional stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelos-Miltiadis eKrypotos

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Response inhibition is a hallmark of executive control and crucial to support flexible behaviour in a constantly changing environment. Recently, it has been shown that response inhibition is influenced by the presentation of emotional stimuli (Verbruggen and De Houwer, 2007. Healthy individuals typically differ in the degree to which they are able to regulate their emotional state, but it remains unknown whether individual differences in emotion regulation (ER may alter the interplay between emotion and response inhibition. Here we address this issue by testing healthy volunteers who were equally divided in groups with high and low Heart Rate Variability (HRV during rest, a physiological measure that serves as proxy of emotion regulation. Both groups performed an emotional stop-signal task, in which negative high arousing pictures served as negative emotional stimuli and neutral low arousing pictures served as neutral non-emotional stimuli. We found that individuals with high HRV activated and inhibited their responses faster compared to individuals with low HRV, but only in the presence of negative stimuli. No group differences emerged for the neutral stimuli. Thus, individuals with low HRV are more susceptible to the adverse effects of negative emotion on response initiation and inhibition. The present research corroborates the idea that the presentation of emotional stimuli may interfere with inhibition and it also adds to previous research by demonstrating that the aforementioned relationship varies for individuals differing in HRV. We suggest that focusing on individual differences in HRV and its associative ER may shed more light on the dynamic interplay between emotion and cognition.

  10. A monoclonal antibody against PDGF B-chain inhibits PDGF-induced DNA synthesis in C3H fibroblasts and prevents binding of PDGF to its receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassbotn, F S; Langeland, N; Hagen, I; Holmsen, H

    1990-09-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb 6D11) against platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) was studied. We found that the MAb 6D11 in concentrations equimolar to PDGF blocked the [3H]thymidine incorporation in C3H/10T1/2 C18 fibroblasts stimulated by PDGF B-B and PDGF A-B. This inhibition was overcome by high doses of PDGF. The [3H]thymidine incorporation stimulated by other growth factors (aFGF, bFGF and bombesin) was not inhibited by the antibody. The MAb 6D11 blocked receptor binding of PDGF B-B, but not PDGF A-A. These findings suggest that the MAb 6D11 abolishes PDGF-induced DNA synthesis by blocking PDGF receptor binding. In this communication we demonstrate an isoform-specific monoclonal antibody against PDGF.

  11. SKF 525-A and cytochrome P-450 ligands inhibit with high affinity the binding of [3H]dextromethorphan and σligands to guinea pig brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.; Canoll, P.D.; Musacchio, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The DM 1 /σ 1 site binds dextromethorphan (DM) and σ receptor ligands. The broad binding specificity of this site and its peculiar subcellular distribution prompted us to explore the possibility that this site is a member of the cytochrome P-450 superfamily of enzymes. We tested the effects of the liver microsomal monooxygenase inhibitor SKF 525-A (Proadifen), and other P-450 substrates on the binding of [ 3 H]dextromethorphan, [ 3 H]3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine and (+)-[ 3 H]1,3-Di-o-tolyl-guanidine ([ 3 H]DTG) to the guinea pig brain. SKF 525-A, l-lobeline and GBR-12909 inhibited the binding of the three labeled ligands with nM affinity. Each drug has identical nM K i values for the high-affinity site labeled by the three ligands. This indicated that they displaced the labeled ligands from the common DM 1 σ 1 site. Debrisoquine and sparteine, prototypical substrates for liver debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase, displayed K i values of 9-13 and 3-4 μM respectively against the three labeled ligands. These results, the broad specificity of the DM 1 /σ 1 binding site, and its peculiar subcellular distribution, raises the possibility that this binding site is a member of the cytochrome P-450 superfamily of isozymes, rather than a neurotransmitter receptor

  12. A strategy for increasing the brain uptake of a radioligand in animals: use of a drug that inhibits plasma protein binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haradahira, Terushi E-mail: terushi@nirs.go.jp; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Maeda, Jun; Okauchi, Takashi; Kawabe, Kouichi; Kida, Takayo; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2000-05-01

    A positron-emitter labeled radioligand for the glycine-binding site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, [{sup 11}C]L-703,717, was examined for its ability to penetrate the brain in animals by simultaneous use with drugs having high-affinity separate binding sites on human serum albumin. [{sup 11}C]L-703,717 has poor blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability because it binds tightly to plasma proteins. Co-injection of warfarin (50-200 mg/kg), a drug that binds to albumin and resembles L-703,717 in structure, dose-dependently enhanced the penetration by [{sup 11}C]L-703,717 in mice, resulting in a five-fold increase in the brain radioactivity at 1 min after the injection. Drugs structurally unrelated to L-703,717, salicylate, phenol red, and L-tryptophan, were less effective or ineffective in increasing the uptake of [{sup 11}C]L-703,717. These results suggest that the simultaneous use of a drug that inhibits the binding of a radioligand to plasma proteins is a useful way to overcome the poor BBB permeability of the radioligand triggered by its tight binding to plasma proteins. In brain distribution studies in rodents, it was found that, after the increase in brain uptake with warfarin, much of the glycine site antagonist accumulates in the cerebellum but its pharmacological specificity did not match the glycine site of NMDA receptors.

  13. A strategy for increasing the brain uptake of a radioligand in animals: use of a drug that inhibits plasma protein binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haradahira, Terushi; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Maeda, Jun; Okauchi, Takashi; Kawabe, Kouichi; Kida, Takayo; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2000-01-01

    A positron-emitter labeled radioligand for the glycine-binding site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, [ 11 C]L-703,717, was examined for its ability to penetrate the brain in animals by simultaneous use with drugs having high-affinity separate binding sites on human serum albumin. [ 11 C]L-703,717 has poor blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability because it binds tightly to plasma proteins. Co-injection of warfarin (50-200 mg/kg), a drug that binds to albumin and resembles L-703,717 in structure, dose-dependently enhanced the penetration by [ 11 C]L-703,717 in mice, resulting in a five-fold increase in the brain radioactivity at 1 min after the injection. Drugs structurally unrelated to L-703,717, salicylate, phenol red, and L-tryptophan, were less effective or ineffective in increasing the uptake of [ 11 C]L-703,717. These results suggest that the simultaneous use of a drug that inhibits the binding of a radioligand to plasma proteins is a useful way to overcome the poor BBB permeability of the radioligand triggered by its tight binding to plasma proteins. In brain distribution studies in rodents, it was found that, after the increase in brain uptake with warfarin, much of the glycine site antagonist accumulates in the cerebellum but its pharmacological specificity did not match the glycine site of NMDA receptors

  14. Role of fibronectin in collagen deposition: Fab' to the gelatin-binding domain of fibronectin inhibits both fibronectin and collagen organization in fibroblast extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    We report the effect of Fab' (anti-60k) to a 60,000 mol wt gelatin binding domain of fibronectin (1981, J. Biol. Chem. 256:5583) on diploid fibroblast (IMR-90) extracellular fibronectin and collagen organization. Anti-60k Fab' did not inhibit IMR-90 attachment or proliferation in fibronectin-depleted medium. Fibroblasts cultured with preimmune Fab' deposited a dense extracellular network of fibronectin and collagen detectable by immunofluorescence, while anti-60k Fab' prevented extracellular ...

  15. Hantaan Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Binds to Importin alpha Proteins and Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Induced Activation of Nuclear Factor Kappa B

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-19

    Microbiology . All Rights Reserved. Hantaan Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Binds to Importin Proteins and Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Induced...Division, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702,1 and Department of Microbiology , Mount Sinai...34–36. 32. Prescott , J., C. Ye, G. Sen, and B. Hjelle. 2005. Induction of innate immune response genes by Sin Nombre hantavirus does not require

  16. Structural determinants of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein for cTAR DNA binding and destabilization, and correlation with inhibition of self-primed DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltz, Hervé; Clauss, Céline; Piémont, Etienne; Ficheux, Damien; Gorelick, Robert J; Roques, Bernard; Gabus, Caroline; Darlix, Jean-Luc; de Rocquigny, Hugues; Mély, Yves

    2005-05-20

    The nucleocapsid protein (NC) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is formed of two highly conserved CCHC zinc fingers flanked by small basic domains. NC is required for the two obligatory strand transfers in viral DNA synthesis through its nucleic acid chaperoning properties. The first DNA strand transfer relies on NC's ability to bind and destabilize the secondary structure of complementary transactivation response region (cTAR) DNA, to inhibit self-priming, and to promote the annealing of cTAR to TAR RNA. To further investigate NC chaperone properties, our aim was to identify by fluorescence spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis, the NC structural determinants for cTAR binding and destabilization, and for the inhibition of self-primed DNA synthesis on a model system using a series of NC mutants and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. NC destabilization and self-priming inhibition properties were found to be supported by the two fingers in their proper context and the basic (29)RAPRKKG(35) linker. The strict requirement of the native proximal finger suggests that its hydrophobic platform (Val13, Phe16, Thr24 and Ala25) is crucial for binding, destabilization and inhibition of self-priming. In contrast, only partial folding of the distal finger is required, probably for presenting the Trp37 residue in an appropriate orientation. Also, Trp37 and the hydrophobic residues of the proximal finger appear to be essential for the propagation of the melting from the cTAR ends up to the middle of the stem. Finally, both N-terminal and C-terminal basic domains contribute to cTAR binding but not to its destabilization.

  17. Evaluations of in vitro metabolism, drug-drug interactions mediated by reversible and time-dependent inhibition of CYPs, and plasma protein binding of MMB4 DMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S Peter; Lusiak, Bozena D; Burback, Brian L; Johnson, Jerry D

    2013-01-01

    1,1'-Methylenebis[4-[(hydroxyimino)methyl]-pyridinium] (MMB4) dimethanesulfonate (DMS) is a bisquaternary pyridinium aldoxime that reactivates acetylcholinesterase inhibited by organophosphorus nerve agent. Drug metabolism and plasma protein binding for MMB4 DMS were examined using various techniques and a wide range of species. When (14)C-MMB4 DMS was incubated in liver microsomes, 4-pyridine aldoxime (4-PA) and an additional metabolite were detected in all species tested. Identity of the additional metabolite was postulated to be isonicotinic acid (INA) based on liquid chromatography with a tandem mass spectrometry analysis, which was confirmed by comparison with authentic INA. Formation of INA was dependent on species, with the highest level found in monkey liver microsomes. The MMB4 DMS exhibited reversible inhibition in a concentration-dependent manner toward cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2), CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 in human liver microsomes showing the highest inhibition for CYP2D6. Human recombinant CYPs were used to evaluate inhibitory curves more adequately and determine detailed kinetic constants for reversible inhibition and potential time-dependent inhibition (TDI). The MMB4 DMS exhibited reversible inhibition toward human-recombinant CYP2D6 with an inhibition constant (K i) value of 66.6 µmol/L. Based on the k inact/K I values, MMB4 DMS was found to exhibit the most potent TDI toward CYP2D6. The MMB4 DMS at 5 different concentrations was incubated in plasma for 5 hours using an equilibrium dialysis device. For all species tested, there were no concentration-dependent changes in plasma protein binding, ranging from 10% to 17%. These results suggest that MMB4 was not extensively bound to plasma protein, and there were no overt species-related differences in the extent of MMB4 bound to plasma protein.

  18. Translation of Polioviral mRNA Is Inhibited by Cleavage of Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Proteins Executed by Polioviral 3Cpro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Sung Hoon; Kim, Yoon Ki; Kim, Woo Jae; Cho, Sungchan; Oh, Hoe Rang; Kim, Jung-Eun; Jang, Sung Key

    2002-01-01

    The translation of polioviral mRNA occurs through an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). Several RNA-binding proteins, such as polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) and poly(rC)-binding protein (PCBP), are required for the poliovirus IRES-dependent translation. Here we report that a poliovirus protein, 3Cpro (and/or 3CDpro), cleaves PTB isoforms (PTB1, PTB2, and PTB4). Three 3Cpro target sites (one major target site and two minor target sites) exist in PTBs. PTB fragments generated by poliovirus infection are redistributed to the cytoplasm from the nucleus, where most of the intact PTBs are localized. Moreover, these PTB fragments inhibit polioviral IRES-dependent translation in a cell-based assay system. We speculate that the proteolytic cleavage of PTBs may contribute to the molecular switching from translation to replication of polioviral RNA. PMID:11836431

  19. Desleucyl-Oritavancin with a Damaged d-Ala-d-Ala Binding Site Inhibits the Transpeptidation Step of Cell-Wall Biosynthesis in Whole Cells of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Joon; Singh, Manmilan; Sharif, Shasad; Schaefer, Jacob

    2017-03-14

    We have used solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance to characterize the exact nature of the dual mode of action of oritavancin in preventing cell-wall assembly in Staphylococcus aureus. Measurements performed on whole cells labeled selectively in vivo have established that des-N-methylleucyl-N-4-(4-fluorophenyl)benzyl-chloroeremomycin, an Edman degradation product of [ 19 F]oritavancin, which has a damaged d-Ala-d-Ala binding aglycon, is a potent inhibitor of the transpeptidase activity of cell-wall biosynthesis. The desleucyl drug binds to partially cross-linked peptidoglycan by a cleft formed between the drug aglycon and its biphenyl hydrophobic side chain. This type of binding site is present in other oritavancin-like glycopeptides, which suggests that for these drugs a similar transpeptidase inhibition occurs.

  20. Discovery and characterization of a novel cyclic peptide that effectively inhibits ephrin binding to the EphA4 receptor and displays anti-angiogenesis activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Han

    Full Text Available The EphA4 receptor tyrosine kinase regulates a variety of physiological and pathological processes during neural development and the formation of tumor blood vessels; thus, it represents a new and promising therapeutic target. We used a combination of phage peptide display and computer modeling/docking approaches and discovered a novel cyclic nonapeptide, now designated TYY. This peptide selectively inhibits the binding of the ephrinA5 ligand with EphA4 and significantly blocks angiogenesis in a 3D matrigel culture system. Molecular docking reveals that TYY recognizes the same binding pocket on EphA4 that the natural ephrin ligand binds to and that the Tyr3 and Tyr4 side chains of TYY are both critical for the TYY/EphA4 interaction. The discovery of TYY introduces a valuable probe of EphA4 function and a new lead for EphA4-targeted therapeutic development.

  1. Tiron Inhibits UVB-Induced AP-1 Binding Sites Transcriptional Activation on MMP-1 and MMP-3 Promoters by MAPK Signaling Pathway in Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lu

    Full Text Available Recent research found that Tiron was an effective antioxidant that could act as the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger or alleviate the acute toxic metal overload in vivo. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of Tiron on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression in human dermal fibroblast cells. Western blot and ELISA analysis revealed that Tiron inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB-induced protein expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Real-time quantitative PCR confirmed that Tiron could inhibit UVB-induced mRNA expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Furthermore, Tiron significantly blocked UVB-induced activation of the MAPK signaling pathway and activator protein (AP-1 in the downstream of this transduction pathway in fibroblasts. Through the AP-1 binding site mutation, it was found that Tiron could inhibit AP-1-induced upregulation of MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression through blocking AP-1 binding to the AP-1 binding sites in the MMP-1 and MMP-3 promoter region. In conclusion, Tiron may be a novel antioxidant for preventing and treating skin photoaging UV-induced.

  2. A novel mechanism of RNase L inhibition: Theiler's virus L* protein prevents 2-5A from binding to RNase L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drappier, Melissa; Elliott, Ruth; Zhang, Rong; Weiss, Susan R.; Silverman, Robert H.

    2018-01-01

    The OAS/RNase L pathway is one of the best-characterized effector pathways of the IFN antiviral response. It inhibits the replication of many viruses and ultimately promotes apoptosis of infected cells, contributing to the control of virus spread. However, viruses have evolved a range of escape strategies that act against different steps in the pathway. Here we unraveled a novel escape strategy involving Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) L* protein. Previously we found that L* was the first viral protein binding directly RNase L. Our current data show that L* binds the ankyrin repeats R1 and R2 of RNase L and inhibits 2’-5’ oligoadenylates (2-5A) binding to RNase L. Thereby, L* prevents dimerization and oligomerization of RNase L in response to 2-5A. Using chimeric mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) expressing TMEV L*, we showed that L* efficiently inhibits RNase L in vivo. Interestingly, those data show that L* can functionally substitute for the MHV-encoded phosphodiesterase ns2, which acts upstream of L* in the OAS/RNase L pathway, by degrading 2-5A. PMID:29652922

  3. Modification of Titanium Substrates with Chimeric Peptides Comprising Antimicrobial and Titanium-Binding Motifs Connected by Linkers To Inhibit Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zihao; Ma, Shiqing; Duan, Shun; Xuliang, Deng; Sun, Yingchun; Zhang, Xi; Xu, Xinhua; Guan, Binbin; Wang, Chao; Hu, Meilin; Qi, Xingying; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Ping

    2016-03-02

    Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are the primary causes of implant-associated infection, which is difficult to eliminate and may induce failure in dental implants. Chimeric peptides with both binding and antimicrobial motifs may provide a promising alternative to inhibit biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. In this study, chimeric peptides were designed by connecting an antimicrobial motif (JH8194: KRLFRRWQWRMKKY) with a binding motif (minTBP-1: RKLPDA) directly or via flexible/rigid linkers to modify Ti surfaces. We evaluated the binding behavior of peptides using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques and investigated the effect of the modification of titanium surfaces with these peptides on the bioactivity of Streptococcus gordonii (S. gordonii) and Streptococcus sanguis (S. sanguis). Compared with the flexible linker (GGGGS), the rigid linker (PAPAP) significantly increased the adsorption of the chimeric peptide on titanium surfaces (p chimeric peptide with the rigid linker exhibited more effective antimicrobial ability than the peptide with the flexible linker. This finding was ascribed to the ability of the rigid linker to separate functional domains and reduce their interference to the maximum extent. Consequently, the performance of chimeric peptides with specific titanium-binding motifs and antimicrobial motifs against bacteria can be optimized by the proper selection of linkers. This rational design of chimeric peptides provides a promising alternative to inhibit the formation of biofilms on titanium surfaces with the potential to prevent peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis.

  4. Structure of a Glomulin-RBX1-CUL1 complex: inhibition of a RING E3 ligase through masking of its E2-binding surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, David M.; Olszewski, Jennifer L.; Tron, Adriana E.; Hammel, Michal; Lambert, Lester J.; Waddell, M. Brett; Mittag, Tanja; DeCaprio, James A.; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The ~300 human Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) are multisubunit E3s in which a RING protein, either RBX1 or RBX2, recruits an E2 to catalyze ubiquitination. RBX1-containing CRLs also can bind Glomulin (GLMN), which binds RBX1’s RING domain, regulates the RBX1-CUL1-containing SCFFBW7 complex, and is disrupted in the disease Glomuvenous Malformation. Here we report the crystal structure of a complex between GLMN, RBX1, and a fragment of CUL1. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal that GLMN adopts a HEAT-like repeat fold that tightly binds the E2-interacting surface of RBX1, inhibiting CRL-mediated chain formation by the E2 CDC34. The structure explains the basis for GLMN’s selectivity toward RBX1 over RBX2, and how disease-associated mutations disrupt GLMN-RBX1 interactions. Our study reveals a mechanism for RING E3 ligase regulation whereby an inhibitor blocks E2 access, and raises the possibility that other E3s are likewise controlled by cellular proteins that mask E2-binding surfaces to mediate inhibition. PMID:22748924

  5. Inhibition of [3H]-dihydroalprenolol binding to rat cardiac membranes by various β-blocking agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenieux-Guicheney, P.; Dausse, J.P.; Meyer, P.; Schmitt, H.

    1978-01-01

    Binding of [ 3 H]-dihydroalprenolol ([ 3 H]-DHA) to rat cardiac membranes was rapid and reversible (k 1 = 0.633 to 0.701 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 and ksub(-1) = 0.0017 to 0.0043 s -1 ). [ 3 H]-DHA bound to a single class of binding sites with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Ksub(d25 0 C) of 5.7 +- 1.1 x 10 -9 M. This binding was specific and the order of potency of adrenoceptor agonists in competing for the binding sites was (-)-isoproterenol > (+-)-isoproterenol >(+)-isoproterenol > (-)-adrenaline > (-)-noradrenaline. This was in agreement with the β 1 nature of the cardiac β-receptors. Cardioselective β-blockers (i.e. metoprolol, acebutolol and practolol) were shown to have lower binding site affinities, when compared to other blockers. This may be related to steric hindrance by the side-chain at the aromatic end of these molecules. (author)

  6. DNA hypomethylation of a transcription factor binding site within the promoter of a gout risk gene NRBP1 upregulates its expression by inhibition of TFAP2A binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zaihua; Meng, Weida; Liu, Peiru; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Liu, Yun; Zou, Hejian

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified dozens of loci associated with gout, but for most cases, the risk genes and the underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to these associations are unknown. This study sought to understand the molecular mechanism of a common genetic variant, rs780093, in the development of gout, both in vitro and in vivo. Nuclear receptor binding protein 1 ( NRBP1 ), as a gout risk gene, and its regulatory region, 72 bp upstream of the transcription start site, designated as B1, were identified through integrative analyses of genome-wide genotype and DNA methylation data. We observed elevated NRBP1 expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from gout patients. In vitro luciferase reporter and protein pulldown assay results showed that DNA methylation could increase the binding of the transcription factor TFAP2A to B1, leading to suppressed gene expression. There results were further confirmed by in vivo bisulfite pyrosequencing showing that hypomethylation on B1 is associated with increased NRBP1 expression in gout patients. Hypomethylation at the promoter region of NRBP1 reduces the binding of TFAP2A and thus leads to elevated NRBP1 expression, which might contribute to the development of gout.

  7. Selective inhibition of CTCF binding by iAs directs TET-mediated reprogramming of 5-hydroxymethylation patterns in iAs-transformed cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Matthew; Gripshover, Tyler; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Methylation at cytosine (5mC) is a fundamental epigenetic DNA modification recently associated with iAs-mediated carcinogenesis. In contrast, the role of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), the oxidation product of 5mC in iAs-mediated carcinogenesis is unknown. Here we assess the hydroxymethylome in iAs-transformed cells, showing that dynamic modulation of hydroxymethylated DNA is associated with specific transcriptional networks. Moreover, this pathologic iAs-mediated carcinogenesis is characterized by a shift toward a higher hydroxymethylation pattern genome-wide. At specific promoters, hydroxymethylation correlated with increased gene expression. Furthermore, this increase in hydroxymethylation occurs concurrently with an upregulation of ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes that oxidize 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in DNA. To gain an understanding into how iAs might impact TET expression, we found that iAs inhibits the binding of CTCF at the proximal, weak CTCF binding sites of the TET1 and TET2 gene promoters and enhances CTCF binding at the stronger distal binding site. Further analyses suggest that this distal site acts as an enhancer, thus high CTCF occupancy at the enhancer region of TET1 and TET2 possibly drives their high expression in iAs-transformed cells. These results have major implications in understanding the impact of differential CTCF binding, genome architecture and its consequences in iAs-mediated pathogenesis. PMID:29175454

  8. Human papillomavirus type 16 E2 and E6 are RNA-binding proteins and inhibit in vitro splicing of pre-mRNAs with suboptimal splice sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodaghi, Sohrab; Jia Rong; Zheng Zhiming

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) genome expresses six regulatory proteins (E1, E2, E4, E5, E6, and E7) which regulate viral DNA replication, gene expression, and cell function. We expressed HPV16 E2, E4, E6, and E7 from bacteria as GST fusion proteins and examined their possible functions in RNA splicing. Both HPV16 E2, a viral transactivator protein, and E6, a viral oncoprotein, inhibited splicing of pre-mRNAs containing an intron with suboptimal splice sites, whereas HPV5 E2 did not. The N-terminal half and the hinge region of HPV16 E2 as well as the N-terminal and central portions of HPV16 E6 are responsible for the suppression. HPV16 E2 interacts with pre-mRNAs through its C-terminal DNA-binding domain. HPV16 E6 binds pre-mRNAs via nuclear localization signal (NLS3) in its C-terminal half. Low-risk HPV6 E6, a cytoplasmic protein, does not bind RNA. Notably, both HPV16 E2 and E6 selectively bind to the intron region of pre-mRNAs and interact with a subset of cellular SR proteins. Together, these findings suggest that HPV16 E2 and E6 are RNA binding proteins and might play roles in posttranscriptional regulation during virus infection

  9. Spermine attenuates the action of the DNA intercalator, actinomycin D, on DNA binding and the inhibition of transcription and DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Yu; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Lee, Yueh-Luen; Lai, Yi-Hua; Chen, Jeremy J W; Wu, Wen-Lin; Yuann, Jeu-Ming P; Su, Wang-Lin; Chuang, Show-Mei; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2012-01-01

    The anticancer activity of DNA intercalators is related to their ability to intercalate into the DNA duplex with high affinity, thereby interfering with DNA replication and transcription. Polyamines (spermine in particular) are almost exclusively bound to nucleic acids and are involved in many cellular processes that require nucleic acids. Until now, the effects of polyamines on DNA intercalator activities have remained unclear because intercalation is the most important mechanism employed by DNA-binding drugs. Herein, using actinomycin D (ACTD) as a model, we have attempted to elucidate the effects of spermine on the action of ACTD, including its DNA-binding ability, RNA and DNA polymerase interference, and its role in the transcription and replication inhibition of ACTD within cells. We found that spermine interfered with the binding and stabilization of ACTD to DNA. The presence of increasing concentrations of spermine enhanced the transcriptional and replication activities of RNA and DNA polymerases, respectively, in vitro treated with ActD. Moreover, a decrease in intracellular polyamine concentrations stimulated by methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) enhanced the ACTD-induced inhibition of c-myc transcription and DNA replication in several cancer cell lines. The results indicated that spermine attenuates ACTD binding to DNA and its inhibition of transcription and DNA replication both in vitro and within cells. Finally, a synergistic antiproliferative effect of MGBG and ACTD was observed in a cell viability assay. Our findings will be of significant relevance to future developments in combination with cancer therapy by enhancing the anticancer activity of DNA interactors through polyamine depletion.

  10. Spermine attenuates the action of the DNA intercalator, actinomycin D, on DNA binding and the inhibition of transcription and DNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Yu Wang

    Full Text Available The anticancer activity of DNA intercalators is related to their ability to intercalate into the DNA duplex with high affinity, thereby interfering with DNA replication and transcription. Polyamines (spermine in particular are almost exclusively bound to nucleic acids and are involved in many cellular processes that require nucleic acids. Until now, the effects of polyamines on DNA intercalator activities have remained unclear because intercalation is the most important mechanism employed by DNA-binding drugs. Herein, using actinomycin D (ACTD as a model, we have attempted to elucidate the effects of spermine on the action of ACTD, including its DNA-binding ability, RNA and DNA polymerase interference, and its role in the transcription and replication inhibition of ACTD within cells. We found that spermine interfered with the binding and stabilization of ACTD to DNA. The presence of increasing concentrations of spermine enhanced the transcriptional and replication activities of RNA and DNA polymerases, respectively, in vitro treated with ActD. Moreover, a decrease in intracellular polyamine concentrations stimulated by methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone (MGBG enhanced the ACTD-induced inhibition of c-myc transcription and DNA replication in several cancer cell lines. The results indicated that spermine attenuates ACTD binding to DNA and its inhibition of transcription and DNA replication both in vitro and within cells. Finally, a synergistic antiproliferative effect of MGBG and ACTD was observed in a cell viability assay. Our findings will be of significant relevance to future developments in combination with cancer therapy by enhancing the anticancer activity of DNA interactors through polyamine depletion.

  11. Structural Characterisation Reveals Mechanism of IL-13-Neutralising Monoclonal Antibody Tralokinumab as Inhibition of Binding to IL-13Rα1 and IL-13Rα2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, B; Breed, J; Rees, D G; Gardener, M J; Vinall, L M K; Kemp, B; Spooner, J; Keen, J; Minter, R; Uddin, F; Colice, G; Wilkinson, T; Vaughan, T; May, R D

    2017-01-20

    Interleukin (IL)-13 is a pleiotropic T helper type 2 cytokine frequently associated with asthma and atopic dermatitis. IL-13-mediated signalling is initiated by binding to IL-13Rα1, which then recruits IL-4Rα to form a heterodimeric receptor complex. IL-13 also binds to IL-13Rα2, considered as either a decoy or a key mediator of fibrosis. IL-13-neutralising antibodies act by preventing IL-13 binding to IL-13Rα1, IL-4Rα and/or IL-13Rα2. Tralokinumab (CAT-354) is an IL-13-neutralising human IgG4 monoclonal antibody that has shown clinical benefit in patients with asthma. To decipher how tralokinumab inhibits the effects of IL-13, we determined the structure of tralokinumab Fab in complex with human IL-13 to 2 Å resolution. The structure analysis reveals that tralokinumab prevents IL-13 from binding to both IL-13Rα1 and IL-13Rα2. This is supported by biochemical ligand-receptor interaction assay data. The tralokinumab epitope is mainly composed of residues in helices D and A of IL-13. It is mostly light chain complementarity-determining regions that are driving paratope interactions; the variable light complementarity-determining region 2 plays a key role by providing residue contacts for a network of hydrogen bonds and a salt bridge in the core of binding. The key residues within the paratope contributing to binding were identified as Asp50, Asp51, Ser30 and Lys31. This study demonstrates that tralokinumab prevents the IL-13 pharmacodynamic effect by binding to IL-13 helices A and D, thus preventing IL-13 from interacting with IL-13Rα1 and IL-13Rα2. Copyright © 2016 AstraZeneca. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Candida glabrata binds to glycosylated and lectinic receptors on the coronary endothelial luminal membrane and inhibits flow sense and cardiac responses to agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Tirado, David; Knabb, Maureen; Castaño, Irene; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Rubio, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata (CG) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that initiates infection by binding to host cells via specific lectin-like adhesin proteins. We have previously shown the importance of lectin-oligosaccharide binding in cardiac responses to flow and agonists. Because of the lectinic-oligosaccharide nature of CG binding, we tested the ability of CG to alter the agonist- and flow-induced changes in cardiac function in isolated perfused guinea pig hearts. Both transmission and scanning electron microscopy showed strong attachment of CG to the coronary endothelium, even after extensive washing. CG shifted the coronary flow vs. auricular-ventricular (AV) delay relationship upward, indicating that greater flow was required to achieve the same AV delay. This effect was completely reversed with mannose, partially reversed with galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine, but hyaluronan had no effect. Western blot analysis was used to determine binding of CG to isolated coronary endothelial luminal membrane (CELM) receptors, and the results indicate that flow-sensitive CELM receptors, ANG II type I, α-adrenergic 1A receptor, endothelin-2, and VCAM-1 bind to CG. In addition, CG inhibited agonist-induced effects of bradykinin, angiotensin, and phenylephrine on AV delay, coronary perfusion pressure, and left ventricular pressure. Mannose reversed the inhibitory effects of CG on the agonist responses. These results suggest that CG directly binds to flow-sensitive CELM receptors via lectinic-oligosaccharide interactions with mannose and disrupts the lectin-oligosaccharide binding necessary for flow-induced cardiac responses. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Identification of constrained peptides that bind to and preferentially inhibit the activity of the hepatitis C viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Anthony; Zaccardi, Joe; Mullen, Stanley; Olland, Stephane; Orlowski, Mark; Feld, Boris; Labonte, Patrick; Mak, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A class of disulfide constrained peptides containing a core motif FPWG was identified from a screen of phage displayed library using the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B) as a bait. Surface plasmon resonance studies showed that three highly purified synthetic constrained peptides bound to immobilized NS5B with estimated K d values ranging from 30 to 60 μM. In addition, these peptides inhibited the NS5B activity in vitro with IC 50 ranging from 6 to 48 μM, whereas in contrast they had no inhibitory effect on the enzymatic activities of calf thymus polymerase α, human polymerase β, RSV polymerase, and HIV reverse transcriptase in vitro. Two peptides demonstrated conformation-dependent inhibition since their synthetic linear versions were not inhibitory in the NS5B assay. A constrained peptide with the minimum core motif FPWG retained selective inhibition of NS5B activity with an IC 50 of 50 μM. Alanine scan analyses of a representative constrained peptide, FPWGNTW, indicated that residues F1 and W7 were critical for the inhibitory effect of this peptide, although residues P2 and N5 had some measurable inhibitory effect as well. Further analyses of the mechanism of inhibition indicated that these peptides inhibited the formation of preelongation complexes required for the elongation reaction. However, once the preelongation complex was formed, its activity was refractory to peptide inhibition. Furthermore, the constrained peptide FPWGNTW inhibited de novo initiated RNA synthesis by NS5B from a poly(rC) template. These data indicate that the peptides confer selective inhibition of NS5B activity by binding to the enzyme and perturbing an early step preceding the processive elongation step of RNA synthesis

  14. Honokiol reverses alcoholic fatty liver by inhibiting the maturation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c and the expression of its downstream lipogenesis genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Huquan; Kim, Youn-Chul; Chung, Young-Suk; Kim, Young-Chul; Shin, Young-Kee; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol induces hepatic steatosis via a complex mechanism that is not well understood. Among the variety of molecules that have been proposed to participate in this mechanism, the sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding proteins (SREBPs) have been identified as attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of honokiol on alcoholic steatosis and investigated its possible effect on the inhibition of SREBP-1c maturation. In in vitro studies, H4IIEC3 rat hepatoma cells developed increased lipid droplets when exposed to ethanol, but co-treatment with honokiol reversed this effect. Honokiol inhibited the maturation of SREBP-1c and its translocation to the nucleus, the binding of nSREBP-1c to SRE or SRE-related sequences of its lipogenic target genes, and the expression of genes for fatty acid synthesis. In contrast, magnolol, a structural isomer of honokiol, had no effect on nSREBP-1c levels. Male Wistar rats fed with a standard Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet for 4 weeks exhibited increased hepatic triglyceride and decreased hepatic glutathione levels, with concomitantly increased serum alanine aminotransferase and TNF-α levels. Daily administration of honokiol (10 mg/kg body weight) by gavage during the final 2 weeks of ethanol treatment completely reversed these effects on hepatotoxicity markers, including hepatic triglyceride, hepatic glutathione, and serum TNF-α, with efficacious abrogation of fat accumulation in the liver. Inhibition of SREBP-1c protein maturation and of the expression of Srebf1c and its target genes for hepatic lipogenesis were also observed in vivo. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated inhibition of specific binding of SREBP-1c to the Fas promoter by honokiol in vivo. These results demonstrate that honokiol has the potential to ameliorate alcoholic steatosis by blocking fatty acid synthesis regulated by SREBP-1c

  15. Inhibition of HCV replication by oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 4 (ORP4 through interaction with HCV NS5B and alteration of lipid droplet formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Woo Park

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA replication involves complex interactions among the 3'x RNA element within the HCV 3' untranslated region, viral and host proteins. However, many of the host proteins remain unknown. In this study, we devised an RNA affinity chromatography /2D/MASS proteomics strategy and identified nine putative 3' X-associated host proteins; among them is oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 4 (ORP4, a cytoplasmic receptor for oxysterols. We determined the relationship between ORP4 expression and HCV replication. A very low level of constitutive ORP4 expression was detected in hepatocytes. Ectopically expressed ORP4 was detected in the endoplasmic reticulum and inhibited luciferase reporter gene expression in HCV subgenomic replicon cells and HCV core expression in JFH-1-infected cells. Expression of ORP4S, an ORP4 variant that lacked the N-terminal pleckstrin-homology domain but contained the C-terminal oxysterol-binding domain also inhibited HCV replication, pointing to an important role of the oxysterol-binding domain in ORP4-mediated inhibition of HCV replication. ORP4 was found to associate with HCV NS5B and its expression led to inhibition of the NS5B activity. ORP4 expression had little effect on intracellular lipid synthesis and secretion, but it induced lipid droplet formation in the context of HCV replication. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ORP4 is a negative regulator of HCV replication, likely via interaction with HCV NS5B in the replication complex and regulation of intracellular lipid homeostasis. This work supports the important role of lipids and their metabolism in HCV replication and pathogenesis.

  16. Mechanism of selective VEGF-A binding by neuropilin-1 reveals a basis for specific ligand inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Parker

    Full Text Available Neuropilin (Nrp receptors function as essential cell surface receptors for the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF family of proangiogenic cytokines and the semaphorin 3 (Sema3 family of axon guidance molecules. There are two Nrp homologues, Nrp1 and Nrp2, which bind to both overlapping and distinct members of the VEGF and Sema3 family of molecules. Nrp1 specifically binds the VEGF-A(164/5 isoform, which is essential for developmental angiogenesis. We demonstrate that VEGF-A specific binding is governed by Nrp1 residues in the b1 coagulation factor domain surrounding the invariant Nrp C-terminal arginine binding pocket. Further, we show that Sema3F does not display the Nrp-specific binding to the b1 domain seen with VEGF-A. Engineered soluble Nrp receptor fragments that selectively sequester ligands from the active signaling complex are an attractive modality for selectively blocking the angiogenic and chemorepulsive functions of Nrp ligands. Utilizing the information on Nrp ligand binding specificity, we demonstrate Nrp constructs that specifically sequester Sema3 in the presence of VEGF-A. This establishes that unique mechanisms are used by Nrp receptors to mediate specific ligand binding and that these differences can be exploited to engineer soluble Nrp receptors with specificity for Sema3.

  17. Kinetics of [123I]iodide uptake and discharge by perchlorate in studies of inhibition of iodide binding by antithyroid drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCruden, D.C.; Connell, J.M.C.; Alexander, W.D.; Hilditch, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    Thyroidal binding of iodide was studied by kinetic analysis of [ 123 ]iodide uptake and its discharge by perchlorate in 80 hyperthyroid subjects receiving antithyroid drug therapy. Five dosage regimens ranging from 5 mg carbimazole twice daily to 15 mg methimazole twice daily were studied. Binding inhibition was estimated at 5-7 h after drug as an index of the mean effect of the 12 hourly regimen. In all cases, except one in the lowest dose group, binding was found to be markedly reduced with mean binding rates ranging from 0.002 to 0.020 min -1 (normal > 0.15 min -1 ). The net clearance of iodide in the lowest dose group was reduced to a mean value near the upper limit of the euthyroid range, whereas in the highest dose group it lay at the lower limit of the euthyroid range. These results were reflected in the serum thyroid hormone response. There was a reducing incidence of inadequate control of hyperthyroidism and an increasing incidence of hypothyroidism with increasing thiourylene dose. The exit rate constant of free iodide for the various doses showed values from 0.048 to 0.055 min -1 . Correpsonding mean values for the discharge rate constant after perchlorate were 0.087 to 0.105 min -1 . This suggests that perchlorate increases the rate of iodide release from the thyroid gland. Studies at a later interval after drug (12-14 h) showed no change in discharge rate constant. This leads to the conclusion that perchlorate may further inhibit iodide binding in subjects receiving antithyroid drug therapy. (author)

  18. CO2 enrichment inhibits shoot nitrate assimilation in C3 but not C4 plants and slows growth under nitrate in C3 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Arnold J; Asensio, Jose Salvador Rubaio; Randall, Lesley; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Cousins, Asaph B; Carlisle, Eli A

    2012-02-01

    The CO2 concentration in Earth's atmosphere may double during this century. Plant responses to such an increase depend strongly on their nitrogen status, but the reasons have been uncertain. Here, we assessed shoot nitrate assimilation into amino acids via the shift in shoot CO2 and O2 fluxes when plants received nitrate instead of ammonium as a nitrogen source (deltaAQ). Shoot nitrate assimilation became negligible with increasing CO2 in a taxonomically diverse group of eight C3 plant species, was relatively insensitive to CO2 in three C4 species, and showed an intermediate sensitivity in two C3-C4 intermediate species. We then examined the influence of CO2 level and ammonium vs. nitrate nutrition on growth, assessed in terms of changes in fresh mass, of several C3 species and a Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species. Elevated CO2 (720 micromol CO2/mol of all gases present) stimulated growth or had no effect in the five C3 species tested when they received ammonium as a nitrogen source but inhibited growth or had no effect if they received nitrate. Under nitrate, two C3 species grew faster at sub-ambient (approximately 310 micromol/mol) than elevated CO2. A CAM species grew faster at ambient than elevated or sub-ambient CO2 under either ammonium or nitrate nutrition. This study establishes that CO2 enrichment inhibits shoot nitrate assimilation in a wide variety of C3 plants and that this phenomenon can have a profound effect on their growth. This indicates that shoot nitrate assimilation provides an important contribution to the nitrate assimilation of an entire C3 plant. Thus, rising CO2 and its effects on shoot nitrate assimilation may influence the distribution of C3 plant species.

  19. Characterization of the in vitro binding and inhibition kinetics of primary amine oxidase/vascular adhesion protein-1 by glucosamine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Olivieri, Aldo

    2012-04-01

    Primary-amine oxidase (PrAO) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of endogenous and exogenous primary amines and also functions, in some tissues, as an inflammation-inducible endothelial factor, known as vascular adhesion protein-1. VAP-1 mediates the slow rolling and adhesion of lymphocytes to endothelial cells in a number of inflammatory conditions, including inflammation of the synovium.

  20. Stimulation of a Cd-binding protein, and inhibition of the vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein, by zinc or cadmium in organ-cultured embryonic chick duodenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradino, R.A.; Fullmer, C.S.

    1980-01-01

    Embryonic chick duodenum maintained in organ culture responds to 1 α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 in the culture medium by de novo synthesis of a specific calcium-binding protein (CaBP). The addition of Cd 2+ (3-5 x 10 -5 M) or Zn 2+ (10 -5 -10 -4 M) to the medium inhibited CaBP, but stimulated biosynthesis of a Cd-binding protein (CdBP). CdBP in duodenal homogenate supernatants was assessed in two ways: first, by its 109 Cd-binding activity ( 109 CdBA) using a competitive ion exchange procedure; and, second, by the extent of [ 35 S]-cystine incorporation into a specific peak or band after gel filtration or analytical polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis, respectively. Regardless of whether cadmium- or zinc-stimulated, the 35 S-labeled CdBP - the only protein significantly labeled under the conditions employed - migrated identically upon gel filtration and electrophoresis, and comigrated with purified chick liver Cd-metallothionein. Neither actinomycin D nor α-amanitin, in concentrations sufficient to severely inhibit CaBP, significantly reduced CdBP production. However, cycloheximide did inhibit either Cd 2+ - or Zn 2+ -stimulated CdBP by about 50% at an inhibitor concentration which abolished CaBP. The inhibitor studies, coupled with the observations of extensive incorporation of [ 35 S]cystine into CdBP, suggest that the metals stimulated biosynthesis by a mechanism operating at the translational level. The organ-cultured duodenum seems well suited for studies of the regulation of CdBP biosynthesis especially since it responds predictably to the steroid hormone, 1α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 , in the induction of another specific protein, CaBP, at the transcriptional level. The biosynthesis of CaBP thus may serve as a convenient control in studies of CdBP production under various experimental conditions

  1. A novel small molecule inhibits STAT3 phosphorylation and DNA binding activity and exhibits potent growth suppressive activity in human cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeting Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3 signaling is an attractive therapeutic approach for most types of human cancers with constitutively activated STAT3. A novel small molecular STAT3 inhibitor, FLLL32 was specifically designed from dietary agent, curcumin to inhibit constitutive STAT3 signaling in multiple myeloma, glioblastoma, liver cancer, and colorectal cancer cells. Results FLLL32 was found to be a potent inhibitor of STAT3 phosphorylation, STAT3 DNA binding activity, and the expression of STAT3 downstream target genes in vitro, leading to the inhibition of cell proliferation as well as the induction of Caspase-3 and PARP cleavages in human multiple myeloma, glioblastoma, liver cancer, and colorectal cancer cell lines. However, FLLL32 exhibited little inhibition on some tyrosine kinases containing SH2 or both SH2 and SH3 domains, and other protein and lipid kinases using a kinase profile assay. FLLL32 was also more potent than four previously reported JAK2 and STAT3 inhibitors as well as curcumin to inhibit cell viability in these cancer cells. Furthermore, FLLL32 selectively inhibited the induction of STAT3 phosphorylation by Interleukin-6 but not STAT1 phosphorylation by IFN-γ. Conclusion Our findings indicate that FLLL32 exhibits potent inhibitory activity to STAT3 and has potential for targeting multiple myeloma, glioblastoma, liver cancer, and colorectal cancer cells expressing constitutive STAT3 signaling.

  2. Inhibition of triacylglycerol and apoprotein B secretion and of low density lipoprotein binding in Hep G2 cells by eicosapentaenoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, S.H.; Nestel, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The consumption of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids of fish oils leads to profound lowering of plasma triacylglyercol (TAG) but not of plasma cholesterol. Reasons for this were investigated with the human hepatoma cell line, the Hep G2 cell. Incubations with oleic acid (OA), linoleic acid (LA) and the characteristic marine fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) enriched cellular TAG mass, though least with EPA. However, secretion of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TAG and apoprotein B (apo B), measured from [ 3 H]-glycerol and [ 3 H]-leucine was markedly inhibited by EPA. Preincubation with LA reduced VLDL-TAG but not apo B secretion in comparison with OA which stimulated both. A possible effect on low density lipoprotein (LDL) removal was studied by measuring [ 125 I]-LDL binding. Preincubation with either EPA or LA inhibited the saturable binding of LDL, observed with OA and control incubations. The binding of lipoproteins containing chylomicron remnants was not affected by any of the fatty acids

  3. Endothelial galectin-1 binds to specific glycans on nipah virus fusion protein and inhibits maturation, mobility, and function to block syncytia formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omai B Garner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Nipah virus targets human endothelial cells via NiV-F and NiV-G envelope glycoproteins, resulting in endothelial syncytia formation and vascular compromise. Endothelial cells respond to viral infection by releasing innate immune effectors, including galectins, which are secreted proteins that bind to specific glycan ligands on cell surface glycoproteins. We demonstrate that galectin-1 reduces NiV-F mediated fusion of endothelial cells, and that endogenous galectin-1 in endothelial cells is sufficient to inhibit syncytia formation. Galectin-1 regulates NiV-F mediated cell fusion at three distinct points, including retarding maturation of nascent NiV-F, reducing NiV-F lateral mobility on the plasma membrane, and directly inhibiting the conformational change in NiV-F required for triggering fusion. Characterization of the NiV-F N-glycome showed that the critical site for galectin-1 inhibition is rich in glycan structures known to bind galectin-1. These studies identify a unique set of mechanisms for regulating pathophysiology of NiV infection at the level of the target cell.

  4. Regulation of synaptic inhibition by phospho-dependent binding of the AP2 complex to a YECL motif in the GABAA receptor γ2 subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittler, Josef T.; Chen, Guojun; Kukhtina, Viktoria; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Gu, Zhenglin; Tretter, Verena; Smith, Katharine R.; McAinsh, Kristina; Arancibia-Carcamo, I. Lorena; Saenger, Wolfram; Haucke, Volker; Yan, Zhen; Moss, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    The regulation of the number of γ2-subunit-containing GABAA receptors (GABAARs) present at synapses is critical for correct synaptic inhibition and animal behavior. This regulation occurs, in part, by the controlled removal of receptors from the membrane in clathrin-coated vesicles, but it remains unclear how clathrin recruitment to surface γ2-subunit-containing GABAARs is regulated. Here, we identify a γ2-subunit-specific Yxxφ-type-binding motif for the clathrin adaptor protein, AP2, which is located within a site for γ2-subunit tyrosine phosphorylation. Blocking GABAAR-AP2 interactions via this motif increases synaptic responses within minutes. Crystallographic and biochemical studies reveal that phosphorylation of the Yxxφ motif inhibits AP2 binding, leading to increased surface receptor number. In addition, the crystal structure provides an explanation for the high affinity of this motif for AP2 and suggests that γ2-subunit-containing heteromeric GABAARs may be internalized as dimers or multimers. These data define a mechanism for tyrosine kinase regulation of GABAAR surface levels and synaptic inhibition. PMID:18305175

  5. Regulation of synaptic inhibition by phospho-dependent binding of the AP2 complex to a YECL motif in the GABAA receptor gamma2 subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittler, Josef T; Chen, Guojun; Kukhtina, Viktoria; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Gu, Zhenglin; Tretter, Verena; Smith, Katharine R; McAinsh, Kristina; Arancibia-Carcamo, I Lorena; Saenger, Wolfram; Haucke, Volker; Yan, Zhen; Moss, Stephen J

    2008-03-04

    The regulation of the number of gamma2-subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) present at synapses is critical for correct synaptic inhibition and animal behavior. This regulation occurs, in part, by the controlled removal of receptors from the membrane in clathrin-coated vesicles, but it remains unclear how clathrin recruitment to surface gamma2-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs is regulated. Here, we identify a gamma2-subunit-specific Yxxvarphi-type-binding motif for the clathrin adaptor protein, AP2, which is located within a site for gamma2-subunit tyrosine phosphorylation. Blocking GABA(A)R-AP2 interactions via this motif increases synaptic responses within minutes. Crystallographic and biochemical studies reveal that phosphorylation of the Yxxvarphi motif inhibits AP2 binding, leading to increased surface receptor number. In addition, the crystal structure provides an explanation for the high affinity of this motif for AP2 and suggests that gamma2-subunit-containing heteromeric GABA(A)Rs may be internalized as dimers or multimers. These data define a mechanism for tyrosine kinase regulation of GABA(A)R surface levels and synaptic inhibition.

  6. Concanavalin A-binding cholesterol crystallization inhibiting and promoting activity in bile from patients with Crohn's disease compared to patients with ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keulemans, Y C; Mok, K S; Slors, J F; Brink, M A; Gouma, D J; Tytgat, G N; Groen, A K

    1999-10-01

    Crohn's disease is a risk factor for gallstone formation. In contrast, patients with ulcerative colitis have an incidence of gallstone formation comparable to the general population. The reason for this difference is not known. The aim of this study was to elucidate the factors controlling cholesterol crystallization in gallbladder bile of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients. Gallbladder bile was obtained by aspiration during bowel resections (26 Crohn's disease patients, 20 ulcerative colitis patients). Biliary lipid composition, crystal detection time and the effect of extraction of the concanavalin A-binding fraction on crystal formation were determined. Cholesterol crystals were present in seven of the 26 bile samples of Crohn's disease-patients and one of the 20 ulcerative colitis patients. Four of the bile samples of Crohn's disease patients were fast nucleating. None of the 20 ulcerative colitis patients had fast nucleating bile. Lipid composition, total lipid concentration and CSI were not significantly different between the two groups. In Crohn's disease patients extraction of concanavalin A-binding fraction decreased crystallization in 10 bile samples but accelerated crystallization in one bile sample. In eight bile samples from ulcerative colitis patients crystallization increased after concanavalin A-binding fraction extraction. Compared to ulcerative colitis patients, gallbladder bile of Crohn's disease patients showed increased cholesterol crystallization despite comparable lipid composition and cholesterol saturation index. This difference is caused by increased cholesterol crystallization-promoting activity. Bile from ulcerative colitis patients contains a Con A-binding factor which inhibits cholesterol crystallization.

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis nucleoid-associated DNA-binding protein H-NS binds with high-affinity to the Holliday junction and inhibits strand exchange promoted by RecA protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharadamma, N; Harshavardhana, Y; Singh, Pawan; Muniyappa, K

    2010-06-01

    A number of studies have shown that the structure and composition of bacterial nucleoid influences many a processes related to DNA metabolism. The nucleoid-associated proteins modulate not only the DNA conformation but also regulate the DNA metabolic processes such as replication, recombination, repair and transcription. Understanding of how these processes occur in the context of Mycobacterium tuberculosis nucleoid is of considerable medical importance because the nucleoid structure may be constantly remodeled in response to environmental signals and/or growth conditions. Many studies have concluded that Escherichia coli H-NS binds to DNA in a sequence-independent manner, with a preference for A-/T-rich tracts in curved DNA; however, recent studies have identified the existence of medium- and low-affinity binding sites in the vicinity of the curved DNA. Here, we show that the M. tuberculosis H-NS protein binds in a more structure-specific manner to DNA replication and repair intermediates, but displays lower affinity for double-stranded DNA with relatively higher GC content. Notably, M. tuberculosis H-NS was able to bind Holliday junction (HJ), the central recombination intermediate, with substantially higher affinity and inhibited the three-strand exchange promoted by its cognate RecA. Likewise, E. coli H-NS was able to bind the HJ and suppress DNA strand exchange promoted by E. coli RecA, although much less efficiently compared to M. tuberculosis H-NS. Our results provide new insights into a previously unrecognized function of H-NS protein, with implications for blocking the genome integration of horizontally transferred genes by homologous and/or homeologous recombination.

  8. FROM SLOW FOOD TO SLOW TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bac Dorin Paul

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the effects of globalization is the faster pace of our lives. This rhythm can be noticed in all aspects of life: travel, work, shopping, etc. and it has serious negative effects. It has become common knowledge that stress and speed generate serious medical issues. Food and eating habits in the modern world have taken their toll on our health. However, some people took a stand and argued for a new kind of lifestyle. It all started in the field of gastronomy, where a new movement emerged – Slow Food, based on the ideas and philosophy of Carlo Petrini. Slow Food represents an important adversary to the concept of fast food, and is promoting local products, enjoyable meals and healthy food. The philosophy of the Slow Food movement developed in several directions: Cittaslow, slow travel and tourism, slow religion and slow money etc. The present paper will account the evolution of the concept and its development during the most recent years. We will present how the philosophy of slow food was applied in all the other fields it reached and some critical points of view. Also we will focus on the presence of the slow movement in Romania, although it is in a very early stage of development. The main objectives of the present paper are: to present the chronological and ideological evolution of the slow movement; to establish a clear separation of slow travel and slow tourism, as many mistake on for the other; to review the presence of the slow movement in Romania. Regarding the research methodology, information was gathered from relevant academic papers and books and also from interviews and discussions with local entrepreneurs. The research is mostly theoretical and empirical, as slow food and slow tourism are emerging research themes in academic circles.

  9. Quercetin suppresses insulin receptor signaling through inhibition of the insulin ligand–receptor binding and therefore impairs cancer cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng [Department of Gastroenterology, The Tenth People’s Hospital of Shanghai, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Yang, Yong, E-mail: yyang@houstonmethodist.org [Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2014-10-03

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quercetin inhibits insulin ligand–receptor interactions. • Quercetin reduces downstream insulin receptor signaling. • Quercetin blocks insulin induced glucose uptake. • Quercetin suppresses insulin stimulated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. - Abstract: Although the flavonoid quercetin is known to inhibit activation of insulin receptor signaling, the inhibitory mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin suppresses insulin induced dimerization of the insulin receptor (IR) through interfering with ligand–receptor interactions, which reduces the phosphorylation of IR and Akt. This inhibitory effect further inhibits insulin stimulated glucose uptake due to decreased cell membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), resulting in impaired cancer cell proliferation. The effect of quercetin in inhibiting tumor growth was also evident in an in vivo model, indicating a potential future application for quercetin in the treatment of cancers.

  10. Quercetin suppresses insulin receptor signaling through inhibition of the insulin ligand–receptor binding and therefore impairs cancer cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Feng; Yang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quercetin inhibits insulin ligand–receptor interactions. • Quercetin reduces downstream insulin receptor signaling. • Quercetin blocks insulin induced glucose uptake. • Quercetin suppresses insulin stimulated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. - Abstract: Although the flavonoid quercetin is known to inhibit activation of insulin receptor signaling, the inhibitory mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin suppresses insulin induced dimerization of the insulin receptor (IR) through interfering with ligand–receptor interactions, which reduces the phosphorylation of IR and Akt. This inhibitory effect further inhibits insulin stimulated glucose uptake due to decreased cell membrane translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), resulting in impaired cancer cell proliferation. The effect of quercetin in inhibiting tumor growth was also evident in an in vivo model, indicating a potential future application for quercetin in the treatment of cancers

  11. Movement - uncontrolled or slow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dystonia; Involuntary slow and twisting movements; Choreoathetosis; Leg and arm movements - uncontrollable; Arm and leg movements - uncontrollable; Slow involuntary movements of large muscle groups; Athetoid movements

  12. Proteasome Inhibition Contributed to the Cytotoxicity of Arenobufagin after Its Binding with Na, K-ATPase in Human Cervical Carcinoma HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Qingxi; Zhen, Hong; Huang, Ming; Zheng, Xi; Feng, Lixing; Jiang, Baohong; Yang, Min; Wu, Wanying; Liu, Xuan; Guo, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Although the possibility of developing cardiac steroids/cardiac glycosides as novel cancer therapeutic agents has been recognized, the mechanism of their anticancer activity is still not clear enough. Toad venom extract containing bufadienolides, which belong to cardiac steroids, has actually long been used as traditional Chinese medicine in clinic for cancer therapy in China. The cytotoxicity of arenobufagin, a bufadienolide isolated from toad venom, on human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells was checked. And, the protein expression profile of control HeLa cells and HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin for 48 h was analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis, respectively. Differently expressed proteins in HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin were identified and the pathways related to these proteins were mapped from KEGG database. Computational molecular docking was performed to verify the binding of arenobufagin and Na, K-ATPase. The effects of arenobufagin on Na, K-ATPase activity and proteasome activity of HeLa cells were checked. The protein-protein interaction network between Na, K-ATPase and proteasome was constructed and the expression of possible intermediate proteins ataxin-1 and translationally-controlled tumor protein in HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin was then checked. Arenobufagin induced apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells. The cytotoxic effect of arenobufagin was associated with 25 differently expressed proteins including proteasome-related proteins, calcium ion binding-related proteins, oxidative stress-related proteins, metabolism-related enzymes and others. The results of computational molecular docking revealed that arenobufagin was bound in the cavity formed by the transmembrane alpha subunits of Na, K-ATPase, which blocked the pathway of extracellular Na+/K+ cation exchange and inhibited the function of ion exchange. Arenobufagin inhibited the activity of Na, K-ATPase and proteasome, decreased the expression of Na, K

  13. Proteasome Inhibition Contributed to the Cytotoxicity of Arenobufagin after Its Binding with Na, K-ATPase in Human Cervical Carcinoma HeLa Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingxi Yue

    Full Text Available Although the possibility of developing cardiac steroids/cardiac glycosides as novel cancer therapeutic agents has been recognized, the mechanism of their anticancer activity is still not clear enough. Toad venom extract containing bufadienolides, which belong to cardiac steroids, has actually long been used as traditional Chinese medicine in clinic for cancer therapy in China. The cytotoxicity of arenobufagin, a bufadienolide isolated from toad venom, on human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells was checked. And, the protein expression profile of control HeLa cells and HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin for 48 h was analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis, respectively. Differently expressed proteins in HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin were identified and the pathways related to these proteins were mapped from KEGG database. Computational molecular docking was performed to verify the binding of arenobufagin and Na, K-ATPase. The effects of arenobufagin on Na, K-ATPase activity and proteasome activity of HeLa cells were checked. The protein-protein interaction network between Na, K-ATPase and proteasome was constructed and the expression of possible intermediate proteins ataxin-1 and translationally-controlled tumor protein in HeLa cells treated with arenobufagin was then checked. Arenobufagin induced apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells. The cytotoxic effect of arenobufagin was associated with 25 differently expressed proteins including proteasome-related proteins, calcium ion binding-related proteins, oxidative stress-related proteins, metabolism-related enzymes and others. The results of computational molecular docking revealed that arenobufagin was bound in the cavity formed by the transmembrane alpha subunits of Na, K-ATPase, which blocked the pathway of extracellular Na+/K+ cation exchange and inhibited the function of ion exchange. Arenobufagin inhibited the activity of Na, K-ATPase and proteasome, decreased the

  14. In vitro characterization of luseogliflozin, a potent and competitive sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor: Inhibition kinetics and binding studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeko Uchida

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated an inhibition model of luseogliflozin on sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2. We also analyzed the binding kinetics of the drug to SGLT2 protein using [3H]-luseogliflozin. Luseogliflozin competitively inhibited human SGLT2 (hSGLT2-mediated glucose uptake with a Ki value of 1.10 nM. In the absence of glucose, [3H]-luseogliflozin exhibited a high affinity for hSGLT2 with a Kd value of 1.3 nM. The dissociation half-time was 7 h, suggesting that luseogliflozin dissociates rather slowly from hSGLT2. These profiles of luseogliflozin might contribute to the long duration of action of this drug.

  15. Lauric acid and myristic acid from Allium sativum inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra: in silico analysis reveals possible binding to protein kinase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniyan, Rajiniraja; Gurunathan, Jayaraman

    2016-12-01

    The bulb of Allium sativum Linn (Alliaceae) has numerous medicinal values. Though the petroleum ether extract of the bulb has shown to exhibit antimycobacterial activity, the phytochemical(s) responsible for this inhibitory activity is not known. To characterize the bioactive compounds in the petroleum ether extract of Allium sativum (garlic) that inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra. Bioactivity-guided fractionation was employed to isolate the bioactive compounds. Antimycobacterial activity was evaluated by well-diffusion method and microplate alamar blue assay (MABA). Infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to characterize the bioactive compounds. Autodock was used to obtain information on molecular recognition, and molecular dynamics simulation was performed using GROMACS. The bioactive compounds that inhibited the growth of M. tuberculosis H37Ra were found to be lauric acid (LA) and myristic acid (MA). The minimal inhibitory concentration of LA and MA was found to be 22.2 and 66.7 μg/mL, respectively. In silico analysis revealed that these fatty acids could bind at the cleft between the N-terminal and C-terminal lobes of the cytosolic domain of serine/threonine protein kinase B (PknB). The inhibition activity was dependent on the alkyl chain length of the fatty acid, and the amino acid residues involved in binding to fatty acid was found to be conserved across the Pkn family of proteins. The study indicates the possibility of using fatty acid derivatives, involving Pkn family of proteins, to inhibit the signal transduction processes in M. tuberculosis.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide-induced inhibition of transcription of tlr4 in vitro is reversed by dexamethasone and correlates with presence of conserved NFκB binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, Camila P., E-mail: mila_bonin@yahoo.com.br [Department of Immunology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Baccarin, Raquel Y.A., E-mail: baccarin@usp.br [Department of Clinics, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Nostell, Katarina, E-mail: katarina.nostell@slu.se [Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7054, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Nahum, Laila A., E-mail: laila@nahum.com.br [Centro de Pesquisas René Rachou, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Belo Horizonte 30190-002 (Brazil); Faculdade Infórium de Tecnologia, Belo Horizonte 30130-180 (Brazil); Fossum, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.fossum@bvf.slu.se [Department of Biomedicine and Veterinary Public Health, Section for Immunology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, BMC, Box 588, SE 751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Camargo, Maristela M. de, E-mail: mmcamar@usp.br [Department of Immunology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Chimpanzees, horses and humans have regions of similarity on TLR4 and MD2 promoters. ► Rodents have few regions of similarity on TLR4 promoter when compared to primates. ► Conserved NFkB binding sites were found in the promoters of TLR4 and MD2. ► LPS-induced inhibition of TLR4 transcription is reversed by dexamethasone. ► LPS-induced transcription of MD2 is inhibited by dexamethasone. -- Abstract: Engagement of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a master trigger of the deleterious effects of septic shock. Horses and humans are considered the most sensitive species to septic shock, but the mechanisms explaining these phenomena remain elusive. Analysis of tlr4 promoters revealed high similarity among LPS-sensitive species (human, chimpanzee, and horse) and low similarity with LPS-resistant species (mouse and rat). Four conserved nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) binding sites were found in the tlr4 promoter and two in the md2 promoter sequences that are likely to be targets for dexamethasone regulation. In vitro treatment of equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (eqPBMC) with LPS decreased transcripts of tlr4 and increased transcription of md2 (myeloid differentiation factor 2) and cd14 (cluster of differentiation 14). Treatment with dexamethasone rescued transcription of tlr4 after LPS inhibition. LPS-induced transcription of md2 was inhibited in the presence of dexamethasone. Dexamethasone alone did not affect transcription of tlr4 and md2.

  17. Inhibition of both HIV-1 reverse transcription and gene expression by a cyclic peptide that binds the Tat-transactivating response element (TAR RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Lalonde

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The RNA response element TAR plays a critical role in HIV replication by providing a binding site for the recruitment of the viral transactivator protein Tat. Using a structure-guided approach, we have developed a series of conformationally-constrained cyclic peptides that act as structural mimics of the Tat RNA binding region and block Tat-TAR interactions at nanomolar concentrations in vitro. Here we show that these compounds block Tat-dependent transcription in cell-free systems and in cell-based reporter assays. The compounds are also cell permeable, have low toxicity, and inhibit replication of diverse HIV-1 strains, including both CXCR4-tropic and CCR5-tropic primary HIV-1 isolates of the divergent subtypes A, B, C, D and CRF01_AE. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, the cyclic peptidomimetic L50 exhibited an IC(50 ∼250 nM. Surprisingly, inhibition of LTR-driven HIV-1 transcription could not account for the full antiviral activity. Timed drug-addition experiments revealed that L-50 has a bi-phasic inhibition curve with the first phase occurring after HIV-1 entry into the host cell and during the initiation of HIV-1 reverse transcription. The second phase coincides with inhibition of HIV-1 transcription. Reconstituted reverse transcription assays confirm that HIV-1 (- strand strong stop DNA synthesis is blocked by L50-TAR RNA interactions in-vitro. These findings are consistent with genetic evidence that TAR plays critical roles both during reverse transcription and during HIV gene expression. Our results suggest that antiviral drugs targeting TAR RNA might be highly effective due to a dual inhibitory mechanism.

  18. Autoantibodies from primary biliary cirrhosis patients with anti-p95c antibodies bind to recombinant p97/VCP and inhibit in vitro nuclear envelope assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIYACHI, K; HIRANO, Y; HORIGOME, T; MIMORI, T; MIYAKAWA, H; ONOZUKA, Y; SHIBATA, M; HIRAKATA, M; SUWA, A; HOSAKA, H; MATSUSHIMA, S; KOMATSU, T; MATSUSHIMA, H; HANKINS, R W; FRITZLER, M J

    2004-01-01

    We have reported previously that p95c, a novel 95-kDa cytosolic protein, was the target of autoantibodies in sera of patients with autoimmune hepatic diseases. We studied 30 sera that were shown previously to immunoprecipitate a 95 kDa protein from [35S]-methionine-labelled HeLa lysates and had a specific precipitin band in immunodiffusion. Thirteen sera were available to test the ability of p95c antibodies to inhibit nuclear envelope assembly in an in vitro assay in which confocal fluorescence microscopy was also used to identify the stages at which nuclear assembly was inhibited. The percentage inhibition of nuclear envelope assembly of the 13 sera ranged from 7% to 99% and nuclear envelope assembly and the swelling of nucleus was inhibited at several stages. The percentage inhibition of nuclear assembly was correlated with the titre of anti-p95c as determined by immunodiffusion. To confirm the identity of this autoantigen, we used a full-length cDNA of the p97/valosin-containing protein (VCP) to produce a radiolabelled recombinant protein that was then used in an immunoprecipitation (IP) assay. Our study demonstrated that 12 of the 13 (93%) human sera with antibodies to p95c immunoprecipitated recombinant p97/VCP. Because p95c and p97 have similar molecular masses and cell localization, and because the majority of sera bind recombinant p97/VCP and anti-p95c antibodies inhibit nuclear assembly, this is compelling evidence that p95c and p97/VCP are identical. PMID:15147362

  19. Vaccinia virus protein C6 is a virulence factor that binds TBK-1 adaptor proteins and inhibits activation of IRF3 and IRF7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Unterholzner

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of viruses by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs causes interferon-β (IFN-β induction, a key event in the anti-viral innate immune response, and also a target of viral immune evasion. Here the vaccinia virus (VACV protein C6 is identified as an inhibitor of PRR-induced IFN-β expression by a functional screen of select VACV open reading frames expressed individually in mammalian cells. C6 is a member of a family of Bcl-2-like poxvirus proteins, many of which have been shown to inhibit innate immune signalling pathways. PRRs activate both NF-κB and IFN regulatory factors (IRFs to activate the IFN-β promoter induction. Data presented here show that C6 inhibits IRF3 activation and translocation into the nucleus, but does not inhibit NF-κB activation. C6 inhibits IRF3 and IRF7 activation downstream of the kinases TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1 and IκB kinase-ε (IKKε, which phosphorylate and activate these IRFs. However, C6 does not inhibit TBK1- and IKKε-independent IRF7 activation or the induction of promoters by constitutively active forms of IRF3 or IRF7, indicating that C6 acts at the level of the TBK1/IKKε complex. Consistent with this notion, C6 immunoprecipitated with the TBK1 complex scaffold proteins TANK, SINTBAD and NAP1. C6 is expressed early during infection and is present in both nucleus and cytoplasm. Mutant viruses in which the C6L gene is deleted, or mutated so that the C6 protein is not expressed, replicated normally in cell culture but were attenuated in two in vivo models of infection compared to wild type and revertant controls. Thus C6 contributes to VACV virulence and might do so via the inhibition of PRR-induced activation of IRF3 and IRF7.

  20. Vaccinia Virus Protein C6 Inhibits Type I IFN Signalling in the Nucleus and Binds to the Transactivation Domain of STAT2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Stuart

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The type I interferon (IFN response is a crucial innate immune signalling pathway required for defense against viral infection. Accordingly, the great majority of mammalian viruses possess means to inhibit this important host immune response. Here we show that vaccinia virus (VACV strain Western Reserve protein C6, is a dual function protein that inhibits the cellular response to type I IFNs in addition to its published function as an inhibitor of IRF-3 activation, thereby restricting type I IFN production from infected cells. Ectopic expression of C6 inhibits the induction of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs in response to IFNα treatment at both the mRNA and protein level. C6 inhibits the IFNα-induced Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT signalling pathway at a late stage, downstream of STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and binding of the interferon stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3 complex to the interferon stimulated response element (ISRE. Mechanistically, C6 associates with the transactivation domain of STAT2 and this might explain how C6 inhibits the type I IFN signalling very late in the pathway. During virus infection C6 reduces ISRE-dependent gene expression despite the presence of the viral protein phosphatase VH1 that dephosphorylates STAT1 and STAT2. The ability of a cytoplasmic replicating virus to dampen the immune response within the nucleus, and the ability of viral immunomodulators such as C6 to inhibit multiple stages of the innate immune response by distinct mechanisms, emphasizes the intricacies of host-pathogen interactions and viral immune evasion.

  1. Inhibition of Poly(A)-binding protein with a synthetic RNA mimic reduces pain sensitization in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragán-Iglesias, Paulino; Lou, Tzu-Fang; Bhat, Vandita D; Megat, Salim; Burton, Michael D; Price, Theodore J; Campbell, Zachary T

    2018-01-02

    Nociceptors rely on cap-dependent translation to rapidly induce protein synthesis in response to pro-inflammatory signals. Comparatively little is known regarding the role of the regulatory factors bound to the 3' end of mRNA in nociceptor sensitization. Poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) stimulates translation initiation by bridging the Poly(A) tail to the eukaryotic initiation factor 4F complex associated with the mRNA cap. Here, we use unbiased assessment of PABP binding specificity to generate a chemically modified RNA-based competitive inhibitor of PABP. The resulting RNA mimic, which we designated as the Poly(A) SPOT-ON, is more stable than unmodified RNA and binds PABP with high affinity and selectivity in vitro. We show that injection of the Poly(A) SPOT-ON at the site of an injury can attenuate behavioral response to pain. Collectively, these results suggest that PABP is integral for nociceptive plasticity. The general strategy described here provides a broad new source of mechanism-based inhibitors for RNA-binding proteins and is applicable for in vivo studies.

  2. Inhibition of 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation by expression of acyl-CoA-binding protein antisense RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, S; Sorensen, R V; Helledie, T

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have recently underscored the significance of fatty acids or fatty acid-derived metabolites as signaling molecules in adipocyte differentiation. The acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP), which functions as an intracellular acyl-CoA pool former and transporter, is induced duri...

  3. Salivary Thromboxane A2-Binding Proteins from Triatomine Vectors of Chagas Disease Inhibit Platelet-Mediated Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs Formation and Arterial Thrombosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella M Mizurini

    Full Text Available The saliva of blood-feeding arthropods contains a notable diversity of molecules that target the hemostatic and immune systems of the host. Dipetalodipin and triplatin are triatomine salivary proteins that exhibit high affinity binding to prostanoids, such as TXA2, thus resulting in potent inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation in vitro. It was recently demonstrated that platelet-derived TXA2 mediates the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs, a newly recognized link between inflammation and thrombosis that promote thrombus growth and stability.This study evaluated the ability of dipetalodipin and triplatin to block NETs formation in vitro. We also investigated the in vivo antithrombotic activity of TXA2 binding proteins by employing two murine models of experimental thrombosis. Remarkably, we observed that both inhibitors abolished the platelet-mediated formation of NETs in vitro. Dipetalodipin and triplatin significantly increased carotid artery occlusion time in a FeCl3-induced injury model. Treatment with TXA2-binding proteins also protected mice from lethal pulmonary thromboembolism evoked by the intravenous injection of collagen and epinephrine. Effective antithrombotic doses of dipetalodipin and triplatin did not increase blood loss, which was estimated using the tail transection method.Salivary TXA2-binding proteins, dipetalodipin and triplatin, are capable to prevent platelet-mediated NETs formation in vitro. This ability may contribute to the antithrombotic effects in vivo. Notably, both molecules inhibit arterial thrombosis without promoting excessive bleeding. Our results provide new insight into the antihemostatic effects of TXA2-binding proteins and may have important significance in elucidating the mechanisms of saliva to avoid host's hemostatic responses and innate immune system.

  4. Heterocyclic cyclohexanone monocarbonyl analogs of curcumin can inhibit the activity of ATP-binding cassette transporters in cancer multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revalde, Jezrael L; Li, Yan; Hawkins, Bill C; Rosengren, Rhonda J; Paxton, James W

    2015-02-01

    Curcumin (CUR) is a phytochemical that inhibits the xenobiotic ABC efflux transporters implicated in cancer multidrug resistance (MDR), such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins 1 and 5 (MRP1 and MRP5). The use of CUR in the clinic however, is complicated by its instability and poor pharmacokinetic profile. Monocarbonyl analogs of CUR (MACs) are compounds without CUR's unstable β-diketone moiety and were reported to have improved stability and in vivo disposition. Whether the MACs can be used as MDR reversal agents is less clear, as the absence of a β-diketone may negatively impact transporter inhibition. In this study, we investigated 23 heterocyclic cyclohexanone MACs for inhibitory effects against P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP5. Using flow cytometry and resistance reversal assays, we found that many of these compounds inhibited the transport activity of the ABC transporters investigated, often with much greater potency than CUR. Overall the analogs were most effective at inhibiting BCRP and we identified three compounds, A12 (2,6-bis((E)-2,5-dimethoxy-benzylidene)cyclohexanone), A13 (2,6-bis((E)-4-hydroxyl-3-methoxybenzylidene)-cyclohexanone) and B11 (3,5-bis((E)-2-fluoro-4,5-dimethoxybenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidin-4-one), as the most promising BCRP inhibitors. These compounds inhibited BCRP activity in a non-cell line, non-substrate-specific manner. Their inhibition occurred by direct transporter interaction rather than modulating protein or cell surface expression. From these results, we concluded that MACs, such as the heterocyclic cyclohexanone analogs in this study, also have potential as MDR reversal agents and may be superior alternatives to the unstable parent compound, CUR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Progranulin-derived Atsttrin directly binds to TNFRSF25 (DR3 and inhibits TNF-like ligand 1A (TL1A activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Liu

    Full Text Available Atsttrin, a progranulin (PGRN-derived molecule composed of three TNFR-binding domains of PGRN, binds to TNF receptors (TNFR and is therapeutic against inflammatory arthritis. Here we screened the associations of Atsttrin and other members in TNFR subfamily, which led to the discovery of TNFRSF25 (DR3 as an additional Atsttrin-interacting member in TNFR family. Similar to TNFR1 and TNFR2, DR3 also directly bound to Atsttrin. The first three cysteine-rich domains (CRD in the extracellular portion of DR3 were required for this interaction. Atsttrin inhibited the interaction between DR3 and its TNF-Like Ligand 1A (TL1A. In addition, Atsttrin inhibited TL1A-stimulated target gene expressions and neutralized TL1A-enhanced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Furthermore, Atsttrin ameliorated the pathology in dextran sulfate sodium induced colitis. Taken together, these findings not only provide the new insights into Atsttrin's therapeutic action in inflammatory arthritis, but may also present Atsttrin as a novel biological agent for treating various types of diseases associated with TL1A/DR3 pathway.

  6. Transport inhibition of digoxin using several common P-gp expressing cell lines is not necessarily reporting only on inhibitor binding to P-gp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Albin Lumen

    Full Text Available We have reported that the P-gp substrate digoxin required basolateral and apical uptake transport in excess of that allowed by digoxin passive permeability (as measured in the presence of GF120918 to achieve the observed efflux kinetics across MDCK-MDR1-NKI (The Netherlands Cancer Institute confluent cell monolayers. That is, GF120918 inhibitable uptake transport was kinetically required. Therefore, IC50 measurements using digoxin as a probe substrate in this cell line could be due to inhibition of P-gp, of digoxin uptake transport, or both. This kinetic analysis is now extended to include three additional cell lines: MDCK-MDR1-NIH (National Institute of Health, Caco-2 and CPT-B2 (Caco-2 cells with BCRP knockdown. These cells similarly exhibit GF120918 inhibitable uptake transport of digoxin. We demonstrate that inhibition of digoxin transport across these cell lines by GF120918, cyclosporine, ketoconazole and verapamil is greater than can be explained by inhibition of P-gp alone. We examined three hypotheses for this non-P-gp inhibition. The inhibitors can: (1 bind to a basolateral digoxin uptake transporter, thereby inhibiting digoxin's cellular uptake; (2 partition into the basolateral membrane and directly reduce membrane permeability; (3 aggregate with digoxin in the donor chamber, thereby reducing the free concentration of digoxin, with concomitant reduction in digoxin uptake. Data and simulations show that hypothesis 1 was found to be uniformly acceptable. Hypothesis 2 was found to be uniformly unlikely. Hypothesis 3 was unlikely for GF120918 and cyclosporine, but further studies are needed to completely adjudicate whether hetero-dimerization contributes to the non-P-gp inhibition for ketoconazole and verapamil. We also find that P-gp substrates with relatively low passive permeability such as digoxin, loperamide and vinblastine kinetically require basolateral uptake transport over that allowed by +GF120918 passive permeability, while

  7. Lewis X component in human milk binds DC-SIGN and inhibits HIV-1 transfer to CD4(+) T lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naarding, Marloes A.; Ludwig, Irene S.; Groot, Fedde; Berkhout, Ben; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Pollakis, Georgios; Paxton, William A.

    2005-01-01

    DC-specific ICAM3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), which is expressed on DCs, can interact with a variety of pathogens such as HIV-1, hepatitis C, Ebola, cytomegalovirus, Dengue virus, Mycobacterium, Leisbmania, and Candida albicans. We demonstrate that human milk can inhibit the DC-SIGN-mediated

  8. Transforming growth factor-β inhibits CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein expression and PPARγ activity in unloaded bone marrow stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahdjoudj, S.; Kaabeche, K.; Holy, X.; Fromigue, O.; Modrowski, D.; Zerath, E.; Marie, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating the adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in vivo remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effects of transforming growth factor beta-2 (TGF-β2) on transcription factors involved in adipogenic differentiation induced by hind limb suspension in rat bone marrow stromal cells in vivo. Time course real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of gene expression showed that skeletal unloading progressively increases the expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)α and C/EBPβ α at 5 days in bone marrow stromal cells resulting in increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ2) transcripts at 7 days. TGF-β2 administration in unloaded rats corrected the rise in C/EBPα and C/EBPβ transcripts induced by unloading in bone marrow stromal cells. This resulted in inhibition of PPARγ2 expression that was associated with increased Runx2 expression. Additionally, the inhibition of C/EBPα and C/EBPβ expression by TGF-β2 was associated with increased PPARγ serine phosphorylation in bone marrow stromal cells, a mechanism that inhibits PPARγ transactivating activity. The sequential inhibitory effect of TGF-β2 on C/EBPα, C/EBPβ, and PPARγ2 resulted in reduced LPL expression and abolition of bone marrow stromal cell adipogenic differentiation, which contributed to prevent bone loss induced by skeletal unloading. We conclude that TGF-β2 inhibits the excessive adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells induced by skeletal unloading by inhibiting C/EBPα, C/EBPβ, and PPARγ expression and activity, which provides a sequential mechanism by which TGF-β2 regulates adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in vivo

  9. PPARγ induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through upregulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 in gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.Y. [Department of Pediatrics, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M.S.; Lee, M.K. [Department of Pediatrics, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.S.; Yi, H.K. [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Nam, S.Y. [Department of Alternative Therapy, Jeonju University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D.Y.; Hwang, P.H. [Department of Pediatrics, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-13

    Peroxisome proliferator activator receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated transcriptional factor involved in the carcinogenesis of various cancers. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is a tumor suppressor gene that has anti-apoptotic activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anticancer mechanism of PPARγ with respect to IGFBP-3. PPARγ was overexpressed in SNU-668 gastric cancer cells using an adenovirus gene transfer system. The cells in which PPARγ was overexpressed exhibited growth inhibition, induction of apoptosis, and a significant increase in IGFBP-3 expression. We investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms of PPARγ in SNU-668 cells using an IGFBP-3 promoter/luciferase reporter system. Luciferase activity was increased up to 15-fold in PPARγ transfected cells, suggesting that PPARγ may directly interact with IGFBP-3 promoter to induce its expression. Deletion analysis of the IGFBP-3 promoter showed that luciferase activity was markedly reduced in cells without putative p53-binding sites (-Δ1755, -Δ1795). This suggests that the critical PPARγ-response region is located within the p53-binding region of the IGFBP-3 promoter. We further demonstrated an increase in PPARγ-induced luciferase activity even in cells treated with siRNA to silence p53 expression. Taken together, these data suggest that PPARγ exhibits its anticancer effect by increasing IGFBP-3 expression, and that IGFBP-3 is a significant tumor suppressor.

  10. Indicine N-oxide binds to tubulin at a distinct site and inhibits the assembly of microtubules: a mechanism for its cytotoxic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appadurai, Prakash; Rathinasamy, Krishnan

    2014-02-10

    Indicine N-oxide, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid present in the plant Heliotropium indicum had shown promising cytotoxic activity in various tumor models. The compound exhibited severe toxicity to hepatocytes and bone marrow cells. The present work was aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanism of the toxicity of indicine N-oxide. We found that indicine N-oxide inhibited the proliferation of various cancer cell lines in a concentration dependent manner with IC50 ranging from 46 to 100 μM. At the half maximal inhibitory concentration it blocked the cell cycle progression at mitosis without significantly altering the organization of the spindle and interphase microtubules. The toxicities of the compound at higher concentrations are attributed to its severe depolymerizing effect on both the interphase and spindle microtubules. Binding studies using purified goat brain tubulin indicated that indicine N-oxide binds to tubulin at a distinct site not shared by colchicine or taxol. It decreased the polymer mass of both purified tubulin and MAP-rich tubulin. It was found to induce cleavage of DNA using pUC18 plasmid. The interactions of indicine N-oxide on DNA were also confirmed by computational analysis; which predicted its binding site at the minor groove of DNA. These studies bring to light that the toxicities of indicine N-oxide were due to its DNA damaging effects and depolymerization of microtubules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Inhibition by cysteine of the carbohydrate-binding activity of lectins from Ricinus communis, Canavalia ensiformis and Euonymus europaeus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorkin, V M

    1985-10-01

    Precipitation induced by different lectins has been studied in the presence of some aminoacids. It was shown that precipitates formed by lectins from Ricinus communis (RCA1), Canavalia ensiformis (Con A), Euonymus europaeus (Eel) in the presence of appropriate carbohydrate-containing molecules disappeared after cysteine addition, like after addition of specific carbohydrate precipitation inhibitors. It is assumed that cysteine residues of RCA1, Con A and Eel lectins are essential for their carbohydrate binding activity.

  12. Akt Phosphorylation and PI (3, 4, 5) P3 Binding Coordinately Inhibit the Tumor Suppressive Activity of Merlin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    GSK3h and merlin S315 phosphorylation tightly correlated with Akt1 expression and activation profiles (Fig. 3B, right). Compared with wild-type NTD...Fig. S4 for a bigger image). (f) Akt phosphorylates merlin in mammalian cells. Akt and merlin protein levels in cell lysates were confirmed (top...II (contains 1-590 residues) had a low level of binding to Akt. Interestingly, neither full-length merlin I nor merlin II interacted with Akt (Fig

  13. Active-site modification of mammalian DNA polymerase β with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate: Mechanism of inhibition and identification of lysine 71 in the deoxynucleoside triphosphate binding pocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, A.; Kedar, P.; Wilson, S.H.; Modak, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is a potent inhibitor of the DNA polymerase activity of recombinant rat DNA polymerase β. Kinetic studies indicate that the mechanism of PLP inhibition is complex. In a lower range of PLP concentration, inhibition is competitive with respect to substrate dNTP, whereas at higher levels of PLP several forms of enzyme combine with PLP and are involved in the overall inhibition, and a possible model for these interactions during the catalytic process is suggested. Reduction of the PLP-treated enzyme with sodium [ 3 H]borohydride results in covalent incorporation of about 4 mol of PLP/mol of enzyme, and the modified enzyme is not capable of DNA polymerase activity. The presence of dNTP during the modification reaction blocks incorporation of 1 mol of PLP/mol of enzyme, and the enzyme so modified is almost fully active. This protective effect is not observed in the absence of template-primer. Tryptic peptide mapping of the PLP-modified enzyme reveals four major sites of modification. Of these four sites, only one is protected by dNTP from pyridoxylation. Sequence analysis of the tryptic peptide corresponding to the protected site reveals that it spans residues 68-80 in the amino acid sequence of the enzyme, with Lys 71 as the site of pyridoxylation. These results indicate that Lys 71 is at or near the binding pocket for the dNTP substrate

  14. Structure-activity studies of dicationically substituted bis-benzimidazoles against Giardia lamblia: correlation of antigiardial activity with DNA binding affinity and giardial topoisomerase II inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, C A; Dykstra, C C; Naiman, N A; Cory, M; Fairley, T A; Tidwell, R R

    1993-01-01

    Nine dicationically substituted bis-benzimidazoles were examined for their in vitro activities against Giardia lamblia WB (ATCC 30957). The potential mechanisms of action of these compounds were evaluated by investigating the relationship among in vitro antigiardial activity and the affinity of the molecules for DNA and their ability to inhibit the activity of giardial topoisomerase II. Each compound demonstrated antigiardial activity, as measured by assessing the incorporation of [methyl-3H]thymidine by giardial trophozoites exposed to the test agents. Three compounds exhibited excellent in vitro antigiardial activities, with 50% inhibitory concentrations which compared very favorably with those of two currently used drugs, quinacrine HCl and metronidazole. Putative mechanisms of action for these compounds were suggested by the strong correlation observed among in vitro antigiardial activity and the affinity of the molecules for natural and synthetic DNA and their ability to inhibit the relaxation activity of giardial topoisomerase II. A strong correlation between the DNA binding affinity of these compounds and their inhibition of giardial topoisomerase II activity was also observed. Images PMID:8109934

  15. Inhibition of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 reduces cardiac fibroblast proliferation by suppressing GATA Binding Protein 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Ning-Ning; Liu, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Shuang-Wei; Zhang, Jing-Zhi; Li, Ai-Qun [Department of Cardiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Guangzhou Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Shi-Ming, E-mail: gzliushiming@126.com [Department of Cardiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Guangzhou Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, Guangzhou (China)

    2016-07-08

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) and GATA Binding Protein 4 (GATA4) are important for the growth of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs). When deregulated, LOX-1 and GATA4 can cause cardiac remodeling. In the present study, we found novel evidence that GATA4 was required for the LOX-1 regulation of CF proliferation. The inhibition of LOX-1 by RNA interference LOX-1 lentivirus resulted in the loss of PI3K/Akt activation and GATA4 protein expression. The overexpression of LOX-1 by lentivirus rescued CF proliferation, PI3K/Akt activation, and GATA4 protein expression. Moreover, GATA4 overexpression enhanced CF proliferation with LOX-1 inhibition. We also found that the inhibition of PI3K/Akt activation by LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, reduced cell proliferation and protein level of GATA4. In summary, GATA4 may play an important role in the LOX-1 and PI3K/Akt regulation of CF proliferation. -- Highlights: •GATA4 is regulated by LOX-1 signaling in CFs. •GATA4 is involved in LOX-1 regulating CF proliferation. •GATA4 is regulated by PI3K/Akt signaling in CFs.

  16. Inhibition of Enterococcus faecium adherence to collagen by antibodies against high-affinity binding subdomains of Acm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R; Sillanpää, Jouko; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K; Höök, Magnus; Murray, Barbara E

    2007-06-01

    Strains of Enterococcus faecium express a cell wall-anchored protein, Acm, which mediates adherence to collagen. Here, we (i) identify the minimal and high-affinity binding subsegments of Acm and (ii) show that anti-Acm immunoglobulin Gs (IgGs) purified against these subsegments reduced E. faecium TX2535 strain collagen adherence up to 73 and 50%, respectively, significantly more than the total IgGs against the full-length Acm A domain (28%) (P Acm adherence with functional subsegment-specific antibodies raises the possibility of their use as therapeutic or prophylactic agents.

  17. Inhibition of. beta. -bungarotoxin binding to brain membranes by mast cell degranulating peptide, toxin I, and ethylene glycol bis(. beta. -aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, R.R.; Betz, H.; Rehm, H.

    1988-02-09

    The presynaptically active snake venom neurotoxin ..beta..-bungarotoxin (..beta..-Butx) is known to affect neurotransmitter release by binding to a subtype of voltage-activated K/sup +/ channels. Here the authors show that mast cell degranulating (MCD) peptide from bee venom inhibits the binding of /sup 125/I-labeled ..beta..-Butx to chick and rat brain membranes with apparent K/sub i/ values of 180 nM and 1100 nM, respectively. The mechanisms of inhibition of MCD peptide is noncompetitive, as is inhibition of /sup 125/I-..beta..-Butx binding by the protease inhibitor homologue from mamba venom, toxin I. ..beta..-Butx and its binding antagonists thus bind to different sites of the same membrane protein. Removal of Ca/sup 2 +/ by ethylene glycol bis(..beta..-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid inhibits the binding of /sup 125/I-..beta..-Butx by lowering its affinity to brain membranes.

  18. Sequence-selective topoisomerase II inhibition by anthracycline derivatives in SV40 DNA: Relationship with DNA binding affinity and cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capranico, G.; Kohn, K.W.; Pommier, Y.; Zunino, F.

    1990-01-01

    Topoisomerase II mediated double-strand breaks produced by anthracycline analogues were studied in SV40 DNA. The compounds included doxorubicin, daunorubicin, two doxorubicin stereoisomers (4'-epimer and β-anomer), and five chromophore-modified derivatives, with a wide range of cytotoxic activity and DNA binding affinity. Cleavage of 32 P-end-labeled DNA fragments was visualized by autoradiography of agarose and polyacrylamide gels. Structure-activity relationships indicated that alterations in the chromophore structure greatly affected drug action on topoisomerase II. In particular, removal of substituents on position 4 of the D ring resulted in more active inducers of cleavage with lower DNA binding affinity. The stereochemistry between the sugar and the chromophore was also essential for activity. All the active anthracyclines induced a single region of prominent cleavage in the entire SV40 DNA, which resulted from a cluster of sites between nucleotides 4237 and 4294. DNA cleavage intensity patterns exhibited differences among analogues and were also dependent upon drug concentration. Intensity at a given site dependent on both stimulatory and suppressive effects depending upon drug concentration and DNA sequence. A good correlation was found between cytotoxicity and intensity of topoisomerase II mediated DNA breakage

  19. The synthetic epoxyquinoids jesterone dimer and epoxyquinone A monomer induce apoptosis and inhibit REL (human c-Rel) DNA binding in an IkappaBalpha-deficient diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mei-Chih; Bardhan, Sujata; Porco, John A; Gilmore, Thomas D

    2006-09-08

    The NF-kappaB transcription factor signaling pathway is constitutively active in many human cancers, and inhibition of this pathway can often kill cancer cells by inducing apoptosis. In this study, we show that two synthetic epoxyquinoids, jesterone dimer (JD) and epoxyquinone A monomer (EqM), are equally effective at inhibiting the growth of two human lymphoma cell lines that have constitutively nuclear REL (human c-Rel) DNA-binding complexes, but either express (SUDHL-4 cells) or do not express (RC-K8 cells) the NF-kappaB inhibitor IkappaBalpha. Furthermore, in these cells, both JD and EqM dose-dependently induced apoptosis, inhibited REL DNA-binding activity, and converted REL to a high molecular weight form. In A293 cells, JD and EqM inhibited the DNA-binding activity of overexpressed REL, but not p50. Replacement of Cys-27 with Ser in REL reduced JD- and EqM-mediated inhibition of REL DNA-binding activity. These results suggest that JD and EqM can induce apoptosis in IkappaBalpha-deficient lymphoma cells through a mechanism involving direct inhibition of transcription factor REL.

  20. Fisetin, a dietary flavonoid, induces apoptosis of cancer cells by inhibiting HSF1 activity through blocking its binding to the hsp70 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Ae; Lee, Somyoung; Kim, Da-Eun; Kim, Moonil; Kwon, Byoung-Mog; Han, Dong Cho

    2015-06-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a transcription factor for heat shock proteins (HSPs) expression that enhances the survival of cancer cells exposed to various stresses. HSF1 knockout suppresses carcinogen-induced cancer induction in mice. Therefore, HSF1 is a promising therapeutic and chemopreventive target. We performed cell-based screening with a natural compound collection and identified fisetin, a dietary flavonoid, as a HSF1 inhibitor. Fisetin abolished heat shock-induced luciferase activity with an IC50 of 14 μM in HCT-116 cancer cells. The treatment of HCT-116 with fisetin inhibited proliferation with a GI50 of 23 μM. When the cells were exposed to heat shock in the presence of fisetin, the induction of HSF1 target proteins, such as HSP70, HSP27 and BAG3 (Bcl-2-associated athanogene domain 3), were inhibited. HSP70/BAG3 complexes protect cancer cells from apoptosis by stabilizing anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. The downregulation of HSP70/BAG3 by fisetin significantly reduced the amounts of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1 proteins, subsequently inducing apoptotic cell death. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that fisetin inhibited HSF1 activity by blocking the binding of HSF1 to the hsp70 promoter. Intraperitoneal treatment of nude mice with fisetin at 30mg/kg resulted in a 35.7% (P < 0.001) inhibition of tumor growth. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Homeobox protein MSX-1 inhibits expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 via Wnt/β-catenin signaling to prevent differentiation of dental mesenchymal cells during the late bell stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao-Yu; Wu, Xiao-Shan; Wang, Jin-Song; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Wang, Song-Lin

    2018-02-01

    Homeobox protein MSX-1 (hereafter referred to as MSX-1) is essential for early tooth-germ development. Tooth-germ development is arrested at bud stage in Msx1 knockout mice, which prompted us to study the functions of MSX-1 beyond this stage. Here, we investigated the roles of MSX-1 during late bell stage. Mesenchymal cells of the mandibular first molar were isolated from mice at embryonic day (E)17.5 and cultured in vitro. We determined the expression levels of β-catenin, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Bmp2), Bmp4, and lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (Lef1) after knockdown or overexpression of Msx1. Our findings suggest that knockdown of Msx1 promoted expression of Bmp2, Bmp4, and Lef1, resulting in elevated differentiation of odontoblasts, which was rescued by blocking the expression of these genes. In contrast, overexpression of Msx1 decreased the expression of Bmp2, Bmp4, and Lef1, leading to a reduction in odontoblast differentiation. The regulation of Bmp2, Bmp4, and Lef1 by Msx1 was mediated by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Additionally, knockdown of Msx1 impaired cell proliferation and slowed S-phase progression, while overexpression of Msx1 also impaired cell proliferation and prolonged G1-phase progression. We therefore conclude that MSX-1 maintains cell proliferation by regulating transition of cells from G1-phase to S-phase and prevents odontoblast differentiation by inhibiting expression of Bmp2, Bmp4, and Lef1 at the late bell stage via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  2. Azadirachtin interacts with the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) binding domain of its receptors and inhibits TNF-induced biological responses.

    OpenAIRE

    Thoh, Maikho; Kumar, Pankaj; Nagarajaram, Hampathalu A.; Manna, Sunil K.

    2013-01-01

    The role of azadirachtin, an active component of a medicinal plant Neem (Azadirachta indica), on TNF-induced cell signaling in human cell lines was investigated. Azadirachtin blocks TNF-induced activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and also expression of NF-κB-dependent genes such as adhesion molecules and cyclooxygenase 2. Azadirachtin inhibits the inhibitory subunit of NF-κB (IκBα) phosphorylation and thereby its degradation and RelA (p65) nuclear translocation. It blocks IκBα kinase (IKK...

  3. The telomeric protein TRF2 binds the ATM kinase and can inhibit the ATM-dependent DNA damage response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Karlseder

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The telomeric protein TRF2 is required to prevent mammalian telomeres from activating DNA damage checkpoints. Here we show that overexpression of TRF2 affects the response of the ATM kinase to DNA damage. Overexpression of TRF2 abrogated the cell cycle arrest after ionizing radiation and diminished several other readouts of the DNA damage response, including phosphorylation of Nbs1, induction of p53, and upregulation of p53 targets. TRF2 inhibited autophosphorylation of ATM on S1981, an early step in the activation of this kinase. A region of ATM containing S1981 was found to directly interact with TRF2 in vitro, and ATM immunoprecipitates contained TRF2. We propose that TRF2 has the ability to inhibit ATM activation at telomeres. Because TRF2 is abundant at chromosome ends but not elsewhere in the nucleus, this mechanism of checkpoint control could specifically block a DNA damage response at telomeres without affecting the surveillance of chromosome internal damage.

  4. Inhibition of LPS binding to MD-2 co-receptor for suppressing TLR4-mediated expression of inflammatory cytokine by 1-dehydro-10-gingerdione from dietary ginger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sun Hong; Kyeong, Min Sik; Hwang, Yuri; Ryu, Shi Yong; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► 1-Dehydro-10-gingerdione (1D10G) from ginger inhibits LPS binding to MD-2. ► 1D10G suppresses MyD88- or TRIF-dependent signaling in LPS-activated macrophages. ► 1D10G down-regulates the expression of NF-κB-, AP1- or IRF3-target genes. ► MD-2 is a molecular target in the anti-inflammatory action of 1D10G. -- Abstract: Myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2) is a co-receptor of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) for innate immunity. Here, we delineated a new mechanism of 1-dehydro-10-gingerdione (1D10G), one of pungent isolates from ginger (Zingiber officinale), in the suppression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced gene expression of inflammatory cytokines. 1D10G inhibited LPS binding to MD-2 with higher affinity than gingerol and shogaol from dietary ginger. Moreover, 1D10G down-regulated TLR4-mediated expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) or activating protein 1 (AP1)-target genes such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β, as well as those of interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 (IRF3)-target IFN-β gene and IFN-γ inducible protein 10 (IP-10) in LPS-activated macrophages. Taken together, MD-2 is a molecular target in the anti-inflammatory action of 1D10G.

  5. Inhibition of LPS binding to MD-2 co-receptor for suppressing TLR4-mediated expression of inflammatory cytokine by 1-dehydro-10-gingerdione from dietary ginger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun Hong; Kyeong, Min Sik; Hwang, Yuri [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Shi Yong [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sang-Bae [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youngsoo, E-mail: youngsoo@chungbuk.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 1-Dehydro-10-gingerdione (1D10G) from ginger inhibits LPS binding to MD-2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 1D10G suppresses MyD88- or TRIF-dependent signaling in LPS-activated macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 1D10G down-regulates the expression of NF-{kappa}B-, AP1- or IRF3-target genes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MD-2 is a molecular target in the anti-inflammatory action of 1D10G. -- Abstract: Myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2) is a co-receptor of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) for innate immunity. Here, we delineated a new mechanism of 1-dehydro-10-gingerdione (1D10G), one of pungent isolates from ginger (Zingiber officinale), in the suppression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced gene expression of inflammatory cytokines. 1D10G inhibited LPS binding to MD-2 with higher affinity than gingerol and shogaol from dietary ginger. Moreover, 1D10G down-regulated TLR4-mediated expression of nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) or activating protein 1 (AP1)-target genes such as tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-1{beta}, as well as those of interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 (IRF3)-target IFN-{beta} gene and IFN-{gamma} inducible protein 10 (IP-10) in LPS-activated macrophages. Taken together, MD-2 is a molecular target in the anti-inflammatory action of 1D10G.

  6. Inhibition of Hb Binding to GP1bα Abrogates Hb-Mediated Thrombus Formation on Immobilized VWF and Collagen under Physiological Shear Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annarapu, Gowtham K; Singhal, Rashi; Peng, Yuandong; Guchhait, Prasenjit

    2016-01-01

    Reports including our own describe that intravascular hemolysis increases the risk of thrombosis in hemolytic disorders. Our recent study shows that plasma Hb concentrations correlate directly with platelet activation in patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). The binding of Hb to glycoprotein1bα (GP1bα) increases platelet activation. A peptide AA1-50, designed from N-terminal amino acid sequence of GP1bα significantly inhibits the Hb binding to GP1bα as well as Hb-induced platelet activation. This study further examined if the Hb-mediated platelet activation plays any significant role in thrombus formation on subendothelium matrix under physiological flow shear stresses and the inhibition of Hb-platelet interaction can abrogate the above effects of Hb. Study performed thrombus formation assay in vitro by perfusing whole blood over immobilized VWF or collagen type I in presence of Hb under shear stresses simulating arterial or venous flow. The Hb concentrations ranging from 5 to 10 μM, commonly observed level in plasma of the hemolytic patients including PNH, dose-dependently increased thrombus formation on immobilized VWF under higher shear stress of 25 dyne/cm2, but not at 5 dyne/cm2. The above Hb concentrations also increased thrombus formation on immobilized collagen under both shear stresses of 5 and 25 dyne/cm2. The peptide AA1-50 abrogated invariably the above effects of Hb on thrombus formation. This study therefore indicates that the Hb-induced platelet activation plays a crucial role in thrombus formation on immobilized VWF or collagen under physiological flow shear stresses. Thus suggesting a probable role of this mechanism in facilitating thrombosis under hemolytic conditions.

  7. Inhibition of transforming growth factor-beta1-induced signaling and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by the Smad-binding peptide aptamer Trx-SARA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bryan M; Hoffmann, F Michael

    2006-09-01

    Overexpression of the inhibitory Smad, Smad7, is used frequently to implicate the Smad pathway in cellular responses to transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) signaling; however, Smad7 regulates several other proteins, including Cdc42, p38MAPK, and beta-catenin. We report an alternative approach for more specifically disrupting Smad-dependent signaling using a peptide aptamer, Trx-SARA, which comprises a rigid scaffold, the Escherichia coli thioredoxin A protein (Trx), displaying a constrained 56-amino acid Smad-binding motif from the Smad anchor for receptor activation (SARA) protein. Trx-SARA bound specifically to Smad2 and Smad3 and inhibited both TGF-beta-induced reporter gene expression and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in NMuMG murine mammary epithelial cells. In contrast to Smad7, Trx-SARA had no effect on the Smad2 or 3 phosphorylation levels induced by TGF-beta1. Trx-SARA was primarily localized to the nucleus and perturbed the normal cytoplasmic localization of Smad2 and 3 to a nuclear localization in the absence of TGF-beta1, consistent with reduced Smad nuclear export. The key mode of action of Trx-SARA was to reduce the level of Smad2 and Smad3 in complex with Smad4 after TGF-beta1 stimulation, a mechanism of action consistent with the preferential binding of SARA to monomeric Smad protein and Trx-SARA-mediated disruption of active Smad complexes.

  8. Novel water soluble morpholine substituted Zn(II) phthalocyanine: Synthesis, characterization, DNA/BSA binding, DNA photocleavage and topoisomerase I inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Burak; Demirbaş, Ümit; Özel, Arzu; Kantekin, Halit

    2017-12-01

    In this study, novel peripherally tetra 3-morpholinophenol substituted zinc(II) phthalocyanine (4) and its water soluble form quaternized zinc(II) phthalocyanine (ZnQ) were synthesized for the first time. These novel compounds were characterized by a combination of different spectroscopic techniques such as FT-IR, 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR, UV-vis and mass. The DNA binding of ZnQ was investigated using UV-vis absorption titration, competitive ethidium bromide, thermal denaturation and viscosity experiments that the ZnQ bound to CT-DNA via intercalation mode. ZnQ indicated photocleavage activity on supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA via formation of singlet oxygen under irradiation at 700nm. Besides, the topoisomerase I inhibitory effect experiments showed that ZnQ inhibited topoisomerase I enzyme in a concentration-dependent manner. The bovine serum albumin (BSA) binding experiments indicated that ZnQ bound to proteins through a static quenching mechanism. All of these results claim that ZnQ has potential agent for photodynamic therapy owing to its nucleic acid interactions and photobiological or photochemical properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Monoclonal antibody OKM5 inhibits the in vitro binding of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to monocytes, endothelial, and C32 melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnwell, J.W.; Ockenhouse, C.F.; Knowles, D.M. II

    1985-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes bind in vitro to human endothelial cells, monocytes, and a certain melanoma cell line. Evidence suggests that this interaction is mediated by similar mechanisms which lead to the sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes in vivo through their attachment to endothelial cells of small blood vessels. They show here the monoclonal antibody OKM5, previously shown to react with the membranes of endothelial cells, monocyte,s and platelets, also reacts with the C32 melanoma cell line which also binds P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. At relatively low concentrations, OKM5 inhibits and reverses the in vitro adherence of infected erythrocytes to target cells. As with monocytes, OKM5 antibody recognizes an 125 I-labeled protein of approximately 88 Kd on the surface of C32 melanoma cells. It seems likely, therefore, that the 88 Kd polypeptide plays a role in cytoadherence, possibly as the receptor or part of a receptor for a ligand on the surface of infected erythrocytes

  10. N-termini of fungal CSL transcription factors are disordered, enriched in regulatory motifs and inhibit DNA binding in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Převorovský

    Full Text Available CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jκ/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1 transcription factors are the effector components of the Notch receptor signalling pathway, which is critical for metazoan development. The metazoan CSL proteins (class M can also function in a Notch-independent manner. Recently, two novel classes of CSL proteins, designated F1 and F2, have been identified in fungi. The role of the fungal CSL proteins is unclear, because the Notch pathway is not present in fungi. In fission yeast, the Cbf11 and Cbf12 CSL paralogs play antagonistic roles in cell adhesion and the coordination of cell and nuclear division. Unusually long N-terminal extensions are typical for fungal and invertebrate CSL family members. In this study, we investigate the functional significance of these extended N-termini of CSL proteins.We identify 15 novel CSL family members from 7 fungal species and conduct bioinformatic analyses of a combined dataset containing 34 fungal and 11 metazoan CSL protein sequences. We show that the long, non-conserved N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins are likely disordered and enriched in phosphorylation sites and PEST motifs. In a case study of Cbf12 (class F2, we provide experimental evidence that the protein is proteolytically processed and that the N-terminus inhibits the Cbf12-dependent DNA binding activity in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay.This study provides insight into the characteristics of the long N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins that may be crucial for controlling DNA-binding and CSL function. We propose that the regulation of DNA binding by Cbf12 via its N-terminal region represents an important means by which fission yeast strikes a balance between the class F1 and class F2 paralog activities. This mode of regulation might be shared with other CSL-positive fungi, some of which are relevant to human disease and biotechnology.

  11. pp32 (ANP32A expression inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth and induces gemcitabine resistance by disrupting HuR binding to mRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy K Williams

    Full Text Available The expression of protein phosphatase 32 (PP32, ANP32A is low in poorly differentiated pancreatic cancers and is linked to the levels of HuR (ELAV1, a predictive marker for gemcitabine response. In pancreatic cancer cells, exogenous overexpression of pp32 inhibited cell growth, supporting its long-recognized role as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer. In chemotherapeutic sensitivity screening assays, cells overexpressing pp32 were selectively resistant to the nucleoside analogs gemcitabine and cytarabine (ARA-C, but were sensitized to 5-fluorouracil; conversely, silencing pp32 in pancreatic cancer cells enhanced gemcitabine sensitivity. The cytoplasmic levels of pp32 increased after cancer cells are treated with certain stressors, including gemcitabine. pp32 overexpression reduced the association of HuR with the mRNA encoding the gemcitabine-metabolizing enzyme deoxycytidine kinase (dCK, causing a significant reduction in dCK protein levels. Similarly, ectopic pp32 expression caused a reduction in HuR binding of mRNAs encoding tumor-promoting proteins (e.g., VEGF and HuR, while silencing pp32 dramatically enhanced the binding of these mRNA targets. Low pp32 nuclear expression correlated with high-grade tumors and the presence of lymph node metastasis, as compared to patients' tumors with high nuclear pp32 expression. Although pp32 expression levels did not enhance the predictive power of cytoplasmic HuR status, nuclear pp32 levels and cytoplasmic HuR levels associated significantly in patient samples. Thus, we provide novel evidence that the tumor suppressor function of pp32 can be attributed to its ability to disrupt HuR binding to target mRNAs encoding key proteins for cancer cell survival and drug efficacy.

  12. Ectopic expression of a polyalanine expansion mutant of poly(A)-binding protein N1 in muscle cells in culture inhibits myogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qishan; Bag, Jnanankur

    2006-01-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset dominant genetic disease caused by the expansion of a GCG trinucleotide repeat that encodes the polyalanine tract at the N-terminus of the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein (PABPN1). Presence of intranuclear inclusions (INIs) containing PABPN1 aggregates in the skeletal muscles is the hallmark of OPMD. Here, we show that ectopic expression of the mutant PABPN1 produced INIs in a muscle cell culture model and reduced expression of several muscle-specific proteins including α-actin, slow troponin C, muscle creatine kinase, and two myogenic transcription factors, myogenin and MyoD. However, the levels of two upstream regulators of the MyoD gene, the Myf-5 and Pax3/7, were not affected, but both proteins co-localized with the PABPN1 aggregates in the mutant PABPN1 overexpressing cells. In these cells, although myogenin and MyoD levels were reduced, these two transcription factors did not co-localize with the mutant PABPN1 aggregates. Therefore, sequestration of Myf5 and Pax3/7 by the mutant PABPN1 aggregates was a specific effect on these factors. Our results suggest that trapping of these two important myogenic determinants may interfere with an early step in myogenesis

  13. Inhibition of bacterial DD-peptidases (penicillin-binding proteins) in membranes and in vivo by peptidoglycan-mimetic boronic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhekieva, Liudmila; Kumar, Ish; Pratt, R F

    2012-04-03

    The DD-peptidases or penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) catalyze the final steps of bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis and are inhibited by the β-lactam antibiotics. There is at present a question of whether the active site structure and activity of these enzymes is the same in the solubilized (truncated) DD-peptidase constructs employed in crystallographic and kinetics studies as in membrane-bound holoenzymes. Recent experiments with peptidoglycan-mimetic boronic acids have suggested that these transition state analogue-generating inhibitors may be able to induce reactive conformations of these enzymes and thus inhibit strongly. We have now, therefore, measured the dissociation constants of peptidoglycan-mimetic boronic acids from Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis PBPs in membrane preparations and, in the former case, in vivo, by means of competition experiments with the fluorescent penicillin Bocillin Fl. The experiments showed that the boronic acids bound measurably (K(i) DD-peptidase inhibitors are more or less effective in vivo than in homogeneous solution.

  14. Triple helix-forming oligonucleotide corresponding to the polypyrimidine sequence in the rat alpha 1(I) collagen promoter specifically inhibits factor binding and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, A; Kandala, J C; Weber, K T; Guntaka, R V

    1996-01-19

    Type I and III fibrillar collagens are the major structural proteins of the extracellular matrix found in various organs including the myocardium. Abnormal and progressive accumulation of fibrillar type I collagen in the interstitial spaces compromises organ function and therefore, the study of transcriptional regulation of this gene and specific targeting of its expression is of major interest. Transient transfection of adult cardiac fibroblasts indicate that the polypurine-polypyrimidine sequence of alpha 1(I) collagen promoter between nucleotides - 200 and -140 represents an overall positive regulatory element. DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays suggest that multiple factors bind to different elements of this promoter region. We further demonstrate that the unique polypyrimidine sequence between -172 and -138 of the promoter represents a suitable target for a single-stranded polypurine oligonucleotide (TFO) to form a triple helix DNA structure. Modified electrophoretic mobility shift assays show that this TFO specifically inhibits the protein-DNA interaction within the target region. In vitro transcription assays and transient transfection experiments demonstrate that the transcriptional activity of the promoter is inhibited by this oligonucleotide. We propose that TFOs represent a therapeutic potential to specifically influence the expression of alpha 1(I) collagen gene in various disease states where abnormal type I collagen accumulation is known to occur.

  15. PH dependence of the spectral and anion binding properties of iron containing superoxide dismutase from E. coli B. An explanation for the azide inhibition of dismutase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fee, J A; McClune, G J; Lees, A C [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor (USA). Dept. of Biological Chemistry; Zidovetzki, R; Pecht, I [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovoth (Israel). Dept. of Chemical Immunology

    1981-01-01

    Examination of the optical and EPR properties of the ferric form of the iron containing superoxide dismutase from E.coli B, at pH values ranging from 4.5 to 10.9, has revealed two reversible structural transitions affecting the Fe/sup 3 +/ ion. The apparent pKsub(a) values of these transitions are 5.1+-0.3 and 9.O+-0.3. The binding of azide has been studied over the pH range 4.5 to 10.7; the affinity of the Fe/sup 3 +/ for N/sub 3//sup -/ is independent of pH from 4.5 to approximately 7.5, after which the dissociation constant decreased by a factor of 10 per unit increase in pH. The apparent pKsub(a) which affects N/sub 3//sup -/ binding to the iron is 8.6+-0.2. The association of N/sub 3//sup -/ with the iron has been examined using the temperature-jump method at pH 7.4 and 9.3. The kinetics of ligand association were shown to conform to the minimal mechanism: P-Fe/sup 3 +/ + N/sub 3//sup -/reversible K/sub 1/N/sub 3//sup -/ - P-Fe/sup 3 +/reversible K/sub 2/P-Fe/sup 3 +/ - N/sub 3//sup -/. K/sub 1/ was found to be essentially unaffected by pH whereas K/sub 2/ was much lower at pH 9.3 than at 7.4. The value of K/sub 1/ at pH 7.4 (100 M/sup -1/) corresponds very closely to that obtained for the inhibition constant of azide, 10mM. A scheme is presented in which N/sub 3//sup -/ inhibits the iron containing dismutase by competing with O/sub 2//sup -/ for an anion binding site near, but not on the Fe/sup 3 +/.

  16. Galectin-3 silencing inhibits epirubicin-induced ATP binding cassette transporters and activates the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway via β-catenin/GSK-3β modulation in colorectal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Kuo Lee

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR, an unfavorable factor compromising the treatment efficacy of anticancer drugs, involves the upregulation of ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters and induction of galectin-3 signaling. Galectin-3 plays an anti-apoptotic role in many cancer cells and regulates various pathways to activate MDR. Thus, the inhibition of galectin-3 has the potential to enhance the efficacy of the anticancer drug epirubicin. In this study, we examined the effects and mechanisms of silencing galectin-3 via RNA interference (RNAi on the β-catenin/GSK-3β pathway in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Galectin-3 knockdown increased the intracellular accumulation of epirubicin in Caco-2 cells; suppressed the mRNA expression of galectin-3, β-catenin, cyclin D1, c-myc, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR-associated protein (MRP 1, and MRP2; and downregulated the protein expression of P-gp, cyclin D1, galectin-3, β-catenin, c-Myc, and Bcl-2. Moreover, galectin-3 RNAi treatment significantly increased the mRNA level of GSK-3β, Bax, caspase-3, and caspase-9; remarkably increased the Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio; and upregulated the GSK-3β and Bax protein expressions. Apoptosis was induced by galectin-3 RNAi and/or epirubicin as demonstrated by chromatin condensation, a higher sub-G1 phase proportion, and increased caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity, indicating an intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Epirubicin-mediated resistance was effectively inhibited via galectin-3 RNAi treatment. However, these phenomena could be rescued after galectin-3 overexpression. We show for the first time that the silencing of galectin-3 sensitizes MDR cells to epirubicin by inhibiting ABC transporters and activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis through modulation of the β-catenin/GSK-3β pathway in human colon cancer cells.

  17. Brief Report: Blockade of TANK-Binding Kinase 1/IKKɛ Inhibits Mutant Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING)-Mediated Inflammatory Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frémond, Marie-Louise; Uggenti, Carolina; Van Eyck, Lien; Melki, Isabelle; Bondet, Vincent; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Hertel, Christina; Hayday, Adrian; Neven, Bénédicte; Rose, Yoann; Duffy, Darragh; Crow, Yanick J; Rodero, Mathieu P

    2017-07-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in TMEM173, encoding the stimulator of interferon (IFN) genes (STING) protein, underlie a novel type I interferonopathy that is minimally responsive to conventional immunosuppressive therapies and associated with high frequency of childhood morbidity and mortality. STING gain-of-function causes constitutive oversecretion of IFN. This study was undertaken to determine the effects of a TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK-1)/IKKɛ inhibitor (BX795) on secretion and signaling of IFN in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with mutations in STING. PBMCs from 4 patients with STING-associated disease were treated with BX795. The effect of BX795 on IFN pathways was assessed by Western blotting and an IFNβ reporter assay, as well as by quantification of IFNα in cell lysates, staining for STAT-1 phosphorylation, and measurement of IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. Treatment of PBMCs with BX795 inhibited the phosphorylation of IFN regulatory factor 3 and IFNβ promoter activity induced in HEK 293T cells by cyclic GMP-AMP or by genetic activation of STING. In vitro exposure to BX795 inhibited IFNα production in PBMCs of patients with STING-associated disease without affecting cell survival. In addition, BX795 decreased STAT-1 phosphorylation and ISG mRNA expression independent of IFNα blockade. These findings demonstrate the effect of BX795 on reducing type I IFN production and IFN signaling in cells from patients with gain-of-function mutations in STING. A combined inhibition of TBK-1 and IKKɛ therefore holds potential for the treatment of patients carrying STING mutations, and may also be relevant in other type I interferonopathies. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Slow electrons kill the ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerk, T.

    2001-01-01

    A new method and apparatus (Trochoidal electron monochromator) to study the interactions of electrons with atoms, molecules and clusters was developed. Two applications are briefly reported: a) the ozone destruction in the atmosphere is caused by different reasons, a new mechanism is proposed, that slow thermal electrons are self added to the ozone molecule (O 3 ) with a high frequency, then O 3 is destroyed ( O 3 + e - → O - + O 2 ); b) another application is the study of the binding energy of the football molecule C60. (nevyjel)

  19. Rac1 activation inhibits E-cadherin-mediated adherens junctions via binding to IQGAP1 in pancreatic carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giehl Klaudia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monomeric GTPases of the Rho family control a variety of cellular functions including actin cytoskeleton organisation, cell migration and cell adhesion. Defects in these regulatory processes are involved in tumour progression and metastasis. The development of metastatic carcinoma is accompanied by deregulation of adherens junctions, which are composed of E-cadherin/β- and α-catenin complexes. Results Here, we show that the activity of the monomeric GTPase Rac1 contributes to inhibition of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion in pancreatic carcinoma cells. Stable expression of constitutively active Rac1(V12 reduced the amount of E-cadherin on protein level in PANC-1 pancreatic carcinoma cells, whereas expression of dominant negative Rac1(N17 resulted in an increased amount of E-cadherin. Extraction of proteins associated with the actin cytoskeleton as well as coimmunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated markedly decreased amounts of E-cadherin/catenin complexes in Rac1(V12-expressing cells, but increased amounts of functional E-cadherin/catenin complexes in cells expressing Rac1(N17. Cell aggregation and migration assays revealed, that cells containing less E-cadherin due to expression of Rac1(V12, exhibited reduced cell-cell adhesion and increased cell motility. The Rac/Cdc42 effector protein IQGAP1 has been implicated in regulating cell-cell adhesion. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed a decrease in the association between IQGAP1 and β-catenin in Rac1(V12-expressing PANC-1 cells and an association of IQGAP1 with Rac1(V12. Elevated association of IQGAP1 with the E-cadherin adhesion complex via β-catenin correlated with increased intercellular adhesion of PANC-1 cells. Conclusion These results indicate that active Rac1 destabilises E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion in pancreatic carcinoma cells by interacting with IQGAP1 which is associated with a disassembly of E-cadherin-mediated adherens junctions. Inhibition

  20. Anti-interleukin-1 alpha autoantibodies in humans: Characterization, isotype distribution, and receptor-binding inhibition--higher frequency in Schnitzler's syndrome (urticaria and macroglobulinemia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saurat, J.H.; Schifferli, J.; Steiger, G.; Dayer, J.M.; Didierjean, L.

    1991-01-01

    Since autoantibodies (Abs) to cytokines may modify their biologic activities, high-affinity binding factors for interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha BF) were characterized in human sera. IL-1 alpha BF was identified as IgG (1) by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation followed by immunodiffusion autoradiography, (2) by ligand-blotting method, (3) by ligand binding to affinity-immobilized serum IgG, and (4) by IgG affinity purification followed by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation. IL-1 alpha binding activity resided in the F(ab)2 fragment. The apparent equilibrium constant was in the range of IgG found after immunization with conventional antigens (i.e., 10(-9) to 10(-10) mol/L). Anti-IL-1 alpha IgG auto-Abs represented only an extremely small fraction of total IgG (less than 1/10(-5)). Some sera with IL-1 alpha BF and purified IgG thereof were able to inhibit by 96% to 98% the binding of human recombinant IL-1 alpha to its receptor on murine thymoma EL4-6.1 cells, whereas other sera did not. When 125I-labeled anti-IL-1 alpha IgG complexes were injected into rats, they prolonged the plasma half-life of 125I-labeled IL-1 alpha several fold and altered its tissue distribution. The predominant class was IgG (12/19), mainly IgG4 (9/19), but in five of the sera, anti-IL-1 alpha IgA was also detected. In a screening of 271 sera, IL-1 alpha BF was detected in 17/98 normal subjects and was not more frequent in several control groups of patients, except in patients with Schnitzler's syndrome (fever, chronic urticaria, bone pain, and monoclonal IgM paraprotein) (6/9; p less than 0.005). The pathologic significance of these auto-Abs remains to be determined

  1. Too slow, for Milton

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, N.

    2011-01-01

    Too slow, for Milton was written in 2011, as part of a memorial project for Milton Babbitt. The piece borrows harmonies from Babbitt's Composition for 12 Instruments (harmonies which Babbitt had in turn borrowed from Schoenberg's Ode to Napoleon), but unfolds them as part of a musical texture characterised by repetition, resonance, and a slow rate of change. As Babbitt once told me that my music was 'too slow', this seemed an appropriately obstinate form of homage.

  2. The microRNA-302b-inhibited insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 signaling pathway induces glioma cell apoptosis by targeting nuclear factor IA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Cheng Lee

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that post-transcriptionally control the expression of genes involved in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM development. Although miR-302b functions as a tumor suppressor, its role in GBM is still unclear. Therefore, this study comprehensively explored the roles of miR-302b-mediated gene networks in GBM cell death. We found that miR-302b levels were significantly higher in primary astrocytes than in GBM cell lines. miR-302b overexpression dose dependently reduced U87-MG cell viability and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and poly(ADP ribose polymerase degradation. A transcriptome microarray revealed 150 downregulated genes and 380 upregulated genes in miR-302b-overexpressing cells. Nuclear factor IA (NFIA, higher levels of which were significantly related to poor survival, was identified as a direct target gene of miR-302b and was involved in miR-302b-induced glioma cell death. Higher NFIA levels were observed in GBM cell lines and human tumor sections compared with astrocytes and non-tumor tissues, respectively. NFIA knockdown significantly enhanced apoptosis. We found high levels of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2, another miR-302b-downregulated gene, in patients with poor survival. We verified that NFIA binds to the IGFBP2 promoter and transcriptionally enhances IGFBP2 expression levels. We identified that NFIA-mediated IGFBP2 signaling pathways are involved in miR-302b-induced glioma cell death. The identification of a regulatory loop whereby miR-302b inhibits NFIA, leading to a decrease in expression of IGFBP-2, may provide novel directions for developing therapies to target glioblastoma tumorigenesis.

  3. Determination of low tetanus or diphtheria antitoxin titers in sera by a toxin neutralization assay and a modified toxin-binding inhibition test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Sonobe

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for the screening of tetanus and diphtheria antibodies in serum using anatoxin (inactivated toxin instead of toxin was developed as an alternative to the in vivo toxin neutralization assay based on the toxin-binding inhibition test (TOBI test. In this study, the serum titers (values between 1.0 and 19.5 IU measured by a modified TOBI test (Modi-TOBI test and toxin neutralization assays were correlated (P < 0.0001. Titers of tetanus or diphtheria antibodies were evaluated in serum samples from guinea pigs immunized with tetanus toxoid, diphtheria-tetanus or triple vaccine. For the Modi-TOBI test, after blocking the microtiter plates, standard tetanus or diphtheria antitoxin and different concentrations of guinea pig sera were incubated with the respective anatoxin. Twelve hours later, these samples were transferred to a plate previously coated with tetanus or diphtheria antitoxin to bind the remaining anatoxin. The anatoxin was then detected using a peroxidase-labeled tetanus or diphtheria antitoxin. Serum titers were calculated using a linear regression plot of the results for the corresponding standard antitoxin. For the toxin neutralization assay, L+/10/50 doses of either toxin combined with different concentrations of serum samples were inoculated into mice for anti-tetanus detection, or in guinea pigs for anti-diphtheria detection. Both assays were suitable for determining wide ranges of antitoxin levels. The linear regression plots showed high correlation coefficients for tetanus (r² = 0.95, P < 0.0001 and for diphtheria (r² = 0.93, P < 0.0001 between the in vitro and the in vivo assays. The standardized method is appropriate for evaluating titers of neutralizing antibodies, thus permitting the in vitro control of serum antitoxin levels.

  4. Gigantol from Dendrobium chrysotoxum Lindl. binds and inhibits aldose reductase gene to exert its anti-cataract activity: An in vitro mechanistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Li, Xue; Wan, Wencheng; Yang, Qiaohong; Ma, Weifeng; Chen, Dan; Hu, Jiangmiao; Chen, C-Y Oliver; Wei, Xiaoyong

    2017-02-23

    Dendrobium. chrysotoxum Lindl is a commonly used species of medicinal Dendrobium which belongs to the family of Orchidaceae, locally known as "Shihu" or "Huangcao". D. chrysotoxum Lindl is widely known for medicinal values in traditional Chinese medicine as it possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-hyperglycemic induction, antitumor and antioxidant properties. To characterize the interaction between gigantol extracted from D. chrysotoxum Lindl and the AR gene, and determine gigantol's efficacy against cataractogenesis. Human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) were induced by glucose as the model group. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to assess AR gene expression. Then, the mode of interaction of gigantol with the AR gene was evaluated by UV-visible spectroscopy, atomic force microscope (AFM) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The binding constant was determined by UV-visible. Gigantol depressed AR gene expression in HLECs. UV-visible spectra preliminarily indicated that interaction between the AR gene and gigantol may follow the groove mode, with a binding constant of 1.85×10 3 L/mol. Atomic force microscope (AFM) data indicated that gigantol possibly bound to insert AR gene base pairs of the double helix. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) studies further supported these observations. Gigantol extracted from D. chrysotoxum Lindl not only has inhibitory effects on aldose reductase, but also inhibits AR gene expression. These findings provide a more comprehensive theoretical basis for the use of Dendrobium for the treatment of diabetic cataract. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The stress granule component TIA-1 binds tick-borne encephalitis virus RNA and is recruited to perinuclear sites of viral replication to inhibit viral translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albornoz, Amelina; Carletti, Tea; Corazza, Gianmarco; Marcello, Alessandro

    2014-06-01

    Flaviviruses are a major cause of disease in humans and animals worldwide. Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is the most important arthropod-borne flavivirus endemic in Europe and is the etiological agent of tick-borne encephalitis, a potentially fatal infection of the central nervous system. However, the contributions of host proteins during TBEV infection are poorly understood. In this work, we investigate the cellular protein TIA-1 and its cognate factor TIAR, which are stress-induced RNA-binding proteins involved in the repression of initiation of translation of cellular mRNAs and in the formation of stress granules. We show that TIA-1 and TIAR interact with viral RNA in TBEV-infected cells. During TBEV infection, cytoplasmic TIA-1 and TIAR are recruited at sites of viral replication with concomitant depletion from stress granules. This effect is specific, since G3BP1, another component of these cytoplasmic structures, remains localized to stress granules. Moreover, heat shock induction of stress granules containing TIA-1, but not G3BP1, is inhibited in TBEV-infected cells. Infection of cells depleted of TIA-1 or TIAR by small interfering RNA (siRNA) or TIA-1(-/-) mouse fibroblasts, leads to a significant increase in TBEV extracellular infectivity. Interestingly, TIAR(-/-) fibroblasts show the opposite effect on TBEV infection, and this phenotype appears to be related to an excess of TIA-1 in these cells. Taking advantage of a TBE-luciferase replicon system, we also observed increased luciferase activity in TIA-1(-/-) mouse fibroblasts at early time points, consistent with TIA-1-mediated inhibition at the level of the first round of viral translation. These results indicate that, in response to TBEV infection, TIA-1 is recruited to sites of virus replication to bind TBEV RNA and modulate viral translation independently of stress granule (SG) formation. This study (i) extends previous work that showed TIA-1/TIAR recruitment at sites of flavivirus replication

  6. The Rhizome Mixture of Anemarrhena asphodeloides and Coptidis chinensis Ameliorates Acute and Chronic Colitis in Mice by Inhibiting the Binding of Lipopolysaccharide to TLR4 and IRAK1 Phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ju Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the previous study, the mixture of the rhizome of Anemarrhena asphodeloides (AA, family Liliaceae and the rhizome of Coptidis chinensis (CC, family Ranunculaceae (AC-mix improved TNBS- or oxazolone-induced colitis in mice. Therefore, to investigate its anticolitic mechanism, we measured its effect in acute and chronic DSS-induced colitic mice and investigated its anti-inflammatory mechanism in peritoneal macrophages. AC-mix potently suppressed DSS-induced body weight loss, colon shortening, myeloperoxidase activity, and TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 expressions in acute or chronic DSS-stimulated colitic mice. Among AC-mix ingredients, AA, CC, and their main constituents mangiferin and berberine potently inhibited the expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as the activation of NF-κB in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages. AA and mangiferin potently inhibited IRAK phosphorylation, but CC and berberine potently inhibited the binding of LPS to TLR4 on macrophages, as well as the phosphorylation of IRAK1. AC-mix potently inhibited IRAK phosphorylation and LPS binding to TLR4 on macrophages. Based on these findings, AC-mix may ameliorate colitis by the synergistic inhibition of IRAK phosphorylation and LPS binding to TLR4 on macrophages.

  7. Knocking out or pharmaceutical inhibition of fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) alleviates osteoarthritis induced by high-fat diet in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Chiu, K Y; Chan, B P M; Li, T; Wen, C; Xu, A; Yan, C H

    2018-06-01

    Adipokines play roles in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) is a novel adipokine that is closely associated with obesity and metabolic diseases. The aim of this study was to discover the potential role of FABP4 in OA. Seventy-two FABP4 knockout mice (KO) in C57BL/6N background and wild-type littermates (WT) (male, 6-week-old) were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD, 60% calorie) or standard diet (STD, 11.6% calorie) for 3 months, 6 months and 9 months (n = 6 each). In the parallel study, forty-eight 6-week-old male WT mice were fed with HFD or STD, and simultaneously treated with daily oral gavage of selective FABP4 inhibitor BMS309403 (15 mg/kg/d) or vehicle for 4 months and 6 months (n = 6 each). Serum FABP4 and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) concentration was quantified. Histological assessment of knee OA and micro-CT analysis of subchondral bone were performed. HFD induced obesity in mice. After 3 months and 6 months of HFD, KO mice showed alleviated cartilage degradation and synovitis, with significantly lower COMP, modified Mankin OA score, and MMP-13/ADAMTS4 expression. After 6 months and 9 months of HFD, KO mice showed less osteophyte formation and subchondral bone sclerosis. Chronic treatment of BMS309403 for 4 months and 6 months significantly alleviated cartilage degradation, but had no effects on the subchondral bone. Knocking out or pharmaceutical inhibition of FABP4 did not have significant effects on lean mice fed with STD. Knocking out or pharmaceutical inhibition of FABP4 alleviates OA induced by HFD in mice. Copyright © 2018 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. TANK-Binding Kinase 1 (TBK1 Isoforms Negatively Regulate Type I Interferon Induction by Inhibiting TBK1-IRF3 Interaction and IRF3 Phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wei Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1 is an important serine/threonine-protein kinase that mediates phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3, which contributes to induction of type I interferons (IFNs in the innate antiviral response. In mammals, TBK1 spliced isoform negatively regulates the virus-triggered IFN-β signaling pathway by disrupting the interaction between retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I and mitochondria antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS. However, it is still unclear whether alternative splicing patterns and the function of TBK1 isoform(s exist in teleost fish. In this study, we identify two alternatively spliced isoforms of TBK1 from zebrafish, termed TBK1_tv1 and TBK1_tv2. Both TBK1_tv1 and TBK1_tv2 contain an incomplete STKc_TBK1 domain. Moreover, the UBL_TBK1_like domain is also missing for TBK1_tv2. TBK1_tv1 and TBK1_tv2 are expressed in zebrafish larvae. Overexpression of TBK1_tv1 and TBK1_tv2 inhibits RIG-I-, MAVS-, TBK1-, and IRF3-mediated activation of IFN promoters in response to spring viremia of carp virus infection. Also, TBK1_tv1 and TBK1_tv2 inhibit expression of IFNs and IFN-stimulated genes induced by MAVS and TBK1. Mechanistically, TBK1_tv1 and TBK1_tv2 competitively associate with TBK1 and IRF3 to disrupt the formation of a functional TBK1-IRF3 complex, impeding the phosphorylation of IRF3 mediated by TBK1. Collectively, these results demonstrate that TBK1 spliced isoforms are dominant negative regulators in the RIG-I/MAVS/TBK1/IRF3 antiviral pathway by targeting the functional TBK1-IRF3 complex formation. Identification and functional characterization of piscine TBK1 spliced isoforms may contribute to understanding the role of TBK1 expression in innate antiviral response.

  9. Tarantula huwentoxin-IV inhibits neuronal sodium channels by binding to receptor site 4 and trapping the domain ii voltage sensor in the closed configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yucheng; Bingham, Jon-Paul; Zhu, Weiguo; Moczydlowski, Edward; Liang, Songping; Cummins, Theodore R

    2008-10-03

    Peptide toxins with high affinity, divergent pharmacological functions, and isoform-specific selectivity are powerful tools for investigating the structure-function relationships of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Although a number of interesting inhibitors have been reported from tarantula venoms, little is known about the mechanism for their interaction with VGSCs. We show that huwentoxin-IV (HWTX-IV), a 35-residue peptide from tarantula Ornithoctonus huwena venom, preferentially inhibits neuronal VGSC subtypes rNav1.2, rNav1.3, and hNav1.7 compared with muscle subtypes rNav1.4 and hNav1.5. Of the five VGSCs examined, hNav1.7 was most sensitive to HWTX-IV (IC(50) approximately 26 nM). Following application of 1 microm HWTX-IV, hNav1.7 currents could only be elicited with extreme depolarizations (>+100 mV). Recovery of hNav1.7 channels from HWTX-IV inhibition could be induced by extreme depolarizations or moderate depolarizations lasting several minutes. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis indicated that the toxin docked at neurotoxin receptor site 4 located at the extracellular S3-S4 linker of domain II. Mutations E818Q and D816N in hNav1.7 decreased toxin affinity for hNav1.7 by approximately 300-fold, whereas the reverse mutations in rNav1.4 (N655D/Q657E) and the corresponding mutations in hNav1.5 (R812D/S814E) greatly increased the sensitivity of the muscle VGSCs to HWTX-IV. Our data identify a novel mechanism for sodium channel inhibition by tarantula toxins involving binding to neurotoxin receptor site 4. In contrast to scorpion beta-toxins that trap the IIS4 voltage sensor in an outward configuration, we propose that HWTX-IV traps the voltage sensor of domain II in the inward, closed configuration.

  10. Cyclic AMP-Responsive Element-Binding Protein (CREB is Critical in Autoimmunity by Promoting Th17 but Inhibiting Treg Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohu Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms that govern differential T cell development into pro-inflammatory Th17 vs. regulatory T (Treg cells remain unclear. Here, we show that selective deletion of CREB in T cells or Th17 cells impaired Th17 cell differentiation in vitro and in vivo, and led to resistance to autoimmune diseases. Mechanistically, CREB, activated by CD3-PKC-ϴ signaling, plays a key role in regulating Th17 cell differentiation, at least in part through directly binding to the Il17-Il17f gene locus. Unexpectedly, although dispensable for FOXP3 expression and for the homeostasis and suppressive function of thymus-derived Treg cells, CREB negatively regulates the survival of TGF-β-induced Treg cells, and deletion of CREB resulted in increased FOXP3+ Treg cells in the intestine and protection in a colitis model. Thus, CREB is critical in autoimmune diseases by promoting Th17 cell and inhibiting de novo Treg cell generation.

  11. H+-ATPase activity from storage tissue of Beta vulgaris. IV. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide binding and inhibition of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleski, N.A.; Bennett, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    The molecular weight and isoelectric point of the plasma membrane H + -ATPase from red beet storage tissue were determined using N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) and a H + -ATPase antibody. When plasma membrane vesicles were incubated with 20 micromolar [ 14 C]-DCCD at 0 0 C, a single 97,000 dalton protein was visualized on a fluorography of a sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel. A close correlation between [ 14 C]DCCD labeling of the 97,000 dalton protein and the extent of ATPase inhibition over a range of DCCD concentration suggests that this 97,000 dalton protein is a component of the plasma membrane H + -ATPase. An antibody raised against the plasma membrane H + -ATPase of Neurospora crassa cross-reacted with the 97,000 dalton DCCD-binding protein, further supporting the identity of this protein. Immunoblots of two-dimensional gels of red beet plasma membrane vesicles indicated the isoelectric point of the H + -ATPase to be 6.5

  12. Inhibition of Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Reverses Autistic-Like Phenotypes Caused by Deficiency of the Translation Repressor eIF4E Binding Protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Valles, Argel; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Khoutorsky, Arkady; Gkogkas, Christos; Nader, Karim; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2015-08-05

    Exacerbated mRNA translation during brain development has been linked to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Deletion of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein 2 gene (Eif4ebp2), encoding the suppressor of mRNA translation initiation 4E-BP2, leads to an imbalance in excitatory-to-inhibitory neurotransmission and ASD-like behaviors. Inhibition of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) mGluR1 and mGluR5 reverses the autistic phenotypes in several ASD mouse models. Importantly, these receptors control synaptic physiology via activation of mRNA translation. We investigated the potential reversal of autistic-like phenotypes in Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice by using antagonists of mGluR1 (JNJ16259685) or mGluR5 (fenobam). Augmented hippocampal mGluR-induced long-term depression (LTD; or chemically induced mGluR-LTD) in Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice was rescued by mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists. While rescue by mGluR5 inhibition occurs through the blockade of a protein synthesis-dependent component of LTD, normalization by mGluR1 antagonists requires the activation of protein synthesis. Synaptically induced LTD was deficient in Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice, and this deficit was not rescued by group I mGluR antagonists. Furthermore, a single dose of mGluR1 (0.3 mg/kg) or mGluR5 (3 mg/kg) antagonists in vivo reversed the deficits in social interaction and repetitive behaviors (marble burying) in Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice. Our results demonstrate that Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice serve as a relevant model to test potential therapies for ASD symptoms. In addition, we provide substantive evidence that the inhibition of mGluR1/mGluR5 is an effective treatment for physiological and behavioral alterations caused by exacerbated mRNA translation initiation. Exacerbated mRNA translation during brain development is associated with several autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We recently demonstrated that the deletion of a negative regulator of mRNA translation initiation, the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding

  13. The protein inhibitor of nNOS (PIN/DLC1/LC8) binding does not inhibit the NADPH-dependent heme reduction in nNOS, a key step in NO synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhad, Swapnil S; Jaiswal, Deepa; Ray, Krishanu; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2016-03-25

    The neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is an essential enzyme involved in the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), a potent neurotransmitter. Although previous studies have indicated that the dynein light chain 1 (DLC1) binding to nNOS could inhibit the NO synthesis, the claim is challenged by contradicting reports. Thus, the mechanism of nNOS regulation remained unclear. nNOS has a heme-bearing, Cytochrome P450 core, and the functional enzyme is a dimer. The electron flow from NADPH to Flavin, and finally to the heme of the paired nNOS subunit within a dimer, is facilitated upon calmodulin (CaM) binding. Here, we show that DLC1 binding to nNOS-CaM complex does not affect the electron transport from the reductase to the oxygenase domain. Therefore, it cannot inhibit the rate of NADPH-dependent heme reduction in nNOS, which results in l-Arginine oxidation. Also, the NO release activity does not decrease with increasing DLC1 concentration in the reaction mix, which further confirmed that DLC1 does not inhibit nNOS activity. These findings suggest that the DLC1 binding may have other implications for the nNOS function in the cell. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Very slow neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, A.

    1983-01-01

    The history is briefly presented of the research so far of very slow neutrons and their basic properties are explained. The methods are described of obtaining very slow neutrons and the problems of their preservation are discussed. The existence of very slow neutrons makes it possible to perform experiments which may deepen the knowledge of the fundamental properties of neutrons. Their wavelength approximates that of visible radiation. The possibilities and use are discussed of neutron optical systems (neutron microscope) which could be an effective instrument for the study of the detailed arrangement, especially of organic substances. (B.S.)

  15. On the reasons for bombarding uranium with slow neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Diyu

    1997-01-01

    Form the concepts of slow neutrons, the binding energy and the excitation energy of complex nuclei, and the activation energy in nuclear fission, the four reasons for bombarding uranium with slow neutrons are summed up. Not only the reasons for uranium fission are brought in light, but also the micromechanism is dealt with

  16. The protein inhibitor of nNOS (PIN/DLC1/LC8) binding does not inhibit the NADPH-dependent heme reduction in nNOS, a key step in NO synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parhad, Swapnil S.; Jaiswal, Deepa; Ray, Krishanu; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is an essential enzyme involved in the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), a potent neurotransmitter. Although previous studies have indicated that the dynein light chain 1 (DLC1) binding to nNOS could inhibit the NO synthesis, the claim is challenged by contradicting reports. Thus, the mechanism of nNOS regulation remained unclear. nNOS has a heme-bearing, Cytochrome P450 core, and the functional enzyme is a dimer. The electron flow from NADPH to Flavin, and finally to the heme of the paired nNOS subunit within a dimer, is facilitated upon calmodulin (CaM) binding. Here, we show that DLC1 binding to nNOS-CaM complex does not affect the electron transport from the reductase to the oxygenase domain. Therefore, it cannot inhibit the rate of NADPH-dependent heme reduction in nNOS, which results in L-Arginine oxidation. Also, the NO release activity does not decrease with increasing DLC1 concentration in the reaction mix, which further confirmed that DLC1 does not inhibit nNOS activity. These findings suggest that the DLC1 binding may have other implications for the nNOS function in the cell. - Highlights: • The effect of interaction of nNOS with DLC1 has been debatable with contradicting reports in literature. • Purified DLC1 has no effect on electron transport between reductase and oxygenase domain of purified nNOS-CaM. • The NO release activity of nNOS was not altered by DLC1, supporting that DLC1 does not inhibit the enzyme. • These findings suggest that the DLC1 binding may have other implications for the nNOS function in the cell.

  17. The protein inhibitor of nNOS (PIN/DLC1/LC8) binding does not inhibit the NADPH-dependent heme reduction in nNOS, a key step in NO synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parhad, Swapnil S. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Jaiswal, Deepa [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); TIFR Centre for Interdisciplinary Sciences, 21 Brundavan Colony, Narsingi, Hyderabad 500075 (India); Ray, Krishanu, E-mail: krishanu@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Mazumdar, Shyamalava, E-mail: shyamal@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2016-03-25

    The neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is an essential enzyme involved in the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), a potent neurotransmitter. Although previous studies have indicated that the dynein light chain 1 (DLC1) binding to nNOS could inhibit the NO synthesis, the claim is challenged by contradicting reports. Thus, the mechanism of nNOS regulation remained unclear. nNOS has a heme-bearing, Cytochrome P450 core, and the functional enzyme is a dimer. The electron flow from NADPH to Flavin, and finally to the heme of the paired nNOS subunit within a dimer, is facilitated upon calmodulin (CaM) binding. Here, we show that DLC1 binding to nNOS-CaM complex does not affect the electron transport from the reductase to the oxygenase domain. Therefore, it cannot inhibit the rate of NADPH-dependent heme reduction in nNOS, which results in L-Arginine oxidation. Also, the NO release activity does not decrease with increasing DLC1 concentration in the reaction mix, which further confirmed that DLC1 does not inhibit nNOS activity. These findings suggest that the DLC1 binding may have other implications for the nNOS function in the cell. - Highlights: • The effect of interaction of nNOS with DLC1 has been debatable with contradicting reports in literature. • Purified DLC1 has no effect on electron transport between reductase and oxygenase domain of purified nNOS-CaM. • The NO release activity of nNOS was not altered by DLC1, supporting that DLC1 does not inhibit the enzyme. • These findings suggest that the DLC1 binding may have other implications for the nNOS function in the cell.

  18. Early events elicited by Bombesin and structurally related peptides in quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells. I. Activation of protein kinase C and inhibition of epidermal growth factor binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachary, I.; Sinnett-Smith, J.W.; Rozengurt, E.

    1986-01-01

    Addition of bombesin to quiescent cultures of Swiss 3T3 cells caused a rapid increase in the phosphorylation of an M/sub r/ 80,000 cellular protein (designated 80k). The effect was both concentration and time dependent. The 80k phosphoproteins generated in response to bombesin and to phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate were identical as judged by one- and two-dimensional PAGE and by peptide mapping after partial proteolysis with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease. In addition, prolonged pretreatment of 3T3 cells with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, which leads to the disappearance of protein kinase C activity, blocked the ability of bombesin to stimulate 80k. Bombesin also caused a rapid (1 min) inhibition of 125 I-labeled epidermal growth factor ( 125 I-EGF) binding to Swiss 3T3 cells. The inhibition was both concentration and temperature dependent and resulted from a marked decrease in the affinity of the EGF receptor for its ligand. These results strongly suggest that these responses are mediated by specific high-affinity receptors that recognize the peptides of the bombesin family in Swiss 3T3 cells. While an increase in cytosolic Ca 2+ concentration does not mediate the bombesin inhibition of 125 I-EGF binding, the activation of protein kinase C in intact Swiss 3T3 cells by peptides of the bombesin family may lead to rapid inhibition of the binding of 125 I-EGF to its cellular receptor

  19. Crosstalk between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in human breast cancer cells: PPARγ binds to VDR and inhibits 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 mediated transactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimirah, Fatouma; Peng, Xinjian; Yuan, Liang; Mehta, Rajeshwari R.; Knethen, Andreas von; Choubey, Divaker; Mehta, Rajendra G.

    2012-01-01

    Heterodimerization and cross-talk between nuclear hormone receptors often occurs. For example, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) physically binds to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and inhibits its transcriptional activity. The interaction between PPARγ and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) however, is unknown. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms linking PPARγ and VDR signaling, and for the first time we show that PPARγ physically associates with VDR in human breast cancer cells. We found that overexpression of PPARγ decreased 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (1,25D 3 ) mediated transcriptional activity of the vitamin D target gene, CYP24A1, by 49% and the activity of VDRE-luc, a vitamin D responsive reporter, by 75% in T47D human breast cancer cells. Deletion mutation experiments illustrated that helices 1 and 4 of PPARγ's hinge and ligand binding domains, respectively, governed this suppressive function. Additionally, abrogation of PPARγ's AF2 domain attenuated its repressive action on 1,25D 3 transactivation, indicating that this domain is integral in inhibiting VDR signaling. PPARγ was also found to compete with VDR for their binding partner retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRα). Overexpression of RXRα blocked PPARγ's suppressive effect on 1,25D 3 action, enhancing VDR signaling. In conclusion, these observations uncover molecular mechanisms connecting the PPARγ and VDR pathways. -- Highlights: PPARγ's role on 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 transcriptional activity is examined. ► PPARγ physically binds to VDR and inhibits 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 action. ► PPARγ's hinge and ligand binding domains are important for this inhibitory effect. ► PPARγ competes with VDR for the availability of their binding partner, RXRα.

  20. Transformer Industry Productivity Slows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Phyllis Flohr

    1981-01-01

    Annual productivity increases averaged 2.4 percent during 1963-79, slowing since 1972 to 1.5 percent; computer-assisted design and product standardization aided growth in output per employee-hour. (Author)

  1. Cardiac actions of phencyclidine in isolated guinea pig and rat heart: possible involvement of slow channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temma, K.; Akera, T.; Ng, Y.C.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the positive inotropic effect of phencyclidine were studied in isolated preparations of guinea pig and rat heart. In electrically paced left atrial muscle preparations, phencyclidine increased the force of contraction; rat heart muscle preparations were more sensitive than guinea pig heart muscle preparations. The positive inotropic effect of phencyclidine was not significantly reduced by a combination of phentolamine and nadolol; however, the effect was competitively blocked by verapamil in the presence of phentolamine and nadolol. Inhibition of the outward K+ current by tetraethylammonium chloride also produced a positive inotropic effect; however, the effect of tetraethylammonium was reduced by phentolamine and nadolol, and was almost insensitive to verapamil. The inotropic effect of phencyclidine was associated with a marked prolongation of the action potential duration and a decrease in maximal upstroke velocity of the action potential, with no change in the resting membrane potential. The specific [ 3 H]phencyclidine binding observed with membrane preparations from guinea pig ventricular muscle was saturable with a single class of high-affinity binding site. This binding was inhibited by verapamil, diltiazem, or nitrendipine, but not by ryanodine or tetrodotoxin. These results suggest that the positive inotropic effect of phencyclidine results from enhanced Ca 2+ influx via slow channels, either by stimulation of the channels or secondary to inhibition of outward K + currents

  2. Inhibition of infection and transmission of HIV-1 and lack of significant impact on the vaginal commensal lactobacilli by carbohydrate-binding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Mariya I; Mathys, Leen; Lebeer, Sarah; Noppen, Sam; Van Damme, Els J M; Tanaka, Haruo; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Vanderleyden, Jos; Balzarini, Jan

    2013-09-01

    A selection of carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs) with different glycan specificities were evaluated for their inhibitory effect against HIV infection and transmission, and their interaction with vaginal commensal bacteria. Several assays were used for the antiviral evaluation: (i) cell-free virus infection of human CD4+ T lymphocyte C8166 cells; (ii) syncytium formation in co-cultures of persistently HIV-1-infected HUT-78/HIV-1 and non-infected CD4+ SupT1 cells; (iii) DC-SIGN-directed capture of HIV-1 particles; and (iv) transmission of DC-SIGN-captured HIV-1 particles to uninfected CD4+ C8166 cells. CBAs were also examined for their interaction with vaginal commensal lactobacilli using several viability, proliferation and adhesion assays. The CBAs showed efficient inhibitory activity in the nanomolar to low-micromolar range against four events that play a crucial role in HIV-1 infection and transmission: cell-free virus infection, fusion between HIV-1-infected and non-infected cells, HIV-1 capture by DC-SIGN and transmission of DC-SIGN-captured virus to T cells. As candidate microbicides should not interfere with the normal human microbiota, we examined the effect of CBAs against Lactobacillus strains, including a variety of vaginal strains, a gastrointestinal strain and several non-human isolates. None of the CBAs included in our studies inhibited the growth of these bacteria in several media, affected their viability or had any significant impact on their adhesion to HeLa cell monolayers. The CBAs in this study were inhibitory to HIV-1 in several in vitro infection and transmission models, and may therefore qualify as potential microbicide candidates. The lack of significant impact on commensal vaginal lactobacilli is an important property of these CBAs in view of their potential microbicidal use.

  3. Inhibition of CUG-binding protein 1 and activation of caspases are critically involved in piperazine derivative BK10007S induced apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Ha Kim

    Full Text Available Though piperazine derivative BK10007S was known to induce apoptosis in pancreatic cancer xenograft model as a T-type CaV3.1 a1G isoform calcium channel blocker, its underlying antitumor mechanism still remains unclear so far. Thus, in the present study, the antitumor mechanism of BK10007S was elucidated in hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCCs. Herein, BK10007S showed significant cytotoxicity by 3-[4,5-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetra-zolium bromide (MTT assay and anti-proliferative effects by colony formation assay in HepG2 and SK-Hep1 cells. Also, apoptotic bodies and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL positive cells were observed in BK10007S treated HepG2 and SK-Hep1 cells by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylinodole (DAPI staining and TUNEL assay, respectively. Consistently, BK10007S increased sub G1 population in HepG2 and SK-Hep1 cells by cell cycle analysis. Furthermore, Western blotting revealed that BK10007S activated the caspase cascades (caspase 8, 9 and 3, cleaved poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, and downregulated the expression of cyclin D1, survivin and for CUG-binding protein 1 (CUGBP1 or CELF1 in HepG2 and SK-Hep1 cells. Conversely, overexpression of CUGBP1 reduced cleavages of PARP and caspase 3, cytotoxicity and subG1 population in BK10007S treated HepG2 cells. Overall, these findings provide scientific evidences that BK10007S induces apoptosis via inhibition of CUGBP1 and activation of caspases in hepatocellular carcinomas as a potent anticancer candidate.

  4. Structures of a bi-functional Kunitz-type STI family inhibitor of serine and aspartic proteases: Could the aspartic protease inhibition have evolved from a canonical serine protease-binding loop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Yasel; Valiente, Pedro A; Pons, Tirso; Berry, Colin; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2016-08-01

    Bi-functional inhibitors from the Kunitz-type soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) family are glycosylated proteins able to inhibit serine and aspartic proteases. Here we report six crystal structures of the wild-type and a non-glycosylated mutant of the bifunctional inhibitor E3Ad obtained at different pH values and space groups. The crystal structures show that E3Ad adopts the typical β-trefoil fold of the STI family exhibiting some conformational changes due to pH variations and crystal packing. Despite the high sequence identity with a recently reported potato cathepsin D inhibitor (PDI), three-dimensional structures obtained in this work show a significant conformational change in the protease-binding loop proposed for aspartic protease inhibition. The E3Ad binding loop for serine protease inhibition is also proposed, based on structural similarity with a novel non-canonical conformation described for the double-headed inhibitor API-A from the Kunitz-type STI family. In addition, structural and sequence analyses suggest that bifunctional inhibitors of serine and aspartic proteases from the Kunitz-type STI family are more similar to double-headed inhibitor API-A than other inhibitors with a canonical protease-binding loop. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Slow self-activation enhances the potency of viridin prodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Joseph; Yuan, Hushan; Smith, Adam; Pacold, Michael E; Weissleder, Ralph; Cantley, Lewis C; Josephson, Lee

    2008-08-14

    When the viridin wortmannin (Wm) is modified by reaction with certain nucleophiles at the C20 position, the compounds obtained exhibit an improved antiproliferative activity even though a covalent reaction between C20 and a lysine in the active site of PI3 kinase is essential to Wm's ability to inhibit this enzyme. Here we show that this improved potency results from an intramolecular attack by the C6 hydroxyl group that slowly converts these inactive prodrugs to the active species Wm over the 48 h duration of the antiproliferative assay. Our results provide a guide for selecting Wm-like compounds to maximize kinase inhibition with the variety of protocols used to assess the role of PI3 kinase in biological systems, or for achieving optimal therapeutic effects in vivo . In addition, the slow self-activation of WmC20 derivatives provides a mechanism that can be exploited to obtain kinase inhibitors endowed with physical and pharmacokinetic properties far different from man-made kinase inhibitors because they do not bind to kinase active sites.

  6. SPS slow extraction septa

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    SPS long straight section (LSS) with a series of 5 septum tanks for slow extraction (view in the direction of the proton beam). There are 2 of these: in LSS2, towards the N-Area; in LSS6 towards the W-Area. See also Annual Report 1975, p.175.

  7. AGS slow extraction improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenn, J.W.; Smith, G.A.; Sandberg, J.N.; Repeta, L.; Weisberg, H.

    1979-01-01

    Improvement of the straightness of the F5 copper septum increased the AGS slow extraction efficiency from approx. 80% to approx. 90%. Installation of an electrostatic septum at H2O, 24 betatron wavelengths upstream of F5, further improved the extraction efficiency to approx. 97%

  8. PF slow positron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, A.; Enomoto, A.; Kurihara, T.

    1993-01-01

    A new slow-positron source is under construction at the Photon Factory. Positrons are produced by bombarding a tantalum rod with high-energy electrons; they are moderated in multiple tungsten vanes. We report here the present status of this project. (author)

  9. Ligand photo-isomerization triggers conformational changes in iGluR2 ligand binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tino Wolter

    Full Text Available Neurological glutamate receptors bind a variety of artificial ligands, both agonistic and antagonistic, in addition to glutamate. Studying their small molecule binding properties increases our understanding of the central nervous system and a variety of associated pathologies. The large, oligomeric multidomain membrane protein contains a large and flexible ligand binding domains which undergoes large conformational changes upon binding different ligands. A recent application of glutamate receptors is their activation or inhibition via photo-switchable ligands, making them key systems in the emerging field of optochemical genetics. In this work, we present a theoretical study on the binding mode and complex stability of a novel photo-switchable ligand, ATA-3, which reversibly binds to glutamate receptors ligand binding domains (LBDs. We propose two possible binding modes for this ligand based on flexible ligand docking calculations and show one of them to be analogues to the binding mode of a similar ligand, 2-BnTetAMPA. In long MD simulations, it was observed that transitions between both binding poses involve breaking and reforming the T686-E402 protein hydrogen bond. Simulating the ligand photo-isomerization process shows that the two possible configurations of the ligand azo-group have markedly different complex stabilities and equilibrium binding modes. A strong but slow protein response is observed after ligand configuration changes. This provides a microscopic foundation for the observed difference in ligand activity upon light-switching.

  10. Fatty Acid-Mediated Inhibition of Metal Binding to the Multi-Metal Site on Serum Albumin: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blindauer, Claudia A; Khazaipoul, Siavash; Yu, Ruitao; Stewart, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the major protein in blood plasma and is responsible for circulatory transport of a range of small molecules including fatty acids, metal ions and drugs. We previously identified the major plasma Zn2+ transport site on HSA and revealed that fatty-acid binding (at a distinct site called the FA2 site) and Zn2+ binding are interdependent via an allosteric mechanism. Since binding affinities of long-chain fatty acids exceed those of plasma Zn2+, this means that under certain circumstances the binding of fatty acid molecules to HSA is likely to diminish HSA Zn2+-binding, and hence affects the control of circulatory and cellular Zn2+ dynamics. This relationship between circulatory fatty acid and Zn2+ dynamics is likely to have important physiological and pathological implications, especially since it has been recognised that Zn2+ acts as a signalling agent in many cell types. Fatty acid levels in the blood are dynamic, but most importantly, chronic elevation of plasma fatty acid levels is associated with some metabolic disorders and disease states - including myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases. In this article, we briefly review the metal-binding properties of albumin and highlight the importance of their interplay with fatty acid binding. We also consider the impact of this dynamic link upon levels and speciation of plasma Zn2+, its effect upon cellular Zn2+ homeostasis and its relevance to cardiovascular and circulatory processes in health and disease.

  11. An allosteric binding site at the human serotonin transporter mediates the inhibition of escitalopram by R-citalopram: kinetic binding studies with the ALI/VFL-SI/TT mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Huailing; Hansen, Kasper B; Boyle, Noel J; Han, Kiho; Muske, Galina; Huang, Xinyan; Egebjerg, Jan; Sánchez, Connie

    2009-10-25

    The human serotonin transporter (hSERT) has primary and allosteric binding sites for escitalopram and R-citalopram. Previous studies have established that the interaction of these two compounds at a low affinity allosteric binding site of hSERT can affect the dissociation of [(3)H]escitalopram from hSERT. The allosteric binding site involves a series of residues in the 10th, 11th, and 12th trans-membrane domains of hSERT. The low affinity allosteric activities of escitalopram and R-citalopram are essentially eliminated in a mutant hSERT with changes in some of these residues, namely A505V, L506F, I507L, S574T, I575T, as measured in dissociation binding studies. We confirm that in association binding experiments, R-citalopram at clinically relevant concentrations reduces the association rate of [(3)H]escitalopram as a ligand to wild type hSERT. We demonstrate that the ability of R-citalopram to reduce the association rate of escitalopram is also abolished in the mutant hSERT (A505V, L506F, I507L, S574T, I575T), along with the expected disruption the low affinity allosteric function on dissociation binding. This suggests that the allosteric binding site mediates both the low affinity and higher affinity interactions between R-citalopram, escitalopram, and hSERT. Our data add an additional structural basis for the different efficacies of escitalopram compared to racemic citalopram reported in animal studies and clinical trials, and substantiate the hypothesis that hSERT has complex allosteric mechanisms underlying the unexplained in vivo activities of its inhibitors.

  12. Inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activating complex by protein S: evidence for a specific binding of protein S to factor VIII

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Protein S is a vitamin K-dependent nonenzymatic anticoagulant protein that acts as a cofactor to activated protein C. Recently it was shown that protein S inhibits the prothrombinase reaction independent of activated protein C. In this study, we show that protein S can also inhibit the intrinsic

  13. Slow wave cyclotron maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kho, T.H.; Lin, A.T.

    1988-01-01

    Cyclotron masers such as Gyrotrons and the Autoresonance Masers, are fast wave devices: the electromagnetic wave's phase velocity v rho , is greater than the electron beam velocity, v b . To be able to convert the beam kinetic energy into radiation in these devices the beam must have an initial transverse momentum, usually obtained by propagating the beam through a transverse wiggler magnet, or along a nonuniform guide magnetic field before entry into the interaction region. Either process introduces a significant amount of thermal spread in the beam which degrades the performance of the maser. However, if the wave phase velocity v rho v b , the beam kinetic energy can be converted directly into radiation without the requirement of an initial transverse beam momentum, making a slow wave cyclotron maser a potentially simpler and more compact device. The authors present the linear and nonlinear physics of the slow wave cyclotron maser and examine its potential for practical application

  14. Slow-transit Constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Philips, Sidney F.

    2001-08-01

    Idiopathic slow-transit constipation is a clinical syndrome predominantly affecting women, characterized by intractable constipation and delayed colonic transit. This syndrome is attributed to disordered colonic motor function. The disorder spans a spectrum of variable severity, ranging from patients who have relatively mild delays in transit but are otherwise indistinguishable from irritable bowel syndrome to patients with colonic inertia or chronic megacolon. The diagnosis is made after excluding colonic obstruction, metabolic disorders (hypothyroidism, hypercalcemia), drug-induced constipation, and pelvic floor dysfunction (as discussed by Wald ). Most patients are treated with one or more pharmacologic agents, including dietary fiber supplementation, saline laxatives (milk of magnesia), osmotic agents (lactulose, sorbitol, and polyethylene glycol 3350), and stimulant laxatives (bisacodyl and glycerol). A subtotal colectomy is effective and occasionally is indicated for patients with medically refractory, severe slow-transit constipation, provided pelvic floor dysfunction has been excluded or treated.

  15. BINDING EFFICACY AND ELUCIDATION OF QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP OF ACETANILIDE AND ITS DERIVATIVES WITH BOVINE SERUM ALBUMIN AND THEIR INHIBITION AGAINST COX1

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Violet Dhayabaran et al

    2012-01-01

    Serum albumins are the most abundant proteins in plasma with many physiological functions. Among them, BSA has a wide range of functions involving the binding, transport and delivery of fatty acids, porphyrins, bilirubin, steroids, etc and it is home to specific binding sites for metals, pharmaceuticals and dyes. Recently, nanotechnology has become a popular term in the current science and technology. Nanotechnology has been introduced for the food and drug industry, including encapsulations ...

  16. Slow brushing reduces heat pain in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljencrantz, J; Strigo, I; Ellingsen, D M; Krämer, H H; Lundblad, L C; Nagi, S S; Leknes, S; Olausson, H

    2017-08-01

    C-tactile (CT) afferents are unmyelinated low-threshold mechanoreceptors optimized for signalling affective, gentle touch. In three separate psychophysical experiments, we examined the contribution of CT afferents to pain modulation. In total, 44 healthy volunteers experienced heat pain and CT optimal (slow brushing) and CT sub-optimal (fast brushing or vibration) stimuli. Three different experimental paradigms were used: Concurrent application of heat pain and tactile (slow brushing or vibration) stimulation; Slow brushing, applied for variable duration and intervals, preceding heat pain; Slow versus fast brushing preceding heat pain. Slow brushing was effective in reducing pain, whereas fast brushing or vibration was not. The reduction in pain was significant not only when the CT optimal touch was applied simultaneously with the painful stimulus but also when the two stimuli were separated in time. For subsequent stimulation, the pain reduction was more pronounced for a shorter time interval between brushing and pain. Likewise, the effect was more robust when pain was preceded by a longer duration of brush stimulation. Strong CT-related pain reduction was associated with low anxiety and high calmness scores obtained by a state anxiety questionnaire. Slow brushing - optimal for CT activation - is effective in reducing pain from cutaneous heating. The precise mechanisms for the pain relief are as yet unknown but possible mechanisms include inhibition of nociceptive projection neurons at the level of the dorsal horn as well as analgesia through cortical mechanisms. Slow brushing stimuli - optimal for activation of C-tactile fibres - can reduce pain from cutaneous heating. No such effect was seen with fast brushing or vibration. These observations indicate the role of C-tactile fibres in pain modulation. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  17. Crystal Structures of the Scaffolding Protein LGN Reveal the General Mechanism by Which GoLoco Binding Motifs Inhibit the Release of GDP from Gαi *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Min; Li, Jianchao; Zhu, Jinwei; Wen, Wenyu; Zhang, Mingjie; Wang, Wenning

    2012-01-01

    GoLoco (GL) motif-containing proteins regulate G protein signaling by binding to Gα subunit and acting as guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors. GLs of LGN are also known to bind the GDP form of Gαi/o during asymmetric cell division. Here, we show that the C-terminal GL domain of LGN binds four molecules of Gαi·GDP. The crystal structures of Gαi·GDP in complex with LGN GL3 and GL4, respectively, reveal distinct GL/Gαi interaction features when compared with the only high resolution structure known with GL/Gαi interaction between RGS14 and Gαi1. Only a few residues C-terminal to the conserved GL sequence are required for LGN GLs to bind to Gαi·GDP. A highly conserved “double Arg finger” sequence (RΨ(D/E)(D/E)QR) is responsible for LGN GL to bind to GDP bound to Gαi. Together with the sequence alignment, we suggest that the LGN GL/Gαi interaction represents a general binding mode between GL motifs and Gαi. We also show that LGN GLs are potent guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors. PMID:22952234

  18. The Sand Fly Salivary Protein Lufaxin Inhibits the Early Steps of the Alternative Pathway of Complement by Direct Binding to the Proconvertase C3b-B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Sousa, Antonio F.; do Vale, Vladimir Fazito; Silva, Naylene C. S.; Guimaraes-Costa, Anderson B.; Pereira, Marcos H.; Sant’Anna, Mauricio R. V.; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Andersen, John F.; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Araujo, Ricardo N.

    2017-01-01

    Saliva of the blood feeding sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis was previously shown to inhibit the alternative pathway (AP) of the complement system. Here, we have identified Lufaxin, a protein component in saliva, as the inhibitor of the AP. Lufaxin inhibited the deposition of C3b, Bb, Properdin, C5b, and C9b on agarose-coated plates in a dose-dependent manner. It also inhibited the activation of factor B in normal serum, but had no effect on the components of the membrane attack complex. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) experiments demonstrated that Lufaxin stabilizes the C3b-B proconvertase complex when passed over a C3b surface in combination with factor B. Lufaxin was also shown to inhibit the activation of factor B by factor D in a reconstituted C3b-B, but did not inhibit the activation of C3 by reconstituted C3b-Bb. Proconvertase stabilization does not require the presence of divalent cations, but addition of Ni2+ increases the stability of complexes formed on SPR surfaces. Stabilization of the C3b-B complex to prevent C3 convertase formation (C3b-Bb formation) is a novel mechanism that differs from previously described strategies used by other organisms to inhibit the AP of the host complement system. PMID:28912782

  19. The Sand Fly Salivary Protein Lufaxin Inhibits the Early Steps of the Alternative Pathway of Complement by Direct Binding to the Proconvertase C3b-B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio F. Mendes-Sousa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Saliva of the blood feeding sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis was previously shown to inhibit the alternative pathway (AP of the complement system. Here, we have identified Lufaxin, a protein component in saliva, as the inhibitor of the AP. Lufaxin inhibited the deposition of C3b, Bb, Properdin, C5b, and C9b on agarose-coated plates in a dose-dependent manner. It also inhibited the activation of factor B in normal serum, but had no effect on the components of the membrane attack complex. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR experiments demonstrated that Lufaxin stabilizes the C3b-B proconvertase complex when passed over a C3b surface in combination with factor B. Lufaxin was also shown to inhibit the activation of factor B by factor D in a reconstituted C3b-B, but did not inhibit the activation of C3 by reconstituted C3b-Bb. Proconvertase stabilization does not require the presence of divalent cations, but addition of Ni2+ increases the stability of complexes formed on SPR surfaces. Stabilization of the C3b-B complex to prevent C3 convertase formation (C3b-Bb formation is a novel mechanism that differs from previously described strategies used by other organisms to inhibit the AP of the host complement system.

  20. The Sand Fly Salivary Protein Lufaxin Inhibits the Early Steps of the Alternative Pathway of Complement by Direct Binding to the Proconvertase C3b-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Sousa, Antonio F; do Vale, Vladimir Fazito; Silva, Naylene C S; Guimaraes-Costa, Anderson B; Pereira, Marcos H; Sant'Anna, Mauricio R V; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ribeiro, José M C; Andersen, John F; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Araujo, Ricardo N

    2017-01-01

    Saliva of the blood feeding sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis was previously shown to inhibit the alternative pathway (AP) of the complement system. Here, we have identified Lufaxin, a protein component in saliva, as the inhibitor of the AP. Lufaxin inhibited the deposition of C3b, Bb, Properdin, C5b, and C9b on agarose-coated plates in a dose-dependent manner. It also inhibited the activation of factor B in normal serum, but had no effect on the components of the membrane attack complex. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) experiments demonstrated that Lufaxin stabilizes the C3b-B proconvertase complex when passed over a C3b surface in combination with factor B. Lufaxin was also shown to inhibit the activation of factor B by factor D in a reconstituted C3b-B, but did not inhibit the activation of C3 by reconstituted C3b-Bb. Proconvertase stabilization does not require the presence of divalent cations, but addition of Ni 2+ increases the stability of complexes formed on SPR surfaces. Stabilization of the C3b-B complex to prevent C3 convertase formation (C3b-Bb formation) is a novel mechanism that differs from previously described strategies used by other organisms to inhibit the AP of the host complement system.

  1. Fisetin inhibits human melanoma cell growth through direct binding to p70S6K and mTOR: findings from 3-D melanoma skin equivalents and computational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Deeba N; Chamcheu, Jean-Christopher; Khan, Mohammad Imran; Sechi, Mario; Lall, Rahul K; Adhami, Vaqar M; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of melanoma continues to rise. Inspite of treatment advances, the prognosis remains grim once the disease has metastasized, emphasizing the need to explore additional therapeutic strategies. One such approach is through the use of mechanism-based dietary intervention. We previously showed that the flavonoid fisetin inhibits melanoma cell proliferation, in vitro and in vivo. Here, we studied fisetin-mediated regulation of kinases involved in melanoma growth and progression. Time-course analysis in 3-D melanoma constructs that transitioned from radial to vertical growth showed that fisetin treatment resulted in significant decrease in melanocytic lesions in contrast to untreated controls that showed large tumor nests and invading disseminated cells. Further studies in melanoma cultures and mouse xenografts showed that fisetin-mediated growth inhibition was associated with dephosphorylation of AKT, mTOR and p70S6K proteins. In silico modeling indicated direct interaction of fisetin with mTOR and p70S6K with favorable free energy values. These findings were validated by cell-free competition assays that established binding of fisetin to p70S6K and mTOR while little affinity was detected with AKT. Kinase activity studies reflected similar trend with % inhibition observed for p70S6K and mTOR at lower doses than AKT. Our studies characterized, for the first time, the differential interactions of any botanical agent with kinases involved in melanoma growth and demonstrate that fisetin inhibits mTOR and p70S6K through direct binding while the observed inhibitory effect of fisetin on AKT is mediated indirectly, through targeting interrelated pathways. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. A kinetic analysis of kappa-opioid agonist binding using the selective radioligand (/sup 3/H)U69593

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.A.; Hunter, J.C.; Hill, R.G.; Hughes, J.

    1989-07-01

    The interaction of the nonselective opioid ligand (3H)bremazocine and of the kappa-opioid (3H)U69593 with the kappa-receptor was investigated in guinea-pig cortical membranes. Each radioligand bound to a single population of high-affinity sites, although (3H)U69593 apparently recognised only 70% of those sites labelled by (3H)bremazocine. Naloxone and the kappa-selective ligands U69593 and PD117302 exhibited full inhibition of the binding of both radioligands. Kinetic analysis demonstrated biphasic rates of association and dissociation for both (3H)bremazocine and (3H)U69593. Detailed analysis of the binding of (3H)U69593 revealed that the fast rate of association was dependent on radioligand concentration, in contrast to the slow rate, which was independent of ligand concentration. Guanylyl-5'-imidodiphosphate (GppNHp) inhibited binding of (3H)U69593; saturation analysis demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of GppNHp resulted in a decrease in affinity without any significant change in binding capacity. GppNHp attenuated the formation of the slow component of (3H)U69593 binding, while accelerating the fast component. The data are consistent with the formation of a high-affinity complex between the kappa-receptor and a guanine nucleotide binding protein. Guanine nucleotides promote the dissociation of this ternary complex and the stabilisation of a lower-affinity state of the receptor.

  3. Antibodies to the CFTR modulate the turgor pressure of guard cell protoplasts via slow anion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, N; Bazin, I; Richaud, P; Marin, E; Vavasseur, A; Forestier, C

    2001-04-06

    The plasma membrane guard cell slow anion channel is a key element at the basis of water loss control in plants allowing prolonged osmolite efflux necessary for stomatal closure. This channel has been extensively studied by electrophysiological approaches but its molecular identification is still lacking. Recently, we described that this channel was sharing some similarities with the mammalian ATP-binding cassette protein, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel [Leonhardt, N. et al. (1999) Plant Cell 11, 1141-1151]. Here, using the patch-clamp technique and a bioassay, consisting in the observation of the change in guard cell protoplasts volume, we demonstrated that a functional antibody raised against the mammalian CFTR prevented ABA-induced guard cell protoplasts shrinking and partially inhibited the slow anion current. Moreover, this antibody immunoprecipitated a polypeptide from guard cell protein extracts and immunolabeled stomata in Vicia faba leaf sections. These results indicate that the guard cell slow anion channel is, or is closely controlled by a polypeptide, exhibiting one epitope shared with the mammalian CFTR.

  4. Epistatic mutations in PUMA BH3 drive an alternate binding mode to potently and selectively inhibit anti-apoptotic Bfl-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenson, Justin M.; Ryan, Jeremy A.; Grant, Robert A.; Letai, Anthony; Keating, Amy E. (DFCI); (MIT)

    2017-06-08

    Overexpression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins contributes to cancer progression and confers resistance to chemotherapy. Small molecules that target Bcl-2 are used in the clinic to treat leukemia, but tight and selective inhibitors are not available for Bcl-2 paralog Bfl-1. Guided by computational analysis, we designed variants of the native BH3 motif PUMA that are > 150-fold selective for Bfl-1 binding. The designed peptides potently trigger disruption of the mitochondrial outer membrane in cells dependent on Bfl-1, but not in cells dependent on other anti-apoptotic homologs. High-resolution crystal structures show that designed peptide FS2 binds Bfl-1 in a shifted geometry, relative to PUMA and other binding partners, due to a set of epistatic mutations. FS2 modified with an electrophile reacts with a cysteine near the peptide-binding groove to augment specificity. Designed Bfl-1 binders provide reagents for cellular profiling and leads for developing enhanced and cell-permeable peptide or small-molecule inhibitors.

  5. Inhibition of Binding of the AB5-Type Enterotoxins LT-I and Cholera Toxin to Ganglioside GM1 by Galactose-Rich Dietary Components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, P.M.; Widjaja-Greefkes, H.C.A.; Wikselaar, van P.G.

    2010-01-01

    Cholera, travelers' diarrhea, or colibacillosis in pigs can possibly be prevented or attenuated by dietary provision of competitive inhibitors that react with the GM1-binding sites of the enterotoxins cholera toxin (CT), human Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin of serogroup I (LTh-I), and

  6. Steady state kinetic model for the binding of substrates and allosteric effectors to Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl-diphosphate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Larsen, Sine

    2000-01-01

    A steady state kinetic investigation of the Pi activation of 5-phospho-D-ribosyl α-1-diphosphate synthase from Escherichia coli suggests that Pi can bind randomly to the enzyme either before or after an ordered addition of free Mg2+ and substrates. Unsaturation with ribose 5-phosphate increased...... the apparent cooperativity of Pi activation. At unsaturating Pi concentrations partial substrate inhibition by ribose 5-phosphate was observed. Together these results suggest that saturation of the enzyme with Pi directs the subsequent ordered binding of Mg2+ and substrates via a fast pathway, whereas...... saturation with ribose 5-phosphate leads to the binding of Mg2+ and substrates via a slow pathway where Pi binds to the enzyme last. The random mechanism for Pi binding was further supported by studies with competitive inhibitors of Mg2+, MgATP, and ribose 5-phosphate that all appeared noncompetitive when...

  7. Fludarabine inhibits STAT1-mediated up-regulation of caspase-3 expression in dexamethasone-induced osteoblasts apoptosis and slows the progression of steroid-induced avascular necrosis of the femoral head in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhenhua; Zheng, Wenhao; Tang, Qian; Cheng, Liang; Li, Hang; Ni, Wenfei; Pan, Xiaoyun

    2017-08-01

    Steroid-induced avascular necrosis of the femoral head (SANFH) is a major limitation of long-term or excessive clinical administration of glucocorticoids. Fludarabine, which is a compound used to treat various hematological malignancies, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia, acts by down-regulating signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) by inhibiting STAT1 phosphorylation in both normal and cancer cells. This study assessed the effects of fludarabine in vitro (primary murine osteoblasts) and in vivo (rat SANFH model). In vitro, pretreatment with fludarabine significantly inhibited Dexamethasone (Dex)-induced apoptosis in osteoblasts, which was examined by TUNEL staining. Treatment with Dex caused a remarkable decrease in the expression of Bcl-2; an increase in cytochrome c release; activation of BAX, caspase-9, and caspase-3; and an obvious enhancement in STAT1 phosphorylation. However, treatment resulted in the up-regulation of caspase-3 expression. Enhanced P-STAT1 activity and up-regulation of caspase-3 expression were also observed in osteoblasts. In vivo, the subchondral trabeculae in fludarabine-treated rats exhibited less bone loss and a lower ratio of empty lacunae. Taken together, our results suggest that STAT1-mediated up-regulation of caspase-3 is involved in osteoblast apoptosis induced by Dex and indicates that fludarabine may serve as a potential agent for the treatment of SANFH.

  8. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the

  9. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 (angstrom) above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational

  10. A class of DNA-binding peptides from wheat bud causes growth inhibition, G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elgjo Kjell

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deproteinized DNA from eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells still contains a low-molecular weight peptidic fraction which can be dissociated by alkalinization of the medium. This fraction inhibits RNA transcription and tumor cell growth. Removal from DNA of normal cells causes amplification of DNA template activity. This effect is lower or absent in several cancer cell lines. Likewise, the amount of active peptides in cancer cell DNA extracts is lower than in DNA preparation of the corresponding normal cells. Such evidence, and their ubiquitous presence, suggests that they are a regulatory, conserved factor involved in the control of normal cell growth and gene expression. Results We report that peptides extracted from wheat bud chromatin induce growth inhibition, G2 arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis in HeLa cells. The growth rate is decreased in cells treated during the S phase only and it is accompanied by DNA damage and DNA synthesis inhibition. In G2 cells, this treatment induces inactivation of the CDK1-cyclin B1 complex and an increase of active chk1 kinase expression. Conclusion The data indicate that the chromatin peptidic pool inhibits HeLa cell growth by causing defective DNA replication which, in turn, arrests cell cycle progression to mitosis via G2 checkpoint pathway activation.

  11. High efficacy of anti DBL4e-VAR2CSA antibodies in inhibition of CSA-binding Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes from pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magistrado, Pamela A; Minja, Daniel; Doritchamou, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Malaria during pregnancy is a major cause of intra-uterine growth-retardation and infant death in sub-Saharan Africa. Ideally, this could be prevented by a vaccine delivered before the first pregnancy. Antibodies against domain DBL4¿ from VAR2CSA has been shown to inhibit adhesion of laboratory i...

  12. Mouse mannose-binding lectin-A and ficolin-A inhibit lipopolysaccharide-mediated pro-inflammatory responses on mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Kang, Hee Jung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2013-01-01

    It is unknown how soluble pattern-recognition receptors in blood, such as mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins, modulate mast cell-mediated inflammatory responses. We investigate how mouse MBL-A or ficolin-A regulate mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (mBMMCs)-derived inflammatory response...... cytokine production by LPS-mediated TLR4 in mBMMCs appears to be down-regulated, indicating that mouse MBL and ficolin may have an inhibitory function toward mouse TLR4-mediated excessive inflammation on the mast cells.......It is unknown how soluble pattern-recognition receptors in blood, such as mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins, modulate mast cell-mediated inflammatory responses. We investigate how mouse MBL-A or ficolin-A regulate mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (mBMMCs)-derived inflammatory response...

  13. A truncated receptor-binding domain of MERS-CoV spike protein potently inhibits MERS-CoV infection and induces strong neutralizing antibody responses: implication for developing therapeutics and vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanying Du

    Full Text Available An emerging respiratory infectious disease with high mortality, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS, is caused by a novel coronavirus (MERS-CoV. It was first reported in 2012 in Saudi Arabia and has now spread to eight countries. Development of effective therapeutics and vaccines is crucial to save lives and halt the spread of MERS-CoV. Here, we show that a recombinant protein containing a 212-amino acid fragment (residues 377-588 in the truncated receptor-binding domain (RBD: residues 367-606 of MERS-CoV spike (S protein fused with human IgG Fc fragment (S377-588-Fc is highly expressed in the culture supernatant of transfected 293T cells. The purified S377-588-Fc protein efficiently binds to dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4, the receptor of MERS-CoV, and potently inhibited MERS-CoV infection, suggesting its potential to be further developed as a therapeutic modality for treating MERS-CoV infection and saving the patients' lives. The recombinant S377-588-Fc is able to induce in the vaccinated mice strong MERS-CoV S-specific antibodies, which blocks the binding of RBD to DPP4 receptor and effectively neutralizes MERS-CoV infection. These findings indicate that this truncated RBD protein shows promise for further development as an effective and safe vaccine for the prevention of MERS-CoV infection.

  14. The plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin inhibits the binding of pemphigus foliaceus autoantibodies to desmoglein 1 in a majority of patients and prevents pathomechanisms of pemphigus foliaceus in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Urda, Susana; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid; Smolle, Josef; Marquart, Yvonne; Chudnovsky, Yakov; Ridky, Todd W; Bernstein, Pamela; Wolff, Klaus; Rappersberger, Klemens

    2003-12-01

    Pemphigus foliaceus (PF) is a life-threatening autoimmune blistering skin disease caused by pathogenic IgG autoantibodies against desmoglein 1 (dg1), a desmosomal cadherin-type adhesion glycoprotein. Using lectins and glycosidases, we have shown that dg1 displays an N-glycosylation pattern of the complex triantennary type. We have found that lectins and glycosidases interfere with N-bound sugar residues on the amino-terminal ectodomain of dg1 and completely abolish, in vitro, the antigenicity of dg1 in most of the patients' sera. Moreover, in an ex vivo model using punch biopsies from normal human skin, we demonstrate that preincubation of the epidermis in wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) prevents PF autoantibody binding, acantholysis, and subcorneal blistering. In addition, we show that topical treatment with WGA inhibits PF autoantibody binding to keratinocytes in both newborn BALB/c mice and in organotypic human epidermis grafted onto the back of SCID mice. The epidermis of these pretreated animals displays a regular morphology, whereas control animals develop the immunopathologic phenotype of PF. These findings suggest that WGA may interfere with autoantibody binding to dg1, preventing experimental PF without affecting the adhesive function of dg1. Our observations may provide a new approach to the therapy of PF.

  15. Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic modelling of drug‐induced QTc interval prolongation in man: prediction from in vitro human ether‐à‐go‐go‐related gene binding and functional inhibition assays and conscious dog studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, V F S; Casarotto, E; Danhof, M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Functional measures of human ether‐à‐go‐go‐related gene (hERG; Kv11.1) channel inhibition have been prioritized as an in vitro screening tool for candidate molecules. However, it is unclear how these results can be translated to humans. Here, we explore how data on drug binding and functional inhibition in vitro relate to QT prolongation in vivo. Using cisapride, sotalol and moxifloxacin as paradigm compounds, we assessed the relationship between drug concentrations, binding, functional measures and in vivo effects in preclinical species and humans. Experimental Approach Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic modelling was used to characterize the drug effects in hERG functional patch clamp, hERG radio‐labelled dofetilide displacement experiments and QT interval in conscious dogs. Data were analysed in parallel to identify potential correlations between pharmacological activity in vitro and in vivo. Key Results An Emax model could not be used due to large variability in the functional patch clamp assay. Dofetilide displacement revealed that binding curves are unrelated to the in vivo potency estimates for QTc prolongation in dogs and humans. Mean in vitro potency estimates ranged from 99.9 nM for cisapride to 1030 μM for moxifloxacin. Conclusions and Implications The lack of standardized protocols for in vitro assays leads to significant differences in experimental conditions, making the assessment of in vitro–in vivo correlations unreliable. Identification of an accurate safety window during the screening of candidate molecules requires a quantitative framework that disentangles system‐ from drug‐specific properties under physiological conditions, enabling translation of the results to humans. Similar considerations will be relevant for the comprehensive in vitro pro‐arrhythmia assay initiative. PMID:27427789

  16. Soaking suggests "alternative facts": Only co-crystallization discloses major ligand-induced interface rearrangements of a homodimeric tRNA-binding protein indicating a novel mode-of-inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Rainer Ehrmann

    Full Text Available For the efficient pathogenesis of Shigella, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery, full functionality of tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (TGT is mandatory. TGT performs post-transcriptional modifications of tRNAs in the anticodon loop taking impact on virulence development. This suggests TGT as a putative target for selective anti-shigellosis drug therapy. Since bacterial TGT is only functional as homodimer, its activity can be inhibited either by blocking its active site or by preventing dimerization. Recently, we discovered that in some crystal structures obtained by soaking the full conformational adaptation most likely induced in solution upon ligand binding is not displayed. Thus, soaked structures may be misleading and suggest irrelevant binding modes. Accordingly, we re-investigated these complexes by co-crystallization. The obtained structures revealed large conformational rearrangements not visible in the soaked complexes. They result from spatial perturbations in the ribose-34/phosphate-35 recognition pocket and, consequently, an extended loop-helix motif required to prevent access of water molecules into the dimer interface loses its geometric integrity. Thermodynamic profiles of ligand binding in solution indicate favorable entropic contributions to complex formation when large conformational adaptations in the dimer interface are involved. Native MS titration experiments reveal the extent to which the homodimer is destabilized in the presence of each inhibitor. Unexpectedly, one ligand causes a complete rearrangement of subunit packing within the homodimer, never observed in any other TGT crystal structure before. Likely, this novel twisted dimer is catalytically inactive and, therefore, suggests that stabilizing this non-productive subunit arrangement may be used as a further strategy for TGT inhibition.

  17. Caffeine Inhibits Acetylcholinesterase, But Not Butyrylcholinesterase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Dobes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is an alkaloid with a stimulant effect in the body. It can interfere in transmissions based on acetylcholine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine and glutamate. Clinical studies indicate that it can be involved in the slowing of Alzheimer disease pathology and some other effects. The effects are not well understood. In the present work, we focused on the question whether caffeine can inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE and/or, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, the two enzymes participating in cholinergic neurotransmission. A standard Ellman test with human AChE and BChE was done for altering concentrations of caffeine. The test was supported by an in silico examination as well. Donepezil and tacrine were used as standards. In compliance with Dixon’s plot, caffeine was proved to be a non-competitive inhibitor of AChE and BChE. However, inhibition of BChE was quite weak, as the inhibition constant, Ki, was 13.9 ± 7.4 mol/L. Inhibition of AChE was more relevant, as Ki was found to be 175 ± 9 µmol/L. The predicted free energy of binding was −6.7 kcal/mol. The proposed binding orientation of caffeine can interact with Trp86, and it can be stabilize by Tyr337 in comparison to the smaller Ala328 in the case of human BChE; thus, it can explain the lower binding affinity of caffeine for BChE with reference to AChE. The biological relevance of the findings is discussed.

  18. Eldecalcitol (ED-71), an analog of 1α,25(OH)2D3, inhibits the growth of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells in vitro and in vivo by down-regulating expression of heparin-binding protein 17/fibroblast growth factor-binding protein-1 (HBp17/FGFBP-1) and FGF-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, T; Takatsu, F; Rosli, S N Z; Usui, E; Hamada, A; Sumi, K; Hayashido, Y; Toratani, S; Okamoto, Tetsuji

    2017-10-01

    Heparin-binding protein 17 (HBp17)/fibroblast growth factor-binding protein-1 (FGFBP-1) was first purified from medium conditioned by A431 cells for its capacity to bind to fibroblast growth factors 1 and 2 (FGF-1 and -2). Among FGF family members, FGF-2 is a potent mitogen for various cell types, including vascular endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and cancer cells such as oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. Besides being well known in bone metabolism, the active form of vitamin D 3 , i.e., 1α,25(OH) 2 D 3 (1,25D 3 ), was reported to have protective effects for heart disease and cancer. Previously, we reported that 1,25D 3 inhibited HBp17/FGFBP-1 expression in OSCC cell lines through NF-κB inhibition (IκBα activation) and resulted in the inactivation of FGF-2. In this study, we examined the potential anti-tumor effect of ED-71, an analog of 1α,25(OH) 2 D 3 , for squamous cell carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. The cell lines used were OSCC cell lines (NA-HO-1-n-1 and UE-HO-1-u-1), established from oral cancer patients in our laboratory, and an epidermoid carcinoma/SCC cell line (A431). The growth assay in serum-free culture revealed that ED-71 inhibited the growth of the cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ED-71 suppressed HBp17/FGFBP-1 expression by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway as did 1,25D 3 . Furthermore, a luciferase reporter assay revealed that the promoter activity of HBp17/FGFBP-1 (region between -217 and +61) was down-regulated by ED-71. Oral administration of ED-71 significantly inhibited the growth of A431-derived tumors in athymic nude mice. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the expression of HBp17/FGFBP-1, FGF-2, CD31, and Ki-67 in the tumors of ED71-treated group was down-regulated in comparison to control. These results suggest that ED-71 possesses potential anti-tumor activity for SCCs both in vitro and in vivo. This compound may act directly on the tumor cells or on endothelial cells by modulating the

  19. The Scl1 protein of M6-type group A Streptococcus binds the human complement regulatory protein, factor H, and inhibits the alternative pathway of complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Clayton C; Han, Runlin; Hovis, Kelley M; Ciborowski, Pawel; Keene, Douglas R; Marconi, Richard T; Lukomski, Slawomir

    2008-02-01

    Non-specific activation of the complement system is regulated by the plasma glycoprotein factor H (FH). Bacteria can avoid complement-mediated opsonization and phagocytosis through acquiring FH to the cell surface. Here, we characterize an interaction between the streptococcal collagen-like protein Scl1.6 of M6-type group A Streptococcus (GAS) and FH. Using affinity chromatography with immobilized recombinant Scl1.6 protein, we co-eluted human plasma proteins with molecular weight of 155 kDa, 43 kDa and 38 kDa. Mass spectrometry identified the 155 kDa band as FH and two other bands as isoforms of the FH-related protein-1. The identities of all three bands were confirmed by Western immunoblotting with specific antibodies. Structure-function relation studies determined that the globular domain of the Scl1.6 variant specifically binds FH while fused to collagenous tails of various lengths. This binding is not restricted to Scl1.6 as the phylogenetically linked Scl1.55 variant also binds FH. Functional analyses demonstrated the cofactor activity of the rScl1.6-bound FH for factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b. Finally, purified FH bound to the Scl1.6 protein present in the cell wall material obtained from M6-type GAS. In conclusion, we have identified a functional interaction between Scl1 and plasma FH, which may contribute to GAS evasion of complement-mediated opsonization and phagocytosis.

  20. Stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms of slow muscle-specific myosin heavy chain gene expression in fish: Transient and transgenic analysis of torafugu MYHM86-2 promoter in zebrafish embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaduzzaman, Md.; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Bhuiyan, Sharmin Siddique; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain gene, MYH M86-2 , exhibited restricted expression in slow muscle fibers of torafugu embryos and larvae, suggesting its functional roles for embryonic and larval muscle development. However, the transcriptional mechanisms involved in its expression are still ambiguous. The present study is the first extensive analysis of slow muscle-specific MYH M86-2 promoter in fish for identifying the cis-elements that are crucial for its expression. Combining both transient transfection and transgenic approaches, we demonstrated that the 2614 bp 5′-flanking sequences of MYH M86-2 contain a sufficient promoter activity to drive gene expression specific to superficial slow muscle fibers. By cyclopamine treatment, we also demonstrated that the differentiation of such superficial slow muscle fibers depends on hedgehog signaling activity. The deletion analyses defined an upstream fragment necessary for repressing ectopic MYH M86-2 expression in the fast muscle fibers. The transcriptional mechanism that prevents MYH M86-2 expression in the fast muscle fibers is mediated through Sox6 binding elements. We also demonstrated that Sox6 may function as a transcriptional repressor of MYH M86-2 expression. We further discovered that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) binding elements plays a key role and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) binding elements participate in the transcriptional regulation of MYH M86-2 expression. - Highlights: ► MYH M86-2 is highly expressed in slow muscle fibers of torafugu embryos and larvae. ► MYH M86-2 promoter activity depends on the hedgehog signaling. ► Sox6 binding elements inhibits MYH M86-2 expression in fast muscle fibers. ► Sox6 elements function as transcriptional repressor of MYH M86-2 promoter activity. ► NFAT and MEF2 binding elements play a key role for directing MYH M86-2 expression

  1. Genome-wide DNA methylation reprogramming in response to inorganic arsenic links inhibition of CTCF binding, DNMT expression and cellular transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Matthew; Eckstein, Meredith; Eleazer, Rebekah; Smith, Caroline; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne N.

    2017-02-01

    Chronic low dose inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure leads to changes in gene expression and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation. During this transformation, cells adopt a fibroblast-like phenotype accompanied by profound gene expression changes. While many mechanisms have been implicated in this transformation, studies that focus on the role of epigenetic alterations in this process are just emerging. DNA methylation controls gene expression in physiologic and pathologic states. Several studies show alterations in DNA methylation patterns in iAs-mediated pathogenesis, but these studies focused on single genes. We present a comprehensive genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using methyl-sequencing to measure changes between normal and iAs-transformed cells. Additionally, these differential methylation changes correlated positively with changes in gene expression and alternative splicing. Interestingly, most of these differentially methylated genes function in cell adhesion and communication pathways. To gain insight into how genomic DNA methylation patterns are regulated during iAs-mediated carcinogenesis, we show that iAs probably targets CTCF binding at the promoter of DNA methyltransferases, regulating their expression. These findings reveal how CTCF binding regulates DNA methyltransferase to reprogram the methylome in response to an environmental toxin.

  2. The Novel C24D Synthetic Polypeptide Inhibits Binding of Placenta Immunosuppressive Ferritin to Human T Cells and Elicits Anti–Breast Cancer Immunity In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Solodeev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Immune tolerance mechanisms supporting normal human pregnancy are exploited by breast cancer and other malignancies. We cloned from human placenta and breast cancer cells the novel human immunomodulator named placenta immunosuppressive ferritin (PLIF. PLIF is composed of a ferritin heavy chain–like domain and a novel cytokine-like domain, named C48. Both intact PLIF and C48 inhibit T cell proliferation. Blocking PLIF by specific antibodies in a tolerant breast cancer model in nude mice resulted in tumor cell apoptosis and rejection. This prompted us to study active immune preventive strategies targeting PLIF activity. Currently, we report on the design and synthesis of the novel C24D polypeptide, which inhibits the binding of PLIF to T cells and therefore inhibits the immune suppressive effect of PLIF. The effect of C24D on the generation of anti–breast cancer cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs was studied in vitro in cultures of MCF-7 (HLA-A2+ or T47D (HLA-A2− breast cancer cells incubated with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from healthy blood donors. We found that C24D treatment exclusively induced development of CTLs. On reactivation by their specific target cells, the CTLs secreted interferon-γ and induced target apoptosis. Anti–MCF-7 CTLs were cross-cytotoxic to MDA-MB-231 (HLA-A2+ triple-negative breast cancer but not to T47D. Moreover, C24D treatment in vivo inhibited the growth of MCF-7 tumors engrafted in immune-compromised nude mice transfused with naïve allogeneic human PBMCs. Our results demonstrate that C24D treatment breakdown breast cancer induced tolerance enabling the initiation of effective anti-tumor immune response.

  3. Role of biological membranes in slow-wave sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnovsky, M L

    1991-02-01

    Two involvements of cellular membranes in slow-wave sleep (SWS) are discussed. In the first the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is focussed upon, and in the second, the plasmalemma, where specific binding sites (receptors?) for promoters of slow-wave sleep are believed to be located. The study concerning the ER focuses on an enzyme in the brain, glucose-6-phosphatase, which, although present at low levels, manifests greatly increased activity during SWS compared to the waking state. The work on the plasmalemma has to do with the specific binding of muramyl peptides, inducers of slow-wave sleep, to various cells, and membrane preparations of various sorts, including those from brain tissue. Such cells as macrophages from mice, B-lymphocytes from human blood, and cells from a cell line (C-6 glioma) have been examined in this context.

  4. Coaxial slow source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, R.D.; Jarboe, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    Field reversed configurations (FRCs) are a class of compact toroid with not toroidal field. The field reversed theta pinch technique has been successfully used for formation of FRCs since their inception in 1958. In this method an initial bias field is produced. After ionization of the fill gas, the current in the coil is rapidly reversed producing the radial implosion of a current sheath. At the ends of the coil the reversed field lines rapidly tear and reconnect with the bias field lines until no more bias flux remains. At this point, vacuum reversed field accumulates around the configuration which contracts axially until an equilibrium is reached. When extrapolating the use of such a technique to reactor size plasmas two main shortcomings are found. First, the initial bias field, and hence flux in a given device, which can be reconnected to form the configuration is limited from above by destructive axial dynamics. Second, the voltages required to produce rapid current reversal in the coil are very large. Clearly, a low voltage formation technique without limitations on flux addition is desirable. The Coaxial Slow Source (CSS) device was designed to meet this need. It has two coaxial theta pinch coils. Coaxial coil geometry allows for the addition of as much magnetic flux to the annular plasma between them as can be generated inside the inner coil. Furthermore the device can be operated at charging voltages less than 10 kV and on resistive diffusion, rather than implosive time scales. The inner coil is a novel, concentric, helical design so as to allow it to be cantilevered on one end to permit translation of the plasma. Following translation off the inner coil the Annular Field Reversed Configuration would be re-formed as a true FRC. In this paper we investigate the formation process in the new parallel configuration., CSSP, in which the inner and outer coils are connected in parallel to the main capacitor bank

  5. The Escherichia coli cryptic prophage protein YfdR binds to DnaA and initiation of chromosomal replication is inhibited by overexpression of the gene cluster yfdQ-yfdR-yfdS-yfdT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaunori eNoguchi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication is regulated by multiple pathways. To explore novel regulators, we isolated multicopy suppressors for the cold-sensitive hda-185 ΔsfiA(sulA mutant. Hda is crucial for the negative regulation of the initiator DnaA and the hda-185 mutation causes severe replication overinitiation at the replication origin oriC. The SOS-associated division inhibitor SfiA inhibits FtsZ ring formation, an essential step for cell division during the SOS response, and ΔsfiA enhances the cold sensitivity of hda-185 cells in colony formation. One of the suppressors comprised the yfdQ-yfdR-yfdS-yfdT gene cluster carried on a cryptic prophage. Increased copy numbers of yfdQRT or yfdQRS inhibited not only hda-185-dependent overinitiation, but also replication overinitiation in a hyperactive dnaA mutant, and in a mutant lacking an oriC-binding initiation-inhibitor SeqA. In addition, increasing the copy number of the gene set inhibited the growth of cells bearing specific, initiation-impairing dnaA mutations. In wild-type cells, multicopy supply of yfdQRT or yfdQRS also inhibited replication initiation and increased hydroxyurea (HU-resistance, as seen in cells lacking DiaA, a stimulator of DnaA assembly on oriC. Deletion of the yfdQ-yfdR-yfdS-yfdT genes did not affect either HU resistance or initiation regulation. Furthermore, we found that DnaA bound specifically to YfdR in soluble protein extracts oversupplied with YfdQRST. Purified YfdR also bound to DnaA, and DnaA Phe46, an amino acid residue crucial for DnaA interactions with DiaA and DnaB replicative helicase was important for this interaction. Consistently, YfdR moderately inhibited DiaA-DnaA and DnaB-DnaA interactions. In addition, protein extracts oversupplied with YfdQRST inhibited replication initiation in vitro. Given the roles of yfdQ and yfdS in cell tolerance to specific environmental stresses, the yfdQ-yfdR-yfdS-yfdT genes might downregulate the initiator

  6. The Escherichia coli Cryptic Prophage Protein YfdR Binds to DnaA and Initiation of Chromosomal Replication Is Inhibited by Overexpression of the Gene Cluster yfdQ-yfdR-yfdS-yfdT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Yasunori; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    The initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication is regulated by multiple pathways. To explore novel regulators, we isolated multicopy suppressors for the cold-sensitive hda-185 ΔsfiA(sulA) mutant. Hda is crucial for the negative regulation of the initiator DnaA and the hda-185 mutation causes severe replication overinitiation at the replication origin oriC. The SOS-associated division inhibitor SfiA inhibits FtsZ ring formation, an essential step for cell division regulation during the SOS response, and ΔsfiA enhances the cold sensitivity of hda-185 cells in colony formation. One of the suppressors comprised the yfdQ-yfdR-yfdS-yfdT gene cluster carried on a cryptic prophage. Increased copy numbers of yfdQRT or yfdQRS inhibited not only hda-185-dependent overinitiation, but also replication overinitiation in a hyperactive dnaA mutant, and in a mutant lacking an oriC-binding initiation-inhibitor SeqA. In addition, increasing the copy number of the gene set inhibited the growth of cells bearing specific, initiation-impairing dnaA mutations. In wild-type cells, multicopy supply of yfdQRT or yfdQRS also inhibited replication initiation and increased hydroxyurea (HU)-resistance, as seen in cells lacking DiaA, a stimulator of DnaA assembly on oriC. Deletion of the yfdQ-yfdR-yfdS-yfdT genes did not affect either HU resistance or initiation regulation. Furthermore, we found that DnaA bound specifically to YfdR in soluble protein extracts oversupplied with YfdQRST. Purified YfdR also bound to DnaA, and DnaA Phe46, an amino acid residue crucial for DnaA interactions with DiaA and DnaB replicative helicase was important for this interaction. Consistently, YfdR moderately inhibited DiaA-DnaA and DnaB-DnaA interactions. In addition, protein extracts oversupplied with YfdQRST inhibited replication initiation in vitro. Given the roles of yfdQ and yfdS in cell tolerance to specific environmental stresses, the yfdQ-yfdR-yfdS-yfdT genes might downregulate the initiator Dna

  7. The Escherichia coli Cryptic Prophage Protein YfdR Binds to DnaA and Initiation of Chromosomal Replication Is Inhibited by Overexpression of the Gene Cluster yfdQ-yfdR-yfdS-yfdT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Yasunori; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    The initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication is regulated by multiple pathways. To explore novel regulators, we isolated multicopy suppressors for the cold-sensitive hda-185 ΔsfiA(sulA) mutant. Hda is crucial for the negative regulation of the initiator DnaA and the hda-185 mutation causes severe replication overinitiation at the replication origin oriC. The SOS-associated division inhibitor SfiA inhibits FtsZ ring formation, an essential step for cell division regulation during the SOS response, and ΔsfiA enhances the cold sensitivity of hda-185 cells in colony formation. One of the suppressors comprised the yfdQ-yfdR-yfdS-yfdT gene cluster carried on a cryptic prophage. Increased copy numbers of yfdQRT or yfdQRS inhibited not only hda-185-dependent overinitiation, but also replication overinitiation in a hyperactive dnaA mutant, and in a mutant lacking an oriC-binding initiation-inhibitor SeqA. In addition, increasing the copy number of the gene set inhibited the growth of cells bearing specific, initiation-impairing dnaA mutations. In wild-type cells, multicopy supply of yfdQRT or yfdQRS also inhibited replication initiation and increased hydroxyurea (HU)-resistance, as seen in cells lacking DiaA, a stimulator of DnaA assembly on oriC. Deletion of the yfdQ-yfdR-yfdS-yfdT genes did not affect either HU resistance or initiation regulation. Furthermore, we found that DnaA bound specifically to YfdR in soluble protein extracts oversupplied with YfdQRST. Purified YfdR also bound to DnaA, and DnaA Phe46, an amino acid residue crucial for DnaA interactions with DiaA and DnaB replicative helicase was important for this interaction. Consistently, YfdR moderately inhibited DiaA-DnaA and DnaB-DnaA interactions. In addition, protein extracts oversupplied with YfdQRST inhibited replication initiation in vitro. Given the roles of yfdQ and yfdS in cell tolerance to specific environmental stresses, the yfdQ-yfdR-yfdS-yfdT genes might downregulate the initiator Dna

  8. Functional consequences of piceatannol binding to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerszon, Joanna; Serafin, Eligiusz; Buczkowski, Adam; Michlewska, Sylwia; Bielnicki, Jakub Antoni; Rodacka, Aleksandra

    2018-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is one of the key redox-sensitive proteins whose activity is largely affected by oxidative modifications at its highly reactive cysteine residue in the enzyme's active site (Cys149). Prolonged exposure to oxidative stress may cause, inter alia, the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds leading to accumulation of GAPDH aggregates and ultimately to cell death. Recently these anomalies have been linked with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Novel evidences indicate that low molecular compounds may be effective inhibitors potentially preventing the GAPDH translocation to the nucleus, and inhibiting or slowing down its aggregation and oligomerization. Therefore, we decided to establish the ability of naturally occurring compound, piceatannol, to interact with GAPDH and to reveal its effect on functional properties and selected parameters of the dehydrogenase structure. The obtained data revealed that piceatannol binds to GAPDH. The ITC analysis indicated that one molecule of the tetrameric enzyme may bind up to 8 molecules of polyphenol (7.3 ± 0.9). Potential binding sites of piceatannol to the GAPDH molecule were analyzed using the Ligand Fit algorithm. Conducted analysis detected 11 ligand binding positions. We indicated that piceatannol decreases GAPDH activity. Detailed analysis allowed us to presume that this effect is due to piceatannol ability to assemble a covalent binding with nucleophilic cysteine residue (Cys149) which is directly involved in the catalytic reaction. Consequently, our studies strongly indicate that piceatannol would be an exceptional inhibitor thanks to its ability to break the aforementioned pathologic disulfide linkage, and therefore to inhibit GAPDH aggregation. We demonstrated that by binding with GAPDH piceatannol blocks cysteine residue and counteracts its oxidative modifications, that induce oligomerization and GAPDH aggregation.

  9. Functional consequences of piceatannol binding to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Gerszon

    Full Text Available Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH is one of the key redox-sensitive proteins whose activity is largely affected by oxidative modifications at its highly reactive cysteine residue in the enzyme's active site (Cys149. Prolonged exposure to oxidative stress may cause, inter alia, the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds leading to accumulation of GAPDH aggregates and ultimately to cell death. Recently these anomalies have been linked with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Novel evidences indicate that low molecular compounds may be effective inhibitors potentially preventing the GAPDH translocation to the nucleus, and inhibiting or slowing down its aggregation and oligomerization. Therefore, we decided to establish the ability of naturally occurring compound, piceatannol, to interact with GAPDH and to reveal its effect on functional properties and selected parameters of the dehydrogenase structure. The obtained data revealed that piceatannol binds to GAPDH. The ITC analysis indicated that one molecule of the tetrameric enzyme may bind up to 8 molecules of polyphenol (7.3 ± 0.9. Potential binding sites of piceatannol to the GAPDH molecule were analyzed using the Ligand Fit algorithm. Conducted analysis detected 11 ligand binding positions. We indicated that piceatannol decreases GAPDH activity. Detailed analysis allowed us to presume that this effect is due to piceatannol ability to assemble a covalent binding with nucleophilic cysteine residue (Cys149 which is directly involved in the catalytic reaction. Consequently, our studies strongly indicate that piceatannol would be an exceptional inhibitor thanks to its ability to break the aforementioned pathologic disulfide linkage, and therefore to inhibit GAPDH aggregation. We demonstrated that by binding with GAPDH piceatannol blocks cysteine residue and counteracts its oxidative modifications, that induce oligomerization and GAPDH aggregation.

  10. The phosphomimetic mutation of syndecan-4 binds and inhibits Tiam1 modulating Rac1 activity in PDZ interaction-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniko Keller-Pinter

    Full Text Available The small GTPases of the Rho family comprising RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 function as molecular switches controlling several essential biochemical pathways in eukaryotic cells. Their activity is cycling between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound conformation. The exchange of GDP to GTP is catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs. Here we report a novel regulatory mechanism of Rac1 activity, which is controlled by a phosphomimetic (Ser179Glu mutant of syndecan-4 (SDC4. SDC4 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane, heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In this study we show that the Ser179Glu mutant binds strongly Tiam1, a Rac1-GEF reducing Rac1-GTP by 3-fold in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. Mutational analysis unravels the PDZ interaction between SDC4 and Tiam1 is indispensable for the suppression of the Rac1 activity. Neither of the SDC4 interactions is effective alone to block the Rac1 activity, on the contrary, lack of either of interactions can increase the activity of Rac1, therefore the Rac1 activity is the resultant of the inhibitory and stimulatory effects. In addition, SDC4 can bind and tether RhoGDI1 (GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 to the membrane. Expression of the phosphomimetic SDC4 results in the accumulation of the Rac1-RhoGDI1 complex. Co-immunoprecipitation assays (co-IP-s reveal that SDC4 can form complexes with RhoGDI1. Together, the regulation of the basal activity of Rac1 is fine tuned and SDC4 is implicated in multiple ways.

  11. The phosphomimetic mutation of syndecan-4 binds and inhibits Tiam1 modulating Rac1 activity in PDZ interaction–dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller-Pinter, Aniko; Ughy, Bettina; Domoki, Monika; Pettko-Szandtner, Aladar; Letoha, Tamas; Tovari, Jozsef; Timar, Jozsef

    2017-01-01

    The small GTPases of the Rho family comprising RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 function as molecular switches controlling several essential biochemical pathways in eukaryotic cells. Their activity is cycling between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound conformation. The exchange of GDP to GTP is catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Here we report a novel regulatory mechanism of Rac1 activity, which is controlled by a phosphomimetic (Ser179Glu) mutant of syndecan-4 (SDC4). SDC4 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane, heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In this study we show that the Ser179Glu mutant binds strongly Tiam1, a Rac1-GEF reducing Rac1-GTP by 3-fold in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. Mutational analysis unravels the PDZ interaction between SDC4 and Tiam1 is indispensable for the suppression of the Rac1 activity. Neither of the SDC4 interactions is effective alone to block the Rac1 activity, on the contrary, lack of either of interactions can increase the activity of Rac1, therefore the Rac1 activity is the resultant of the inhibitory and stimulatory effects. In addition, SDC4 can bind and tether RhoGDI1 (GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1) to the membrane. Expression of the phosphomimetic SDC4 results in the accumulation of the Rac1–RhoGDI1 complex. Co-immunoprecipitation assays (co-IP-s) reveal that SDC4 can form complexes with RhoGDI1. Together, the regulation of the basal activity of Rac1 is fine tuned and SDC4 is implicated in multiple ways. PMID:29121646

  12. The phosphomimetic mutation of syndecan-4 binds and inhibits Tiam1 modulating Rac1 activity in PDZ interaction-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller-Pinter, Aniko; Ughy, Bettina; Domoki, Monika; Pettko-Szandtner, Aladar; Letoha, Tamas; Tovari, Jozsef; Timar, Jozsef; Szilak, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    The small GTPases of the Rho family comprising RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 function as molecular switches controlling several essential biochemical pathways in eukaryotic cells. Their activity is cycling between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound conformation. The exchange of GDP to GTP is catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Here we report a novel regulatory mechanism of Rac1 activity, which is controlled by a phosphomimetic (Ser179Glu) mutant of syndecan-4 (SDC4). SDC4 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane, heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In this study we show that the Ser179Glu mutant binds strongly Tiam1, a Rac1-GEF reducing Rac1-GTP by 3-fold in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. Mutational analysis unravels the PDZ interaction between SDC4 and Tiam1 is indispensable for the suppression of the Rac1 activity. Neither of the SDC4 interactions is effective alone to block the Rac1 activity, on the contrary, lack of either of interactions can increase the activity of Rac1, therefore the Rac1 activity is the resultant of the inhibitory and stimulatory effects. In addition, SDC4 can bind and tether RhoGDI1 (GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1) to the membrane. Expression of the phosphomimetic SDC4 results in the accumulation of the Rac1-RhoGDI1 complex. Co-immunoprecipitation assays (co-IP-s) reveal that SDC4 can form complexes with RhoGDI1. Together, the regulation of the basal activity of Rac1 is fine tuned and SDC4 is implicated in multiple ways.

  13. Slow Tourism: Exploring the discourses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guiver

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ‘Slow travel’ and ‘slow tourism’ are relatively new, but contested, concepts. This paper examines the meanings ascribed to them in the academic literature and websites targeted at potential tourists. It finds concurrence on aspects of savouring time at the destination and investing time to appreciate the locality, its people, history, culture and products, but detects different emphases. The academic literature stresses the benefits to the destination and global sustainability, while the websites focus on the personal benefits and ways of becoming a ‘slow tourist’. Food and drink epitomise the immersion in and absorption of the destination and the multi-dimensional tourism experience, contrasted with the superficiality of mainstream tourism. The paper discusses whether tourists practising slow tourism without using the label are slow tourists or not.

  14. Papain cleavage of the 38,000-dalton fragment inhibits the binding of 4, 4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2, 2'-disulfonate to lys-539 on the 60,000-dalton fragment in human band 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Takeo; Kojima, Hideaki; Kawaguchi, Shiori; Shimada, Maiko; Aso, Haruka

    2017-08-01

    Human band 3 is a 98-kDa transmembrane (TM) protein comprising 14 TM segments. Papain cleavages band 3 into 38- and 60-kDa fragments. Under vigorous conditions, the cleavage of the loop region between the TM 7 of gate domain and the TM 8 of core domain in the 38-kDa fragment produces 7- and 31-kDa fragments. Conformational changes of the TM 5 segment containing Lys-539 by cleavage of the 38-kDa fragment remain unclear. Pressure-induced haemolysis of erythrocytes was suppressed by binding of 4, 4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2, 2'-disulfonate (DIDS) to Lys-539. Such effect of DIDS was not observed upon cleavage of the 38-kDa fragment, because of inhibition of DIDS binding to Lys-539. Using fluorescence of DIDS labelled to Lys-539, conformational changes of band 3 were examined. Fluorescence spectra demonstrated that the molecular motion of DIDS is more restricted upon digestion of the 38-kDa fragment. Interestingly, the quenching of DIDS fluorescence showed that Hg2+ is less accessible to DIDS upon digestion of the 38-kDa fragment. Taken together, we propose that the conformational changes of the TM 5 segment characterized by the sequestration and restricted motion of Lys-539 are induced by the cleavage of the loop region between the TM 7 and the TM 8. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Experimental and computational approaches of a novel methyl (2E)-2-{[N-(2-formylphenyl)(4-methylbenzene)sulfonamido]methyl}-3-(4-chlorophenyl)prop-2-enoate: A potential antimicrobial agent and an inhibition of penicillin-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugavel, S.; Vetri velan, V.; Kannan, Damodharan; Bakthadoss, Manickam

    2016-07-01

    The title compound methyl(2E)-2-{[N-(2-formylphenyl) (4-methylbenzene)sulfonamido]methyl}-3-(4-chlorophenyl) prop-2-enoate (MFMSC) has been synthesized and single crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature. Structural and vibrational spectroscopic studies were carried out by using single crystal X-ray diffraction, FT-IR and NMR spectral analysis together with DFT method using GAUSSIAN'03 software. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out by VEDA program. NBO analysis, Mulliken charge analysis, HOMO-LUMO, MEP, Global chemical reactivity descriptors and thermodynamic properties have been analyzed. The hyperpolarisability calculation reveals the present material has a reasonably good propensity for nonlinear optical activity. The obtained antimicrobial activity results indicate that the compound shows good to moderate activity against all tested bacterial and fungal pathogens. A computational study was also carried out to predict the drug-likeness and ADMET properties of the title compound. Due to the different potential biological activity of the title compound, molecular docking study is also reported and the compound might exhibit inhibitory activity against penicillin-binding protein PBP-2X.

  16. Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins inhibit hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of Bcl-2 via NF-κB in H1299 human lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Mi Ran; Nam, Hyo-Jung; Kim, So-Young; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Gi proteins) mediate a variety of signaling pathways by coupling receptors and effectors to regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the role of Gi proteins in the modulation of hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis is not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated the effect of Gi proteins on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms in H1299 human lung cancer cells. The stable expression of constitutively active alpha subunits of Gi1 (Gαi1QL), Gi2, or Gi3 inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The expression of Gαi1QL up-regulated Bcl-2 expression, and the knockdown of Bcl-2 with siRNA abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of Gαi1QL. Gαi1 induced the transcription of Bcl-2 by activation of NF-κB, which resulted from an increase in NF-κB p50 protein. We conclude that Gαi1 inhibits hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of H1299 lung cancer cells by up-regulating the transcription of Bcl-2 through a p50-mediated NF-κB activation.

  17. Kinetics and Mechanism Study of Competitive Inhibition of Jack-Bean Urease by Baicalin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lirong; Su, Jiyan; Wu, Dianwei; Yu, Xiaodan; Su, Zuqing; Wu, Xiaoli; Kong, Songzhi; Lai, Xiaoping; Lin, Ji; Su, Ziren

    2013-01-01

    Baicalin (BA) is the principal component of Radix Scutellariae responsible for its pharmacological activity. In this study, kinetics and mechanism of inhibition by BA against jack-bean urease were investigated for its therapeutic potential. It was revealed that the IC50 of BA against jack-bean urease was 2.74 ± 0.51 mM, which was proved to be a competitive and concentration-dependent inhibition with slow-binding progress curves. The rapid formation of initial BA-urease complex with an inhibition constant of K i = 3.89 × 10−3 mM was followed by a slow isomerization into the final complex with an overall inhibition constant of K i* = 1.47 × 10−4 mM. High effectiveness of thiol protectors against BA inhibition indicated that the strategic role of the active-site sulfhydryl group of the urease was involved in the blocking process. Moreover, the inhibition of BA was proved to be reversible due to the fact that urease could be reactivated by dithiothreitol but not reactant dilution. Molecular docking assay suggested that BA made contacts with the important activating sulfhydryl group Cys-592 residues and restricted the mobility of the active-site flap. Taken together, it could be deduced that BA was a competitive inhibitor targeting thiol groups of urease in a slow-binding manner both reversibly and concentration-dependently, serving as a promising urease inhibitor for treatments on urease-related diseases. PMID:24198731

  18. Requirement for the eIF4E binding proteins for the synergistic down-regulation of protein synthesis by hypertonic conditions and mTOR inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Michael J; Elia, Androulla; Morley, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    The protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates the phosphorylation and activity of several proteins that have the potential to control translation, including p70S6 kinase and the eIF4E binding proteins 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2. In spite of this, in exponentially growing cells overall protein synthesis is often resistant to mTOR inhibitors. We report here that sensitivity of wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to mTOR inhibitors can be greatly increased when the cells are subjected to the physiological stress imposed by hypertonic conditions. In contrast, protein synthesis in MEFs with a double knockout of 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2 remains resistant to mTOR inhibitors under these conditions. Phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase and protein kinase B (Akt) is blocked by the mTOR inhibitor Ku0063794 equally well in both wild-type and 4E-BP knockout cells, under both normal and hypertonic conditions. The response of protein synthesis to hypertonic stress itself does not require the 4E-BPs. These data suggest that under certain stress conditions: (i) translation has a greater requirement for mTOR activity and (ii) there is an absolute requirement for the 4E-BPs for regulation by mTOR. Importantly, dephosphorylation of p70S6 kinase and Akt is not sufficient to affect protein synthesis acutely.

  19. The T4 Phage DNA Mimic Protein Arn Inhibits the DNA Binding Activity of the Bacterial Histone-like Protein H-NS*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chun-Han; Wang, Hao-Ching; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2014-01-01

    The T4 phage protein Arn (Anti restriction nuclease) was identified as an inhibitor of the restriction enzyme McrBC. However, until now its molecular mechanism remained unclear. In the present study we used structural approaches to investigate biological properties of Arn. A structural analysis of Arn revealed that its shape and negative charge distribution are similar to dsDNA, suggesting that this protein could act as a DNA mimic. In a subsequent proteomic analysis, we found that the bacterial histone-like protein H-NS interacts with Arn, implying a new function. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that Arn prevents H-NS from binding to the Escherichia coli hns and T4 p8.1 promoters. In vitro gene expression and electron microscopy analyses also indicated that Arn counteracts the gene-silencing effect of H-NS on a reporter gene. Because McrBC and H-NS both participate in the host defense system, our findings suggest that T4 Arn might knock down these mechanisms using its DNA mimicking properties. PMID:25118281

  20. Triazolopyridinyl-acrylonitrile derivatives as antimicrotubule agents: Synthesis, in vitro and in silico characterization of antiproliferative activity, inhibition of tubulin polymerization and binding thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briguglio, Irene; Laurini, Erik; Pirisi, Maria Antonietta; Piras, Sandra; Corona, Paola; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Pricl, Sabrina; Carta, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we report the synthesis, in vitro anticancer activity, and the experimental/computational characterization of mechanism of action of a new series of E isomers of triazolo[4,5-b/c]pyridin-acrylonitrile derivatives (6c-g, 7d-e, 8d-e, 9c-f, 10d-e, 11d-e). All new compounds are endowed with moderate to interesting antiproliferative activity against 9 different cancer cell lines derived from solid and hematological human tumors. Fluorescence-based assays prove that these molecules interfere with tubulin polymerization. Furthermore, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides full tubulin/compound binding thermodynamics, thereby ultimately qualifying and quantifying the interactions of these molecular series with the target protein. Lastly, the analysis based on the tight coupling of in vitro and in silico modeling of the interactions between tubulin and the title compounds allows to propose a molecular rationale for their biological activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Virtual Dual inhibition of COX-2 / 5-LOX enzymes based on binding properties of alpha-amyrins, the anti-inflammatory compound as a promising anti-cancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Mehdi; Assadolahi, Vahideh; Yazdani, Mohsen; Nikaein, Donya; Rashidieh, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of Cordia myxa was considerably effective on curing acute inflammation in mouse model. Previous studies suggested significant anti-inflammatory activities as well as potential anticancer agent of α-amyrins in seeds. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipooxygenase (5-LOX) is significant in cancer prevention and therapeutics although this inhibition with chemo-drugs has its own side-effects. It is shown that these enzymes pathways are related to several cancers including colon, breast and lung cancer. This study was conducted based on Cordia species' α-amyrins as a safer natural anti-cancer compound for inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes by molecular docking. The X-ray crystal structure of COX2 / 5-LOX enzymes and α-amyrins was retrieved and energetically minimized respectively. The binding site and surface of enzymes were detected. Docking studies were performed by AutoDock 4.2 using Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA). Finally drug likeness, molecular pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity of α-amyrins was calculated. Molecular Docking revealed hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions between α-amyrins with both active sites of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes. Interestingly, it covalently bonded to Fe cofactor of 5-LOX enzyme and chelated this molecule. Base on binding energies (∆G) α-amyrin has more inhibitory effects on 5-LOX (-10.45 Kcal/mol) than COX-2 (-8.02 Kcal/mol). Analysis of molecular pharmacokinetic parameters suggested that α-amyrins complied with most sets of Lipinski's rules, and so it could be a suitable ligand for docking studies. Eventually, bioactivity score showed α-amyrins possess considerable biological activities as nuclear receptor, enzyme inhibitor, GPCR and protease inhibitor ligand. These results clearly demonstrate that α-amyrins could act as potential highly selective COX-/5-LOX inhibitor. Also, it is a safe compound in comparison with classical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs

  2. Megalin binds and mediates cellular internalization of folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birn, Henrik; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Holm, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Folate is an essential vitamin involved in a number of biological processes. High affinity folate binding proteins (FBPs) exist both as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked, membrane associated folate binding proteins and as soluble FBPs in plasma and some secretory fluids such as milk, saliva...... to express high levels of megalin, is inhibitable by excess unlabeled FBP and by receptor associated protein, a known inhibitor of binding to megalin. Immortalized rat yolk sac cells, representing an established model for studying megalin-mediated uptake, reveal (125)I-labeled FBP uptake which is inhibited...

  3. Slow light in moving media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, U.; Piwnicki, P.

    2001-06-01

    We review the theory of light propagation in moving media with extremely low group velocity. We intend to clarify the most elementary features of monochromatic slow light in a moving medium and, whenever possible, to give an instructive simplified picture.

  4. Birth control - slow release methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contraception - slow-release hormonal methods; Progestin implants; Progestin injections; Skin patch; Vaginal ring ... might want to consider a different birth control method. SKIN PATCH The skin patch is placed on ...

  5. Slow rupture of frictional interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Sinai, Yohai Bar; Brener, Efim A.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2011-01-01

    The failure of frictional interfaces and the spatiotemporal structures that accompany it are central to a wide range of geophysical, physical and engineering systems. Recent geophysical and laboratory observations indicated that interfacial failure can be mediated by slow slip rupture phenomena which are distinct from ordinary, earthquake-like, fast rupture. These discoveries have influenced the way we think about frictional motion, yet the nature and properties of slow rupture are not comple...

  6. Myxoma Virus dsRNA Binding Protein M029  Inhibits the Type I IFN-Induced Antiviral State in a  Highly Species-Specific Fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant

    2017-02-02

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is Leporipoxvirus that possesses a specific rabbit-restricted host tropism but exhibits a much broader  cellular host range in cultured cells. MYXV is able to efficiently  block all aspects of the type I interferon (IFN)-induced  antiviral  state  in rabbit cells, partially in  human  cells  and  very  poorly  in  mouse  cells.  The mechanism(s) of this species-specific inhibition of  type I IFN-induced antiviral state is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that MYXV encoded  protein  M029, a truncated relative of the vaccinia virus (VACV) E3 double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)  binding  protein  that  inhibits  protein  kinase  R (PKR),  can  also  antagonize the type I IFN-induced  antiviral state in a highly species-specific manner. In cells pre-treated with type I IFN prior to  infection,  MYXV  exploits  M029  to  overcome  the  induced  antiviral  state completely in rabbit cells,  partially  in  human  cells,  but  not at all in mouse cells. However, in cells pre-infected with MYXV,  IFN-induced  signaling  is fully  inhibited  even  in the  absence  of M029 in cells from all three species,  suggesting  that  other  MYXV  protein(s)  apart  from  M029  block  IFN  signaling  in  a  speciesindependent  manner.  We  also  show  that  the  antiviral  state  induced in rabbit, human or mouse cells  by  type  I IFN  can  inhibit M029-knockout MYXV even when PKR is genetically knocked-out, suggesting  that  M029  targets  other  host  proteins  for  this  antiviral state inhibition. Thus, the MYXV  dsRNA  binding  protein  M029  not  only  antagonizes  PKR  from  multiple  species  but  also blocks the  type I IFN antiviral state independently of PKR in a highly species-specific fashion.

  7. Novel mechanism of gene regulation: the protein Rv1222 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits transcription by anchoring the RNA polymerase onto DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudra, Paulami; Prajapati, Ranjit Kumar; Banerjee, Rajdeep; Sengupta, Shreya; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta

    2015-07-13

    We propose a novel mechanism of gene regulation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis where the protein Rv1222 inhibits transcription by anchoring RNA polymerase (RNAP) onto DNA. In contrast to our existing knowledge that transcriptional repressors function either by binding to DNA at specific sequences or by binding to RNAP, we show that Rv1222-mediated transcription inhibition requires simultaneous binding of the protein to both RNAP and DNA. We demonstrate that the positively charged C-terminus tail of Rv1222 is responsible for anchoring RNAP on DNA, hence the protein slows down the movement of RNAP along the DNA during transcription elongation. The interaction between Rv1222 and DNA is electrostatic, thus the protein could inhibit transcription from any gene. As Rv1222 slows down the RNA synthesis, upon expression of the protein in Mycobacterium smegmatis or Escherichia coli, the growth rate of the bacteria is severely impaired. The protein does not possess any significant affinity for DNA polymerase, thus, is unable to inhibit DNA synthesis. The proposed mechanism by which Rv1222 inhibits transcription reveals a new repertoire of prokaryotic gene regulation. © Crown copyright 2015.

  8. DNA cytosine methylation in the bovine leukemia virus promoter is associated with latency in a lymphoma-derived B-cell line: potential involvement of direct inhibition of cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-binding protein/CRE modulator/activation transcription factor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierard, Valérie; Guiguen, Allan; Colin, Laurence; Wijmeersch, Gaëlle; Vanhulle, Caroline; Van Driessche, Benoît; Dekoninck, Ann; Blazkova, Jana; Cardona, Christelle; Merimi, Makram; Vierendeel, Valérie; Calomme, Claire; Nguyên, Thi Liên-Anh; Nuttinck, Michèle; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Kettmann, Richard; Portetelle, Daniel; Burny, Arsène; Hirsch, Ivan; Rohr, Olivier; Van Lint, Carine

    2010-06-18

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) proviral latency represents a viral strategy to escape the host immune system and allow tumor development. Besides the previously demonstrated role of histone deacetylation in the epigenetic repression of BLV expression, we showed here that BLV promoter activity was induced by several DNA methylation inhibitors (such as 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine) and that overexpressed DNMT1 and DNMT3A, but not DNMT3B, down-regulated BLV promoter activity. Importantly, cytosine hypermethylation in the 5'-long terminal repeat (LTR) U3 and R regions was associated with true latency in the lymphoma-derived B-cell line L267 but not with defective latency in YR2 cells. Moreover, the virus-encoded transactivator Tax(BLV) decreased DNA methyltransferase expression levels, which could explain the lower level of cytosine methylation observed in the L267(LTaxSN) 5'-LTR compared with the L267 5'-LTR. Interestingly, DNA methylation inhibitors and Tax(BLV) synergistically activated BLV promoter transcriptional activity in a cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-dependent manner. Mechanistically, methylation at the -154 or -129 CpG position (relative to the transcription start site) impaired in vitro binding of CRE-binding protein (CREB) transcription factors to their respective CRE sites. Methylation at -129 CpG alone was sufficient to decrease BLV promoter-driven reporter gene expression by 2-fold. We demonstrated in vivo the recruitment of CREB/CRE modulator (CREM) and to a lesser extent activating transcription factor-1 (ATF-1) to the hypomethylated CRE region of the YR2 5'-LTR, whereas we detected no CREB/CREM/ATF recruitment to the hypermethylated corresponding region in the L267 cells. Altogether, these findings suggest that site-specific DNA methylation of the BLV promoter represses viral transcription by directly inhibiting transcription factor binding, thereby contributing to true proviral latency.

  9. The Potential of/for 'Slow': Slow Tourists and Slow Destinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guiver

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Slow tourism practices are nothing new; in fact, they were once the norm and still are for millions of people whose annual holiday is spent camping, staying in caravans, rented accommodation, with friends and relations or perhaps in a second home, who immerse themselves in their holiday environment, eat local food, drink local wine and walk or cycle around the area. So why a special edition about slow tourism? Like many aspects of life once considered normal (such as organic farming or free-range eggs, the emergence of new practices has highlighted differences and prompted a re-evaluation of once accepted practices and values. In this way, the concept of ‘slow tourism’ has recently appeared as a type of tourism that contrasts with many contemporary mainstream tourism practices. It has also been associated with similar trends already ‘branded’ slow: slow food and cittaslow (slow towns and concepts such as mindfulness, savouring and well-being.

  10. Dictyostelium cells bind a secreted autocrine factor that represses cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Jonathan E

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dictyostelium cells secrete the proteins AprA and CfaD. Cells lacking either AprA or CfaD proliferate faster than wild type, while AprA or CfaD overexpressor cells proliferate slowly, indicating that AprA and CfaD are autocrine factors that repress proliferation. CfaD interacts with AprA and requires the presence of AprA to slow proliferation. To determine if CfaD is necessary for the ability of AprA to slow proliferation, whether AprA binds to cells, and if so whether the binding requires the presence of CfaD, we examined the binding and effect on proliferation of recombinant AprA. Results We find that the extracellular accumulation of AprA increases with cell density and reaches a concentration of 0.3 μg/ml near a stationary cell density. When added to wild-type or aprA- cells, recombinant AprA (rAprA significantly slows proliferation at 0.1 μg/ml and higher concentrations. From 4 to 64 μg/ml, the effect of rAprA is at a plateau, slowing but not stopping proliferation. The proliferation-inhibiting activity of rAprA is roughly the same as that of native AprA in conditioned growth medium. Proliferating aprA- cells show saturable binding of rAprA to 92,000 ± 11,000 cell-surface receptors with a KD of 0.03 ± 0.02 μg/ml. There appears to be one class of binding site, and no apparent cooperativity. Native AprA inhibits the binding of rAprA to aprA- cells with a Ki of 0.03 μg/ml, suggesting that the binding kinetics of rAprA are similar to those of native AprA. The proliferation of cells lacking CrlA, a cAMP receptor-like protein, or cells lacking CfaD are not affected by rAprA. Surprisingly, both cell types still bind rAprA. Conclusion Together, the data suggest that AprA functions as an autocrine proliferation-inhibiting factor by binding to cell surface receptors. Although AprA requires CfaD for activity, it does not require CfaD to bind to cells, suggesting the possibility that cells have an AprA receptor and a Cfa

  11. Dictyostelium cells bind a secreted autocrine factor that represses cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Jonathan M; Bakthavatsalam, Deenadayalan; Phillips, Jonathan E; Gomer, Richard H

    2009-02-02

    Dictyostelium cells secrete the proteins AprA and CfaD. Cells lacking either AprA or CfaD proliferate faster than wild type, while AprA or CfaD overexpressor cells proliferate slowly, indicating that AprA and CfaD are autocrine factors that repress proliferation. CfaD interacts with AprA and requires the presence of AprA to slow proliferation. To determine if CfaD is necessary for the ability of AprA to slow proliferation, whether AprA binds to cells, and if so whether the binding requires the presence of CfaD, we examined the binding and effect on proliferation of recombinant AprA. We find that the extracellular accumulation of AprA increases with cell density and reaches a concentration of 0.3 microg/ml near a stationary cell density. When added to wild-type or aprA- cells, recombinant AprA (rAprA) significantly slows proliferation at 0.1 microg/ml and higher concentrations. From 4 to 64 microg/ml, the effect of rAprA is at a plateau, slowing but not stopping proliferation. The proliferation-inhibiting activity of rAprA is roughly the same as that of native AprA in conditioned growth medium. Proliferating aprA- cells show saturable binding of rAprA to 92,000 +/- 11,000 cell-surface receptors with a KD of 0.03 +/- 0.02 microg/ml. There appears to be one class of binding site, and no apparent cooperativity. Native AprA inhibits the binding of rAprA to aprA- cells with a Ki of 0.03 mug/ml, suggesting that the binding kinetics of rAprA are similar to those of native AprA. The proliferation of cells lacking CrlA, a cAMP receptor-like protein, or cells lacking CfaD are not affected by rAprA. Surprisingly, both cell types still bind rAprA. Together, the data suggest that AprA functions as an autocrine proliferation-inhibiting factor by binding to cell surface receptors. Although AprA requires CfaD for activity, it does not require CfaD to bind to cells, suggesting the possibility that cells have an AprA receptor and a CfaD receptor, and activation of both receptors is

  12. Slow, stopped and stored light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, G.; Scully, M.

    2005-01-01

    Light that can been slowed to walking pace could have applications in telecommunications, optical storage and quantum computing. Whether we use it to estimate how far away a thunderstorm is, or simply take it for granted that we can have a conversation with someone on the other side of the world, we all know that light travels extremely fast. Indeed, special relativity teaches us that nothing in the universe can ever move faster than the speed of light in a vacuum: 299 792 458 ms sup - sup 1. However, there is no such limitation on how slowly light can travel. For the last few years, researchers have been routinely slowing light to just a few metres per second, and have recently even stopped it dead in its tracks so that it can be stored for future use. Slow-light has considerable popular appeal, deriving perhaps from the importance of the speed of light in relativity and cosmology. If everyday objects such as cars or people can travel faster than 'slow' light, for example, then it might appear that relativistic effects could be observed at very low speeds. Although this is not the case, slow light nonetheless promises to play an important role in optical technology because it allows light to be delayed for any period of time desired. This could lead to all-optical routers that would increase the bandwidth of the Internet, and applications in optical data storage, quantum information and even radar. (U.K.)

  13. Slow rupture of frictional interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar Sinai, Yohai; Brener, Efim A.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2012-02-01

    The failure of frictional interfaces and the spatiotemporal structures that accompany it are central to a wide range of geophysical, physical and engineering systems. Recent geophysical and laboratory observations indicated that interfacial failure can be mediated by slow slip rupture phenomena which are distinct from ordinary, earthquake-like, fast rupture. These discoveries have influenced the way we think about frictional motion, yet the nature and properties of slow rupture are not completely understood. We show that slow rupture is an intrinsic and robust property of simple non-monotonic rate-and-state friction laws. It is associated with a new velocity scale cmin, determined by the friction law, below which steady state rupture cannot propagate. We further show that rupture can occur in a continuum of states, spanning a wide range of velocities from cmin to elastic wave-speeds, and predict different properties for slow rupture and ordinary fast rupture. Our results are qualitatively consistent with recent high-resolution laboratory experiments and may provide a theoretical framework for understanding slow rupture phenomena along frictional interfaces.

  14. Core binding factor beta (Cbfβ) controls the balance of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation by upregulating Indian hedgehog (Ihh) expression and inhibiting parathyroid hormone-related protein receptor (PPR) expression in postnatal cartilage and bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fei; Wu, Mengrui; Deng, Lianfu; Zhu, Guochun; Ma, Junqing; Gao, Bo; Wang, Lin; Li, Yi-Ping; Chen, Wei

    2014-07-01

    Core binding factor beta (Cbfβ) is essential for embryonic bone morphogenesis. Yet the mechanisms by which Cbfβ regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation as well as postnatal cartilage and bone formation remain unclear. Hence, using paired-related homeobox transcription factor 1-Cre (Prx1-Cre) mice, mesenchymal stem cell-specific Cbfβ-deficient (Cbfβ(f/f) Prx1-Cre) mice were generated to study the role of Cbfβ in postnatal cartilage and bone development. These mutant mice survived to adulthood but exhibited severe sternum and limb malformations. Sternum ossification was largely delayed in the Cbfβ(f/f) Prx1-Cre mice and the xiphoid process was noncalcified and enlarged. In newborn and 7-day-old Cbfβ(f/f) Prx1-Cre mice, the resting zone was dramatically elongated, the proliferation zone and hypertrophic zone of the growth plates were drastically shortened and disorganized, and trabecular bone formation was reduced. Moreover, in 1-month-old Cbfβ(f/f) Prx1-Cre mice, the growth plates were severely deformed and trabecular bone was almost absent. In addition, Cbfβ deficiency impaired intramembranous bone formation both in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, although the expression of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) was largely reduced, the expression of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) receptor (PPR) was dramatically increased in the Cbfβ(f/f) Prx1-Cre growth plate, indicating that that Cbfβ deficiency disrupted the Ihh-PTHrP negative regulatory loop. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis and promoter luciferase assay demonstrated that the Runx/Cbfβ complex binds putative Runx-binding sites of the Ihh promoter regions, and also the Runx/Cbfβ complex directly upregulates Ihh expression at the transcriptional level. Consistently, the expressions of Ihh target genes, including CyclinD1, Ptc, and Pthlh, were downregulated in Cbfβ-deficient chondrocytes. Taken together, our study reveals not only that Cbfβ is essential for chondrocyte

  15. Computation of saddle-type slow manifolds using iterative methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall

    2015-01-01

    with respect to , appropriate estimates are directly attainable using the method of this paper. The method is applied to several examples, including a model for a pair of neurons coupled by reciprocal inhibition with two slow and two fast variables, and the computation of homoclinic connections in the Fitz......This paper presents an alternative approach for the computation of trajectory segments on slow manifolds of saddle type. This approach is based on iterative methods rather than collocation-type methods. Compared to collocation methods, which require mesh refinements to ensure uniform convergence...

  16. Slow Images and Entangled Photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swordy, Simon

    2007-01-01

    I will discuss some recent experiments using slow light and entangled photons. We recently showed that it was possible to map a two dimensional image onto very low light level signals, slow them down in a hot atomic vapor while preserving the amplitude and phase of the images. If time remains, I will discuss some of our recent work with time-energy entangled photons for quantum cryptography. We were able to show that we could have a measurable state space of over 1000 states for a single pair of entangled photons in fiber.

  17. Pulsar slow-down epochs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintzmann, H.; Novello, M.

    1981-01-01

    The relative importance of magnetospheric currents and low frequency waves for pulsar braking is assessed and a model is developed which tries to account for the available pulsar timing data under the unifying aspect that all pulsars have equal masses and magnetic moments and are born as rapid rotators. Four epochs of slow-down are distinguished which are dominated by different braking mechanisms. According to the model no direct relationship exists between 'slow-down age' and true age of a pulsar and leads to a pulsar birth-rate of one event per hundred years. (Author) [pt

  18. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) unmasks specific high affinity FSH-binding sites in cell-free membrane preparations of porcine granulosa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, K.A.; LaBarbera, A.R.

    1988-11-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine whether changes in FSH receptors correlated with FSH-induced attenuation of FSH-responsive adenylyl cyclase in immature porcine granulosa cells. Cells were incubated with FSH (1-1000 ng/ml) for up to 24 h, treated with acidified medium (pH 3.5) to remove FSH bound to cells, and incubated with (125I)iodo-porcine FSH to quantify FSH-binding sites. FSH increased binding of FSH in a time-, temperature-, and FSH concentration-dependent manner. FSH (200 ng/ml) increased binding approximately 4-fold within 16 h. Analysis of equilibrium saturation binding data indicated that the increase in binding sites reflected a 2.3-fold increase in receptor number and a 5.4-fold increase in apparent affinity. The increase in binding did not appear to be due to 1) a decrease in receptor turnover, since the basal rate of turnover appeared to be very slow; 2) an increase in receptor synthesis, since agents that inhibit protein synthesis and glycosylation did not block the increase in binding; or 3) an increase in intracellular receptors, since agents that inhibit cytoskeletal components had no effect. Agents that increase intracellular cAMP did not affect FSH binding. The increase in binding appeared to result from unmasking of cryptic FSH-binding sites, since FSH increased binding in cell-free membrane preparations to the same extent as in cells. Unmasking of cryptic sites was hormone specific, and the sites bound FSH specifically. Unmasking of sites was reversible in a time- and temperature-dependent manner after removal of bound FSH. The similarity between the FSH dose-response relationships for unmasking of FSH-binding sites and attenuation of FSH-responsive cAMP production suggests that the two processes are functionally linked.

  19. Inhibition of cardiac sodium currents by toluene exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Silvia L; Orta-Salazar, Gerardo; Gauthereau, Marcia Y; Millan-Perez Peña, Lourdes; Salinas-Stefanón, Eduardo M

    2003-01-01

    Toluene is an industrial solvent widely used as a drug of abuse, which can produce sudden sniffing death due to cardiac arrhythmias. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that toluene inhibits cardiac sodium channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes transfected with Nav1.5 cDNA and in isolated rat ventricular myocytes. In oocytes, toluene inhibited sodium currents (INa+) in a concentration-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 274 μM (confidence limits: 141–407μM). The inhibition was complete, voltage-independent, and slowly reversible. Toluene had no effect on: (i) the shape of the I–V curves; (ii) the reversal potential of Na+; and (iii) the steady-state inactivation. The slow recovery time constant from inactivation of INa+ decreased with toluene exposure, while the fast recovery time constant remained unchanged. Block of INa+ by toluene was use- and frequency-dependent. In rat cardiac myocytes, 300 μM toluene inhibited the sodium current (INa+) by 62%; this inhibition was voltage independent. These results suggest that toluene binds to cardiac Na+ channels in the open state and unbinds either when channels move between inactivated states or from an inactivated to a closed state. The use- and frequency-dependent block of INa+ by toluene might be responsible, at least in part, for its arrhythmogenic effect. PMID:14534149

  20. A slowing-down problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlvik, I; Pershagen, B

    1958-06-15

    An infinitely long circular cylinder of radius a is surrounded by an infinite moderator. Both media are non-capturing. The cylinder emits neutrons of age zero with a constant source density of S. We assume that the ratios of the slowing-down powers and of the diffusion constants are independent of the neutron energy. The slowing-down density is calculated for two cases, a) when the slowing-down power of the cylinder medium is very small, and b) when the cylinder medium is identical with the moderator. The ratios of the slowing-down density at the age {tau} and the source density in the two cases are called {psi}{sub V}, and {psi}{sub M} respectively. {psi}{sub V} and {psi}{sub M} are functions of y=a{sup 2}/4{tau}. These two functions ({psi}{sub V} and {psi}{sub M}) are calculated and tabulated for y = 0-0.25.

  1. Numerical modeling of slow shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winske, D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews previous attempt and the present status of efforts to understand the structure of slow shocks by means of time dependent numerical calculations. Studies carried out using MHD or hybrid-kinetic codes have demonstrated qualitative agreement with theory. A number of unresolved issues related to hybrid simulations of the internal shock structure are discussed in some detail. 43 refs., 8 figs

  2. The unappreciated slowness of conventional tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.R. Larsen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Most tourists are not consciously engaging in ‘slow travel’, but a number of travel behaviours displayed by conventional tourists can be interpreted as slow travel behaviour. Based on Danish tourists’ engagement with the distances they travel across to reach their holiday destination, this paper explores unintended slow travel behaviours displayed by these tourists. None of the tourists participating in this research were consciously doing ‘slow travel’, and yet some of their most valued holiday memories are linked to slow travel behaviours. Based on the analysis of these unintended slow travel behaviours, this paper will discuss the potential this insight might hold for promotion of slow travel. If unappreciated and unintentional slow travel behaviours could be utilised in the deliberate effort of encouraging more people to travel slow, ‘slow travel’ will be in a better position to become integrated into conventional travel behaviour.

  3. The inhibition of assembly of HIV-1 virus-like particles by 3-O-(3',3'-dimethylsuccinyl betulinic acid (DSB is counteracted by Vif and requires its Zinc-binding domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouaziz Serge

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DSB, the 3-O-(3',3'dimethylsuccinyl derivative of betulinic acid, blocks the last step of protease-mediated processing of HIV-1 Gag precursor (Pr55Gag, which leads to immature, noninfectious virions. When administered to Pr55Gag-expressing insect cells (Sf9, DSB inhibits the assembly and budding of membrane-enveloped virus-like particles (VLP. In order to explore the possibility that viral factors could modulate the susceptibility to DSB of the VLP assembly process, several viral proteins were coexpressed individually with Pr55Gag in DSB-treated cells, and VLP yields assayed in the extracellular medium. Results Wild-type Vif (Vifwt restored the VLP production in DSB-treated cells to levels observed in control, untreated cells. DSB-counteracting effect was also observed with Vif mutants defective in encapsidation into VLP, suggesting that packaging and anti-DSB effect were separate functions in Vif. The anti-DSB effect was abolished for VifC133S and VifS116V, two mutants which lacked the zinc binding domain (ZBD formed by the four H108C114C133H139 coordinates with a Zn atom. Electron microscopic analysis of cells coexpressing Pr55Gag and Vifwt showed that a large proportion of VLP budded into cytoplasmic vesicles and were released from Sf9 cells by exocytosis. However, in the presence of mutant VifC133S or VifS116V, most of the VLP assembled and budded at the plasma membrane, as in control cells expressing Pr55Gag alone. Conclusion The function of HIV-1 Vif protein which negated the DSB inhibition of VLP assembly was independent of its packaging capability, but depended on the integrity of ZBD. In the presence of Vifwt, but not with ZBD mutants VifC133S and VifS116V, VLP were redirected to a vesicular compartment and egressed via the exocytic pathway.

  4. Bay11-7082 attenuates neuropathic pain via inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B and nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 inflammasome activation in dorsal root ganglions in a rat model of lumbar disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang AL

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ailiang Zhang, Kun Wang, Lianghua Ding, Xinnan Bao, Xuan Wang, Xubin Qiu, Jinbo Liu Spine Surgery, Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Changzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Lumbar disc herniation (LDH is an important cause of radiculopathy, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Many studies suggested that local inflammation, rather than mechanical compression, results in radiculopathy induced by LDH. On the molecular and cellular level, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB and nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3 inflammasome have been implicated in the regulation of neuroinflammation formation and progression. In this study, the autologous nucleus pulposus (NP was implanted in the left L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG to mimic LDH in rats. We investigated the expression of NF-κB and the components of NLRP3 inflammasome in the DRG neurons in rats. Western blotting and immunofluorescence for the related molecules, including NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing caspase-1 activator domain (ASC, caspase-1, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-18, IκBα, p-IκBα, p65, p-p65, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP were examined. In the NP-treated group, the activations of NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1, IL-1β, IL-18, p-IκBα, and p-p65 in DRG neurons in rats were elevated at 1 day after surgery, and the peak occurred at 7 days. Treatment with Bay11-7082, an inhibitor of the actions of IKK-β, was able to inhibit expression and activation of the molecules (NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1, IL-1β, IL-18, p-IκBα, and p-p65 and relieve the pain in rats. Our study shows that NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammasome are involved in the maintenance of NP-induced pain, and that Bay11-7082 could alleviate mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia by inhibiting NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Keywords: pain, NLRP3, NF-κB, dorsal root ganglion, nucleus pulposus

  5. A Primer to Slow Light

    OpenAIRE

    Leonhardt, U.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory-based optical analogs of astronomical objects such as black holes rely on the creation of light with an extremely low or even vanishing group velocity (slow light). These brief notes represent a pedagogical attempt towards elucidating this extraordinary form of light. This paper is a contribution to the book Artificial Black Holes edited by Mario Novello, Matt Visser and Grigori Volovik. The paper is intended as a primer, an introduction to the subject for non-experts, not as a det...

  6. Capillary waves in slow motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seydel, Tilo; Tolan, Metin; Press, Werner; Madsen, Anders; Gruebel, Gerhard

    2001-01-01

    Capillary wave dynamics on glycerol surfaces has been investigated by means of x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy performed at grazing angles. The measurements show that thermally activated capillary wave motion is slowed down exponentially when the sample is cooled below 273 K. This finding directly reflects the freezing of the surface waves. The wave-number dependence of the measured time constants is in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions for overdamped capillary waves

  7. The fast slow TDPAC spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cekic, B.; Koicki, S.; Manasijevic, M.; Ivanovic, N.; Koteski, V.; Milosevic, Z.; Radisavljevic, I.; Cavor, J.; Novakovic, N.; Marjanovic, D.

    2001-01-01

    A 2-BaF 2 detector - fast slow time spectrometer for time differential perturbed angular correlations (TDPAC) experiments is described. This apparatus has been developed in the Group for Hyperfine Interactions in the Institute for Nuclear Sciences in VINCA. The excellent time resolution combined with high efficiency offered by these detectors enables one high counting rate performance and is operating in the wide temperature range 78-1200 K. (author)

  8. Hidden slow pulsars in binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, Marco; Brookshaw, Leigh

    1993-01-01

    The recent discovery of the binary containing the slow pulsar PSR 1718-19 orbiting around a low-mass companion star adds new light on the characteristics of binary pulsars. The properties of the radio eclipses of PSR 1718-19 are the most striking observational characteristics of this system. The surface of the companion star produces a mass outflow which leaves only a small 'window' in orbital phase for the detection of PSR 1718-19 around 400 MHz. At this observing frequency, PSR 1718-19 is clearly observable only for about 1 hr out of the total 6.2 hr orbital period. The aim of this Letter is twofold: (1) to model the hydrodynamical behavior of the eclipsing material from the companion star of PSR 1718-19 and (2) to argue that a population of binary slow pulsars might have escaped detection in pulsar surveys carried out at 400 MHz. The possible existence of a population of partially or totally hidden slow pulsars in binaries will have a strong impact on current theories of binary evolution of neutron stars.

  9. Inhibition of human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and HT-29 colon cancer cells by rice-produced recombinant human insulin-like growth binding protein-3 (rhIGFBP-3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley C K Cheung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 is a multifunctional molecule which is closely related to cell growth, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metabolism and senescence. It combines with insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I to form a complex (IGF-I/IGFBP-3 that can treat growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (GHIS and reduce insulin requirement in patients with diabetes. IGFBP-3 alone has been shown to have anti-proliferation effect on numerous cancer cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We reported here an expression method to produce functional recombinant human IGFBP-3 (rhIGFBP-3 in transgenic rice grains. Protein sorting sequences, signal peptide and endoplasmic reticulum retention tetrapeptide (KDEL were included in constructs for enhancing rhIGFBP-3 expression. Western blot analysis showed that only the constructs with signal peptide were successfully expressed in transgenic rice grains. Both rhIGFBP-3 proteins, with or without KDEL sorting sequence inhibited the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells (65.76 ± 1.72% vs 45.00 ± 0.86%, p < 0.05; 50.84 ± 1.97% vs 45.00 ± 0.86%, p < 0.01 respectively and HT-29 colon cancer cells (65.14 ± 3.84% vs 18.01 ± 13.81%, p < 0.05 and 54.7 ± 9.44% vs 18.01 ± 13.81%, p < 0.05 respectively when compared with wild type rice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrated the feasibility of producing biological active rhIGFBP-3 in rice using a transgenic approach, which will definitely encourage more research on the therapeutic use of hIGFBP-3 in future.

  10. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals a functional heparin binding motif involved in binding to the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolton Michael J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 (SU, gp120 and the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP bind to chemokine receptors during infection and have a site of amino acid sequence similarity in their binding domains that often includes a heparin binding motif (HBM. Infection by either pathogen has been found to be inhibited by polyanions. Results Specific polyanions that inhibit HIV infection and bind to the V3 loop of X4 strains also inhibited DBP-mediated infection of erythrocytes and DBP binding to the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC. A peptide including the HBM of PvDBP had similar affinity for heparin as RANTES and V3 loop peptides, and could be specifically inhibited from heparin binding by the same polyanions that inhibit DBP binding to DARC. However, some V3 peptides can competitively inhibit RANTES binding to heparin, but not the PvDBP HBM peptide. Three other members of the DBP family have an HBM sequence that is necessary for erythrocyte binding, however only the protein which binds to DARC, the P. knowlesi alpha protein, is inhibited by heparin from binding to erythrocytes. Heparitinase digestion does not affect the binding of DBP to erythrocytes. Conclusion The HBMs of DBPs that bind to DARC have similar heparin binding affinities as some V3 loop peptides and chemokines, are responsible for specific sulfated polysaccharide inhibition of parasite binding and invasion of red blood cells, and are more likely to bind to negative charges on the receptor than cell surface glycosaminoglycans.

  11. The slow cell death response when screening chemotherapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Joseph; Smith, Adam; Josephson, Lee

    2011-09-01

    To examine the correlation between cell death and a common surrogate of death used in screening assays, we compared cell death responses to those obtained with the sulforhodamine B (SRB) cell protein-based "cytotoxicity" assay. With the SRB assay, the Hill equation was used to obtain an IC50 and final cell mass, or cell mass present at infinite agent concentrations, with eight adherent cell lines and four agents (32 agent/cell combinations). Cells were treated with high agent concentrations (well above the SRB IC50) and the death response determined as the time-dependent decrease in cells failing to bind both annexin V and vital fluorochromes by flow cytometry. Death kinetics were categorized as fast (5/32) (similar to the reference nonadherent Jurkat line), slow (17/32), or none (10/32), despite positive responses in the SRB assay in all cases. With slow cell death, a single exposure to a chemotherapeutic agent caused a slow, progressive increase in dead (necrotic) and dying (apoptotic) cells for at least 72 h. Cell death (defined by annexin and/or fluorochrome binding) did not correlate with the standard SRB "cytotoxicity" assay. With the slow cell death response, a single exposure to an agent caused a slow conversion from vital to apoptotic and necrotic cells over at least 72 h (the longest time point examined). Here, increasing the time of exposure to agent concentrations modestly above the SRB IC50 provides a method of maximizing cell kill. If tumors respond similarly, sustained low doses of chemotherapeutic agents, rather than a log-kill, maximum tolerated dose strategy may be an optimal strategy of maximizing tumor cell death.

  12. The CUORE slow monitoring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, L.; Biare, D.; Cappelli, L.; Cushman, J. S.; Del Corso, F.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Hickerson, K. P.; Moggi, N.; Pagliarone, C. E.; Schmidt, B.; Wagaarachchi, S. L.; Welliver, B.; Winslow, L. A.

    2017-09-01

    CUORE is a cryogenic experiment searching primarily for neutrinoless double decay in 130Te. It will begin data-taking operations in 2016. To monitor the cryostat and detector during commissioning and data taking, we have designed and developed Slow Monitoring systems. In addition to real-time systems using LabVIEW, we have an alarm, analysis, and archiving website that uses MongoDB, AngularJS, and Bootstrap software. These modern, state of the art software packages make the monitoring system transparent, easily maintainable, and accessible on many platforms including mobile devices.

  13. Blowup for flat slow manifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a way of extending the blowup method, in the formulation of Krupa and Szmolyan, to flat slow manifolds that lose hyperbolicity beyond any algebraic order. Although these manifolds have infinite co-dimensions, they do appear naturally in certain settings; for example, in (a......) the regularization of piecewise smooth systems by tanh, (b) a particular aircraft landing dynamics model, and finally (c) in a model of earthquake faulting. We demonstrate the approach using a simple model system and the examples (a) and (b)....

  14. Blowup for flat slow manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, K. U.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we present a way of extending the blowup method, in the formulation of Krupa and Szmolyan, to flat slow manifolds that lose hyperbolicity beyond any algebraic order. Although these manifolds have infinite co-dimensions, they do appear naturally in certain settings; for example, in (a) the regularization of piecewise smooth systems by \\tanh , (b) a particular aircraft landing dynamics model, and finally (c) in a model of earthquake faulting. We demonstrate the approach using a simple model system and the examples (a) and (b).

  15. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals a functional heparin binding motif involved in binding to the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines

    OpenAIRE

    Bolton, Michael J; Garry, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 (SU, gp120) and the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) bind to chemokine receptors during infection and have a site of amino acid sequence similarity in their binding domains that often includes a heparin binding motif (HBM). Infection by either pathogen has been found to be inhibited by polyanions. Results Specific polyanions that inhibit HIV infection and bind to the V3 loop of X4 strains also inhibited DBP-mediated infectio...

  16. Connecting slow earthquakes to huge earthquakes

    OpenAIRE

    Obara, Kazushige; Kato, Aitaro

    2016-01-01

    Slow earthquakes are characterized by a wide spectrum of fault slip behaviors and seismic radiation patterns that differ from those of traditional earthquakes. However, slow earthquakes and huge megathrust earthquakes can have common slip mechanisms and are located in neighboring regions of the seismogenic zone. The frequent occurrence of slow earthquakes may help to reveal the physics underlying megathrust events as useful analogs. Slow earthquakes may function as stress meters because of th...

  17. Integrated Photonics Enabled by Slow Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Chen, Yuntian; Ek, Sara

    2012-01-01

    In this talk we will discuss the physics of slow light in semiconductor materials and in particular the possibilities offered for integrated photonics. This includes ultra-compact slow light enabled optical amplifiers, lasers and pulse sources.......In this talk we will discuss the physics of slow light in semiconductor materials and in particular the possibilities offered for integrated photonics. This includes ultra-compact slow light enabled optical amplifiers, lasers and pulse sources....

  18. Slowing down bubbles with sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, Cedric; Dangla, Remie; Guinard, Marion

    2009-11-01

    We present experimental evidence that a bubble moving in a fluid in which a well-chosen acoustic noise is superimposed can be significantly slowed down even for moderate acoustic pressure. Through mean velocity measurements, we show that a condition for this effect to occur is for the acoustic noise spectrum to match or overlap the bubble's fundamental resonant mode. We render the bubble's oscillations and translational movements using high speed video. We show that radial oscillations (Rayleigh-Plesset type) have no effect on the mean velocity, while above a critical pressure, a parametric type instability (Faraday waves) is triggered and gives rise to nonlinear surface oscillations. We evidence that these surface waves are subharmonic and responsible for the bubble's drag increase. When the acoustic intensity is increased, Faraday modes interact and the strongly nonlinear oscillations behave randomly, leading to a random behavior of the bubble's trajectory and consequently to a higher slow down. Our observations may suggest new strategies for bubbly flow control, or two-phase microfluidic devices. It might also be applicable to other elastic objects, such as globules, cells or vesicles, for medical applications such as elasticity-based sorting.

  19. Binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes with compensation for saturable binding to filters and its implication for binding studies with brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, O.M.; Wood, K.M.; Williams, D.C.

    1984-08-01

    Apparent specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes at high concentrations of imipramine showed deviation from that expected of a single binding site, a result consistent with a low-affinity binding site. The deviation was due to displaceable, saturable binding to the glass fibre filters used in the assays. Imipramine, chloripramine, desipramine, and fluoxetine inhibited binding to filters whereas 5-hydroxytryptamine and ethanol were ineffective. Experimental conditions were developed that eliminated filter binding, allowing assay of high- and low-affinity binding to membranes. Failure to correct for filter binding may lead to overestimation of binding parameters, Bmax and KD for high-affinity binding to membranes, and may also be misinterpreted as indicating a low-affinity binding component in both platelet and brain membranes. Low-affinity binding (KD less than 2 microM) of imipramine to human platelet membranes was demonstrated and its significance discussed.

  20. Involvement of 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS (membrane associated, rapid response steroid-binding), a novel vitamin D receptor, in growth inhibition of breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, Cynthia L. [Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada); Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Rohe, Ben [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Nemere, Ilka [Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Center for Integrated BioSystems, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322 8700 (United States); Meckling, Kelly A., E-mail: kmecklin@uoguelph.ca [Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada)

    2010-03-10

    In addition to classical roles in calcium homeostasis and bone development, 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} [1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}] inhibits the growth of several cancer types, including breast cancer. Although cellular effects of 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} traditionally have been attributed to activation of a nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR), a novel receptor for 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} called 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS (membrane-associated, rapid response steroid-binding) protein was identified recently. The purpose of this study was to determine if the level of 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS expression modulates 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} activity in breast cancer cells. Relative levels of 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS protein in MCF-7, MDA MB 231, and MCF-10A cells were estimated by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. To determine if 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS receptor was involved in the growth inhibitory effects of 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} in MCF-7 cells, a ribozyme construct designed to knock down 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS mRNA was stably transfected into MCF-7 cells. MCF-7 clones in which 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS receptor expression was reduced showed increased sensitivity to 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} ( IC{sub 50} 56 {+-} 24 nM) compared to controls (319 {+-} 181 nM; P < 0.05). Reduction in 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS receptor lengthened the doubling time in transfectants treated with 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}. Knockdown of 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS receptor also increased the sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to the vitamin D analogs KH1060 and MC903, but not to unrelated agents (all-trans retinoic acid, paclitaxel, serum/glucose starvation, or the isoflavone, pomiferin). These results suggest that 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS receptor expression interferes with the growth inhibitory activity of 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} in breast cancer cells, possibly through the nuclear VDR. Further research should examine the potential for pharmacological or natural agents that modify 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS expression or activity as anticancer agents.

  1. A fast-slow logic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Hideo.

    1977-01-01

    A fast-slow logic system has been made for use in multi-detector experiments in nuclear physics such as particle-gamma and particle-particle coincidence experiments. The system consists of a fast logic system and a slow logic system. The fast logic system has a function of fast coincidences and provides timing signals for the slow logic system. The slow logic system has a function of slow coincidences and a routing control of input analog signals to the ADCs. (auth.)

  2. Traditional Procurement is too Slow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Kong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on an exploratory interview survey of construction project participants aimed at identifying the reasons for the decrease in use of the traditional, lump-sum, procurement system in Malaysia. The results show that most people believe it is too slow. This appears to be in part due to the contiguous nature of the various phase and stages of the process and especially the separation of the design and construction phases. The delays caused by disputes between the various parties are also seen as a contributory factor - the most prominent cause being the frequency of variations, with design and scope changes being a particular source of discontent. It is concluded that an up scaling of the whole of the time related reward/penalty system may be the most appropriate measure for the practice in future.

  3. Slow pyrolysis of pistachio shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apaydin-Varol, Esin; Putun, Ersan; Putun, Ayse E [Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2007-08-15

    In this study, pistachio shell is taken as the biomass sample to investigate the effects of pyrolysis temperature on the product yields and composition when slow pyrolysis is applied in a fixed-bed reactor at atmospheric pressure to the temperatures of 300, 400, 500, 550, 700{sup o}C. The maximum liquid yield was attained at about 500-550{sup o}C with a yield of 20.5%. The liquid product obtained under this optimum temperature and solid products obtained at all temperatures were characterized. As well as proximate and elemental analysis for the products were the basic steps for characterization, column chromatography, FT-IR, GC/MS and SEM were used for further characterization. The results showed that liquid and solid products from pistachio shells show similarities with high value conventional fuels. 31 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. The TTI slowness surface approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Stovas, A.

    2011-01-01

    The relation between the vertical and horizontal slownesses, better known as the dispersion relation, for a transversely isotropic media with titled symmetry axis {left parenthesis, less than bracket}TTI{right parenthesis, greater than bracket} requires solving a quartic polynomial, which does not admit a practical explicit solution to be used, for example, in downward continuation. Using a combination of perturbation theory with respect to the anelliptic parameter and Shanks transform to improve the accuracy of the expansion, we develop an explicit formula for the dispersion relation that is highly accurate for all practical purposes. It also reveals some insights into the anisotropy parameter dependency of the dispersion relation including the low impact that the anelliptic parameter has on the vertical placement of reflectors for small tilt in the symmetry angle. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  5. Binding of human beta 2-microglobulin to murine EL4 thymoma cells upregulates MHC class I heavy-chain epitopes, inhibits IL-2 secretion and induces resistance to killing by natural killer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claësson, M H; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1994-01-01

    line (ABLS-8), X63 B-lymphoma cells and YAC cells did not bind h beta 2m. In two of the T lymphomas, EL4 and BW5147, binding of h beta 2m led to an increase in major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) heavy-chain epitope expression as measured by anti-H-2K/D antibody binding and FACS analysis....... EL4 cells which had bound h beta 2m decreased their rate of constitutive IL-2 secretion and became resistant to activated natural killer (NK) cell killing. The present data suggest the binding of h beta 2m to mouse T cells leads to conformational changes of MHC-I heavy chains which influence both...

  6. Possible mechanisms underlying slow component of V̇O2 on-kinetics in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Bernard; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2015-05-15

    A computer model of a skeletal muscle bioenergetic system is used to study the background of the slow component of oxygen consumption V̇O2 on-kinetics in skeletal muscle. Two possible mechanisms are analyzed: inhibition of ATP production by anaerobic glycolysis by progressive cytosol acidification (together with a slow decrease in ATP supply by creatine kinase) and gradual increase of ATP usage during exercise of constant power output. It is demonstrated that the former novel mechanism is potent to generate the slow component. The latter mechanism further increases the size of the slow component; it also moderately decreases metabolite stability and has a small impact on muscle pH. An increase in anaerobic glycolysis intensity increases the slow component, elevates cytosol acidification during exercise, and decreases phosphocreatine and Pi stability, although slightly increases ADP stability. A decrease in the P/O ratio (ATP molecules/O2 molecules) during exercise cannot also be excluded as a relevant mechanism, although this issue requires further study. It is postulated that both the progressive inhibition of anaerobic glycolysis by accumulating protons (together with a slow decrease of the net creatine kinase reaction rate) and gradual increase of ATP usage during exercise, and perhaps a decrease in P/O, contribute to the generation of the slow component of the V̇O2 on-kinetics in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Selective binding of 2-[125I]iodo-nisoxetine to norepinephrine transporters in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, M.-P.; Choi, Seok-Rye; Hou, Catherine; Zhuang, Z.-P.; Foulon, Catherine; Kung, Hank F.

    2004-01-01

    A radioiodinated ligand, (R)-N-methyl-(2-[ 125 I]iodo-phenoxy)-3-phenylpropylamine, [ 125 I]2-INXT, targeting norepinephrine transporters (NET), was successfully prepared. A no-carrier-added product, [ 125 I]2-INXT, displayed a saturable binding with a high affinity (K d =0.06 nM) in the homogenates prepared from rat cortical tissues as well as from LLC-PK 1 cells expressing NET. A relatively low number of binding sties (B max =55 fmol/mg protein) measured with [ 125 I]2-INXT in rat cortical homogenates is consistent with the value reported for a known NET ligand, [ 3 H]nisoxetine. Competition studies with various compounds on [ 125 I]2-INXT binding clearly confirmed the pharmacological specificity and selectivity for NET binding sites. Following a tail-vein injection of [ 125 I]2-INXT in rats, a good initial brain uptake was observed (0.56% dose at 2 min) followed by a slow washout from the brain (0.2% remained at 3 hours post-injection). The hypothalamus (a NET-rich region) to striatum (a region devoid of NET) ratio was 1.5 at 3 hours post-i.v. injection. Pretreatment of rats with nisoxetine significantly inhibited the uptake of [ 125 I]2-INXT (70-100% inhibition) in locus coeruleus, hypothalamus and raphe nuclei, regions known to have a high density of NET; whereas escitalopram, a serotonin transporter ligand, did not show a similar effect. Ex vivo autoradiography of rat brain sections of [ 125 I]2-INXT (at 3 hours after an i.v. injection) displayed an excellent regional brain localization pattern corroborated to the specific NET distribution in the brain. The specific brain localization was significantly reduced by a dose of nisoxetine pretreatment. Taken together, the data suggest that [ 123 I]2-INXT may be useful for mapping NET binding sites in the brain

  8. Plant domestication slows pest evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Martin M; Lochab, Amaneet K; Turley, Nash E; Johnson, Marc T J

    2015-09-01

    Agricultural practices such as breeding resistant varieties and pesticide use can cause rapid evolution of pest species, but it remains unknown how plant domestication itself impacts pest contemporary evolution. Using experimental evolution on a comparative phylogenetic scale, we compared the evolutionary dynamics of a globally important economic pest - the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) - growing on 34 plant taxa, represented by 17 crop species and their wild relatives. Domestication slowed aphid evolution by 13.5%, maintained 10.4% greater aphid genotypic diversity and 5.6% higher genotypic richness. The direction of evolution (i.e. which genotypes increased in frequency) differed among independent domestication events but was correlated with specific plant traits. Individual-based simulation models suggested that domestication affects aphid evolution directly by reducing the strength of selection and indirectly by increasing aphid density and thus weakening genetic drift. Our results suggest that phenotypic changes during domestication can alter pest evolutionary dynamics. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  9. Applications of Slow Light in Telecommunications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boyd, Robert W; Gauthier, Daniel J; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2006-01-01

    .... Now, optical scientists are turning their attention toward developing useful applications of slow light, including controllable optical delay lines, optical buffers and true time delay methods...

  10. Inhibiting the inevitable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shashoua, Yvonne

    2006-01-01

    conservation is to ‘buy time’ for the object. Inhibitive conservation of plastics involves the removal or reduction of factors causing or accelerating degradation including light, oxygen, acids, relative humidity and acidic breakdown products. Specific approaches to conservation have been developed......Once plastics objects are registered in museum collections, the institution becomes responsible for their long term preservation, until the end of their useful lifetime. Plastics appear to deteriorate faster than other materials in museum collections and have a useful lifetime between 5 and 25...... years. Preventive or inhibitive conservation involves controlling the environments in which objects are placed during storage and display, with the aim of slowing the major deterioration reactions. Once in progress, degradation of plastics cannot be stopped or reversed, so the aim of preventive...

  11. Insulin binding to individual rat skeletal muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerker, D.J.; Sweet, I.R.; Baskin, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Studies of insulin binding to skeletal muscle, performed using sarcolemmal membrane preparations or whole muscle incubations of mixed muscle or typical red (soleus, psoas) or white [extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius] muscle, have suggested that red muscle binds more insulin than white muscle. We have evaluated this hypothesis using cryostat sections of unfixed tissue to measure insulin binding in a broad range of skeletal muscles; many were of similar fiber-type profiles. Insulin binding per square millimeter of skeletal muscle slice was measured by autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometry. We found a 4.5-fold range in specific insulin tracer binding, with heart and predominantly slow-twitch oxidative muscles (SO) at the high end and the predominantly fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) muscles at the low end of the range. This pattern reflects insulin sensitivity. Evaluation of displacement curves for insulin binding yielded linear Scatchard plots. The dissociation constants varied over a ninefold range (0.26-2.06 nM). Binding capacity varied from 12.2 to 82.7 fmol/mm2. Neither binding parameter was correlated with fiber type or insulin sensitivity; e.g., among three muscles of similar fiber-type profile, the EDL had high numbers of low-affinity binding sites, whereas the quadriceps had low numbers of high-affinity sites. In summary, considerable heterogeneity in insulin binding was found among hindlimb muscles of the rat, which can be attributed to heterogeneity in binding affinities and the numbers of binding sites. It can be concluded that a given fiber type is not uniquely associated with a set of insulin binding parameters that result in high or low binding

  12. Neuronal ensemble for visual working memory via interplay of slow and fast oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuhara, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2011-05-01

    The current focus of studies on neural entities for memory maintenance is on the interplay between fast neuronal oscillations in the gamma band and slow oscillations in the theta or delta band. The hierarchical coupling of slow and fast oscillations is crucial for the rehearsal of sensory inputs for short-term storage, as well as for binding sensory inputs that are represented in spatially segregated cortical areas. However, no experimental evidence for the binding of spatially segregated information has yet been presented for memory maintenance in humans. In the present study, we actively manipulated memory maintenance performance with an attentional blink procedure during human scalp electroencephalography (EEG) recordings and identified that slow oscillations are enhanced when memory maintenance is successful. These slow oscillations accompanied fast oscillations in the gamma frequency range that appeared at spatially segregated scalp sites. The amplitude of the gamma oscillation at these scalp sites was simultaneously enhanced at an EEG phase of the slow oscillation. Successful memory maintenance appears to be achieved by a rehearsal of sensory inputs together with a coordination of distributed fast oscillations at a preferred timing of the slow oscillations. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. An anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody and small molecule CCR5 antagonists synergize by inhibiting different stages of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safarian, Diana; Carnec, Xavier; Tsamis, Fotini; Kajumo, Francis; Dragic, Tatjana

    2006-01-01

    HIV-1 coreceptors are attractive targets for novel antivirals. Here, inhibition of entry by two classes of CCR5 antagonists was investigated. We confirmed previous findings that HIV-1 isolates vary greatly in their sensitivity to small molecule inhibitors of CCR5-mediated entry, SCH-C and TAK-779. In contrast, an anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody (PA14) similarly inhibited entry of diverse viral isolates. Sensitivity to small molecules was V3 loop-dependent and inversely proportional to the level of gp120 binding to CCR5. Moreover, combinations of the MAb and small molecules were highly synergistic in blocking HIV-1 entry, suggesting different mechanisms of action. This was confirmed by time course of inhibition experiments wherein the PA14 MAb and small molecules were shown to inhibit temporally distinct stages of CCR5 usage. We propose that small molecules inhibit V3 binding to the second extracellular loop of CCR5, whereas PA14 preferentially inhibits subsequent events such as CCR5 recruitment into the fusion complex or conformational changes in the gp120-CCR5 complex that trigger fusion. Importantly, our findings suggest that combinations of CCR5 inhibitors with different mechanisms of action will be central to controlling HIV-1 infection and slowing the emergence of resistant strains

  14. Vitamin K3 disrupts the microtubule networks by binding to tubulin: a novel mechanism of its antiproliferative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Bipul R; Choudhury, Diptiman; Das, Amlan; Chakrabarti, Gopal

    2009-07-28

    Vitamin K3 (2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), also known as menadione, is the synthetic precursor of all the naturally occurring vitamin K in the body. Vitamin K is necessary for the production of prothrombin and five other blood-clotting factors in humans. We have examined the effects of menadione on cellular microtubules ex vivo as well as its binding with purified tubulin and microtubules in vitro. Cell viability experiments using human cervical epithelial cancer cells (HeLa) and human oral epithelial cancer cells (KB) indicated that the IC(50) values for menadione are 25.6 +/- 0.6 and 64.3 +/- 0.36 microM, respectively, in those cells. Mendione arrests HeLa cells in mitosis. Immunofluorescence studies using an anti-alpha-tubulin antibody showed a significant irreversible depolymeriztion of the interphase microtubule network and spindle microtubule in a dose-dependent manner. In vitro polymerization of purified tubulin into microtubules is inhibited by menadione with an IC(50) value of 47 +/- 0.65 microM. The binding of menadione with tubulin was studied using menadione fluorescence and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of tubulin. Binding of menadione to tubulin is slow, taking 35 min for equilibration at 25 degrees C. The association reaction kinetics is biphasic in nature, and the association rate constants for fast and slow phases are 189.12 +/- 17 and 32.44 +/- 21 M(-1) s(-1) at 25 degrees C, respectively. The stoichiometry of menadione binding to tubulin is 1:1 (molar ratio) with a dissociation constant from 2.44 +/- 0.34 to 3.65 +/- 0.25 microM at 25 degrees C. Menadione competes for the colchicine binding site with a K(i) of 2.5 muM as determined from a modified Dixon plot. The obtained data suggested that menadione binds at the colchicine binding site to tubulin. Thus, we can conclude one novel mechanism of inhibition of cancer cell proliferation by menadione is through tubulin binding.

  15. Response of electret dosemeter to slow neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghilardi, A.J.P.; Pela, C.A.; Zimmerman, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The response of electret dosemeter to slow neutrons exposure is cited, mentioning the preparation and the irradiation of dosemeter with Am-Be source. Some theory considerations about the response of electret dosemeter to slow and fast neutrons are also presented. (C.G.C.) [pt

  16. Tandem queue with server slow-down

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miretskiy, D.I.; Scheinhardt, W.R.W.; Mandjes, M.R.H.

    2007-01-01

    We study how rare events happen in the standard two-node tandem Jackson queue and in a generalization, the socalled slow-down network, see [2]. In the latter model the service rate of the first server depends on the number of jobs in the second queue: the first server slows down if the amount of

  17. Slow-light pulses in moving media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiurasek, J.; Leonhardt, U.; Parentani, R.

    2002-01-01

    Slow light in moving media reaches a counterintuitive regime when the flow speed of the medium approaches the group velocity of light. Pulses can penetrate a region where a counterpropagating flow exceeds the group velocity. When the counterflow slows down, pulses are reflected

  18. Can fast and slow intelligence be differentiated?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Partchev, I.; de Boeck, P.

    2012-01-01

    Responses to items from an intelligence test may be fast or slow. The research issue dealt with in this paper is whether the intelligence involved in fast correct responses differs in nature from the intelligence involved in slow correct responses. There are two questions related to this issue: 1.

  19. Slow Movement/Slow University: Critical Engagements. Introduction to the Thematic Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie O'Neill

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This thematic section emerged from two seminars that took place at Durham University in England in November 2013 and March 2014 on the possibilities for thinking through what a change movement towards slow might mean for the University. Slow movements have emerged in relation to a number of topics: Slow food, Citta slow and more recently, slow science. What motivated us in the seminars was to explore how far these movements could help us address the acceleration and intensification of work within our own and other universities, and indeed, what new learning, research, philosophies, practices, structures and governance might emerge. This editorial introduction presents the concept of the "slow university" and introduces our critical engagements with slow. The articles presented here interrogate the potentialities, challenges, problems and pitfalls of the slow university in an era of corporate culture and management rationality. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1403166

  20. Connecting slow earthquakes to huge earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Kazushige; Kato, Aitaro

    2016-07-15

    Slow earthquakes are characterized by a wide spectrum of fault slip behaviors and seismic radiation patterns that differ from those of traditional earthquakes. However, slow earthquakes and huge megathrust earthquakes can have common slip mechanisms and are located in neighboring regions of the seismogenic zone. The frequent occurrence of slow earthquakes may help to reveal the physics underlying megathrust events as useful analogs. Slow earthquakes may function as stress meters because of their high sensitivity to stress changes in the seismogenic zone. Episodic stress transfer to megathrust source faults leads to an increased probability of triggering huge earthquakes if the adjacent locked region is critically loaded. Careful and precise monitoring of slow earthquakes may provide new information on the likelihood of impending huge earthquakes. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Inhibition of the functional interplay between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) oxidoreduclin-1α (Ero1α) and protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) by the endocrine disruptor bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Masaki; Kadokura, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Shoko; Yutani, Katsuhide; Kanemura, Shingo; Hikima, Takaaki; Hidaka, Yuji; Ito, Len; Shiba, Kohei; Masui, Shoji; Imai, Daiki; Imaoka, Susumu; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Inaba, Kenji

    2014-09-26

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disruptor that may have adverse effects on human health. We recently isolated protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) as a BPA-binding protein from rat brain homogenates and found that BPA markedly inhibited PDI activity. To elucidate mechanisms of this inhibition, detailed structural, biophysical, and functional analyses of PDI were performed in the presence of BPA. BPA binding to PDI induced significant rearrangement of the N-terminal thioredoxin domain of PDI, resulting in more compact overall structure. This conformational change led to closure of the substrate-binding pocket in b' domain, preventing PDI from binding to unfolded proteins. The b' domain also plays an essential role in the interplay between PDI and ER oxidoreduclin 1α (Ero1α), a flavoenzyme responsible for reoxidation of PDI. We show that BPA inhibited Ero1α-catalyzed PDI oxidation presumably by inhibiting the interaction between the b' domain of PDI and Ero1α; the phenol groups of BPA probably compete with a highly conserved tryptophan residue, located in the protruding β-hairpin of Ero1α, for binding to PDI. Consistently, BPA slowed down the reoxidation of PDI and caused the reduction of PDI in HeLa cells, indicating that BPA has a great impact on the redox homeostasis of PDI within cells. However, BPA had no effect on the interaction between PDI and peroxiredoxin-4 (Prx4), another PDI family oxidase, suggesting that the interaction between Prx4 and PDI is different from that of Ero1α and PDI. These results indicate that BPA, a widely distributed and potentially harmful chemical, inhibits Ero1-PDI-mediated disulfide bond formation. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Inhibition of the Functional Interplay between Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Oxidoreduclin-1α (Ero1α) and Protein-disulfide Isomerase (PDI) by the Endocrine Disruptor Bisphenol A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Masaki; Kadokura, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Shoko; Yutani, Katsuhide; Kanemura, Shingo; Hikima, Takaaki; Hidaka, Yuji; Ito, Len; Shiba, Kohei; Masui, Shoji; Imai, Daiki; Imaoka, Susumu; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Inaba, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disruptor that may have adverse effects on human health. We recently isolated protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) as a BPA-binding protein from rat brain homogenates and found that BPA markedly inhibited PDI activity. To elucidate mechanisms of this inhibition, detailed structural, biophysical, and functional analyses of PDI were performed in the presence of BPA. BPA binding to PDI induced significant rearrangement of the N-terminal thioredoxin domain of PDI, resulting in more compact overall structure. This conformational change led to closure of the substrate-binding pocket in b′ domain, preventing PDI from binding to unfolded proteins. The b′ domain also plays an essential role in the interplay between PDI and ER oxidoreduclin 1α (Ero1α), a flavoenzyme responsible for reoxidation of PDI. We show that BPA inhibited Ero1α-catalyzed PDI oxidation presumably by inhibiting the interaction between the b′ domain of PDI and Ero1α; the phenol groups of BPA probably compete with a highly conserved tryptophan residue, located in the protruding β-hairpin of Ero1α, for binding to PDI. Consistently, BPA slowed down the reoxidation of PDI and caused the reduction of PDI in HeLa cells, indicating that BPA has a great impact on the redox homeostasis of PDI within cells. However, BPA had no effect on the interaction between PDI and peroxiredoxin-4 (Prx4), another PDI family oxidase, suggesting that the interaction between Prx4 and PDI is different from that of Ero1α and PDI. These results indicate that BPA, a widely distributed and potentially harmful chemical, inhibits Ero1-PDI-mediated disulfide bond formation. PMID:25122773

  3. Lead-Binding Proteins: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey C. Gonick

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead-binding proteins are a series of low molecular weight proteins, analogous to metallothionein, which segregate lead in a nontoxic form in several organs (kidney, brain, lung, liver, erythrocyte. Whether the lead-binding proteins in every organ are identical or different remains to be determined. In the erythrocyte, delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD isoforms have commanded the greatest attention as proteins and enzymes that are both inhibitable and inducible by lead. ALAD-2, although it binds lead to a greater degree than ALAD-1, appears to bind lead in a less toxic form. What may be of greater significance is that a low molecular weight lead-binding protein, approximately 10 kDa, appears in the erythrocyte once blood lead exceeds 39 μg/dL and eventually surpasses the lead-binding capacity of ALAD. In brain and kidney of environmentally exposed humans and animals, a cytoplasmic lead-binding protein has been identified as thymosin β4, a 5 kDa protein. In kidney, but not brain, another lead-binding protein has been identified as acyl-CoA binding protein, a 9 kDa protein. Each of these proteins, when coincubated with liver ALAD and titrated with lead, diminishes the inhibition of ALAD by lead, verifying their ability to segregate lead in a nontoxic form.

  4. INHIBITION OF THE DNA-BINDING ACTIVITY OF DROSOPHILA SUPPRESSOR OF HAIRLESS AND OF ITS HUMAN HOMOLOG, KBF2/RBP-J-KAPPA, BY DIRECT PROTEIN-PROTEIN INTERACTION WITH DROSOPHILA HAIRLESS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROU, C; LOGEAT, F; LECOURTOIS, M; VANDEKERCKHOVE, Joël; KOURILSKY, P; SCHWEISGUTH, F; ISRAEL, A

    1994-01-01

    We have purified the sequence-specific DNA-binding protein KBF2 and cloned the corresponding cDNA, which is derived from the previously described RBP-J kappa gene, the human homolog of the Drosophila Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] gene. Deletion studies of the RBP-J kappa and Su(H) proteins allowed

  5. KEK-IMSS Slow Positron Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyodo, T; Wada, K; Yagishita, A; Kosuge, T; Saito, Y; Kurihara, T; Kikuchi, T; Shirakawa, A; Sanami, T; Ikeda, M; Ohsawa, S; Kakihara, K; Shidara, T, E-mail: toshio.hyodo@kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    The Slow Positron Facility at the Institute of Material Structure Science (IMSS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam produced by a dedicated 55MeV linac. The present beam line branches have been used for the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) measurements, the transmission positron microscope (TPM) and the photo-detachment of Ps negative ions (Ps{sup -}). During the year 2010, a reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) measurement station is going to be installed. The slow positron generator (converter/ moderator) system will be modified to get a higher slow positron intensity, and a new user-friendly beam line power-supply control and vacuum monitoring system is being developed. Another plan for this year is the transfer of a {sup 22}Na-based slow positron beam from RIKEN. This machine will be used for the continuous slow positron beam applications and for the orientation training of those who are interested in beginning researches with a slow positron beam.

  6. DNA Binding Drugs Targeting the Regulatory DNA Binding Site of the ETS Domain Family Transcription Factor Associated With Human Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Yong-Dong

    1999-01-01

    .... The key approach is to prevent the binding of two transcription factors, ESX and AP-2, to the consensus DNA binding sites contained within the Her2/neu promoter resulting in inhibition of transcription factor function...

  7. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-01-01

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed to differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator-1 (PGC-1α) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.

  8. In vitro inhibition of enterobacteria-reactive CD4+Tumor necrosis factor-alpha binding capacity and anti-infliximab antibodies measured by fluid-phase radioimmunoassays as predictors of clinical efficacy of infliximab in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangano, K.; Sardesai, N.; D'Alcamo, M.

    2008-01-01

    VGX-1027 is an isozaxoline compound that has recently been found to primarily target the function of murine macrophages but not of T cells, inhibiting secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in response to different Toll-like receptor agonists in vitro and in vivo. The well-defined role...

  9. The cryogenic source of slow monochromatic positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshkov, I.N.; Pavlov, V.N.; Sidorin, A.O.; Yakovenko, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    The cryogenic source of slow monochromatic positrons based on the 22 Na isotope has been designed and constructed at JINR. Positrons emitted from radioactive source 22 Na have a very broad energy spectrum up to 0.5 MeV. To generate monochromatic beam of slow positrons the solid neon is used as a moderator. The solid neon allows forming slow positron beam of the energy of 1.2 eV at the spectrum width of 1 eV. The efficiency of moderation is 1 % of total positron flux

  10. Dystonia Associated with Idiopathic Slow Orthostatic Tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Kobylecki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: We aimed to characterize the clinical and electrophysiological features of patients with slow orthostatic tremor.Case Report: The clinical and neurophysiological data of patients referred for lower limb tremor on standing were reviewed. Patients with symptomatic or primary orthostatic tremor were excluded. Eight patients were identified with idiopathic slow 4–8 Hz orthostatic tremor, which was associated with tremor and dystonia in cervical and upper limb musculature. Coherence analysis in two patients showed findings different to those seen in primary orthostatic tremor.Discussion: Slow orthostatic tremor may be associated with dystonia and dystonic tremor.

  11. Revealing the cluster of slow transients behind a large slow slip event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, William B; Rousset, Baptiste; Lasserre, Cécile; Campillo, Michel

    2018-05-01

    Capable of reaching similar magnitudes to large megathrust earthquakes [ M w (moment magnitude) > 7], slow slip events play a major role in accommodating tectonic motion on plate boundaries through predominantly aseismic rupture. We demonstrate here that large slow slip events are a cluster of short-duration slow transients. Using a dense catalog of low-frequency earthquakes as a guide, we investigate the M w 7.5 slow slip event that occurred in 2006 along the subduction interface 40 km beneath Guerrero, Mexico. We show that while the long-period surface displacement, as recorded by Global Positioning System, suggests a 6-month duration, the motion in the direction of tectonic release only sporadically occurs over 55 days, and its surface signature is attenuated by rapid relocking of the plate interface. Our proposed description of slow slip as a cluster of slow transients forces us to re-evaluate our understanding of the physics and scaling of slow earthquakes.

  12. Synergy between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis HupB is essential for high-affinity binding, DNA supercoiling and inhibition of RecA-promoted strand exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharadamma, N; Khan, Krishnendu; Kumar, Sandeep; Patil, K Neelakanteshwar; Hasnain, Seyed E; Muniyappa, K

    2011-09-01

    The occurrence of DNA architectural proteins containing two functional domains derived from two different architectural proteins is an interesting emerging research theme in the field of nucleoid structure and function. Mycobacterium tuberculosis HupB, unlike Escherichia coli HU, is a two-domain protein that, in the N-terminal region, shows broad sequence homology with bacterial HU. The long C-terminal extension, on the other hand, contains seven PAKK/KAAK motifs, which are characteristic of the histone H1/H5 family of proteins. In this article, we describe several aspects of HupB function, in comparison with its truncated derivatives lacking either the C-terminus or N-terminus. We found that HupB binds a variety of DNA repair and replication intermediates with K(d) values in the nanomolar range. By contrast, the N-terminal fragment of M. tuberculosis HupB (HupB(MtbN)) showed diminished DNA-binding activity, with K(d) values in the micromolar range, and the C-terminal domain was completely devoid of DNA-binding activity. Unlike HupB(MtbN) , HupB was able to constrain DNA in negative supercoils and introduce negative superhelical turns into relaxed DNA. Similarly, HupB exerted a robust inhibitory effect on DNA strand exchange promoted by cognate and noncognate RecA proteins, whereas HupB(MtbN), even at a 50-fold molar excess, had no inhibitory effect. Considered together, these results suggest that synergy between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of HupB is essential for its DNA-binding ability, and to modulate the topological features of DNA, which has implications for processes such as DNA compaction, gene regulation, homologous recombination, and DNA repair. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  13. IGF binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Leon A

    2017-12-18

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) 1-6 bind IGFs but not insulin with high affinity. They were initially identified as serum carriers and passive inhibitors of IGF actions. However, subsequent studies showed that, although IGFBPs inhibit IGF actions in many circumstances, they may also potentiate these actions. IGFBPs are widely expressed in most tissues, and they are flexible endocrine and autocrine/paracrine regulators of IGF activity, which is essential for this important physiological system. More recently, individual IGFBPs have been shown to have IGF-independent actions. Mechanisms underlying these actions include (i) interaction with non-IGF proteins in compartments including the extracellular space and matrix, the cell surface and intracellularly; (ii) interaction with and modulation of other growth factor pathways including EGF, TGF- and VEGF; and (iii) direct or indirect transcriptional effects following nuclear entry of IGFBPs. Through these IGF-dependent and IGF-independent actions, IGFBPs modulate essential cellular processes including proliferation, survival, migration, senescence, autophagy and angiogenesis. They have been implicated in a range of disorders including malignant, metabolic, neurological and immune diseases. A more complete understanding of their cellular roles may lead to the development of novel IGFBP-based therapeutic opportunities.

  14. VERY SLOW SPEED AXIAL MOTION RELUCTANCE MOTOR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    1984-09-01

    Sep 1, 1984 ... VERY SLOW SPEED AXIAL MOTION RELUCTANCE MOTOR by. L. A. Agu ... order as that of the screw-thread motor can be obtained. LIST OF .... The n stator have equal non- magnetic spacers .... induction motor. An.

  15. Slow and Fast Light, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In response to the NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program 2015 Phase I Solicitation S3.08: Slow and Fast Light, Torch Technologies in partnership...

  16. Experimental demonstration of spinor slow light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meng-Jung; Ruseckas, Julius; Lee, Chin-Yuan; Kudriašov, Viačeslav; Chang, Kao-Fang; Cho, Hung-Wen; JuzeliÅ«nas, Gediminas; Yu, Ite A.

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decade there has been a continuing interest in slow and stored light based on the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) effect, because of their potential applications in quantum information manipulation. However, previous experimental works all dealt with the single-component slow light which cannot be employed as a qubit. In this work, we report the first experimental demonstration of two-component or spinor slow light (SSL) using a double tripod (DT) atom-light coupling scheme. The oscillations between the two components, similar to the Rabi oscillation of a two-level system or a qubit, were observed. Single-photon SSL can be considered as two-color qubits. We experimentally demonstrated a possible application of the DT scheme as quantum memory and quantum rotator for the two-color qubits. This work opens up a new direction in the slow light research.

  17. Elastic scattering of slow positrons by helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.; Cherepkov, N.A.; Chernysheva, L.V.; Shapiro, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    The s-, p-, d- and f-wave phaseshifts for elastic scattering of slow positrons by He are calculated using a simplified version of the random phase approximation with exchange, with virtual positronium formation effect taken into account. (author)

  18. A tilted transversely isotropic slowness surface approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Stovas, A.; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2012-01-01

    for the vertical slowness that is highly accurate for all practical purposes. It also reveals some insights into the anisotropy parameter dependency of the dispersion relation including the low impact that the anelliptic parameter has on the vertical placement

  19. Frequency response of slow beam extraction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Takeshi; Sato, Hikaru; Marutsuka, Katsumi; Shirakata, Masashi.

    1994-01-01

    A servo control system has been incorporated into the practical slow extraction system in order to stabilize the spill structure less than a few kHz. Frequency responses of the components of the servo-spill control system and the open-loop frequency response were measured. The beam transfer function of the slow extraction process was derived from the measured data and approximated using a simple function. This is utilized to improve the performance of the servo-loop. (author)

  20. Slow potentials in a melody recognition task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verleger, R; Schellberg, D

    1990-01-01

    In a previous study, slow negative shifts were found in the EEG of subjects listening to well-known melodies. The two experiments reported here were designed to investigate the variables to which these slow potentials are related. In the first experiment, two opposite hypotheses were tested: The slow shifts might express subjects' acquaintance with the melodies or, on the contrary, the effort invested to identify them. To this end, some of the melodies were presented in the rhythms of other melodies to make recognition more difficult. Further, melodies rated as very well-known and as very unknown were analysed separately. However, the slow shifts were not affected by these experimental variations. Therefore in the second experiment, on the one hand the purely physical parameters intensity and duration were varied, but this variation had no impact on the slow shifts either. On the other hand, recognition was made more difficult by monotonously repeating the pitch of the 4th tone for the rest of some melodies. The slow negative shifts were enhanced with these monotonous melodies. This enhancement supports the "effort" hypothesis. Accordingly, the ofter shifts obtained in both experiments might likewise reflect effort. But since the task was not demanding, it is suggested that these constant shifts reflect the effort invested for coping with the entire underarousing situation rather than with the task. Frequently, slow eye movements occurred in the same time range as the slow potentials, resulting in EOG potentials spreading to the EEG recording sites. Yet results did not change substantially when the EEG recordings were corrected for the influence of EOG potentials.

  1. Human milk glycoconjugates that inhibit pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburg, D S

    1999-02-01

    Breast-fed infants have lower incidence of diarrhea, respiratory disease, and otitis media. The protection by human milk has long been attributed to the presence of secretory IgA. However, human milk contains large numbers and amounts of complex carbohydrates, including glycoproteins, glycolipids, glycosaminoglycans, mucins, and especially oligosaccharides. The oligosaccharides comprise the third most abundant solid constituent of human milk, and contain a myriad of structures. Complex carbohydrate moieties of glycoconjugates and oligosaccharides are synthesized by the many glycosyltransferases in the mammary gland; those with homology to cell surface glycoconjugate pathogen receptors may inhibit pathogen binding, thereby protecting the nursing infant. Several examples are reviewed: A fucosyloligosaccharide inhibits the diarrheagenic effect of stable toxin of Escherichia coli. A different fucosyloligosaccharide inhibits infection by Campylobacter jejuni. Binding of Streptococcus pneumoniae and of enteropathogenic E. coli to their respective receptors is inhibited by human milk oligosaccharides. The 46-kD glycoprotein, lactadherin, inhibits rotavirus binding and infectivity. Low levels of lactadherin in human milk are associated with a higher incidence of symptomatic rotavirus in breast-fed infants. A mannosylated glycopeptide inhibits binding by enterohemorrhagic E. coli. A glycosaminoglycan inhibits binding of gp120 to CD4, the first step in HIV infection. Human milk mucin inhibits binding by S-fimbriated E. coli. The ganglioside, GM1, reduces diarrhea production by cholera toxin and labile toxin of E. coli. The neutral glycosphingolipid, Gb3, binds to Shigatoxin. Thus, many complex carbohydrates of human milk may be novel antipathogenic agents, and the milk glycoconjugates and oligosaccharides may be a major source of protection for breastfeeding infants.

  2. Effects of heparin on insulin binding and biological activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriauciunas, K.M.; Grigorescu, F.; Kahn, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of heparin, a polyanionic glycosaminoglycan known to alter the function of many proteins, on insulin binding and bioactivity was studied. Cultured human lymphocytes (IM-9) were incubated with varying concentrations of heparin, then extensively washed, and 125 I-labeled insulin binding was measured. Heparin at concentrations used clinically for anticoagulation (1-50 U/ml) inhibited binding in a dose-dependent manner; 50% inhibition of binding occurred with 5-10 U/ml. Scatchard analysis indicated that the decrease in binding was due to a decrease in both the affinity and the apparent number of available insulin receptors. The effect occurred within 10 min at 22 degrees C and persisted even after the cells were extensively washed. Inhibition of insulin binding also occurred when cells were preincubated with heparinized plasma or heparinized serum but not when cells were incubated with normal serum or plasma from blood anticoagulated with EDTA. By contrast, other polyanions and polycations, e.g., poly-L-glutamic acid, poly-L-lysine, succinylated poly-L-lysine, and histone, did not inhibit binding. Heparin also inhibited insulin binding in Epstein-Barr (EB) virus-transformed lymphocytes but had no effect on insulin binding to isolated adipocytes, human erythrocytes, or intact hepatoma cells. When isolated adipocytes were incubated with heparin, there was a dose-dependent inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation and, to a lesser extent, of basal glucose oxidation. Although heparin has no effect on insulin binding to intact hepatoma cells, heparin inhibited both insulin binding and insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation in receptors solubilized from these cells

  3. Human GIP(3-30)NH inhibits G protein-dependent as well as G protein-independent signaling and is selective for the GIP receptor with high-affinity binding to primate but not rodent GIP receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabe, Maria Buur Nordskov; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Pedersen, Mie Fabricius

    2018-01-01

    using human125I-GIP(3-30)NH2. The selectivity of human GIP(3-30)NH2was examined by testing for agonistic and antagonistic properties on 62 human GPCRs. Human GIP(3-30)NH2inhibited GIP(1-42)-induced cAMP and β-arrestin 1 and 2 recruitment on the human GIPR and Schild plot analysis showed competitive...... in transfected cells as well as in human adipocytes....

  4. 3-(imidazo[1,2-a:5,4-b']dipyridin-2-yl)aniline inhibits pestivirus replication by targeting a hot spot drug binding pocket in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiu, Simone; Leyssen, Pieter; Froeyen, Mathy; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Neyts, Johan; Paeshuyse, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The compound 3-(imidazo[1,2-a:5,4-b']dipyridin-2-yl)aniline (CF02334) was identified as a selective inhibitor of the cytopathic effect (CPE) caused by bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in a virus-cell-based assay. The EC50-values for inhibition of CPE, viral RNA synthesis and the production of infectious virus progeny were 13.0 ± 0.6 μM, 2.6 ± 0.9 μM and 17.8 ± 0.6 μM, respectively. CF02334 was found to be inactive in the hepatitis C subgenomic replicon system. CF02334-resistant BVDV was obtained and was found to carry the N264D mutation in the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). Molecular modeling revealed that N264D is located in a small cavity near the fingertip domain of the pestivirus polymerase. CF02334-resistant BVDV was proven to be cross-resistant to BPIP, AG110 and LZ37, inhibitors that have previously been described to target the same region of the BVDV RdRp. CF02334 did not inhibit the in vitro activity of recombinant BVDV RdRp, but did inhibit the activity of BVDV replication complexes. Taken together, these observations indicate that CF02334 likely interacts with the fingertip of the pestivirus RdRp at the same position as BPIP, AG110 and LZ37, which marks this region of the viral polymerase as a "hot spot" for inhibition of pestivirus replication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The amphiphilic peptide adenoregulin enhances agonist binding to A1-adenosine receptors and [35S]GTP gamma S to brain membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, R W; Romero, F S; Daly, J W

    1995-08-01

    1. Adenoregulin is an amphilic peptide isolated from skin mucus of the tree frog, Phyllomedusa bicolor. Synthetic adenoregulin enhanced the binding of agonists to several G-protein-coupled receptors in rat brain membranes. 2. The maximal enhancement of agonist binding, and in parentheses, the concentration of adenoregulin affording maximal enhancement were as follows: 60% (20 microM) for A1-adenosine receptors, 30% (100 microM) for A2a-adenosine receptors, 20% (2 microM) for alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, and 30% (10 microM) for 5HT1A receptors. High affinity agonist binding for A1-, alpha 2-, and 5HT1A-receptors was virtually abolished by GTP gamma S in the presence of adenoregulin, but was only partially abolished in its absence. Magnesium ions increased the binding of agonists to receptors and reduced the enhancement elicited by adenoregulin. 3. The effect of adenoregulin on binding of N6-cyclohexyladenosine ([3H]CHA) to A1-receptors was relatively slow and was irreversible. Adenoregulin increased the Bmax value for [3H]CHA binding sites, and the proportion of high affinity states, and slowed the rate of [3H]CHA dissociation. Binding of the A1-selective antagonist, [3H]DPCPX, was maximally enhanced by only 13% at 2 microM adenoregulin. Basal and A1-adenosine receptor-stimulated binding of [35S]GTP gamma S were maximally enhanced 45% and 23%, respectively, by 50 microM adenoregulin. In CHAPS-solubilized memb