WorldWideScience

Sample records for sloshing

  1. Liquid Sloshing Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Raouf A.

    2005-06-01

    The problem of liquid sloshing in moving or stationary containers remains of great concern to aerospace, civil, and nuclear engineers; physicists; designers of road tankers and ship tankers; and mathematicians. Beginning with the fundamentals of liquid sloshing theory, this book takes the reader systematically from basic theory to advanced analytical and experimental results in a self-contained and coherent format. The book is divided into four sections. Part I deals with the theory of linear liquid sloshing dynamics; Part II addresses the nonlinear theory of liquid sloshing dynamics, Faraday waves, and sloshing impacts; Part III presents the problem of linear and nonlinear interaction of liquid sloshing dynamics with elastic containers and supported structures; and Part IV considers the fluid dynamics in spinning containers and microgravity sloshing. This book will be invaluable to researchers and graduate students in mechanical and aeronautical engineering, designers of liquid containers, and applied mathematicians.

  2. Getting Sloshed in Outer Space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 12. Getting Sloshed in Outer Space - Liquid Behavior in Microgravity. N Ananthkrishnan. General Article Volume 12 Issue 12 December 2007 pp 40-45. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Sloshing behaviors in liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choun, Young Sun; Yoo, Bong; Lee, Jae Han

    1998-04-01

    It is very difficult to predict sloshing response in the LMFBR which contains many internal components, since the sloshing response of a coolant depends not only upon the frequency contents of input ground motion, but also upon the configuration of reactor vessel and internal components, arrangement of internal components, and excitation direction of ground motion. Therefore, clear understanding of sloshing in the reactor vessel and development of proper technologies to predict sloshing response are necessary to establish the safety of the LMFBR against earthquake. The purpose of this report is to review sloshing behaviors in the LMFBR for the clear understanding of sloshing characteristics and to propose some interesting topics to be studied in future. (author). 34 refs., 12 tabs., 50 figs

  4. Sloshing impact in roofed tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uras, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    A large number of high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks exists in various tank farms. Seismic activities at those locations may cause significant sloshing in HLW tanks. These tanks are covered to avoid any spilling during large amplitude earthquakes. However, large amplitude sloshing may result in impact on the cover or the roof of the tank. Hence, a better understanding of the impact phenomenon is necessary to assess the safety of the tanks currently in existence, and to establish design guidelines for future designs. A pressure based formulation is derived to model sloshing impact in roared tanks. It is incorporated into Argonne's in-house finite element code FLUSTR-ANL. A numerical test case with a harmonic input excitation is studied. The simulation results indicate that linear behavior is preserved beyond the first impact, and some mesh distortion is observed following a stronger second impact. During the impact, the displacement of the contacting surface nodes remains constant, and the velocities are reduced to zero. An identification of impacting nodes is possible from the dynamic pressures induced in surface elements

  5. Sloshing impact in roofed tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uras, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    A large number of high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks exists in various tank farms. Seismic activities at those locations may cause significant sloshing in HLW tanks. These tanks are covered to avoid any spilling during large amplitude earthquakes. However, large amplitude sloshing may result in impact on the cover or the roof of the tank. Hence, a better understanding of the impact phenomenon is necessary to assess the safety of the tanks currently in existence, and to establish design guidelines for future designs. A pressure based formulation is derived to model sloshing impact in roofed tanks. It is incorporated into Argonne's in-house finite element code FLUSTR-ANL. A numerical test case with a harmonic input excitation is studied. The simulation results indicate that linear behavior is preserved beyond the first impact, and some mesh distortion is observed following a stronger second impact. During the impact, the displacement of the contacting surface nodes remains constant, and the velocities are reduced to zero. An identification of impacting nodes is possible from the dynamic pressures induced in surface elements

  6. Sloshing response of a reactor tank with internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

    1984-01-01

    The sloshing response of a large reactor tank with in-tank components is presented. The study indicates that the presence of the internal components can significantly change the dynamic characteristics of the sloshing motion. The sloshing frequency of a tank with internals is considerably higher than that of a tank without internal. The higher sloshing frequency reduces the sloshing wave height on the free-surface but increases the dynamic pressure in the fluid

  7. Damping of liquid sloshing by foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauret, A.; Boulogne, F.; Cappello, J.; Dressaire, E.; Stone, H. A.

    2015-02-01

    When a container is set in motion, the free surface of the liquid starts to oscillate or slosh. Such effects can be observed when a glass of water is handled carelessly and the fluid sloshes or even spills over the rims of the container. However, beer does not slosh as readily as water, which suggests that foam could be used to damp sloshing. In this work, we study experimentally the effect on sloshing of a liquid foam placed on top of a liquid bath. We generate a monodisperse two-dimensional liquid foam in a rectangular container and track the motion of the foam. The influence of the foam on the sloshing dynamics is experimentally characterized: only a few layers of bubbles are sufficient to significantly damp the oscillations. We rationalize our experimental findings with a model that describes the foam contribution to the damping coefficient through viscous dissipation on the walls of the container. Then we extend our study to confined three-dimensional liquid foam and observe that the behavior of 2D and confined 3D systems are very similar. Thus, we conclude that only the bubbles close to the walls have a significant impact on the dissipation of energy. The possibility to damp liquid sloshing using foam is promising in numerous industrial applications such as the transport of liquefied gas in tankers or for propellants in rocket engines.

  8. Propellant Slosh Force and Mass Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Hunt

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used electrical capacitance tomography (ECT to instrument a demonstration tank containing kerosene and have successfully demonstrated that ECT can, in real time, (i measure propellant mass to better than 1% of total in a range of gravity fields, (ii image propellant distribution, and (iii accurately track propellant centre of mass (CoM. We have shown that the ability to track CoM enables the determination of slosh forces, and we argue that this will result in disruptive changes in a propellant tank design and use in a spacecraft. Ground testing together with real-time slosh force data will allow an improved tank design to minimize and mitigate slosh forces, while at the same time keeping the tank mass to a minimum. Fully instrumented Smart Tanks will be able to provide force vector inputs to a spacecraft inertial navigation system; this in turn will (i eliminate or reduce navigational errors, (ii reduce wait time for uncertain slosh settling, since actual slosh forces will be known, and (iii simplify slosh control hardware, hence reducing overall mass. ECT may be well suited to space borne liquid measurement applications. Measurements are independent of and unaffected by orientation or levels of g. The electronics and sensor arrays can be low in mass, and critically, the technique does not dissipate heat into the propellant, which makes it intrinsically safe and suitable for cryogenic liquids. Because of the limitations of operating in earth-bound gravity, it has not been possible to check the exact numerical accuracy of the slosh force acting on the vessel. We are therefore in the process of undertaking a further project to (i build a prototype integrated “Smart Tank for Space”, (ii undertake slosh tests in zero or microgravity, (iii develop the system for commercial ground testing, and (iv qualify ECT for use in space.

  9. Coupled Simulation of Vehicle Dynamics and Tank Slosh. Phase 1 Report. Testing and Validation of Tank Slosh Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wendel, Glenn

    2002-01-01

    .... Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis software is available that can predict fluid slosh, however, the use of this software in accurately predicting fluid slosh for a military vehicle application has not been...

  10. Fluid structure interaction with sloshing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belytschko, T.B.; Liu, W.K.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, three different formulations for fluid-structure interaction with sloshing are discussed. When the surface displacements are large, the problems are nonlinear, and Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) methods and direct time integration are most appropriate. Explicit direct time integration has the disadvantage of a limited time-step whereas implicit method has the disadvantage of nonconvergence and high computational cost. A mixed time method which employs E-mE (explicit-multiple explicit) integration for obtaining the velocity and free surface displacement and I-mI (implicit-multiple implicit) integration for obtaining the pressure is described. An iterative solution procedure is used to enhance the efficiency of the implicit solution procedure as well as to reduce the computer storage. For linear problems, the surface wave effects can be approximated by a perturbation method on the body force term if the surface displacements are small. Furthermore, if the fluid can be idealized as inviscid, incompressible and irrotational, the pressure, velocity, and free surface displacement variables can be eliminated via a velocity potential formulation. (orig.)

  11. Parameter Estimation of Spacecraft Fuel Slosh Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangadharan, Sathya; Sudermann, James; Marlowe, Andrea; Njengam Charles

    2004-01-01

    Fuel slosh in the upper stages of a spinning spacecraft during launch has been a long standing concern for the success of a space mission. Energy loss through the movement of the liquid fuel in the fuel tank affects the gyroscopic stability of the spacecraft and leads to nutation (wobble) which can cause devastating control issues. The rate at which nutation develops (defined by Nutation Time Constant (NTC can be tedious to calculate and largely inaccurate if done during the early stages of spacecraft design. Pure analytical means of predicting the influence of onboard liquids have generally failed. A strong need exists to identify and model the conditions of resonance between nutation motion and liquid modes and to understand the general characteristics of the liquid motion that causes the problem in spinning spacecraft. A 3-D computerized model of the fuel slosh that accounts for any resonant modes found in the experimental testing will allow for increased accuracy in the overall modeling process. Development of a more accurate model of the fuel slosh currently lies in a more generalized 3-D computerized model incorporating masses, springs and dampers. Parameters describing the model include the inertia tensor of the fuel, spring constants, and damper coefficients. Refinement and understanding the effects of these parameters allow for a more accurate simulation of fuel slosh. The current research will focus on developing models of different complexity and estimating the model parameters that will ultimately provide a more realistic prediction of Nutation Time Constant obtained through simulation.

  12. Axisymmetric MHD stable sloshing ion distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Dominguez, N.; Roslyakov, G.V.

    1986-07-01

    The MHD stability of a sloshing ion distribution is investigated in a symmetric mirror cell. Fokker-Planck calculations show that stable configurations are possible for ion injection energies that are at least 150 times greater than the electron temperture. Special axial magnetic field profiles are suggested to optimize the favorable MHD properties

  13. Non-Linear Slosh Damping Model Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Propellant tank slosh dynamics are typically represented by a mechanical model of spring mass damper. This mechanical model is then included in the equation of motion of the entire vehicle for Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) analysis. For a partially-filled smooth wall propellant tank, the critical damping based on classical empirical correlation is as low as 0.05%. Due to this low value of damping, propellant slosh is potential sources of disturbance critical to the stability of launch and space vehicles. It is postulated that the commonly quoted slosh damping is valid only under the linear regime where the slosh amplitude is small. With the increase of slosh amplitude, the critical damping value should also increase. If this nonlinearity can be verified and validated, the slosh stability margin can be significantly improved, and the level of conservatism maintained in the GN&C analysis can be lessened. The purpose of this study is to explore and to quantify the dependence of slosh damping with slosh amplitude. Accurately predicting the extremely low damping value of a smooth wall tank is very challenging for any Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool. One must resolve thin boundary layers near the wall and limit numerical damping to minimum. This computational study demonstrates that with proper grid resolution, CFD can indeed accurately predict the low damping physics from smooth walls under the linear regime. Comparisons of extracted damping values with experimental data for different tank sizes show very good agreements. Numerical simulations confirm that slosh damping is indeed a function of slosh amplitude. When slosh amplitude is low, the damping ratio is essentially constant, which is consistent with the empirical correlation. Once the amplitude reaches a critical value, the damping ratio becomes a linearly increasing function of the slosh amplitude. A follow-on experiment validated the developed nonlinear damping relationship. This discovery can

  14. Mechanical Slosh Models for Rocket-Propelled Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jiann-Woei; Alaniz, Abram; Yang, Lee; Powers. Joseph; Hall, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Several analytical mechanical slosh models for a cylindrical tank with flat bottom are reviewed. Even though spacecrafts use cylinder shaped tanks, most of those tanks usually have elliptical domes. To extend the application of the analytical models for a cylindrical tank with elliptical domes, the modified slosh parameter models are proposed in this report by mapping an elliptical dome cylindrical tank to a flat top/bottom cylindrical tank while maintaining the equivalent liquid volume. For the low Bond number case, the low-g slosh models were also studied. Those low-g models can be used for Bond number > 10. The current low-g slosh models were also modified to extend their applications for the case that liquid height is smaller than the tank radius. All modified slosh models are implemented in MATLAB m-functions and are collected in the developed MST (Mechanical Slosh Toolbox).

  15. Validation of Slosh Modeling Approach Using STAR-CCM+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, David J.; Ng, Wanyi

    2018-01-01

    Without an adequate understanding of propellant slosh, the spacecraft attitude control system may be inadequate to control the spacecraft or there may be an unexpected loss of science observation time due to higher slosh settling times. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used to model propellant slosh. STAR-CCM+ is a commercially available CFD code. This paper seeks to validate the CFD modeling approach via a comparison between STAR-CCM+ liquid slosh modeling results and experimental, empirically, and analytically derived results. The geometries examined are a bare right cylinder tank and a right cylinder with a single ring baffle.

  16. Sloshing analysis of viscous liquid storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uras, R.Z.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of viscosity on the sloshing response of tanks containing viscous liquids is studied using the in-house finite element computer code, FLUSTR-ANL. Two different tank sizes each filled at two levels, are modeled, and their dynamic responses under harmonic and seismic ground motions are simulated. The results are presented in terms of the wave height, and pressures at selected nodes and elements in the finite element mesh. The viscosity manifests itself as a damping effect, reducing the amplitudes. Under harmonic excitation, the dynamic response reaches the steady-state faster as the viscosity value becomes larger. The fundamental sloshing frequency for each study case stays virtually unaffected by an increase in viscosity. For the small tank case, a 5% difference is observed in the fundamental frequency of the smallest (1 cP) and the highest (1000 cP) viscosity cases considered in this study. The fundamental frequencies of the large tank are even less sensitive

  17. Validity of Miles Equation in Predicting Propellant Slosh Damping in Baffled Tanks at Variable Slosh Amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2018-01-01

    Determination of slosh damping is a very challenging task as there is no analytical solution. The damping physics involves the vorticity dissipation which requires the full solution of the nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations. As a result, previous investigations were mainly carried out by extensive experiments. A systematical study is needed to understand the damping physics of baffled tanks, to identify the difference between the empirical Miles equation and experimental measurements, and to develop new semi-empirical relations to better represent the real damping physics. The approach of this study is to use Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technology to shed light on the damping mechanisms of a baffled tank. First, a 1-D Navier-Stokes equation representing different length scales and time scales in the baffle damping physics is developed and analyzed. Loci-STREAM-VOF, a well validated CFD solver developed at NASA MSFC, is applied to study the vorticity field around a baffle and around the fluid-gas interface to highlight the dissipation mechanisms at different slosh amplitudes. Previous measurement data is then used to validate the CFD damping results. The study found several critical parameters controlling fluid damping from a baffle: local slosh amplitude to baffle thickness (A/t), surface liquid depth to tank radius (d/R), local slosh amplitude to baffle width (A/W); and non-dimensional slosh frequency. The simulation highlights three significant damping regimes where different mechanisms dominate. The study proves that the previously found discrepancies between Miles equation and experimental measurement are not due to the measurement scatter, but rather due to different damping mechanisms at various slosh amplitudes. The limitations on the use of Miles equation are discussed based on the flow regime.

  18. Sloshing of coolant in a seismically isolated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.S.; Guildys, J.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    During a seismic event, the liquid coolant inside the reactor vessel has sloshing motion which is a low-frequency phenomenon. In a reactor system incorporated with seismic isolation, the isolation frequency usually is also very low. There is concern on the potential amplification of sloshing motion of the liquid coolant. This study investigates the effects of seismic isolation on the sloshing of liquid coolant inside the reactor vessel of a liquid metal cooled reactor. Based on a synthetic ground motion whose response spectra envelop those specified by the NRC Regulator Guide 1.60, it is found that the maximum sloshing wave height increases from 18 in. to almost 30 in. when the system is seismically isolated. Since higher sloshing wave may introduce severe impact forces and thermal shocks to the reactor closure and other components within the reactor vessel, adequate design considerations should be made either to suppress the wave height or to reduce the effects caused by high waves

  19. Microstability of the sloshing ions in TMX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzins, L.V.

    1988-03-01

    We have measured the microstability of the sloshing ions in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). This is the first experimental measurement of the microstability of a sloshing-ion distribution. We found that the sloshing ions were unstable to the drift cyclotron loss-cone instability. This instability was driven at the outer turning-point of the sloshing ions. We compare the experimental observations with the theoretical predictions for the drift cyclotron loss-cone instability. It is on the basis of these comparisons that we identify this instability as the drift cyclotron loss-cone intability. This instability affected the lifetime of the sloshing ions. We compare the observed scaling of the sloshing-ion lifetime with the amplitude of the instability to the results of a quasilinear theory where ion trapping is important. We show that this instability can be stabilized by two diferent cold-ion populations in TMX-U. We observe warm plasma stabilization of the instability by the cold ion endlosses. The amoun of stream necessary to stabilize the instability is consistent with the theory for the drift cyclotron loss-cone instability. We also show that warm ions trapped at the midplane can stabilize this instability, even though the instability is driven at a location removed from the midplane. This is the first experimental verification of the stabilizign effect of trapped ions for a sloshing-ion distribution. 125 refs., 33 figs

  20. A weakly compressible formulation for modelling liquid-gas sloshing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heyns, Johan A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the development and extension of free-surface modelling techniques with the purpose of improving the modelling accuracy for liquid-gas sloshing. Considering high density ratio fluids under low Mach number conditions...

  1. Experimental, Numerical, and Analytical Slosh Dynamics of Water and Liquid Nitrogen in a Spherical Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Jedediah Morse

    2016-01-01

    Understanding, predicting, and controlling fluid slosh dynamics is critical to safety and improving performance of space missions when a significant percentage of the spacecraft's mass is a liquid. Computational fluid dynamics simulations can be used to predict the dynamics of slosh, but these programs require extensive validation. Many experimental and numerical studies of water slosh have been conducted. However, slosh data for cryogenic liquids is lacking. Water and cryogenic liquid nitrogen are used in various ground-based tests with a spherical tank to characterize damping, slosh mode frequencies, and slosh forces. A single ring baffle is installed in the tank for some of the tests. Analytical models for slosh modes, slosh forces, and baffle damping are constructed based on prior work. Select experiments are simulated using a commercial CFD software, and the numerical results are compared to the analytical and experimental results for the purposes of validation and methodology-improvement.

  2. Fluid management technology: Liquid slosh dynamics and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Franklin T.; Green, Steven T.; Kana, Daniel D.

    1991-11-01

    Flight experiments were defined for the Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot Storage, Acquisition and Transfer Satellite (COLD-SAT) test bed satellite and the Shuttle middeck to help establish the influence of the gravitational environment on liquid slosh dynamics and control. Several analytical and experimental studies were also conducted to support the experiments and to help understand the anticipated results. Both FLOW-3D and NASA-VOF3D computer codes were utilized to simulate low Bond number, small amplitude sloshing, for which the motions are dominated by surface forces; it was found that neither code provided a satisfactory simulation. Thus, a new analysis of low Bond number sloshing was formulated, using an integral minimization technique that will allow the assumptions made about surface physics phenomena to be modified easily when better knowledge becomes available from flight experiments. Several examples were computed by the innovative use of a finite-element structural code. An existing spherical-pendulum analogy of nonlinear, rotary sloshing was also modified for easier use and extended to low-gravity conditions. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the requirements for liquid-vapor interface sensors as a method of resolving liquid surface motions in flight experiments. The feasibility of measuring the small slosh forces anticipated in flight experiments was also investigated.

  3. Sloshing analysis of tanks containing multiple fluid layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uras, R.A.; Tang, Yu.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of liquid density changes in high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks is studied. The density variations with the liquid depth is modeled by layers of piece wise constant densities. A computational formulation based on the finite element method is presented. The computer code FLUSTR-ANL has been modified for the analysis of the sloshing response under seismic excitation

  4. Analytical and Numerical Studies of Sloshing in Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solaas, F

    1996-12-31

    For oil cargo ship tanks and liquid natural gas carriers, the dimensions of the tanks are often such that the highest resonant sloshing periods and the ship motions are in the same period range, which may cause violent resonant sloshing of the liquid. In this doctoral thesis, linear and non-linear analytical potential theory solutions of the sloshing problem are studied for a two-dimensional rectangular tank and a vertical circular cylindrical tank, using perturbation technique for the non-linear case. The tank is forced to oscillate harmonically with small amplitudes of sway with frequency in the vicinity of the lowest natural frequency of the fluid inside the tank. The method is extended to other tank shapes using a combined analytical and numerical method. A boundary element numerical method is used to determine the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the problem. These are used in the non-linear analytical free surface conditions, and the velocity potential and free surface elevation for each boundary value problem in the perturbation scheme are determined by the boundary element method. Both the analytical method and the combined analytical and numerical method are restricted to tanks with vertical walls in the free surface. The suitability of a commercial programme, FLOW-3D, to estimate sloshing is studied. It solves the Navier-Stokes equations by the finite difference method. The free surface as function of time is traced using the fractional volume of fluid method. 59 refs., 54 figs., 37 tabs.

  5. A modal method for finite amplitude, nonlinear sloshing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A modal method is used to calculate the two-dimensional sloshing motion of an inviscid liquid in a rectangular container. The full nonlinear problem is reduced to the solution of a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations for the time varying coefficients in the expansions of the interface and the potential. The effects ...

  6. A modal method for finite amplitude, nonlinear sloshing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A modal method is used to calculate the two-dimensional sloshing motion of an inviscid liquid in a rectangular container. The full nonlinear problem is reduced to the solution of a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations for the time varying coefficients in the expansions of the interface and the potential.

  7. Analytical and Numerical Studies of Sloshing in Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solaas, F.

    1995-12-31

    For oil cargo ship tanks and liquid natural gas carriers, the dimensions of the tanks are often such that the highest resonant sloshing periods and the ship motions are in the same period range, which may cause violent resonant sloshing of the liquid. In this doctoral thesis, linear and non-linear analytical potential theory solutions of the sloshing problem are studied for a two-dimensional rectangular tank and a vertical circular cylindrical tank, using perturbation technique for the non-linear case. The tank is forced to oscillate harmonically with small amplitudes of sway with frequency in the vicinity of the lowest natural frequency of the fluid inside the tank. The method is extended to other tank shapes using a combined analytical and numerical method. A boundary element numerical method is used to determine the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the problem. These are used in the non-linear analytical free surface conditions, and the velocity potential and free surface elevation for each boundary value problem in the perturbation scheme are determined by the boundary element method. Both the analytical method and the combined analytical and numerical method are restricted to tanks with vertical walls in the free surface. The suitability of a commercial programme, FLOW-3D, to estimate sloshing is studied. It solves the Navier-Stokes equations by the finite difference method. The free surface as function of time is traced using the fractional volume of fluid method. 59 refs., 54 figs., 37 tabs.

  8. Potential solver for sloshing-ion thermal barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boghosian, B.M.; Campbell, R.B.; Gilmore, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    The quasineutrality equations at points (a) and (b) in a sloshing-ion thermal barrier are derived and an algorithm for their solution is given. The solution technique is sufficiently reliable and efficient to be used in a fluid code where it must be invoked at each time step. Circumstances under which the equations admit multiple solutions are noted and discussed

  9. Modeling of Non-Isothermal Cryogenic Fluid Sloshing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamic model was used to simulate the thermal destratification in an upright self-pressurized cryostat approximately half-filled with liquid nitrogen and subjected to forced sinusoidal lateral shaking. A full three-dimensional computational grid was used to model the tank dynamics, fluid flow and thermodynamics using the ANSYS Fluent code. A non-inertial grid was used which required the addition of momentum and energy source terms to account for the inertial forces, energy transfer and wall reaction forces produced by the shaken tank. The kinetics-based Schrage mass transfer model provided the interfacial mass transfer due to evaporation and condensation at the sloshing interface. The dynamic behavior of the sloshing interface, its amplitude and transition to different wave modes, provided insight into the fluid process at the interface. The tank pressure evolution and temperature profiles compared relatively well with the shaken cryostat experimental test data provided by the Centre National D'Etudes Spatiales.

  10. Weakly nonlinear sloshing in a truncated circular conical tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilyuk, I P; Hermann, M; Lukovsky, I A; Solodun, O V; Timokha, A N

    2013-01-01

    Sloshing of an ideal incompressible liquid in a rigid truncated (tapered) conical tank is considered when the tank performs small-magnitude oscillatory motions with the forcing frequency close to the lowest natural sloshing frequency. The multimodal method, the non-conformal mapping technique and the Moiseev type asymptotics are employed to derive a finite-dimensional system of weakly nonlinear ordinary differential (modal) equations. This modal system is a generalization of that by Gavrilyuk et al 2005 Fluid Dyn. Res. 37 399–429. Using the derived modal equations, we classify the resonant steady-state wave regimes occurring due to horizontal harmonic tank excitations. The frequency ranges are detected where the ‘planar’ and/or ‘swirling’ steady-state sloshing are stable as well as a range in which all steady-state wave regimes are not stable and irregular (chaotic) liquid motions occur is established. The results on the frequency ranges are qualitatively supported by experiments by Matta E 2002 PhD Thesis Politecnico di Torino, Torino. (paper)

  11. Time Frequency Analysis of Spacecraft Propellant Tank Spinning Slosh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Steven T.; Burkey, Russell C.; Sudermann, James

    2010-01-01

    Many spacecraft are designed to spin about an axis along the flight path as a means of stabilizing the attitude of the spacecraft via gyroscopic stiffness. Because of the assembly requirements of the spacecraft and the launch vehicle, these spacecraft often spin about an axis corresponding to a minor moment of inertia. In such a case, any perturbation of the spin axis will cause sloshing motions in the liquid propellant tanks that will eventually dissipate enough kinetic energy to cause the spin axis nutation (wobble) to grow further. This spinning slosh and resultant nutation growth is a primary design problem of spinning spacecraft and one that is not easily solved by analysis or simulation only. Testing remains the surest way to address spacecraft nutation growth. This paper describes a test method and data analysis technique that reveal the resonant frequency and damping behavior of liquid motions in a spinning tank. Slosh resonant frequency and damping characteristics are necessary inputs to any accurate numerical dynamic simulation of the spacecraft.

  12. Attitude tracking control of flexible spacecraft with large amplitude slosh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Mingle; Yue, Baozeng

    2017-12-01

    This paper is focused on attitude tracking control of a spacecraft that is equipped with flexible appendage and partially filled liquid propellant tank. The large amplitude liquid slosh is included by using a moving pulsating ball model that is further improved to estimate the settling location of liquid in microgravity or a zero-g environment. The flexible appendage is modelled as a three-dimensional Bernoulli-Euler beam, and the assumed modal method is employed. A hybrid controller that combines sliding mode control with an adaptive algorithm is designed for spacecraft to perform attitude tracking. The proposed controller has proved to be asymptotically stable. A nonlinear model for the overall coupled system including spacecraft attitude dynamics, liquid slosh, structural vibration and control action is established. Numerical simulation results are presented to show the dynamic behaviors of the coupled system and to verify the effectiveness of the control approach when the spacecraft undergoes the disturbance produced by large amplitude slosh and appendage vibration. Lastly, the designed adaptive algorithm is found to be effective to improve the precision of attitude tracking.

  13. Practical Methodology for the Inclusion of Nonlinear Slosh Damping in the Stability Analysis of Liquid-Propelled Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottander, John A.; Hall, Robert A.; Powers, J. F.

    2018-01-01

    A method is presented that allows for the prediction of the magnitude of limit cycles due to adverse control-slosh interaction in liquid propelled space vehicles using non-linear slosh damping. Such a method is an alternative to the industry practice of assuming linear damping and relying on: mechanical slosh baffles to achieve desired stability margins; accepting minimal slosh stability margins; or time domain non-linear analysis to accept time periods of poor stability. Sinusoidal input describing functional analysis is used to develop a relationship between the non-linear slosh damping and an equivalent linear damping at a given slosh amplitude. In addition, a more accurate analytical prediction of the danger zone for slosh mass locations in a vehicle under proportional and derivative attitude control is presented. This method is used in the control-slosh stability analysis of the NASA Space Launch System.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics application: slosh analysis of a fuel tank model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iu, H.S.; Cleghorn, W.L.; Mills, J.K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of fluid slosh behaviour inside a fuel tank model. The fuel tank model was a simplified version of a stock fuel tank that has a sloshing noise problem. A commercial CFD software, FLOW-3D, was used to simulate the slosh behaviour. Slosh experiments were performed to verify the computer simulation results. High speed video equipment enhanced with a data acquisition system was used to record the slosh experiments and to obtain the instantaneous sound level of each video frame. Five baffle configurations including the no baffle configuration were considered in the computer simulations and the experiments. The simulation results showed that the best baffle configuration can reduce the mean kinetic energy by 80% from the no baffle configuration in a certain slosh situation. The experimental results showed that 15dB(A) noise reduction can be achieved by the best baffle configuration. The correlation analysis between the mean kinetic energy and the noise level showed that high mean kinetic energy of the fluid does not always correspond to high sloshing noise. High correlation between them only occurs for the slosh situations where the fluid hits the top of the tank and creates noise. (author)

  15. CFD Fuel Slosh Modeling of Fluid-Structure Interaction in Spacecraft Propellant Tanks with Diaphragms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sances, Dillon J.; Gangadharan, Sathya N.; Sudermann, James E.; Marsell, Brandon

    2010-01-01

    Liquid sloshing within spacecraft propellant tanks causes rapid energy dissipation at resonant modes, which can result in attitude destabilization of the vehicle. Identifying resonant slosh modes currently requires experimental testing and mechanical pendulum analogs to characterize the slosh dynamics. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques have recently been validated as an effective tool for simulating fuel slosh within free-surface propellant tanks. Propellant tanks often incorporate an internal flexible diaphragm to separate ullage and propellant which increases modeling complexity. A coupled fluid-structure CFD model is required to capture the damping effects of a flexible diaphragm on the propellant. ANSYS multidisciplinary engineering software employs a coupled solver for analyzing two-way Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) cases such as the diaphragm propellant tank system. Slosh models generated by ANSYS software are validated by experimental lateral slosh test results. Accurate data correlation would produce an innovative technique for modeling fuel slosh within diaphragm tanks and provide an accurate and efficient tool for identifying resonant modes and the slosh dynamic response.

  16. Design of Tank Velocity Based on Multi-Mode Natural Frequencies for Suppression of Sloshing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Taegwon; Kim, Dongjoo [Kumoh Nat’l Institute of Technology, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Suppression of sloshing is essential to achieve fast transportation and stable maneuvering of tanks partially filled with liquid. In this study, numerical simulations are performed to investigate the effects of the acceleration magnitude and the acceleration duration of triangular velocity profiles on sloshing when a rectangular tank moves horizontally. We previously reported, based on only the first natural mode, that sloshing is significantly suppressed when the acceleration duration equals the first natural period of sloshing. On the other hand, the present CFD simulations find the best acceleration duration for minimum sloshing and explains the results considering higher modes as well as the first mode. We also perform the analysis using an equivalent model based on masses and springs, and evaluate its accuracy by comparing it with the CFD simulation results.

  17. Seismic sloshing experiments of large pool-type fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, A.; Masuko, Y.; Kurihara, C.; Ishihama, K.; Yashiro, T.; Rodwell, E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of seismic sloshing experiments performed on large pool-type LMFBR vessels. Two types of tests were performed. The first type of test was designed to understand the basis phenomena of sloshing (limited to linear sloshing only) and evaluate the effects of the deck-mounted components (i.e., IHXs, pumps, and UIS) on sloshing wave heights using a 1/10-scale model (diameter 2.23 m x H 1.03 m) of the LSPB 1340 MWe pool plant. The second type of test was designed to evaluate the structural integrity of the thermal baffles of the roof-deck to withstand sloshing impulsive pressures (focused on nonlinear sloshing), using a two-dimensional 1/3-scale model (L 8 m x W 3 m x H 2.6 m) of a typical 1000 MWe pool plant. The results of the linear sloshing tests have shown that: 1. the vessel wall stiffness has no effect on the sloshing natural frequency; 2. sloshing wave heights are lowered by 30% to 50% in the presence of the deck-mounted components; and 3. damping factors of sloshing are not influenced by the wall stiffness while they are increased by the presence of the deck-mounted components. The results of the nonlinear sloshing tests are that: 1. the maximum impulsive pressure occurs when the first effective wave strikes at the roof-deck, and thereafter the impulsive pressure decreases irrespective of the impact velocity of the fluid; 2. the first effective wave refers to the case in which the height of the fluid free surface becomes nearly twice the height of the cover gas space; and 3. the structural integrity of the thermal baffles for the roof-deck against the sloshing load was confirmed. In addition to these results, two sloshing-caused problems were identified. The first one is the spillover of hot sodium into the gas-dam type thermal insulator. The second one is cover-gas entrainment into sodium which might lead to a transient overpower (TOP) incident because of the presence of gas bubbles in the reactor core. (orig./HP)

  18. Sloshing in a Hele-Shaw cell: experiments and theory

    OpenAIRE

    Viola , Francesco; Gallaire , Francois; Dollet , Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    International audience; The response of the free liquid surface in a Hele-Shaw cell subjected to a horizontal oscillation is investigated. We study the low-oscillation-amplitude regime and we show, by varying the fluid viscosity, ν, and the forcing frequency, ω, that the ratio between the Stokes viscous length, 2ν/ω, and the cell thickness greatly affects the amplitude and phase lag of the gravity waves. In particular, the sloshing system undergoes an under-damped/overdamped transition for su...

  19. Dominant seismic sloshing mode in a pool-type reactor tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

    1987-01-01

    Large-diameter LMR (Liquid Metal Reactor) tanks contain a large volume of sodium coolant and many in-tank components. A reactor tank of 70 ft. in diameter contains 5,000,000 of sodium coolant. Under seismic events, the sloshing wave may easily reach several feet. If sufficient free board is not provided to accommodate the wave height, several safety problems may occur such as damage to tank cover due to sloshing impact and thermal shocks due to hot sodium, etc. Therefore, the sloshing response should be properly considered in the reactor design. This paper presents the results of the sloshing analysis of a pool-type reactor tank with a diameter of 39 ft. The results of the fluid-structure interaction analysis are presented in a companion paper. Five sections are contained in this paper. The reactor system and mathematical model are described. The dominant sloshing mode and the calculated maximum wave heights are presented. The sloshing pressures and sloshing forces acting on the submerged components are described. The conclusions are given

  20. CFD and experimental investigation of sloshing parameters for the safety assessment of HLM reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrillas, Konstantinos, E-mail: myrillas@vki.ac.be [von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, B-1640 Rhode-St-Genèse (Belgium); Planquart, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.planquart@vki.ac.be [von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, B-1640 Rhode-St-Genèse (Belgium); Simonini, Alessia, E-mail: Simonini@vki.ac.be [von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, B-1640 Rhode-St-Genèse (Belgium); Buchlin, Jean-Marie, E-mail: buchlin@vki.ac.be [von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, B-1640 Rhode-St-Genèse (Belgium); Schyns, Marc, E-mail: mschyns@SCKCEN.BE [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Comparison of sloshing behavior in cylindrical tank using mercury and water. • Flow visualization of liquid sloshing in resonance case. • CFD simulations of sloshing with OpenFOAM, using the VOF method. • Qualitative and quantitative comparison of experimental and numerical results. • Evaluation of sloshing forces on the tank walls from numerical simulations. - Abstract: For the safety assessment of Heavy Liquid Metal nuclear reactors under seismic excitation, sloshing phenomena can be of great concern. The earthquake motions are transferred to the liquid coolant which oscillates inside the vessel, exerting additional forces on the walls and internal structures. The present study examines the case of MYRRHA, a multi-purpose experimental reactor with LBE as coolant, developed by SCK·CEN. The sloshing behavior of liquid metals is studied through a comparison between mercury and water in a cylindrical tank. Experimental investigation of sloshing is carried out using optical techniques with the shaking table facility SHAKESPEARE at the von Karman Institute. Emphasis is given on the resonance case, where maximum forces occur on the tank walls. The experimental cases are reproduced numerically with the CFD software OpenFOAM, using the VOF method to track the liquid interface. The non-linear nature of sloshing is observed through visualization, where swirling is shown in the resonance case. The complex behavior is well reproduced by the CFD simulations, providing good qualitative validation of the numerical tools. A quantitative comparison of the maximum liquid elevation inside the tank shows higher values for the liquid metal than for water. Some discrepancies are revealed in CFD results and the differences are quantified. From simulations it is verified that the forces scale with the density ratio, following similar evolution in time. Overall, water is demonstrated to be a valid option as a working liquid in order to evaluate the sloshing

  1. CFD and experimental investigation of sloshing parameters for the safety assessment of HLM reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myrillas, Konstantinos; Planquart, Philippe; Simonini, Alessia; Buchlin, Jean-Marie; Schyns, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Comparison of sloshing behavior in cylindrical tank using mercury and water. • Flow visualization of liquid sloshing in resonance case. • CFD simulations of sloshing with OpenFOAM, using the VOF method. • Qualitative and quantitative comparison of experimental and numerical results. • Evaluation of sloshing forces on the tank walls from numerical simulations. - Abstract: For the safety assessment of Heavy Liquid Metal nuclear reactors under seismic excitation, sloshing phenomena can be of great concern. The earthquake motions are transferred to the liquid coolant which oscillates inside the vessel, exerting additional forces on the walls and internal structures. The present study examines the case of MYRRHA, a multi-purpose experimental reactor with LBE as coolant, developed by SCK·CEN. The sloshing behavior of liquid metals is studied through a comparison between mercury and water in a cylindrical tank. Experimental investigation of sloshing is carried out using optical techniques with the shaking table facility SHAKESPEARE at the von Karman Institute. Emphasis is given on the resonance case, where maximum forces occur on the tank walls. The experimental cases are reproduced numerically with the CFD software OpenFOAM, using the VOF method to track the liquid interface. The non-linear nature of sloshing is observed through visualization, where swirling is shown in the resonance case. The complex behavior is well reproduced by the CFD simulations, providing good qualitative validation of the numerical tools. A quantitative comparison of the maximum liquid elevation inside the tank shows higher values for the liquid metal than for water. Some discrepancies are revealed in CFD results and the differences are quantified. From simulations it is verified that the forces scale with the density ratio, following similar evolution in time. Overall, water is demonstrated to be a valid option as a working liquid in order to evaluate the sloshing

  2. Effect of Baffles on the Sloshing in Road Tankers Carrying LPG: A Comparative Numerical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Bautista-Jacobo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a comparative numerical study of the effect of using baffles, and its design, on the behavior of sloshing in a partially filled road tanker carrying LPG. Navier-Stokes equations and standard k-ε turbulence model are used to simulate fluid movement; the Volume of Fluid (VOF method is used to track the liquid-gas interface. Velocity distributions, sloshing stabilization times, and contours of turbulent kinetic energy, which are of high importance in choosing the best design of baffles, are shown. The results show sloshing stabilization times of 22 and 21 s for road tankers with cross-shaped (Type I and X-shaped (Type II baffles, respectively, finding lower values of turbulent kinetic energy for Type II design, being, therefore, the best design of baffles for damping of sloshing and vehicle control among studied ones.

  3. Wave-Based Attitude Control of Spacecraft with Fuel Sloshing Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Joseph William

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Wave-Based Control has been previously applied successfully to simple under-actuated flexible mechanical systems. Spacecraft and rockets with structural flexibility and sloshing are examples of such systems but have added difficulties due to non-uniform structure, external disturbing forces and non-ideal actuators and sensors. The aim of this paper is to extend the application of WBC to spacecraft systems, to compare the performance of WBC to other popular controllers and to carry out experimental validation of the designed control laws. A mathematical model is developed for an upper stage accelerating rocket moving in a single plane. Fuel sloshing is represented by an equivalent mechanical pendulum model. A wave-based controller is designed for the upper stage AVUM of the European launcher Vega. In numerical simulations the controller successfully suppresses the sloshing motion. A major advantage of the strategy is that no measurement of the pendulum states (sloshing motion is required.

  4. Thrust Vector Control of an Upper-Stage Rocket with Multiple Propellant Slosh Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Rubio Hervas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The thrust vector control problem for an upper-stage rocket with propellant slosh dynamics is considered. The control inputs are defined by the gimbal deflection angle of a main engine and a pitching moment about the center of mass of the spacecraft. The rocket acceleration due to the main engine thrust is assumed to be large enough so that surface tension forces do not significantly affect the propellant motion during main engine burns. A multi-mass-spring model of the sloshing fuel is introduced to represent the prominent sloshing modes. A nonlinear feedback controller is designed to control the translational velocity vector and the attitude of the spacecraft, while suppressing the sloshing modes. The effectiveness of the controller is illustrated through a simulation example.

  5. The Impact of Sloshing Liquids on Ship Stability for Various Dimensions of Partly Filled Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemyslaw Krata

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Liquid sloshing phenomenon taking place in partly filled ships’ tanks directly affects the stability of a vessel. However, only static calculations are carried out onboard ships nowadays and static transfer of liquid weight is taken into account in the course of routine stability calculation. The paper is focused on a dynamic heeling moment due to liquid sloshing in tanks onboard ships. A number of numerical simulations of liquid sloshing taking place in a moving tank is carried out. The wide range of ship’s tanks is taken into account. The conducted CFD simulations are experimentally verified. Finally, the method of an assessment of the liquid sloshing impact on ship transverse stability is worked out. The key point of the method is a dynamic coefficient describing relation of the researched dynamic heeling moment and the quasi-static one in terms of dynamic stability of a vessel which is related to the weather criterion of ship stability assessment.

  6. Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) Inundation for Categories 2 and 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The file geodatabase (fgdb) contains the Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) Maximum of Maximums (MOM) model for hurricane categories 2 and 4. The...

  7. Sloshing-ion equilibria in the TARA endplugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokin, S.; Kesner, J.

    1983-11-01

    We have employed a modified version of the LLNL Bounce-average Fokker-Planck code to model neutral beam-produced sloshing-ion equilibria in the TARA endplugs. The questions we have addressed concern the effect of deuterium beam operation as opposed to hydrogen operation, and the advantage of using full-energy beams rather than the usual three-component beams. We find that, for the expected base case TARA operating parameters, a 40% savings in required beam power is attained by using deuterium beams rather than hydrogen beams, and that the use of full-energy beams results in an additional 26% power savings for these parameters. For higher plasma temperatures the use of full-energy beams becomes significantly advantagous. We have also investigated the equilibria of two possible alternate mirror configurations for the TARA endplugs, believed to be more stable to trapped particle modes, and report those results here

  8. Elucidation of self-induced sloshing occurrence mechanism using numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Soichi; Madarame, Haruki; Okamoto, Koji; Tanaka, Nobukazu.

    1995-01-01

    In liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactors, there is free liquid surface in a reactor vessel and others, and by reducing the size of the reactor vessel and others, it is necessary to increase the flow velocity of liquid sodium coolant. In the free liquid surface in which fast circulating flow exists, undesirable phenomena like waving and bubble catching are feared. The self-induced sloshing taken up in this study is one of these phenomena. Since the actual machine has complex three-dimensional structure, in order to forecast the occurrence of sloshing, it is necessary to elucidate the mechanism of vibration occurrence. The mechanism of occurrence of self-induced sloshing due to horizontal and vertical plane jets has been explained a number of times so far. In this study, by applying the model of the occurrence mechanism of Fukaya to horizontal plane jet, the self-induced sloshing due to horizontal plane jet was simulated by numerical analysis. Based on the results, it was attempted to examine the vibration energy supplied to sloshing in a whole flow field and the dependence of sloshing region on water depth and flow velocity. The numerical simulation, the analysis of the occurrence mechanism by using the numerical analysis code and the results are reported. (K.I.)

  9. Mechanism of occurrence of self-exciting sloshing in rectangular vessel by plane jet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Masashi; Okamoto, Koji; Madarame, Haruki

    1996-01-01

    FBRs have free liquid surfaces in reactor vessels and others, and it is expected that the flow velocity of liquid sodium coolant heightens accompanying the reduction of the reactor size. In the field where free liquid surface and high velocity flow exist, there is the possibility that various unstable phenomena occur on the liquid surface by the interference of the free liquid surface and flow. One example is the self-exciting sloshing by flow. In order to elucidate the mechanism of occurrence of the phenomena in a simple system, the experimental and analytical examinations were carried out on the self-exciting sloshing of free liquid surface in a rectangular vessel by plane jet flow. The basic oscillation characteristics of self-exciting sloshing were examined, and the physical quantities that control the occurrence of self-exciting sloshing were investigated by examining the effect in the case of changing the shapes of vessels. The experiments on the self-exciting sloshing in the case of vertical, horizontal and oblique plane jet flows are reported. The model for the occurrence of oscillation, in which the interaction of sloshing and jet variation was simplified, is proposed, and the verification of the model is reported. (K.I.)

  10. Fluid structure interaction modeling of liquid sloshing phenomena in flexible tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolici, S.; Bilegan, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We used Ansys Workbench package to study sloshing phenomena in liquid containers. ► The interaction liquid–structure is modeled considering full and one-way coupling. ► The results obtained with the FSI models were compared against design codes. ► The results have shown that the sloshing is influenced by tank wall elasticity. -- Abstract: The present paper is concerned with the problem of modeling the fluid–structure interaction (FSI) in partially filled liquid containers. The study focuses on the sloshing phenomena and on the coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis with the finite element stress analysis (FEA) used to predict the sloshing wave amplitude, convective mode frequency, pressure exerted on the walls and the effect of sloshing on the anchoring points forces. The interaction between fluids (water and air) and tank wall is modeled considering full and one-way coupling. Using the time history of an earthquake excitation, the results of the FSI model are compared with those obtained employing simplified mechanical models given in design codes. The coupling phenomenon was found to influence the sloshing effect, the impulsive pressure being amplified by the wall elasticity. The applied FSI methodology proves to be feasible in analyzing a 3D full coupled CFD/FEA storage tank subjected to a long time history excitation

  11. Damping of liquid sloshing by foams: from everyday observations to liquid transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauret, Alban; Boulogne, Francois; Cappello, Jean; Stone, Howard

    2014-11-01

    When a liquid-filled container is set in motion, the free surface of the liquid starts to slosh, i.e. oscillate. Such effects can be observed when a glass of water is handled carelessly and the fluid sloshes or even spills over the rim of the container. However, beer does not slosh as readily, which suggests that the presence of foam could be used to damp sloshing. In this work, we study experimentally the effect on sloshing of liquid foam placed on top of a liquid bath in a Hele-Shaw cell. We generate a monodisperse 2D liquid foam and track its motion. The influence of the foam on the sloshing dynamics is characterized: 2 to 3 layers of bubbles are sufficient to significantly damp the oscillations. For more than 5 layers of bubbles, the original vertical motion of the foam becomes mainly horizontal. We rationalize our experimental findings with a model that describes the foam contribution to the damping coefficient. This study motivated by everyday observations has promising applications in numerous industrial applications such as the transport of liquid in cargoes.

  12. Numerical analysis of the flow field in a sloshing tank with a horizontal perforated plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Heng; Liu, Yong; Li, Huajun; Fu, Qiang

    2017-08-01

    Liquid sloshing is a type of free surface flow inside a partially filled water tank. Sloshing exerts a significant effect on the safety of liquid transport systems; in particular, it may cause large hydrodynamic loads when the frequency of the tank motion is close to the natural frequency of the tank. Perforated plates have recently been used to suppress the violent movement of liquids in a sloshing tank at resonant conditions. In this study, a numerical model based on OpenFOAM (Open Source Field Operation and Manipulation), an open source computed fluid dynamic code, is used to investigate resonant sloshing in a swaying tank with a submerged horizontal perforated plate. The numerical results of the free surface elevations are first verified using experimental data, and then the flow characteristics around the perforated plate and the fluid velocity distribution in the entire tank are examined using numerical examples. The results clearly show differences in sloshing motions under first-order and third-order resonant frequencies. This study provides a better understanding of the energy dissipation mechanism of a horizontal perforated plate in a swaying tank.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Liquid Sloshing Problem under Resonant Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-kun Gui

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations were conducted to investigate the fluid resonance in partially filled rectangular tank based on the OpenFOAM package of viscous fluid model. The numerical model was validated by the available theoretical, numerical, and experimental data. The study was mainly focused on the large amplitude sloshing motion and the corresponding impact force around the resonant condition. It was found that, for the 2D situation, the double pressure peaks happened near to the side walls around the still water level. And they were corresponding to the local free surface rising up and set-down, respectively. The impulsive loads on the tank corner with extreme magnitudes were observed as the free surface impacted the ceiling. The 3D numerical results showed that the free surface amplitudes along the side walls varied diversely, depending on the direction and frequency of the external excitation. The characteristics of the pressure around the still water level and tank ceiling were also presented. According to the computational results, it was found that the 2D numerical model can predict the impact loads near the still water level as accurately as 3D model. However, the impulsive pressure near the tank ceiling corner was remarkably underestimated.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Sloshing Phenomena in Cubic Tank with Multiple Baffles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-An Xue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-phase fluid flow model solving Navier-Stokes equations was employed in this paper to investigate liquid sloshing phenomena in cubic tank with horizontal baffle, perforated vertical baffle, and their combinatorial configurations under the harmonic motion excitation. Laboratory experiment of liquid sloshing in cubic tank with perforated vertical baffle was carried out to validate the present numerical model. Fairly good agreements were obtained from the comparisons between the present numerical results and the present experimental data, available numerical data. Liquid sloshing in cubic tank with multiple baffles was investigated numerically in detail under different external excitation frequencies. Power spectrum of the time series of free surface elevation was presented with the aid of fast Fourier transform technique. The dynamic impact pressures acting on the normal and parallel sidewalls were discussed in detail.

  15. Design of container velocity profile for the suppression of liquid sloshing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongjoo

    2016-11-01

    In many industrial applications, high-speed position control of a liquid container causes undesirable liquid vibrations called 'sloshing' which poses a control challenge in fast maneuvering and accurate positioning of containers. Recently, it has been shown that a control theory called 'input shaping' is successfully applied to reduce the sloshing, but its success comes at a cost of longer process time. Therefore, we aim to minimize liquid sloshing without increasing the process time when a container moves horizontally by a target distance within a limited time. In this study, sensing and feedback actuation are not permitted but the container velocity is allowed to be modified from a given triangular profile. A new design is proposed by applying input shaping to the container velocity with carefully selected acceleration time. That is, the acceleration time is chosen to be the 1st mode natural period, and the input shaper is determined based on the 3rd mode natural frequency. The proposed approach is validated by performing numerical simulations, which show that the simple modification of container velocity reduces the sloshing significantly without additional process time in a feedforward manner. Supported by the NRF programs (NRF-2015R1D1A1A01059675) of Korean government.

  16. Nonlinear finite element analysis of liquid sloshing in complex vehicle motion scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolsen, Brynne; Wang, Liang; Shabana, Ahmed

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this investigation is to develop a new total Lagrangian continuum-based liquid sloshing model that can be systematically integrated with multibody system (MBS) algorithms in order to allow for studying complex motion scenarios. The new approach allows for accurately capturing the effect of the sloshing forces during curve negotiation, rapid lane change, and accelerating and braking scenarios. In these motion scenarios, the liquid experiences large displacements and significant changes in shape that can be captured effectively using the finite element (FE) absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF). ANCF elements are used in this investigation to describe complex mesh geometries, to capture the change in inertia due to the change in the fluid shape, and to accurately calculate the centrifugal forces, which for flexible bodies do not take the simple form used in rigid body dynamics. A penalty formulation is used to define the contact between the rigid tank walls and the fluid. A fully nonlinear MBS truck model that includes a suspension system and Pacejka's brush tire model is developed. Specified motion trajectories are used to examine the vehicle dynamics in three different scenarios - deceleration during straight-line motion, rapid lane change, and curve negotiation. It is demonstrated that the liquid sloshing changes the contact forces between the tires and the ground - increasing the forces on certain wheels and decreasing the forces on other wheels. In cases of extreme sloshing, this dynamic behavior can negatively impact the vehicle stability by increasing the possibility of wheel lift and vehicle rollover.

  17. The effects of sloshing energetic particles on ballooning modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotler, D.P.; Berk, H.L.

    1986-10-01

    Distributions that give rise to energetic trapped particle pressures peaked in the ''good curvature'' region of a tokamak (sloshing distributions) are examined in an attempt to find stable regimes for both the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and precessional modes. It is the precessional drift destabilization of ballooning modes that inhibits bridging the unstable gap to second stability by the use of deeply-trapped energetic particles unless the hot particles have an extremely large energy (∼0.35 MeV for a tokamak like PDX). Unfortunately, our calculations indicate that the sloshing particles do not have a significant stabilizing effect. An analytic treatment shows that complete stability can be found only if the sign of the energetic particle magnetic drift-frequency can be reversed from its value in vacuum bad curvature without hot species diamagnetism. This is difficult to do in a tokamak because of the destabilizing contribution of the geodesic curvature to the drift frequency. Furthermore, for each of the two sloshing distributions employed (one contains only trapped particles; the other includes trapped and passing particles), a new ''continuum instability'' (where asymptotically along the field line the mode is a propagating plane wave) is found to be driven by geodesic curvature. These results indicate that energetic sloshing particles are not able to bridge the unstable gap to second stability

  18. Nonlinear model and attitude dynamics of flexible spacecraft with large amplitude slosh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Mingle; Yue, Baozeng

    2017-04-01

    This paper is focused on the nonlinearly modelling and attitude dynamics of spacecraft coupled with large amplitude liquid sloshing dynamics and flexible appendage vibration. The large amplitude fuel slosh dynamics is included by using an improved moving pulsating ball model. The moving pulsating ball model is an equivalent mechanical model that is capable of imitating the whole liquid reorientation process. A modification is introduced in the capillary force computation in order to more precisely estimate the settling location of liquid in microgravity or zero-g environment. The flexible appendage is modelled as a three dimensional Bernoulli-Euler beam and the assumed modal method is employed to derive the nonlinear mechanical model for the overall coupled system of liquid filled spacecraft with appendage. The attitude maneuver is implemented by the momentum transfer technique, and a feedback controller is designed. The simulation results show that the liquid sloshing can always result in nutation behavior, but the effect of flexible deformation of appendage depends on the amplitude and direction of attitude maneuver performed by spacecraft. Moreover, it is found that the liquid sloshing and the vibration of flexible appendage are coupled with each other, and the coupling becomes more significant with more rapid motion of spacecraft. This study reveals that the appendage's flexibility has influence on the liquid's location and settling time in microgravity. The presented nonlinear system model can provide an important reference for the overall design of the modern spacecraft composed of rigid platform, liquid filled tank and flexible appendage.

  19. TURBULENCE AND RADIO MINI-HALOS IN THE SLOSHING CORES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M.; Brunetti, G.; Giacintucci, S.

    2013-01-01

    A number of relaxed, cool-core galaxy clusters exhibit diffuse, steep-spectrum radio sources in their central regions, known as radio mini-halos. It has been proposed that the relativistic electrons responsible for the emission have been reaccelerated by turbulence generated by the sloshing of the cool core gas. We present a high-resolution MHD simulation of gas sloshing in a galaxy cluster coupled with subgrid simulations of relativistic electron acceleration to test this hypothesis. Our simulation shows that the sloshing motions generate turbulence on the order of δv ∼ 50-200 km s –1 on spatial scales of ∼50-100 kpc and below in the cool core region within the envelope of the sloshing cold fronts, whereas outside the cold fronts, there is negligible turbulence. This turbulence is potentially strong enough to reaccelerate relativistic electron seeds (with initial γ ∼ 100-500) to γ ∼ 10 4 via damping of magnetosonic waves and non-resonant compression. The seed electrons could remain in the cluster from, e.g., past active galactic nucleus activity. In combination with the magnetic field amplification in the core, these electrons then produce diffuse radio synchrotron emission that is coincident with the region bounded by the sloshing cold fronts, as indeed observed in X-rays and the radio. The result holds for different initial spatial distributions of pre-existing relativistic electrons. The power and the steep spectral index (α ≈ 1-2) of the resulting radio emission are consistent with observations of mini-halos, though the theoretical uncertainties of the acceleration mechanisms are high. We also produce simulated maps of inverse-Compton hard X-ray emission from the same population of relativistic electrons.

  20. CFD simulations on the dynamics of liquid sloshing and its control in a storage tank for spent fuel applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanapala, V.S.; Velusamy, K.; Patnaik, B.S.V.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamics of sloshing in partially filled spent fuel storage tanks is numerically simulated. • Two type of baffle plates were examined towards the control of slosh suppression. • An optimum baffles configuration was obtained, after carrying out systematic investigations. • This vertical baffle design was effective, when tested for a seismic excitation (El centro). - Abstract: Spent nuclear liquid waste is often kept in partially filled storage tanks. When such storage tanks are subjected to wind and/or earthquake induced excitations, this could lead to detrimental conditions. Therefore, storage tank designers should ensure safe design margins and develop methodologies to overcome a wide range of possible scenarios. In the present study, systematic numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the sloshing dynamics of liquid in a storage tank, subjected to seismic excitation. As a precursor, the influence of resonant harmonic excitation on the free surface displacement, pressure distribution, slosh forces etc. is studied. To suppress the free surface fluctuations and the associated slosh force, two types of baffles viz., ring and vertical baffle are examined. Based on the response to an imposed harmonic excitation, the vertical baffle plate in the middle of the tank, was found to be effective and its dimensions are systematically optimized. This baffle geometry was tested for a well known seismic excitation (El Centro) and it was observed to effectively suppress free surface fluctuations and the slosh forces.

  1. Characterization of Slosh Damping for Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid Internal Tank Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Douglas G.; Sansone, Marco D.; Eberhart, Chad J.; West, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Grid stiffened tank structures such as Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid are widely used in cryogenic tanks for providing stiffening to the tank while reducing mass, compared to tank walls of constant cross-section. If the structure is internal to the tank, it will positively affect the fluid dynamic behavior of the liquid propellant, in regard to fluid slosh damping. As NASA and commercial companies endeavor to explore the solar system, vehicles will by necessity become more mass efficient, and design margin will be reduced where possible. Therefore, if the damping characteristics of the Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid structure is understood, their positive damping effect can be taken into account in the systems design process. Historically, damping by internal structures has been characterized by rules of thumb and for Ortho-Grid, empirical design tools intended for slosh baffles of much larger cross-section have been used. There is little or no information available to characterize the slosh behavior of Iso-Grid internal structure. Therefore, to take advantage of these structures for their positive damping effects, there is much need for obtaining additional data and tools to characterize them. Recently, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center conducted both sub-scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of slosh damping for Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid tanks for cylindrical tanks containing water. Enhanced grid meshing techniques were applied to the geometrically detailed and complex Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid structures. The Loci-STREAM CFD program with the Volume of Fluid Method module for tracking and locating the water-air fluid interface was used to conduct the simulations. The CFD simulations were validated with the test data and new empirical models for predicting damping and frequency of Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid structures were generated.

  2. Predicting the Storm Surge Threat of Hurricane Sandy with the National Weather Service SLOSH Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Forbes

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations of the storm tide that flooded the US Atlantic coastline during Hurricane Sandy (2012 are carried out using the National Weather Service (NWS Sea Lakes and Overland Surges from Hurricanes (SLOSH storm surge prediction model to quantify its ability to replicate the height, timing, evolution and extent of the water that was driven ashore by this large, destructive storm. Recent upgrades to the numerical model, including the incorporation of astronomical tides, are described and simulations with and without these upgrades are contrasted to assess their contributions to the increase in forecast accuracy. It is shown, through comprehensive verifications of SLOSH simulation results against peak water surface elevations measured at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA tide gauge stations, by storm surge sensors deployed and hundreds of high water marks collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS, that the SLOSH-simulated water levels at 71% (89% of the data measurement locations have less than 20% (30% relative error. The RMS error between observed and modeled peak water levels is 0.47 m. In addition, the model’s extreme computational efficiency enables it to run large, automated ensembles of predictions in real-time to account for the high variability that can occur in tropical cyclone forecasts, thus furnishing a range of values for the predicted storm surge and inundation threat.

  3. Temperature oscillation and the sloshing motion of the large-scale circulation in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Heng-Dong; Chen, Xin; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2017-11-01

    We report an experimental study of the temperature oscillation and the sloshing motion of the large-scale circulation (LSC) in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in water. Temperature measurements were made in aspect ratio one cylindrical cell by probes put in fluid and embedded in the sidewall simultaneously, and located at the 1/4, 1/2 and 3/4 heights of the convection cell. The results show that the temperature measured in fluid contains information of both the LSC and the signature of the hot and cold plumes, while the temperature measured in sidewall only contains information of the LSC. It is found that the sloshing motion of the LSC can be measured by both the temperatures in fluid and in sidewall. We also studies the effect of cell tilting on the temperature oscillation and sloshing motion of the LSC. It is found that both the amplitude and the frequency of the temperature oscillation (and the sloshing motion) increase when the tilt angle increases, while the off-center distance of the sloshing motion of the LSC remains unchanged. This work is supported by the NSFC of China (Grant Nos. 11472094 and U1613227), the RGC of Hong Kong SAR (Grant No. 403712) and the 111 project of China (Grant No. B17037).

  4. Investigation of Damping Physics and CFD Tool Validation for Simulation of Baffled Tanks at Variable Slosh Amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Determination of slosh damping is a very challenging task as there is no analytical solution. The damping physics involves the vorticity dissipation which requires the full solution of the nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations. As a result, previous investigations were mainly carried out by extensive experiments. A systematical study is needed to understand the damping physics of baffled tanks, to identify the difference between the empirical Miles equation and experimental measurements, and to develop new semi-empirical relations to better represent the real damping physics. The approach of this study is to use Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technology to shed light on the damping mechanisms of a baffled tank. First, a 1-D Navier-Stokes equation representing different length scales and time scales in the baffle damping physics is developed and analyzed. Loci-STREAM-VOF, a well validated CFD solver developed at NASA MSFC, is applied to study the vorticity field around a baffle and around the fluid-gas interface to highlight the dissipation mechanisms at different slosh amplitudes. Previous measurement data is then used to validate the CFD damping results. The study found several critical parameters controlling fluid damping from a baffle: local slosh amplitude to baffle thickness (A/t), surface liquid depth to tank radius (d/R), local slosh amplitude to baffle width (A/W); and non-dimensional slosh frequency. The simulation highlights three significant damping regimes where different mechanisms dominate. The study proves that the previously found discrepancies between Miles equation and experimental measurement are not due to the measurement scatter, but rather due to different damping mechanisms at various slosh amplitudes. The limitations on the use of Miles equation are discussed based on the flow regime.

  5. Mass-spring model used to simulate the sloshing of fluid in the container under the earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Jing; Luan Lin; Gao Xiaoan; Wang Wei; Lu Daogang; Zhang Shuangwang

    2005-01-01

    A lumped-mass spring model is given to simulated the sloshing of liquid in the container under the earthquake in the ASCE 4-86. A new mass-spring model is developed in the 3D finite element model instead of beam model in this paper. The stresses corresponding to the sloshing mass could be given directly, which avoids the construction of beam model. This paper presents 3-D Mass-Spring Model for the total overturning moment as well as an example of the model. Moreover the mass-spring models for the overturning moment to the sides and to the bottom of the container are constructed respectively. (authors)

  6. The Effect of Sloshing on a Tank Pressure Build-up Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Banne, Håvard Bolstad

    2017-01-01

    This thesis work has aimed to identify how sloshing will affect a liquefied natural gas (LNG) fuel tank. The physical nature of LNG means it needs to be kept cooled and pressurized in order to remain in a liquid state. By implementing a pressure build-up unit (PBU) it is possible to pressurize the tank vaporizing the tank’s contents, for the vapour then to return to tank in a loop, building pressure in the process. A tank pressure build-up unit has been built in the laboratory ...

  7. A study on self-excited sloshing due to the fluid discharge over a flexible weir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagakura, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Shigehiko.

    1995-01-01

    An analytical model for the fluid-elastic instability as observed in Super-Phenix-1 LMFBR is proposed. This fluid-structure system is constituted by the flexible weir and adjoining fluid plenums, and the fluid is discharged from the upstream plenum to the downstream plenum over a flexible weir. The characteristic equation of the system is derived for the case in which the weir vibrates at the frequency of the downstream plenum sloshing. The effects of the fluid level difference between the upstream and the downstream plenum and weir rigidity are examined, and the mechanism for instability is discussed. (author)

  8. Numerical simulation of sloshing in rectangular tanks with OpenFOAM CFD Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreski, Filip; Markov, Zoran; Diebold, Louis; Gazzola, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to simulate the sloshing phenomenon using OpenFOAM CFD software package. The present paper treats a 2D numerical simulation of a partially filled tank that is located on a LNG carrier. Experiments were done on a rectangular tank excited with different excitation periods and amplitudes and the pressure was measured at certain locations on the tank walls. The goal of this research is to compare the experimental data for the pressure with the pressure results obtained with the CFD software. It is shown that the obtained results match well with the experimental data.

  9. Influence of slosh baffles on thermodynamic performance in liquid hydrogen tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhan; Li, Cui

    2018-03-15

    A calibrated CFD model is built to investigate the influence of slosh baffles on the pressurization performance in liquid hydrogen (LH 2 ) tank. The calibrated CFD model is proven to have great predictive ability by compared against the flight experimental results. The pressure increase, thermal stratification and wall heat transfer coefficient of LH 2 tank have been detailedly studied. The results indicate that slosh baffles have a great influence on tank pressure increase, fluid temperature distribution and wall heat transfer. Owning to the existence of baffles, the stratification thickness increases gradually with the distance from tank axis to tank wall. While for the tank without baffles, the stratification thickness decreases firstly and then increases with the increase of the distance from the axis. The "M" type stratified thickness distribution presents in tank without baffles. One modified heat transfer coefficient correlation has been proposed with the change of fluid temperature considered by multiplying a temperature correction factor. It has been proven that the average relative prediction errors of heat transfer coefficient reduced from 19.08% to 4.98% for the wet tank wall of the tank, from 8.93% to 4.27% for the dry tank wall, respectively, calculated by the modified correlation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Gas Sloshing and Radio Galaxy Dynamics in the Core of the 3C 449 Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Dharam V.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Randall, Scott W.; Forman, William R.; Nulsen, Paul E.; Roediger, Elke; ZuHone, John A.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Jones, Christine; Croston, Judith H.

    2013-01-01

    We present results from a 140 ks Chandra/ACIS-S observation of the hot gas around the canonical FR I radio galaxy 3C 449. An earlier, shorter 30 ks Chandra observation of the group gas showed an unusual entropy distribution and a surface brightness edge in the gas that could be a strong shock around the inner radio lobes. In our deeper data we find no evidence for a temperature increase inside of the brightness edge, but a temperature decrease across part of the edge. This suggests that the edge is a "sloshing" cold front due to a merger within the last 1.3-1.6 Gyr. Both the northern and southern inner jets are bent slightly to the west in projection as they enter their respective lobes, suggesting that the sloshing core is moving to the east. The straight inner jet flares at approximately the position where it crosses the contact edge, suggesting that the jet is entraining and thermalizing some of the hot gas as it crosses the edge.We also detect filaments of X-ray emission around the southern inner radio jet and lobe which we attribute to low entropy entrained gas. The lobe flaring and gas entrainment were originally predicted in simulations of Loken et al. and are confirmed in our deep observation.

  11. Experimental and Numerical Analyses of the Sloshing in a Fuel Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Frosina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The sloshing of fuel inside the tank is an important issue in aerospace and automotive applications. This phenomenon, in fact, can cause various issues related to vehicle stability and safety, to component fatigue, audible noise, vibrations and to the level measurement of the fuel itself. The sloshing phenomenon can be defined as a highly nonlinear oscillatory movement of the free-surface of liquid inside a container, such as a fuel tank, under the effect of continuous or instantaneous forces. This paper is the result of a research collaboration between the Industrial Engineering Department of the University of Naples “Federico II” and the R&D department of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (F.C.A. The activity is focused on the study of the sloshing in the fuel tank of vehicles. The goal is the optimization of the tank geometry in order to allow, for example, the correct fuel suction under all driving conditions and to prevent undesired noise and vibrations. This paper shows results obtained on a reference tank filled by water tinted with a dark blue food colorant. The geometry has been tested on a test bench designed by Moog Inc. on specification from Fiat Chrysler Automobiles with harmonic excitation of a 2D tank slice along one degree of freedom. The test bench consists of a hexapod with six independent actuators connecting the base to the top platform, allowing all six Degrees of Freedom (DOFs. On the top platform there are other two additional actuators to extend pitch and roll envelope, thus the name of “8-DOF bench”. The designed tank has been studied with a three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD modeling approach, too. By the end, the numerical and experimental data have been compared with a post-processing analysis by means of Matlab® software. For this reason, the images have been reduced in two dimensions. In particular, the percentage gaps of the free surfaces and the center of gravity have been compared each other

  12. Semi-analytical models of hydroelastic sloshing impact in tanks of liquefied natural gas vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten, I; Malenica, Š; Korobkin, A

    2011-07-28

    The present paper deals with the methods for the evaluation of the hydroelastic interactions that appear during the violent sloshing impacts inside the tanks of liquefied natural gas carriers. The complexity of both the fluid flow and the structural behaviour (containment system and ship structure) does not allow for a fully consistent direct approach according to the present state of the art. Several simplifications are thus necessary in order to isolate the most dominant physical aspects and to treat them properly. In this paper, choice was made of semi-analytical modelling for the hydrodynamic part and finite-element modelling for the structural part. Depending on the impact type, different hydrodynamic models are proposed, and the basic principles of hydroelastic coupling are clearly described and validated with respect to the accuracy and convergence of the numerical results.

  13. A VERY DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF A2052: BUBBLES, SHOCKS, AND SLOSHING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanton, E. L.; Douglass, E. M.; Randall, S. W.; McNamara, B. R.; Clarke, T. E.; Sarazin, C. L.; McDonald, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first results from a very deep (∼650 ks) Chandra X-ray observation of A2052, as well as archival Very Large Array radio observations. The data reveal detailed structure in the inner parts of the cluster, including bubbles evacuated by radio lobes of the active galactic nucleus (AGN), compressed bubble rims, filaments, and loops. Two concentric shocks are seen, and a temperature rise is measured for the innermost one. On larger scales, we report the first detection of an excess surface brightness spiral feature. The spiral has cooler temperatures, lower entropies, and higher abundances than its surroundings, and is likely the result of sloshing gas initiated by a previous cluster-cluster or sub-cluster merger. Initial evidence for previously unseen bubbles at larger radii related to earlier outbursts from the AGN is presented.

  14. Low Frequency Sloshing Analysis of Cylindrical Containers with Flat and Conical Baffles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnitko V.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of low-frequency liquid vibrations in rigid partially filled containers with baffles. The liquid is supposed to be an ideal and incompressible one and its flow is irrotational. A compound shell of revolution is considered as the container model. For evaluating the velocity potential the system of singular boundary integral equations has been obtained. The single-domain and multi-domain reduced boundary element methods have been used for its numerical solution. The numerical simulation is performed to validate the proposed method and to estimate the sloshing frequencies and modes of fluid-filled cylindrical shells with baffles in the forms of circular plates and truncated cones. Both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes of liquid vibrations in baffled and un-baffled tanks have been considered. The proposed method makes it possible to determine a suitable place with a proper height for installing baffles in tanks by using the numerical experiment.

  15. Neutral beam injector for 475 keV MARS sloshing ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, D.M.; Hamilton, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    A neutral beam injector system which produces 5 MW of 475 keV D 0 neutrals continuously on target has been designed. The beamline is intended to produce the sloshing ion distribution required in the end plug region of the conceptual MARS tandem mirror commercial reactor. The injector design utilizes the LBL self-extraction negative ion source and Transverse Field Focusing (TFF) accelerator to generate a long, ribbon ion beam. A laser photodetachment neutralizer strips over 90% of the negative ions. Magnetic and neutron shield designs are included to exclude the fringe fields of the end plug and provide low activation by the neutron flux from the target plasma. The use of a TFF accelerator and photodetachment neutralizer produces a total system electrical efficiency of about 63% for this design

  16. A Calculation Method for the Sloshing Impact Pressure Imposed on the Roof of a Passive Water Storage Tank of AP1000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daogang Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a large water storage tank installed at the top of containment of AP1000, which can supply the passive cooling. In the extreme condition, sloshing of the free surface in the tank may impact on the roof under long-period earthquake. For the safety assessment of structure, it is necessary to calculate the impact pressure caused by water sloshing. Since the behavior of sloshing impacted on the roof is involved into a strong nonlinear phenomenon, it is a little difficult to calculate such pressure by theoretical or numerical method currently. But it is applicable to calculate the height of sloshing in a tank without roof. In the present paper, a simplified method was proposed to calculate the impact pressure using the sloshing wave height, in which we first marked the position of the height of roof, then produced sloshing in the tank without roof and recorded the maximum wave height, and finally regarded approximately the difference between maximum wave height and roof height as the impact pressure head. We also designed an experiment to verify this method. The experimental result showed that this method overpredicted the impact pressure with a certain error of no more than 35%. By the experiment, we conclude that this method is conservative and applicable for the engineering design.

  17. Sloshing Simulation of Three Types Tank Ship on Pitching and Heaving Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edi Djatmiko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As an important part of a ship, tanker / cargo hold specifically designed to distribute the load to be maintained safely. In a related IMO classification of LNG carrier, there are a wide variety of types of LNG tanks on ships. Are generally divided into two types, namely tank (Independent Self Supporting Tank and (Non Self Supporting Tanks. The tank-type variation will affect the characteristics of fluid motion that is inside the tank. Need for simulation of sloshing and analysis of the structure of the tank due to the force created by the load when the heaving and pitching. Sloshing the effect of the free movement of the fluid in the tank with the striking motion wall tank walls that can damage the walls of the tank. Type 1 tank is a tank octagonal (octogonal for membrane-type LNG carrier with dimensions of length 38 m width 39.17 m 14.5 m high side of the tank. Type 2 tank is a tank-shaped capsule with the long dimension of 26.6 m and a diameter of 10.5 m. Type 3 tank is rectangular tank (rectanguler with dimensions of length of 49.68 m, width 46.92 and 32.23 m high. Simulations conducted using Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD using ANSYS FLUENT software. From the simulation results concluded that the tank 1 to form (octogonal have a total pressure of 3013.99 Pa on the front wall with a height of 13.65 m from the base of the tank

  18. Sloshing, fluid-structure interaction and structural response due to shock and impact loads 1994. PVP-Vol. 272

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, D.C.; Shin, Y.S.; Brochard, D.; Fujita, K.

    1994-01-01

    This volume is comprised of papers presented in two symposia at the 1994 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference. These sessions, sponsored by the Fluid-Structure Interaction and Seismic Engineering Technical Committees, provided a forum for the discussion of recent advances in sloshing, fluid-structure interaction, and structural dynamics produced by high energy excitations. The papers presented at the four technical sessions on Sloshing and Fluid-Structure Interaction represent a broad spectrum of fluid-structure systems: sloshing, fluid-structure interaction, and dynamic and seismic response of various fluid-structure systems such as reactor components, liquid storage tanks, submerged structures and piping systems, etc. The paper presented at the session on Structural Dynamics Produced by High-Energy Excitations cover underwater explosion effects on submerged structures, bubble loading phenomena, finite element mesh refinements on failure predictions, penetration and impact problems, and dynamic design of blast containment vessels. Also included are numerical analysis, design, and testing to understand difficult transient response phenomena. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 papers in this volume

  19. Sloshing of water in torus pressure-suppression pool of boiling water reactors under earthquake ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Godden, W.G.; Scalise, D.T.

    1978-08-01

    This report presents an analytical and experimental investigation into the sloshing of water in torus tanks under horizontal earthquake ground motions. This study was motivated because of the use of torus tanks for pressure-suppression pools in Boiling Water Reactors. Such a pressure-suppression pool would typically have 80 ft and 140 ft inside and outside diameters, a 30 ft diameter section, and a water depth of 15 ft. A general finite element analysis was developed for all axisymmetric tanks and a computer program was written to obtain time-history plots of sloshing displacements of water and dynamic pressures. Tests were carried out on a 1/60th scale model under sinusoidal as well as simulated earthquake ground motions. Tests and analytical results regarding natural frequencies, surface water displacements, and dynamic pressures were compared and a good agreement was found within the range of displacements studied. The computer program gave satisfactory results within a maximum range of sloshing displacements in the full-size prototype of 30 in. which is greater than the value obtained under the full intensity of the El Centro earthquake (N-S component 1940). The range of linear behavior was studied experimentally by subjecting the torus model to increasing intensities of the El Centro earthquake

  20. The Effects of Propellant Slosh Dynamics on the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Paul; Starin, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission, which is part of the Living With a Star program, was successfully launched and deployed from its Atlas V launch vehicle on February 11, 2010. SDO is an Explorer-class mission now operating in a geosynchronous orbit (GEO). The basic mission is to observe the Sun for a very high percentage of the 5-year mission (10-year goal) with long stretches of uninterrupted observations and with constant, high-data-rate transmission to a dedicated ground station located in White Sands, New Mexico. A significant portion of SDO's launch mass was propellant, contained in two large tanks. To ensure performance with this level of propellant, a slosh analysis was performed. This paper provides an overview of the SDO slosh analysis, the on-orbit experience, and the lessons learned. SDO is a three-axis controlled, single fault tolerant spacecraft. The attitude sensor complement includes sixteen coarse Sun sensors, a digital Sun sensor, three two-axis inertial reference units, two star trackers, and four guide telescopes. Attitude actuation is performed either using four reaction wheels or eight thrusters, depending on the control mode, along with single main engine which nominally provides velocity-change thrust. The attitude control software has five nominal control modes: three wheel-based modes and two thruster-based modes. A wheel-based Safehold running in the Attitude Control Electronics (ACE) box improves the robustness of the system as a whole. All six modes are designed on the same basic proportional-integral-derivative attitude error structure, with more robust modes setting their integral gains to zero. To achieve and maintain a geosynchronous orbit for a 2974-kilogram spacecraft in a cost effective manner, the SDO team designed a high-efficiency propulsive system. This bi-propellant design includes a 100-pound-force main engine and eight 5-pound-force attitude control thrusters. The main engine provides high specific impulse for

  1. Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) Inundation for Categories 2 and 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    The file geodatabase (fgdb) contains the Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes (SLOSH) Maximum of Maximums (MOM) model for hurricane categories 2 and 4. The EPA Office of Research & Development (ORD) modified the original model from NOAA to fit the model parameters for the Buzzards Bay region. The models show storm surge extent for the Mattapoisett area and therefore the flooding area was reduced to the study area. Areas of flooding that were not connected to the main water body were removed. The files in the geodatabase are:Cat2_SLR0_Int_Feet_dissolve_Mattapoisett: Current Category 2 hurricane with 0 ft sea level riseCat4_SLR0_Int_Feet_dissolve_Mattapoisett: Current Category 4 hurricane with 0 ft sea level riseCat4_SLR4_Int_Feet_dissolve_Mattapoisett: Future Category 4 hurricane with 4 feet sea level riseThe features support the Weather Ready Mattapoisett story map, which can be accessed via the following link:https://epa.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapJournal/index.html?appid=1ff4f1d28a254cb689334799d94b74e2

  2. Foam on troubled water: Capillary induced finite-time arrest of sloshing waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Francesco; Brun, P.-T.; Dollet, Benjamin; Gallaire, François

    2016-09-01

    Interfacial forces exceed gravitational forces on a scale small relative to the capillary length—two millimeters in the case of an air-water interface—and therefore dominate the physics of sub-millimetric systems. They are of paramount importance for various biological taxa and engineering processes where the motion of a liquid meniscus induces a viscous frictional force that exhibits a sublinear dependence in the meniscus velocity, i.e., a power law with an exponent smaller than one. Interested in the fundamental implications of this dependence, we use a liquid-foam sloshing system as a prototype to exacerbate the effect of sublinear friction on the macroscopic mechanics of multi-phase flows. In contrast to classical theory, we uncover the existence of a finite-time singularity in our system yielding the arrest of the fluid's oscillations. We propose a minimal theoretical framework to capture this effect, thereby amending the paradigmatic damped harmonic oscillator model. Our results suggest that, although often not considered at the macroscale, sublinear capillary forces govern the friction at liquid-solid and liquid-liquid interfaces.

  3. Analysis of Seismic Sloshing of Coolant in the ELSY-LFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, G.; Dinoi, P.; Cercos, J.; Gonzalez, L.; Guerrero, A.; Beltran, F.; Moreno, A.

    2013-01-01

    The seismically induced sloshing in the ELSY-LFR reactor vessel with and without seismic isolators at the base of the reactor building are studied. The approach is to compare the results given by three different methodologies. In the first method, a detailed model has been developed using the commercial code FLUENT. The methodology is CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics). The goal is to obtain the evolution of the free surfaces of molten lead in the complex 3D geometry of the vessel with internals. No fluid-structure interaction is considered during the seismic shaking. The second approach is based on the commercial code ABAQUS, using the ALE methodology (Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian). The purpose is to obtain the same results as with FLUENT. However, ABAQUS allows the study of the fluid structure interaction within the same computational model. In the third approach, the same simulation has been performed using the SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) method, a non-classical particle based Lagrangian numerical procedure which allows extremely large displacements at the fluid surfaces. A comparative study of the three different solutions has been carried out, in order to assess the capabilities and limitations of each method. The work has been carried out within the SILER project, a EU funded R and D project included in the 7th Framework Programme.

  4. Analysis of Seismic Sloshing of Coolant in the ELSY-LFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, G.; Dinoi, P.; Cercos, J.; Gonzalez, L.; Guerrero, A.; Beltran, F.; Moreno, A.

    2013-07-01

    The seismically induced sloshing in the ELSY-LFR reactor vessel with and without seismic isolators at the base of the reactor building are studied. The approach is to compare the results given by three different methodologies. In the first method, a detailed model has been developed using the commercial code FLUENT. The methodology is CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics). The goal is to obtain the evolution of the free surfaces of molten lead in the complex 3D geometry of the vessel with internals. No fluid-structure interaction is considered during the seismic shaking. The second approach is based on the commercial code ABAQUS, using the ALE methodology (Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian). The purpose is to obtain the same results as with FLUENT. However, ABAQUS allows the study of the fluid structure interaction within the same computational model. In the third approach, the same simulation has been performed using the SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) method, a non-classical particle based Lagrangian numerical procedure which allows extremely large displacements at the fluid surfaces. A comparative study of the three different solutions has been carried out, in order to assess the capabilities and limitations of each method. The work has been carried out within the SILER project, a EU funded R and D project included in the 7th Framework Programme.

  5. The dynamical simulation of transient three-dimensional cryogenic liquid sloshing oscillations under low-gravity and microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yong Mann

    A numerical simulation model has been developed for the dynamical behavior of spacecraft propellant, both during the draining and the closing of the tank outlet at the onset of suction dip affected by the asymmetric combined gravity gradient and gravity jitter accelerations. In particular the effect of the surface tension of the fluids in the partially filled dewar (applicable to the Gravity Probe-B spacecraft dewar tank and fuel tanks for a liquid rocket) with rotation has been simulated and investigated. Two different cases of accelerations, one with gravity jitter dominated and the other equally weighted between gravity gradient and gravity jitter accelerations, are studied. In the development of this numerical simulation model, the NASA-VOF3D has been used as a supplement to the numerical program of this dissertation. The NASA-VOF3D code has been used for performing the three-dimensional incompressible flows with free surface. This is also used for controlling liquid sloshing inside the tank when the spacecraft is orbiting. To keep track of the location of the liquid, the fractional volume of fluid (VOF) technique was used. The VOF is based on the indicator function of the region occupied by the liquid with an Eulerian approach to solve the free surface phenomena between liquid and gas phases. For the calculation of surface tension force, the VOF model is also used. The newly developed simulation model is used to investigate the characteristics of liquid hydrogen draining in terms of the residual amount of trapped liquid at the onset of the suction dip and residual liquid volume at the time the dip of the liquid-vapor interface formed. This investigation simulates the characteristics of liquid oscillations due to liquid container outlet shut-off at the onset of suction dip. These phenomena checked how these mechanisms affected the excitation of slosh waves during the course of liquid draining and after shut-off tank outlet. In the present study, the dynamical

  6. Sloshing of water in annular pressure-suppression pool of boiling water reactors under earthquake ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Godden, W.G.; Scalise, D.T.

    1979-10-01

    This report presents an analytical investigation of the sloshing response of water in annular-circular as well as simple-circular tanks under horizontal earthquake ground motions, and the results are verified with tests. This study was motivated because of the use of annular tanks for pressure-suppression pools in Boiling Water Reactors. Such a pressure-suppression pool would typically have 80 ft and 120 ft inside and outside diameters and a water depth of 20 ft. The analysis was based upon potential flow theory and a computer program was written to obtain time-history plots of sloshing displacements of water and the dynamic pressures. Tests were carried out on 1/80th and 1/15th scale models under sinusoidal as well as simulated earthquake ground motions. Tests and analytical results regarding the natural frequencies, surface water displacements, and dynamic pressures were compared and a good agreement was found for relatively small displacements. The computer program gave satisfactory results as long as the maximum water surface displacements were less than 30 in., which is roughly the value obtained under full intensity of El Centro earthquake

  7. Sloshing motion dynamics of a free surface in the draft tube cone of a Francis turbine operating in synchronous condenser mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagnoni, Elena; Andolfatto, Loïc; Favrel, Arthur; Avellan, François

    2016-11-01

    The penetration of the electrical grid by intermittent renewable energy sources induces grid fluctuations which must be compensated in order to guarantee the stability of the grid. Hydropower plants can supply reactive power to ensure the grid stabilization by operating in condenser mode. In this operating mode, the turbine operates with the tail water depressed to let the runner spin in air to reduce the power consumption. Pressurized air is injected in the draft tube cone to maintain the water level below the runner and this induces air-water interaction phenomena which cause important power losses. Flow visualization and pressure fluctuation measurements are performed in a reduced scale physical model of a Francis turbine operating in condenser mode to investigate the dynamics of the air-water interaction in the draft tube cone which causes the sloshing motion of the free surface. An image post-processing method is developed, enabling a quantitative description of the sloshing motion. The latter depends on the Froude number. By increasing the value of the Froude number, the amplitude of the sloshing motion decreases, as well as the amplitude of the pressure fluctuations. The frequency of the sloshing motion corresponds to the first natural frequency of the water volume.

  8. Experimental investigation of the sloshing motion of the water free surface in the draft tube of a Francis turbine operating in synchronous condenser mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagnoni, Elena; Favrel, Arthur; Andolfatto, Loïc; Avellan, François

    2018-06-01

    Hydropower units may be required to operate in condenser mode to supply reactive power. In this operating mode, the water level in the turbine or pump-turbine is decreased below the runner by closing the guide vanes and injecting pressurized air. While operating in condenser mode the machine experiences power losses due to several air-water interaction phenomena which cause air losses. One of such phenomena is the sloshing motion of the water free surface below the runner in the draft tube cone of a Francis turbine. The objective of the present work is to experimentally investigate the sloshing motion of the water free surface in the draft tube cone of a reduced scale physical model of a Francis turbine operating in condenser mode. Images acquisition and simultaneous pressure fluctuation measurements are performed and an image processing method is developed to investigate amplitude and frequency of the sloshing motion of the free surface. It is found that this motion is excited at the natural frequency of the water volume and corresponds to the azimuthal wavenumber m = 1 of a rotating gravity wave. The amplitude of the motion is perturbed by wave breaking and it decreases by increasing the densimetric Froude number. The sloshing frequency slightly increases with respect to the natural frequency of the water volume by increasing the densimetric Froude number. Moreover, it results that this resonant phenomenon is not related to the torque perturbation.

  9. Acquisition of Long-Duration, Low-Gravity Slosh Data Utilizing Existing ISS Equipment (SPHERES) for Calibration of CFD Models of Coupled Fluid-Vehicle Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallhorn, Paul; Roth, Jacob; Marsell, Brandon; Kirk, Daniel; Gutierrez, Hector; Saenz-Otero, Alvar; Dorney, Daniel; Moder, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Accurate prediction of coupled fluid slosh and launch vehicle or spacecraft dynamics (e.g., nutation/precessional movement about various axes, attitude changes, ect.) requires Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models calibrated with low-gravity, long duration slosh data. Recently completed investigations of reduced gravity slosh behavior have demonstrated the limitations of utilizing parabolic flights on specialized aircraft with respect to the specific objectives of the experiments. Although valuable data was collected, the benefits of longer duration low-gravity environments were clearly established. The proposed research provides the first data set from long duration tests in zero gravity that can be directly used to benchmark CFD models, including the interaction between the sloshing fluid and the tank/vehicle dynamics. To explore the coupling of liquid slosh with the motion of an unconstrained tank in microgravity, NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Launch Services Program has teamed up with the Florida Institute of Technology (FIT), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the NASA Game Changing Development Program (GCD) to perform a series of slosh dynamics experiments on the International Space Station using the SPHERES platform. The Synchronized Position Hold Engage Reorient Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) testbed provides a unique, free-floating instrumented platform on ISS that can be utilized in a manner that would solve many of the limitations of the current knowledge related to propellant slosh dynamics on launch vehicle and spacecraft fuel tanks. The six degree of freedom (6-DOF) motion of the SPHERES free-flyer is controlled by an array of cold-flow C02 thrusters, supplied from a built-in liquid C02 tank. These SPHERES can independently navigate and re-orient themselves within the ISS. The intent of this project is to design an externally mounted tank to be driven inside the ISS by a set of two SPHERES devices (Figure 1). The tank geometry

  10. Acquisition of Long-Duration, Low-Gravity Slosh Data Utilizing Existing ISS Equipment (SPHERES) for Calibration of CFD Models of Coupled Fluid-Vehicle Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallhorn, Paul; Roth, Jacob; Marsell, Brandon; Kirk, Daniel; Gutierrez, Hector; Saenz-Otero, Alvar; Dorney, Daniel; Moder, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Accurate prediction of coupled fluid slosh and launch vehicle or spacecraft dynamics (e.g., nutation/precessional movement about various axes, attitude changes, ect.) requires Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models calibrated with low-gravity, long duration slosh data. Recently completed investigations of reduced gravity slosh behavior have demonstrated the limitations of utilizing parabolic flights on specialized aircraft with respect to the specific objectives of the experiments. Although valuable data was collected, the benefits of longer duration low-gravity environments were clearly established. The proposed research provides the first data set from long duration tests in zero gravity that can be directly used to benchmark CFD models, including the interaction between the sloshing fluid and the tank/vehicle dynamics. To explore the coupling of liquid slosh with the motion of an unconstrained tank in microgravity, NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Launch Services Program has teamed up with the Florida Institute of Technology (FIT), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) to perform a series of slosh dynamics experiments on the International Space Station using the SPHERES platform. The Synchronized Position Hold Engage Reorient Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) testbed provides a unique, free-floating instrumented platform on ISS that can be utilized in a manner that would solve many of the limitations of the current knowledge related to propellant slosh dynamics on launch vehicle and spacecraft fuel tanks. The six degree of freedom (6-DOF) motion of the SPHERES free-flyer is controlled by an array of cold-flow C02 thrusters, supplied from a built-in liquid C02 tank. These SPHERES can independently navigate and re-orient themselves within the ISS. The intent of this project is to design an externally mounted tank to be driven inside the ISS by a set of two SPHERES devices (Figure 1 ). The tank geometry simulates

  11. Theoretical study on instability mechanism of jet-induced sloshing. Model development using Orr-Sommerfeld equation generalized for non-parallel flow; Funryu reiki sloshing gensho no hassei kiko ni kansuru rironteki kenkyu. Hiheiko nagare ni ippankashita Orr-Sommerfeld hoteishiki wo mochiita model ka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguchi, Y. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-25

    A theoretical model was developed to study the mechanism of free surface sloshing in a vessel induced by a steady vertical jet flow. In the model, jet deflection is calculated with eigen values of the generalized Orr-Sommerfeld equation which is applicable to slightly non-parallel jet. Instability criteria employed in the model are (1) resonace condition between sloshing and jet frequencies and (2) {pi} phase relation between jet displacement at an inlet and global jet deflection. Numerical results of the mathematical model have shown good agreement with experimental ones, which justifies that the inherent instability of free jet itself and edge tone feedback are the main causes of the self-excited sloshing. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Theoretical analysis of Sloshing effect on Pitch Angel to optimize quick dive on litoral submarine 22 M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinaga, L. T. P.

    2016-11-01

    This study considers the analytic theoretical model. The Submarine was considered to be rigid body are free sailing model with various angle of attack to be quick dive as pitching motion. By using Floating Body Mechanism supported by analytic model to describe the theoretical model analisys test. For the case of fluid level on 30% of the front balast tank and various angle of pitch. The paper describes a study on Analytic theoretical and modeling in CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics). For Analyzing at special care of sloshing on free surce ballast tank after peak and fore peak were taken into consideration. In general, both methods (analytic model and CFD model) demonstrated such a good agreement, particularly in the consistent trend of RAO.

  13. On the sloshing free surface in the draft tube cone of a Francis turbine operating in synchronous condenser mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagnoni, E.; Andolfatto, L.; Avellan, F.

    2017-04-01

    Hydropower plants may be required to operate in synchronous condenser mode in order to supply reactive power to the grid for compensating the fluctuations introduced by the intermittent renewable energies such wind and solar. When operating in this mode, the tail water in the Francis turbine or pump-turbine is depressed below the runner by injecting pressurized air in order to spin in air to reduce the power consumption. Many air-water interaction phenomena occur in the machine causing air losses and a consequent power consumption to recover the air lost. In this paper, the experimental investigation of the sloshing motion in the cone of a dewatered Francis turbine performed by image visualization and pressure measurements is presented. The developed image post processing method for identifying the amplitude and frequency of the oscillation of the free surface is described and the results obtained are illustrated and discussed.

  14. BINARY BLACK HOLES, GAS SLOSHING, AND COLD FRONTS IN THE X-RAY HALO HOSTING 4C+37.11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade-Santos, Felipe; Bogdán, Ákos; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Romani, Roger W. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States); Taylor, Greg B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Zavala, Robert T. [US Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 W. Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2016-07-20

    We analyzed deep Chandra ACIS-I exposures of the cluster-scale X-ray halo surrounding the radio source 4C+37.11. This remarkable system hosts the closest resolved pair of super-massive black holes and an exceptionally luminous elliptical galaxy, the likely product of a series of past mergers. We characterize the halo with r {sub 500} ∼ 0.95 Mpc, M {sub 500} = 2.5 ± 0.2 × 10{sup 14} M {sub ⊙}, kT = 4.6 ± 0.2 keV, and a gas mass of M {sub g,500} = 2.2 ± 0.1 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ⊙}. The gas mass fraction within r {sub 500} is f {sub g} = 0.09 ± 0.01. The entropy profile shows large non-gravitational heating in the central regions. We see several surface brightness jumps, associated with substantial temperature and density changes but approximate pressure equilibrium, implying that these are sloshing structures driven by a recent merger. A residual intensity image shows a core spiral structure closely matching that seen in the Perseus cluster, although at z = 0.055 the spiral pattern is less distinct. We infer that the most recent merger occurred 1–2 Gyr ago and that the event that brought the two observed super-massive black holes to the system core is even older. Under this interpretation, the black hole binary pair has, unusually, remained at a parsec-scale separation for more than 2 Gyr.

  15. Shallow-water sloshing in a moving vessel with variable cross-section and wetting-drying using an extension of George's well-balanced finite volume solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemi Ardakani, Hamid; Bridges, Thomas J.; Turner, Matthew R.

    2016-06-01

    A class of augmented approximate Riemann solvers due to George (2008) [12] is extended to solve the shallow-water equations in a moving vessel with variable bottom topography and variable cross-section with wetting and drying. A class of Roe-type upwind solvers for the system of balance laws is derived which respects the steady-state solutions. The numerical solutions of the new adapted augmented f-wave solvers are validated against the Roe-type solvers. The theory is extended to solve the shallow-water flows in moving vessels with arbitrary cross-section with influx-efflux boundary conditions motivated by the shallow-water sloshing in the ocean wave energy converter (WEC) proposed by Offshore Wave Energy Ltd. (OWEL) [1]. A fractional step approach is used to handle the time-dependent forcing functions. The numerical solutions are compared to an extended new Roe-type solver for the system of balance laws with a time-dependent source function. The shallow-water sloshing finite volume solver can be coupled to a Runge-Kutta integrator for the vessel motion.

  16. Hydroelastic slamming response in the evolution of a flip-through event during shallow-liquid sloshing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugni, C.; Bardazzi, A.; Faltinsen, O. M.; Graziani, G.

    2014-03-01

    The evolution of a flip-through event [6] upon a vertical, deformable wall during shallow-water sloshing in a 2D tank is analyzed, with specific focus on the role of hydroelasticity. An aluminium plate, whose dimensions are Froude-scaled in order to reproduce the first wet natural frequency associated with the typical structural panel of a Mark III containment system, is used. (Mark III Containment System is a membrane-type tank used in the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) carrier to contain the LNG. A typical structural panel is composed by two metallic membranes and two independent thermal insulation layers. The first membrane contains the LNG, the second one ensures redundancy in case of leakage.) Such a system is clamped to a fully rigid vertical wall of the tank at the vertical ends while being kept free on its lateral sides. Hence, in a 2D flow approximation the system can be suitably modelled, as a double-clamped Euler beam, with the Euler beam theory. The hydroelastic effects are assessed by cross-analyzing the experimental data based both on the images recorded by a fast camera, and on the strain measurements along the deformable panel and on the pressure measurements on the rigid wall below the elastic plate. The same experiments are also carried out by substituting the deformable plate with a fully stiff panel. The pressure transducers are mounted at the same positions of the strain gauges used for the deformable plate. The comparison between the results of rigid and elastic case allows to better define the role of hydroelasticity. The analysis has identified three different regimes characterizing the hydroelastic evolution: a quasi-static deformation of the beam (regime I) precedes a strongly hydroelastic behavior (regime II), for which the added mass effects are relevant; finally, the free-vibration phase (regime III) occurs. A hybrid method, combining numerical modelling and experimental data from the tests with fully rigid plate is proposed to examine the

  17. Hydroelastic slamming response in the evolution of a flip-through event during shallow-liquid sloshing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugni, C.; Bardazzi, A.; Faltinsen, O. M.; Graziani, G.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of a flip-through event [6] upon a vertical, deformable wall during shallow-water sloshing in a 2D tank is analyzed, with specific focus on the role of hydroelasticity. An aluminium plate, whose dimensions are Froude-scaled in order to reproduce the first wet natural frequency associated with the typical structural panel of a Mark III containment system, is used. (Mark III Containment System is a membrane-type tank used in the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) carrier to contain the LNG. A typical structural panel is composed by two metallic membranes and two independent thermal insulation layers. The first membrane contains the LNG, the second one ensures redundancy in case of leakage.) Such a system is clamped to a fully rigid vertical wall of the tank at the vertical ends while being kept free on its lateral sides. Hence, in a 2D flow approximation the system can be suitably modelled, as a double-clamped Euler beam, with the Euler beam theory. The hydroelastic effects are assessed by cross-analyzing the experimental data based both on the images recorded by a fast camera, and on the strain measurements along the deformable panel and on the pressure measurements on the rigid wall below the elastic plate. The same experiments are also carried out by substituting the deformable plate with a fully stiff panel. The pressure transducers are mounted at the same positions of the strain gauges used for the deformable plate. The comparison between the results of rigid and elastic case allows to better define the role of hydroelasticity. The analysis has identified three different regimes characterizing the hydroelastic evolution: a quasi-static deformation of the beam (regime I) precedes a strongly hydroelastic behavior (regime II), for which the added mass effects are relevant; finally, the free-vibration phase (regime III) occurs. A hybrid method, combining numerical modelling and experimental data from the tests with fully rigid plate is proposed to examine the

  18. Factor structure and longitudinal measurement invariance of the demand control support model: an evidence from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chungkham, Holendro Singh; Ingre, Michael; Karasek, Robert; Westerlund, Hugo; Theorell, Töres

    2013-01-01

    To examine the factor structure and to evaluate the longitudinal measurement invariance of the demand-control-support questionnaire (DCSQ), using the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH). A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and multi-group confirmatory factor analysis (MGCFA) models within the framework of structural equation modeling (SEM) have been used to examine the factor structure and invariance across time. Four factors: psychological demand, skill discretion, decision authority and social support, were confirmed by CFA at baseline, with the best fit obtained by removing the item repetitive work of skill discretion. A measurement error correlation (0.42) between work fast and work intensively for psychological demands was also detected. Acceptable composite reliability measures were obtained except for skill discretion (0.68). The invariance of the same factor structure was established, but caution in comparing mean levels of factors over time is warranted as lack of intercept invariance was evident. However, partial intercept invariance was established for work intensively. Our findings indicate that skill discretion and decision authority represent two distinct constructs in the retained model. However removing the item repetitive work along with either work fast or work intensively would improve model fit. Care should also be taken while making comparisons in the constructs across time. Further research should investigate invariance across occupations or socio-economic classes.

  19. Factor structure and longitudinal measurement invariance of the demand control support model: an evidence from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holendro Singh Chungkham

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine the factor structure and to evaluate the longitudinal measurement invariance of the demand-control-support questionnaire (DCSQ, using the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH. METHODS: A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA and multi-group confirmatory factor analysis (MGCFA models within the framework of structural equation modeling (SEM have been used to examine the factor structure and invariance across time. RESULTS: Four factors: psychological demand, skill discretion, decision authority and social support, were confirmed by CFA at baseline, with the best fit obtained by removing the item repetitive work of skill discretion. A measurement error correlation (0.42 between work fast and work intensively for psychological demands was also detected. Acceptable composite reliability measures were obtained except for skill discretion (0.68. The invariance of the same factor structure was established, but caution in comparing mean levels of factors over time is warranted as lack of intercept invariance was evident. However, partial intercept invariance was established for work intensively. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that skill discretion and decision authority represent two distinct constructs in the retained model. However removing the item repetitive work along with either work fast or work intensively would improve model fit. Care should also be taken while making comparisons in the constructs across time. Further research should investigate invariance across occupations or socio-economic classes.

  20. X-Ray Flare Oscillations Track Plasma Sloshing along Star-disk Magnetic Tubes in the Orion Star-forming Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, Fabio; Lopez-Santiago, Javier; Flaccomio, Ettore; Petralia, Antonino; Sciortino, Salvatore

    2018-03-01

    Pulsing X-ray emission tracks the plasma “echo” traveling in an extremely long magnetic tube that flares in an Orion pre-main sequence (PMS) star. On the Sun, flares last from minutes to a few hours and the longest-lasting ones typically involve arcades of closed magnetic tubes. Long-lasting X-ray flares are observed in PMS stars. Large-amplitude (∼20%), long-period (∼3 hr) pulsations are detected in the light curve of day-long flares observed by the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer on-board Chandra from PMS stars in the Orion cluster. Detailed hydrodynamic modeling of two flares observed on V772 Ori and OW Ori shows that these pulsations may track the sloshing of plasma along a single long magnetic tube, triggered by a sufficiently short (∼1 hr) heat pulse. These magnetic tubes are ≥20 solar radii long, enough to connect the star with the surrounding disk.

  1. Do Predictors of Career Success Differ between Swedish Women and Men? Data from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Anna; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Leineweber, Constanze; Johansson, Gunn

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to explore predictors of objective career success among Swedish women and men, focussing on gender differences. Data were drawn from the 2008 and 2010 waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) with a total of 3670 female and 2773 male participants. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for job promotion and an above-average salary increase between 2008 and 2010 were obtained through binary logistic regression analyses. Individual and organisational factors measured in 2008 were used as predictors in analyses stratified by sex. Mutual adjustment was performed for these variables, as well as for labour market sector and staff category at baseline. In both sexes, younger age predicted both job promotion and an above-average salary increase. Job promotion was also in both sexes predicted by being part of decision-making processes, having conflicts with superiors, and being eager to advance. Furthermore, promotion was predicted by, among men, being educated to post-graduate level and having an open coping strategy and, among women, working >60 hours/week. An above-average salary increase was predicted in both sexes by having a university education. Postgraduate education, having children living at home, and being very motivated to advance predicted an above-average salary increase among women, as did working 51-60 hours/week and being part of decision-making processes in men. Gender differences were seen in several predictors. In conclusion, the results support previous findings of gender differences in predictors of career success. A high level of education, motivation to advance, and procedural justice appear to be more important predictors of career success among women, while open coping was a more important predictor among men.

  2. High-resolution sub-Doppler infrared spectroscopy of atmospherically relevant Criegee precursor CH2I radicals: CH2 stretch vibrations and "charge-sloshing" dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortyna, A.; Lesko, D. M. B.; Nesbitt, D. J.

    2018-05-01

    The combination of a pulsed supersonic slit-discharge source and single-mode difference frequency direct absorption infrared spectroscopy permit first high resolution infrared study of the iodomethyl (CH2I) radical, with the CH2I radical species generated in a slit jet Ne/He discharge and cooled to 16 K in the supersonic expansion. Dual laser beam detection and collisional collimation in the slit expansion yield sub-Doppler linewidths (60 MHz), an absolute frequency calibration of 13 MHz, and absorbance sensitivities within a factor of two of the shot-noise limit. Fully rovibrationally resolved direct absorption spectra of the CH2 symmetric stretch mode (ν2) are obtained and fitted to a Watson asymmetric top Hamiltonian with electron spin-rotation coupling, providing precision rotational constants and spin-rotation tensor elements for the vibrationally excited state. Analysis of the asymmetric top rotational constants confirms a vibrationally averaged planar geometry in both the ground- and first-excited vibrational levels. Sub-Doppler resolution permits additional nuclear spin hyperfine structures to be observed, with splittings in excellent agreement with microwave measurements on the ground state. Spectroscopic data on CH2I facilitate systematic comparison with previous studies of halogen-substituted methyl radicals, with the periodic trends strongly correlated with the electronegativity of the halogen atom. Interestingly, we do not observe any asymmetric CH2 stretch transitions, despite S/N ≈ 25:1 on strongest lines in the corresponding symmetric CH2 stretch manifold. This dramatic reversal of the more typical 3:1 antisymmetric/symmetric CH2 stretch intensity ratio signals a vibrational transition moment poorly described by simple "bond-dipole" models. Instead, the data suggest that this anomalous intensity ratio arises from "charge sloshing" dynamics in the highly polar carbon-iodine bond, as supported by ab initio electron differential density plots and

  3. Do Predictors of Career Success Differ between Swedish Women and Men? Data from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Nyberg

    Full Text Available The aim of this prospective study was to explore predictors of objective career success among Swedish women and men, focussing on gender differences. Data were drawn from the 2008 and 2010 waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH with a total of 3670 female and 2773 male participants. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for job promotion and an above-average salary increase between 2008 and 2010 were obtained through binary logistic regression analyses. Individual and organisational factors measured in 2008 were used as predictors in analyses stratified by sex. Mutual adjustment was performed for these variables, as well as for labour market sector and staff category at baseline. In both sexes, younger age predicted both job promotion and an above-average salary increase. Job promotion was also in both sexes predicted by being part of decision-making processes, having conflicts with superiors, and being eager to advance. Furthermore, promotion was predicted by, among men, being educated to post-graduate level and having an open coping strategy and, among women, working >60 hours/week. An above-average salary increase was predicted in both sexes by having a university education. Postgraduate education, having children living at home, and being very motivated to advance predicted an above-average salary increase among women, as did working 51-60 hours/week and being part of decision-making processes in men. Gender differences were seen in several predictors. In conclusion, the results support previous findings of gender differences in predictors of career success. A high level of education, motivation to advance, and procedural justice appear to be more important predictors of career success among women, while open coping was a more important predictor among men.

  4. Change in Work-Time Control and Work-Home Interference Among Swedish Working Men and Women: Findings from the SLOSH Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leineweber, Constanze; Kecklund, Göran; Lindfors, Petra; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L

    2016-12-01

    The aim is to study the influence of change in work-time control (WTC) on work-home interference (WHI) while adjusting for other work-related factors, demographics, changes at work and WHI at baseline among women and men. An additional aim was to explore sex differences in the relation between change in WTC and WHI. The study included working participants of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) study of the third (2010) and fourth (2012) waves (n = 5440). Based on a seven-item index, four groups of WTC were formed: stable high (40 %), stable low (42 %), increasing (9 %), or decreasing (9 %) WTC over the 2 years. WHI was measured by four items and individuals were categorised in whether suffering or not suffering of WHI. Sex-stratified logistic regression analyses with 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were used to estimate the odds of experiencing WHI by change in WTC. Controlling for demographics and work-related factors, women with stable low (OR = 1.46; 95 % CI 1.14-1.88) and women and men with decreasing WTC (women OR = 1.99; 95 % CI 1.38-2.85; men OR = 1.80; 95 % CI 1.18-2.73) had higher odds of WHI than those with a stable high WTC. Additionally, adjusting for changes at work and WHI at baseline did not alter the results substantially. Interaction analysis did not reveal any significant sex difference in the relation between WTC and WHI. For both women and men decreased and for women only, low control over working hours resulted in WHI also after adjusting for work-related factors and demographics.

  5. Liquid sloshing on Earth and in space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, J; Fekken, G; Loots, GE; Veldman, AEP; Sarler, B; Brebbia, CA; Power, H

    1999-01-01

    Free-surface flows are difficult to simulate since the position of the free surface itself is part of the problem that needs to be solved. In the absence of gravity, simulation of free-surface flow is extra complicated because capillary effects dominate. In this case the shape of the interface

  6. Linear sloshing frequencies in the annular region of a circular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Choudhary

    Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039, India e-mail: ... free surface flows in tanks in aircraft, missiles and rockets ... oil, liquefied gas or water. ... limit of the modes depended on the angle of intersection of the .... examine the effect of baffle width and liquid height as well.

  7. Linear and nonlinear analysis of fluid slosh dampers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, B. A.; Baumgarten, J. R.

    1982-11-01

    A vibrating structure and a container partially filled with fluid are considered coupled in a free vibration mode. To simplify the mathematical analysis, a pendulum model to duplicate the fluid motion and a mass-spring dashpot representing the vibrating structure are used. The equations of motion are derived by Lagrange's energy approach and expressed in parametric form. For a wide range of parametric values the logarithmic decrements of the main system are calculated from theoretical and experimental response curves in the linear analysis. However, for the nonlinear analysis the theoretical and experimental response curves of the main system are compared. Theoretical predictions are justified by experimental observations with excellent agreement. It is concluded finally that for a proper selection of design parameters, containers partially filled with viscous fluids serve as good vibration dampers.

  8. A modal method for finite amplitude, nonlinear sloshing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    obtaining new and interesting results of the effects of capillarity and shallow .... expressions to the corresponding ones for the infinitely deep cavity when h —∞ and to ..... These five frames show the contribution of modes 10–20 to the free.

  9. GAS payload no. G-025: Study of liquid sloshing behaviour in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    The Get Away Special (GAS) G-025, which flew on shuttle Mission 51-G, examined the behavior of a liquid in a tank under microgravity conditions. The experiment is representative of phenomena occurring in satellite tanks with liquid propellants. A reference fluid in a hemispherical model tank will be subjected to linear acceleration inputs of known levels and frequencies, and the dynamic response of the tank liquid system was recorded. Preliminary analysis of the flight data indicates that the experiment functioned perfectly. The results will validate and refine mathematical models describing the dynamic characteristics of tank-fluid systems. This will in turn support the development of future spacecraft tanks, in particular the design of propellant management devices for surface tension tanks.

  10. A computationally efficient 3D finite-volume scheme for violent liquid–gas sloshing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oxtoby, Oliver F

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe a semi-implicit volume-of-fluid free-surface-modelling methodology for flow problems involving violent free-surface motion. For efficient computation, a hybrid-unstructured edge-based vertex-centred finite volume discretisation...

  11. PLASMA SLOSHING IN PULSE-HEATED SOLAR AND STELLAR CORONAL LOOPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reale, F., E-mail: fabio.reale@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence that coronal heating is highly intermittent, and flares are the high energy extreme. The properties of the heat pulses are difficult to constrain. Here, hydrodynamic loop modeling shows that several large amplitude oscillations (∼20% in density) are triggered in flare light curves if the duration of the heat pulse is shorter than the sound crossing time of the flaring loop. The reason for this is that the plasma does not have enough time to reach pressure equilibrium during heating, and traveling pressure fronts develop. The period is a few minutes for typical solar coronal loops, dictated by the sound crossing time in the decay phase. The long period and large amplitude make these oscillations different from typical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. This diagnostic can be applied both to observations of solar and stellar flares and to future observations of non-flaring loops at high resolution.

  12. Dedicated Slosh Dynamics Experiment on ISS using SPHERES (Advanced Space Operations in CR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — At the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) the Launch Services Program is leading an effort to conduct an experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to validate...

  13. Modeling, system identification, and control for slosh-free motion of an open container of liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feddema, J.; Baty, R.; Dykhuizen, R.; Dohrmann, C.; Parker, G.; Robinett, R.; Romero, V.; Schmitt, D.

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses work performed under a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) with Corning, Inc., to analyze and test various techniques for controlling the motion of a high speed robotic arm carrying an open container of viscous liquid, in this case, molten glass. A computer model was generated to estimate the modes of oscillation of the liquid based on the shape of the container and the viscosity of the liquid. This fluid model was experimentally verified and tuned based on experimental data from a capacitive sensor on the side of the container. A model of the robot dynamics was also developed and verified through experimental tests on a Fanuc S-800 robot arm. These two models were used to estimate the overall modes of oscillation of an open container of liquid being carried by a robot arm. Using the estimated modes, inverse dynamic control techniques were used to determine a motion profile which would eliminate waves on the liquid's surface. Experimental tests showed that residual surface waves in an open container of water at the end of motion were reduced by over 95% and that in-motion surface waves were reduced by over 75%

  14. The longitudinal relationship between control over working hours and depressive symptoms: Results from SLOSH, a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Sophie C; Kecklund, Göran; Rajaleid, Kristiina; Leineweber, Constanze

    2017-06-01

    Psychosocial work factors can affect depressive moods, but research is inconclusive if flexibility to self-determine working hours (work-time control, WTC) is associated with depressive symptoms over time. We investigated if either sub-dimension of WTC, control over daily hours and control over time off, was related to depressive symptoms over time and examined causal, reversed-causal, and reciprocal pathways. The study was based on four waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health which is a follow-up of representative samples of the Swedish working population. WTC was measured using a 5-item index. Depressive symptoms were assessed with a brief subscale of the Symptom Checklist. Latent growth curve models and cross-lagged panel models were tested. Best fit was found for a model with correlated intercepts (control over daily hours) and both correlated intercepts and slopes (control over time off) between WTC and depressive symptoms, with stronger associations for control over time off. Causal models estimating impacts from WTC to subsequent depressive symptoms were best fitting, with a standardised coefficient between -0.023 and -0.048. Results were mainly based on self-report data and mean age in the study sample was relatively high. Higher WTC was related to fewer depressive symptoms over time albeit small effects. Giving workers control over working hours - especially over taking breaks and vacation - may improve working conditions and buffer against developing depression, potentially by enabling workers to recover more easily and promoting work-life balance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of overflow-induced sloshing in an elestic-wall vessel using physical component BFC method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, D.; Kondo, S. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Takizawa, A. [Toyko Electric Power Company, Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Newly developed {open_quotes}physical component boundary fitted coordinate (PCBFC) method{close_quotes} is applied to the fluid-structure interaction problems. The applicability was verified through several benchmark problems. Then, 2D experiment on overflow-induced fluid-structure interaction instability was simulated. The computation showed occurrence scope of instability essentially the same as that obtained by experiment. By computations with modified initial and boundary conditions, several basic factors for the occurrence of this instability were obtained.

  16. The longitudinal relationship between control over working hours and depressive symptoms: Results from SLOSH, a population-based cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, S.C.; Kecklund, L.G.; Rajaleid, K.; Leineweber, C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Psychosocial work factors can affect depressive moods, but research is inconclusive if flexibility to self-determine working hours (work-time control, WTC) is associated with depressive symptoms over time. We investigated if either sub-dimension of WTC, control over daily hours and

  17. Work-family conflict and health in Swedish working women and men: a 2-year prospective analysis (the SLOSH study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leineweber, Constanze; Baltzer, Maria; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Westerlund, Hugo

    2013-08-01

    Research has suggested that gender is related to perceptions of work-family conflict (WFC) and an underlying assumption is that interference of paid work with family life will burden women more than men. There is, however, mixed evidence as to whether men and women report different levels of WFC. Even less studies investigate gender differences in health outcomes of WFC. Also the number of longitudinal studies in this field is low. Based on the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health, we prospectively examined the effects of WFC on three different health measures representing a wide spectrum off ill health (i.e. self-rated health, emotional exhaustion and problem drinking). Logistic regression analyses were used to analyse multivariate associations between WFC in 2008 and health 2 years later. The results show that WFC was associated with an increased risk of emotional exhaustion among both men and women. Gender differences are suggested as WFC was related to an increased risk for poor self-rated health among women and problem drinking among men. Interaction analyses revealed that the risk of poor self-rated health was substantially more influenced by WFC among women than among men. We conclude that, despite the fact that women experience conflict between work and family life slightly more often than men, both men's and women's health is negatively affected by this phenomenon.

  18. Self-induced oscillation of free surface in a tank with circulating flow, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Koji; Madarame, Haruki; Hagiwara, Tsuyoshi

    1991-01-01

    An energy supply mechanism to self-induced sloshing in a tank with circulating flow is proposed. The circulating flow impinges on the free surface making it swell partially. The amount of swell increases with increasing water level under the condition of growing sloshing. The change of the free surface contour by this effect supplies sufficient energy to the sloshing. The dependency of the sloshing growth on the flow rate and the water level is explained well by this model. (author)

  19. The nonlinear dynamics of a spacecraft coupled to the vibration of a contained fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lee D.; Crawley, Edward F.; Hansman, R. John

    1988-01-01

    The dynamics of a linear spacecraft mode coupled to a nonlinear low gravity slosh of a fluid in a cylindrical tank is investigated. Coupled, nonlinear equations of motion for the fluid-spacecraft dynamics are derived through an assumed mode Lagrangian method. Unlike linear fluid slosh models, this nonlinear slosh model retains two fundamental slosh modes and three secondary modes. An approximate perturbation solution of the equations of motion indicates that the nonlinear coupled system response involves fluid-spacecraft modal resonances not predicted by either a linear, or a nonlinear, uncoupled slosh analysis. Experimental results substantiate the analytical predictions.

  20. Guide to Eating for Sports

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... energy and then leave them to "crash" or run out of energy before they've finished working ... than you may need either. It's hard to run when there's a lot of water sloshing around ...

  1. Application of real space Kerker method in simulating gate-all-around nanowire transistors with realistic discrete dopants*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chang-Sheng; Ma Lei; Guo Jie-Rong

    2017-01-01

    We adopt a self-consistent real space Kerker method to prevent the divergence from charge sloshing in the simulating transistors with realistic discrete dopants in the source and drain regions. The method achieves efficient convergence by avoiding unrealistic long range charge sloshing but keeping effects from short range charge sloshing. Numerical results show that discrete dopants in the source and drain regions could have a bigger influence on the electrical variability than the usual continuous doping without considering charge sloshing. Few discrete dopants and the narrow geometry create a situation with short range Coulomb screening and oscillations of charge density in real space. The dopants induced quasi-localized defect modes in the source region experience short range oscillations in order to reach the drain end of the device. The charging of the defect modes and the oscillations of the charge density are identified by the simulation of the electron density. (paper)

  2. Self-excited oscillation due to the fluid discharge over a flexible weir, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisano, Katsumi; Kaneko, Shigehiko

    1989-01-01

    The excitation mechanism of a self-excited oscillation due to the fluid discharge over a flexible weir was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. A new type of hydroelastic instability was discovered during test operations of the Super-Phenix LMFBR reactor in France. According to the recent report by Aita, this phenomenon includes two types of instability modes: one is sloshing mode which means the oscillation of a weir associated with coupled sloshing modes of both feeding and restitution fluid collectors; the other is a hydroelastic mode which means the oscillation of a weir associated with fluid-shell modes. In this report, the excitation mechanism of a sloshing mode is discussed by calculating the excitation energy brought by discharge to the fluid-structure system. The theoretical results for the range of sloshing mode instability almost agreed with the experimental data. (author)

  3. Tuned liquid dampers for multi-storey structure: numerical simulation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Eswaran

    Abstract. Wind-induced and earthquake-induced vibrations of structures such as super-tall towers and bridges ... A TLD is liquid confined in a container that uses the sloshing energy ... lation and handling, easy maintenance and lower cost,.

  4. Shallow Water Tuned Liquid Dampers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Jørgen

    that for realistic roughness parameters the bottom friction has very limited effect on the liquid sloshing behavior and can be neglected. Herby the postulate is verified. Based on the mathematical model three dimensionless parameters are derived showing that the response of the damper depends solely on ratio......The use of sloshing liquid as a passive means of suppressing the rolling motion of ships was proposed already in the late 19th century. Some hundred years later the use of liquid sloshing devices, often termed Tuned Liquid Dampers (TLD), began to find use in the civil engineering community....... The TLDs studied in this thesis essentially consist of a rectangular container partially filled with liquid in the form of plain tap water. The frequency of the liquid sloshing motion, which is adjusted by varying the length of the tank and the depth of the wa- ter, is tuned to the structural frequency...

  5. Exciting Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Bradford L.

    1975-01-01

    Advocates the creation of swimming pool oscillations as part of a general investigation of mechanical oscillations. Presents the equations, procedure for deriving the slosh modes, and methods of period estimation for exciting swimming pool oscillations. (GS)

  6. Plasma heating and hot ion sustaining in mirror based hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseenko, V. E.; Ågren, O.

    2012-01-01

    Possibilities of plasma heating and sloshing ion sustaining in mirror based hybrids are briefly reviewed. Sloshing ions, i.e. energetic ions with a velocity distribution concentrated to a certain pitch-angle, play an important role in plasma confinement and generation of fusion neutrons in mirror machines. Neutral beam injection (NBI) is first discussed as a method to generate sloshing ions. Numerical results of NBI modeling for a stellarator-mirror hybrid are analyzed. The sloshing ions could alternatively be sustained by RF heating. Fast wave heating schemes, i.e. magnetic beach, minority and second harmonic heating, are addressed and their similarities and differences are described. Characteristic features of wave propagation in mirror hybrid devices including both fundamental harmonic minority and second harmonic heating are examined. Minority heating is efficient for a wide range of minority concentration and plasma densities; it allows one to place the antenna aside from the hot ion location. A simple-design strap antenna suitable for this has good performance. However, this scenario is appropriate only for light minority ions. The second harmonic heating can be applied for the heavy ion component. Arrangements are similar for minority and second harmonic heating. The efficiency of second harmonic heating is influenced by a weaker wave damping than for minority heating. Numerical calculations show that in a hybrid reactor scaled mirror machine the deuterium sloshing ions could be heated within the minority heating scheme, while the tritium ions could be sustained by second harmonic heating.

  7. Water level response measurement in a steel cylindrical liquid storage tank using image filter processing under seismic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Wan; Choi, Hyoung-Suk; Park, Dong-Uk; Baek, Eun-Rim; Kim, Jae-Min

    2018-02-01

    Sloshing refers to the movement of fluid that occurs when the kinetic energy of various storage tanks containing fluid (e.g., excitation and vibration) is continuously applied to the fluid inside the tanks. As the movement induced by an external force gets closer to the resonance frequency of the fluid, the effect of sloshing increases, and this can lead to a serious problem with the structural stability of the system. Thus, it is important to accurately understand the physics of sloshing, and to effectively suppress and reduce the sloshing. Also, a method for the economical measurement of the water level response of a liquid storage tank is needed for the exact analysis of sloshing. In this study, a method using images was employed among the methods for measuring the water level response of a liquid storage tank, and the water level response was measured using an image filter processing algorithm for the reduction of the noise of the fluid induced by light, and for the sharpening of the structure installed at the liquid storage tank. A shaking table test was performed to verify the validity of the method of measuring the water level response of a liquid storage tank using images, and the result was analyzed and compared with the response measured using a water level gauge.

  8. Attitude dynamics and control of spacecraft with a partially filled liquid tank and flexible panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Yue, Baozeng; Zhao, Liangyu

    2018-02-01

    A liquid-filled flexible spacecraft is essentially a time-variant fully-coupled system, whose dynamics characteristics are closely associated with its motion features. This paper focuses on the mathematical modelling and attitude control of the spacecraft coupled with fuel sloshing dynamics and flexible solar panels vibration. The slosh motion is represented by a spherical pendulum, whose motion description method is improved by using split variable operation. Benefiting from this improvement, the nonlinear lateral sloshing and the rotary sloshing as well as the rigid motion of a liquid respect to the spacecraft can be approximately described. The assumed modes discretization method has been adopted to approximate the elastic displacements of the attached panels, and the coupled dynamics is derived by using the Lagrangian formulation. A variable substitution method is proposed to obtain the apparently-uncoupled mathematical model of the rigid-flexible-liquid spacecraft. After linearization, this model can be directly used for designing Lyapunov output-feedback attitude controller (OFAC). With only torque actuators, and attitude and rate sensors installed, this kind of attitude controller, as simulation results show, is capable of not only bringing the spacecraft to the desired orientation, but also suppressing the effect of flex and slosh on the attitude motion of the spacecraft.

  9. A Neural Network Approach to Fluid Quantity Measurement in Dynamic Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Terzic, Edin; Nagarajah, Romesh; Alamgir, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Sloshing causes liquid to fluctuate, making accurate level readings difficult to obtain in dynamic environments. The measurement system described uses a single-tube capacitive sensor to obtain an instantaneous level reading of the fluid surface, thereby accurately determining the fluid quantity in the presence of slosh. A neural network based classification technique has been applied to predict the actual quantity of the fluid contained in a tank under sloshing conditions.   In A neural network approach to fluid quantity measurement in dynamic environments, effects of temperature variations and contamination on the capacitive sensor are discussed, and the authors propose that these effects can also be eliminated with the proposed neural network based classification system. To examine the performance of the classification system, many field trials were carried out on a running vehicle at various tank volume levels that range from 5 L to 50 L. The effectiveness of signal enhancement on the neural network base...

  10. New concepts for drift pumping a thermal barrier with rf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barter, J.D.; Baldwin, D.; Chen, Y.; Poulsen, P.

    1985-01-01

    Pump neutral beams, which are directed into the loss cone of the TMX-U plugs, are normally used to pump ions from the thermal barriers. Because these neutral beams introduce cold gas that reduces pumping efficiency, and require a straight line entrance and exit from the plug, alternate methods are being investigated to provide barrier pumping. To maintain the thermal barrier, either of two classes of particles can be pumped. First, the collisionally trapped ions can be pumped directly. In this case, the most promising selection criterion is the azimuthal drift frequency. Second, the excess sloshing-ion density can be removed, allowing the use of increased sloshing-beam density to pump the trapped ions. The selection mechanism in this case is the Doppler-shifted ion-cyclotron resonance of the high-energy sloshing-ions (3 keV less than or equal to U/sub parallel/ less than or equal to 10 keV)

  11. Numerical discrepancy between serial and MPI parallel computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Bong Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations of 1D Burgers equation and 2D sloshing problem were carried out to study numerical discrepancy between serial and parallel computations. The numerical domain was decomposed into 2 and 4 subdomains for parallel computations with message passing interface. The numerical solution of Burgers equation disclosed that fully explicit boundary conditions used on subdomains of parallel computation was responsible for the numerical discrepancy of transient solution between serial and parallel computations. Two dimensional sloshing problems in a rectangular domain were solved using OpenFOAM. After a lapse of initial transient time sloshing patterns of water were significantly different in serial and parallel computations although the same numerical conditions were given. Based on the histograms of pressure measured at two points near the wall the statistical characteristics of numerical solution was not affected by the number of subdomains as much as the transient solution was dependent on the number of subdomains.

  12. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    client1

    Liquid Behavior in Microgravity. N Ananthkrishnan. Keywords. Low gravity, microgravity, un- manned aircraft, sloshing. 1 http://science.nasa.gov/ppod/ y2003/07apr_hightea.htm. W e docum ent som e basic facts about how liquids behave in the low gravity ofouter space and how this poses challenges to space scientists and ...

  13. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Sadhana; Volume 33; Issue 1. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 33, Issue 1. February 2008, pages 1-68. pp 1-14. LQG controller designs from reduced order models for a launch vehicle · Ashwin Dhabale R N Banavar M V Dhekane · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The suppression of liquid fuel slosh ...

  14. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The suppression of liquid fuel slosh motion is critical in a launch vehicle (LV). In particular, during certain stages of the launch, the dynamics of the fuel interacts adversely with the rigid body dynamics of the LV and the feedback controller must attentuate these effects. This paper describes the effort of a multivariable control ...

  15. Improving Freight Fire Safety: Analysis and Testing of Real Engine Conditions to Progress Development of Mist-controlling Additives for Fire Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    The formation of a fuel mist resulting from high shear stresses acting on the fuel during violent sloshing and tank rupture under the energy of a crash severely increases the occurrence and intensity of fires in transportation related accidents. In o...

  16. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS). Final report. Volume 1-A. Commercial fusion electric plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donohue, M.L.; Price, M.E.

    1984-07-01

    Volume 1-A contains the following chapters: (1) plasma engineering, (2) magnets, (3) ecr heating systems, (4) anchor ion-cyclotron resonance heating system, (5) sloshing ion neutral beam, (6) end cell structure, (7) end plasma technology, (8) fueling, (9) startup ion cyclotron resonant heating systems, and (10) end cell radiation analysis

  17. Progresses on the computation of added masses for fluid structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzeri, L.; Cecconi, S.; Scala, M.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of coupled vibrations of fluids and structures is analyzed, in the case of irrotational incompressible fluid fields the effect is modelled as an added mass matrix. The Modified Boundary Elements technique is used; a particular case (cylindrical reservois with sloshing) and the general case are examined. (orig.)

  18. Seismic performance of spherical liquid storage tanks: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Alessandra; Demartino, Cristoforo; Greco, Rita; Rago, Carlo; Sulpizio, Concetta; Vanzi, Ivo

    2018-02-01

    Spherical storage tanks are widely used for various types of liquids, including hazardous contents, thus requiring suitable and careful design for seismic actions. On this topic, a significant case study is described in this paper, dealing with the dynamic analysis of a spherical storage tank containing butane. The analyses are based on a detailed finite element (FE) model; moreover, a simplified single-degree-of-freedom idealization is also set up and used for verification of the FE results. Particular attention is paid to the influence of sloshing effects and of the soil-structure interaction for which no special provisions are contained in technical codes for this reference case. Sloshing effects are investigated according to the current literature state of the art. An efficient methodology based on an "impulsive-convective" decomposition of the container-fluid motion is adopted for the calculation of the seismic force. With regard to the second point, considering that the tank is founded on piles, soil-structure interaction is taken into account by computing the dynamic impedances. Comparison between seismic action effects, obtained with and without consideration of sloshing and soil-structure interaction, shows a rather important influence of these parameters on the final results. Sloshing effects and soil-structure interaction can produce, for the case at hand, beneficial effects. For soil-structure interaction, this depends on the increase of the fundamental period and of the effective damping of the overall system, which leads to reduced design spectral values.

  19. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    client1

    12. Mayer-Jensen Shell Model and Magic Numbers. An Independent Nucleon Model with Spin-Orbit. Coupling. R Velusamy. 46. 25 Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria. MK Chattopadhyay. Collimator. 31 Seven Different Proofs of the Irrationality of 12. VG Tikekar. Prism Table. Telescope. 40 Getting Sloshed in Outer Space.

  20. Manipulation of a Bose-Einstein condensate by a time-averaged orbiting potential using phase jumps of the rotating field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleary, P.W.; Hijmans, T.W.; Walraven, J.T.M.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the manipulation of the center-of-mass motion ("sloshing") of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a time-averaged orbiting potential (TOP) trap. We start with a condensate at rest in the center of a static trapping potential. When suddenly replacing the static trap with a TOP trap centered

  1. Dynamics of Finite Dust Clouds in a Magnetized Anodic Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piel, A.; Pilch, I.; Trottenberg, T.; Koepke, M. E.

    2008-01-01

    The response to an external modulation voltage of small dust clouds confined in an anodic plasma is studied. Dust density waves are excited when the cloud is larger than a wavelength, whereas a sloshing and stretching motion is found for smaller clouds. The wave dispersion shows similarities with waveguide modes.

  2. A computer code to design liquid containers for vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parizi, H.B.; Fard, M.P.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2003-01-01

    We are presenting the development of a modular code for the simulation of the fluid sloshing that occurs in the liquid containers in vehicles. Sloshing occurs when a partially filled container of liquid goes through transient or steady external forces. Under such conditions, the free surface of the liquid may move and the liquid may impact on the walls of the container, exchanging forces. These forces may cause numerous harmful and undesirable consequences in the operation of the vehicle, such as vehicle turn over. The fluid mechanic equations that describe the fluid sloshing in the container and the dynamic equations that describe the movement of the container are solved separately in two different codes. The codes are coupled weekly, such that the output of one code will be used as the input to the other code in the same time step. The outputs of the fluid code are the forces and torques that are applied to the body of the container due to sloshing, whereas the output of the dynamic code are the translational and rotational velocities and accelerations of the container. The proposed software can be used to test the performance of the designed container under various operating condition and allow effective improvements to the container design. The proposed code is different than the presently available codes, in that it will provide a true simulation of the coupled fluid and structure interaction. (author)

  3. Seismic analysis and testing of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The following subjects are discussed in this guide: General Recommendations for seismic classification, loading combinations and allowable limits; seismic analysis methods; implications for seismic design; seismic testing and qualification; seismic instrumentation; modelling techniques; material property characterization; seismic response of soil deposits and earth structures; liquefaction and ground failure; slope stability; sloshing effects in water pools; qualification testing by means of the transport vehicle

  4. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS). Final report. Volume 1-A. Commercial fusion electric plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donohue, M.L.; Price, M.E. (eds.)

    1984-07-01

    Volume 1-A contains the following chapters: (1) plasma engineering, (2) magnets, (3) ecr heating systems, (4) anchor ion-cyclotron resonance heating system, (5) sloshing ion neutral beam, (6) end cell structure, (7) end plasma technology, (8) fueling, (9) startup ion cyclotron resonant heating systems, and (10) end cell radiation analysis. (MOW)

  5. Current status of studies on temperature fluctuation phenomena in LMFRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, H.; Muramatsu, T.; Kobayashi, J.; Yamaguchi, A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the current status of studies being performed in PNC on temperature fluctuation phenomena occurring in fast reactors. The studies concentrate on four problems: thermal stratification, thermal striping, core-plenum interaction and free surface sloshing. Both experimental and analytical approaches to reveal these phenomena and to establish design and safety evaluation methods are presented together with future works. (author)

  6. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sloshing in any type of container may invite instability to it. If some part of the free liquid surface in the annular region of a specially designed circular cylindrical container is covered with an annular baffle, the natural frequencies and the response of the liquid in the container undergo a drastic change. A partly covered free ...

  7. Voluntary work and the relationship with unemployment, health, and well-being: a two-year follow-up study contrasting a materialistic and psychosocial pathway perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griep, Yannick; Hyde, Martin; Vantilborgh, Tim; Bidee, Jemima; De Witte, Hans; Pepermans, Roland

    2015-04-01

    In the present study we contrast materialistic (i.e., income and economic inequality) and psychosocial (i.e., social circumstances) pathway perspectives on whether volunteering while being unemployed mitigates the well-documented negative effects of unemployment on health, health behaviors, and well-being. We test our hypotheses using data from the 2010 and 2012 waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Study of Health (SLOSH; n = 717). This is a nationally representative, longitudinal, cohort survey. We compared groups of individuals who were (a) unemployed and volunteering during both SLOSH waves (n = 58), (b) unemployed and not volunteering during both SLOSH waves (n = 194), (c) employed and volunteering during both SLOSH waves (n = 139), and (d) employed and not volunteering during both SLOSH waves (n = 326). Conducting a path analysis in Mplus, we examined the interaction effects between labor market status (i.e., employed or unemployed) and voluntary work (i.e., volunteering or not) when predicting changes in health, health behaviors, and psychological well-being. Our results indicate that volunteering during unemployment significantly decreased the likelihood to smoke, the amount of cigarettes smoked, the likelihood of consuming alcohol, and the likelihood of being diagnosed with hypertension. These results support a psychosocial pathway perspective. For all other indicators no such buffering interaction effect was obtained, thereby supporting a materialistic pathway perspective. Nevertheless, for some indicators, volunteering was found to be beneficial for both the unemployed and employed. Consequently, integrating both perspectives might offer a better explanation for the onset of ill-health and ill-being. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Nonlinear modeling of tuned liquid dampers (TLDs) in rotating wind turbine blades for damping edgewise vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zili; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Basu, Biswajit

    2015-01-01

    Tuned liquid dampers (TLDs) utilize the sloshing motion of the fluid to suppress structural vibrations and become a natural candidate for damping vibrations in rotating wind turbine blades. The centrifugal acceleration at the tip of a wind turbine blade can reach a magnitude of 7–8g. This facilit......Tuned liquid dampers (TLDs) utilize the sloshing motion of the fluid to suppress structural vibrations and become a natural candidate for damping vibrations in rotating wind turbine blades. The centrifugal acceleration at the tip of a wind turbine blade can reach a magnitude of 7–8g...... free-surface elevation equally well, the one-mode model can still be utilized for the design of TLD. Parametric optimization of the TLD is carried out based on the one-mode model, and the optimized damper effectively improves the dynamic response of wind turbine blades....

  9. First experiment on liquid hydrogen transportation by ship inside Osaka bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, K.; Takeda, M.; Hamaura, T.; Suzuki, K.; Miyake, Y.; Matsuno, Y.; Fujikawa, S.; Kumakura, H.

    2017-12-01

    A project to import a large amount of liquid hydrogen (LH2) from Australia by a cargo carrier, which is equipped with two 1250 m3 tanks, is underway in Japan. It is important to understand sloshing and boil-off characteristics inside the LH2 tank during marine transportation. However, the LH2 sloshing and boil-off characteristics on the sea have not yet been clarified. First experiment on the LH2 transportation of 20 liter with magnesium diboride (MgB2) level sensors by the training ship “Fukae-maru”, which has 50 m long and 449 ton gross weight, was carried out successfully inside Osaka bay on February 2, 2017. In the experiment, synchronous measurements of liquid level, temperature, pressure, ship motions, and accelerations as well as the rapid depressurization test were done. The increase rate of the temperature and the pressure inside the LH2 tank were discussed under the rolling and the pitching conditions.

  10. Investigation of barrier cell and auxilliary heating in a tandem mirror. Annual progress report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesner, J.; Emmert, G.A.; Howard, J.E.

    1980-06-01

    A number of areas relating to RF heating and thermal barrier formation in a tandem mirror have been investigated. The possibility of creating axisymmetric confinement through the use of sloshing-ions has been investigated. We have also suggested the complimentary concept of sloshing-electrons. Self-consistent thermal barrier formation has been studied and ion drift orbits in non-axisymmetric barriers are being investigated. The study of dynamic stabilization of the DCLC by RF fields has been extended to ω near 2 ω/sub ci/; significant stabilization is found. Fast and slow wave heating have been extensively studied using single particle theory. A new theory of relativistic ECH is under development

  11. Rayleigh instability of the inverted one-cell amphibian embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouri, Comron; Gordon, Richard; Luppes, Roel; Veldman, Arthur E P; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2008-01-01

    The one-cell amphibian embryo is modeled as a rigid spherical shell containing equal volumes of two immiscible fluids with different densities and viscosities and a surface tension between them. The fluids represent denser yolk in the bottom hemisphere and clearer cytoplasm and the germinal vesicle in the top hemisphere. The unstable equilibrium configuration of the inverted system (the heavier fluid on top) depends on the value of the contact angle. The theoretically calculated normal modes of perturbation and the instability of each mode are in agreement with the results from ComFlo computational fluid dynamic simulations of the same system. The two dominant types of modes of perturbation give rise to axisymmetric and asymmetric sloshing of the cytoplasm of the inverted embryos, respectively. This work quantifies our hypothesis that the axisymmetric mode corresponds to failure of development, and the asymmetric sloshing mode corresponds to development proceeding normally, but with reversed pigmentation, for inverted embryos

  12. Metrological approach to the force exerted by the axle of a road vehicle in motion carrying liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faruolo, Luciano Bruno; Pinto, Fernando Augusto de Noronha Castro

    2016-01-01

    Weigh-in-motion (WIM) systems are used for identifying the dynamic force exerted on the ground by axles of a vehicle. These systems are important for monitoring the gross vehicle weight and the vehicle axle load. Overweighted trucks on the roads increase pavement damage and traffic accidents. Knowing the accuracy of WIM systems is necessary. In the case of liquid transport the ‘sloshing effect’ affects this accuracy. This paper aims to analyze the dynamic measurement of the axle forces in vehicles carrying liquid during WIM up to 6 km h −1 . Laboratory experiments using one vehicle with six axles and liquid loads on different levels in weighing instruments are presented. A non-linear computational multi-mass-springs model was developed and laboratory experiments were carried out to show the acceleration influences on axle forces of vehicles with six axles and with and without baffles to vary the ‘sloshing effect’. (paper)

  13. Review of liquid-tank interaction analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Based on a literature survey, various models of increasing sophistication and complexity are presented which might be used to assess the liquid tank interaction effects due to sloshing of contained high level radioactive liquid waste in storage tanks at the NFS site. In addition, the effects of liquid damping, tank bending modes, and nonlinearity of the sloshing liquid are discussed. The results of the survey indicate that due to the compexities encountered in adequately modeling the system, due to the approximations which must be made as regards the tank boundary conditions, and due to the assumptions which must be made regarding the liquid waste dynamic character, the liquid tank interaction at NFS can not be adequately theoretically modeled. It is therefore recommended that experimental scale model tests be performed to assess the effects of liquid tank interaction during seismic excitation of the NFS waste tanks

  14. D.E.M.T. Experimental and analytical studies on seismic isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantenbein, F.; Buland, P.

    1989-01-01

    The various studies which have been performed in C.E.A./D.E.M.T. will be reviewed in the paper. They are experimental or theoretical and related to the overall behavior of isolated structures. Among the experimental work one can notice: - the seismic tests on a shaking table of a concrete cylinder isolated by sliding neoprene pads, - the vibrational tests on the reaction mass of TAMARIS seismic facility. The analytical work consists of dynamic calculation method development: - for the soil structure interaction in case of pads interposed between an upper raft and pedestals; - for the time history calculation of sliding structures; - for fluid structure interaction (coupling of fluid and structure motion or sloshing modes). Finally comments will be given on the seismic isolation consequencies for the analysis of F.B.R. vessels: the modes can no more be considered independent (SRSS method leads to important errors), the sloshing increases

  15. Self-induced free surface oscillations caused by water jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, M.; Madarame, H.; Okamoto, K.; Iida, M.; Someya, S.

    1995-01-01

    The interaction between the high speed flow and the free surfaces could induced surface oscillations. Recently, some kinds of self-induced free surface oscillations caused by water jet were discovered, e.g., a self-induced sloshing, 'Jet-Flutter' and a self-induced manometer oscillation. These oscillations have many different characteristics with each other. In this study, the similarities and differences of these oscillations are examined, and the geometrical effects on the phenomena are experimentally investigated. The self-induced sloshing and the Jet-Flutter have different dimensionless traveling times, which suggests a difference in the energy supply mechanism. When the distance between the inlet and the outlet is small in a vessel, the self-induced manometer oscillation could occur in the multi-free-surface system. (author)

  16. Self-excited oscillation due to the fluid discharge over a flexible weir, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisano, Katsumi; Kaneko, Shigehiko

    1990-01-01

    The excitation mechanism of a self-excited oscillation due to the fluid discharge over a flexible weir was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. A new type of hydroelastic instability was discovered during test operations of the Super-Phenix LMFBR reactor in France. According to a recent report by Aita, this phenomenon includes two types of instability modes: one is the sloshing mode which means the oscillation of a weir associated with coupled sloshing modes of both feeding and restitution fluid collectors; the other is a hydroelastic mode which means the oscillation of a weir associated with fluid-shell modes. In this report, the excitation mechanism of a hydroelastic mode is discussed by calculating the excitation energy brought by discharge to the fluid-structure system. The theoretical results for the range of hydroelastic mode instability virtually agreed with the experimental data. (author)

  17. Vibration of liquid-filled thin shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnins, A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis of free and forced vibration of a thin, axisymmetric shell, which contains some liquid. The axis of symmetry is vertical. Only such vibration is considered which can be produced by a horizontal movement of the base of shell. The objective of this paper is to examine the response of the coupled shell-liquid system for a frequency range lying between zero and the lowest natural sloshing frequency of the liquid. The mass of the liquid is modeled by a stationary and one or more sloshing masses. It is shown how the stationary mass can be incorporated in the vibration analysis of the shell and how to natural frequency of the coupled shell-liquid system can be obtained from a simple formula, if the lowest natural frequency of the shell, plus the stationary mass of the liquid, can be determined. A numerical example is given. (orig.)

  18. Fluid management in space construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Howard

    1989-01-01

    The low-g fluids management group with the Center for Space Construction is engaged in active research on the following topics: gauging; venting; controlling contamination; sloshing; transfer; acquisition; and two-phase flow. Our basic understanding of each of these topics at present is inadequate to design space structures optimally. A brief report is presented on each topic showing the present status, recent accomplishings by our group and our plans for future research. Reports are presented in graphic and outline form.

  19. What Do the Hitomi Observations Tell Us About the Turbulent Velocities in the Perseus Cluster? Probing the Velocity Field with Mock Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZuHone, J. A.; Miller, E. D.; Bulbul, E.; Zhuravleva, I.

    2018-02-01

    Hitomi made the first direct measurements of galaxy cluster gas motions in the Perseus cluster, which implied that its core is fairly “quiescent,” with velocities less than ∼200 km s‑1, despite the presence of an active galactic nucleus and sloshing cold fronts. Building on previous work, we use synthetic Hitomi/X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) observations of the hot plasma of a simulated cluster with sloshing gas motions and varying viscosity to analyze its velocity structure in a similar fashion. We find that sloshing motions can produce line shifts and widths similar to those measured by Hitomi. We find these measurements are unaffected by the value of the gas viscosity, since its effects are only manifested clearly on angular scales smaller than the SXS ∼1‧ PSF. The PSF biases the line shift of regions near the core as much as ∼40–50 km s‑1, so it is crucial to model this effect carefully. We also infer that if sloshing motions dominate the observed velocity gradient, Perseus must be observed from a line of sight that is somewhat inclined from the plane of these motions, but one that still allows the spiral pattern to be visible. Finally, we find that assuming isotropy of motions can underestimate the total velocity and kinetic energy of the core in our simulation by as much as ∼60%. However, the total kinetic energy in our simulated cluster core is still less than 10% of the thermal energy in the core, in agreement with the Hitomi observations.

  20. Neutral beams for mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    An important demonstration of negative ion technology is proposed for FY92 in the MFTF-α+T, an upgrade of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This facility calls for 200-keV negative ions to form neutral beams that generate sloshing ions in the reactor end plugs. Three different beam lines are considered for this application. Their advantages and disadvantages are discussed

  1. Forum on unsteady flow; Proceedings of the Winter Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, December 9-14, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    Several devices involving unsteady flows are characterized, along with methods of modeling the flows. Analyses are presented of wave rotor propulsive device cycles, MHD channel flow in the presence of magnetic field transients, and propellant sloshing on board spacecraft. The influence of the wing nose radius on unsteady phenomena in large scale flows is examined and a collocation-finite element method is defined for solving the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations

  2. MINIMARS conceptual design: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1986-09-01

    This volume of the conceptual design report contains detailed information on the following: (1) plasma engineering, (2) tandem mirror optimization code, (3) configuration, (4) assembly and maintenance, (5) availability, (6) site and facilities, (7) magnet design, (8) end-cell shielding, (9) drift pumping system, (10) rf systems, (11) negative-ion neutral beam injection system, (12) sloshing-ion beamline, and (13) power balance and electrical systems

  3. Recommendations for the Interagency Ship Structure Committee’s Fiscal 1985 Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    of the World War II 70 ship fracture problems. For over 30 years, the SSC has undertaken ,merous efforts to study the problem of brittle fracture. An...Research & Development Company, Houston, TX Prof. N. A. Hamlin, Webb Institute of Naval Architecture, Glen Cove, NY Prof. W. H. C. Maxwell...Institute of Naval Architecture, Glen Cove, NY OBJECTIVE The objective of this study is to determine sloshing loads on the boundaries, swash bulkheads, and

  4. Energy and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, P.S.

    1983-06-01

    Research activities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are described in the Energy and Technology Review. This issue includes articles on measuring chromosome changes in people exposed to cigarette smoke, sloshing-ion experiments in the tandem mirror experiment, aluminum-air battery development, and a speech by Edward Teller on national defense. Abstracts of the first three have been prepared separately for the data base

  5. Seismic analysis of a large LMFBR with fluid-structure interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    The seismic analysis of a large LMFBR with many internal components and structures is presented. Both vertical and horizontal seismic excitations are considered. The important hydrodynamic phenomena such as fluid-structure interaction, sloshing, fluid coupling and fluid inertia effects are included in the analysis. The results of this study are discussed in detail. Information which is useful to the design of future reactions under seismic conditions is also given. 4 refs., 12 figs

  6. Analytical Solution and Physics of a Propellant Damping Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. Q.; Peugeot, John

    2011-01-01

    NASA design teams have been investigating options for "detuning" Ares I to prevent oscillations originating in the vehicle solid-rocket main stage from synching up with the natural resonance of the rest of the vehicle. An experimental work started at NASA MSFC center in 2008 using a damping device showed great promise in damping the vibration level of an 8 resonant tank. However, the mechanisms of the vibration damping were not well understood and there were many unknowns such as the physics, scalability, technology readiness level (TRL), and applicability for the Ares I vehicle. The objectives of this study are to understand the physics of intriguing slosh damping observed in the experiments, to further validate a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software in propellant sloshing against experiments with water, and to study the applicability and efficiency of the slosh damper to a full scale propellant tank and to cryogenic fluids. First a 2D fluid-structure interaction model is built to model the system resonance of liquid sloshing and structure vibration. A damper is then added into the above model to simulate experimentally observed system damping phenomena. Qualitative agreement is found. An analytical solution is then derived from the Newtonian dynamics for the thrust oscillation damper frequency, and a slave mass concept is introduced in deriving the damper and tank interaction dynamics. The paper will elucidate the fundamental physics behind the LOX damper success from the derivation of the above analytical equation of the lumped Newtonian dynamics. Discussion of simulation results using high fidelity multi-phase, multi-physics, fully coupled CFD structure interaction model will show why the LOX damper is unique and superior compared to other proposed mitigation techniques.

  7. Energy and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, P.S. (ed.)

    1983-06-01

    Research activities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are described in the Energy and Technology Review. This issue includes articles on measuring chromosome changes in people exposed to cigarette smoke, sloshing-ion experiments in the tandem mirror experiment, aluminum-air battery development, and a speech by Edward Teller on national defense. Abstracts of the first three have been prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  8. Lifting Off of the Digital Plateau with Military Decision Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    Commission SLOSH Sea, Lake, and Overland Surges from Hurricanes SME Subject Matter Expert STP Sketch-Thru-Plan TIGER Tactical Inference GenERator...example, solvable equations that represent the laws of supply and demand in the world market . Structural models are representations of the physical or...of action. The 1970s saw a new phenomenon in wargaming and simulations. The civilian market expanded from a single publisher selling a paltry two

  9. A new arrangement with nonlinear sidewalls for tanker ship storage panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketabdari, M. J.; Saghi, H.

    2013-03-01

    Sloshing phenomenon in a moving container is a complicated free surface flow problem. It has a wide range of engineering applications, especially in tanker ships and Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) carriers. When the tank in these vehicles is partially filled, it is essential to be able to evaluate the fluid dynamic loads on tank perimeter. Different geometric shapes such as rectangular, cylindrical, elliptical, spherical and circular conical have been suggested for ship storage tanks by previous researchers. In this paper a numerical model is developed based on incompressible and inviscid fluid motion for the liquid sloshing phenomenon. The coupled BEM-FEM is used to solve the governing equations and nonlinear free surface boundary conditions. The results are validated for rectangular container using data obtained for a horizontal periodic sway motion. Using the results of this model a new arrangement of trapezoidal shapes with quadratic sidewalls is suggested for tanker ship storage panels. The suggested geometric shape not only has a maximum surrounded tank volume to the constant available volume, but also reduces the sloshing effects more efficiently than the existing geometric shapes.

  10. A comparative study of reinitialization approaches of the level set method for simulating free-surface flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sufyan, Muhammad; Ngo, Long Cu; Choi, Hyoung Gwon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Unstructured grids were used to compare the performance of a direct reinitialization scheme with those of two reinitialization approaches based on the solution of a hyperbolic Partial differential equation (PDE). The problems of moving interface were solved in the context of a finite element method. A least-square weighted residual method was used to discretize the advection equation of the level set method. The benchmark problems of rotating Zalesak's disk, time-reversed single vortex, and two-dimensional sloshing were examined. Numerical results showed that the direct reinitialization scheme performed better than the PDE-based reinitialization approaches in terms of mass conservation, dissipation and dispersion error, and computational time. In the case of sloshing, numerical results were found to be in good agreement with existing experimental data. The direct reinitialization approach consumed considerably less CPU time than the PDE-based simulations for 20 time periods of sloshing. This approach was stable, accurate, and efficient for all the problems considered in this study.

  11. Seismic behavior of a low-rise horizontal cylindrical tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Alessandra; Rago, Carlo; Vanzi, Ivo; Greco, Rita; Briseghella, Bruno

    2018-05-01

    Cylindrical storage tanks are widely used for various types of liquids, including hazardous contents, thus requiring suitable and careful design for seismic actions. The study herein presented deals with the dynamic analysis of a ground-based horizontal cylindrical tank containing butane and with its safety verification. The analyses are based on a detailed finite element (FE) model; a simplified one-degree-of-freedom idealization is also set up and used for verification of the FE results. Particular attention is paid to sloshing and asynchronous seismic input effects. Sloshing effects are investigated according to the current literature state of the art. An efficient methodology based on an "impulsive-convective" decomposition of the container-fluid motion is adopted for the calculation of the seismic force. The effects of asynchronous ground motion are studied by suitable pseudo-static analyses. Comparison between seismic action effects, obtained with and without consideration of sloshing and asynchronous seismic input, shows a rather important influence of these conditions on the final results.

  12. Hydrodynamic response of viscous fluids under seismic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrodynamic response of liquid-tank systems, such as reactor vessels, spent-fuel pools and liquid storage tanks have been studied extensively in the last decade (Chang et al. 1988; Ma et al. 1991). However, most of the studies are conducted with the assumption of an inviscid fluid. In recent years, the hydrodynamic response of viscous fluids has received increasing attention in high level waste storage tanks containing viscous waste material. This paper presents a numerical study on the hydrodynamic response of viscous fluids in a large 2-D fluid-tank system under seismic excitation. Hydrodynamic responses (i.e. sloshing wave height, fluid pressures, shear stress, etc.) are calculated for a fluid with various viscosities. Four fluid viscosities are considered. They are 1 cp, 120 cp, 1,000 cp and 12,000 cp (1 cp = 1.45 x 10 -7 lb-sec/in 2 ). Note that the liquid sodium of the Liquid-Metal Reactor (LMR) reactor has a viscosity of 1.38 x 10 -5 lb-sec/in 2 (about 95 cp) at an operational temperature of 900 degree F. Section 2 describes the pertinent features of the mathematical model. In Section 3, the fundamental sloshing phenomena of viscous fluid are examined. Sloshing wave height and shear stress for fluid with different viscosities are compared. The conclusions are given in Section 4

  13. Recent advances in vibro-impact dynamics and collision of ocean vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Raouf A.

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of ship impacts and collisions takes different approaches depending on the emphasis of each discipline. For example, dynamicists, physicist, and mathematicians are dealing with developing analytical models and mappings of vibro-impact systems. On the other hand, naval architects and ship designers are interested in developing design codes and structural assessments due to slamming loads, liquid sloshing impact loads in liquefied natural gas tanks and ship grounding accidents. The purpose of this review is to highlight the main differences of the two disciplines. It begins with a brief account of the theory of vibro-impact dynamics based on modeling and mapping of systems experiencing discontinuous changes in their state of motion due to collision. The main techniques used in modeling include power-law phenomenological modeling, Hertzian modeling, and non-smooth coordinate transformations originally developed by Zhuravlev and Ivanov. In view of their effectiveness, both Zhuravlev and Ivanov non-smooth coordinate transformations will be described and assessed for the case of ship roll dynamics experiencing impact with rigid barriers. These transformations have the advantage of converting the vibro-impact oscillator into an oscillator without barriers such that the corresponding equation of motion does not contain any impact term. One of the recent results dealing with the coefficient of restitution is that its value monotonically decreases with the impact velocity and not unique but random in nature. Slamming loads and grounding events of ocean waves acting on the bottom of high speed vessels will be assessed with reference to the ship structural damage. It will be noticed that naval architects and marine engineers are treating these problems using different approaches from those used by dynamicists. The problem of sloshing impact in liquefied natural gas cargo and related problems will be assessed based on the numerical and experimental results. It is

  14. Neutral particle balance in GDT with fast titanium coating of the first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagryansky, P.A.; Bender, E.D.; Ivanov, A.A.; Krahl, S.; Noack, K.; Karpushov, A.N.; Murakhtin, S.V.; Shikhovtsev, I.V.

    1995-01-01

    The GDT is an axisymmetric open trap with a high mirror ratio for confinement of a collisional plasma. The experimental program of the GDT was focused on the generation of plasma physics database necessary for a GDT-based neutron source. A distinct feature of both GDT and the GDT-based neutron source is that the Larmor radius of the fast sloshing ions is comparable to plasma radius. In this case, the sloshing ions can not be well shielded by the plasma halo from penetration of the neutral gas from periphery that results in high charge exchange losses. The plasma parameters are then very sensitive to gas pressure near the plasma boundary. To reduce the gas pressure to desured value during the beam heating, the authors have used arc-type evaporators developed at the Budker INP for fast titanium coating of the GDT first wall. If needed, the coating can be done a few seconds before each shot. They investigated the neutral particle balance in presence of NB-heating. The inverted magnetron gauges were used to study the temporal dependence of gas pressure inside the central cell. Pyroelectric bolometers were employed to measure the flux of charge exchange neutrals. Neutral particle balance has also been studied numerically by using a gas-transport code. The results of the investigations are the following: (1) sloshing ion lifetime was increased about 10 times compared to that without the coating of the first wall; and (2) wall recycling coefficient of the Ti-coated wall does not exceed 1 for 8 keV mean energy of the neutral hydrogen atoms striking the wall

  15. Development, Verification and Validation of Parallel, Scalable Volume of Fluid CFD Program for Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jeff; Yang, H. Q.

    2014-01-01

    There are many instances involving liquid/gas interfaces and their dynamics in the design of liquid engine powered rockets such as the Space Launch System (SLS). Some examples of these applications are: Propellant tank draining and slosh, subcritical condition injector analysis for gas generators, preburners and thrust chambers, water deluge mitigation for launch induced environments and even solid rocket motor liquid slag dynamics. Commercially available CFD programs simulating gas/liquid interfaces using the Volume of Fluid approach are currently limited in their parallel scalability. In 2010 for instance, an internal NASA/MSFC review of three commercial tools revealed that parallel scalability was seriously compromised at 8 cpus and no additional speedup was possible after 32 cpus. Other non-interface CFD applications at the time were demonstrating useful parallel scalability up to 4,096 processors or more. Based on this review, NASA/MSFC initiated an effort to implement a Volume of Fluid implementation within the unstructured mesh, pressure-based algorithm CFD program, Loci-STREAM. After verification was achieved by comparing results to the commercial CFD program CFD-Ace+, and validation by direct comparison with data, Loci-STREAM-VoF is now the production CFD tool for propellant slosh force and slosh damping rate simulations at NASA/MSFC. On these applications, good parallel scalability has been demonstrated for problems sizes of tens of millions of cells and thousands of cpu cores. Ongoing efforts are focused on the application of Loci-STREAM-VoF to predict the transient flow patterns of water on the SLS Mobile Launch Platform in order to support the phasing of water for launch environment mitigation so that vehicle determinantal effects are not realized.

  16. Computer methods for transient fluid-structure analysis of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belytschko, T.; Liu, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    Fluid-structure interaction problems in nuclear engineering are categorized according to the dominant physical phenomena and the appropriate computational methods. Linear fluid models that are considered include acoustic fluids, incompressible fluids undergoing small disturbances, and small amplitude sloshing. Methods available in general-purpose codes for these linear fluid problems are described. For nonlinear fluid problems, the major features of alternative computational treatments are reviewed; some special-purpose and multipurpose computer codes applicable to these problems are then described. For illustration, some examples of nuclear reactor problems that entail coupled fluid-structure analysis are described along with computational results

  17. Whistler mode startup in the Michigan Mirror Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booske, J.; Getty, W.D.; Gilgenbach, R.M.; Goodman, T.; Whaley, D.; Olivieri, R.; Pitcher, E.; Simonetti, L.

    1985-01-01

    Results of investigations of whistler mode ECRH plasma startup in the Michigan Mirror Machine are presented. Electron-velocity-distribution and plasma-spatial-distribution time evolution are characterized by measurements from axially and radially moveable Langmuir probes, an endloss current detector, an electron cyclotron emission radiometer, a foil-filtered X-ray detector, and a diamagnetic loop at the mirror midplane. Measurements of the buildup of both electron density and perpendicular pressure (nkT/sub perpendicular/) are compared to predictions from various numerical models. Both modeling and data suggest the creation of a highly anisotropic electron velocity distribution function with a ''sloshing electron'' axial density profile

  18. Sensors and sensor integration; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 4, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Peter D.

    Consideration is given to adaptive control of propellant slosh for launch vehicles, a lidar for expendable launch vehicles, a high-resolution airborne multisensor system, an optical velocity sensor for air data applications, and use of absorption spectroscopy for refined petroleum product discrimination. Attention is also given to edge effects in silicon photodiode arrays, sensing and environment perception for a mobile vehicle, distributed-effect optical fiber sensors for trusses and plates, and instrumentation concepts for multiplexed Bragg grating sensors. (For individual items see A93-21962 to A93-21972)

  19. The Shock and Vibration Digest, Volume 4, Number 5, May 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-05-01

    order dif- FLUID SLOSH DAMPERS ferential equation of at 1 e as t two degrees of Sayar, B.A. (Georgia Inst. Tech.) (1971) freedom) a quantum modelof...ENGINE ROTORS symmetric and asymmetric, and to excitation Levit , M.E. and Roizman, V.P. by means of a vibrator (shake table). It is con- Air Force...Diesel engines for commercial vehicles. 40 AUTHOR INDEX Abhat, O.G.B .............. 766 Levit , M.E .................. 888 Thornley, A.R.1) ............ 833

  20. TMX tandem-mirror experiments and thermal-barrier theoretical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, T.C.; Baldwin, D.E.; Allen, S.L.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes recent analysis of energy confinement in the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX). TMX data also indicates that warm plasma limits the amplitude of the anisotropy driven Alfven ion cyclotron (AIC) mode. Theoretical calculations show strong AIC stabilization with off-normal beam injection as planned in TMX-U and MFTF-B. This paper reports results of theoretical analysis of hot electrons in thermal barriers including electron heating calculations by Monte Carlo and Fokker-Planck codes and analysis of hot electron MHD and microinstability. Initial results from the TMX-U experiment are presented which show the presence of sloshing ions

  1. Analysis and test for space shuttle propellant dynamics (1/10th scale model test results). Volume 1: Technical discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, R. L.; Tegart, J. R.; Demchak, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Space shuttle propellant dynamics during ET/Orbiter separation in the RTLS (return to launch site) mission abort sequence were investigated in a test program conducted in the NASA KC-135 "Zero G" aircraft using a 1/10th-scale model of the ET LOX Tank. Low-g parabolas were flown from which thirty tests were selected for evaluation. Data on the nature of low-g propellant reorientation in the ET LOX tank, and measurements of the forces exerted on the tank by the moving propellent will provide a basis for correlation with an analytical model of the slosh phenomenon.

  2. Fluid behavior in microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Tsao, Y. D.

    1990-01-01

    The instability of liquid and gas interface can be induced by the presence of longitudinal and lateral accelerations, vehicle vibration, and rotational fields of spacecraft in a microgravity environment. In a spacecraft design, the requirements of settled propellant are different for tank pressurization, engine restart, venting, or propellent transfer. In this paper, the dynamical behavior of liquid propellant, fluid reorientation, and propellent resettling have been carried out through the execution of a CRAY X-MP super computer to simulate fluid management in a microgravity environment. Characteristics of slosh waves excited by the restoring force field of gravity jitters have also been investigated.

  3. Central cell confinement in MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The point code TANDEM has been used to survey the range of plasma parameters which can be attained in MFTF-B. The code solves for the electron and ion densities and temperatures in the central cell, yin-yang, barrier, and A-cell regions as well as the plasma potential in each region. In these studies, the A-cell sloshing ion beams were fixed while the neutral beams in the yin-yang and central cell, the gas feed in the central cell, and the applied ECRH power β, central cell ion density and temperature, and the confining potential are discussed

  4. Evaluation of methods for seismic analysis of nuclear fuel reprocessing and fabrication facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, D.F.; Dong, R.G.; Murray, R.C.; Nelson, T.A.; Smith, P.D.; Wight, L.H.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of seismic analysis for critical structures and equipment in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants (NFRPs) and mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants (MOFFPs) are evaluated. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide the NRC with a technical basis for assessing seismic analysis methods and for writing regulatory guides in which methods ensuring the safe design of nuclear fuel cycle facilities are recommended. The present report evaluates methods of analyzing buried pipes and wells, sloshing effects in large pools, earth dams, multiply supported equipment, pile foundations, and soil-structure interactions

  5. Numerical Simulation to Phenomenon of Main Vessel Free Surface Flow Impact Coping for Fast Reactor by Moving Particle Semi-implicit Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Yuanyuan; Lu Daogang

    2009-01-01

    There is the free surface in the main vessel of fast reactor, when long period earthquakes happen, the fluid will impact the coping of vessel and make the reactor dangerous. The flow of the fluid was simulated by moving particle semi-implicit method. The phenomenon on sloshing response of the free surface in the main vessel of fast reactor excited by 3 sine waves was simulated. The impact pressure from the research can provide important loadings for the integrality analysis of the main vessel. (authors)

  6. Psychosocial working conditions and depressive symptoms among Swedish employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Theorell, Töres; Bech, Per

    2009-01-01

    Survey 2003. Work demands, decision authority, support and conflicts at work were measured in 2003. Depressive symptoms were recorded in 2006 by a short version of the depression subscale of the Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90). Linear regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: After adjusting......PURPOSE: To investigate prospective associations between working conditions and depressive symptoms in Swedish men and women. METHODS: The study was based on SLOSH (N = 5,985), a follow-up of a representative sample of gainfully employed Swedes 16-64 years of age from the Swedish Work Environment...... authority, support and conflicts at work are predictive of depressive symptoms in the general Swedish working population....

  7. Fluid management in the optimization of space construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Howard

    1990-01-01

    Fluid management impacts strongly on the optimization of space construction. Large quantities of liquids are needed for propellants and life support. The mass of propellant liquids is comparable to that required for the structures. There may be a strong dynamic interaction between the stored liquids and the space structure unless the design minimizes the interaction. The constraints of cost and time required optimization of the supply/resupply strategy. The proper selection and design of the fluid management methods for: slosh control; stratification control; acquisition; transfer; gauging; venting; dumping; contamination control; selection of tank configuration and size; the storage state and the control system can improve the entire system performance substantially. Our effort consists of building mathematical/computer models of the various fluid management methods and testing them against the available experimental data. The results of the models are used as inputs to the system operations studies. During the past year, the emphasis has been on modeling: the transfer of cryogens; sloshing and the storage configuration. The work has been intermeshed with ongoing NASA design and development studies to leverage the funds provided by the Center.

  8. Parametric study of flow patterns behind the standing accretion shock wave for core-collapse supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwakami, Wakana; Nagakura, Hiroki [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi, E-mail: wakana@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2014-05-10

    In this study, we conduct three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations systematically to investigate the flow patterns behind the accretion shock waves that are commonly formed in the post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. Adding small perturbations to spherically symmetric, steady, shocked accretion flows, we compute the subsequent evolutions to find what flow pattern emerges as a consequence of hydrodynamical instabilities such as convection and standing accretion shock instability for different neutrino luminosities and mass accretion rates. Depending on these two controlling parameters, various flow patterns are indeed realized. We classify them into three basic patterns and two intermediate ones; the former includes sloshing motion (SL), spiral motion (SP), and multiple buoyant bubble formation (BB); the latter consists of spiral motion with buoyant-bubble formation (SPB) and spiral motion with pulsationally changing rotational velocities (SPP). Although the post-shock flow is highly chaotic, there is a clear trend in the pattern realization. The sloshing and spiral motions tend to be dominant for high accretion rates and low neutrino luminosities, and multiple buoyant bubbles prevail for low accretion rates and high neutrino luminosities. It is interesting that the dominant pattern is not always identical between the semi-nonlinear and nonlinear phases near the critical luminosity; the intermediate cases are realized in the latter case. Running several simulations with different random perturbations, we confirm that the realization of flow pattern is robust in most cases.

  9. DEMT experimental and analytical studies on seismic isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantenbein, F.; Buland, P.

    1989-01-01

    Work on seismic isolation has been performed in France for many years, and the isolation device developed by SPIE-BATIGNOLLES in collaboration with Electricite de France (EDF) has been incorporated in the design of pressurized-water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants. This paper reviews the experimental and theoretical studies performed at CEA/DEMT related to the overall behavior of isolated structures. The experimental work consists of the seismic shaking-table tests of a concrete cylinder isolated by neoprene sliding pads, and the vibrational tests on the reaction mass of the TAMARIS seismic facility. The analytical work consists of the development of procedures for dynamic calculation methods: for soil-structure interaction where pads are placed between an upper raft and pedestals, for time-history calculations where sliding plates are used, and for fluid-structure interaction where coupled fluid and structure motions and sloshing modes are important. Finally, this paper comments on the consequences of seismic isolation for the analysis of fast breeder reactor (FBR) vessels. The modes can no longer be considered independent (SRSS Method leads to important errors), and the sloshing increases

  10. Interfacial Phenomena of Magnetic Fluid with Permanent Magnet in a Longitudinally Excited Container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Seiichi; Wakuda, Hirofumi; Yano, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the magnetic fluid sloshing in a longitudinally excited container. Liquid responses of magnetic fluid with a permanent magnet in a circular cylindrical container subject to vertical vibration are investigated. Experiments are performed on a vibration- testing system which provided longitudinal excitation. A cylindrical container made with the acrylic plastic is used in the experiment. A permanent magnet is in the state of floating in a magnetic fluid. The disk-shaped and ring-shaped magnets are examined. The different interfacial phenomena from the usual longitudinal liquid sloshing are observed. It is found that the wave motion frequency of magnetic fluid with a disk-shaped magnet in the container subject to vertical vibration is exactly same that of the excitation. In the case of ring-shaped magnet, the first symmetrical mode of one-half subharmonic response is dominant at lower excitation frequencies. The magnetic fluid disintegration of the free surface was also observed by a high-speed video camera system

  11. Interfacial Phenomena of Magnetic Fluid with Permanent Magnet in a Longitudinally Excited Container

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Seiichi; Wakuda, Hirofumi; Yano, Tetsuya

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the magnetic fluid sloshing in a longitudinally excited container. Liquid responses of magnetic fluid with a permanent magnet in a circular cylindrical container subject to vertical vibration are investigated. Experiments are performed on a vibration- testing system which provided longitudinal excitation. A cylindrical container made with the acrylic plastic is used in the experiment. A permanent magnet is in the state of floating in a magnetic fluid. The disk-shaped and ring-shaped magnets are examined. The different interfacial phenomena from the usual longitudinal liquid sloshing are observed. It is found that the wave motion frequency of magnetic fluid with a disk-shaped magnet in the container subject to vertical vibration is exactly same that of the excitation. In the case of ring-shaped magnet, the first symmetrical mode of one-half subharmonic response is dominant at lower excitation frequencies. The magnetic fluid disintegration of the free surface was also observed by a high-speed video camera system.

  12. Report of workshop on vibration related to fluid in atomic energy field. 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Because of the nonlinearity of the equation that governs flow, sometimes vibration occurs in an unexpected system, and it causes trouble. This 7th workshop on vibration related to fluid in atomic energy field was held at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory of University of Tokyo on August 25 and 26, 1997. Two themes were ``Vibration of liquid surface by flow`` and ``Numerical analysis of coupled vibration of fluid-structures``. The former is related to the problem in the development of a demonstration FBR, and the latter is related to the numerical analysis technology such as the handling of boundary conditions and the method of taking position, moving velocity and acceleration into account. This workshop aims at thoroughly discussing a small number of themes, and deepening the understanding. In this report, the summaries of 17 papers are collected, of which the titles are as follows. Liquid surface self-exciting vibration by flow, vibration of upper plenum liquid surface of fast reactor, stability analysis of multiple liquid surfaces, flow instability phenomena of multi-loop system, sloshing in a vessel in which fluid flows, the mechanism of occurrence of self-exciting sloshing in a vessel elucidated by numerical analysis, numerical analysis of manometer vibration excited by flow, numerical analysis of flutter phenomena of aircraft, numerical analysis of aerodynamic elastic problem, mechanism of in-line excitation, numerical analysis of hydrodynamic elastic vibration of tube nest and so on. (K.I.)

  13. Efficient mixing scheme for self-consistent all-electron charge density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishidou, Tatsuya; Weinert, Michael

    2015-03-01

    In standard ab initio density-functional theory calculations, the charge density ρ is gradually updated using the ``input'' and ``output'' densities of the current and previous iteration steps. To accelerate the convergence, Pulay mixing has been widely used with great success. It expresses an ``optimal'' input density ρopt and its ``residual'' Ropt by a linear combination of the densities of the iteration sequences. In large-scale metallic systems, however, the long range nature of Coulomb interaction often causes the ``charge sloshing'' phenomenon and significantly impacts the convergence. Two treatments, represented in reciprocal space, are known to suppress the sloshing: (i) the inverse Kerker metric for Pulay optimization and (ii) Kerker-type preconditioning in mixing Ropt. In all-electron methods, where the charge density does not have a converging Fourier representation, treatments equivalent or similar to (i) and (ii) have not been described so far. In this work, we show that, by going through the calculation of Hartree potential, one can accomplish the procedures (i) and (ii) without entering the reciprocal space. Test calculations are done with a FLAPW method.

  14. Neck Collar with Mild Jugular Vein Compression Ameliorates Brain Activation Changes during a Working Memory Task after a Season of High School Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Weihong; Leach, James; Maloney, Thomas; Altaye, Mekibib; Smith, David; Gubanich, Paul J; Barber Foss, Kim D; Thomas, Staci; DiCesare, Christopher A; Kiefer, Adam W; Myer, Gregory D

    2017-08-15

    Emerging evidence indicates that repetitive head impacts, even at a sub-concussive level, may result in exacerbated or prolonged neurological deficits in athletes. This study aimed to: 1) quantify the effect of repetitive head impacts on the alteration of neuronal activity based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of working memory after a high school football season; and 2) determine whether a neck collar that applies mild jugular vein compression designed to reduce brain energy absorption in head impact through "slosh" mitigation can ameliorate the altered fMRI activation during a working memory task. Participants were recruited from local high school football teams with 27 and 25 athletes assigned to the non-collar and collar group, respectively. A standard N-Back task was used to engage working memory in the fMRI at both pre- and post-season. The two study groups experienced similar head impact frequency and magnitude during the season (all p > 0.05). fMRI blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal response (a reflection of the neuronal activity level) during the working memory task increased significantly from pre- to post-season in the non-collar group (corrected p working memory related brain activity, as well as a potential protective effect that resulted from the use of the purported brain slosh reducing neck collar in contact sports.

  15. Composite Flood Risk for Virgin Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Composite Flood Risk layer combines flood hazard datasets from Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) flood zones, NOAA's Shallow Coastal Flooding, and the National Hurricane Center SLOSH model for Storm Surge inundation for category 1, 2, and 3 hurricanes.Geographic areas are represented by a grid of 10 by 10 meter cells and each cell has a ranking based on variation in exposure to flooding hazards: Moderate, High and Extreme exposure. Geographic areas in each input layers are ranked based on their probability of flood risk exposure. The logic was such that areas exposed to flooding on a more frequent basis were given a higher ranking. Thus the ranking incorporates the probability of the area being flooded. For example, even though a Category 3 storm surge has higher flooding elevations, the likelihood of the occurrence is lower than a Category 1 storm surge and therefore the Category 3 flood area is given a lower exposure ranking. Extreme exposure areas are those areas that are exposed to relatively frequent flooding.The ranked input layers are then converted to a raster for the creation of the composite risk layer by using cell statistics in spatial analysis. The highest exposure ranking for a given cell in any of the three input layers is assigned to the corresponding cell in the composite layer.For example, if an area (a cell) is rank as medium in the FEMA layer, moderate in the SLOSH layer, but extreme in the SCF layer, the cell will be considere

  16. Study on the seismic response of reactor vessel of pool type LMFBR including fluid-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, K.; Ito, T.; Fujita, K.; Kurihara, C.; Sawada, Y.; Sakurai, A.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents the seismic response of reactor vessel of pool type LMFBR with fluid-structure interaction. The reactor vessel has bottom support arrangement, the same core support system as Super-Phenix in France. Due to the bottom support arrangement, the level of core support is lower than that of the side support arrangement. So, in this reactor vessel, the displacement of the core top tends to increase because of the core's rocking. In this study, we investigated the vibration and seismic response characteristics of the reactor vessel. Therefore, the seismic experiments were carried out using one-eighth scale model and the seismic response including FSI and sloshing were investigated. From this study, the effect of liquid on the vibration characteristics and the seismic response characteristics of reactor vessel were clarified and sloshing characteristics were also clarified. It was confirmed that FEM analysis with FSI can reproduce the seismic behavior of the reactor vessel and is applicable to seismic design of the pool type LMFBR with bottom support arrangement. (author). 5 refs, 14 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Evaluation of Soil-Structure Interaction on the Seismic Response of Liquid Storage Tanks under Earthquake Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Farajian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil-structure interaction (SSI could affect the seismic response of structures. Since liquid storage tanks are vital structures and must continue their operation under severe earthquakes, their seismic behavior should be studied. Accordingly, the seismic response of two types of steel liquid storage tanks (namely, broad and slender, with aspect ratios of height to radius equal to 0.6 and 1.85 founded on half-space soil is scrutinized under different earthquake ground motions. For a better comparison, the six considered ground motions are classified, based on their pulse-like characteristics, into two groups, named far and near fault ground motions. To model the liquid storage tanks, the simplified mass-spring model is used and the liquid is modeled as two lumped masses known as sloshing and impulsive, and the interaction of fluid and structure is considered using two coupled springs and dashpots. The SSI effect, also, is considered using a coupled spring and dashpot. Additionally, four types of soils are used to consider a wide variety of soil properties. To this end, after deriving the equations of motion, MATLAB programming is employed to obtain the time history responses. Results show that although the SSI effect leads to a decrease in the impulsive displacement, overturning moment, and normalized base shear, the sloshing (or convective displacement is not affected by such effects due to its long period.

  18. FSI effects and seismic performance evaluation of water storage tank of AP1000 subjected to earthquake loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chunfeng, E-mail: zhaowindy@126.com [Institute of Earthquake Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); School of Civil Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Anhui Province 230009 (China); Chen, Jianyun; Xu, Qiang [Institute of Earthquake Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Water sloshing and oscillation of water tank under earthquake are simulated by FEM. • The influences of various water levels on seismic response are investigated. • ALE algorithm is applied to study the fluid–structure interaction effects. • The effects of different water levels in reducing seismic response are compared. • The optimal water level of water tank under seismic loading is obtained. - Abstract: The gravity water storage tank of AP1000 is designed to cool down the temperature of containment vessel by spray water when accident releases mass energy. However, the influence of fluid–structure interaction between water and water tank of AP1000 on dynamic behavior of shield building is still a hot research question. The main objective of the current study is to investigate how the fluid–structure interaction affects the dynamic behavior of water tank and whether the water sloshing and oscillation can reduce the seismic response of the shield building subjected to earthquake. For this purpose, a fluid–structure interaction algorithm of finite element technique is employed for the seismic analysis of water storage tank of AP1000. In the finite element model, 8 cases height of water, such as 10.8, 9.8, 8.8, 7.8, 6.8, 5.8, 4.8, and 3.8 m, are established and compared with the empty water tank in order to demonstrate the positive effect in mitigating the seismic response. An Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) algorithm is used to simulate the fluid–structure interaction, fluid sloshing and oscillation of water tank under the El-Centro earthquake. The correlation between seismic response and parameters of water tank in terms of height of air (h{sub 1}), height of water (h{sub 2}), height ratio of water to tank (h{sub 2}/H{sub w}) and mass ratio of water to total structure (m{sub w}/m{sub t}) is also analyzed. The numerical results clearly show that the optimal h{sub 2}, h{sub 2}/H{sub w} and m{sub w}/m{sub t

  19. Lessons Learned from Ares I Upper Stage Structures and Thermal Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rafiq

    2012-01-01

    The Ares 1 Upper Stage was part of the vehicle intended to succeed the Space Shuttle as the United States manned spaceflight vehicle. Although the Upper Stage project was cancelled, there were many lessons learned that are applicable to future vehicle design. Lessons learned that are briefly detailed in this Technical Memorandum are for specific technical areas such as tank design, common bulkhead design, thrust oscillation, control of flight and slosh loads, purge and hazardous gas system. In addition, lessons learned from a systems engineering and vehicle integration perspective are also included, such as computer aided design and engineering, scheduling, and data management. The need for detailed systems engineering in the early stages of a project is emphasized throughout this report. The intent is that future projects will be able to apply these lessons learned to keep costs down, schedules brief, and deliver products that perform to the expectations of their customers.

  20. Dynamics of small dust clouds trapped in a magnetized anodic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilch, Iris; Piel, Alexander; Trottenberg, Thomas; Koepke, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Small dust clouds, which are confined in an anodic plasma, are studied with respect to their structure and their response to modulation of the anode bias. The dust cloud is displaced from the center of the discharge by a process similar to the void mechanism in radio-frequency discharges under microgravity. The top layers of the dust cloud are in a crystalline state and the cloud performs a slow rotation about the magnetic field direction. For modulation frequencies below 15 Hz, a sloshing and stretching motion in the confining potential well is found. Spontaneously excited dust density waves are observed when the dust cloud exceeds a minimum size. The waves are characterized by sickle-shaped wave fronts. No standing waves were found. The wave dispersion shows an influence of the boundedness of the system in terms of a frequency cutoff

  1. Ultrasonic fluid quantity measurement in dynamic vehicular applications a support vector machine approach

    CERN Document Server

    Terzic, Jenny; Nagarajah, Romesh; Alamgir, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Accurate fluid level measurement in dynamic environments can be assessed using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) approach. SVM is a supervised learning model that analyzes and recognizes patterns. It is a signal classification technique which has far greater accuracy than conventional signal averaging methods. Ultrasonic Fluid Quantity Measurement in Dynamic Vehicular Applications: A Support Vector Machine Approach describes the research and development of a fluid level measurement system for dynamic environments. The measurement system is based on a single ultrasonic sensor. A Support Vector Machines (SVM) based signal characterization and processing system has been developed to compensate for the effects of slosh and temperature variation in fluid level measurement systems used in dynamic environments including automotive applications. It has been demonstrated that a simple ν-SVM model with Radial Basis Function (RBF) Kernel with the inclusion of a Moving Median filter could be used to achieve the high levels...

  2. Simulation of a marine nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Kyouya, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Hideo; Ochiai, Masaaki

    1995-01-01

    A Nuclear-powered ship Engineering Simulation SYstem (NESSY) has been developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute as an advanced design tool for research and development of future marine reactors. A marine reactor must respond to changing loads and to the ship's motions because of the ship's maneuvering and its presence in a marine environment. The NESSY has combined programs for the reactor plant behavior calculations and the ship's motion calculations. Thus, it can simulate reactor power fluctuations caused by changing loads and the ship's motions. It can also simulate the behavior of water in the pressurizer and steam generators. This water sloshes in response to the ship's motions. The performance of NESSY has been verified by comparing the simulation calculations with the measured data obtained by experiments performed using the nuclear ship Mutsu. The effects of changing loads and the ship's motions on the reactor behavior can be accurately simulated by NESSY

  3. Heating of energetic electrons and ELMO ring formation in symmetric mirror facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quon, B.H.; Dandl, R.A.; Lazar, N.H.; Wuerker, R.F.

    1982-01-01

    The spatial structure of the high beta, hot-electron ECH plasma, (ELMO Ring), has been studied by using a Hall probe array diagnostic system which measures the diamagnetic field of the hot electron plasma in a large number of spatial locations. The steady state pressure profile obtained using a two-gaussian geometric model that best fits the measurements is found to peak at the mirror midplane near the vacuum field second harmonic resonant point. The radial width of the ring is typically 4 to 7 cm, and the axial length extends significantly beyond the second harmonic resonance zone of the total magnetic field. The radial thickness and the Ring beta are increased by multiple frequency ECH. The electron ring is observed to evolve from a sloshing-like turning point distribution which was observed in the early times following a microwave turnon, demonstrating stochastic processes involved in ELMO Ring formation

  4. On the possibility of laser diagnostics of anisotropically superheated electrons in magnetic fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukushkin, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    The anisotropically superheated electrons (ASE) are known to be generated by a resonance interaction of high-frequency electromagnetic waves with electron plasma. Under definite conditions the ASE energy may essentially exceed (by the order of magnitude or even more) thermal energies of background electron plasma, the ASE distribution in pitch-angle being concentrated around definite directions. This situation is typical for, e.g. electron cyclotron heating of magnetic mirror plasmas (generation of 'sloshing' electrons) and for current drive in tokamaks by means of lower-hybrid or, sometimes, electron cyclotron waves. In this work, an analysis of the possibility of the ASE laser diagnostics is based on the calculations of Thomson scattering of laser radiation by plasma electrons. The model electron velocity distribution functions, which provide qualitative description of the ASE peculiar features, were used in calculations. (author) 4 refs., 1 fig

  5. Engineering aspects of the Stanford relativity gyro experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, C. W. F.; Debra, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    According to certain theoretical predictions, the Newtonian laws of motion must be corrected for the effect of a gravitational field. Schiff (1960) proposed an experiment which would demonstrate the effect predicted by Einstein's Theory of General Relativity on a gyroscope. The experiment has been under development at Stanford University since 1961. The requirements involved make it necessary that the test be performed in a satellite to take advantage of weightlessness in space. In a discussion of engineering developments related to the experiment, attention is given to the development of proportional helium thrusters, the simulation of the attitude control system, aspects of inner loop control, the mechanization of the two-loop attitude control system, the effects of helium slosh on spacecraft pointing, and the data instrumentation system.

  6. STAMINA OF A GASKETED BOLTED FLANGED PIPE JOINT UNDER DYNAMIC LOADING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abid

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Gasketed bolted flange joints are the most critical components in pipelines for their sealing and strength under operating conditions. Most of the work available in literature is under static loading, whereas in industry, cyclic loads are applied due to the vibrating machinery such as motors, pumps, sloshing in offshore applications and in the ships etc. In this study a three dimensional finite element analysis of a gasketed joint is carried out using a spiral wound gasket under bolt up and dynamic operating conditions (internal pressure, axial and bending singly and in combination. The cyclic axial loads are concluded relatively more challenging for both the sealing and strength of the joint. Higher magnitudes of loads and frequencies are also observed more challenging to the joints performance.

  7. Dynamic centering of liquid shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsamopoulos, J.A.; Brown, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The moderate-amplitude axisymmetric oscillations of an inviscid liquid shell surrounding an incompressible gas bubble are calculated by a multiple-time-scale expansion for initial deformations composed of two-lobed perturbations of the shell and a displacement of the bubble from the center of mass of the liquid. Two types of small-amplitude motion are identified and lead to very different nonlinear dynamic interactions, as described by the results valid up to second order in the amplitude of the initial deformation. In the ''bubble mode,'' the oscillations of the captive bubble and the liquid shell are exactly in phase and the bubble vibrates about its initial eccentric location. The bubble moves toward the center of the drop when the shell is perturbed into a ''sloshing mode'' of oscillation where both interfaces move out of phase. These results explain the centering of liquid shells observed in several experiments

  8. Dynamics of a metal overlayer on metallic substrates: High temperature effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, T.S.; Black, J.E.; Tian, Zeng Ju

    1992-01-01

    We have explored the structure and the dynamics of a bimetallic system consisting of a hexagonal (almost) overlayer of Ag on a square lattice (Ni(100) and Cu(100)), as a function of the surface temperature. In each case the structure is ''nearly'' incommensurate giving rise to a low frequency Goldstone mode. Also, the overlayer atoms slosh back and forth over the substrate in a corrugated fashion. The calculated dispersion of the Ag/metal vertical mode, at room temperature, is in excellent agreement with experimental data. At higher temperatures floater atoms appear on top of the overlayer displaying a variety of cluster formations and also exchanges with the substrate atoms leading to surface disordering, interdiffusion and melting

  9. Fluid-structure finite-element vibrational analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, G. C.; Kiefling, L.

    1974-01-01

    A fluid finite element has been developed for a quasi-compressible fluid. Both kinetic and potential energy are expressed as functions of nodal displacements. Thus, the formulation is similar to that used for structural elements, with the only differences being that the fluid can possess gravitational potential, and the constitutive equations for fluid contain no shear coefficients. Using this approach, structural and fluid elements can be used interchangeably in existing efficient sparse-matrix structural computer programs such as SPAR. The theoretical development of the element formulations and the relationships of the local and global coordinates are shown. Solutions of fluid slosh, liquid compressibility, and coupled fluid-shell oscillation problems which were completed using a temporary digital computer program are shown. The frequency correlation of the solutions with classical theory is excellent.

  10. Mission definition study for Stanford relativity satellite. Volume 2: Engineering flight test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    The need is examined for orbital flight tests of gyroscope, dewar, and other components, in order to reduce the technical and financial risk in performing the relativity experiment. A program is described that would generate engineering data to permit prediction of final performance. Two flight tests are recommended. The first flight would test a dewar smaller than that required for the final flight, but of size and form sufficient to allow extrapolation to the final design. The second flight would use the same dewar design to carry a set of three gyroscopes, which would be evaluated for spinup and drift characteristics for a period of a month or more. A proportional gas control system using boiloff helium gas from the dewar, and having the ability to prevent sloshing of liquid helium, would also be tested.

  11. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Controls Systems Design and Analysis Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center maintains a critical national capability in the analysis of launch vehicle flight dynamics and flight certification of GN&C algorithms. MSFC analysts are domain experts in the areas of flexible-body dynamics and control-structure interaction, thrust vector control, sloshing propellant dynamics, and advanced statistical methods. Marshall's modeling and simulation expertise has supported manned spaceflight for over 50 years. Marshall's unparalleled capability in launch vehicle guidance, navigation, and control technology stems from its rich heritage in developing, integrating, and testing launch vehicle GN&C systems dating to the early Mercury-Redstone and Saturn vehicles. The Marshall team is continuously developing novel methods for design, including advanced techniques for large-scale optimization and analysis.

  12. Recent results from TMX-U thermal barrier experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Allen, S.; Barter, J.

    1984-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) device was designed to study plasma confinement in a tandem mirror with thermal barriers. Previously the author reported improved axial confinement with high end-plug potentials, consistent with thermal barrier operation. Now, the existence of thermal barriers in TMX-U confirmed by measuring the axial potential profile. Specifically, measured the change in energy of a 5-keV deuterium neutral beam that is injected nearly parallel to the axis and is ionized between the barrier and the central cell. The authors found that the barrier potential is lower than the central cell potential, as required for a thermal barrier. The peak potential is at least 2.4 keV, as determined from the minimum energy of end loss ions. In addition, radial transport is reduced by the use of floating and electrodes that map to concentric cylinders in the central cell. Sloshing ions continue to be microstable

  13. Review on GAMMA 10 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamano, T.; Cho, T.; Hirata, M.; Hojo, H.; Ichimura, M.; Inutake, M.; Ishii, K.; Itakura, A.; Katanuma, I.; Katsumata, R.; Kiwamoto, Y.; Mase, A.; Nagayama, Y.; Nakashima, Y.; Saito, T.; Shoji, M.; Takahashi, E.; Tatematsu, Y.; Tsuchiya, K.; Yamaguchi, N.; Yatsu, K.

    1995-01-01

    Physics of tandem mirror plasmas have been investigated in GAMMA 10. MHD stability of anisotropic plasma in the average minimum B system is studied in detail. Formation of potentials for axial confinement is performed by ECRH alone without creating sloshing ions. In hot ion modes by ICRH, where T i /T e approx-gt(m i /m e ) 1/3 , ion temperatures of about 10 keV are achieved and thermonuclear fusion neutrons are detected for the firs time in a tandem mirror. Details of the plasma confinement in the hot ion modes indicate that axial confinement is consistent with classical potential confinement. This implies that radial confinement is better than axial. Density fluctuations due to drift waves are well suppressed by radial electric fields naturally formed as the axial potentials build up. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  14. TASKA-M - a low cost, near term tandem mirror device for fusion technology testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badger, B.; Corradini, M.L.; El-Guebaly, L.; Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Larsen, E.M.; Maynard, C.W.; Perkins, L.J.; Peterson, R.R.; Plute, K.E.; Santarius, J.F.; Sawan, M.E.; Scharer, J.E.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Sze, D.K.; Vogelsang, W.F.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Leppelmeier, G.W.; Grover, J.M.; Opperman, E.K.; Vogel, M.A.; Borie, E.; Taczanowski, S.; Arendt, F.; Dittrich, H.G.; Fett, T.; Haferkamp, B.; Heinz, W.; Hoelzchen, E.; Kleefeldt, K.; Klingelhoefer, R.; Komarek, P.; Kuntze, M.; Leiste, H.G.; Link, W.; Malang, S.; Manes, B.M.; Maurer, W.; Michael, I.; Mueller, R.A.; Neffe, G.; Schramm, K.; Suppan, A.; Weinberg, D.

    1984-04-01

    TASKA-M (Modifizierte Tandem Spiegelmaschine Karlsruhe) is a study of a dedicated fusion technology device based on the mirror principle, in continuation of the 1981/82 TASKA study. The main objective is to minimize cost while retaining key requirements of neutron flux and fluence for blanket and material development and for component testing in a nuclear environment. Direct costs are reduced to about 400 M$ by dropping reactor-relevant aspects not essential to technology testing: No thermal barrier and electrostatic plugging of the plasma; fusion power of 7 MW at an injected power of 44 MW; tritium supply from external sources. All technologies for operating the machine are expected to be available by 1990; the plasma physics relies on microstabilization in a sloshing ion population. (orig.) [de

  15. Seismic tests on a reduced scale mock-up of a reprocessing plant cooling pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queval, J.C.; Gantenbein, F.; Lebelle, M.

    1995-01-01

    In conjunction with COGEMA and SGN, CEA has launched an important research program to validate the reprocessing plant cooling pond calculation mainly for the effect of the racks on the fluid-pond interaction. The paper presents the tests performed on a reduced scale mock-up (scale 1/5). The tests are composed by: -random excitations at very low excitation level to measure the natural frequencies, especially the first sloshing mode frequency; -sinusoidal tests to measure the damping; -seismic tests performed with 3 different time reduction scales (1, 1/5, 1/√5) and 3 different synthetic accelerograms. Two types of simplified model with added masses and finite element model were developed. Comparisons of measured and calculated pressure fields against the panels will be presented. The measured frequencies, obtained during tests, are in good agreement with Housner's results. (authors). 2 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  16. Vorticity and turbulence effects in fluid structure interaction an application to hydraulic structure design

    CERN Document Server

    Brocchini, M

    2006-01-01

    This book contains a collection of 11 research and review papers devoted to the topic of fluid-structure interaction.The subject matter is divided into chapters covering a wide spectrum of recognized areas of research, such as: wall bounded turbulence; quasi 2-D turbulence; canopy turbulence; large eddy simulation; lake hydrodynamics; hydraulic hysteresis; liquid impacts; flow induced vibrations; sloshing flows; transient pipe flow and air entrainment in dropshaft.The purpose of each chapter is to summarize the main results obtained by the individual research unit through a year-long activity on a specific issue of the above list. The main feature of the book is to bring state of the art research on fluid structure interaction to the attention of the broad international community.This book is primarily aimed at fluid mechanics scientists, but it will also be of value to postgraduate students and practitioners in the field of fluid structure interaction.

  17. Performance of liquid storage tanks during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haroun, M.A.; Mourad, S.A.; Izzeddine, W.

    1991-01-01

    Utilities and industrial facilities in the strong shaking area of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake include a large inventory of tanks of all types. The earthquake induced a few incidents of damage to tanks of old and modern design, and even to a retrofitted tank. This paper documents the performance of tank structures during this seismic event through a detailed description of the damage sustained by ground-based petroleum and water storage tanks and by elevated water tanks. It appears that site amplification of the long period ground motion components was a cause of large amplitude sloshing and the associated damage to tanks built on Bay Mud. It is also apparent that design procedures for ground-based unanchored tanks require a substantial updating to reflect the recent technical advances and the lessons learned for such a type of tanks

  18. A Deep Chandra Observation of the Centaurus Cluster:Bubbles, Filaments and Edges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabian, A.C.

    2005-03-14

    X-ray images and gas temperatures taken from a deep {approx}200 ks Chandra observation of the Centaurus cluster are presented. Multiple inner bubbles and outer semicircular edges are revealed, together with wispy filaments of soft X-ray emitting gas. The frothy central structure and eastern edge are likely due to the central radio source blowing bubbles in the intracluster gas. The semicircular edges to the surface brightness maps 32 kpc to the east and 17.5 kpc to the west are marked by sharp temperature increases and abundance drops. The edges could be due to sloshing motions of the central potential, or are possibly enhanced by earlier radio activity. The high abundance of the innermost gas (about 2.5 times Solar) limits the amount of diffusion and mixing taking place.

  19. Performance evaluation and design of flight vehicle control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Falangas, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    This book will help students, control engineers and flight dynamics analysts to model and conduct sophisticated and systemic analyses of early flight vehicle designs controlled with multiple types of effectors and to design and evaluate new vehicle concepts in terms of satisfying mission and performance goals. Performance Evaluation and Design of Flight Vehicle Control Systems begins by creating a dynamic model of a generic flight vehicle that includes a range of elements from airplanes and launch vehicles to re-entry vehicles and spacecraft. The models may include dynamic effects dealing with structural flexibility, as well as dynamic coupling between structures and actuators, propellant sloshing, and aeroelasticity, and they are typically used for control analysis and design. The book shows how to efficiently combine different types of effectors together, such as aero-surfaces, TVC, throttling engines and RCS, to operate as a system by developing a mixing logic atrix. Methods of trimming a vehicle controll...

  20. A drift-pump coil design for a Tandem Mirror Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neef, W.S.; Logan, B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes both the theory and mechanical design behind a new concept for trapped ion removal from tandem mirror end plugs. The design has been developed for the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS). The new drift-pump coils replace charge exchange pump beams. Pump beams consume large amounts of power and seriously reduce reactor performance. Drift-pump coils consume only a few megawatts of power and introduce no added burden to the reactor vacuum pumps. In addition, they are easy to replace. The coils are similar in shape to a paper clip and are located at two positions in each end plug. The coils between the transition coil and the first anchor yinyang serve to remove ions trapped in the magnetic well just outboard of the high field choke coil. The coils located between the anchor coil set and the plug coil set remove sloshing ions and trapped cold ions from the plug region

  1. Informal caregiving as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes in individuals with favourable and unfavourable psychosocial work environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, J; Clark, A J; Lange, T

    2018-01-01

    AIM: To examine whether informal caregiving is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and whether job strain and social support at work modify the association. METHODS: Individual participant's data were pooled from three cohort studies-the French GAZEL study, the Swedish...... Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) and the British Whitehall II study-a total of 21,243 study subjects. Informal caregiving was defined as unpaid care for a closely related person. Job strain was assessed using the demand-control model, and questions on co-worker and supervisor support were...... combined in a measure of social support at work. Incident T2D was ascertained using registry-based, clinically assessed and self-reported data. RESULTS: A total of 1058 participants developed T2D during the up to 10 years of follow-up. Neither informal caregiving (OR: 1.09, 95% CI: 0.92-1.30) nor high job...

  2. Fluid Structure Interaction for Hydraulic Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souli, Mhamed; Aquelet, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Fluid Structure interaction plays an important role in engineering applications. Physical phenomena such as flow induced vibration in nuclear industry, fuel sloshing tank in automotive industry or rotor stator interaction in turbo machinery, can lead to structure deformation and sometimes to failure. In order to solve fluid structure interaction problems, the majority of numerical tests consists in using two different codes to separately solve pressure of the fluid and structural displacements. In this paper, a unique code with an ALE formulation approach is used to implicitly calculate the pressure of an incompressible fluid applied to the structure. The development of the ALE method as well as the coupling in a computational structural dynamic code, allows to solve more large industrial problems related to fluid structure coupling. (authors)

  3. A Multi-Hazard Vulnerability Assessment of Coastal Landmarks along Cape Hatteras National Seashore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Cape Hatteras National Seashore is located along the Outer Banks, a narrow string of barrier islands in eastern North Carolina. The seashore was established to preserve cultural and natural resources of national significance, yet these islands have shoreline rates of change that are predominately erosional, frequently experience storm surge inundation driven by tropical and extra-tropical storm events, and are highly vulnerable to sea level rise. The National Park Service staff are concerned about the vulnerability of historic structures located within the park, and recognized the utility of a coastal hazard risk assessment to assist park managers with long-term planning. They formed a cooperative agreement with researchers at East Carolina University to conduct the assessment, which primarily used GIS to evaluate the susceptibility of 27 historical structures to coastal erosion, storm surge, and sea-level rise. The Digital Shoreline Analysis System was used to calculate a linear regression rate of shoreline movement based on historical shorelines. Those rates were used to simulate the future position of the shoreline along transects. The SLOSH model output was down scaled to a DEM generated from the 2014 NC QL2 LiDAR collection to determine the extent and depth of inundation that would occur from storm events. Sea level rise was modeled for various scenarios referenced to existing MHHW, and also added to each SLOSH model output to determine the effect of a storm event under those sea level rise scenarios. Risk maps were developed to include not only areal coverage for existing structures and districts, but also identify potential areas of relocation or retreat in the long-term. In addition to evaluating vulnerability, timelines for potential impacts provided scenarios for National Park Service staff to research adaption and mitigation strategies.

  4. Numerical prediction of fire extinguishment characteristics of sodium leak collection tray in a fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diwakar, S.V.; Mangarjuna Rao, P.; Kasinathan, N.; Das, Sarit K.; Sundararajan, T.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sodium fire extinguishment in a leak collection tray is modeled by lumped approach. ► Hydrodynamics of liquid sodium on tray is emulated through a draining/sloshing model. ► Pool burning rates in the tray and holdup vessel are numerically estimated. ► The model directly yields the mass of sodium recovered after extinction of fire. ► Model predictions are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data. - Abstract: Sodium leak collection tray (LCT) is an efficient passive device used for the extinguishment of liquid sodium fire in case of an accidental leakage from the secondary circuit of a fast breeder reactor. The LCT essentially isolates the leaking sodium into closed containers where the resulting fire is extinguished due to limited availability of oxygen. The current work aims to highlight the combustion extinguishment characteristics of LCT through a lumped formulation by conserving the mass and energy of liquid sodium and constituent gases in various parts of the LCT. Here, the complex hydrodynamics of liquid sodium is emulated through a semi-analytical draining/sloshing model and its burning rates are predicted through a three-dimensional open pool combustion model for the tray region and a closed pool combustion model for the holdup vessel. These simulations evaluate the burning rates at discrete levels of liquid sodium which are subsequently interpolated to establish correlations involving instantaneous liquid levels and oxygen concentration. Using the correlations obtained from the draining and combustion models, the overall lumped formulation directly predicts the un-burnt sodium recoverable after the extinguishment of fire in the LCT. The predicted results of this model compare well with the available experimental data.

  5. FSI-based Overflow Assessment of the Seismically-Isolated SFP with Fuel Racks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Gil Y.; Park, Hyun T.; Chang, Soo-Hyuk [Korea Maintenance Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Hoon [KEPCO E-C, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To date, effectiveness of the seismic isolation systems for reducing seismic force effectively has been well demonstrated. In this context, practical application of the technology in nuclear engineering fields has become an important issue more and more. This is because fluid motion can be rather amplified due to the increased relative displacement between the base and superstructures by a long-period shift. Therefore, overflow assessment and prediction of the seismically-isolated SFP have to be conducted in design phase. For performing sloshing-induced overflow of the seismically-isolated SFP, a fluid-structure interaction(FSI) approach making a two-way coupling process between structural and fluid solvers is herein employed. In this study, fuel racks inside the SFP are included in FSI modeling to investigate effect of fuel-cell assemblies on SFP overflow. Accordingly, three different assembly sets of fuel cells are assumed to be inserted in fuel racks. In addition, floor acceleration time-histories produced from three different amplitudes of peak ground acceleration (PGA) are applied to the SFP base to investigate load effect on liquid overflow. An approach for the liquid overflow assessment of the seismically-isolated nuclear SFP with fuel storage racks based on FSI analysis was addressed. From the results of the identified cases, the following conclusions are drawn: (i) FSI technique can be effectively used to assess the seismically-isolated SFP overflow, (ii) In a conservative way, the isolated SFP without fuel racks can be used to assess its sloshing-induced overflow under earthquake since effect of fuel-cell assemblies on the SFP overflow is not significant, (iii) for given same conditions (e.g., constant design free surface, same fuel-cell assembly) except seismic loading, the higher PGA is, the more liquid overflow increases.

  6. The mystery of the "Kite" radio source in Abell 2626: Insights from new Chandra observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignesti, A.; Gitti, M.; Brunetti, G.; O'Sullivan, E.; Sarazin, C.; Wong, K.

    2018-03-01

    Context. We present the results of a new Chandra study of the galaxy cluster Abell 2626. The radio emission of the cluster shows a complex system of four symmetric arcs without known correlations with the thermal X-ray emission. The mirror symmetry of the radio arcs toward the center and the presence of two optical cores in the central galaxy suggested that they may be created by pairs of precessing radio jets powered by dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs) inside the core dominant galaxy. However, previous observations failed to observe the second jetted AGN and the spectral trend due to radiative age along the radio arcs, thus challenging this interpretation. Aim. The new Chandra observation had several scientific objectives, including the search for the second AGN that would support the jet precession model. We focus here on the detailed study of the local properties of the thermal and non-thermal emission in the proximity of the radio arcs, in order to obtain further insights into their origin. Methods: We performed a standard data reduction of the Chandra dataset deriving the radial profiles of temperature, density, pressure and cooling time of the intra-cluster medium. We further analyzed the two-dimensional (2D) distribution of the gas temperature, discovering that the south-western junction of the radio arcs surrounds the cool core of the cluster. Results: We studied the X-ray surface brightness and spectral profiles across the junction, finding a cold front spatially coincident with the radio arcs. This may suggest a connection between the sloshing of the thermal gas and the nature of the radio filaments, raising new scenarios for their origin. A tantalizing possibility is that the radio arcs trace the projection of a complex surface connecting the sites where electrons are most efficiently reaccelerated by the turbulence that is generated by the gas sloshing. In this case, diffuse emission embedded by the arcs and with extremely steep spectrum should be

  7. Effect of viscosity on seismic response of waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yu; Uras, R.A.; Chang, Yao-Wen.

    1992-06-01

    The dynamic response of liquid-storage tanks subjected to harmonic excitations and earthquake ground motions has been studied. A rigid tank of negligible mass, rigidly supported at the base having a diameter of 50 ft. and fluid height of 20.4 ft. was used in the computer analysis. The liquid is assumed to have a density of 1.5 g/ml. Viscosity values, μ = 60, 200, 100, and 10,000 cP, were used in the numerical analyses to study the effects of viscosity on sloshing wave height, impulsive and convective pressure on the tank wall, base shear and base moments. Harmonic excitations as well as earthquake ground motions were used as input motions. The harmonic excitations used in the analyses covers a wide range of frequencies, including both the resonant and non-resonant frequencies. Two earthquake motions were used. One matches the Newmark-Hall median response spectrum and is anchored at 0.24 g for a rock site with a damping of 2% and a time duration of 10 s. The other is the 1978 Tabas earthquake which had a peak ZPA of 0.81 g and a time duration of 29 s. A small tank, about 1/15 the size of the typical waste storage tank, was used in the harmonic excitation study to investigate the effect of viscosity on the response of liquid-storage tanks and how the viscosity effect is affected by the size of the storage tank. The results of this study show that for the typical waste storage tank subjected to earthquake motions, the effect of viscosity on sloshing wave height and impulsive and convective pressures is very small and can be neglected. For viscosity effect to become noticeable in the response of the typical waste storage tank, the waste viscosity must be greater than 10,000 cP. This value is far greater than the estimated viscosity value of the high level wastes, which may range from 60 to 200 cP for some tanks

  8. Analytical Formulation of Equatorial Standing Wave Phenomena: Application to QBO and ENSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukite, P. R.

    2016-12-01

    Key equatorial climate phenomena such as QBO and ENSO have never been adequately explained as deterministic processes. This in spite of recent research showing growing evidence of predictable behavior. This study applies the fundamental Laplace tidal equations with simplifying assumptions along the equator — i.e. no Coriolis force and a small angle approximation. To connect the analytical Sturm-Liouville results to observations, a first-order forcing consistent with a seasonally aliased Draconic or nodal lunar period (27.21d aliased into 2.36y) is applied. This has a plausible rationale as it ties a latitudinal forcing cycle via a cross-product to the longitudinal terms in the Laplace formulation. The fitted results match the features of QBO both qualitatively and quantitatively; adding second-order terms due to other seasonally aliased lunar periods provides finer detail while remaining consistent with the physical model. Further, running symbolic regression machine learning experiments on the data provided a validation to the approach, as it discovered the same analytical form and fitted values as the first principles Laplace model. These results conflict with Lindzen's QBO model, in that his original formulation fell short of making the lunar connection, even though Lindzen himself asserted "it is unlikely that lunar periods could be produced by anything other than the lunar tidal potential".By applying a similar analytical approach to ENSO, we find that the tidal equations need to be replaced with a Mathieu-equation formulation consistent with describing a sloshing process in the thermocline depth. Adapting the hydrodynamic math of sloshing, we find a biennial modulation coupled with angular momentum forcing variations matching the Chandler wobble gives an impressive match over the measured ENSO range of 1880 until the present. Lunar tidal periods and an additional triaxial nutation of 14 year period provide additional fidelity. The caveat is a phase

  9. The constrained discrete-time state-dependent Riccati equation technique for uncertain nonlinear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Insu

    The objective of the thesis is to introduce a relatively general nonlinear controller/estimator synthesis framework using a special type of the state-dependent Riccati equation technique. The continuous time state-dependent Riccati equation (SDRE) technique is extended to discrete-time under input and state constraints, yielding constrained (C) discrete-time (D) SDRE, referred to as CD-SDRE. For the latter, stability analysis and calculation of a region of attraction are carried out. The derivation of the D-SDRE under state-dependent weights is provided. Stability of the D-SDRE feedback system is established using Lyapunov stability approach. Receding horizon strategy is used to take into account the constraints on D-SDRE controller. Stability condition of the CD-SDRE controller is analyzed by using a switched system. The use of CD-SDRE scheme in the presence of constraints is then systematically demonstrated by applying this scheme to problems of spacecraft formation orbit reconfiguration under limited performance on thrusters. Simulation results demonstrate the efficacy and reliability of the proposed CD-SDRE. The CD-SDRE technique is further investigated in a case where there are uncertainties in nonlinear systems to be controlled. First, the system stability under each of the controllers in the robust CD-SDRE technique is separately established. The stability of the closed-loop system under the robust CD-SDRE controller is then proven based on the stability of each control system comprising switching configuration. A high fidelity dynamical model of spacecraft attitude motion in 3-dimensional space is derived with a partially filled fuel tank, assumed to have the first fuel slosh mode. The proposed robust CD-SDRE controller is then applied to the spacecraft attitude control system to stabilize its motion in the presence of uncertainties characterized by the first fuel slosh mode. The performance of the robust CD-SDRE technique is discussed. Subsequently

  10. Comparison of thermohydraulic characteristics in the use of various coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu; Suda, Kazunori; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2000-11-01

    Numerical calculations were carried out for a free surface sloshing, a thermal stratification, a thermal striping, and a natural convection as key phenomena of in-vessel thermohydraulics in future fast reactor systems with various fluids as coolants. This numerical work was initiated based on a recognition that the fundamental characteristics of the phenomena have been unsolved quantitatively in the use of various coolants. From the analysis for the phenomena, the following results were obtained. [Free Surface Sloshing phenomena] (1) There is no remarkable difference between liquid sodium and liquid Pb-Bi in characteristics of internal flows and free surface characteristics based on Fr number. (2) The AQUA-VOF code has a potential enough to evaluate gas entrainment behavior from the free surface including the internal flow characteristics. [Thermal Stratification Phenomena] (1) On-set position of thermal entrainment process due to dynamic vortex flows was moved to downstream direction with decreasing of Ri number. On the other hand, the position in the case of CO 2 gas was shifted to upstream side with decreasing of Ri number. (2) Destruction speed of the thermal stratification interface was dependent on thermal diffusivity as fluid properties. Therefore it was concluded that an elimination method is necessary for the interface generated in CO 2 gas. [Thermal Striping Phenomena] (1) Large amplitudes of fluid temperature fluctuations was reached to down stream area in the use of CO 2 gas, due to larger fluid viscosity and smaller thermal diffusivity, compared with liquid sodium and liquid Pb-Bi cases. (2) To simulate thermal striping conditions such as amplitude and frequency of the fluid temperature fluctuations, it is necessary for coincidences of Re number for the amplitude and of velocity value for the frequency, in various coolants. [Natural Convection Phynomlena] (1) Fundamental behavior of the natural convection in various coolant follows buoyant jet

  11. Prevalence of mind and body exercises (MBE in relation to demographics, self-rated health, and purchases of prescribed psychotropic drugs and analgesics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Rådmark

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify any differences regarding gender, age, socioeconomic status (SES, self-rated health, perceived stress and the purchase of prescribed drugs among people who practice mind and body exercises (MBE extensively compared to people who do not.The study includes 3,913 men and 4,803 women aged 20-72 who participated in the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH. The respondents were divided into three groups depending on frequency of MBE practice (never/seldom/often. Measures regarding MBE practice, health behaviors, self-rated health, and illnesses were drawn from the SLOSH questionnaire, while more objective measures of socioeconomic status and education were derived from registry data. In addition, data on purchases of prescription drugs for all respondents were included in the study. These data were obtained from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, which contains information about prescription drugs dispensed at Swedish pharmacies. Separate analyses were performed for mental MBE (mindfulness, meditation, relaxation techniques and physical MBE (yoga, Tai Chi, Qi Gong, respectively.A high intensity MBE practice is cross-sectionally related to poor self-assessed health (sleeping problems, pain, depressive symptoms, mental disorders, high levels of stress, and high levels of purchases of psychotropic drugs and analgesics. These cross-sectional relationships are generally stronger for mental MBE than for bodily-directed MBE. More women than men are practicing MBE on a regular basis, and physically active people participate to a greater extent in MBE compared with the physically inactive.Overall, the study shows that frequent participation in mind and body exercises is associated with high levels of purchases of psychotropic drugs and analgesics as well as with poor self-assessed health and high levels of stress. However, since this is a cross-sectional study, it is impossible to establish cause and effect

  12. Discovery of megaparsec-scale, low surface brightness nonthermal emission in merging galaxy clusters using the green bank telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnsworth, Damon; Rudnick, Lawrence [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Brown, Shea [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, 203 Van Allen Hall, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Brunetti, Gianfranco [INAF/Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-20

    We present results from a study of 12 X-ray bright clusters at 1.4 GHz with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope. After subtraction of point sources using existing interferometer data, we reach a median (best) 1σ rms sensitivity level of 0.01 (0.006) μJy arcsec{sup –2}, and find a significant excess of diffuse, low surface brightness emission in 11 of 12 Abell clusters observed. We also present initial results at 1.4 GHz of A2319 from the Very Large Array. In particular, we find: (1) four new detections of diffuse structures tentatively classified as two halos (A2065, A2069) and two relics (A2067, A2073); (2) the first detection of the radio halo in A2061 at 1.4 GHz, which qualifies this as a possible ultra-steep spectrum halo source with a synchrotron spectral index of α ∼ 1.8 between 327 MHz and 1.4 GHz; (3) a ∼2 Mpc radio halo in the sloshing, minor-merger cluster A2142; (4) a >2× increase of the giant radio halo extent and luminosity in the merging cluster A2319; (5) a ∼7× increase to the integrated radio flux and >4× increase to the observed extent of the peripheral radio relic in A1367 to ∼600 kpc, which we also observe to be polarized on a similar scale; (6) significant excess emission of ambiguous nature in three clusters with embedded tailed radio galaxies (A119, A400, A3744). Our radio halo detections agree with the well-known X-ray/radio luminosity correlation, but they are larger and fainter than current radio power correlation studies would predict. The corresponding volume-averaged synchrotron emissivities are 1-2 orders of magnitude below the characteristic value found in previous studies. Some of the halo-like detections may be some type of previously unseen, low surface brightness radio halo or blend of unresolved shock structures and sub-Mpc-scale turbulent regions associated with their respective cluster merging activity. Four of the five tentative halos contain one or more X-ray cold fronts, suggesting a possible connection between gas

  13. Interfacial instabilities in vibrated fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier

    2016-07-01

    Vibrations induce a range of different interfacial phenomena in fluid systems depending on the frequency and orientation of the forcing. With gravity, (large) interfaces are approximately flat and there is a qualitative difference between vertical and horizontal forcing. Sufficient vertical forcing produces subharmonic standing waves (Faraday waves) that extend over the whole interface. Horizontal forcing can excite both localized and extended interfacial phenomena. The vibrating solid boundaries act as wavemakers to excite traveling waves (or sloshing modes at low frequencies) but they also drive evanescent bulk modes whose oscillatory pressure gradient can parametrically excite subharmonic surface waves like cross-waves. Depending on the magnitude of the damping and the aspect ratio of the container, these locally generated surfaces waves may interact in the interior resulting in temporal modulation and other complex dynamics. In the case where the interface separates two fluids of different density in, for example, a rectangular container, the mass transfer due to vertical motion near the endwalls requires a counterflow in the interior region that can lead to a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and a ``frozen wave" pattern. In microgravity, the dominance of surface forces favors non-flat equilibrium configurations and the distinction between vertical and horizontal applied forcing can be lost. Hysteresis and multiplicity of solutions are more common, especially in non-wetting systems where disconnected (partial) volumes of fluid can be established. Furthermore, the vibrational field contributes a dynamic pressure term that competes with surface tension to select the (time averaged) shape of the surface. These new (quasi-static) surface configurations, known as vibroequilibria, can differ substantially from the hydrostatic state. There is a tendency for the interface to orient perpendicular to the vibrational axis and, in some cases, a bulge or cavity is induced

  14. PROBING THE EXTREME REALM OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK IN THE MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTER, RX J1532.9+3021

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Allen, S. W.; Canning, R. E. A.; Werner, N.; Ehlert, S.; Von der Linden, A. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Taylor, G. B.; Grimes, C. K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New-Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Fabian, A. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Sanders, J. S., E-mail: juliehl@stanford.edu [Max-Planck-Institut fur extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-11-10

    We present a detailed Chandra, XMM-Newton, Very Large Array (VLA) and Hubble Space Telescope analysis of one of the strongest cool core clusters known, RX J1532.9+3021 (z = 0.3613). Using new, deep 90 ks Chandra observations, we confirm the presence of a western X-ray cavity or bubble, and report on a newly discovered eastern X-ray cavity. The total mechanical power associated with these active galactic nucleus (AGN) driven outflows is (22 ± 9) × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1}, and is sufficient to offset the cooling, indicating that AGN feedback still provides a viable solution to the cooling flow problem even in the strongest cool core clusters. Based on the distribution of the optical filaments, as well as a jet-like structure seen in the 325 MHz VLA radio map, we suggest that the cluster harbors older outflows along the north to south direction. The jet of the central AGN is therefore either precessing or sloshing-induced motions have caused the outflows to change directions. There are also hints of an X-ray depression to the north aligned with the 325 MHz jet-like structure, which might represent the highest redshift ghost cavity discovered to date. We further find evidence of a cold front (r ≈ 65 kpc) that coincides with the outermost edge of the western X-ray cavity and the edge of the radio mini-halo. The common location of the cold front with the edge of the radio mini-halo supports the idea that the latter originates from electrons being reaccelerated due to sloshing-induced turbulence. Alternatively, its coexistence with the edge of the X-ray cavity may be due to cool gas being dragged out by the outburst. We confirm that the central AGN is highly sub-Eddington and conclude that a >10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} or a rapidly spinning black hole is favored to explain both the radiative-inefficiency of the AGN and the powerful X-ray cavities.

  15. Wave energy extraction by coupled resonant absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D V; Porter, R

    2012-01-28

    In this article, a range of problems and theories will be introduced that will build towards a new wave energy converter (WEC) concept, with the acronym 'ROTA' standing for resonant over-topping absorber. First, classical results for wave power absorption for WECs constrained to operate in a single degree of freedom will be reviewed and the role of resonance in their operation highlighted. Emphasis will then be placed on how the introduction of further resonances can improve power take-off characteristics by extending the range of frequencies over which the efficiency is close to a theoretical maximum. Methods for doing this in different types of WECs will be demonstrated. Coupled resonant absorbers achieve this by connecting a WEC device equipped with its own resonance (determined from a hydrodynamic analysis) to a new system having separate mass/spring/damper characteristics. It is shown that a coupled resonant effect can be realized by inserting a water tank into a WEC, and this idea forms the basis of the ROTA device. In essence, the idea is to exploit the coupling between the natural sloshing frequencies of the water in the internal tank and the natural resonance of a submerged buoyant circular cylinder device that is tethered to the sea floor, allowing a rotary motion about its axis of attachment.

  16. Measurement of wetted area fraction in subcooled pool boiling of water using infrared thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyungdae; Park, Youngjae; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2013-01-01

    The wetted area fraction in subcooled pool boiling of water at atmospheric pressure is measured using the DEPIcT (DEtection of Phase by Infrared Thermography) technique. DEPIcT exploits the contrast in infrared (IR) light emissions between wet and dry areas on the surface of an IR-transparent heater to visualize the instantaneous distribution of the liquid and gas phases in contact with the heater surface. In this paper time-averaged wetted area fraction data in nucleate boiling are reported as functions of heat flux (from 30% up to 100% of the Critical Heat Flux) and subcooling (ΔT sub = 0, 5, 10, 30 and 50 °C). The results show that the wetted area fraction monotonically decreases with increasing heat flux and increases with increasing subcooling: both trends are expected. The range of time-averaged wetted area fractions is from 90%, at low heat flux and high subcooling, to 50% at high heat flux (right before CHF) and low subcooling. It is also shown that the dry areas are periodically rewetted by liquid sloshing on the surface at any subcooling and heat flux; however, the dry areas expand irreversibly at CHF

  17. Description and Flight Performance Results of the WASP Sounding Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pauw, J. F.; Steffens, L. E.; Yuska, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    A general description of the design and construction of the WASP sounding rocket and of the performance of its first flight are presented. The purpose of the flight test was to place the 862-pound (391-kg) spacecraft above 250 000 feet (76.25 km) on free-fall trajectory for at least 6 minutes in order to study the effect of "weightlessness" on a slosh dynamics experiment. The WASP sounding rocket fulfilled its intended mission requirements. The sounding rocket approximately followed a nominal trajectory. The payload was in free fall above 250 000 feet (76.25 km) for 6.5 minutes and reached an apogee altitude of 134 nautical miles (248 km). Flight data including velocity, altitude, acceleration, roll rate, and angle of attack are discussed and compared to nominal performance calculations. The effect of residual burning of the second stage motor is analyzed. The flight vibration environment is presented and analyzed, including root mean square (RMS) and power spectral density analysis.

  18. Fusion power demonstration - a baseline for the mirror engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Neef, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    Developing a definition of an engineering test reactor (ETR) is a current goal of the Office of Fusion Energy (OFE). As a baseline for the mirror ETR, the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) concept has been pursued at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in cooperation with Grumman Aerospace, TRW, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Envisioned as an intermediate step to fusion power applications, the FPD would achieve DT ignition in the central cell, after which blankets and power conversion would be added to produce net power. To achieve ignition, a minimum central cell length of 67.5 m is needed to supply the ion and alpha particles radial drift pumping losses in the transition region. The resulting fusion power is 360 MW. Low electron-cyclotron heating power of 12 MW, ion-cyclotron heating of 2.5 MW, and a sloshing ion beam power of 1.0 MW result in a net plasma Q of 22. A primary technological challenge is the 24-T, 45-cm bore choke coil, comprising a copper hybrid insert within a 15 to 18 T superconducting coil

  19. Fundamental study on dynamic behaviors of fuel debris bed. Research report in 2007 (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Koji; Fukuda, Kenji; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Suzuki, Tohru; Yamano, Hidemasa

    2009-05-01

    It is important to make a reasonable evaluation of coolability of debris bed with decay heat source in assessing post accident heat removal of a liquid metal cooled fast reactor. In general, the coolability of fuel debris depends on coolant convection, boiling and debris bed movement. In the present study, to understand fundamental characteristics of debris movement, self-leveling behavior caused by the coolant boiling was investigated experimentally using simulant materials. The present experiments employed depressurization boiling of water to simulate void distribution in a debris bed, which consists of solid particles of alumina. A rough estimation model of self-leveling occurrence was proposed and compared with the experimental results. Its extrapolation to reactor accident conditions was also discussed. In addition, solid-liquid flow experiments, which are relevant to debris bed movement behaviors, were analyzed to verify the validity of multiphase flow models employed in a safety analysis code. In the present verification study, basic validity of the code was demonstrated by analyzing experiments of water-column sloshing with solid particles. (author)

  20. Power optimization in the star-LM modular, natural convection reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.W.; Sienicki, J.J.; Farmer, M.T.

    2001-01-01

    The secure, transportable, autonomous reactor (STAR) project addresses the needs of developing countries and independent power producers for small, multi-purpose energy systems, which operate near autonomously for very long term. The STAR-LM variant described here is a liquid metal cooled, fast reactor system. Previous development of STAR-LM resulted in a 300 MWt modular, pool-type reactor based on criteria for factory fabrication, full transportability (barge, overland, rail), and fast construction and startup. Steam generator modules are placed directly into the primary heat transport circuit, eliminating the intermediate heat transport loop. Natural convection heat transport at all power levels eliminates the need for main coolant pumps. Seismic isolation eliminates concern about seismic and sloshing-related loads in the pool configuration. Even end-of-spectrum postulated events such as loss-of-heat sink with failure to scram are terminated passively by inherent core power shutdown, and decay heat is passively rejected to the atmospheric air inexhaustible heat sink by guard vessel exterior cooling. Recent concept development has focused on maximizing the power achievable in a small module size based on preserving key criteria for: full spectrum of modes of module transport from factory to site (including rail transport); 100% natural circulation heat transport; ultra-long core cartridge lifetime; coolant and cladding peak temperatures well within the existing (Russian) database for Pb/Bi coolant and ferritic steel core materials. (author)

  1. Resonant frequencies in an elevated spherical container partially filled with water: FEM and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curadelli, O.; Ambrosini, D.; Mirasso, A.; Amani, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a numerical-experimental study of the overall dynamical response of elevated spherical tanks subjected to horizontal base motion is presented. The main objective is to gain insight in the physical response of this particular structural typology widely used in the petrochemical industry as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) containers. In order to identify the natural frequencies of the modes that mainly contribute to the response, experimental free vibration tests on an elevated spherical tank model for different liquid levels were carried out. Next, a numerical model that takes into account the coupling between fluid and structure was developed and validated against the experimental results. A very good agreement between experimental and numerical results was obtained. The results obtained show the influence of liquid levels on natural frequencies and indicate that the sloshing has a significant effect on the dynamical characteristics of the analyzed system. In order to obtain a good representation of the overall dynamical behaviour of the system by means of a simplified lumped mass model, a minimum of three masses is suggested. Finally, appropriate names of these three masses are proposed in the present paper.

  2. A study of energy dissipation and critical speed of granular flow in a rotating cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragomir, Sergiu C.; Sinnott, Mathew D.; Semercigil, S. Eren; Turan, Özden F.

    2014-12-01

    Tuned vibration absorbers may improve the safety of flexible structures which are prone to excessive oscillation magnitudes under dynamic loads. A novel absorber design proposes sloshing of granular material in a rotating cylinder where the granular material is the energy dissipating agent. As the conventional dissipative elements require maintenance due to the nature of their function, the new design may represent a virtually maintenance free alternative. The angular speed of the cylinder containing particles has a critical centrifuging speed, after which particles remain permanently in contact with the walls and there can be no further dissipation. Until the critical speed, however, dissipation increases proportionally with the angular speed. It is then vital to know the value of the critical speed as the limit of dissipation. The focus of the present study is on determination of the critical centrifuge speed. This critical speed is also of practical importance in bulk-material handling rotary mills, such as dryers and crushers. Experiments and numerical simulations, using Discrete Element Method, are used to determine the critical centrifuging speed. In addition, predictions are given and guidelines are offered for the choice of material properties to maximize the energy dissipation. As a result of a parametric study, the coefficient of friction is found to have the greatest significance on the centrifuging speed.

  3. Accurate Fluid Level Measurement in Dynamic Environment Using Ultrasonic Sensor and ν-SVM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny TERZIC

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A fluid level measurement system based on a single Ultrasonic Sensor and Support Vector Machines (SVM based signal processing and classification system has been developed to determine the fluid level in automotive fuel tanks. The novel approach based on the ν-SVM classification method uses the Radial Basis Function (RBF to compensate for the measurement error induced by the sloshing effects in the tank caused by vehicle motion. A broad investigation on selected pre-processing filters, namely, Moving Mean, Moving Median, and Wavelet filter, has also been presented. Field drive trials were performed under normal driving conditions at various fuel volumes ranging from 5 L to 50 L to acquire sample data from the ultrasonic sensor for the training of SVM model. Further drive trials were conducted to obtain data to verify the SVM results. A comparison of the accuracy of the predicted fluid level obtained using SVM and the pre-processing filters is provided. It is demonstrated that the ν-SVM model using the RBF kernel function and the Moving Median filter has produced the most accurate outcome compared with the other signal filtration methods in terms of fluid level measurement.

  4. Necessity of radiation education suggested from press report during earthquake damage of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamoto, Kazuko; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Itami, Toshio; Kobayashi, Masahide; Akizuki, Teruo; Onishi, Hidetoshi

    2009-01-01

    Although Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station was affected by Chuetsu-Oki earthquake, the important components in the reactor building were hardly damaged, and fundamental nuclear safety was ensured. However, as the mass communication media reported the pictures of the black smoke of fire accident of the transformer, sloshing of the pool, etc. without declaration of 'Safety' by the Central Government or sufficient explanation, the habitants on the site and the Japan's people were put into anxiety and thus, harmful rumor was spread. The people obtain the information from the mass communication media, and they believed all the reports of the mass media. Behind it, there is a fundamental knowledge among them that Radiation = 'dangerous', 'bad for health' and 'awful' = Nuclear Power Generation. This knowledge has been fixed more firmly due to the report of the earthquake damage. In order to escape from this deep-rooted scheme, it is necessary to spread the correct knowledge on the radiation. At this time, the Official Curriculum Guidelines for Junior High School are revised, and the radiation education is started for the first time in 30 years. We analyzed and evaluated the results of the survey performed by Radiation Education Forum, and, simultaneously, we considered the necessity of the radiation education judging from the reports of the mass communication media. (author)

  5. Seismic response analysis of floating nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hideharu; Shiojiri, Hiroo

    1988-01-01

    Since Floating Nuclear Power Plants (FNPs) are considered to be isolated from horizontal seismic motion, it is anticipated to reduce seismic load for plant components and buildings on the barge. On the other hand, barge oscillation and sloshing in the closed basin might be excited by earthquakes, because natural periods of those motions correspond to relatively-long period component (between 2 and 20 seconds) of seismic motion. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate seismic isolation effects and barge oscillation, for the rational design of FNPs. However, there do not exist any reasonable analytical tools which can evaluate seismic response of floating structures in closed basin. The purpose of the present report is to develop a seismic analysis method for FNPs. The proposed method is based on the finite element method, and the formulation includes fluid-structure interaction, water surface wave, buoyancy effect, and non-linear characteristics of mooring system. Response analysis can be executed in both time-domain and frequency-domain. Shaking table tests were conducted to validate the proposed method of analysis. The test results showed significant isolation effect of floating structure, and apparent interaction between the barge and the basin. And 2-D and 3-D frequency domain analyses and the 2-D linear and non-linear time-domain analyses were done and those analyses could simulate the test results well. (author)

  6. Design of a reconfigurable liquid hydrogen fuel tank for use in the Genii unmanned aerial vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Patrick; Leachman, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Long endurance flight, on the order of days, is a leading flight performance characteristic for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Liquid hydrogen (LH2) is well suited to providing multi-day flight times with a specific energy 2.8 times that of conventional kerosene based fuels. However, no such system of LH2 storage, delivery, and use is currently available for commercial UAVs. In this paper, we develop a light weight LH2 dewar for integration and testing in the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell powered, student designed and constructed, Genii UAV. The fuel tank design is general for scaling to suit various UAV platforms. A cylindrical vacuum-jacketed design with removable end caps was chosen to incorporate various fuel level gauging, pressurizing, and slosh mitigation systems. Heat and mechanical loadings were modeled to compare with experimental results. Mass performance of the fuel tank is characterized by the fraction of liquid hydrogen to full tank mass, and the insulation performance was characterized by effective thermal conductivity and boil-off rate

  7. Design of a reconfigurable liquid hydrogen fuel tank for use in the Genii unmanned aerial vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, Patrick; Leachman, Jacob [HYdrogen Properties for Energy Research (HYPER) Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2920 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    Long endurance flight, on the order of days, is a leading flight performance characteristic for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Liquid hydrogen (LH2) is well suited to providing multi-day flight times with a specific energy 2.8 times that of conventional kerosene based fuels. However, no such system of LH2 storage, delivery, and use is currently available for commercial UAVs. In this paper, we develop a light weight LH2 dewar for integration and testing in the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell powered, student designed and constructed, Genii UAV. The fuel tank design is general for scaling to suit various UAV platforms. A cylindrical vacuum-jacketed design with removable end caps was chosen to incorporate various fuel level gauging, pressurizing, and slosh mitigation systems. Heat and mechanical loadings were modeled to compare with experimental results. Mass performance of the fuel tank is characterized by the fraction of liquid hydrogen to full tank mass, and the insulation performance was characterized by effective thermal conductivity and boil-off rate.

  8. Comparison of different iterative schemes for ISPH based on Rankine source solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Zheng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH method has a good adaptability for the simulation of free surface flow problems. There are two forms of SPH. One is weak compressible SPH and the other one is incompressible SPH (ISPH. Compared with the former one, ISPH method performs better in many cases. ISPH based on Rankine source solution can perform better than traditional ISPH, as it can use larger stepping length by avoiding the second order derivative in pressure Poisson equation. However, ISPH_R method needs to solve the sparse linear matrix for pressure Poisson equation, which is one of the most expensive parts during one time stepping calculation. Iterative methods are normally used for solving Poisson equation with large particle numbers. However, there are many iterative methods available and the question for using which one is still open. In this paper, three iterative methods, CGS, Bi-CGstab and GMRES are compared, which are suitable and typical for large unsymmetrical sparse matrix solutions. According to the numerical tests on different cases, still water test, dam breaking, violent tank sloshing, solitary wave slamming, the GMRES method is more efficient than CGS and Bi-CGstab for ISPH method.

  9. Space Launch System Ascent Flight Control Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Jeb S.; Wall, John H.; VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Hall, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    A robust and flexible autopilot architecture for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) family of launch vehicles is presented. The SLS configurations represent a potentially significant increase in complexity and performance capability when compared with other manned launch vehicles. It was recognized early in the program that a new, generalized autopilot design should be formulated to fulfill the needs of this new space launch architecture. The present design concept is intended to leverage existing NASA and industry launch vehicle design experience and maintain the extensibility and modularity necessary to accommodate multiple vehicle configurations while relying on proven and flight-tested control design principles for large boost vehicles. The SLS flight control architecture combines a digital three-axis autopilot with traditional bending filters to support robust active or passive stabilization of the vehicle's bending and sloshing dynamics using optimally blended measurements from multiple rate gyros on the vehicle structure. The algorithm also relies on a pseudo-optimal control allocation scheme to maximize the performance capability of multiple vectored engines while accommodating throttling and engine failure contingencies in real time with negligible impact to stability characteristics. The architecture supports active in-flight disturbance compensation through the use of nonlinear observers driven by acceleration measurements. Envelope expansion and robustness enhancement is obtained through the use of a multiplicative forward gain modulation law based upon a simple model reference adaptive control scheme.

  10. Development of design window evaluation and display system. 1. System development and performance confirmation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2003-07-01

    Purpose: The work was performed to develop a design window evaluation and display system for the purpose of obtaining the effects of various design parameters on the typical thermal hydraulic issues resulting from a use of various kind of working fluid etc. easily. Method: The function of the system were 'confirmation of design margin' of the present design, 'confirmation of the affected design zone' when a designer changed some design parameter, and search for an design improvement' for design optimization. The system was developed using existing soft wares on PC and the database relating analytical results of typical thermal hydraulic issues provided by separate work. Results: (1) System design: In order to develop a design window evaluation and display system, 'numerical analysis unit', 'statistical analysis unit', 'MMI unit', 'optimization unit' were designed based on the result of selected optimization procedure and display visualization. Further, total system design was performed combining these units. Typical thermal hydraulic issues to be considered are upper plenum thermal hydraulics, thermal stratification, free surface sloshing, flow-induced vibration of a heat exchanger and thermal striping in the T-junction piping systems. (2) Development of prototype system and a functional check: A prototype system of a design window evaluation and display system was developed and the functions were confirmed as was planned. (author)

  11. Development of seismic safety reevaluation procedure considering the ageing of NPP facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung Kue [Jeonju Univ., Cheonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. M. [Cheonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. S.; Cheong, S. H.; Kim, I. S.; Lee, M. G.; Kim, D. O. [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of); Lee, G. H. [Mokpo National Maritime Univ., Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-15

    There are three of Nuclear Power Plants subject to the USI A-46 in Korea, including Kori No 1 and No 2 and Wolsung No 1. For the sake of resolution of the issue the possibility of adopting the GIP developed by the SQUG in USA is very high. In relation to the issue, this study addresses some technical improvements of the GIP including sloshing analysis based on multiple modes, seismic retrofit of cabinet for reduction of ICRS and modification of IRS depending on damping ratio. Dominant degradation factor and its affects NPP concrete elements are reviewed : chloride induced corrosion, carbonation of concrete elements, freezing and thawing of concrete elements, chemical and biological process, crack affect on concrete degradation. Various technical reports and papers about age-related degradation are reviewed for identification of degradation properties of NPP structures and components and degradation trend in NPP structures and components. This report summarizes numerical model for concrete degradation and development procedure of numerical models for concrete degradation. This report proposes the research necessity for performance evaluation of degraded concrete structure and selection of element for further study.

  12. NGC 741—Mergers and AGN Feedback on a Galaxy-group Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schellenberger, G.; Vrtilek, J. M.; David, L.; O’Sullivan, E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Giacintucci, S. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Code 7213, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Duchesne, S. W. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, 6140 (New Zealand); Raychaudhury, S., E-mail: gerrit.schellenberger@cfa.harvard.edu [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

    2017-08-10

    Low-mass galaxy cluster systems and groups will play an essential role in upcoming cosmological studies, such as those to be carried out with eROSITA. Though the effects of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and merging processes are of special importance to quantify biases like selection effects or deviations from hydrostatic equilibrium, they are poorly understood on the galaxy-group scale. We present an analysis of recent deep Chandra and XMM-Newton integrations of NGC 741 that provides an excellent example of a group with multiple concurrent phenomena: both an old central radio galaxy and a spectacular infalling head-tail source, strongly bent jets, a 100-kpc radio trail, intriguing narrow X-ray filaments, and gas-sloshing features. Supported principally by X-ray and radio continuum data, we address the merging history of the group, the nature of the X-ray filaments, the extent of gas-stripping from NGC 742, the character of cavities in the group, and the roles of the central AGN and infalling galaxy in heating the intra-group medium.

  13. Training Knowledge Bots for Physics-Based Simulations Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.; Wong, Jay Ming

    2014-01-01

    Millions of complex physics-based simulations are required for design of an aerospace vehicle. These simulations are usually performed by highly trained and skilled analysts, who execute, monitor, and steer each simulation. Analysts rely heavily on their broad experience that may have taken 20-30 years to accumulate. In addition, the simulation software is complex in nature, requiring significant computational resources. Simulations of system of systems become even more complex and are beyond human capacity to effectively learn their behavior. IBM has developed machines that can learn and compete successfully with a chess grandmaster and most successful jeopardy contestants. These machines are capable of learning some complex problems much faster than humans can learn. In this paper, we propose using artificial neural network to train knowledge bots to identify the idiosyncrasies of simulation software and recognize patterns that can lead to successful simulations. We examine the use of knowledge bots for applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), trajectory analysis, commercial finite-element analysis software, and slosh propellant dynamics. We will show that machine learning algorithms can be used to learn the idiosyncrasies of computational simulations and identify regions of instability without including any additional information about their mathematical form or applied discretization approaches.

  14. Low-gravity sensing of liquid/vapor interface and transient liquid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Saul A.; Korba, James M.; Lynnworth, Lawrence C.; Nguyen, Toan H.; Orton, George F.

    1987-03-01

    The work reported here deals mainly with tests on internally vaned cylindrical shell acrylic containers capped by hemispherical acrylic or aluminum end domes. Three different ultrasonic sensor techniques and one nucleonic technique presently are evaluated as possible solutions to the low-gravity liquid gauging problem. The ultrasonic techniques are as follows: use of a torsional wave sensor in which transit time is proportional to the integral of wetted distance x liquid density; integration of the flow rate output signal of a fast-response ultrasonic flowmeter; and use of multiplexed externally mounted 'point-sensor' transducers that sense transit times to liquid-gas interfaces. Using two commercial flowmeters and a thickness gauge modified for this particular project, bench tests were conducted at 1 g on liquids such as water, freon, and solvent 140, including both steady flow and pulsating flow with 40, 80, and 120 ms flow pulses. Subsequently, flight tests were conducted in the NASA KC-135 aircraft in which nearly 0-g conditions are obtainable for up to about 5 s in each of a number of repetitive parabolic flight trajectories. In some of these brief low-gravity flight tests freon was replaced with a higher-viscosity fuel to reduce sloshing and thereby obtain settled surfaces more quickly.

  15. Advanced Liquid Feed Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distefano, E.; Noll, C.

    1993-06-01

    The Advanced Liquid Feed Experiment (ALFE) is a Hitchhiker experiment flown on board the Shuttle of STS-39 as part of the Space Test Payload-1 (STP-1). The purpose of ALFE is to evaluate new propellant management components and operations under the low gravity flight environment of the Space Shuttle for eventual use in an advanced spacecraft feed system. These components and operations include an electronic pressure regulator, an ultrasonic flowmeter, an ultrasonic point sensor gage, and on-orbit refill of an auxiliary propellant tank. The tests are performed with two transparent tanks with dyed Freon 113, observed by a camera and controlled by ground commands and an on-board computer. Results show that the electronic pressure regulator provides smooth pressure ramp-up, sustained pressure control, and the flexibility to change pressure settings in flight. The ultrasonic flowmeter accurately measures flow and detects gas ingestion. The ultrasonic point sensors function well in space, but not as a gage during sustained low-gravity conditions, as they, like other point gages, are subject to the uncertainties of propellant geometry in a given tank. Propellant transfer operations can be performed with liquid-free ullage equalization at a 20 percent fill level, gas-free liquid transfer from 20-65 percent fill level, minimal slosh, and can be automated.

  16. Wave impact on a deck or baffle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Noar, Nor Aida Zuraimi; Greenhow, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Some coastal or ocean structures have deck-like baffles or horizontal platforms that can be exposed to wave action in heavy seas. A similar situation may occur in partially-filled tanks with horizontal baffles that become engulfed by sloshing waves. This can result in dangerous wave impact loads (slamming) causing a rapid rise of pressures which may lead to local damaging by crack initiation and/or propagation. We consider the wave impact against the whole of underside of horizontal deck (or baffle) projecting from a seawall (or vertical tank wall), previously studied by Wood and Peregrine (1996) using a different method based on conformal mappings. The approach used is to simplify the highly time-dependent and very nonlinear problem by considering the time integral of the pressure over the duration of the impact pressure-impulse, P (x, y). Our method expresses this in terms of eigenfunctions that satisfy the boundary conditions apart from that on the impact region and the matching of the two regions (under the platform and under the free surface); this results in a matrix equation to be solved numerically. As in Wood and Peregrine, we found that the pressure impulse on the deck increases when the length of deck increases, there is a strong pressure gradient beneath the deck near the seaward edge and the maximum pressure impulse occurs at the landward end of the impact zone.

  17. Structural dynamics in FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhoje, S.B.

    2003-01-01

    In view of thin walled large diameter shell structures with associated fluid effects, structural dynamics problems are very critical in a fast breeder reactor. Structural characteristics and consequent structural dynamics problems in typical pool type Fast Breeder Reactor are highlighted. A few important structural dynamics problems are pump induced as well as flow induced vibrations, seismic excitations, pressure transients in the intermediate heat exchangers and pipings due to a large sodium water reaction in the steam generator, and core disruptive accident loadings. The vibration problems which call for identification of excitation forces, formulation of special governing equations and detailed analysis with fluid structure interaction and sloshing effects, particularly for the components such as PSP, inner vessel, CP, CSRDM and TB are elaborated. Seismic design issues are presented in a comprehensive way. Other transient loadings which are specific to FBR, resulting from sodium-water reaction and core disruptive accident are highlighted. A few important results of theoretical as well as experimental works carried out for 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR), in the domain of structural dynamics are presented. (author)

  18. Conflicts at work--the relationship with workplace factors, work characteristics and self-rated health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxenstierna, Gabriel; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Widmark, Maria; Finnholm, Kristina; Stenfors, Cecilia; Elofsson, Stig; Theorell, Töres

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have considered the work environment in relation to workplace conflicts and those who have been published have included relatively few psychosocial work environment factors. Little research has been published on the consequences of workplace conflicts in terms of employee health. In this study, the statistical relationships between work and workplace characteristics on one hand and conflicts on the other hand are examined. In addition, the relationship between conflicts at work and self-rated health are described. The study population was derived from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) 2006; n=5,141. Among employees at workplaces with more than 20 employees (n=3,341), 1,126 (33.7%) responded that they had been involved in some type of conflict during the two years preceding the survey. Among the work and workplace characteristics studied, the following factors were independently associated with increased likelihood of ongoing conflicts: Conflicting demands, emotional demands, risk of transfer or dismissal, poor promotion prospects, high level of employee influence and good freedom of expression. Factors that decreased the likelihood of ongoing conflicts were: Good resources, good relations with management, good confidence in management, good procedural justice (fairness of decisions) and good social support. After adjustment for socioeconomic conditions the odds ratio for low self-rated health associated with ongoing conflict at work was 2.09 (1.60-2.74). The results provide a good starting point for intervention and prevention work.

  19. Task 7c: Worm tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Worm tank has a unique shape. In the seismic design of a worm tank, it is desirable to clear the behavior of the worm tank under the seismic loading. We assumed that there are two phenomena in the seismic behavior of the worm tank same as the behavior of the cylindrical and rectangular tanks. One is a sloshing behavior of the water and another is the dynamic response of the worm tank. In this study, we investigate the dynamic characteristics of the worm tank during the strong earthquakes. We conducted the vibration tests to clarify the seismic behaviors of the worm tanks and obtained the valuable data to verify the analytical method. It was found that the natural frequency can be calculated using the eigenvalue formula of the cylindrical and rectangular tanks. Lower modes of the worm tank are identical with that of the rectangular tank. We can estimate the surface behavior and the impact mode using the data of the rectangular tank. (author)

  20. Langevin dynamics encapsulate the microscopic and emergent macroscopic properties of midge swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    In contrast to bird flocks, fish schools and animal herds, midge swarms maintain cohesion but do not possess global order. High-speed imaging techniques are now revealing that these swarms have surprising properties. Here, I show that simple models found on the Langevin equation are consistent with this wealth of recent observations. The models predict correctly that large accelerations, exceeding 10 g, will be common and they predict correctly the coexistence of core condensed phases surrounded by dilute vapour phases. The models also provide new insights into the influence of environmental conditions on swarm dynamics. They predict that correlations between midges increase the strength of the effective force binding the swarm together. This may explain why such correlations are absent in laboratory swarms but present in natural swarms which contend with the wind and other disturbances. Finally, the models predict that swarms have fluid-like macroscopic mechanical properties and will slosh rather than slide back and forth after being abruptly displaced. This prediction offers a promising avenue for future experimentation that goes beyond current quasi-static testing which has revealed solid-like responses. PMID:29298958

  1. The split in the ancient cold front in the Perseus cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Stephen A.; ZuHone, John; Fabian, Andy; Sanders, Jeremy

    2018-04-01

    Sloshing cold fronts in clusters, produced as the dense cluster core moves around in the cluster potential in response to in-falling subgroups, provide a powerful probe of the physics of the intracluster medium and the magnetic fields permeating it1,2. These sharp discontinuities in density and temperature rise gradually outwards with age in a characteristic spiral pattern, embedding into the intracluster medium a record of the minor merging activity of clusters: the further from the cluster centre a cold front is, the older it is. Recently, it was discovered that these cold fronts can survive out to extremely large radii in the Perseus cluster3. Here, we report on high-spatial-resolution Chandra observations of the large-scale cold front in Perseus. We find that rather than broadening through diffusion, the cold front remains extremely sharp (consistent with abrupt jumps in density) and instead is split into two sharp edges. These results show that magnetic draping can suppress diffusion for vast periods of time—around 5 Gyr—even as the cold front expands out to nearly half the cluster virial radius.

  2. Numerical investigation of unsteady mixing mechanism in plate film cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A large-scale large eddy simulation in high performance personal computer clusters is carried out to present unsteady mixing mechanism of film cooling and the development of films. Simulation cases include a single-hole plate with the inclined angle of 30° and blowing ratio of 0.5, and a single-row plate with hole-spacing of 1.5D and 2D (diameters of the hole. According to the massive simulation results, some new unsteady phenomena of gas films are found. The vortex system is changed in different position with the development of film cooling with the time marching the process of a single-row plate film cooling. Due to the mutual interference effects including mutual exclusion, a certain periodic sloshing and mutual fusion, and the structures of a variety of vortices change between parallel gas films. Macroscopic flow structures and heat transfer behaviors are obtained based on 20 million grids and Reynolds number of 28600.

  3. Coupling dynamic analysis of spacecraft with multiple cylindrical tanks and flexible appendages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Jun; Yue, Bao-Zeng; Huang, Hua

    2016-02-01

    This paper is mainly concerned with the coupling dynamic analysis of a complex spacecraft consisting of one main rigid platform, multiple liquid-filled cylindrical tanks, and a number of flexible appendages. Firstly, the carrier potential function equations of liquid in the tanks are deduced according to the wall boundary conditions. Through employing the Fourier-Bessel series expansion method, the dynamic boundaries conditions on a curved free-surface under a low-gravity environment are transformed to general simple differential equations and the rigid-liquid coupled sloshing dynamic state equations of liquid in tanks are obtained. The state vectors of rigid-liquid coupled equations are composed with the modal coordinates of the relative potential function and the modal coordinates of wave height. Based on the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory and the D'Alembert's principle, the rigid-flexible coupled dynamic state equations of flexible appendages are directly derived, and the coordinate transform matrixes of maneuvering flexible appendages are precisely computed as time-varying. Then, the coupling dynamics state equations of the overall system of the spacecraft are modularly built by means of the Lagrange's equations in terms of quasi-coordinates. Lastly, the coupling dynamic performances of a typical complex spacecraft are studied. The availability and reliability of the presented method are also confirmed.

  4. Parallel Dynamic Analysis of a Large-Scale Water Conveyance Tunnel under Seismic Excitation Using ALE Finite-Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parallel analyses about the dynamic responses of a large-scale water conveyance tunnel under seismic excitation are presented in this paper. A full three-dimensional numerical model considering the water-tunnel-soil coupling is established and adopted to investigate the tunnel’s dynamic responses. The movement and sloshing of the internal water are simulated using the multi-material Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE method. Nonlinear fluid–structure interaction (FSI between tunnel and inner water is treated by using the penalty method. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction (SSI between soil and tunnel is dealt with by using the surface to surface contact algorithm. To overcome computing power limitations and to deal with such a large-scale calculation, a parallel algorithm based on the modified recursive coordinate bisection (MRCB considering the balance of SSI and FSI loads is proposed and used. The whole simulation is accomplished on Dawning 5000 A using the proposed MRCB based parallel algorithm optimized to run on supercomputers. The simulation model and the proposed approaches are validated by comparison with the added mass method. Dynamic responses of the tunnel are analyzed and the parallelism is discussed. Besides, factors affecting the dynamic responses are investigated. Better speedup and parallel efficiency show the scalability of the parallel method and the analysis results can be used to aid in the design of water conveyance tunnels.

  5. Background and principles of throttles-only flight control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    There have been many cases in which the crew of a multi-engine airplane had to use engine thrust for emergency flight control. Such a procedure is very difficult, because the propulsive control forces are small, the engine response is slow, and airplane dynamics such as the phugoid and dutch roll are difficult to damp with thrust. In general, thrust increases are used to climb, thrust decreases to descend, and differential thrust is used to turn. Average speed is not significantly affected by changes in throttle setting. Pitch control is achieved because of pitching moments due to speed changes, from thrust offset, and from the vertical component of thrust. Roll control is achieved by using differential thrust to develop yaw, which, through the normal dihedral effect, causes a roll. Control power in pitch and roll tends to increase as speed decreases. Although speed is not controlled by the throttles, configuration changes are often available (lowering gear, flaps, moving center-of-gravity) to change the speed. The airplane basic stability is also a significant factor. Fuel slosh and gyroscopic moments are small influences on throttles-only control. The background and principles of throttles-only flight control are described.

  6. SHOULD ONE USE THE RAY-BY-RAY APPROXIMATION IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, M. Aaron; Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Dolence, Joshua C., E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: askinner@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: jdolence@lanl.gov [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    We perform the first self-consistent, time-dependent, multi-group calculations in two dimensions (2D) to address the consequences of using the ray-by-ray+ transport simplification in core-collapse supernova simulations. Such a dimensional reduction is employed by many researchers to facilitate their resource-intensive calculations. Our new code (Fornax) implements multi-D transport, and can, by zeroing out transverse flux terms, emulate the ray-by-ray+ scheme. Using the same microphysics, initial models, resolution, and code, we compare the results of simulating 12, 15, 20, and 25 M {sub ⊙} progenitor models using these two transport methods. Our findings call into question the wisdom of the pervasive use of the ray-by-ray+ approach. Employing it leads to maximum post-bounce/pre-explosion shock radii that are almost universally larger by tens of kilometers than those derived using the more accurate scheme, typically leaving the post-bounce matter less bound and artificially more “explodable.” In fact, for our 25 M {sub ⊙} progenitor, the ray-by-ray+ model explodes, while the corresponding multi-D transport model does not. Therefore, in two dimensions, the combination of ray-by-ray+ with the axial sloshing hydrodynamics that is a feature of 2D supernova dynamics can result in quantitatively, and perhaps qualitatively, incorrect results.

  7. Workplace bullying, working environment and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxenstierna, Gabriel; Elofsson, Stig; Gjerde, Maria; Magnusson Hanson, Linda; Theorell, Töres

    2012-01-01

    Improved work organisation could be of importance for decreased bullying in workplaces. Participants in the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) responded to questions about work and workplace and whether they had been bullied during the past year in 2006. Those in worksites with at least five employees who did not report that they had been bullied in 2006 and without workplace change between 2006 and 2008 constituted the final sample (n=1,021 men and 1,182 women). Work characteristics and workplace factors in 2006 were used in multiple logistic regression as predictors of bullying in 2008. Separate analyses were performed for work characteristics and workplace factors respectively. Adjustments for demographic factors were made in all analyses. The question used for bullying was: "Are you exposed to personal persecution by means of vicious words or actions from your superiors or your workmates?" Such persecution any time during the past year was defined as bullying. For both genders organisational change and conflicting demands were identified as risk factors, and good decision authority as a protective factor. Dictatorial leadership, lack of procedural justice and attitude of expendability were male and lack of humanity a female risk factor for bullying.

  8. Experimental study on moonpool resonance of offshore floating structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Ho Yang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Offshore floating structures have so-called moonpool in the centre area for the purpose of drilling, installation of subsea structures, recovery of Remotely-Operated Vehicle (ROV and divers. However, this vertical opening has an effect on the operating performance of floating offshore structure in the vicinity of moonpool resonance frequency; piston mode and sloshing mode. Experimental study based on model test was carried out. Moonpool resonance of floating offshore structure on fixed condition and motion free condition were investigated. And, the effect of cofferdam which is representative inner structure inside moonpool was examined. Model test results showed that Molin's theoretical formula can predict moonpool resonance on fixed condition quite accurately. However, motion free condition has higher resonance frequency when it is compared with that of motion fixed. The installation of cofferdam moves resonance frequency to higher region and also generates secondary resonance at lower frequency. Furthermore, it was found that cofferdam was the cause of generating waves in the longitudinal direction when the vessel was in beam sea.

  9. Mapping the particle acceleration in the cool core of the galaxy cluster RX J1720.1+2638

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacintucci, S.; Markevitch, M.; Brunetti, G.; Venturi, T.; ZuHone, J. A.; Mazzotta, P.; Bourdin, H.

    2014-01-01

    We present new deep, high-resolution radio images of the diffuse minihalo in the cool core of the galaxy cluster RX J1720.1+2638. The images have been obtained with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 317, 617, and 1280 MHz and with the Very Large Array at 1.5, 4.9, and 8.4 GHz, with angular resolutions ranging from 1'' to 10''. This represents the best radio spectral and imaging data set for any minihalo. Most of the radio flux of the minihalo arises from a bright central component with a maximum radius of ∼80 kpc. A fainter tail of emission extends out from the central component to form a spiral-shaped structure with a length of ∼230 kpc, seen at frequencies 1.5 GHz and below. We find indication of a possible steepening of the total radio spectrum of the minihalo at high frequencies. Furthermore, a spectral index image shows that the spectrum of the diffuse emission steepens with increasing distance along the tail. A striking spatial correlation is observed between the minihalo emission and two cold fronts visible in the Chandra X-ray image of this cool core. These cold fronts confine the minihalo, as also seen in numerical simulations of minihalo formation by sloshing-induced turbulence. All these observations favor the hypothesis that the radio-emitting electrons in cluster cool cores are produced by turbulent re-acceleration.

  10. An extended validation of the last generation of particle finite element method for free surface flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Juan M.; González, Leo M.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a new generation of the particle method known as Particle Finite Element Method (PFEM), which combines convective particle movement and a fixed mesh resolution, is applied to free surface flows. This interesting variant, previously described in the literature as PFEM-2, is able to use larger time steps when compared to other similar numerical tools which implies shorter computational times while maintaining the accuracy of the computation. PFEM-2 has already been extended to free surface problems, being the main topic of this paper a deep validation of this methodology for a wider range of flows. To accomplish this task, different improved versions of discontinuous and continuous enriched basis functions for the pressure field have been developed to capture the free surface dynamics without artificial diffusion or undesired numerical effects when different density ratios are involved. A collection of problems has been carefully selected such that a wide variety of Froude numbers, density ratios and dominant dissipative cases are reported with the intention of presenting a general methodology, not restricted to a particular range of parameters, and capable of using large time-steps. The results of the different free-surface problems solved, which include: Rayleigh-Taylor instability, sloshing problems, viscous standing waves and the dam break problem, are compared to well validated numerical alternatives or experimental measurements obtaining accurate approximations for such complex flows.

  11. Environmental magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Roy

    1986-01-01

    The scientist will be forced, in the unenthusiastic words of one of my scientific colleagues, 'to slosh about in the primordial ooze known as inter-disciplinary studies'. John Passmore Man's responsibility for nature The present text has arisen from some thirteen years advances in our perception, appraisal and creative use of collaboration between the two authors. During that of order in natural systems. Out of this can come period, upwards of a dozen postgraduates in enhanced insight into processes, structures and Edinburgh, the New University of Ulster and Liver­ systems interactions on all temporal and spatial scales pool have been closely involved in exploring many of and at all integrative levels from subatomic to cosmic. the applications of magnetic measurements described In the environment, elements of order are often in the second half of the book. Much of the text is difficult to appraise and analyse, not only because of based on their work, both published and unpublished. intrinsic complexity, but ...

  12. Ion flow ripples in the Earth's plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Spiegeleer, Alexandre; Hamrin, Maria; Pitkänen, Timo; Norqvist, Patrik; Mann, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    For a long time, magnetotail flows were considered rather smooth and laminar, and primarily dominated by a simple convection flow pattern. However, in the early 90's, high speed bursty bulk flows (BBFs) were discovered and found to commonly perturb the underlying convection flows. In addition, there are other disturbances complicating the magnetotail flow pattern. Instabilities such as the Kelvin-Helmholz instability and the kink instability can cause different types of magnetic field oscillations, such as field line resonances. It is expected that ions will follow these oscillations if the typical time and length scales are larger than the gyroperiod and gyroradius of the ions. Though low-velocity sloshing and ripple disturbances of the average magnetotail convection flows have been observed, their connection with magnetic field oscillations is not fully understood. Furthermore, when studying BFFs, these "Ion Flow Ripples" (IFRs) are often neglected, dismissed as noise or can even erroneously be identified as BBFs. It is therefore of utter importance to find out and understand the role of IFRs in magnetotail dynamics. In a statistical investigation, we use several years of Cluster plasma sheet data to study the low-speed flows in the magnetotail. We investigate different types of IFRs, study their occurrence, and discuss their possible causes.

  13. Fast breeder reactor-block antiseismic design and verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martelli, A.; Forni, M.

    1988-02-01

    The Specialists' Meeting on ''Fast Breeder Reactor-Block Antiseismic Design and Verification'' was organized by the ENEA Fast Reactor Department in co-operation with the International Working Group (IWGFR) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the recommendations of the 19th IAEA/IWGFR Meeting. It was held in Bologna, at the Headquarters of the ENEA Fast Reactor Department, on October 12-15, 1987, in the framework of the Celebrations for the Ninth Centenary of the Bologna University. The proceedings of the meeting consists of three parts. Part 1 contains the introduction and general comments, the agenda of the meeting, session summaries, conclusions and recommendations and the list of participants. Part 2 contains 8 status reports of Member States participating in the Working Group. Contributed papers were published in Part 3 and were further subdivided into 5 sessions as follows: whole reactor-block analysis (4 papers); whole reactor-block analysis (sloshing and buckling, seismic isolation effects) (8 papers); detailed core analysis (6 papers); shutdown systems and core structural and functional verifications (6 papers); component and piping analysis (7 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 8 status reports and 31 contributed papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Manipulating Liquids With Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    1999-01-01

    High-intensity ultrasound waves can produce the effects of "Acoustic Radiation Pressure" (ARP) and "acoustic streaming." These effects can be used to propel liquid flows and to apply forces that can be used to move or manipulate floating objects or liquid surfaces. NASA's interest in ARP includes the remote-control agitation of liquids and the manipulation of bubbles and drops in liquid experiments and propellant systems. A high level of flexibility is attained by using a high-power acoustic phased array to generate, steer, and focus a beam of acoustic waves. This is called an Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Array, or ARPPA. In this approach, many acoustic transducer elements emit wavelets that converge into a single beam of sound waves. Electronically coordinating the timing, or "phase shift," of the acoustic waves makes it possible to form a beam with a predefined direction and focus. Therefore, a user can direct the ARP force at almost any desired point within a liquid volume. ARPPA lets experimenters manipulate objects anywhere in a test volume. This flexibility allow it to be used for multiple purposes, such as to agitate liquids, deploy and manipulate drops or bubbles, and even suppress sloshing in spacecraft propellant tanks.

  15. Cryogenic Fuel Tank Draining Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Donald

    1999-01-01

    One of the technological challenges in designing advanced hypersonic aircraft and the next generation of spacecraft is developing reusable flight-weight cryogenic fuel tanks. As an aid in the design and analysis of these cryogenic tanks, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed specifically for the analysis of flow in a cryogenic fuel tank. This model employs the full set of Navier-Stokes equations, except that viscous dissipation is neglected in the energy equation. An explicit finite difference technique in two-dimensional generalized coordinates, approximated to second-order accuracy in both space and time is used. The stiffness resulting from the low Mach number is resolved by using artificial compressibility. The model simulates the transient, two-dimensional draining of a fuel tank cross section. To calculate the slosh wave dynamics the interface between the ullage gas and liquid fuel is modeled as a free surface. Then, experimental data for free convection inside a horizontal cylinder are compared with model results. Finally, cryogenic tank draining calculations are performed with three different wall heat fluxes to demonstrate the effect of wall heat flux on the internal tank flow field.

  16. Ares I Flight Control System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jiann-Woei; Alaniz, Abran; Hall, Robert; Bedrossian, Nazareth; Hall, Charles; Ryan, Stephen; Jackson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Ares I launch vehicle represents a challenging flex-body structural environment for flight control system design. This paper presents a design methodology for employing numerical optimization to develop the Ares I flight control system. The design objectives include attitude tracking accuracy and robust stability with respect to rigid body dynamics, propellant slosh, and flex. Under the assumption that the Ares I time-varying dynamics and control system can be frozen over a short period of time, the flight controllers are designed to stabilize all selected frozen-time launch control systems in the presence of parametric uncertainty. Flex filters in the flight control system are designed to minimize the flex components in the error signals before they are sent to the attitude controller. To ensure adequate response to guidance command, step response specifications are introduced as constraints in the optimization problem. Imposing these constraints minimizes performance degradation caused by the addition of the flex filters. The first stage bending filter design achieves stability by adding lag to the first structural frequency to phase stabilize the first flex mode while gain stabilizing the higher modes. The upper stage bending filter design gain stabilizes all the flex bending modes. The flight control system designs provided here have been demonstrated to provide stable first and second stage control systems in both Draper Ares Stability Analysis Tool (ASAT) and the MSFC 6DOF nonlinear time domain simulation.

  17. Design and Analysis of Morpheus Lander Flight Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jiann-Woei; Yang, Lee; Fritz, Mathew; Nguyen, Louis H.; Johnson, Wyatt R.; Hart, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    The Morpheus Lander is a vertical takeoff and landing test bed vehicle developed to demonstrate the system performance of the Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) system capability for the integrated autonomous landing and hazard avoidance system hardware and software. The Morpheus flight control system design must be robust to various mission profiles. This paper presents a design methodology for employing numerical optimization to develop the Morpheus flight control system. The design objectives include attitude tracking accuracy and robust stability with respect to rigid body dynamics and propellant slosh. Under the assumption that the Morpheus time-varying dynamics and control system can be frozen over a short period of time, the flight controllers are designed to stabilize all selected frozen-time control systems in the presence of parametric uncertainty. Both control gains in the inner attitude control loop and guidance gains in the outer position control loop are designed to maximize the vehicle performance while ensuring robustness. The flight control system designs provided herein have been demonstrated to provide stable control systems in both Draper Ares Stability Analysis Tool (ASAT) and the NASA/JSC Trick-based Morpheus time domain simulation.

  18. A cluster in a crowded environment: XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of A3558

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, M.; Ghizzardi, S.; Molendi, S.; Finoguenov, A.

    2007-03-01

    Combining XMM-Newton and Chandra data, we have performed a detailed study of Abell 3558. Our analysis shows that its dynamical history is more complicated than previously thought. We have found some traits typical of cool core clusters (surface brightness peaked at the center, peaked metal abundance profile) and others that are more common in merging clusters, like deviations from spherical symmetry in the thermodynamic quantities of the ICM. This last result has been achieved with a new technique for deriving temperature maps from images. We have also detected a cold front and, with the combined use of XMM-Newton and Chandra, we have characterized its properties, such as the speed and the metal abundance profile across the edge. This cold front is probably due to the sloshing of the core, induced by the perturbation of the gravitational potential associated with a past merger. The hydrodynamic processes related to this perturbation have presumably produced a tail of lower entropy, higher pressure and metal rich ICM, which extends behind the cold front for~500 kpc. The unique characteristics of A3558 are probably due to the very peculiar environment in which it is located: the core of the Shapley supercluster. Appendices A and B are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Winds and tides of Ligeia Mare, with application to the drift of the proposed time TiME (Titan Mare Explorer) capsule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Tokano, Tetsuya; Newman, Claire E.

    2012-01-01

    We use two independent General Circulation Models (GCMs) to estimate surface winds at Titan’s Ligeia Mare (78° N, 250° W), motivated by a proposed mission to land a floating capsule in this ∼500 km hydrocarbon sea. The models agree on the overall magnitude (∼0.5-1 m/s) and seasonal variation (strongest in summer) of windspeeds, but details of seasonal and diurnal variation of windspeed and direction differ somewhat, with the role of surface exchanges being more significant than that of gravitational tides in the atmosphere. We also investigate the tidal dynamics in the sea using a numerical ocean dynamics model: assuming a rigid lithosphere, the tidal amplitude is up to ∼0.8 m. Tidal currents are overall proportional to the reciprocal of depth-with an assumed central depth of 300 m, the characteristic tidal currents are ∼1 cm/s, with notable motions being a slosh between Ligeia’s eastern and western lobes, and a clockwise flow pattern. We find that a capsule will drift at approximately one tenth of the windspeed, unless measures are adopted to augment the drag areas above or below the waterline. Thus motion of a floating capsule is dominated by the wind, and is likely to be several km per Earth day, a rate that will be readily measured from Earth by radio navigation methods. In some instances, the wind vector rotates diurnally such that the drift trajectory is epicyclic.

  20. MINIMARS interim report appendix halo model and computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarius, J.F.; Barr, W.L.; Deng, B.Q.; Emmert, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    A tenuous, cool plasma called the halo shields the core plasma in a tandem mirror from neutral gas and impurities. The neutral particles are ionized and then pumped by the halo to the end tanks of the device, since flow of plasma along field lines is much faster than radial flow. Plasma reaching the end tank walls recombines, and the resulting neutral gas is vacuum pumped. The basic geometry of the MINIMARS halo is shown. For halo modeling purposes, the core plasma and cold gas regions may be treated as single radial zones leading to halo source and sink terms. The halo itself is differential into two major radial zones: halo scraper and halo dump. The halo scraper zone is defined by the radial distance required for the ion end plugging potential to drop to the central cell value, and thus have no effect on axial confinement; this distance is typically a sloshing plug ion Larmor diameter. The outer edge of the halo dump zone is defined by the last central cell flux tube to pass through the choke coil. This appendix will summarize the halo model that has been developed for MINIMARS and the methodology used in implementing that model as a computer code

  1. Gas pressure measurements and control in the Tara tandem mirror experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.S.; Brau, K.; Casey, J.

    1986-05-01

    The Tara Tandem Mirror has a 10 m long, 22 cm diameter central cell plasma heated by fundamental ion cyclotron heating. Typical central cell parameters in unplugged operation are n = 3 x 10 12 /cm 3 . T/sub i perpendicular/ = 300 eV, T/sub i parallel/ ≅ 75 eV. The axisymmetric plug cell incorporates sloshing ions and ECH to generate axial confining potentials. The axisymmetric central cell and plug comprise a max-B mirror which is observed to operate in both flute stable and unstable regimes. The flute instability is m = 1 and can be stabilized by an outboard anchor. The anchor plasma is formed by electron and ion cyclotron heating. Satisfactory operation of a tandem mirror requires extensive control of neutral gas from neutral beam (NB) sources and startup. Tara makes extensive use of Ti gettering in the beamlines, beam dumps and plasma surfaces for both hydrogen pumping and reflux control. A description of this technology along with its impact on plasma performance is discussed

  2. Cross-lagged relationships between workplace demands, control, support, and sleep problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Linda L Magnusson; Åkerstedt, Torbjörn; Näswall, Katharina; Leineweber, Constanze; Theorell, Töres; Westerlund, Hugo

    2011-10-01

    Sleep problems are experienced by a large part of the population. Work characteristics are potential determinants, but limited longitudinal evidence is available to date, and reverse causation is a plausible alternative. This study examines longitudinal, bidirectional relationships between work characteristics and sleep problems. Prospective cohort/two-wave panel. Sweden. 3065 working men and women approximately representative of the Swedish workforce who responded to the 2006 and 2008 waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH). N/A. Bidirectional relationships between, on the one hand, workplace demands, decision authority, and support, and, on the other hand, sleep disturbances (reflecting lack of sleep continuity) and awakening problems (reflecting feelings of being insufficiently restored), were investigated by structural equation modeling. All factors were modeled as latent variables and adjusted for gender, age, marital status, education, alcohol consumption, and job change. Concerning sleep disturbances, the best fitting models were the "forward" causal model for demands and the "reverse" causal model for support. Regarding awakening problems, reciprocal models fitted the data best. Cross-lagged analyses indicates a weak relationship between demands at Time 1 and sleep disturbances at Time 2, a "reverse" relationship from support T1 to sleep disturbances T2, and bidirectional associations between work characteristics and awakening problems. In contrast to an earlier study on demands, control, sleep quality, and fatigue, this study suggests reverse and reciprocal in addition to the commonly hypothesized causal relationships between work characteristics and sleep problems based on a 2-year time lag.

  3. Rocking response of tanks containing two liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Yu

    1994-01-01

    A study of the dynamic response of upright circular cylindrical liquid storage tanks containing two different liquids under a rocking base motion with an arbitrary temporal variation is presented. Only rigid tanks were studied. The response quantities examined include the hydrodynamic pressure, the sloshing wave height and associated frequencies, and the base shear and moments. Each of these response quantities is expressed as the sum of the so-called impulsive component and convective component. Unlike the case of tanks containing one liquid, in which the response is controlled by one parameter, the height-to-radius ratio, the response of tanks containing two different liquids is controlled by three parameters: the height-to-radius ratio and the mass density ratio and height ratio of the two liquids. The interrelationship of the responses of the tank-liquid system to rocking and lateral base excitations is established by examining numerical results extensively. It is found that some of the response quantities for a tank-liquid system under a rocking base motion can be determined from the corresponding response quantities for an identical tank under a horizontal base motion. ((orig.))

  4. Earthquake resistant design of nuclear facilities with limited radioactive inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This document comprises the essential elements of an earthquake resistant design code for nuclear facilities with limited radioactive inventory. The purpose of the document is the enhancement of seismic safety for such facilities without the necessity to resort to complicated and sophisticated methodologies which are often associated with and borrowed from nuclear power plant analysis and design. The first two sections are concerned with the type of facility for which the document is applicable and the radiological consideration for accident conditions. The principles of facility classification and item categorization as a function of the potential radiological consequences of failure are given in section 3. The design basis ground motion is evaluated in sections 4-6 using a simplified but conservative approach which also includes considerations for the underlying soil characteristics. Sections 7 and 8 specify the principles of seismic design of building structures and equipment using two methods, called the equivalent static and simplified dynamic approach. Considerations for the detailing of equipment and piping and those other than for lateral load calculations, such as sloshing effects, are given in the subsequent sections. Several appendices are given for illustration of the principles presented in the text. Finally, a design tree diagram is included to facilitate the user's task of making the appropriate selections. (author)

  5. Basic research on nonlinear instability phenomena of liquid surface. Fiscal year 1996 report on preceding basic engineering field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madarame, Haruki; Okamoto, Koji; Iida, Masao

    1997-03-01

    Various nonlinear behaviors caused by nonlinear boundary conditions have been observed, and it is feared that in large vessels like FBRs, the instability phenomena such as self-exciting sloshing may occur in the free liquid surface of coolant. In this research, the nonlinear instability phenomena in free liquid surface were examined by the basic experiment and the analysis. As to the self-exciting oscillation 'jet flutter' of upward plane jet that collides against liquid surface, in order to know the mechanism of determining the frequency and supplying energy, the amplitude and phase relation of various variable quantities were investigated. The simplified model for calculating the displacement of jet was made, and compared with the experiment. The jet flutter phenomena are explained. The interaction of free liquid surface and turbulent flow, which is important for considering the nonlinearity in free liquid surface, was measured by LDV and visualization, and the turbulent flow phenomena in free liquid surface were investigated. In the experiment, turbulent flow energy was given to the free liquid surfaces of water and polymers, and the effect that the Toms effect exerted to interface turbulent flow was observed. The results of these studies are reported. (K.I.) studies are reported. (K.I.)

  6. Models for electromagnetic scattering from the sea at extremely low grazing angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Lewis B.

    1987-12-01

    The present state of understanding in the field of low-grazing-angle sea scatter is reviewed and extended. The important concept of shadowing is approached from the point of view of diffraction theory, and limits in wind speed and radar frequency are found for the application of shadowing theories based on geometrical optics. The implications of shadowing function based on illumination thresholding are shown to compare favorably with a variety of experimental results. Scattering from the exposed surface peaks is treated by a composite-surface Bragg model, and by wedge models using both physical optics and the method of equivalent currents. Curiously, the scattering levels predicted by these widely different approximations are all in fairly good agreement with experimental values for moderately low grazing angles (about 5 deg), with the physical optics wedge model being superior at 1 deg. A new scattering feature, the slosh, is introduced, with scattering behavior that resembles the temporal and polarization dependence of observed low angle returns from calm water. The plume model of scattering from breaking waves (from earlier work) is discussed as a source of high-intensity Sea Spikes. It is emphasized that the prediction of low angle scattering from the sea will require considerably more information about the shape, size, and distribution of the actual scattering features.

  7. Ferrofluid based micro-electrical energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Viswas; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Jena, Grishma; Mishra, Madhusha; Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA93106 Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Innovations in energy harvesting have seen a quantum leap in the last decade. With the introduction of low energy devices in the market, micro energy harvesting units are being explored with much vigor. One of the recent areas of micro energy scavenging is the exploitation of existing vibrational energy and the use of various mechanical motions for the same, useful for low power consumption devices. Ferrofluids are liquids containing magnetic materials having nano-scale permanent magnetic dipoles. The present work explores the possibility of the use of this property for generation of electricity. Since the power generation is through a liquid material, it can take any shape as well as response to small acceleration levels. In this work, an electromagnet-based micropower generator is proposed to utilize the sloshing of the ferrofluid within a controlled chamber which moves to different low frequencies. As compared to permanent magnet units researched previously, ferrofluids can be placed in the smallest of containers of different shapes, thereby giving an output in response to the slightest change in motion. Mechanical motion from 1- 20 Hz was able to give an output voltage in mV's. In this paper, the efficiency and feasibility of such a system is demonstrated.

  8. Transient Analysis and Dosimetry of the Tokaimura Criticality Incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pain, Christopher C.; Oliveira, Cassiano R.E. de; Goddard, Antony J. H.; Eaton, Matthew D.; Gundry, Sarah; Umpleby, Adrian P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes research on the application of the finite element transient criticality (FETCH) code to modeling and neutron dosimetry of the Tokaimura criticality incident. FETCH has been developed to model criticality transients in single and multiphase media and is applied here to fissile solution transient criticality. Since the initial transient behavior has different time scales and physics to the longer transient behavior, the transient modeling is divided into two parts: modeling the initial transient over a time scale of seconds in which radiolytic gases and free-surface sloshing play an important role in the transient - this provides information about the dose to workers; and modeling the long-term transient behavior following the initial transient that has a time scale over hours.The neutron dosimetry of worker A who received the largest dose during the Tokaimura criticality incident is also investigated here. This dose was received mainly in the first few seconds of the ensuing nuclear criticality transient. In addition to the multiorgan dosimetry of worker A, this work provides a method of helping to evaluate the yield in the initial phase of the criticality incident; it also shows how kinetic simulations can be calibrated so that they can be applied to investigate the physics behind the incident

  9. SHOULD ONE USE THE RAY-BY-RAY APPROXIMATION IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, M. Aaron; Burrows, Adam; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2016-01-01

    We perform the first self-consistent, time-dependent, multi-group calculations in two dimensions (2D) to address the consequences of using the ray-by-ray+ transport simplification in core-collapse supernova simulations. Such a dimensional reduction is employed by many researchers to facilitate their resource-intensive calculations. Our new code (Fornax) implements multi-D transport, and can, by zeroing out transverse flux terms, emulate the ray-by-ray+ scheme. Using the same microphysics, initial models, resolution, and code, we compare the results of simulating 12, 15, 20, and 25 M ⊙ progenitor models using these two transport methods. Our findings call into question the wisdom of the pervasive use of the ray-by-ray+ approach. Employing it leads to maximum post-bounce/pre-explosion shock radii that are almost universally larger by tens of kilometers than those derived using the more accurate scheme, typically leaving the post-bounce matter less bound and artificially more “explodable.” In fact, for our 25 M ⊙ progenitor, the ray-by-ray+ model explodes, while the corresponding multi-D transport model does not. Therefore, in two dimensions, the combination of ray-by-ray+ with the axial sloshing hydrodynamics that is a feature of 2D supernova dynamics can result in quantitatively, and perhaps qualitatively, incorrect results.

  10. Physics of mirror systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.

    1982-05-01

    In recent years the emphasis in research on the magnetic mirror approach to fusion has been shifted to address what are essentially economically-motivated issues. The introduction of the Tandem Mirror idea solved in principal the problem of low Q (low fusion power gain) of mirror-based fusion systems. In order to optimize the tandem mirror idea from an economic standpoint, some important improvements have been suggested. These improvements include the thermal barrier idea of Baldwin and Logan and the axicell concept of Kesner. These new modifications introduce some special physics considerations. Among these are (1) The MHD stability properties of high energy electron components in the end cells; (2) The optimization of end-cell magnetic field configurations with the objective of minimizing equilibrium parallel currents; (3) The suppression of microstabilities by use of sloshing ion distributions. Following a brief outline of tandem mirror concepts, the above three topics are discussed, with illustrative examples taken from earlier work or from recent design studies

  11. Soil-structure interaction in fuel handling building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elaidi, B.M.; Eissa, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an accurate three-dimensional seismic soil-structure interaction analysis for large structures. The method is applied to the fuel building in nuclear power plants. The analysis is performed numerically in the frequency domain and the responses are obtained by inverse Fourier transformation. The size of the structure matrices is reduced by transforming the equation of motion to the modal coordinate system. The soil is simulated as a layered media on top of viscoelastic half space. Soil impedance matrices are calculated from the principles of continuum mechanics and account for soil stiffness and energy dissipation. Effects of embedment on the field equations is incorporated through the scattering matrices or by simply scaling the soil impedance. Finite element methods are used to discretize the concrete foundation for the generation of the soil interaction matrices. Decoupling of the sloshing water in the spent fuel pools and the free-standing spent fuel racks is simulated. The input seismic motions are defined by three artificial time history accelerations. These input motions are generated to match the ground design basis response spectra and the target power spectral density function. The methods described in this paper can handle arbitrary foundation layouts, allows for large structural models, and accurately represents the soil impedance. Time history acceleration responses were subsequently used to generate floor response spectra at applicable damping values. (orig.)

  12. A harmonic polynomial cell (HPC) method for 3D Laplace equation with application in marine hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yan-Lin, E-mail: yanlin.shao@dnvgl.com; Faltinsen, Odd M.

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new efficient and accurate numerical method based on harmonic polynomials to solve boundary value problems governed by 3D Laplace equation. The computational domain is discretized by overlapping cells. Within each cell, the velocity potential is represented by the linear superposition of a complete set of harmonic polynomials, which are the elementary solutions of Laplace equation. By its definition, the method is named as Harmonic Polynomial Cell (HPC) method. The characteristics of the accuracy and efficiency of the HPC method are demonstrated by studying analytical cases. Comparisons will be made with some other existing boundary element based methods, e.g. Quadratic Boundary Element Method (QBEM) and the Fast Multipole Accelerated QBEM (FMA-QBEM) and a fourth order Finite Difference Method (FDM). To demonstrate the applications of the method, it is applied to some studies relevant for marine hydrodynamics. Sloshing in 3D rectangular tanks, a fully-nonlinear numerical wave tank, fully-nonlinear wave focusing on a semi-circular shoal, and the nonlinear wave diffraction of a bottom-mounted cylinder in regular waves are studied. The comparisons with the experimental results and other numerical results are all in satisfactory agreement, indicating that the present HPC method is a promising method in solving potential-flow problems. The underlying procedure of the HPC method could also be useful in other fields than marine hydrodynamics involved with solving Laplace equation.

  13. TMX-U experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, T.C.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes results from the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). Mirror-confined electrons with 30 to 70 keV mean energy densities of 0.5 to 2.0 x 10 12 cm -3 and average betas of 3 to 5% are produced using electron-cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH). These results are consistent with an electron Fokker-Planck code. Improved ion-cyclotron microstability is observed using neutral beam injection at 47 0 to the magnetic axis, rather than at 90 0 as in the previous experiment, TMX. Strong end plugging has been produced using a combination of ECRH gyrotrons with sloshing-ion beam injection. In these low-density central cell experiments (3 x 10 11 cm -3 ) the axial losses (tau/sub parallel/ = 20 to 80 ms) are smaller than the nonambipolar radial losses (tau/sub perpendicular/ = 4 to 8 ms). Plugging has been achieved with a central cell density double that of the end plugs. Although no direct measurements are yet available to determine if a thermal barrier potential dip is generated, these experiments support many theoretical features of the thermal barrier concept

  14. Study of responses of 64-story Rincon Building to Napa, Fremont, Piedmont, San Ramon earthquakes and ambient motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebi, Mehmet; Hooper, John; Klemencic, Ron

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the recorded responses of a 64-story, instrumented, concrete core shear wall building in San Francisco, California, equipped with tuned sloshing liquid dampers (TSDs) and buckling restraining braces (BRBs). Previously, only ambient data from the 72-channel array in the building were studied (Çelebi et al. 2013). Recently, the 24 August 2014 Mw 6.0 Napa and three other earthquakes were recorded. The peak accelerations of ambient and the larger Napa earthquake responses at the basement are 0.12 cm/s/s and 5.2 cm/s/s respectively—a factor of ~42. At the 61st level, they are 0.30 cm/s/s (ambient) and 16.8 cm/s/s (Napa), respectively—a factor of ~56. Fundamental frequencies (NS ~ 0.3, EW ~ 0.27 Hz) from earthquake responses vary within an insignificant frequency band of ~0.02–0.03 Hz when compared to those from ambient data. In the absence of soil-structure interaction (SSI), these small and insignificant differences may be attributed to (1) identification errors, (2) any nonlinear behavior, and (3) shaking levels that are not large enough to activate the BRBs and TSDs to make significant shifts in frequencies and increase damping.

  15. Options for axisymmetric operation of MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenstermacher, M.E.; Devoto, R.S.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1986-01-01

    The flexibility of MFTF-B for axisymmetric experiments has been investigated. Interhcanging the axicell coils and increasing their separation results in an axisymmetric plug cell with 12:1 and 6:1 inner and outer mirror ratios, respectively. For axisymmetric operation, the sloshing-ion neutral beams, ECRH gyrotrons, and the pumping system would be moved to the axicell. Stabilization by E-rings could be explored in this configuration. With the addition of octopole magnets, off-axis multipole stabilization could also be tested. Operating points for octopole and E-ring-stabilized configurations with properties similar to those of the quadrupole MFTF-B, namely T/sub ic/ = 10 - 15 keV and n/sub c/ approx. = 3 x 10 13 cm -3 , have been obtained. Because of the negligible radial transport of central-cell ions, the required neutral-beam power in the central cell has been dramatically reduced. In addition, because MHD stabilization is achieved by off-axis hot electrons in both cases, much lower barrier beta is possible, which aids in reducing the barrier ECRH power. Total ECRH power in the end cell is projected to be approx. =1 MW. Possible operating points for both octopole and E-ring configurations are described along with the stability considerations involved

  16. Data Sets, Ensemble Cloud Computing, and the University Library (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plale, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    in the Sustainable Environments - Actionable Data (SEAD) project, an NSF funded DataNet partner, for reducing the burden of describing, publishing, and sharing research data. We use as example the university institutional repository (IR) and an application taken from climate studies. The application is a storm surge model running as a cloud-based software as a service (SaaS). One of the more immediate and dangerous impacts of climate change could be change in the strength of storms that form over the oceans. There have already been indications that even modest changes in ocean surface temperature can have a disproportionate effect on hurricane strength. In an effort to understand these impacts, modelers turn to predictions generated by hydrodynamic coastal ocean models such as the Sea, Lake and Overland Surges from Hurricanes (SLOSH) model. We step through a use scenario of SLOSH in emergency management. To publish a newly created data set resulting from the ensemble runs on the cloud, one needs tools that minimize the burden of describing the data. SEAD has such tools, and engages the e-Science data curation librarian in the process to aid the data set's ingest into the university IR. We finally bring attention to ongoing effort in the Research Data Alliance (RDA) to make data lifecycle issues easier for environmental researchers so that they invest less time and get more credit for their data sets, giving research wider adoption and impact.

  17. HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANK THERMAL and SEISMIC PROJECT. DYTRAN ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN A HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL PRIMARY TANK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-01-01

    M and D Professional Services, Inc. (M and D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project-DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The overall seismic analysis of the DSTs is being performed with the general-purpose finite element code ANSYS'. The global model used for the seismic analysis of the DSTs includes the DST structure, the contained waste, and the surrounding soil. The seismic analysis of the DSTs must address the fluid-structure interaction behavior and sloshing response of the primary tank and contained liquid. ANSYS has demonstrated capabilities for structural analysis, but has more limited capabilities for fluid-structure interaction analysis. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the capabilities and investigate the limitations of the finite element code MSC.Dytranz for performing a dynamic fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste. To this end, the Dytran solutions are benchmarked against theoretical solutions appearing in BNL 1995, when such theoretical solutions exist. When theoretical solutions were not available, comparisons were made to theoretical solutions to similar problems, and to the results from ANSYS simulations. Both rigid tank and flexible tank configurations were analyzed with Dytran. The response parameters of interest that are evaluated in this study are the total hydrodynamic reaction forces, the impulsive and convective mode frequencies, the waste pressures, and slosh

  18. Review of Seismic Evaluation Methodologies for Nuclear Power Plants Based on a Benchmark Exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    Niigataken-chuetsu-oki (NCO) earthquake (Mw = 6.6) occurred on 16 July 2007 and affected the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa (K-K) NPP in Japan. Although there was significant loss of main shock data due to transmission problems, a significant number of instruments were still able to measure the acceleration at different locations in soil (boreholes) and in structures at the K-K NPP during the main shock and the aftershocks. The availability of all these instrumental data provided an excellent background for initiating a benchmarking exercise known as the KAshiwazaki-Kariwa Research Initiative for Seismic Margin Assessment (KARISMA). The main objective of the KARISMA benchmark exercise is to study a comparison between analytical seismic response versus real response of selected structure, system and components (SSCs) of K-K NPP Unit 7. The KARISMA benchmark exercise includes benchmarking the analytical tools and numerical simulation techniques used for predicting seismic response of NPP structures (in linear and non-linear ranges), site response, soil-structure interaction phenomena, seismic response of piping systems, 'sloshing' in the spent fuel pool and buckling of tanks. The benchmark is primarily based on data provided by Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO). It is not linked to the seismic re-evaluation of K-K NPP carried out by TEPCO. Twenty-one organizations, comprising researchers, operating organizations, regulatory authorities, vendors and technical support organizations from 14 countries, participated in the benchmarking exercises. This publication, including a CD-ROM, summarizes the analyses of the main results of the benchmarking exercise for the K-K NPP reactor building (including static and modal analyses of the fixed base model, soil column analyses, analyses of the soil-structure models and margin assessment of the K-K NPP reactor building), the analyses of the main results of the benchmarking exercise for the residual heat removal piping system (including

  19. A Human Sensor Network Framework in Support of Near Real Time Situational Geophysical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulov, O.; Price, A.; Smith, J. A.; Halem, M.

    2013-12-01

    and mitigation in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. Hurricane Sandy devastated multiple regions along the Atlantic coast causing damage estimated at $68 billion to the Eastern United States. We developed a framework consisting of a set of APIs that harvested over 8 million tweets and 370 thousand Instagram photos mentioning Hurricane Sandy over 4 days from Oct. 29 -Nov. 1, 2012. The flexibility of the framework allows for easy integration with such geophysical models such as GNOME, SLOSH, HySplit, and WRF. We use ElasticSearch, a RESTful, distributed search engine based on Apache Lucene, as the underlying platform for indexing, filtering and extracting feature content from the Twitter and Instagram metadata. We identify microscale events and visually present time varying correlation results of forecasts from the NOAA operational surge model SLOSH with those obtained from our SM database on a Google Earth based map. We are exploring the benefits of our framework to illuminate gaps in our understanding of the use of such data in geophysical models.

  20. Dynamic Analysis of AP1000 Shield Building Considering Fluid and Structure Interaction Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Xu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The shield building of AP1000 was designed to protect the steel containment vessel of the nuclear reactor. Therefore, the safety and integrity must be ensured during the plant life in any conditions such as an earthquake. The aim of this paper is to study the effect of water in the water tank on the response of the AP1000 shield building when subjected to three-dimensional seismic ground acceleration. The smoothed particle hydrodynamics method (SPH and finite element method (FEM coupling method is used to numerically simulate the fluid and structure interaction (FSI between water in the water tank and the AP1000 shield building. Then the grid convergence of FEM and SPH for the AP1000 shield building is analyzed. Next the modal analysis of the AP1000 shield building with various water levels (WLs in the water tank is taken. Meanwhile, the pressure due to sloshing and oscillation of the water in the gravity drain water tank is studied. The influences of the height of water in the water tank on the time history of acceleration of the AP1000 shield building are discussed, as well as the distributions of amplification, acceleration, displacement, and stresses of the AP1000 shield building. Research on the relationship between the WLs in the water tank and the response spectrums of the structure are also taken. The results show that the high WL in the water tank can limit the vibration of the AP1000 shield building and can more efficiently dissipate the kinetic energy of the AP1000 shield building by fluid-structure interaction.

  1. Gender differences in psychosocial work factors, work-personal life interface, and well-being among Swedish managers and non-managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Anna; Leineweber, Constanze; Magnusson Hanson, Linda

    2015-11-01

    To explore differences in psychosocial work factors, work-personal life interface, and well-being between managers and non-managers, female and male managers, and managers in the public and private sectors. Data were drawn from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) 2010, including 602 female managers, 4174 female non-managers, 906 male managers, and 2832 male non-managers. Psychosocial work factors, work-personal life interface, satisfaction, and well-being were investigated among non-managers and managers and male and female managers, using logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, educational level, staff category, and labour market sector. Both female and male managers reported high job demands and interference between work and personal life, but also high influence, high satisfaction with work and life, and low amount of sickness absence more often than non-managers of the same sex. However, female managers reported high quantitative and emotional demands, low influence, and work-personal life interference more frequently than male managers. More psychosocial work stressors were also reported in the public sector, where many women work. Male managers more often reported conflicts with superiors, lack of support, and personal life-work interference. Female managers reported poor well-being to a greater extent than male managers, but were more satisfied with their lives. Lack of motivation due to limited increase in satisfaction and organisational benefits is not likely to hinder women from taking on managerial roles. Managerial women's higher overall demands, lower influence at work, and poorer well-being relative to men's could hinder female managers from reaching higher organisational levels.

  2. Deep Chandra Observation and Numerical Studies of the Nearest Cluster Cold Front in the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, N.; ZuHone, J. A.; Zhuravleva, I.; Ichinohe, Y.; Simionescu, A.; Allen, S. W.; Markevitch, M.; Fabian, A. C.; Keshet, U.; Roediger, E.; hide

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a very deep (500 ks) Chandra observation, along with tailored numerical simulations, of the nearest, best resolved cluster cold front in the sky, which lies 90 kpc (19 arcmin) to the north-west of M87. The northern part of the front appears the sharpest, with a width smaller than 2.5 kpc (1.5 Coulomb mean free paths; at 99 per cent confidence). Everywhere along the front, the temperature discontinuity is narrower than 4-8 kpc and the metallicity gradient is narrower than 6 kpc, indicating that diffusion, conduction and mixing are suppressed across the interface. Such transport processes can be naturally suppressed by magnetic fields aligned with the cold front. Interestingly, comparison to magnetohydrodynamic simulations indicates that in order to maintain the observed sharp density and temperature discontinuities, conduction must also be suppressed along the magnetic field lines. However, the northwestern part of the cold front is observed to have a non-zero width. While other explanations are possible, the broadening is consistent with the presence of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities (KHI) on length-scales of a few kpc. Based on comparison with simulations, the presence of KHI would imply that the effective viscosity of the intracluster medium is suppressed by more than an order of magnitude with respect to the isotropic Spitzer-like temperature dependent viscosity. Underneath the cold front, we observe quasi-linear features that are approximately 10 per cent brighter than the surrounding gas and are separated by approximately 15 kpc from each other in projection. Comparison to tailored numerical simulations suggests that the observed phenomena may be due to the amplification of magnetic fields by gas sloshing in wide layers below the cold front, where the magnetic pressure reaches approximately 5-10 per cent of the thermal pressure, reducing the gas density between the bright features.

  3. Predictability, Force and (Anti-)Resonance in Complex Object Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Pauline; Hogan, Neville; Sternad, Dagmar

    2018-04-18

    Manipulation of complex objects as in tool use is ubiquitous and has given humans an evolutionary advantage. This study examined the strategies humans choose when manipulating an object with underactuated internal dynamics, such as a cup of coffee. The object's dynamics renders the temporal evolution complex, possibly even chaotic, and difficult to predict. A cart-and-pendulum model, loosely mimicking coffee sloshing in a cup, was implemented in a virtual environment with a haptic interface. Participants rhythmically manipulated the virtual cup containing a rolling ball; they could choose the oscillation frequency, while the amplitude was prescribed. Three hypotheses were tested: 1) humans decrease interaction forces between hand and object; 2) humans increase the predictability of the object dynamics; 3) humans exploit the resonances of the coupled object-hand system. Analysis revealed that humans chose either a high-frequency strategy with anti-phase cup-and-ball movements or a low-frequency strategy with in-phase cup-and-ball movements. Counter Hypothesis 1, they did not decrease interaction force; instead, they increased the predictability of the interaction dynamics, quantified by mutual information, supporting Hypothesis 2. To address Hypothesis 3, frequency analysis of the coupled hand-object system revealed two resonance frequencies separated by an anti-resonance frequency. The low-frequency strategy exploited one resonance, while the high-frequency strategy afforded more choice, consistent with the frequency response of the coupled system; both strategies avoided the anti-resonance. Hence, humans did not prioritize interaction force, but rather strategies that rendered interactions predictable. These findings highlight that physical interactions with complex objects pose control challenges not present in unconstrained movements.

  4. Fluid elastic instability analysis of 1/6th experimental model of PFBR main vessel cooling circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalaldeen, S.; Ravi, R.; Chellapandi, P.; Bhoje, S.B.

    1993-01-01

    In reactor assembly of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR), the main vessel (MV) temperature is kept below creep range i.e. less than 427 deg C by way of diverting a small fraction of core flow from the cold pool and sent through the passage between main vessel and an outer cylindrical baffle to cool the vessel. The sodium coning from this, is collected by another inner baffle and then returned to cold pool again. This system is termed as MV cooling circuit. The outer and inner baffles form feeding and restitution collectors respectively. The sodium from the feeding collector flows over the outer baffle and falls through a height of about 0.5 m before impacting on the free surface of sodium in the restitution collector. The fall of sodium may become a source of vibration of the baffles. Such vibrations have been already noted in case of SPX-I during its commissioning stage. For PFBR, the theoretical analysis was done to assess the fluid-elastic instability risks and stability charts were obtained. By this, it was concluded that the operating point (flow rate and fall height) lies within the stable zone. In order to confirm the above analysis results, a series of experiments were proposed. One preliminary experiment on 1/16 th model of MV cooling circuit has been completed. This model has also been analysed theoretically for the fluid- elastic instability, the theoretical analysis involves 2 stage computations. In the first stage, free vibration analysis with fluid structure interaction (FSI) effect for experimental model has been done using INCA (CASTEM 1985) code and all the mode shapes including sloshing are extracted. In the second stage the instability analysis is performed with the free vibration results from INCA. For the instability computations, a code WEIR has been written based on Aita's instability criteria [Aita.S. 1986

  5. Fluid free surface effect on the vibration analysis of cylindrical shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakis, A.A.; Brusuc, G.; Toorani, M.

    2007-01-01

    The present study is to investigate the effect of free surface motion of the fluid on the dynamic behavior of the thin-walled cylindrical shells. This paper outlines a semi-analytical approach to dynamic analysis of the fluid-filled horizontal cylindrical shell taking into account the free surface motion effect. The aim of the method is to provide a general approach that can be used for both analysis and synthesis of fluid structure interaction problems in the horizontal cylindrical shells where the dynamic interaction of a flexible structure and incompressible and inviscid flow is in focus. The approach is very general and allows for dynamic analysis of both uniform and non-uniform cylindrical shell considering the fluid forces including the sloshing effect exerted on the structure. The hybrid method developed in this work is on the basis of a combination of the classical finite element approach and the thin shell theory to determine the specific displacement functions. Mass and stiffness matrices of the shell are determined by precise analytical integration. A potential function is considered to develop the dynamic pressure due to the fluid. The kinetic and potential energies are evaluated for a range of fluid height to find the influence of the fluid on the dynamic responses of the structure. The influence of the physical and geometrical parameters on the fluid-structure system has been considered in the numerical solutions. When these results are compared with corresponding results available in the literature, both theory and experiment, very good agreement is obtained. (authors)

  6. DIMENSIONAL DEPENDENCE OF THE HYDRODYNAMICS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolence, Joshua C.; Burrows, Adam; Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Nordhaus, Jason

    2013-01-01

    A major goal over the last decade has been understanding which multidimensional effects are crucial in facilitating core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosions. Unfortunately, much of this work has necessarily assumed axisymmetry. In this work, we present analyses of simplified two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) CCSN models with the goal of comparing the hydrodynamics in setups that differ only in dimension. Not surprisingly, we find many differences between 2D and 3D models. While some differences are subtle and perhaps not crucial, others are dramatic and make interpreting 2D models problematic. In particular, axisymmetric models produce excess power at the largest spatial scales, power that has been deemed critical in previous explosion models. Nevertheless, our 3D models, which have an order of magnitude less power than 2D models on large scales, explode earlier. Since explosions occur earlier in 3D than in 2D, the vigorous large-scale sloshing is either not critical in any dimension or the explosion mechanism operates differently in 2D and 3D. On the other hand, we find that the average parcel of matter in the gain region has been exposed to net heating for up to 30% longer in 3D than in 2D, an effect we attribute to the differing characters of turbulence in 2D and 3D. We suggest that this effect plays a prominent role in producing earlier explosions in 3D. Finally, we discuss a simple model for the runaway growth of buoyant bubbles that is able to quantitatively account for the growth of the shock radius and predicts a critical luminosity relation.

  7. Non-linear seismic response of base-isolated liquid storage tanks to bi-directional excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrimali, M.K.; Jangid, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    Seismic response of the liquid storage tanks isolated by lead-rubber bearings is investigated for bi-directional earthquake excitation (i.e. two horizontal components). The biaxial force-deformation behaviour of the bearings is considered as bi-linear modelled by coupled non-linear differential equations. The continuous liquid mass of the tank is modelled as lumped masses known as convective mass, impulsive mass and rigid mass. The corresponding stiffness associated with these lumped masses has been worked out depending upon the properties of the tank wall and liquid mass. Since the force-deformation behaviour of the bearings is non-linear, as a result, the seismic response is obtained by the Newmark's step-by-step method. The seismic responses of two types of the isolated tanks (i.e. slender and broad) are investigated under several recorded earthquake ground to study the effects of bi-directional interaction. Further, a parametric study is also carried out to study the effects of important system parameters on the effectiveness of seismic isolation for liquid storage tanks. The various important parameters considered are: (i) the period of isolation, (ii) the damping of isolation bearings and (iii) the yield strength level of the bearings. It has been observed that the seismic response of isolated tank is found to be insensitive to interaction effect of the bearing forces. Further, there exists an optimum value of isolation damping for which the base shear in the tank attains the minimum value. Therefore, increasing the bearing damping beyond a certain value may decrease the bearing and sloshing displacements but it may increase the base shear

  8. Associations between onset of effort-reward imbalance at work and onset of musculoskeletal pain: analyzing observational longitudinal data as pseudo-trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halonen, Jaana I; Virtanen, Marianna; Leineweber, Constanze; Rod, Naja H; Westerlund, Hugo; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L

    2018-03-27

    Existing evidence of an association between effort-reward imbalance (ERI) at work and musculoskeletal pain is limited, preventing reliable conclusions about the magnitude and direction of the relation. In a large longitudinal study, we examined whether the onset of ERI is associated with subsequent onset of musculoskeletal pain among those free of pain at baseline, and vice versa, whether onset of pain leads to onset of ERI. Data were from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) study. We used responses from 3 consecutive study phases to examine whether exposure onset between the first and second phases predicts onset of the outcome in the third phase (N = 4079). Effort-reward imbalance was assessed with a short form of the ERI model. Having neck-shoulder and low back pain affecting life to some degree in the past 3 months was also assessed in all study phases. As covariates, we included age, sex, marital status, occupational status, and physically strenuous work. In the adjusted models, onset of ERI was associated with onset of neck-shoulder pain (relative risk [RR] 1.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-1.89) and low back pain (RR 1.21, 95% CI 0.97-1.50). The opposite was also observed, as onset of neck-shoulder pain increased the risk of subsequent onset of ERI (RR 1.36, 95% CI 1.05-1.74). Our findings suggest that when accounting for the temporal order, the associations between ERI and musculoskeletal pain that affects life are bidirectional, implying that interventions to both ERI and pain may be worthwhile to prevent a vicious cycle.

  9. Mixing driven by transient buoyancy flows. I. Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, W. M. B.; Zhong, H.; Batur, C.

    2018-05-01

    Mixing of two miscible liquids juxtaposed inside a cavity initially separated by a divider, whose buoyancy-driven motion is initiated via impulsive perturbation of divider motion that can generate the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, is investigated experimentally. The measured Lagrangian history of interface motion that contains the continuum mechanics of mixing shows self-similar nearly Gaussian length stretch distribution for a wide range of control parameters encompassing an approximate Hele-Shaw cell to a three-dimensional cavity. Because of the initial configuration of the interface which is parallel to the gravitational field, we show that at critical initial potential energy mixing occurs through the stretching of the interface, which shows frontogenesis, and folding, owing to an overturning motion that results in unstable density stratification and produces an ideal condition for the growth of the single wavelength Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The initial perturbation of the interface and flow field generates the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and causes kinks at the interface, which grow into deep fingers during overturning motion and unfold into local whorl structures that merge and self-organize into the Rayleigh-Taylor morphology (RTM) structure. For a range of parametric space that yields two-dimensional flows, the unfolding of the instability through a supercritical bifurcation yields an asymmetric pairwise structure exhibiting smooth RTM that transitions to RTM fronts with fractal structures that contain small length scales for increasing Peclet numbers. The late stage of the RTM structure unfolds into an internal breakwave that breaks down through wall and internal collision and sets up the condition for self-induced sloshing that decays exponentially as the two fluids become stably stratified with a diffusive region indicating local molecular diffusion.

  10. Non-listening and self centered leadership--relationships to socioeconomic conditions and employee mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theorell, Töres; Nyberg, Anna; Leineweber, Constanze; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Oxenstierna, Gabriel; Westerlund, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    The way in which leadership is experienced in different socioeconomic strata is of interest per se, as well as how it relates to employee mental health. Three waves of SLOSH (Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health, a questionnaire survey on a sample of the Swedish working population) were used, 2006, 2008 and 2010 (n = 5141). The leadership variables were: "Non-listening leadership" (one question: "Does your manager listen to you?"--four response categories), "Self centered leadership" (sum of three five-graded questions--"non-participating", "asocial" and "loner"). The socioeconomic factors were education and income. Emotional exhaustion and depressive symptoms were used as indicators of mental health. Non-listening leadership was associated with low income and low education whereas self-centered leadership showed a weaker relationship with education and no association at all with income. Both leadership variables were significantly associated with emotional exhaustion and depressive symptoms. "Self centered" as well as "non-listening" leadership in 2006 significantly predicted employee depressive symptoms in 2008 after adjustment for demographic variables. These predictions became non-significant when adjustment was made for job conditions (demands and decision latitude) in the "non-listening" leadership analyses, whereas predictions of depressive symptoms remained significant after these adjustments in the "self-centered leadership" analyses. Our results show that the leadership variables are associated with socioeconomic status and employee mental health. "Non-listening" scores were more sensitive to societal change and more strongly related to socioeconomic factors and job conditions than "self-centered" scores.

  11. Permeability and flammability study of composite sandwich structures for cryogenic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubacz, Monika

    Fiber reinforced plastics offer advantageous specific strength and stiffness compared to metals and has been identified as candidates for the reusable space transportation systems primary structures including cryogenic tanks. A number of carbon and aramid fiber reinforced plastics have been considered for the liquid hydrogen tanks. Materials selection is based upon mechanical properties and containment performance (long and short term) and upon manufacturing considerations. The liquid hydrogen tank carries shear, torque, end load, and bending moment due to gusts, maneuver, take-off, landing, lift, drag, and fuel sloshing. The tank is pressurized to about 1.5 atmosphere (14.6psi or 0.1 MPa) differential pressure and on ascent maintains the liquid hydrogen at a temperature of 20K. The objective of the research effort into lay the foundation for developing the technology required for reliable prediction of the effects of various design, manufacturing, and service parameters on the susceptibility of composite tanks to develop excessive permeability to cryogenic fuels. Efforts will be expended on developing the materials and structural concepts for the cryogenic tanks that can meet the functional requirements. This will include consideration for double wall composite sandwich structures, with inner wall to meet the cryogenic requirements. The structure will incorporate nanoparticles for properties modifications and developing barriers. The main effort will be extended to tank wall's internal skin design. The main requirements for internal composite stack are: (1) introduction of barrier film (e.g. honeycomb material paper sheet) to reduce the wall permeability to hydrogen, (2) introduction of nanoparticles into laminate resin to prevent micro-cracking or crack propagation. There is a need to characterize and analyze composite sandwich structural damage due to burning and explosion. Better understanding of the flammability and blast resistance of the composite structures

  12. High order methods for incompressible fluid flow: Application to moving boundary problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoentegaard, Tormod

    2008-04-15

    Fluid flows with moving boundaries are encountered in a large number of real life situations, with two such types being fluid-structure interaction and free-surface flows. Fluid-structure phenomena are for instance apparent in many hydrodynamic applications; wave effects on offshore structures, sloshing and fluid induced vibrations, and aeroelasticity; flutter and dynamic response. Free-surface flows can be considered as a special case of a fluid-fluid interaction where one of the fluids are practically inviscid, such as air. This type of flows arise in many disciplines such as marine hydrodynamics, chemical engineering, material processing, and geophysics. The driving forces for free-surface flows may be of large scale such as gravity or inertial forces, or forces due to surface tension which operate on a much smaller scale. Free-surface flows with surface tension as a driving mechanism include the flow of bubbles and droplets, and the evolution of capillary waves. In this work we consider incompressible fluid flow, which are governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. There are several challenges when simulating moving boundary problems numerically, and these include - Spatial discretization - Temporal discretization - Imposition of boundary conditions - Solution strategy for the linear equations. These are some of the issues which will be addressed in this introduction. We will first formulate the problem in the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework, and introduce the weak formulation of the problem. Next, we discuss the spatial and temporal discretization before we move to the imposition of surface tension boundary conditions. In the final section we discuss the solution of the resulting linear system of equations. (Author). refs., figs., tabs

  13. NaBH4 (sodium borohydride) hydrogen generator with a volume-exchange fuel tank for small unmanned aerial vehicles powered by a PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taegyu

    2014-01-01

    A proton exchange membrane fuel cell system integrated with a NaBH 4 (sodium borohydride) hydrogen generator was developed for small UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles). The hydrogen generator was composed of a catalytic reactor, liquid pump and volume-exchange fuel tank, where the fuel and spent fuel exchange the volume within a single fuel tank. Co–B catalyst supported on a porous ceramic material was used to generate hydrogen from the NaBH 4 solution. Considering the power consumption according to the mission profile of a UAV, the power output of the fuel cell and auxiliary battery was distributed passively as an electrical load. A blended wing-body was selected considering the fuel efficiency and carrying capability of fuel cell components. First, the fuel cell stack and hydrogen generator were evaluated under the operating conditions, and integrated into the airframe. The ground test of the complete fuel cell UAV was performed under a range of load conditions. Finally, the fuel cell powered flight test was made for 1 h. The volume-exchange fuel tank minimized the fuel sloshing and the change in center of gravity due to fuel consumption during the flight, so that much stable operation of the fuel cell system was validated at different flight modes. - Highlights: • PEMFC system with a NaBH 4 hydrogen source was developed for small UAVs. • Volume-exchange fuel tank was used to reduce the size of the fuel cell system. • Passive power management was used for a stable power output during the flight. • BWB UAV was selected by taking the fuel cell integration into consideration. • Stable operation of the fuel cell system was verified from the flight test

  14. Seismic response of flexible cylindrical tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, T A; Boley, B A [comps.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study of the seismic behavior of thin shell circular cylindrical liquid storage tanks is described. The investigation was planned to evaluate the adequacy of present methods of tank design, and was conducted using the Earthquake Simulator Facility of the University of California, Berkeley. The model tank considered in this paper was 6 ft high by 12 ft in diameter, and was welded from thin sheet aluminum to simulate a steel tank 36 feet in diameter. During testing the tank had an open top, held 60 inches of water, and was subjected to a time scaled El Centro (1940) earthquake, amplified to a peak acceleration of 0.5 g. Both base free and base fixed conditions were studied. Results of the experiments demonstrate that fluid pressures included both impulsive and convective components, and that the wave sloshing followed basic theory quite closely. But it also was apparent that the tank flexibility influenced the hydrodynamic pressures, as indicated by pressure amplification in the clamped tank, and by a total change of pressure history in the unclamped case. Significant out of round distortions of the tank were developed, of a three lobe form or the free base case and with four lobes in the fixed base case. Uplift of the tank base was closely related to the out-of-round deformation of the unanchored tank, whereas initial eccentricities apparently caused the section distortions in the anchored system. Stresses in the tank wall do not follow the expected pattern of response to overturning moment; instead they seem to be mainly associated with the section distortions. At present there is no analytical procedure for predicting these distortions .

  15. The analysis of the pathophysiology of syringomyelia by means of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Toshiaki

    1992-01-01

    The pathophysiology of syringomyelia was examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 70 patients. According to complications, syringomyelia was classified as being associated with (1) Chiari malformation, (2) both Chiari malformation and basal arachnoiditis, (3) basal arachnoiditis, (4) an obstruction of the foramen Magendie, and (5) spinal arachnoiditis. MRI features in Type 1 included: wedge-shaped herniated tonsils with the cisterna magna, pencil-shaped rostral end of the intraspinal syrinx, and obliterated caudal part of the fourth ventricle. These findings suggested that the herniated tonsils might result in the disturbance of cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) circulation. In Type 2, the tip of the herniated tonsils was round; a triangular space was noted between the herniated tonsils and the upper spinal cord; the rostral end of the intraspinal syrinx was round; and the caudal part of the fourth ventricle was well visualized. These findings revealed that the brain stem and spinal cord were less pressed, suggesting that CSF circulatory disturbance resulted from basal arachnoiditis around the foramen magnum. In Type 3, the cisterna magna was narrowed by a thickened arachnoid membrane. In type 4, the intraspinal syrinx was directly connected with the fourth ventricle via the patent central canal associated with hydrocephalus. The position of the cerebellar tonsils and the size of the cisterna magna were both normal. In Type 5, a partial adhesion of the arachnoid membrane around the spinal cord was shown, and the syrinx was found extended toward the rostral as well as the caudal direction of the arachnoid adhesion. The rostral end of the syrinx was sometimes changed in size during MRI examinatin. This phenomenon sustained William's theory of 'suck and slosh mechanism' of intraspinal syrinx extension. (N.K.)

  16. Three-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamical Simulations of the Morphology of Head–Tail Radio Galaxies Based on the Magnetic Tower Jet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Zhaoming; Yuan, Feng [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai, E-mail: zmgan@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: fyuan@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: hli@lanl.gov, E-mail: sli@lanl.gov [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2017-04-10

    The distinctive morphology of head–tail radio galaxies reveals strong interactions between the radio jets and their intra-cluster environment, the general consensus on the morphology origin of head–tail sources is that radio jets are bent by violent intra-cluster weather. We demonstrate in this paper that such strong interactions provide a great opportunity to study the jet properties and also the dynamics of the intra-cluster medium (ICM). By three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations, we analyze the detailed bending process of a magnetically dominated jet, based on the magnetic tower jet model. We use stratified atmospheres modulated by wind/shock to mimic the violent intra-cluster weather. Core sloshing is found to be inevitable during the wind-cluster core interaction, which induces significant shear motion and could finally drive ICM turbulence around the jet, making it difficult for the jet to survive. We perform a detailed comparison between the behavior of pure hydrodynamical jets and the magnetic tower jet and find that the jet-lobe morphology could not survive against the violent disruption in all of our pure hydrodynamical jet models. On the other hand, the head–tail morphology is well reproduced by using a magnetic tower jet model bent by wind, in which hydrodynamical instabilities are naturally suppressed and the jet could always keep its integrity under the protection of its internal magnetic fields. Finally, we also check the possibility for jet bending by shock only. We find that shock could not bend the jet significantly, and thus could not be expected to explain the observed long tails in head–tail radio galaxies.

  17. Selection of nutrients to enhance biodegradation for the remediation of oil spilled on beaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safferman, S.I.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to determine the fate of fertilizers proposed for application to the Alaska shoreline in support of the Alaskan Oil Spill EPA Bioremediation Project. Fertilizer application is theorized to provide indigenous organisms with nutrients that appear to be limited on ocean beaches. The experiments were developed strictly to test the durability, release rates, and application procedures of a variety of fertilizer types. The effects of tidal movement on a beach was simulated by two separate conditions, static and dynamic. The static condition represented periods when the beach material was under water and turbulence was at a minimum. This condition was simulated in the laboratory by submerging the nutrient in a beaker of simulated sea water (with or without beach material depending on the nutrients). These experiments ran continuously over a 3-month period with water exchanges in accordance with a planned schedule. Nutrient concentrations were measured in the exchanged water. Dynamic conditions represented the forces on beach material as the water moved from the low to high tide and then back to the low tide. In the laboratory, the condition was simulated by applying the nutrients to beach material, which was piled in one end of a long narrow trayplaced on a rocker table. When the rocker table was operating and sufficient quantities of sea water had been added to cover the beach material, a gentle sloshing of the water over the materials resulted. These experiments generally lasted 1 to 2 hours during which time liquid samples were collected for nutrient analyses. Durability of the fertilizers was measured by visual observation and freeze/thaw determinations. The experimental setup was economical and performed well

  18. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS): executive summary and overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.; Perkins, L.J.; Gordon, J.D.

    1984-07-01

    Two self-consistent MARS configurations are discussed - a 1200-MWe commercial electricity-generating plant and a synguels-generating plant that produces hydrogen with an energy equivalent to 26,000 barrels of oil per day. The MARS machine emphasizes the attractive features of the tandem mirror concept, including steady-state operation, a small-diameter high-beta plasma, a linear central cell with simple low-maintenance blankets, low first-wall heat fluxes ( 2 ), no driven plasma currents or associated disruptions, natural halo impurity diversion, and direct conversion of end-loss charged-particle power. The MARS electric plant produces 2600 MW of fusion power in a 130-m-long central cell. Advanced tandem-mirror plasma-engineering concepts, a high-efficiency liquid lithium-lead (Li 17 Pb 83 ) blanket, and efficient direct electrical conversion of end loss power combine to produce a high net plant efficiency of 36%. With a total capital cost of $2.9 billion (constant 1983 dollars), the MARS electric plant produces busbar electricity at approx. 7 cents/kW-hour. The MARS synfuels plant produces 3500 MW of fusion power in a 150-m-long central cell. A helium-gas-cooled silicon carbide pebble-bed blanket provides high-temperature (1000 0 C) heat to a thermochemical water-splitting cycle and the resulting hydrogen is catalytically converted to methanol for distribution. With a total capital cost of $3.6 billion (constant 1983 dollars), the synfuels plant produces methanol fuel at about $1.7/gal. The major features of the MARS reactor include sloshing-ion thermal barrier plugs for efficient plasma confinement, a high efficiency blanket, high-field (24-T) choke cells, drift pumping for trapped plasma species, quasi-optical electron-cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) systems, and a component gridless direct converter

  19. Fiber-based optic sensor for detecting human blood clot: present and future revival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshikeri, Nada; Bakhtiar, Hazri

    2018-05-01

    Sustaining human’s life-frame away from being impeded by the clot - ghost term, we attempt to approach a mobile fiber-based optical sensor (f-s) for detecting blood clot in a blood vessel (intra-arteries/veins). Blood vessels are the part of the circulatory system that transport blood throughout the human body, thus their significance of being protected arise to the monograph focus. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), X-rays and other medical instruments are diagnostic immobility techniques with a slackest interval. The corer causation of fiber-based optical sensor is to detect a clump of blood in the bloodstream by providing a prompt mobile diagnostic intervals preserving last-minutes-breath of human’s life. The detector (f-s) has been etched by diluting sulphuric acid ~10% at certain zone to sensate its function. The in-vitro monograph peaks its maximal monitoring when the sensor is attached to Raman Spectroscopy (RS) setup. RS quantifies the relative intensities of fibrinogen bond, which is the first type of blood coagulation elements of blood plasma. Blood coagulation parameters are the major concern of the monograph investigation, such as total haemoglobin (tHb), clotting reaction time (t), clot progression time (t2), maximum clot amplitude (ma) and mean refractive index (r). A blood sample will be drawn from the patient and after centrifugation to separate blood plasma from its constituents, then an immediate sloshing of blood plasma in the (f-s) packet which has its plug-in to RS. Estimating the quantitative analysis of blood sample concentration, RS will determine the presence of coagulation in terms of intensity and medical procedures will dominate the treatment process. Thus, the suggestive monograph provides a definite instrument for investigating blood coagulation intra-arteries/veins promptly.

  20. Stability of Working Reference Standards for Hybrid K-Edge Densitometer Quality Assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzzardo, T.; Pickett, C.A.; McElroy, R.; Croft, S.; Garrison, J.; Venkataraman, R.

    2015-01-01

    The relatively short working life of aqueous solution standards of actinides for the calibration and quality control of Hybrid K-Edge Densitometer (HKED) measurements necessitates the development of a stable matrix material less susceptible to degradation. Degradation in the form of evaporation, radiolysis, settling, sloshing, and sediment formation can all reduce the reliability and working life of an aqueous standard. These factors make aqueous solutions inadequate for long-term quality assurance measurements designed to detect weak or subtle trends in system performance. Epoxy, studied here, is an alternative matrix material that may be less vulnerable to degradation. An additional benefit of epoxy is that standards can easily be characterized as sealed sources which allows for simplified administrative controls during shipping and storage. The stability of working reference standards consisting of U 3 O 8 in an epoxy matrix for use in the HKED has been tracked for over three years through repeated X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) and K-Edge (KED) measurements. A set of six epoxy standards ranging in concentration from 1 g/l to 76 g/l uranium were determined to be stable, within the expected accuracy of the system, over the period of analysis. During this time, no effort was made to enhance the stability of the epoxy standards; the radial measurement position was not controlled and in the middle of the analysis period the HKED system and standards were shipped from the vendor's factory to the customer. Epoxy standards afford numerous benefits over those created from aqueous solutions and should be considered when developing HKED standards for quality assurance measurements. The stability of the epoxy allows the development of working standards of a stability and robustness sufficient for use in a proposed international round-robin exercise based on the exchange of such standards. (author)

  1. A new multi-dimensional general relativistic neutrino hydrodynamics code for core-collapse supernovae. IV. The neutrino signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Bernhard [Monash Center for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Building 28, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Janka, Hans-Thomas, E-mail: bernhard.mueller@monash.edu, E-mail: bjmuellr@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-06-10

    Considering six general relativistic, two-dimensional (2D) supernova (SN) explosion models of progenitor stars between 8.1 and 27 M {sub ☉}, we systematically analyze the properties of the neutrino emission from core collapse and bounce to the post-explosion phase. The models were computed with the VERTEX-COCONUT code, using three-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport in the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. Our results confirm the close similarity of the mean energies, (E), of ν-bar {sub e} and heavy-lepton neutrinos and even their crossing during the accretion phase for stars with M ≳ 10 M {sub ☉} as observed in previous 1D and 2D simulations with state-of-the-art neutrino transport. We establish a roughly linear scaling of 〈E{sub ν-bar{sub e}}〉 with the proto-neutron star (PNS) mass, which holds in time as well as for different progenitors. Convection inside the PNS affects the neutrino emission on the 10%-20% level, and accretion continuing beyond the onset of the explosion prevents the abrupt drop of the neutrino luminosities seen in artificially exploded 1D models. We demonstrate that a wavelet-based time-frequency analysis of SN neutrino signals in IceCube will offer sensitive diagnostics for the SN core dynamics up to at least ∼10 kpc distance. Strong, narrow-band signal modulations indicate quasi-periodic shock sloshing motions due to the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), and the frequency evolution of such 'SASI neutrino chirps' reveals shock expansion or contraction. The onset of the explosion is accompanied by a shift of the modulation frequency below 40-50 Hz, and post-explosion, episodic accretion downflows will be signaled by activity intervals stretching over an extended frequency range in the wavelet spectrogram.

  2. Interactional justice at work is related to sickness absence: a study using repeated measures in the Swedish working population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leineweber, Constanze; Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia; Peristera, Paraskevi; Eib, Constanze; Nyberg, Anna; Westerlund, Hugo

    2017-12-08

    Research has shown that perceived unfairness contributes to higher rates of sickness absence. While shorter, but more frequent periods of sickness absence might be a possibility for the individual to get relief from high strain, long-term sickness absence might be a sign of more serious health problems. The Uncertainty Management Model suggests that justice is particularly important in times of uncertainty, e.g. perceived job insecurity. The present study investigated the association between interpersonal and informational justice at work with long and frequent sickness absence respectively, under conditions of job insecurity. Data were derived from the 2010, 2012, and 2014 biennial waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH). The final analytic sample consisted of 19,493 individuals. We applied repeated measures regression analyses through generalized estimating equations (GEE), a method for longitudinal data that simultaneously analyses variables at different time points. We calculated risk of long and frequent sickness absence, respectively in relation to interpersonal and informational justice taking perceptions of job insecurity into account. We found informational and interpersonal justice to be associated with risk of long and frequent sickness absence independently of job insecurity and demographic variables. Results from autoregressive GEE provided some support for a causal relationship between justice perceptions and sickness absence. Contrary to expectations, we found no interaction between justice and job insecurity. Our results underline the need for fair and just treatment of employees irrespective of perceived job insecurity in order to keep the workforce healthy and to minimize lost work days due to sickness absence.

  3. Preliminary evaluation of steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) accident in lead cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frano, R. Lo; Forasassi, G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper some contributions are provided to the development of a European Lead-cooled System, known as the ELSY project (within EU-6 Framework Project); that will constitute a possible reference system for a large lead-cooled reactor of GEN IV. Steam generator (SG) tubing of this system type might be subject to a variety of degradation processes, such as cracking, wall thinning and potential leakage or rupture, eventually leading to the failure of one or more SG tubes that constitute a steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) accident with possible consequences for the safety of the primary systems. It is therefore of interest for the designer to know how the SG itself, as well as the vessel and internals structures, behave under impulsive loading conditions (in form of a rapid and strong increase of pressure) that can arise as consequences of the interaction between the primary and secondary coolants (lead-water interaction). The analysed initiator event, as already mentioned, is a large break (up to a double ended guillotine break) of one (or more) SG cooling tubes that may become severe enough to determine dangerous effects on the interested structures. In order to better simulate and perform the mentioned postulated SGTR accident sequence analyses, an appropriate numerical model with the available computing resources (FEM codes) was set up at the DIMNP of Pisa University. That model was used to evaluate the effects of the propagation of the blast pressure waves inside the SG structures, taking into account also the sloshing phenomenon that could be induced by the lead primary coolant motions. Therefore the SGTR effects study may be considered as a transient and non linear problem the solution of which provides the 'time histories' of hydrodynamic pressures and stresses on the reactor pressure vessel and internals walls. (author)

  4. HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANK THERMAL and SEISMIC PROJECT-ANSYS BENCHMARK ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN A HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL PRIMARY TANK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-01-01

    M and D Professional Services, Inc. (M and D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project-DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The overall seismic analysis of the DSTs is being performed with the general-purpose finite element code ANSYS. The overall model used for the seismic analysis of the DSTs includes the DST structure, the contained waste, and the surrounding soil. The seismic analysis of the DSTs must address the fluid-structure interaction behavior and sloshing response of the primary tank and contained liquid. ANSYS has demonstrated capabilities for structural analysis, but the capabilities and limitations of ANSYS to perform fluid-structure interaction are less well understood. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the capabilities and investigate the limitations of ANSYS for performing a fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste. To this end, the ANSYS solutions are benchmarked against theoretical solutions appearing in BNL 1995, when such theoretical solutions exist. When theoretical solutions were not available, comparisons were made to theoretical solutions of similar problems and to the results from Dytran simulations. The capabilities and limitations of the finite element code Dytran for performing a fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste were explored in a parallel investigation (Abatt 2006). In conjunction with the results of the global ANSYS

  5. HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELL TANK THERMAL and SEISMIC PROJECT-DYTRAN BENCHMARK ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN FLAT-TOP TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2007-01-01

    The work reported in this document was performed in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work herein was motivated by review comments from a Project Review Meeting held on March 20-21, 2006. One of the recommendations from that meeting was that the effects of the interaction between the tank liquid and the roof be further studied (Rinker, Deibler, Johnson, Karri, Pilli, Abatt, Carpenter, and Hendrix - Appendix E of RPP-RPT-28968, Rev. 1). The reviewers recommended that solutions be obtained for seismic excitation of flat roof tanks containing liquid with varying headspace between the top of the liquid and the tank roof. It was recommended that the solutions be compared with simple, approximate procedures described in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005). This report documents the results of the requested studies and compares the predictions of Dytran simulations to the approximate procedures in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005) for flat roof tanks. The four cases analyzed all employed a rigid circular cylindrical flat top tank with a radius of 450 in. and a height of 500 in. The initial liquid levels in the tank were 460,480,490, and 500 in. For the given tank geometry and the selected seismic input, the maximum unconstrained slosh height of the liquid is slightly greater than 25 in. Thus, the initial liquid level of 460 in. represents an effectively roofless tank, the two intermediate liquid levels lead to intermittent interaction between the liquid and tank roof, and the 500 in. liquid level represents a completely full tank with no sloshing. Although this work was performed in support of the

  6. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT DYTRAN BENCHMARK ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN FLAT TOP TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2007-02-16

    The work reported in this document was performed in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work herein was motivated by review comments from a Project Review Meeting held on March 20-21, 2006. One of the recommendations from that meeting was that the effects of the interaction between the tank liquid and the roof be further studied (Rinker, Deibler, Johnson, Karri, Pilli, Abatt, Carpenter, and Hendrix - Appendix E of RPP-RPT-28968, Rev. 1). The reviewers recommended that solutions be obtained for seismic excitation of flat roof tanks containing liquid with varying headspace between the top of the liquid and the tank roof. It was recommended that the solutions be compared with simple, approximate procedures described in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005). This report documents the results of the requested studies and compares the predictions of Dytran simulations to the approximate procedures in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005) for flat roof tanks. The four cases analyzed all employed a rigid circular cylindrical flat top tank with a radius of 450 in. and a height of 500 in. The initial liquid levels in the tank were 460,480,490, and 500 in. For the given tank geometry and the selected seismic input, the maximum unconstrained slosh height of the liquid is slightly greater than 25 in. Thus, the initial liquid level of 460 in. represents an effectively roofless tank, the two intermediate liquid levels lead to intermittent interaction between the liquid and tank roof, and the 500 in. liquid level represents a completely full tank with no sloshing. Although this work was performed

  7. Three-dimensional analysis of AP600 standard plant shield building roof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greimann, L.; Fanous, F.; Safar, S.; Khalil, A.; Bluhm, D.

    1999-01-01

    The AP600 passive containment vessel is surrounded by a concrete cylindrical shell covered with a truncated conical roof. This roof supports the passive containment cooling system (PCS) annular tank, shield plate and other nonstructural attachments. When the shield building is subjected to different loading combinations as defined in the Standard Review Plan (SRP), some of the sections in the shield building could experience forces in excess of their design values. This report summarized the three-dimensional finite element analysis that was conducted to review the adequacy of the proposed Westinghouse shield building design. The ANSYS finite element software was utilized to analyze the Shield Building Roof (SBR) under dead, snow, wind, thermal and seismic loadings. A three-dimensional model that included a portion of the shield building cylindrical shell, the conical roof and its attachments, the eccentricities at the cone-cylinder connection and at the compression ring and the PCS tank was developed. Mesh sensitivity studies were conducted to select appropriate element size in the cylinder, cone, near air intakes and in the vicinity of the eccentricities. Also, a study was carried out to correctly idealize the water-structure interaction in the PCS tank. Response spectrum analysis was used to calculate the internal forces at different sections in the SBR under Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE). Forty-nine structural modes and twenty sloshing modes were used. Two horizontal components of the SSE together with a vertical component were used. Modal stress resultants were combined taking into account the effects of closely spaced modes. The three earthquake directions were combined by the Square Root of the Sum Squares method. Two load combinations were studied. The load combination that included dead, snow, fluid, thermal and seismic loads was selected to be the most critical. Interaction diagrams for critical sections were developed and used to check the design

  8. Multi-hazard risk analysis related to hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ning

    Hurricanes present major hazards to the United States. Associated with extreme winds, heavy rainfall, and storm surge, landfalling hurricanes often cause enormous structural damage to coastal regions. Hurricane damage risk assessment provides the basis for loss mitigation and related policy-making. Current hurricane risk models, however, often oversimplify the complex processes of hurricane damage. This dissertation aims to improve existing hurricane risk assessment methodology by coherently modeling the spatial-temporal processes of storm landfall, hazards, and damage. Numerical modeling technologies are used to investigate the multiplicity of hazards associated with landfalling hurricanes. The application and effectiveness of current weather forecasting technologies to predict hurricane hazards is investigated. In particular, the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF), with Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL)'s hurricane initialization scheme, is applied to the simulation of the wind and rainfall environment during hurricane landfall. The WRF model is further coupled with the Advanced Circulation (AD-CIRC) model to simulate storm surge in coastal regions. A case study examines the multiple hazards associated with Hurricane Isabel (2003). Also, a risk assessment methodology is developed to estimate the probability distribution of hurricane storm surge heights along the coast, particularly for data-scarce regions, such as New York City. This methodology makes use of relatively simple models, specifically a statistical/deterministic hurricane model and the Sea, Lake and Overland Surges from Hurricanes (SLOSH) model, to simulate large numbers of synthetic surge events, and conducts statistical analysis. The estimation of hurricane landfall probability and hazards are combined with structural vulnerability models to estimate hurricane damage risk. Wind-induced damage mechanisms are extensively studied. An innovative windborne debris risk model is

  9. The Complete Local Volume Groups Sample - I. Sample selection and X-ray properties of the high-richness subsample

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Ewan; Ponman, Trevor J.; Kolokythas, Konstantinos; Raychaudhury, Somak; Babul, Arif; Vrtilek, Jan M.; David, Laurence P.; Giacintucci, Simona; Gitti, Myriam; Haines, Chris P.

    2017-12-01

    We present the Complete Local-Volume Groups Sample (CLoGS), a statistically complete optically selected sample of 53 groups within 80 Mpc. Our goal is to combine X-ray, radio and optical data to investigate the relationship between member galaxies, their active nuclei and the hot intra-group medium (IGM). We describe sample selection, define a 26-group high-richness subsample of groups containing at least four optically bright (log LB ≥ 10.2 LB⊙) galaxies, and report the results of XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of these systems. We find that 14 of the 26 groups are X-ray bright, possessing a group-scale IGM extending at least 65 kpc and with luminosity >1041 erg s-1, while a further three groups host smaller galaxy-scale gas haloes. The X-ray bright groups have masses in the range M500 ≃ 0.5-5 × 1013 M⊙, based on system temperatures of 0.4-1.4 keV, and X-ray luminosities in the range 2-200 × 1041 erg s-1. We find that ∼53-65 per cent of the X-ray bright groups have cool cores, a somewhat lower fraction than found by previous archival surveys. Approximately 30 per cent of the X-ray bright groups show evidence of recent dynamical interactions (mergers or sloshing), and ∼35 per cent of their dominant early-type galaxies host active galactic nuclei with radio jets. We find no groups with unusually high central entropies, as predicted by some simulations, and confirm that CLoGS is in principle capable of detecting such systems. We identify three previously unrecognized groups, and find that they are either faint (LX, R500 < 1042 erg s-1) with no concentrated cool core, or highly disturbed. This leads us to suggest that ∼20 per cent of X-ray bright groups in the local universe may still be unidentified.

  10. Broadband Ground Motion Reconstruction for the Kanto Basin during the 1923 Kanto Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Haruko; Yoshimi, Masayuki

    2011-03-01

    southeastern corner of the fault plane and further east are largely due to this effect. Waveforms above the fault plane contain both short- and long-period components, but the short-period components are not observed further afield. Away from the fault, long-period waves (>2 s) dominate the ground motion, and in areas where the base of the third layer is relatively deep, the predominant period is >5 s. Levels of long-period ground motion in the southern part of the study area, around Sagami Bay and the southern parts of Boso Peninsula and Tokyo Bay, exceed that recorded at Tomakomai during the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, when large oil storage tanks collapsed in response to sloshing generated by strong long-period motions.

  11. Space Debris Attitude Simulation - IOTA (In-Orbit Tumbling Analysis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzler, R.; Schildknecht, T.; Lips, T.; Fritsche, B.; Silha, J.; Krag, H.

    Today, there is little knowledge on the attitude state of decommissioned intact objects in Earth orbit. Observational means have advanced in the past years, but are still limited with respect to an accurate estimate of motion vector orientations and magnitude. Especially for the preparation of Active Debris Removal (ADR) missions as planned by ESA's Clean Space initiative or contingency scenarios for ESA spacecraft like ENVISAT, such knowledge is needed. The In-Orbit Tumbling Analysis tool (IOTA) is a prototype software, currently in development within the framework of ESA's “Debris Attitude Motion Measurements and Modelling” project (ESA Contract No. 40000112447), which is led by the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB). The project goal is to achieve a good understanding of the attitude evolution and the considerable internal and external effects which occur. To characterize the attitude state of selected targets in LEO and GTO, multiple observation methods are combined. Optical observations are carried out by AIUB, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is performed by the Space Research Institute of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IWF) and radar measurements and signal level determination are provided by the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques (FHR). Developed by Hyperschall Technologie Göttingen GmbH (HTG), IOTA will be a highly modular software tool to perform short- (days), medium- (months) and long-term (years) propagation of the orbit and attitude motion (six degrees-of-freedom) of spacecraft in Earth orbit. The simulation takes into account all relevant acting forces and torques, including aerodynamic drag, solar radiation pressure, gravitational influences of Earth, Sun and Moon, eddy current damping, impulse and momentum transfer from space debris or micro meteoroid impact, as well as the optional definition of particular spacecraft specific influences like tank sloshing, reaction wheel behaviour

  12. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY TC; RINKER MW; CARPENTER BG; HENDRIX C; ABATT FG

    2009-01-15

    M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses. The original scope of the project was to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). Although Milestone M-48-14 has been met, Revision I is being issued to address external review comments with emphasis on changes in the modeling of anchor bolts connecting the concrete dome and the steel primary tank. The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that a nonlinear soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis be performed on the DSTs. The analysis is required to include the effects of sliding interfaces and fluid sloshing (fluid-structure interaction). SSI analysis has traditionally been treated by frequency domain computer codes such as SHAKE (Schnabel, et al. 1972) and SASSI (Lysmer et al. 1999a). Such frequency domain programs are limited to the analysis of linear systems. Because of the contact surfaces, the response of the DSTs to a seismic event is inherently nonlinear and consequently outside the range of applicability of the linear frequency domain programs. That is, the nonlinear response of the DSTs to seismic excitation requires the use of a time domain code. The capabilities and limitations of the commercial time domain codes ANSYS{reg_sign} and MSC Dytran{reg_sign} for performing seismic SSI analysis of the DSTs and the methodology required to perform the detailed seismic analysis of the DSTs has been addressed in Rinker et al (2006a). On the basis of the results reported in Rinker et al

  13. Probing the non-thermal emission in Abell 2146 and the Perseus cluster with the JVLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron-Marsolais, Marie-Lou; Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie; van Weeren, Reinout; Clarke, Tracy; Intema, Huib; Russell, Helen; Edge, Alastair; Fabian, Andy; Olamaie, Malak; Rumsey, Clare; King, Lindsay; McNamara, Brian; Fecteau-Beaucage, David; Hogan, Michael; Mezcua, Mar; Taylor, Gregory; Blundell, Katherine; Sanders, Jeremy

    2018-01-01

    Jets created from accretion onto supermassive black holes release relativistic particles on large distances. These strongly affect the intracluster medium when located in the center of a brightest cluster galaxy. The hierarchical merging of subclusters and groups, from which cluster originate, also generates perturbations into the intracluster medium through shocks and turbulence, constituting a potential source of reacceleration for these particles. I will present deep multi-configuration low radio frequency observations from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array of two unique clusters, probing the non-thermal emission from the old particle population of the AGN outflows.Recently awarded of 550 hours of Chandra observations, Abell 2146 is one of the rare clusters undergoing a spectacular merger in the plane of the sky. Our recent deep multi-configuration JVLA 1.4 GHz observations have revealed the presence of a structure extending to 850 kpc in size, consisting of one component associated with the upstream shock and classified as a radio relic, and one associated with the subcluster core, consistent with a radio halo bounded by the bow shock. Theses structures have some of the lowest radio powers detected thus far in any cluster. The flux measurements of the halo, its morphology and measurements of the dynamical state of the cluster suggest that the halo was recently created (~ 0.3 Gyr after core passage). This makes A2146 extremely interesting to study, allowing us to probe the complete evolutionary stages of halos.I will also present results on 230-470 MHz JVLA observations of the Perseus cluster. Our observations of this nearby relaxed cool core cluster have revealed a multitude of new structures associated with the mini-halo, extending to hundreds of kpc in size. Its irregular morphology seems to be have been influenced both by the AGN activity and by the sloshing motion of the cluster’ gas. In addition, it has a filamentary structure similar to that seen in

  14. Sliding behaviors of elastic cylindrical tanks under seismic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, N.

    1993-01-01

    There is a paper that reports on the occurrence of sliding in several oil tanks on Alaskan earthquake of 1964. This incident appears to be in need of further investigation for the following reasons: First, in usual seismic designing of cylindrical tanks ('tanks'), sliding is considered to occur when the lateral inertial force exceeds the static friction force. When the tank in question can be taken as a rigid body, this rule is known to hold true. If the tank is capable of undergoing a considerable amount of elastic deformation, however, its applicability has not been proved. Second, although several studies have been done on the critical conditions for static sliding the present author is unaware of like ones made on the dynamic sliding, except for the pioneering work of Sogabe, in which they have empirically indicated possibility of sliding to occur under the force of sloshing. Third, this author has shown earlier on that tanks, if not anchored properly, will start rocking, inducing uplifting of the base plate, even at a relatively small seismic acceleration of 10 gal or so. The present study has been conducted with these observations for the background. Namely, based on a notion that elastic deformation given rise to by rocking oscillation should be incorporated as an important factor in any set of critical conditions for the onset of sliding, a series of shaking table experiments were performed for rigid steel block to represent the rigid tanks ('rigid model') and a model tank having a same sort of plate thickness-to-diameter ratio as industrial tanks to represent the elastic cylindrical tanks ('elastic model'). Following observations have been obtained for the critical condition of the onset of sliding: (1) sliding of rigid tanks will occur when the lateral force given rise to by oscillation exceeds the static, or the Coulombic, friction force. (2) if vertical oscillation is imposed on the lateral oscillation, the lateral force needed to induce sliding of a

  15. Study on Dissipation of Landslide Generated Waves in Different Shape of Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2017-12-01

    The landslide generated waves are major risks for many reservoirs located in mountainous areas. As the initial wave is often very huge (e.g. 30m of the height in Xiaowan event, 2009, China), the dissipation of the wave, which is closely connected with the shape of the reservoir (e.g. channel type vs. lake type), is a crucial factor in risk estimation and prevention. While even for channel type reservoir, the wave damping also varies a lot due to details of the shape such as branches and turnings. Focusing on the influence of this shape details on the wave damping in channel type reservoir, we numerically studied two landslide generated wave events with both a triangle shape of the cross section but different longitudinal shape configurations (Xiaowan event in 2009 and an assuming event in real topography). The two-dimensional Saint-Venant equation and dry-wet boundary treatment method are used to simulate the wave generation and propagation processes. The simulation is based on an open source code called `Basilisk' and the adaptive mesh refinement technique is used to achieve enough precision with affordable computational resources. The sensitivity of the parameters representing bed drag and the vortex viscosity is discussed. We found that the damping is relatively not sensitive to the bed drag coefficient, which is natural as the water depth is large compared with wave height. While the vortex viscosity needs to be chosen carefully as it is related to cross sectional velocity distribution. It is also found that the longitudinal shape, i.e. the number of turning points and branches, is the key factor influencing the wave damping. The wave height at the far field could be only one seventh comparing with the initial wave in the case with complex longitudinal shape, while the damping is much weaker in the straight channel case. We guess that this phenomenon is due to the increasing sloshing at these abruptly changed positions. This work could provide a deeper

  16. Dynamics of Superfluid Helium in Low-Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David J.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under a contract entitled 'Dynamics of Superfluid Helium in Low Gravity'. This project performed verification tests, over a wide range of accelerations of two Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes of which one incorporates the two-fluid model of superfluid helium (SFHe). Helium was first liquefied in 1908 and not until the 1930s were the properties of helium below 2.2 K observed sufficiently to realize that it did not obey the ordinary physical laws of physics as applied to ordinary liquids. The term superfluidity became associated with these unique observations. The low temperature of SFHe and it's temperature unifonrmity have made it a significant cryogenic coolant for use in space applications in astronomical observations with infrared sensors and in low temperature physics. Superfluid helium has been used in instruments such as the Shuttle Infrared Astronomy Telescope (IRT), the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), the Cosmic Background Observatory (COBE), and the Infrared Satellite Observatory (ISO). It is also used in the Space Infrared Telescope (SIRTF), Relativity Mission Satellite formally called Gravity Probe-B (GP-B), and the Test of the Equivalence Principle (STEP) presently under development. For GP-B and STEP, the use of SFHE is used to cool Superconducting Quantum Interference Detectors (SQUIDS) among other parts of the instruments. The Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) experiment flown in the Shuttle studied the behavior of SFHE. This experiment attempted to get low-gravity slosh data, however, the main emphasis was to study the low-gravity transfer of SFHE from tank to tank. These instruments carried tanks of SFHE of a few hundred liters to 2500 liters. The capability of modeling the behavior of SFHE is important to spacecraft control engineers who must design systems that can overcome disturbances created by the movement of the fluid. In addition instruments such as GP-B and STEP are very

  17. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-17

    M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site double-shell tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project--DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST system at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14, The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that the seismic analysis of the DSTs assess the impacts of potentially non-conservative assumptions in previous analyses and account for the additional soil mass due to the as-found soil density increase, the effects of material degradation, additional thermal profiles applied to the full structure including the soil-structure response with the footings, the non-rigid (low frequency) response of the tank roof, the asymmetric seismic-induced soil loading, the structural discontinuity between the concrete tank wall and the support footing and the sloshing of the tank waste. The seismic analysis considers the interaction of the tank with the surrounding soil and the effects of the primary tank contents. The DSTs and the surrounding soil are modeled as a system of finite elements. The depth and width of the soil incorporated into the analysis model are sufficient to obtain appropriately accurate analytical results. The analyses required to support the work statement differ from previous analysis of the DSTs in that the soil-structure interaction (SSI) model includes several (nonlinear) contact surfaces in the tank structure, and the contained waste must be modeled explicitly in order to capture the fluid-structure interaction behavior between the primary

  18. Numerical analysis of regular waves over an onshore oscillating water column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davyt, D.P.; Teixeira, P.R.F. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), RS (Brazil)], E-mail: pauloteixeira@furg.br; Ramalhais, R. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal). Fac. de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Didier, E. [Laboratorio Nacional de Engenharia Civil, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: edidier@lnec.pt

    2010-07-01

    difference between the wave inside and outside the chamber); and sloshing parameter to quantify it inside the chamber are analysed. Finally, a discussion of the potential and limitations of each numerical model as well as the behaviour of the onshore OWC device is presented. (author)

  19. Practical speed meter designs for quantum nondemolition gravitational-wave interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdue, Patricia; Chen Yanbei

    2002-01-01

    In the quest to develop viable designs for third-generation optical interferometric gravitational-wave detectors (e.g., LIGO-III and EURO), one strategy is to monitor the relative momentum or speed of the test-mass mirrors, rather than monitoring their relative position. A previous paper analyzed a straightforward but impractical design for a speed-meter interferometer that accomplishes this. This paper describes some practical variants of speed-meter interferometers. Like the original interferometric speed meter, these designs in principle can beat the gravitational-wave standard quantum limit (SQL) by an arbitrarily large amount, over an arbitrarily wide range of frequencies. These variants essentially consist of a Michelson interferometer plus an extra 'sloshing' cavity that sends the signal back into the interferometer with opposite phase shift, thereby cancelling the position information and leaving a net phase shift proportional to the relative velocity. In practice, the sensitivity of these variants will be limited by the maximum light power W circ circulating in the arm cavities that the mirrors can support and by the leakage of vacuum into the optical train at dissipation points. In the absence of dissipation and with squeezed vacuum (power squeeze factor e -2R ≅0.1) inserted into the output port so as to keep the circulating power down, the SQL can be beat by h/h SQL ∼√(W circ SQL e -2R /W circ ) at all frequencies below some chosen f opt ≅100 Hz. Here W circ SQL ≅800 kW(f opt /100 Hz) 3 is the power required to reach the SQL in the absence of squeezing. (However, as the power increases in this expression, the speed meter becomes more narrow band; additional power and reoptimization of some parameters are required to maintain the wide band. See Sec. III B.) Estimates are given of the amount by which vacuum leakage at dissipation points will debilitate this sensitivity; these losses are 10% or less over most of the frequency range of interest (f

  20. The hybrid reactor project based on the straight field line mirror concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ågren, O.; Noack, K.; Moiseenko, V. E.; Hagnestål, A.; Källne, J.; Anglart, H.

    2012-01-01

    The straight field line mirror (SFLM) concept is aiming towards a steady-state compact fusion neutron source. Besides the possibility for steady state operation for a year or more, the geometry is chosen to avoid high loads on materials and plasma facing components. A comparatively small fusion hybrid device with “semi-poor” plasma confinement (with a low fusion Q factor) may be developed for industrial transmutation and energy production from spent nuclear fuel. This opportunity arises from a large fission to fusion energy multiplication ratio, Q r = P fis /P fus >>1. The upper bound on Q r is primarily determined by geometry and reactor safety. For the SFLM, the upper bound is Q r ≈150, corresponding to a neutron multiplicity of k eff =0.97. Power production in a mirror hybrid is predicted for a substantially lower electron temperature than the requirement T e ≈10 keV for a fusion reactor. Power production in the SFLM seems possible with Q≈0.15, which is 10 times lower than typically anticipated for hybrids (and 100 times smaller than required for a fusion reactor). This relaxes plasma confinement demands, and broadens the range for use of plasmas with supra-thermal ions in hybrid reactors. The SFLM concept is based on a mirror machine stabilized by qudrupolar magnetic fields and large expander tanks beyond the confinement region. The purpose of the expander tanks is to distribute axial plasma loss flow over a sufficiently large area so that the receiving plates can withstand the heat. Plasma stability is not relying on a plasma flow into the expander regions. With a suppressed plasma flow into the expander tanks, a possibility arise for higher electron temperature. A brief presentation will be given on basic theory for the SFLM with plasma stability and electron temperature issues, RF heating computations with sloshing ion formation, neutron transport computations with reactor safety margins and material load estimates, magnetic coil designs as well as

  1. The hybrid reactor project based on the straight field line mirror concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ågren, O.; Noack, K.; Moiseenko, V. E.; Hagnestâl, A.; Källne, J.; Anglart, H.

    2012-06-01

    The straight field line mirror (SFLM) concept is aiming towards a steady-state compact fusion neutron source. Besides the possibility for steady state operation for a year or more, the geometry is chosen to avoid high loads on materials and plasma facing components. A comparatively small fusion hybrid device with "semi-poor" plasma confinement (with a low fusion Q factor) may be developed for industrial transmutation and energy production from spent nuclear fuel. This opportunity arises from a large fission to fusion energy multiplication ratio, Qr = Pfis/Pfus>>1. The upper bound on Qr is primarily determined by geometry and reactor safety. For the SFLM, the upper bound is Qr≈150, corresponding to a neutron multiplicity of keff=0.97. Power production in a mirror hybrid is predicted for a substantially lower electron temperature than the requirement Te≈10 keV for a fusion reactor. Power production in the SFLM seems possible with Q≈0.15, which is 10 times lower than typically anticipated for hybrids (and 100 times smaller than required for a fusion reactor). This relaxes plasma confinement demands, and broadens the range for use of plasmas with supra-thermal ions in hybrid reactors. The SFLM concept is based on a mirror machine stabilized by qudrupolar magnetic fields and large expander tanks beyond the confinement region. The purpose of the expander tanks is to distribute axial plasma loss flow over a sufficiently large area so that the receiving plates can withstand the heat. Plasma stability is not relying on a plasma flow into the expander regions. With a suppressed plasma flow into the expander tanks, a possibility arise for higher electron temperature. A brief presentation will be given on basic theory for the SFLM with plasma stability and electron temperature issues, RF heating computations with sloshing ion formation, neutron transport computations with reactor safety margins and material load estimates, magnetic coil designs as well as a discussion on

  2. Equation-of-state dependent features in shock-oscillation modulated neutrino and gravitational-wave signals from supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, A.; Janka, H.-T.; Müller, E.

    2009-03-01

    We present two-dimensional (axisymmetric) neutrino-hydrodynamic simulations of the long-time accretion phase of a 15 M_⊙ progenitor star after core bounce and before the launch of a supernova explosion, when non-radial hydrodynamic instabilities like convection occur in different regions of the collapsing stellar core and the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) leads to large-amplitude oscillations of the stalled shock with a period of tens of milliseconds. Our simulations were performed with the Prometheus-Vertex code, which includes a multi-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport scheme and employs an effective relativistic gravitational potential. Testing the influence of a stiff and a soft equation of state for hot neutron star matter, we find that the non-radial mass motions in the supernova core impose a time variability on the neutrino and gravitational-wave signals with larger amplitudes, as well as higher frequencies in the case of a more compact nascent neutron star. After the prompt shock-breakout burst of electron neutrinos, a more compact accreting remnant produces higher neutrino luminosities and higher mean neutrino energies. The observable neutrino emission in the SASI sloshing direction exhibits a modulation of several ten percent in the luminosities and around 1 MeV in the mean energies with most power at typical SASI frequencies between roughly 20 and 100 Hz. The modulation is caused by quasi-periodic variations in the mass accretion rate of the neutron star in each hemisphere. At times later than ~50-100 ms after bounce, the gravitational-wave amplitude is dominated by the growing low-frequency (⪉200 Hz) signal associated with anisotropic neutrino emission. A high-frequency wave signal results from nonradial gas flows in the outer layers of the anisotropically accreting neutron star. Right after bounce such nonradial mass motions occur due to prompt post-shock convection in both considered cases and contribute mostly to the early

  3. Paid and unpaid working hours among Swedish men and women in relation to depressive symptom trajectories: results from four waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peristera, Paraskevi; Westerlund, Hugo; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L

    2018-06-07

    Long working hours and unpaid work are possible risk factors for depressive symptoms. However, little is known about how working hours influence the course of depressive symptoms. This study examined the influence of paid, unpaid working hours and total working hours on depressive symptoms trajectories. The study was based on data from four waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH 2008-2014). We applied group-based trajectory modelling in order to identify trajectories of depressive symptoms and studied paid and unpaid working hours and total working hours as risk factors. Six trajectory groups were identified with symptoms: 'very low stable', 'low stable', 'doubtful increasing', 'high decreasing', 'mild decreasing' and 'high stable'. More time spent on unpaid work was associated with the 'low stable' (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.30) and the 'high stable (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.65) symptom trajectories compared with being in the 'very low stable' symptom group. In addition, more total working hours was associated with a higher probability of having 'high decreasing' (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.48) and 'high stable' (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.47) symptoms, when adjusting for sex, age, civil status and socioeconomic status. The results, however, differed somewhat for men and women. More unpaid working hours was more clearly associated with higher symptom trajectories among women. More total working hours was associated with 'high stable' symptoms among women only. This study supported heterogeneous individual patterns of depressive symptoms over time among the Swedish working population. The results also indicate that a higher burden of unpaid work and longer total working hours, which indicate a double burden from paid and unpaid work, may be associated with higher depressive symptom trajectories, especially among women. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights

  4. Hydrate-bearing Submarine Landslides in the Orca Basin, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, D.; Mason, A.; Cook, A.; Portnov, A.; Hillman, J.

    2017-12-01

    The co-occurrence of submarine landslides and hydrate-bearing sediment suggests that hydrates may play a role in landslide triggering and/or the mobility and dynamic characteristics of the submarine landslide. In turn, the removal of large sections of seafloor perturbs the hydrate stability field by removing overburden pressure and disturbing the temperature field. These potential hydrate-landslide feedbacks are not well understood. Here we combine three-dimensional seismic and petrophysical logs to characterize the deposits of submarine landslides that failed from hydrate-bearing sediments in the Orca Basin in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The Orca Basin contains a regionally mappable bottom simulating reflector, hydrate saturations within sands and muds, as well as numerous landslides. In addition, the Orca Basin features a well-known 123 km2 anoxic hypersaline brine pool that is actively being fed by outcropping salt. Lying at the bottom of the brine pool are deposits of submarine landslides. Slope instability in the Orca Basin is likely associated with near-seafloor salt tectonics. The most prominent landslide scar observable on the seafloor has a correlative deposit that now lies at the bottom of the brine pool 11.6 km away. The headwall is amphitheater-shaped with an average height of 80 meters and with only a minor amount of rubble remaining near the headwall. A total of 8.7 km3 of material was removed and deposited between the lower slopes of the basin and the base of the brine pool. Around the perimeter of the landslide headwall, two industry wells were drilled and well logs show elevated resistivity that are likely caused by gas hydrate. The slide deposits have a chaotic seismic facies with large entrained blocks and the headwall area does not retain much original material, which together suggests a relatively mobile style of landslide and therefore may have generated a wave upon impacting the brine pool. Such a slide-induced wave may have sloshed

  5. Forecasting Ocean Acidification in the coastal waters of the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlecki, S. A.; Alin, S. R.; Feely, R. A.; Hermann, A. J.; Bednarsek, N.; Nguyen, T.; Officer, S.; Kaplan, I.; Bond, N.; Newton, J.; Fisher, J. L.; Morgan, C.; Saenger, C.

    2016-12-01

    The co-occurrence of submarine landslides and hydrate-bearing sediment suggests that hydrates may play a role in landslide triggering and/or the mobility and dynamic characteristics of the submarine landslide. In turn, the removal of large sections of seafloor perturbs the hydrate stability field by removing overburden pressure and disturbing the temperature field. These potential hydrate-landslide feedbacks are not well understood. Here we combine three-dimensional seismic and petrophysical logs to characterize the deposits of submarine landslides that failed from hydrate-bearing sediments in the Orca Basin in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The Orca Basin contains a regionally mappable bottom simulating reflector, hydrate saturations within sands and muds, as well as numerous landslides. In addition, the Orca Basin features a well-known 123 km2 anoxic hypersaline brine pool that is actively being fed by outcropping salt. Lying at the bottom of the brine pool are deposits of submarine landslides. Slope instability in the Orca Basin is likely associated with near-seafloor salt tectonics. The most prominent landslide scar observable on the seafloor has a correlative deposit that now lies at the bottom of the brine pool 11.6 km away. The headwall is amphitheater-shaped with an average height of 80 meters and with only a minor amount of rubble remaining near the headwall. A total of 8.7 km3 of material was removed and deposited between the lower slopes of the basin and the base of the brine pool. Around the perimeter of the landslide headwall, two industry wells were drilled and well logs show elevated resistivity that are likely caused by gas hydrate. The slide deposits have a chaotic seismic facies with large entrained blocks and the headwall area does not retain much original material, which together suggests a relatively mobile style of landslide and therefore may have generated a wave upon impacting the brine pool. Such a slide-induced wave may have sloshed

  6. Expendable launch vehicle studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainum, Peter M.; Reiss, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Analytical support studies of expendable launch vehicles concentrate on the stability of the dynamics during launch especially during or near the region of maximum dynamic pressure. The in-plane dynamic equations of a generic launch vehicle with multiple flexible bending and fuel sloshing modes are developed and linearized. The information from LeRC about the grids, masses, and modes is incorporated into the model. The eigenvalues of the plant are analyzed for several modeling factors: utilizing diagonal mass matrix, uniform beam assumption, inclusion of aerodynamics, and the interaction between the aerodynamics and the flexible bending motion. Preliminary PID, LQR, and LQG control designs with sensor and actuator dynamics for this system and simulations are also conducted. The initial analysis for comparison of PD (proportional-derivative) and full state feedback LQR Linear quadratic regulator) shows that the split weighted LQR controller has better performance than that of the PD. In order to meet both the performance and robustness requirements, the H(sub infinity) robust controller for the expendable launch vehicle is developed. The simulation indicates that both the performance and robustness of the H(sub infinity) controller are better than that for the PID and LQG controllers. The modelling and analysis support studies team has continued development of methodology, using eigensensitivity analysis, to solve three classes of discrete eigenvalue equations. In the first class, the matrix elements are non-linear functions of the eigenvector. All non-linear periodic motion can be cast in this form. Here the eigenvector is comprised of the coefficients of complete basis functions spanning the response space and the eigenvalue is the frequency. The second class of eigenvalue problems studied is the quadratic eigenvalue problem. Solutions for linear viscously damped structures or viscoelastic structures can be reduced to this form. Particular attention is paid to

  7. Bay of Fundy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The highest tides on Earth occur in the Minas Basin, the eastern extremity of the Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia, Canada, where the tide range can reach 16 meters when the various factors affecting the tides are in phase. The primary cause of the immense tides of Fundy is a resonance of the Bay of Fundy-Gulf of Maine system. The system is effectively bounded at this outer end by the edge of the continental shelf with its approximately 40:1 increase in depth. The system has a natural period of approximately 13 hours, which is close to the 12h25m period of the dominant lunar tide of the Atlantic Ocean. Like a father pushing his daughter on a swing, the gentle Atlantic tidal pulse pushes the waters of the Bay of Fundy-Gulf of Maine basin at nearly the optimum frequency to cause a large to-and-fro oscillation. The greatest slosh occurs at the head (northeast end) of the system. The high tide image (top) was acquired April 20, 2001, and the low tide image (bottom) was acquired September 30, 2002. The images cover an area of 16.5 by 21 km, and are centered near 64 degrees west longitude and 45.5 degrees north latitude. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying

  8. Parent's Relative Perceived Work Flexibility Compared to Their Partner Is Associated With Emotional Exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leineweber, Constanze; Falkenberg, Helena; Albrecht, Sophie C

    2018-01-01

    A number of studies have found that control over work conditions and hours is positively related to mental health. Still, potential positive and negative effects of work flexibility remain to be fully explored. On the one hand, higher work flexibility might provide better opportunities for recovery. On the other hand, especially mothers may use flexibility to meet household and family demands. Here, we investigated the association between parent's work flexibility, rated relative to their partner, and emotional exhaustion in interaction with gender. Additionally, gender differences in time use were investigated. Cross-sectional analyses based on responses of employed parents to the 2012 wave of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) were conducted ( N = 2,911). Generalized linear models with gamma distribution and a log-link function were used to investigate associations between relative work-flexibility (lower, equal, or higher as compared to partner), gender, and emotional exhaustion. After control for potential confounders, we found that having lower work flexibility than the partner was associated with higher levels of emotional exhaustion as compared to those with higher relative work flexibility. Also, being a mother was associated with higher levels of emotional exhaustion, independent of possible confounders. An interaction effect between low relative work flexibility and gender was found in relation to emotional exhaustion. Regarding time use, clear differences between mothers' and fathers' were found. However, few indications were found that relative work flexibility influenced time use. Mothers spent more time on household chores as compared to fathers, while fathers reported longer working hours. Fathers spent more time on relaxation compared with mothers. To conclude, our results indicate that lower relative work flexibility is detrimental for mental health both for mothers and fathers. However, while gender seems to have a

  9. Parent's Relative Perceived Work Flexibility Compared to Their Partner Is Associated With Emotional Exhaustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanze Leineweber

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have found that control over work conditions and hours is positively related to mental health. Still, potential positive and negative effects of work flexibility remain to be fully explored. On the one hand, higher work flexibility might provide better opportunities for recovery. On the other hand, especially mothers may use flexibility to meet household and family demands. Here, we investigated the association between parent's work flexibility, rated relative to their partner, and emotional exhaustion in interaction with gender. Additionally, gender differences in time use were investigated. Cross-sectional analyses based on responses of employed parents to the 2012 wave of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH were conducted (N = 2,911. Generalized linear models with gamma distribution and a log-link function were used to investigate associations between relative work-flexibility (lower, equal, or higher as compared to partner, gender, and emotional exhaustion. After control for potential confounders, we found that having lower work flexibility than the partner was associated with higher levels of emotional exhaustion as compared to those with higher relative work flexibility. Also, being a mother was associated with higher levels of emotional exhaustion, independent of possible confounders. An interaction effect between low relative work flexibility and gender was found in relation to emotional exhaustion. Regarding time use, clear differences between mothers' and fathers' were found. However, few indications were found that relative work flexibility influenced time use. Mothers spent more time on household chores as compared to fathers, while fathers reported longer working hours. Fathers spent more time on relaxation compared with mothers. To conclude, our results indicate that lower relative work flexibility is detrimental for mental health both for mothers and fathers. However, while gender

  10. A positivity preserving and conservative variational scheme for phase-field modeling of two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vaibhav; Jaiman, Rajeev K.

    2018-05-01

    We present a positivity preserving variational scheme for the phase-field modeling of incompressible two-phase flows with high density ratio. The variational finite element technique relies on the Allen-Cahn phase-field equation for capturing the phase interface on a fixed Eulerian mesh with mass conservative and energy-stable discretization. The mass conservation is achieved by enforcing a Lagrange multiplier which has both temporal and spatial dependence on the underlying solution of the phase-field equation. To make the scheme energy-stable in a variational sense, we discretize the spatial part of the Lagrange multiplier in the phase-field equation by the mid-point approximation. The proposed variational technique is designed to reduce the spurious and unphysical oscillations in the solution while maintaining the second-order accuracy of both spatial and temporal discretizations. We integrate the Allen-Cahn phase-field equation with the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for modeling a broad range of two-phase flow and fluid-fluid interface problems. The coupling of the implicit discretizations corresponding to the phase-field and the incompressible flow equations is achieved via nonlinear partitioned iterative procedure. Comparison of results between the standard linear stabilized finite element method and the present variational formulation shows a remarkable reduction of oscillations in the solution while retaining the boundedness of the phase-indicator field. We perform a standalone test to verify the accuracy and stability of the Allen-Cahn two-phase solver. We examine the convergence and accuracy properties of the coupled phase-field solver through the standard benchmarks of the Laplace-Young law and a sloshing tank problem. Two- and three-dimensional dam break problems are simulated to assess the capability of the phase-field solver for complex air-water interfaces involving topological changes on unstructured meshes. Finally, we demonstrate the phase

  11. Stability Assessment and Tuning of an Adaptively Augmented Classical Controller for Launch Vehicle Flight Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZwieten, Tannen; Zhu, J. Jim; Adami, Tony; Berry, Kyle; Grammar, Alex; Orr, Jeb S.; Best, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a robust and practical adaptive control scheme for launch vehicles [ [1] has been introduced. It augments a classical controller with a real-time loop-gain adaptation, and it is therefore called Adaptive Augmentation Control (AAC). The loop-gain will be increased from the nominal design when the tracking error between the (filtered) output and the (filtered) command trajectory is large; whereas it will be decreased when excitation of flex or sloshing modes are detected. There is a need to determine the range and rate of the loop-gain adaptation in order to retain (exponential) stability, which is critical in vehicle operation, and to develop some theoretically based heuristic tuning methods for the adaptive law gain parameters. The classical launch vehicle flight controller design technics are based on gain-scheduling, whereby the launch vehicle dynamics model is linearized at selected operating points along the nominal tracking command trajectory, and Linear Time-Invariant (LTI) controller design techniques are employed to ensure asymptotic stability of the tracking error dynamics, typically by meeting some prescribed Gain Margin (GM) and Phase Margin (PM) specifications. The controller gains at the design points are then scheduled, tuned and sometimes interpolated to achieve good performance and stability robustness under external disturbances (e.g. winds) and structural perturbations (e.g. vehicle modeling errors). While the GM does give a bound for loop-gain variation without losing stability, it is for constant dispersions of the loop-gain because the GM is based on frequency-domain analysis, which is applicable only for LTI systems. The real-time adaptive loop-gain variation of the AAC effectively renders the closed-loop system a time-varying system, for which it is well-known that the LTI system stability criterion is neither necessary nor sufficient when applying to a Linear Time-Varying (LTV) system in a frozen-time fashion. Therefore, a

  12. The 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake and tsunamis: a modern perspective and enduring legacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Filson, John R.; Fuis, Gary S.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Holzer, Thomas L.; Plafker, George; Blair, J. Luke

    2014-01-01

    The magnitude 9.2 Great Alaska Earthquake that struck south-central Alaska at 5:36 p.m. on Friday, March 27, 1964, is the largest recorded earthquake in U.S. history and the second-largest earthquake recorded with modern instruments. The earthquake was felt throughout most of mainland Alaska, as far west as Dutch Harbor in the Aleutian Islands some 480 miles away, and at Seattle, Washington, more than 1,200 miles to the southeast of the fault rupture, where the Space Needle swayed perceptibly. The earthquake caused rivers, lakes, and other waterways to slosh as far away as the coasts of Texas and Louisiana. Water-level recorders in 47 states—the entire Nation except for Connecticut, Delaware, and Rhode Island— registered the earthquake. It was so large that it caused the entire Earth to ring like a bell: vibrations that were among the first of their kind ever recorded by modern instruments. The Great Alaska Earthquake spawned thousands of lesser aftershocks and hundreds of damaging landslides, submarine slumps, and other ground failures. Alaska’s largest city, Anchorage, located west of the fault rupture, sustained heavy property damage. Tsunamis produced by the earthquake resulted in deaths and damage as far away as Oregon and California. Altogether the earthquake and subsequent tsunamis caused 129 fatalities and an estimated $2.3 billion in property losses (in 2013 dollars). Most of the population of Alaska and its major transportation routes, ports, and infrastructure lie near the eastern segment of the Aleutian Trench that ruptured in the 1964 earthquake. Although the Great Alaska Earthquake was tragic because of the loss of life and property, it provided a wealth of data about subductionzone earthquakes and the hazards they pose. The leap in scientific understanding that followed the 1964 earthquake has led to major breakthroughs in earth science research worldwide over the past half century. This fact sheet commemorates Great Alaska Earthquake and

  13. Axisymmetric Magnetic Mirror Fusion-Fission Hybrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martovetsky, N. N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Molvik, A. W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Simonen, T. C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-05-13

    The achieved performance of the gas dynamic trap version of magnetic mirrors and today’s technology we believe are sufficient with modest further efforts for a neutron source for material testing (Q=Pfusion/Pinput~0.1). The performance needed for commercial power production requires considerable further advances to achieve the necessary high Q>>10. An early application of the mirror, requiring intermediate performance and intermediate values of Q~1 are the hybrid applications. The Axisymmetric Mirror has a number of attractive features as a driver for a fusion-fission hybrid system: geometrical simplicity, inherently steady-state operation, and the presence of the natural divertors in the form of end tanks. This level of physics performance has the virtue of low risk and only modest R&D needed and its simplicity promises economy advantages. Operation at Q~1 allows for relatively low electron temperatures, in the range of 4 keV, for the DT injection energy ~ 80 keV. A simple mirror with the plasma diameter of 1 m and mirror-to-mirror length of 35 m is discussed. Simple circular superconducting coils are based on today’s technology. The positive ion neutral beams are similar to existing units but designed for steady state. A brief qualitative discussion of three groups of physics issues is presented: axial heat loss, MHD stability in the axisymmetric geometry, microstability of sloshing ions. Burning fission reactor wastes by fissioning actinides (transuranics: Pu, Np, Am, Cm, .. or just minor actinides: Np, Am, Cm, …) in the hybrid will multiply fusion’s energy by a factor of ~10 or more and diminish the Q needed to less than 1 to overcome the cost of recirculating power for good economics. The economic value of destroying actinides by fissioning is rather low based on either the cost of long-term storage or even deep geologic disposal so most of the revenues of hybrids will come from electrical power. Hybrids that obtain revenues from

  14. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT ESTABLISHMENT OF METHODOLOGY FOR TIME DOMAIN SOIL STRUCTURE INTERACTION ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-14

    M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank DSV Integrity Project-DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that the seismic analysis of the DST assess the impacts of potentially non-conservative assumptions in previous analyses and account for the additional soil mass due to the as-found soil density increase, the effects of material degradation, additional thermal profiles applied to the full structure including the soil-structure response with the footings, the non-rigid (low frequency) response of the tank roof, the asymmetric seismic-induced soil loading, the structural discontinuity between the concrete tank wall and the support footing and the sloshing of the tank waste. The seismic analysis considers the interaction of the tank with the surrounding soil, and the effects of the primary tank contents. The DST and the surrounding soil are modeled as a system of finite elements. The depth and width of the soil incorporated into the analysis model are sufficient to obtain appropriately accurate analytical results. The analyses required to support the work statement differ from previous analysis of the DSTs in that the soil-structure interaction (SSI) model includes several (nonlinear) contact surfaces in the tank structure, and the contained waste must be modeled explicitly in order to capture the fluid-structure interaction behavior between the primary tank and contained waste. Soil-structure interaction analyses are traditionally solved in

  15. True polar wander on convecting planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Ian Robert

    the characteristic size of moment of inertia anomalies decreases with higher Ra, but that the characteristic response time for TPW also decreases. These two effects approximately cancel. However, the orientation of the principal axes of the moment of inertia becomes less stable to perturbations at high Ra, thereby increasing the rate of TPW. Overall, I find that a more vigorously convecting planet is more likely to experience large TPW events. If early Earth had more vigorous convection, it may have experienced more TPW than present-day Earth. Flow induced by density anomalies in the mantle deflects free surfaces at the surface and the CMB, and the mass anomalies due to these deflections contribute to the moment of inertia. A full accounting of the moment of inertia anomalies must include these surface effects. Numerical models of mantle convection with a free surface have suffered from numerical sloshing instabilities. I analyze the sloshing instability by constructing a generalized eigenvalue problem for the relaxation time spectrum. The minimum relaxation time of the spectrum sets the maximum stable timestep. This analysis gives the first quantitative explanation for why existing techniques for stabilizing geodynamic simulations with a free surface work. I also use this perspective to construct an alternative stabilization scheme based on nonstandard finite differences. This scheme has a single parameter, given by an estimate of the minimum relaxation time, and allows for still larger timesteps. Finally, I develop a new method for analyzing apparent polar wander (APW) paths described by sequences of paleomagnetic poles. Existing techniques, such as spline fits and running means, do not fully account for the uncertainties in the position and timing of paleomagnetic pole paths. Furthermore, they impose regularization on the solution, and the resulting uncertainties are difficult to interpret. Our technique is an extension of paleomagnetic Euler pole (PEP) analysis. I

  16. Modeling and Simulation of Variable Mass, Flexible Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobbe, Patrick A.; Matras, Alex L.; Wilson, Heath E.

    2009-01-01

    distribution of mass in the fuel tank or Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) case for various propellant levels. Based on the mass consumed by the liquid engine or SRB, the appropriate propellant model is coupled with the dry structure model for the stage. Then using vehicle configuration data, the integrated vehicle model is assembled and operated on by the constant system shape functions. The system mode shapes and frequencies can then be computed from the resulting generalized mass and stiffness matrices for that mass configuration. The rigid body mass properties of the vehicle are derived from the integrated vehicle model. The coupling terms between the vehicle rigid body motion and elastic deformation are also updated from the constant system shape functions and the integrated vehicle model. This approach was first used to analyze variable mass spinning beams and then prototyped into a generic dynamics simulation engine. The resulting code was tested against Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV-)class problems worked in the TREETOPS simulation package and by Wilson [2]. The Ares I System Integration Laboratory (SIL) is currently being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to test vehicle avionics hardware and software in a hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) environment and certify that the integrated system is prepared for flight. The Ares I SIL utilizes the Ares Real-Time Environment for Modeling, Integration, and Simulation (ARTEMIS) tool to simulate the launch vehicle and stimulate avionics hardware. Due to the presence of vehicle control system filters and the thrust oscillation suppression system, which are tuned to the structural characteristics of the vehicle, ARTEMIS must incorporate accurate structural models of the Ares I launch vehicle. The ARTEMIS core dynamics simulation models the highly coupled nature of the vehicle flexible body dynamics, propellant slosh, and vehicle nozzle inertia effects combined with mass and flexible body properties that vary significant with time

  17. Radio-Frequency Tank Eigenmode Sensor for Propellant Quantity Gauging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Buchanan, David A.; Follo, Jeffrey C.; Vaden, Karl R.; Wagner, James D.; Asipauskas, Marius; Herlacher, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Although there are several methods for determining liquid level in a tank, there are no proven methods to quickly gauge the amount of propellant in a tank while it is in low gravity or under low-settling thrust conditions where propellant sloshing is an issue. Having the ability to quickly and accurately gauge propellant tanks in low-gravity is an enabling technology that would allow a spacecraft crew or mission control to always know the amount of propellant onboard, thus increasing the chances for a successful mission. The Radio Frequency Mass Gauge (RFMG) technique measures the electromagnetic eigenmodes, or natural resonant frequencies, of a tank containing a dielectric fluid. The essential hardware components consist of an RF network analyzer that measures the reflected power from an antenna probe mounted internal to the tank. At a resonant frequency, there is a drop in the reflected power, and these inverted peaks in the reflected power spectrum are identified as the tank eigenmode frequencies using a peak-detection software algorithm. This information is passed to a pattern-matching algorithm, which compares the measured eigenmode frequencies with a database of simulated eigenmode frequencies at various fill levels. A best match between the simulated and measured frequency values occurs at some fill level, which is then reported as the gauged fill level. The database of simulated eigenmode frequencies is created by using RF simulation software to calculate the tank eigenmodes at various fill levels. The input to the simulations consists of a fairly high-fidelity tank model with proper dimensions and including internal tank hardware, the dielectric properties of the fluid, and a defined liquid/vapor interface. Because of small discrepancies between the model and actual hardware, the measured empty tank spectra and simulations are used to create a set of correction factors for each mode (typically in the range of 0.999 1.001), which effectively accounts for

  18. Flow induced vibration studies on PFBR control plug components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, V., E-mail: prakash@igcar.gov.in [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India); Kumar, P. Anup; Anandaraj, M.; Thirumalai, M.; Anandbabu, C.; Rajan, K.K. [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Flow induced vibration studies on Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor control plug model carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Velocity similitude was followed for the study. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Frequencies and amplitude of vibrations of various control plug components measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overall values of vibration are well within permissible limits. - Abstract: The construction of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR), a 500 MWe liquid sodium cooled reactor, is in progress at Kalpakkam in India. Control plug (CP) is located right above the core subassemblies in the hot pool. Control plug is an important component as many of the critical reactor parameters are sensed and controlled by the components housed in the control plug assembly. In PFBR primary circuit, components are basically thin walled, slender shells with diameter to thickness ratio ranging from 100 to 650. These components are prone to flow induced vibrations. The existence of free liquid (sodium) surfaces, which is the source of sloshing phenomenon and the operation of primary sodium pump in the primary pool are other potential sources of vibration of reactor components. Control plug is a hollow cylindrical shell structure and provides passages and support for 12 absorber rod drive mechanisms (ARDM) which consists of 9 control and safety rods and 3 diverse safety rods, 210 thermo wells to measure the sodium temperature at the exit of various fuel subassemblies, three failed fuel localization modules (FFLM) and acoustic detectors. It consists of a core cover plate (CCP), which forms the bottom end, two intermediate supports plate, i.e. lower stay plate (LSP) and upper stay plate (USP) and an outer shell. The CCP is located at a distance of 1.3 m from the core top. With such a gap, there will be long free hanging length of the thermocouple sleeves, Delayed neutron detector (DND) sampling tubes and ARDM shroud tubes and hence they are

  19. Propagation of a turbidity current in confined geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Nuno; Salgueiro, Dora; Franca, Mário J.; Ferreira, Rui M. L.

    2017-04-01

    provided high-resolution images, the front velocity in the far field was tracked with an algorithm that captured its geometry with great accuracy (including, for instance, the lobe and cleft formation). The temporal analysis of the velocity signal revealed great "oscillations" that are beyond the scale/influence of the irregularity of lobes and clefts. This sloshing effect is assessed and discussed. The results obtained provide data with high spatial and temporal resolution that can lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in such flows. Thus, these results can be used for a proper modelling and the development of mitigation measures against the adverse effects of density currents. This research was partially supported by Portuguese and European funds, within programs COMPETE2020 and PORL-FEDER, through project PTDC/ECM-HID/6387/2014 granted by the National Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT).

  20. Validation of analysis methods to simulate national and international impact experiments. Final report; Validierung von Analysemethoden zur Simulation von Aufprallversuchen im In- und Ausland. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckoetter, C.; Sievers, J.

    2012-08-15

    arrangements. Additionally, the influence of possible sloshing effects during the impact of partially liquid-filled missiles will be investigated.

  1. Adaptive Augmenting Control Flight Characterization Experiment on an F/A-18

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Orr, Jeb S.; Wall, John H.; Gilligan, Eric T.

    2014-01-01

    dynamics such as slosh and bending modes, as well as atmospheric disturbances, are being produced by the airframe via modification of bending filters and the use of secondary control surfaces, including leading and trailing edge flaps, symmetric ailerons, and symmetric rudders. The platform also has the ability to inject signals in flight to simulate structural mode resonances or other challenging dynamics. This platform also offers more test maneuvers and longer maneuver times than a single rocket or missile test, which provides ample opportunity to fully and repeatedly exercise all aspects of the algorithm. Prior to testing on an F/A-18, AAC was the only component of the SLS autopilot design that had not been flight tested. The testing described in this paper raises the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) early in the SLS Program and is able to demonstrate its capabilities and robustness in a flight environment.

  2. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Electrorheological Fluids and Magnetorheological Suspensions (ERMR2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Halil Ibrahim

    2013-02-01

    China) gave plenary talks on novel MR shear thickening fluids, MR rubber composites and MR plastomers, respectively. H J Choi (INHA University, Korea), X Zhao (Northwestern Polytechnical University, China) and R Tao (Temple University, USA) delivered plenary lectures on issues relating to the area of electrorheological (ER) fluids. In their talks, Choi and Zhao covered novel ER materials with core-shell structured microspheres and micro/nano hierarchical structured titania particles, respectively, and Tao focused on the reduction of the viscosity of liquid suspensions for energy applications in transporting crude oil via pipelines. Attendance of the presentations was exceptionally high. Poster presentations were divided into two sessions and held in the afternoons after the close of the sessions, which were filled with stimulating discussions. The award for the best student research in the area of electrorheological fluids, sponsored by the Winslow family, was given to Y D Liu of INHA University, Korea on research entitled 'Copolyaniline coated monodisperse polystyrene microparticles and their electrorheological response'. The award for the best student research on magnetorheological suspensions, sponsored by the LORD Corporation, was given to S Kaneko of Keio University, Japan on research entitled 'Effect of a magnetic field on sloshing pressure in a magnetic fluid'. Besides the purely scientific program during the five days, some special events were also organized. A guided tour of the old city and some important landmarks of the capital city of Ankara were organized before the Gala Dinner. Special samples of Turkish classical music and folk dancing were performed by a group from the Republic of Turkey Ministry of Culture and Tourism to exhibit Turkish culture to the delegates at Gala Night, which was truly appreciated. Following the conclusion of this successful meeting, the next conference is expected to be organized at the University of Granada, Spain by Professor

  3. AAS 227: Day 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    because the star sloshes around. Seriously.), or the evidence that supernova 1987A exploded asymmetrically.NuSTAR is funded through the end of 2016 and is now in its extended mission, so we can expect to see more exciting science coming from it in the future!