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Sample records for sleeper perccottus glenii

  1. The expansion and occurrence of the Amur sleeper (Perccottus glenii) in eastern Slovakia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koščo, J.; Lusk, Stanislav; Halačka, Karel; Lusková, Věra

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2003), s. 329-336 ISSN 0139-7893 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS6093007; GA AV ČR KSK6005114 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 1/9209/02 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6093917 Keywords : Perccottus glenii * invasion * Tisa drainage area Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.494, year: 2003 http://www.ivb.cz/folia/52/3/329-336.pdf

  2. Role of the invasive Chinese sleeper Perccottus glenii (Actinopterygii: Odontobutidae) in the distribution of fish parasites in Europe: New data and a review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvach, Yuriy; Kutsokon, Y.; Stepien, C. A.; Markovych, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 8 (2016), s. 941-951 ISSN 0006-3088 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Chinese sleeper * enemy release hypothesis * invasive species * parasites * Perccottus glenii Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 0.759, year: 2016

  3. The parasites of the invasive Chinese sleeper Perccottus glenii (Fam. Odontobutidae, with the first report of Nippotaenia mogurndae in Ukraine

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    Kvach Y.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The parasites of the Asian invasive fish, Chinese sleeper Perccottus glenii, were studied in 6 localities in different parts of Ukraine. In total, 15 taxa of parasites were registered; among them were 1 species of Microsporidia, 5 species of ciliates, 2 species of cestodes, 2 species of trematodes, 2 species of nematodes, 1 species of acanthocephalan, 1 species of parasitic crustacean and 1 mollusk (glochidia. The invasive Chinese sleeper is included as a paratenic host in the life cycle of the parasites of indigenous reptiles in Europe. The non-indigenous cestode Nippotaenia mogurndae occurred in the intestine of the Chinese sleeper from the Ivachiv Reservoir (Dniester River basin. This cestode is recorded for Ukrainian fauna for the first time. In addition, 3 species of parasites were recorded in the Chinese sleeper for the first time: Nicolla skrjabini, Cosmocephalus obvelatus and Pomphorhynchus laevis. We note the low similarity among the different localities and the low parasite richness, that suggest that the parasite fauna of the Chinese sleeper in Ukraine is in transition.

  4. Trichodinids (Ciliophora, Peritrichia Of Perccottus Glenii (Actinopterygii, Odontobutidae In Three Ukrainian Rivers

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    Drobiniak O.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Trichodinids (Ciliophora, Peritrichia of Perccottus glenii (Actinopterygii, Odontobutidae in Three Ukrainian Rivers. Drobiniak, O., Kutsokon, Yu., Kvach, Yu. — The Chinese sleeper Perccottus glenii Dybowski, 1877 (Actinopterygii, Odontobutidae, alien for Ukrainian rivers, was examined for presence of trichodinids (Ciliopora, Peritrichia. Six species belonging to the genus Trichodina were found: Trichodina acuta Lom, 1961; T. intermedia Lom, 1961; T. mutabilis Kazubski et Migala, 1968; T. nigra Lom, 1960; T. pediculus Ehrenberg, 1838; T. perforata Lom, Golemansky et Grupcheva, 1976. For the first time for Chinese slipper, T. perforata and T. intermedia were recorded. Morphometric data of all found species were compared with those from previous descriptions.

  5. Parasite communities and infection levels of the invasive Chinese sleeper Perccottus glenii (Actinopterygii: Odontobutidae) from the Naab river basin, Germany

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvach, Yuriy; Janáč, Michal; Nehring, S.; Ondračková, Markéta; Jurajda, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 6 (2017), s. 703-710 ISSN 0022-149X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Amur sleeper * Baltic Sea Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 1.420, year: 2016

  6. Rapid isolation of microsatellite DNAs and identification of polymorphic mitochondrial DNA regions in the fish rotan (Perccottus glenii) invading European Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Timothy L.; Eackles, Michael S.; Reshetnikov, Andrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Human-mediated translocations and subsequent large-scale colonization by the invasive fish rotan (Perccottus glenii Dybowski, 1877; Perciformes, Odontobutidae), also known as Amur or Chinese sleeper, has resulted in dramatic transformations of small lentic ecosystems. However, no detailed genetic information exists on population structure, levels of effective movement, or relatedness among geographic populations of P. glenii within the European part of the range. We used massively parallel genomic DNA shotgun sequencing on the semiconductor-based Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) sequencing platform to identify nuclear microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA sequences in P. glenii from European Russia. Here we describe the characterization of nine nuclear microsatellite loci, ascertain levels of allelic diversity, heterozygosity, and demographic status of P. glenii collected from Ilev, Russia, one of several initial introduction points in European Russia. In addition, we mapped sequence reads to the complete P. glenii mitochondrial DNA sequence to identify polymorphic regions. Nuclear microsatellite markers developed for P. glenii yielded sufficient genetic diversity to: (1) produce unique multilocus genotypes; (2) elucidate structure among geographic populations; and (3) provide unique perspectives for analysis of population sizes and historical demographics. Among 4.9 million filtered P. glenii Ion Torrent PGM sequence reads, 11,304 mapped to the mitochondrial genome (NC_020350). This resulted in 100 % coverage of this genome to a mean coverage depth of 102X. A total of 130 variable sites were observed between the publicly available genome from China and the studied composite mitochondrial genome. Among these, 82 were diagnostic and monomorphic between the mitochondrial genomes and distributed among 15 genome regions. The polymorphic sites (N = 48) were distributed among 11 mitochondrial genome regions. Our results also indicate that sequence reads generated

  7. The nonindigenous fish Perccottus glenii in the Tisza River drainage, Eastern Slovakia – I. part: history of invasion, habitat associations and genetic characteristics (results up to the year 2006)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lusk, S.; Koščo, J.; Lusková, V.; Halačka, Karel; Mendel, Jan; Košúth, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 8 (2017), s. 127-143 ISSN 1212-1312 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : invasive fishes * Odontobutidae * Perccottus glenii * dispersal * habitat * genetics Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology

  8. A first record of Perccottus glenii (Perciformes: Odontobutidae) in the Danube River in Bulgaria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurajda, Pavel; Vassilev, M.; Polačik, Matej; Trichkova, T.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2006), s. 279-282 ISSN 0324-0770 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : exotic species * Amur sleeper * Danube basin Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour http://www.acta-zoologica-bulgarica.eu/downloads/acta-zoologica-bulgarica/2006/58-2-279-282.pdf

  9. First record of the Chinese sleeper, Perccottus glenii Dybowski, 1877 (Actinopterygii: Odontobutidae) in the Dnieper Estuary, southern Ukraine (Black Sea drainage)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvach, Yuriy; Dykyy, I.; Janko, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2016), s. 285-290 E-ISSN 2242-1300 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP505/12/G112; GA ČR GA13-12580S Institutional support: RVO:68081766 ; RVO:67985904 Keywords : invasive species * new finding * Dnieper Estuary * Ukraine Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.835, year: 2016 http://www.reabic.net/journals/bir/2016/4/BIR_2016_Kvach_etal.pdf

  10. Natural short sleeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep - natural short sleeper ... 7 to 9 hours of sleep each night. Short sleepers sleep less than 75% of what is normal for their age. Natural short sleepers are different from people who chronically do ...

  11. Data on morphology and biology of the fish rotan Perccottus Glenii Dybowski, 1877 (Perciformes, Eleotrididae of kuybyshev water reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Semenov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is the first to present information on the ecological peculiarities of habitation for the fish rotan in Kuybyshev water reservoir; its morphometric characteristic, age and sex structure, terms of spawning, prolificacy, feeding, morphological deviations; and also on presence of heavy metals, toxic elements and radioactive nuclides.

  12. APPRAISAL OF USED WOODEN RAILWAY SLEEPER

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    SITI HAWA HAMZAH

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of wooden sleepers to prestressed concrete sleepers has marked as advancement in the railway sleepers industry in Malaysia. Despite superiority of these man-made composite sleepers, wooden sleepers still lead in terms of track performance qualities in particular on its natural elasticity. An initiative to investigate the degree of degradation of used wooden sleepers and the possibility of reusing them on low capacity railway track in Malaysia as a means of reducing the overall track rehabilitation cost was undertaken. Used wooden sleepers were tested according to Australian Standard, Railway Track Material, Prestressed Concrete Sleepers (AS 1085:14:2003 on Rail Seat Vertical Load Test and Centre Positive Bending Moment Test. Six wooden sleeper samples were tested under the static load until failure. Benchmarking was carried on high strength prestressed concrete sleeper, tested according to AS 1085:14:2003: Rail Seat - Positive Moment Test. The results obtained showed the maximum load that the used wooden sleepers can carry surpassed the design load of KTMB specifications and it is about 58% of high strength prestressed concrete sleeper.The maximum deflection produced by all used wooden sleepers is 20 mm showing that the sleepers maintained their elastic behaviour. Modulus of Elasticity ranging from 21 to 27 kN/mm2 of which within the standard value, indicating weathering process does not so much affect their stiffness. Most sleepers showed crack patterns propagated in the longitudinal direction. Toughness value is almost one half of the high strength prestressed concrete sleeper. This study indicates that there is a potential of reusing the wooden sleepers for light loading of the railway track. Hence, an extensive study is recommended to be carried out under fatigue loading condition.

  13. Time estimation in good and poor sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichten, Catherine S; Creti, Laura; Amsel, Rhonda; Bailes, Sally; Libman, Eva

    2005-12-01

    Time estimation was examined in 148 older good and poor sleepers in analogue and naturalistic sleep settings. On analogue tasks, both "empty" time and time listening to an audiobook were overestimated by both good and poor sleepers. There were no differences between groups. "Empty" time was experienced as "dragging." In the sleep setting, most poor sleepers underestimated nocturnal sleep and overestimated awake times related to their own sleep problem: sleep onset vs. sleep maintenance insomnia. Good sleepers did the opposite. Severity of sleep problem and size of time estimation errors were unrelated. Greater night-to-night wake time variability was experienced by poor than by good sleepers. Psychological adjustment was unrelated to time estimations and to magnification or minimization of sleep problems. The results suggest that for poor sleepers who magnify their sleep problem, self-monitoring can be of benefit by demonstrating that the sleep problem is not as severe as believed.

  14. New data concerning fish fauna from lakes of the fluvial Danube Delta (Gorgova-Uzlina and Sontea-Furtuna lake complexes, Romania in 2010

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    NĂSTASE Aurel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available New data refers to evolution of ichthyofauna in last decade, especially after first record of Amur sleeper (Perccottus glenii in DDBR in 2007. Two complexes were investigated in August 2010, using two complementary sampling-methods: electric fishing for shore areas and gillnet fishing for deep water zone. These studies improve the knowledge on fish fauna in the area after visible human influences in the 80’s and 90’s (water pollution, eutrophication, uncontrolled fishing, poaching etc., contributed to quantitative decrease of native fish species, which suffered important structural and quantitative changes. The waters of this complexes shelter fish communities that include 37 species over time, with 6 exotic fish species (the most important scientific discovery for the last few years in Danube delta is the occurrence of Perccottus glenii. Out of the total number of captured fish species (37, in 2010 were captured 32 species (last sampling in 2010 increased fish diversity with 3 species – Atherina boyeri, Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and Leuciscus idus. The most abundant fish species in 2010 are Alburnus alburnus, Rutilus rutilus and Scardinius erythrophthalmus, but in biomass dominant are Scardinius erythrophthalmus, Perca fluviatilis, Rutilus rutilus and Carassius gibelio with differences for those twocomplementary methods of sampling. Regarding to biodiversity index and equity indices of the ichthyofauna is noticed that thelake-complexes have a medium stable ecosystem, but Shannon-Wiener index is lower than in others campaigns of sampling (like was in 2004, 2007. The main species for ecological significance index is Alburnus alburnus, and Perccottus glenii is not anymore an accidental species (like it was in 2007.

  15. Time-Dependent Topology of Railway Prestressed Concrete Sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Ngamkhanong, Chayut; Kaewunruen, Sakdirat

    2017-10-01

    The railway sleepers are very important component of railway track structure. The sleepers can be manufactured by using timber, concrete, steel or other engineered materials. Nowadays, prestressed concrete has become most commonly used type of sleepers. Prestressed concrete sleepers have longer life-cycle and lower maintenance cost than reinforced concrete sleepers. They are expected to withstand high dynamic loads and harsh environments. However, durability and long-term performance of prestressed concrete sleepers are largely dependent on creep and shrinkage responses. This study investigates the long-term behaviours of prestressed concrete sleepers and proposes the shortening and deflection diagrams. Comparison between design codes of Eurocode 2 and AS3600-2009 provides the insight into the time-dependent performance of prestressed concrete sleepers. The outcome of this paper will improve the rail maintenance and inspection criteria in order to establish appropriate sensible remote track condition monitor network in practice.

  16. 77 FR 73345 - Safety Standard for Bedside Sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ...-- Reclined Cradles to assess and market various design elements and structures in bedside sleeper products.... Fatalities All four reported fatalities involved the same brand of recalled bedside sleeper/bassinet. In all... components of a particular brand of bedside sleeper. In two of these three fatalities involving a 4-month-old...

  17. Damage Detection in Railway Prestressed Concrete Sleepers using Acoustic Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A.; Kaewunruen, S.; Janeliukstis, R.; Papaelias, M.

    2017-10-01

    Prestressed concrete sleepers (or railroad ties) are safety-critical elements in railway tracks that distribute the wheel loads from the rails to the track support system. Over a period of time, the concrete sleepers age and deteriorate in addition to experiencing various types of static and dynamic loading conditions, which are attributable to train operations. In many cases, structural cracks can develop within the sleepers due to high intensity impact loads or due to poor track maintenance. Often, cracks of sleepers develop and present at the midspan due to excessive negative bending. These cracks can cause broken sleepers and sometimes called ‘center bound’ problem in railway lines. This paper is the world first to present an application of non-destructive acoustic emission technology for damage detection in railway concrete sleepers. It presents experimental investigations in order to detect center-bound cracks in railway prestressed concrete sleepers. Experimental laboratory testing involves three-point bending tests of four concrete sleepers. Three-point bending tests correspond to a real failure mode, when the loads are not transferred uniformly to the ballast support. It is observed that AE sensing provides an accurate means for detecting the location and magnitude of cracks in sleepers. Sensor location criticality is also highlighted in the paper to demonstrate the reliability-based damage detection of the sleepers.

  18. Sleep Characteristics of Self-Reported Long Sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay R.; Blackwell, Terri; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Stone, Katie L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Self-reported long habitual sleep durations (≥ 9 h per night) consistently predict increased mortality. We compared objective sleep parameters of self-reported long versus normal duration sleepers to determine whether long sleepers truly sleep more or have an underlying sleep abnormality. Methods: Older men participating in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (MrOS) were recruited for a comprehensive sleep assessment, which included wrist actigraphy, overnight polysomnography (PSG), and a question about usual nocturnal sleep duration. Results: Of the 3134 participants (mean age 76.4 ± 5.6; 89.9% Caucasian), 1888 (60.2%) reported sleeping 7-8 h (normal sleepers) and 174 (5.6%) reported ≥ 9 h (long sleepers). On actigraphy, long sleepers spent on average 63.0 min more per night in bed (P sleep stage distribution did not differ. After adjusting for differences in demographics, comorbidities, and medication usage, self-reported long sleepers continued to spend more time in bed and sleep more, based on both actigraphy and PSG. Each additional 30 min in bed or asleep as measured by actigraphy increased the odds of being a self-reported long-sleeper 1.74-fold and 1.33-fold, respectively (P sleep disorders. Citation: Patel SR; Blackwell T; Ancoli-Israel S; Stone KL. Sleep characteristics of self-reported long sleepers. SLEEP 2012;35(5):641-648. PMID:22547890

  19. Awake EEG disregulation in good compared to poor sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckelew, Susan P; DeGood, Douglas E; Roberts, Kristyn D; Butkovic, Jessica D; MacKewn, Angie S

    2009-06-01

    This study was designed to test a disregulation model of sleep deprivation by assessing the ability of good sleepers compared to poor sleepers to shift daytime EEG patterning to changing environmental demands. Ten good and ten poor sleepers were identified from a sample of 110 college students who completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory (PSQI). EEG and SCR were recorded during a five task assessment session, including: (1) pre-baseline, (2) eyes open at rest, (3) eyes closed at rest, (4) sensory attentiveness (listening to an audio book clip), and (5) cognitive effort (a higher level cognitive flexibility task). A significant Group x Task interaction, F (3, 16) = 4.81, p = . 01 was attained on the theta data. Specifically, for good sleepers, theta decreased from the "eyes open at rest" to the "sensory attentiveness" tasks, while poor sleepers showed the opposite pattern. This pattern of theta suppression was found in 70% of the good sleepers and only 20% of the poor sleepers. No between group differences were noted in the SCR data, supporting a brain disregulation model, rather than a general psychophysiological stress model.

  20. Performance of Railway Sleepers with Holes under Impact Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chie Hong; Kaewunruen, Sakdirat; Mlilo, Nhlanganiso

    2017-12-01

    Prestressed concrete sleepers are essential structural components of railway track structures, with the purpose of redistributing wheel loads from the rails to the ground. To facilitate cables and signalling equipment, holes are often generated in these prestressed concrete sleepers. However, the performance of these sleepers under impact loading may be a concern with the addition of these holes. Numerical modelling using finite element analysis (FEA) is an ideal tool that enables static and dynamic simulation and can perform analyses of basic/advanced linear and nonlinear problems, without incurring a huge cost in resources like standard experimental test methods would. This paper will utilize the three-dimensional FE modelling software ABAQUS to investigate the behaviour of the prestressed concrete sleepers with holes of varying sizes upon impact loading. To obtain the results that resemble real-life behaviour of the sleepers under impact loading, the material properties, element types, mesh sizes, contact and interactions and boundary conditions will be defined as accurately as possible. Both Concrete Damaged Plasticity (CDP) and Brittle Cracking models will be used in this study. With a better understanding of how the introduction of holes will influence the performance of prestressed sleepers under impact loading, track and railway engineers will be able to generate them in prestressed concrete sleepers without compromising the sleepers’ performance during operation

  1. A sleep diary and questionnaire study of naturally short sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Welsh, D. K.; Kennedy, K. S.; Rose, L. R.

    2001-01-01

    Whereas most people require more than 6 h of sleep to feel well rested, there appears to be a group of people who can function well on between 3 and 6 h of sleep. The aims of the present study were to compare 12 naturally short (3-6 h) sleepers (9 males 3 females, mean age 39.6 years, SD age 10.1 years) recruited by a media publicity campaign with age, gender and chronotype matched medium length (7-8.5 h) sleepers on various measures. Measurement instruments included diaries and questionnaires to assess sleep duration and timing, as well as questionnaire assessments of sleep pathology, morningness-eveningness, extroversion, neuroticism, pathological daytime sleepiness, subclinical hypomania, optimism, depressive symptoms, exercise, and work habits. Few measures showed reliable differences between naturally short sleepers and controls except the obvious ones related to sleep duration. There was, however, some evidence for subclinical hypomanic symptoms in naturally short sleepers.

  2. Sleep-readiness signals in insomniacs and good sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giganti, Fiorenza; Guidi, Sara; Aboudan, Samir; Baiardi, Simone; Mondini, Susanna; Cirignotta, Fabio; Salzarulo, Piero

    2016-05-01

    Sleep is preceded by physiological and behavioural events that inform the subject that it is time to sleep. Our hypothesis is that insomniacs do not adequately recognize such signals, thus missing the best time to go to bed. Eighty-seven chronic insomniac participants and 76 age-matched good sleeper controls were recruited. Semi-structured interviews focused on three aspects of nocturnal sleep: features, habitual activities and signals that they usually rely on in order to decide their readiness to sleep. The results showed that insomniacs relied more than good sleepers on external signals (time) than on bodily ones to decide to go to sleep. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. (SNP) markers for the Chinese black sleeper, Bostrychus sinensis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-04-25

    Apr 25, 2011 ... population genetics (Morin et al., 2004). Here, we developed the first set of SNP markers for Chinese black sleeper which can be widely used in population genetics studies of this organism in the future. *Corresponding author. E-mail: sxding@xmu.edu.cn. Genomic DNA of B. sinensis individuals sampled ...

  4. (SNP) markers for the Chinese black sleeper, Bostrychus sinensis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We characterized 11 single nucleotide ploymorphism (SNP) markers for the Chinese black sleeper, Bostrychus sinensis. These markers were isolated from a genomic library and tested in ten geographically distant individuals of B. sinensis. Polymorphisms of these SNP loci were assessed using a wild population including ...

  5. (SNP) markers for the Chinese black sleeper, Bostrychus sinensis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-04-25

    Apr 25, 2011 ... The Chinese black sleeper, Bostrychus sinensis. Lacepede 1801, occurs from the northern Indian Ocean coast, reaching east to the Pacific, Melanesia and. Polynesia, north to Japan and south to Australia (Kottelat et al., 1993; Masuda et al., 1984). It is a small warm- water fish that inhabits holes and caves ...

  6. Chronic Moderate Sleep Restriction in Older Long Sleepers and Older Average Duration Sleepers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngstedt, Shawn D.; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Bootzin, Richard R.; Kripke, Daniel F.; Cooper, Jonnifer; Dean, Lauren R.; Catao, Fabio; James, Shelli; Vining, Caitlyn; Williams, Natasha J.; Irwin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have consistently shown that sleeping sleep may be consistent with results from experimental sleep deprivation studies. However, there has been little study of chronic moderate sleep restriction and no evaluation of older adults who might be more vulnerable to negative effects of sleep restriction, given their age-related morbidities. Moreover, the risks of long sleep have scarcely been examined experimentally. Moderate sleep restriction might benefit older long sleepers who often spend excessive time in bed (TIB), in contrast to older adults with average sleep patterns. Our aims are: (1) to examine the ability of older long sleepers and older average sleepers to adhere to 60 min TIB restriction; and (2) to contrast effects of chronic TIB restriction in older long vs. average sleepers. Older adults (n=100) (60–80 yr) who sleep 8–9 hr per night and 100 older adults who sleep 6–7.25 hr per night will be examined at 4 sites over 5 years. Following a 2-week baseline, participants will be randomized to one of two 12-week treatments: (1) a sleep restriction involving a fixed sleep-wake schedule, in which TIB is reduced 60 min below each participant’s baseline TIB; (2) a control treatment involving no sleep restriction, but a fixed sleep schedule. Sleep will be assessed with actigraphy and a diary. Measures will include glucose tolerance, sleepiness, depressive symptoms, quality of life, cognitive performance, incidence of illness or accident, and inflammation. PMID:23811325

  7. Greenhouse gas emissions embodied in reinforced concrete and timber railway sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Robert H

    2009-05-15

    In Australia, there are currently two main materials used for railway sleepers: timber (river red gum, a species of eucalypt) and reinforced concrete. Within the state of Victoria alone, there are currently seven million railway sleepers that make up the rail network. It is estimated that around two million sleepers, or 29%, are presently required to replace timber sleepers and upgrade the entire network, for which there are significant environmental implications, such as the emission of greenhouse gases. These emissions are mainly as a result of the energy and other resources required or "embodied" through the sleeper manufacture, including those associated with harvesting timber and mining raw materials for manufacturing cement. Where alternatives are readily available, it is important that the environmental impacts of the various choices are assessed, ensuring that these impacts are minimized. This study aimed to assess the life cycle greenhouse gas emissions associated with timber and reinforced concrete railway sleepers and showed that the life cycle emissions of reinforced concrete sleepers were up to six times less than the emissions associated with timber sleepers. Taking the potential errors associated with this type of assessment into account, there appearsto be a significant advantage in using reinforced concrete sleepers, in terms of reducing the life cycle emissions associated with the provision of railway sleepers.

  8. Influence of Surface Abrasion on Creep and Shrinkage of Railway Prestressed Concrete Sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Ngamkhanong, Chayut; Kaewunruen, Sakdirat

    2017-10-01

    Ballasted railway track is very suitable for heavy-rail networks because of its many superior advantages in design, construction, short- and long-term maintenance, sustainability, and life-cycle cost. The sleeper, which supports rail and distributes loads from rail to ballast, is a very important component of rail track system. Prestressed concrete is very popular used in manufacturing sleepers. Therefore, improved knowledge about design techniques for prestressed concrete (PC) sleepers has been developed. However, the ballast angularity causes differential abrasions on the soffit or bottom surface of sleepers. Furthermore, in sharp curves and rapid gradient change, longitudinal and lateral dynamics of rails increase the likelihood of abrasions in concrete sleepers. This paper presents a comparative investigation using a variety of methods to evaluate creep and shrinkage effects in railway prestressed concrete sleepers. The outcome of this study will improve the material design, which is very critical to the durability of railway track components.

  9. Quality of Sleep and Performance in the Navy: A Longitudinal Study of Good and Poor Sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-21

    identify by block number) Humans Insomnia Sleep quality Sleep EEC Performance Good and poor sleepers 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side if...8217 subjective sleep habits and POMS scores were very similar to our good and poor sleepers defined by subjective estimates of sleep quality. This...differences in our follow-up samples. Since over 60% of our poor sleepers do not meet EEG criteria for sleep -onset insomnia , a reasonable question is

  10. Black yeast diversity on creosoted railway sleepers changes with ambient climatic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümral, Ramazan; Tümgör, Ayşegül; Saraçlı, Mehmet Ali; Yıldıran, Şinasi Taner; Ilkit, Macit; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2014-11-01

    The environmental isolation of opportunistic pathogenic black yeasts, which are responsible for a wide spectrum of human infections, is essential to understanding the ecology of clinical fungi. Extreme outdoor environments polluted with aromatic hydrocarbons support the growth of black yeasts in unlikely places, such as railway sleepers. However, there are limited data concerning the diversity of these fungi growing on polluted railway sleepers. In this investigation, we examined 845 railway sleeper samples, obtained from 11 Turkish cities representing altitudes from 25 to 1,893 m, and inoculated the samples onto mycological media for the isolation of black yeasts. Ninety-four samples (11.1 %) yielded positive results for black yeast, with creosoted oak sleepers having a significantly higher number of isolates than concrete sleepers (p railway sleepers harboring black yeasts were predominantly (>75 %) populated with thermophilic species. We observed that altitude might have a significant effect on species diversity. Briefly, E. phaeomuriformis exhibited growth over a wide altitude range, from 30 to 1,893 m. In contrast, E. dermatitidis had a remarkable aversion to low altitudes and exhibited maximum growth at 1,285 m. In conclusion, we speculate that one can predict what species will be found on railway sleepers and their probability and that species diversity primarily depends on sleeper type and altitude height. We believe that this study can contribute new insights into the ecology of black yeasts on railway sleepers and the railway factors that influence their diversity.

  11. A Review on the Development of New Materials for Construction of Prestressed Concrete Railway Sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Anand; Nagarajan, Praveen; Shashikala, A. P.

    2018-03-01

    Railways form the backbone of all economies, transporting goods, and passengers alike. Sleepers play a pivotal role in track performance and safety in rail transport. This paper discusses in brief about the materials that have been used in making sleepers in the early stages of railways. Extensive studies have been carried out on the static, dynamic and impact analysis of prestressed sleepers all around the globe. It has been shown that majority of the sleepers do not last till their expected design life resulting in massive replacement and repair cost. The primary reasons leading to the failure of sleepers have been summarised. This article also highlights the use of new materials developed recently for the construction of prestressed concrete sleepers to improve the performance and life of railway sleepers. Use of geopolymer concrete and steel fibre reinforced concrete, assist in the reduction of flexural cracking, whereas rubber concrete enhances the impact resistance of concrete by three folds. This paper presents a review of state of the art of new materials for railway sleepers.

  12. Impact analyses for negative flexural responses (hogging) in railway prestressed concrete sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewunruen, S.; Ishida, T.; Remennikov, AM

    2016-09-01

    By nature, ballast interacts with railway concrete sleepers in order to provide bearing support to track system. Most train-track dynamic models do not consider the degradation of ballast over time. In fact, the ballast degradation causes differential settlement and impact forces acting on partial and unsupported tracks. Furthermore, localised ballast breakages underneath railseat increase the likelihood of centrebound cracks in concrete sleepers due to the unbalanced support under sleepers. This paper presents a dynamic finite element model of a standard-gauge concrete sleeper in a track system, taking into account the tensionless nature of ballast support. The finite element model was calibrated using static and dynamic responses in the past. In this paper, the effects of centre-bound ballast support on the impact behaviours of sleepers are highlighted. In addition, it is the first to demonstrate the dynamic effects of sleeper length on the dynamic design deficiency in concrete sleepers. The outcome of this study will benefit the rail maintenance criteria of track resurfacing in order to restore ballast profile and appropriate sleeper/ballast interaction.

  13. Static and dynamic behaviours of railway prestressed concrete sleepers with longitudinal through hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngamkhanong, C.; Kaewunruen, S.; Remennikov, A. M.

    2017-10-01

    As the crosstie beam in railway track systems, the prestressed concrete sleepers (or railroad ties) are principally designed in order to carry wheel loads from the rails to the ground. Their design takes into account static and dynamic loading conditions. It is evident that prestressed concrete has played a significant role as to maintain the high endurance of the sleepers under low to moderate repeated impact loads. In spite of the most common use of the prestressed concrete sleepers in railway tracks, there have always been many demands from rail engineers to improve serviceability and functionality of concrete sleepers. For example, signalling, fibre optic, equipment cables are often damaged either by ballast corners or by tamping machine. There has been a need to re-design concrete sleeper to cater cables internally so that they would not experience detrimental or harsh environments. Accordingly, this study will investigate the effects of through hole or longitudinal hole on static and dynamic behaviours of concrete sleepers under rail shock loading. The modified compression field theory for ultimate strength design of concrete sleepers will be highlighted in this study. The outcome of this study will enable the new design and calculation methods for prestressed concrete sleepers with holes and web opening that practically benefits civil, track and structural engineers in railway industry.

  14. Impact capacity reduction in railway prestressed concrete sleepers with vertical holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngamkhanong, Chayut; Li, Dan; Kaewunruen, Sakdirat

    2017-09-01

    Railway prestressed concrete sleepers (or railroad ties) are principally designed in order to carry wheel loads from the rails to the ground as well as to secure rail gauge for dynamic safe movements of trains. In spite of the most common use of the prestressed concrete sleepers in railway tracks, the concrete sleepers are often modified on construction sites to fit in other systems such as cables, signalling gears, drainage pipes, etc. This is because those signalling, fibre optic, equipment cables are often damaged either by ballast corners or by tamping machine. It is thus necessary to modify concrete sleepers to cater cables internally so that the cables or drainage pipes would not experience detrimental or harsh environments. Accordingly, this study will extend from the previous study into the design criteria of holes and web openings. This paper will highlight structural capacity of concrete sleepers under dynamic transient loading. The modified compression field theory for ultimate strength design of concrete sleepers will be highlighted in this study. The outcome of this study will improve the understanding into dynamic behavior of prestressed concrete sleepers with vertical holes. The insight will enable predictive track maintenance regime in railway industry.

  15. The Sleeper Effect in Persuasion: A Meta-Analytic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumkale, G. Tarcan; Albarracín, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    A meta-analysis of the available judgment and memory data on the sleeper effect in persuasion is presented. According to this effect, when people receive a communication associated with a discounting cue, such as a noncredible source, they are less persuaded immediately after exposure than they are later in time. Findings from this meta-analysis indicate that recipients of discounting cues were more persuaded over time when the message arguments and the cue had a strong initial impact. In addition, the increase in persuasion was stronger when recipients of discounting cues had higher ability or motivation to think about the message and received the discounting cue after the message. These results are discussed in light of classic and contemporary models of attitudes and persuasion. PMID:14717653

  16. Impact Capacity Reduction in Railway Prestressed Concrete Sleepers with Surface Abrasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngamkhanong, Chayut; Li, Dan; Kaewunruen, Sakdirat

    2017-10-01

    Railway sleepers (also called ‘railroad tie’ in North America) embedded in ballasted railway tracks are a main part of railway track structures. Its important role is to transfer the loads evenly from the rails to a wider area of ballast bed and to secure rail gauge and enable safe passages of rolling stocks. By nature, railway infrastructure is nonlinear, evidenced by its behaviours, geometry and alignment, wheel-rail contact and operational parameters such as tractive efforts. Based on our critical review, the dynamic behaviour of railway sleepers has not been fully investigated, especially when the sleepers are deteriorated by excessive wears. In fact, the ballast angularity causes differential abrasions on the soffit or bottom surface of sleepers (especially at railseat zone). Furthermore, in sharp curves and rapid gradient change, longitudinal and lateral dynamics of rails increase the likelihood of railseat abrasions in concrete sleepers due to the unbalanced loading conditions. This paper presents a structural capacity of concrete sleepers under dynamic transient loading. The modified compression field theory for ultimate strength design of concrete sleepers under impact loading will be highlighted in this study. The influences of surface abrasions, including surface abrasion and soffit abrasion, on the dynamic behaviour of prestressed concrete sleepers, are firstly highlighted. The outcome of this study will improve the rail maintenance and inspection criteria in order to establish appropriate and sensible remote track condition monitoring network in practice. Moreover, this study will also improve the understanding of the fundamental dynamic behaviour of prestressed concrete sleepers with surface abrasions. The insight into these behaviours will not only improve safety and reliability of railway infrastructure but will enhance the structural safety of other concrete structures.

  17. RESEARCH PREMATURE DESTRUCTION OF CONCRETE SLEEPERS ON THE MAIN LINES OF PUBLIC COMPANY «UZ»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kovalenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The study aims to identify the causes of premature destruction of concrete sleepers of one of Ukrainian producers. Methodology. Applied microstructural, fractographic, X-ray microanalysis revealed causes of transient corrosion processes in concrete. Findings. Subject of study in this work is a cement rock and concrete structure of prematurely shattered concrete sleepers. Another premature destruction of concrete sleepers was studied using the traditional method for Dnipropetrovsk National University of Railway Transport named after Academician V. Lazaryan (DNURT that was patented in 2009. The conducted research showed: 1 a cement rock near the sand particles of high concentration of chlorine and alkali metals exceeding permissible in existing standards; 2 different grained cement crystals indicates excess of water in the concrete mixture; 3 the presence in the cement rock structure of wood fibers, which are due to the additional moisture absorption accelerate chemical reactions in the operated concrete sleepers; 4 speed of alkaline-silicic-acidic reaction in concrete sleepers is 5 microns per year; 5 availability of wood fibers indicates unsatisfactory purity of aggregates screening, including crushed stone; 6 chlorine ions further accelerate structural transformation reaction of cement. Originality. The paper found the rate of corrosion processes in concrete sleepers of Ukrainian producer. The influence on the corrosion rate of contamination of large aggregates of organic substances, including wood fibers was shown in the article. There were presented characteristic signs of accelerating corrosion processes as a result of excess of water and chlorine ions in the structure of cement rock. Practical value. Identifying the typical signs of premature destruction of concrete under rail foundations prevents massive failure of railway sleepers, which affects negatively the railway traffic safety. The proposed by DNURT without steaming

  18. Seasonal frost penetration, Sleepers River Research Watershed, Vermont, USA, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The frost tube network is located within a 3.25-square-mile sub-watershed of the Sleepers River Research Watershed near Danville, Vermont, USA. Tubes were positioned...

  19. Research on the Numerical Simulation of Sleeper in the Pipeline Global Buckling Controlling Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wen-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzed the lateral buckling of pipelines located in Western Africa with ABAQUS software. The application of sleepers in practice is explored to guide the pipeline buckling controlling design.

  20. The SLEEPER genes: a transposase-derived angiosperm-specific gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knip Marijn

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DAYSLEEPER encodes a domesticated transposase from the hAT-superfamily, which is essential for development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Little is known about the presence of DAYSLEEPER orthologs in other species, or how and when it was domesticated. We studied the presence of DAYSLEEPER orthologs in plants and propose a model for the domestication of the ancestral DAYSLEEPER gene in angiosperms. Results Using specific BLAST searches in genomic and EST libraries, we found that DAYSLEEPER-like genes (hereafter called SLEEPER genes are unique to angiosperms. Basal angiosperms as well as grasses (Poaceae and dicotyledonous plants possess such putative orthologous genes, but SLEEPER-family genes were not found in gymnosperms, mosses and algae. Most species contain more than one SLEEPER gene. All SLEEPERs contain a C2H2 type BED-zinc finger domain and a hATC dimerization domain. We designated 3 motifs, partly overlapping the BED-zinc finger and dimerization domain, which are hallmark features in the SLEEPER family. Although SLEEPER genes are structurally conserved between species, constructs with SLEEPER genes from grapevine and rice did not complement the daysleeper phenotype in Arabidopsis, when expressed under control of the DAYSLEEPER promoter. However these constructs did cause a dominant phenotype when expressed in Arabidopsis. Rice plant lines with an insertion in the RICESLEEPER1 or 2 locus displayed phenotypic abnormalities, indicating that these genes are functional and important for normal development in rice. We suggest a model in which we hypothesize that an ancestral hAT transposase was retrocopied and stably integrated in the genome during early angiosperm evolution. Evidence is also presented for more recent retroposition events of SLEEPER genes, such as an event in the rice genome, which gave rise to the RICESLEEPER1 and 2 genes. Conclusions We propose the ancestral SLEEPER gene was formed after a process of retro

  1. Individual differences in face recognition memory: comparison among habitual short, average, and long sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mograss, Melodee A; Guillem, Francois; Stickgold, Robert

    2010-04-02

    Research indicates that habitual short sleepers show more rapid accumulation of slow-wave sleep at the beginning of the night. Enhancement in performance on declarative memory tasks has been associated with early NonREM sleep, consisting of the highest percentage of slow-wave sleep. Twenty-four subjects (eight short sleepers 7 but or=9h) were tested. Subjects were presented with unfamiliar face stimuli and asked to memorize them for a subsequent test. Following sleep, the subjects were presented with the 40 "old/studied" items intermixed with 40 new and asked to indicate the previously presented stimuli. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were analyzed to verify the existence of the "Old/New" effect, i.e. amplitude difference [in ERPs] between the old and new stimuli. ANOVA on the scores revealed a significant interaction between the stimuli and group. Post-hoc test on the studied items revealed more accurate responses in the short sleepers compared to the average and long sleepers. Strikingly, the long sleepers failed to show significant retention of the old/studied items, with their recognition of old faces not different from chance. Reaction time (RT) responses were faster for the old vs. the new items. Pearson correlation revealed a significant negative correlation between accuracy and sleep duration in the short sleepers. However, long and average sleepers showed a positive correlation between the two variables. ANOVA performed on the ERPs revealed main effects of stimuli and site, and no interactions involving the group factor. In conclusion, our data show that individual differences in recognition memory performance may be associated with differences in habitual sleep duration. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of vertical holes on creep and shrinkage of railway prestressed concrete sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Ngamkhanong, Chayut; Kaewunruen, Sakdirat

    2017-09-01

    Railway prestressed concrete sleepers (or railroad ties) must successfully perform two critical duties: first, to carry wheel loads from the rails to the ground; and second, to secure rail gauge for dynamic safe movements of trains. The second duty is often fouled by inappropriate design of the time-dependent behaviors due to their creep, shrinkage and elastic shortening responses of the materials. In addition, the concrete sleepers are often modified on construction sites to fit in other systems such as cables, signalling gears, drainage pipes, etc. Accordingly, this study is the world first to investigate creep and shrinkage effects on the railway prestressed concrete sleepers with vertical holes. This paper will highlight constitutive models of concrete materials within the railway sleepers under different environmental conditions over time. It will present a comparative investigation using a variety of methods to evaluate shortening effects in railway prestressed concrete sleepers. The outcome of this study will improve material design, which is very critical to the durability of railway track components.

  3. Analytical and experimental study of sleeper SAT S 312 in slab track Sateba system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guigou-Carter, C.; Villot, M.; Guillerme, B.; Petit, C.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, a simple prediction tool based on a two-dimensional model is developed for a slab track system composed of two rails with rail pads, sleepers with sleeper pads, and a concrete base slab. The track and the slab are considered as infinite beams with bending stiffness, loss factor and mass per unit length. The track system is represented by its impedance per unit length of track and the ground by its line input impedance calculated using a two-dimensional elastic half-space ground model based on the wave approach. Damping of each track component is modelled as hysteretic damping and is taken into account by using a complex stiffness. The unsprung mass of the vehicle is considered as a concentrated mass at the excitation point on the rail head. The effect of the dynamic stiffness of the sleeper pads on the vibration isolation is studied in detail, the vibration isolation provided by the track system being quantified by an insertion gain in dB per one-third octave band. The second part of this paper presents an experimental test rig used to measure the dynamic stiffness of the sleeper pads on a full width section of the track (two rails). The experimental set-up is submitted to vertical as well as horizontal static loads (via hydraulic jacks) and an electrodynamic shaker is used for dynamic excitation of the system. The determination of the dynamic stiffness of the sleeper pads is based on the approach called the "direct method". The limitations of the experimental set-up are discussed. The measurement results for one type of sleeper pad are presented.

  4. The relationship between a night's sleep and subsequent daytime functioning in older poor and good sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rashelle A; Lack, Leon C; Lovato, Nicole; Wright, Helen

    2015-02-01

    Those suffering insomnia symptoms generally report daytime impairments. However, research has not assessed whether this relationship holds on a nightly basis, despite the strongly held belief that a night of poor sleep impairs mood and functioning the following day. The objective of this study was to test this relationship in a group of older poor sleepers with insomnia symptoms compared with good sleepers. This study utilized a within-subjects design to investigate day-to-day subjective daytime functioning and its relation to the previous night's sleep. Seventeen older individuals (mean age: 67.5 years) were identified with a retrospective questionnaire and 2 weeks of sleep-wake diary to have poor sleep consistent with insomnia. Seventeen good sleepers (mean age: 67.8 years) were selected using the same measures. Participants reported their beliefs about sleep and daytime functioning on the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep Scale (DBAS-16). One week later they commenced a 14-day period of sleep-wake diaries and concurrent responses to a modified Daytime Insomnia Symptom Scale (DISS). Results showed significant night-to-day covariation between sleep efficiency and daytime functioning for individuals with poor sleep (r = 0.34), but not for good sleepers (r = 0.08). Those poor sleepers who held this covariation belief most strongly were those who subsequently showed this night-to-day relationship the most strongly (r = 0.56). This was not true for good sleepers. For those suffering insomnia, these findings demonstrate their belief that a poor sleep is followed by an impaired daytime, consistent with their experience. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  5. Utilization of bagasse and coconut fibers waste as fillers of sandwich composite for bridge railway sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soehardjo, K. A.; Basuki, A.

    2017-07-01

    The bridge railway sleepers is an essential component in the construction of railways, as the foundation of the rail support in order to withstand the load a train that runs above it. Sleepers used in bridge construction are expected to have a longer service life, lighter weight and durable so that can be used more efficient. This research was carried out to create a model of bridges railway sleepers made of sandwich structured composite from fiber glass, epoxy resin with fillers waste of bagasse (sugar cane pulp mill) or coconut fiberboard (copra industry) that using polyurethane as an adhesive. The process of making was conditioned for small and medium industrial applications. Railway sleepers’ specifications adapted to meet the requirements of end user. The process steps in this research include; lay-up fiberglass combined with bagasse/coconut fiberboard (as fillers), gluing with epoxy resin, molded it with pressure to be solid, curing after solidification process. The specimens of composite, bagasse and coconut fiber board were tested for tensile and compressive strength. The prototype were tested of mechanical test: flexural moment test to the stand rail, flexural moment test to the middle of the sleepers and tensile strength test on one side of the sleepers, in accordance to SNI 11-3388-1994 Method testing of single block concrete sleepers and bearing single rail fastening systems. The results of mechanical testing all variations meet the technical specifications of end user such as test results for flexural moment on all prototypes, after load test, there is no visible crack. While in the tensile strength test, it seem the prototype with coconut fiberboard filler, shows better performance than bagasse fiberboard filler, the decisions is just depended on techno economic and lifetime.

  6. A COMPARISION BETWEEN CROSSBODY STRETCH VERSUS SLEEPER STRETCH IN PERIARTHRITIS OF SHOULDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaik Raheem Saheb

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently Cross body stretch and Sleeper stretch are used to improve internal rotation Range of motion in Shoulder Pathologies. It was proposed to study the effect of cross body stretch and sleeper stretch in subjects with periarthritis of shoulder. Methods: 60 subjects with a mean age of 53 years having clinical diagnosis of Periarthritis of shoulder and full filled the inclusive criteria are taken. After the initial measurements, the subjects are randomly assigned into 2 stretching groups. Group-A performed the Sleeper stretch. Group-B performed a Cross body stretch. Both Groups performed the Stretch in Duration of 6weeks – once daily for 5 repetitions holding each stretch for 30 seconds for 5 days a week. Along with this technique conventional physiotherapy like IFT, overhead pulleys, Pendula exercises, Wall climbing exercises, mariners wheel exercises are performed. After the treatment, subjects were evaluated for their pain profile using visual analogue scale, Goniometer for measuring Range of motion. Results: For within group comparison we used Paired t-test analysis, For Between group comparison we used Independent t-test for statistical analysis. At the end of 6 weeks It was found that subjects treated with cross-body stretch showed significant improvement in terms of VAS scores and Range of motion scores (P=0.000 and patients treated with Sleeper stretch showed significant improvement in terms of VAS scores and Range of motion scores (P=0.000. When compared between Groups the VAS and Range of motion scores showed a significant improvement in Cross body stretch Group than the Sleeper stretch Group (P=0.000. Conclusion: It was concluded that both stretching techniques were found improvement in Range of motion and VAS and Cross-body Stretch showed more Significant improvement than the sleeper Stretch after 6 weeks treatment.

  7. Comparison of good and poor sleepers : stress and life satisfaction of university athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Litwic-Kaminska, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare differences in level of perceived stress, type of stress appraisal and life satisfaction between university athletes who declare problems with sleep (Poor Sleepers, PS, n = 72) and those without problems (Good Sleepers, GS, n = 105). In preliminary analyses the PS and GS were compared for group homogeneity with (a) the Chi-Square test for gender and type of sport, and (b) the Mann-Whitney U test for practice time and weekly frequency of trainings. I...

  8. Essential and non-essential element concentrations in two sleeper shark species collected in arctic waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMeans, Bailey C. [Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor, 401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, ON, N9B 3P4 (Canada); Borga, Katrine [Norwegian Institute for Water Research, P.O. Box 173, Kjelsas, N-0411 Oslo (Norway); Bechtol, William R. [Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Commercial Fisheries, Anchorage, AK 99518-1599 (United States); Higginbotham, David [Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2152 (United States); Fisk, Aaron T. [Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor, 401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, ON, N9B 3P4 (Canada)]. E-mail: afisk@uwindsor.ca

    2007-07-15

    A number of elements/metals have increased in arctic biota and are of concern due to their potential toxicity. Most studies on elements in the Arctic have focused on marine mammals and seabirds, but concentrations in the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus) and Pacific sleeper shark (Somniosus pacificus), the only two shark species known to regularly inhabit arctic waters, have never been reported. To address this data gap, concentrations and patterns of 25 elements were analyzed in liver of Greenland sharks collected about Cumberland Sound (n = 24) and Pacific sleeper sharks collected about Prince William Sound (n = 14). Several non-essential elements differed between species/locations, which could suggest geographical exposure differences or ecological (e.g., diet) differences between the species. Certain essential elements also differed between the two sleeper sharks, which may indicate different physiological requirements between these closely related shark species, although information on such relationships are lacking for sharks and fish. - Patterns of essential and non-essential elements provide insight into sleeper shark biology and physiology.

  9. Essential and non-essential element concentrations in two sleeper shark species collected in arctic waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMeans, Bailey C.; Borga, Katrine; Bechtol, William R.; Higginbotham, David; Fisk, Aaron T.

    2007-01-01

    A number of elements/metals have increased in arctic biota and are of concern due to their potential toxicity. Most studies on elements in the Arctic have focused on marine mammals and seabirds, but concentrations in the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus) and Pacific sleeper shark (Somniosus pacificus), the only two shark species known to regularly inhabit arctic waters, have never been reported. To address this data gap, concentrations and patterns of 25 elements were analyzed in liver of Greenland sharks collected about Cumberland Sound (n = 24) and Pacific sleeper sharks collected about Prince William Sound (n = 14). Several non-essential elements differed between species/locations, which could suggest geographical exposure differences or ecological (e.g., diet) differences between the species. Certain essential elements also differed between the two sleeper sharks, which may indicate different physiological requirements between these closely related shark species, although information on such relationships are lacking for sharks and fish. - Patterns of essential and non-essential elements provide insight into sleeper shark biology and physiology

  10. Investigation of longitudinal profile of rigid frogs on reinforced concrete sleepers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Orlovs’kyi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the effect of longitudinal profile of rigid frogs of type R65 mark 1/11 on reinforced concrete sleepers on the interaction in the ‘wheel-rail’ system in the zone of rolling surface irregularities is investigated.

  11. The sleeper effect: Artifact or phenomenon-A brief comment on Bell et al. (2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flückiger, Christoph; Del Re, A C; Wampold, Bruce E

    2015-04-01

    Bell, Marcus, and Goodlad (2013) recently conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled additive trials and found that adding an additional component to an existing treatment vis-à-vis the existing treatment produced larger effect sizes on targeted outcomes at 6-months follow-up than at termination, an effect they labeled as a sleeper effect. One of the limitations with Bell et al.'s detection of the sleeper effect was that they did not conduct a statistical test of the size of the effect at follow-up versus termination. To statistically test if the differences of effect sizes between the additive conditions and the control conditions at follow-up differed from those at termination, we used a restricted maximum-likelihood random-effect model with known variances to conduct a multilevel longitudinal meta-analysis (k = 30). Although the small effects at termination detected by Bell et al. were replicated (ds = 0.17-0.23), none of the analyses of growth from termination to follow-up produced statistically significant effects (ds .20), and when asymmetry was considered using trim-and-fill procedure or the studies after 2000 were analyzed, magnitude of the sleeper effect was negligible (d = 0.00). There is no empirical evidence to support the sleeper effect. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Validity of a commercial wearable sleep tracker in adult insomnia disorder patients and good sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seung-Gul; Kang, Jae Myeong; Ko, Kwang-Pil; Park, Seon-Cheol; Mariani, Sara; Weng, Jia

    2017-06-01

    To compare the accuracy of the commercial Fitbit Flex device (FF) with polysomnography (PSG; the gold-standard method) in insomnia disorder patients and good sleepers. Participants wore an FF and actigraph while undergoing overnight PSG. Primary outcomes were intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of the total sleep time (TST) and sleep efficiency (SE), and the frequency of clinically acceptable agreement between the FF in normal mode (FFN) and PSG. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of detecting sleep epochs were compared among FFN, actigraphy, and PSG. The ICCs of the TST between FFN and PSG in the insomnia (ICC=0.886) and good-sleepers (ICC=0.974) groups were excellent, but the ICC of SE was only fair in both groups. The TST and SE were overestimated for FFN by 6.5min and 1.75%, respectively, in good sleepers, and by 32.9min and 7.9% in the insomnia group with respect to PSG. The frequency of acceptable agreement of FFN and PSG was significantly lower (p=0.006) for the insomnia group (39.4%) than for the good-sleepers group (82.4%). The sensitivity and accuracy of FFN in an epoch-by-epoch comparison with PSG was good and comparable to those of actigraphy, but the specificity was poor in both groups. The ICC of TST in the FFN-PSG comparison was excellent in both groups, and the frequency of agreement was high in good sleepers but significantly lower in insomnia patients. These limitations need to be considered when applying commercial sleep trackers for clinical and research purposes in insomnia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamic Response Analysis of an Asymmetric Coupled Vehicle-Track System Generated by Voided Elastic Two-Block Sleeper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxing He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on vehicle-track coupled dynamic theory, a three-dimensional asymmetric vehicle-track coupling vibration model is developed to investigate the effect of voided elastic two-block sleepers on vehicle and track system dynamic responses. For the vehicle system, one car body, two frames, and four wheel sets are assumed to be rigid, with 35 degrees of freedom (DOF. For the track system, the rails and the concrete two-block sleepers are the main vibration components. The rails are modelled as Timoshenko beams, and the concrete two-block sleepers are assumed to be rigid mass with vertical and lateral movement. The pads under the rails and the rubber boots under the sleepers provide greater vertical and lateral elasticity for the track. The Hertz nonlinear elastic contact theory is used to calculate the normal wheel/rail force. The wheel/rail tangent creep force is first calculated using Kalker’s linear creep theory and then modified by the Shen-Hedrick-Elkins theory. The results show that the asymmetric voided elastic two-block sleepers have greater effects on the dynamic responses for fasteners and sleepers than on the car body and the wheel/rail forces under measured geometric irregularity and random irregularity. Two or more voided sleepers will greatly affect the vehicle running safety.

  14. Sleep-related attentional bias in poor versus good sleepers is independent of affective valence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Nicola L; Ellis, Jason G

    2013-08-01

    Contradictory evidence exists relating to the presence of an attention bias to sleep-related stimuli in poor sleepers/insomnia using the emotional Stroop task (EST). These inconsistencies may be due to methodological issues related to the affective valence of the sleep-related stimuli. Thus, individuals may attend differentially to sleep-related stimuli not because of their 'sleep' properties, but their negativity. The current study addresses this by controlling the affective valence of sleep-related words. A total of 107 participants [mean age = 33.22 years, standard deviation (SD) = 12.31 years; 61.7% female] were recruited during an evening event at the Newcastle Science Festival. Participants completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and a computerized EST containing 20 non-affective sleep-related, 20 neutral and 20 negatively valenced threat words. Good and poor sleepers were categorized using the PSQI. There were no significant differences between groups on response latency to sleep-related words (t(105) = -0.30, P = 0.76). However, the interaction between good versus poor sleepers and word-type on response latency was significant (F(2,210) = 3.06, P sleep-related words (mean = 723.35, SD = 172.55) compared to threat words (mean = 694.63, SD = 162.17) than good sleepers (mean = 713.20, SD = 166.32; and mean = 716.65, SD = 181.14). The results demonstrate the presence of an attention bias towards sleep-related stimuli compared to threat stimuli in poor sleepers. Accordingly, poor sleepers may be consumed by stimuli relevant to their specific difficulties, as well as being more highly attuned to negative cues that signal anxious states. Thus, the present research suggests that there are two opposing forces at play: one which facilitates performance (non-specific threats) and one which hinders performance (personally relevant threats). © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  15. An approach to bilateral bone-anchored hearing aid surgery in children: contralateral placement of sleeper fixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, J M; Sheehan, P Z

    2009-05-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aid surgery in younger children is a two-stage procedure, with a titanium fixture being allowed to osseointegrate for several months before an abutment is fitted through a skin graft. In the first procedure, it has been usual to place a reserve or sleeper fixture approximately 5 mm from the primary fixture as a backup in case the primary fixture fails to osseointegrate. This ipsilateral sleeper fixture is expensive, is often not used, and is placed in thinner calvarial bone where it is less likely to osseointegrate successfully. The authors have implanted the sleeper fixture on the contralateral side, with the additional objective of reducing the number of procedures for bilateral bone-anchored hearing aid implantation, providing a cost-effective use for the sleeper. The authors implanted the bone-anchored hearing aid sleeper fixture in the contralateral temporal bone instead of on the ipsilateral side in seven successive paediatric cases with bilateral conductive hearing loss requiring two-stage bone-anchored hearing aids, treated at the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, UK. The seven patients ranged in age from five to 15 years, with a mean age of 10 years; in addition, a 20-year-old with learning disability was also treated. In each case, the contralateral sleeper fixture was not needed as a backup fixture, but was used in four patients (57 per cent) as the basis for a second-side bone-anchored hearing aid. In children with bilateral conductive hearing loss, in whom a bilateral bone-anchored hearing aid is being considered and the second side is to be operated upon at a later date, we recommend placing the sleeper fixture on the contralateral side at the time of primary first-side surgery. Our technique provides a sleeper fixture located in an optimal position, where it also offers the option of use for a second-side bone-anchored hearing aid and reduces the number of procedures needed.

  16. Physical exercise performed before bedtime improves the sleep pattern of healthy young good sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flausino, Noler Heyden; Da Silva Prado, Juliana Martuscelli; de Queiroz, Sandra Souza; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the influence of different intensities and durations of exercise before bedtime on the sleep pattern and core body temperature of individuals considered good sleepers, we selected 17 healthy males and all underwent 5 nonconsecutive days of study. Measurements of polysomnographic parameters and core body temperature were taken at baseline and after each experimental protocol, performed at night. We found increased sleep efficiency (p = .016) among all protocols compared with baseline data and increase in REM sleep latency (p = .047) between two experiments; there was decrease in the percentage of stage 1 sleep (p = .046) and wake after sleep onset (p = .003). Core body temperature did not change significantly during the nights following exercise. Exercise performed before sleep does not impair sleep quality; rather, its practice improves sleep in good sleepers who are nonathletes, and may be considered to improve sleep pattern. Copyright © 2011 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  17. Sleep duration and resting fMRI functional connectivity: examination of short sleepers with and without perceived daytime dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Brian J; Williams, Paula G; Jones, Christopher R; Anderson, Jeffrey S

    2016-12-01

    Approximately 30% of the U.S. population reports recurrent short sleep; however, perceived sleep need varies widely among individuals. Some "habitual short sleepers" routinely sleep 4-6 hr/night without self-reported adverse consequences. Identifying neural mechanisms underlying individual differences in perceived sleep-related dysfunction has important implications for understanding associations between sleep duration and health. This study utilized data from 839 subjects of the Human Connectome Project to examine resting functional connectivity associations with self-reported short sleep duration, as well as differences between short sleepers with versus without reported dysfunction. Functional connectivity was analyzed using a parcellation covering the cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar gray matter at 5 mm resolution. Self-reported sleep duration predicts one of the primary patterns of intersubject variance in resting functional connectivity. Compared to conventional sleepers, both short sleeper subtypes exhibited resting fMRI (R-fMRI) signatures consistent with diminished wakefulness, potentially indicating inaccurate perception of functionality among those denying dysfunction. Short sleepers denying dysfunction exhibited increased connectivity between sensory cortices and bilateral amygdala and hippocampus, suggesting that efficient sleep-related memory consolidation may partly explain individual differences in perceived daytime dysfunction. Overall, current findings indicate that R-fMRI investigations should include assessment of average sleep duration during the prior month. Furthermore, short sleeper subtype findings provide a candidate neural mechanism underlying differences in perceived daytime impairment associated with short sleep duration.

  18. Mechanical and Physical Properties of Polyester Polymer Concrete Using Recycled Aggregates from Concrete Sleepers

    OpenAIRE

    Carrión, F.; Montalban Domingo, Maria Laura; Real Herráiz, Julia Irene; Real, T.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, reuse of solid waste from disused infrastructures is an important environmental issue to study. In this research, polymer concrete was developed by mixing orthophthalic unsaturated polyester resin, artificial microfillers (calcium carbonate) and waste aggregates (basalt and limestone) coming from the recycling process of concrete sleepers. The variation of the mechanical and physical properties of the polymer concrete (compressive strenght, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity,...

  19. A dynamic image recognition method for sleeper springs trouble of moving freight cars based on Haar features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fuqiang; Jiang, Yuan; Zhang, Guangjun

    2006-11-01

    A novel conception of automatic recognition for free-trouble sleeper springs is proposed and Adaboost algorithm based on Haar features is applied for the sleeper springs recognition in Trouble of moving Freight car Detection System (TFDS). In the recognition system, feature set of sleeper springs is determined by Haar features and selected by Adaboost algorithm. In order to recognize and select the free-trouble sleeper springs from all the captured dynamic images, a cascade of classifier is established by searching dynamic images. The amount of detected images is drastically reduced and the recognition efficiency is improved due to the conception of free-trouble recognition. Experiments show that the proposed method is characterized by simple feature, high efficiency and robustness. It performs high robustness against noise as well as translation, rotation and scale transformations of objects and indicates high stability to images with poor quality such as low resolution, partial occlusion, poor illumination and overexposure etc. The recognition time of a 640×480 image is about 16ms, and Correct Detection Rate is high up to about 97%, while Miss Detection Rate and Error Detection Rate are very low. The proposed method can recognize sleeper springs in all-weather conditions, which advances the engineering application for TFDS.

  20. The endogenous circadian temperature period length (tau) in delayed sleep phase disorder compared to good sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micic, Gorica; de Bruyn, Amanda; Lovato, Nicole; Wright, Helen; Gradisar, Michael; Ferguson, Sally; Burgess, Helen J; Lack, Leon

    2013-12-01

    The currently assumed aetiology for delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD) is a delay of the circadian system. Clinicians have sought to use bright light therapy, exogenous melatonin or chronotherapy to correct the disorder. However, these treatments have achieved unreliable outcomes for DSPD patients and, as such, one suggestion has been that the disorder may be caused by a longer than normal circadian rhythm period length (i.e. tau). The present study investigated this premise using a 78-h ultradian, ultra-short sleep-wake cycle. This constant bedrest routine was used to simulate a series of 1-h long 'days' by alternating 20-min sleep opportunities and 40 min of enforced wakefulness. Thirteen participants were recruited for the study including, six people diagnosed with DSPD according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders-2 [mean age = 22.0, standard deviation (SD) = 3.3] and seven good sleepers (mean age = 23.1, SD = 3.9) with normal sleep timing. The DSPD participants' core temperature rhythm tau (mean = 24 h 54 min, SD = 23 min) was significantly longer (t = -2.33, P = 0.04, Cohen's d = 1.91) than the good sleepers' (mean 24 h 29 min, SD = 16 min). The temperature rhythm of the DSPD participants delayed more rapidly (i.e. >25 min day(-1) ) than the good sleepers'. These findings provide an explanation for the difficulty that DSPD patients have in phase advancing to a more conventional sleep time and their frequent relapse following treatment. The outcomes of this study support a vigorous and continued application of chronobiological and behavioural therapies to entrain DSPD patients to their desired earlier sleep times. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  1. Nocturnal Melatonin Profiles in Patients with Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder and Control Sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micic, Gorica; Lovato, Nicole; Gradisar, Michael; Burgess, Helen J; Ferguson, Sally A; Kennaway, David J; Lack, Leon

    2015-10-01

    A significant delay in the timing of endogenous circadian rhythms has been associated with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). More recently, other mechanisms have also been proposed to account for this disorder. To further explore the etiology of DSPD, the present study compared nocturnal melatonin profiles of 26 DSPD patients (18 males, 8 females; age, 21.73 ± 4.98 years) and 17 normally timed good sleepers (10 males, 7 females; age, 23.82 ± 5.23 years) in a time-free, dim-light (sleep opportunities and 40 min of enforced wakefulness was used to measure the endogenous melatonin circadian rhythm. Salivary melatonin was sampled half-hourly from 1820 h to 0020 h and then hourly from 0120 h to 1620 h. DSPD patients had significantly later timed melatonin profiles that were delayed by approximately 3 h compared to normal sleepers, and there were no notable differences in the relative duration of secretion between groups. However, melatonin secretion between dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) and acrophase was less prominent in DSPD patients compared to good sleepers, who showed a more acute initial surge of melatonin following the DLMO. Although the regulatory role of melatonin is unknown, abnormal melatonin profiles have been linked to psychiatric and neurological disorders (e.g., major depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, Parkinson disease). These results therefore suggest that in addition to a delayed endogenous circadian rhythm, a diminished initial surge of melatonin secretion following DLMO may contribute to the etiology of DSPD. © 2015 The Author(s).

  2. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of creosotes extracted from wooden sleepers installed in playgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotard, W.; Mailahn, W.

    1987-01-01

    In order to evaluate their hygienic risk, wood samples from sleepers (railroad cross ties) impregnated with coal tar creosote were taken from playgrounds and investigated for hazardous compounds. The samples were extracted with ether, and acid-base-neutral separations were made on the creosote extracts. Water-soluble compounds were also isolated. All the fractions were investigated by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Besides phenols in the acidic fractions and N-heterocyclic polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the basic fractions, high amounts of neutral PAH and also, in several samples high levels of carcinogenic and cocarcinogenic PAH were determined.

  3. Mechanical and Physical Properties of Polyester Polymer Concrete Using Recycled Aggregates from Concrete Sleepers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carrión

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, reuse of solid waste from disused infrastructures is an important environmental issue to study. In this research, polymer concrete was developed by mixing orthophthalic unsaturated polyester resin, artificial microfillers (calcium carbonate, and waste aggregates (basalt and limestone coming from the recycling process of concrete sleepers. The variation of the mechanical and physical properties of the polymer concrete (compressive strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, density, and water absorption was analyzed based on the modification of different variables: nature of the recycled aggregates, resin contents (11 wt%, 12 wt%, and 13 wt%, and particle-size distributions of microfillers used. The results show the influence of these variables on mechanical performance of polymer concrete. Compressive and flexural strength of recycled polymer concrete were improved by increasing amount of polyester resin and by optimizing the particle-size distribution of the microfillers. Besides, the results show the feasibility of developing a polymer concrete with excellent mechanical behavior.

  4. Mechanical and physical properties of polyester polymer concrete using recycled aggregates from concrete sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Francisco; Montalbán, Laura; Real, Julia I; Real, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Currently, reuse of solid waste from disused infrastructures is an important environmental issue to study. In this research, polymer concrete was developed by mixing orthophthalic unsaturated polyester resin, artificial microfillers (calcium carbonate), and waste aggregates (basalt and limestone) coming from the recycling process of concrete sleepers. The variation of the mechanical and physical properties of the polymer concrete (compressive strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, density, and water absorption) was analyzed based on the modification of different variables: nature of the recycled aggregates, resin contents (11 wt%, 12 wt%, and 13 wt%), and particle-size distributions of microfillers used. The results show the influence of these variables on mechanical performance of polymer concrete. Compressive and flexural strength of recycled polymer concrete were improved by increasing amount of polyester resin and by optimizing the particle-size distribution of the microfillers. Besides, the results show the feasibility of developing a polymer concrete with excellent mechanical behavior.

  5. Study on the electrical resistance of the sleeper-fastening elements system in railway tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barroso, F. J.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrical resistance of the sleeper-fastening elements system in a wet railway track is a very important parameter. This is because the rails are electric conductors in the circuit of signaling and traction systems. This electrical resistance, defined as a characteristic value of the sleeper-fastening elements-water system is a measurand obtained with reference measurement procedures as described in international standards. But it is subject to many kinds of undefinitions that result in a very high dispersion. In this work the dependence of this parameter on variables such as the water conductivity, the temperature and the relative humidity is shown, and several ways to reduce it to minimum values are also established.En vías de ferrocarril sometidas a condiciones medioambientales desfavorables la resistencia eléctrica del conjunto formado por una traviesa y el sistema de sujeción del raíl es un parámetro muy importante. Esto se debe a que los raíles actúan como conductores eléctricos en los sistemas de señalización y tracción. Esta resistencia eléctrica, definida como un valor característico del sistema traviesa-elementos de sujeción-agua se mide con procedimientos normalizados. Sin embargo estos procedimientos están sujetos a ciertas indefiniciones que provocan una elevada dispersión. En este trabajo se estudia la dependencia de este parámetro en variables tales como la conductividad del agua, la temperatura y la humedad relativa, y se establecen estrategias para reducir dicha dispersión a valores mínimos.

  6. Long-Haul Truck Sleeper Heating Load Reduction Package for Rest Period Idling: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lustbader, Jason; Kekelia, Bidzina; Tomerlin, Jeff; Kreutzer, Cory; Adelman, Steve; Yeakel, Skip; Luo, Zhiming; Zehme, John

    2016-03-24

    Annual fuel use for sleeper cab truck rest period idling is estimated at 667 million gallons in the United States, or 6.8% of long-haul truck fuel use. Truck idling during a rest period represents zero freight efficiency and is largely done to supply accessory power for climate conditioning of the cab. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's CoolCab project aims to reduce heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) loads and resulting fuel use from rest period idling by working closely with industry to design efficient long-haul truck thermal management systems while maintaining occupant comfort. Enhancing the thermal performance of cab/sleepers will enable smaller, lighter, and more cost-effective idle reduction solutions. In addition, if the fuel savings provide a one- to three-year payback period, fleet owners will be economically motivated to incorporate them. For candidate idle reduction technologies to be implemented by original equipment manufacturers and fleets, their effectiveness must be quantified. To address this need, several promising candidate technologies were evaluated through experimentation and modeling to determine their effectiveness in reducing rest period HVAC loads. Load reduction strategies were grouped into the focus areas of solar envelope, occupant environment, conductive pathways, and efficient equipment. Technologies in each of these focus areas were investigated in collaboration with industry partners. The most promising of these technologies were then combined with the goal of exceeding a 30% reduction in HVAC loads. These technologies included 'ultra-white' paint, advanced insulation, and advanced curtain design. Previous testing showed more than a 35.7% reduction in air conditioning loads. This paper describes the overall heat transfer coefficient testing of this advanced load reduction technology package that showed more than a 43% reduction in heating load. Adding an additional layer of advanced insulation

  7. Long-Haul Truck Sleeper Heating Load Reduction Package for Rest Period Idling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lustbader, Jason Aaron; Kekelia, Bidzina; Tomerlin, Jeff; Kreutzer, Cory J.; Yeakel, Skip; Adelman, Steven; Luo, Zhiming; Zehme, John

    2016-04-05

    Annual fuel use for sleeper cab truck rest period idling is estimated at 667 million gallons in the United States, or 6.8% of long-haul truck fuel use. Truck idling during a rest period represents zero freight efficiency and is largely done to supply accessory power for climate conditioning of the cab. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's CoolCab project aims to reduce heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) loads and resulting fuel use from rest period idling by working closely with industry to design efficient long-haul truck thermal management systems while maintaining occupant comfort. Enhancing the thermal performance of cab/sleepers will enable smaller, lighter, and more cost-effective idle reduction solutions. In addition, if the fuel savings provide a one- to three-year payback period, fleet owners will be economically motivated to incorporate them. For candidate idle reduction technologies to be implemented by original equipment manufacturers and fleets, their effectiveness must be quantified. To address this need, several promising candidate technologies were evaluated through experimentation and modeling to determine their effectiveness in reducing rest period HVAC loads. Load reduction strategies were grouped into the focus areas of solar envelope, occupant environment, conductive pathways, and efficient equipment. Technologies in each of these focus areas were investigated in collaboration with industry partners. The most promising of these technologies were then combined with the goal of exceeding a 30% reduction in HVAC loads. These technologies included 'ultra-white' paint, advanced insulation, and advanced curtain design. Previous testing showed more than a 35.7% reduction in air conditioning loads. This paper describes the overall heat transfer coefficient testing of this advanced load reduction technology package that showed more than a 43% reduction in heating load. Adding an additional layer of advanced insulation

  8. Consistent high prevalence of Exophiala dermatitidis, a neurotropic opportunist, on railway sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanparast, S A; Mohseni, S; De Hoog, G S; Aslani, N; Sadeh, A; Badali, H

    2017-06-01

    Environmental isolation of black yeasts potentially causing human disorders is essential for understanding ecology and routes of infection. Several Exophiala species show prevalence for man-made environments rich in monoaromatic compounds, such as creosote-treated or petroleum-stained railway sleepers. Ambient climatic conditions play a role in species composition in suitable habitats. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to establish the composition of Exophiala species in railway stations as a potential source of human infections in a subtropical region with evaluation of their antifungal susceptibility profiles. We examined 150 railway samples using cotton swabs moistened with sterile physiological saline. Black yeasts and relatives were selected on theirs colony morphology and identified based on ITS rDNA sequencing. Overall, 36 (24%) of samples were positive for black yeast-like fungi, i.e., Exophiala dermatitidis (n=20, 55.6%) was predominant, followed by E. phaeomuriformis (n=9, 25%), E. heteromorpha (n=5, 13.9%), and E. xenobiotica (n=2, 5.6%). Massive contaminations of E. dermatitidis were seen on railway sleepers on creosoted oak wood at the region close to the sea level, while in cold climates were primarily contaminated with clinically insignificant or rare human opportunists (E. crusticola). It seems that, high temperature and humidity are significant effect on species diversity. Moreover, the MIC results for all E. dermatitidis and E. phaeomuriformis strains revealed the widest range and the highest MICs to caspofungin (range 1-16mg/L, Geometric mean 4.912mg/L), and the lowest MIC for posaconazole (0.016-0.031mg/L, G mean 0.061mg/L). However, their clinical effectiveness in the treatment of Exophiala infections remains to be determined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. A three-phase epidemiological study of short and long sleepers in a middle-aged Chinese population: prevalence and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Y.L.; Zhang, B.; Jia, F.J.; Li, X.L.; Tang, Y.; Ren, Y.Z.; Liu, W.H.

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of short and long sleepers have not been conducted previously. We collected socioeconomic, psychological, and polysomnographic characteristics of 6501 parents (3252 men and 3249 women) of 4036 primary school children in Guangzhou city. The study data were collected in three phases. The overall prevalence of short (5 h or less) and long (10 h or more) sleep duration was 0.52 and 0.64%, respectively. Long sleepers had higher Eysenck Personality Questionnaire neuroticism scores [odds ratio (OR)=1.224, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.047-1.409] and lower education levels (OR=0.740, 95%CI=0.631-0.849) than short sleepers. In the polysomnographic assessment, short, long, and normal sleepers (7-8 h) shared similar durations of Stage 3 sleep (short=25.7±10.7, long=20.3±7.9, and normal=28.0±12.8 min, F=1.402, P=0.181). In daytime multiple sleep latency tests, short sleepers (10/19, 52.6%) were more prone to have a short sleep latency (≤8 min) than long sleepers (2/23, 8.7%). In addition to different sleep durations, neuroticism might also contribute to differences between short and long sleepers in social achievements. Stage 3 sleep might be essential for humans. The short sleep latency (≤8 min) of short sleepers in multiple sleep latency tests should be interpreted cautiously, since it was of the same severity as required for a diagnosis of narcolepsy or idiopathic hypersomnia

  10. A three-phase epidemiological study of short and long sleepers in a middle-aged Chinese population: prevalence and characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Y.L. [Department of Human Anatomy, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China, Department of Human Anatomy, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, B.; Jia, F.J.; Li, X.L.; Tang, Y. [Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangdong Mental Health Centre, Guangzhou, China, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangdong Mental Health Centre, Guangzhou (China); Ren, Y.Z. [Zhongshan The Third People' s Hospital, Zhongshan, China, Zhongshan The Third People' s Hospital, Zhongshan (China); Liu, W.H. [Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangdong Mental Health Centre, Guangzhou, China, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangdong Mental Health Centre, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-02-17

    Epidemiological studies of short and long sleepers have not been conducted previously. We collected socioeconomic, psychological, and polysomnographic characteristics of 6501 parents (3252 men and 3249 women) of 4036 primary school children in Guangzhou city. The study data were collected in three phases. The overall prevalence of short (5 h or less) and long (10 h or more) sleep duration was 0.52 and 0.64%, respectively. Long sleepers had higher Eysenck Personality Questionnaire neuroticism scores [odds ratio (OR)=1.224, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.047-1.409] and lower education levels (OR=0.740, 95%CI=0.631-0.849) than short sleepers. In the polysomnographic assessment, short, long, and normal sleepers (7-8 h) shared similar durations of Stage 3 sleep (short=25.7±10.7, long=20.3±7.9, and normal=28.0±12.8 min, F=1.402, P=0.181). In daytime multiple sleep latency tests, short sleepers (10/19, 52.6%) were more prone to have a short sleep latency (≤8 min) than long sleepers (2/23, 8.7%). In addition to different sleep durations, neuroticism might also contribute to differences between short and long sleepers in social achievements. Stage 3 sleep might be essential for humans. The short sleep latency (≤8 min) of short sleepers in multiple sleep latency tests should be interpreted cautiously, since it was of the same severity as required for a diagnosis of narcolepsy or idiopathic hypersomnia.

  11. A three-phase epidemiological study of short and long sleepers in a middle-aged Chinese population: prevalence and characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.L. Hao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies of short and long sleepers have not been conducted previously. We collected socioeconomic, psychological, and polysomnographic characteristics of 6501 parents (3252 men and 3249 women of 4036 primary school children in Guangzhou city. The study data were collected in three phases. The overall prevalence of short (5 h or less and long (10 h or more sleep duration was 0.52 and 0.64%, respectively. Long sleepers had higher Eysenck Personality Questionnaire neuroticism scores [odds ratio (OR=1.224, 95% confidence interval (CI=1.047-1.409] and lower education levels (OR=0.740, 95%CI=0.631-0.849 than short sleepers. In the polysomnographic assessment, short, long, and normal sleepers (7-8 h shared similar durations of Stage 3 sleep (short=25.7±10.7, long=20.3±7.9, and normal=28.0±12.8 min, F=1.402, P=0.181. In daytime multiple sleep latency tests, short sleepers (10/19, 52.6% were more prone to have a short sleep latency (≤8 min than long sleepers (2/23, 8.7%. In addition to different sleep durations, neuroticism might also contribute to differences between short and long sleepers in social achievements. Stage 3 sleep might be essential for humans. The short sleep latency (≤8 min of short sleepers in multiple sleep latency tests should be interpreted cautiously, since it was of the same severity as required for a diagnosis of narcolepsy or idiopathic hypersomnia.

  12. The effects of one night of partial sleep deprivation on executive functions in individuals reporting chronic insomnia and good sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesio, Andrea; Cerolini, Silvia; Ferlazzo, Fabio; Cellini, Nicola; Lombardo, Caterina

    2018-02-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a partial sleep deprivation night on executive functions in participants reporting chronic insomnia and good sleepers using a Task Switching paradigm. Sixteen participants reporting symptoms of chronic insomnia and sixteen good sleepers were tested after a night of habitual sleep and after a night of partial sleep deprivation (5 h of sleep allowed). The Switch Cost (SC) and the Backward Inhibition (BI) were computed as measures of switching attention and response inhibition, respectively. We observed a marginally significant interaction Night × Group on SC (F (1,29)  = 4.06, p = 0.053), η 2  = 0.123. Fisher's least significant difference (LSD) post-hoc revealed a smaller SC after the sleep deprived night relative to the habitual night for the good sleepers (p = 0.027; M = 192.23 ± 201.81 vs M = 98.99 ± 141.16). Differently, participants with insomnia did not show any change after the two nights. Several limitations must be acknowledged including the use of a convenient sample of university students and the use of a single task of cognitive performance. We found that SC was smaller in the good sleepers after a night of partial sleep deprivation compared to a habitual night, indicating a better switching performance. The insomnia group showed no differences in performance after the two experimental nights. Several factors may account for these results, including increased levels of arousal and cognitive effort during task execution. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. What Sways People's Judgment of Sleep Quality? A Quantitative Choice-Making Study With Good and Poor Sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlee, Fatanah; Sanborn, Adam N; Tang, Nicole K Y

    2017-07-01

    We conceptualized sleep quality judgment as a decision-making process and examined the relative importance of 17 parameters of sleep quality using a choice-based conjoint analysis. One hundred participants (50 good sleepers; 50 poor sleepers) were asked to choose between 2 written scenarios to answer 1 of 2 questions: "Which describes a better (or worse) night of sleep?". Each scenario described a self-reported experience of sleep, stringing together 17 possible determinants of sleep quality that occur at different times of the day (day before, pre-sleep, during sleep, upon waking, day after). Each participant answered 48 questions. Logistic regression models were fit to their choice data. Eleven of the 17 sleep quality parameters had a significant impact on the participants' choices. The top 3 determinants of sleep quality were: Total sleep time, feeling refreshed (upon waking), and mood (day after). Sleep quality judgments were most influenced by factors that occur during sleep, followed by feelings and activities upon waking and the day after. There was a significant interaction between wake after sleep onset and feeling refreshed (upon waking) and between feeling refreshed (upon waking) and question type (better or worse night of sleep). Type of sleeper (good vs poor sleepers) did not significantly influence the judgments. Sleep quality judgments appear to be determined by not only what happened during sleep, but also what happened after the sleep period. Interventions that improve mood and functioning during the day may inadvertently also improve people's self-reported evaluation of sleep quality. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of the Sleep Research Society].

  14. What Sways People’s Judgment of Sleep Quality? A Quantitative Choice-Making Study With Good and Poor Sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlee, Fatanah; Sanborn, Adam N.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Study objectives: We conceptualized sleep quality judgment as a decision-making process and examined the relative importance of 17 parameters of sleep quality using a choice-based conjoint analysis. Methods: One hundred participants (50 good sleepers; 50 poor sleepers) were asked to choose between 2 written scenarios to answer 1 of 2 questions: “Which describes a better (or worse) night of sleep?”. Each scenario described a self-reported experience of sleep, stringing together 17 possible determinants of sleep quality that occur at different times of the day (day before, pre-sleep, during sleep, upon waking, day after). Each participant answered 48 questions. Logistic regression models were fit to their choice data. Results: Eleven of the 17 sleep quality parameters had a significant impact on the participants’ choices. The top 3 determinants of sleep quality were: Total sleep time, feeling refreshed (upon waking), and mood (day after). Sleep quality judgments were most influenced by factors that occur during sleep, followed by feelings and activities upon waking and the day after. There was a significant interaction between wake after sleep onset and feeling refreshed (upon waking) and between feeling refreshed (upon waking) and question type (better or worse night of sleep). Type of sleeper (good vs poor sleepers) did not significantly influence the judgments. Conclusions: Sleep quality judgments appear to be determined by not only what happened during sleep, but also what happened after the sleep period. Interventions that improve mood and functioning during the day may inadvertently also improve people’s self-reported evaluation of sleep quality. PMID:28525617

  15. Respiratory symptoms are more common among short sleepers independent of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsdóttir, Erla; Janson, Christer; Lindberg, Eva; Arnardottir, Erna Sif; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Carsin, Anne Elie; Real, Francisco Gómez; Torén, Kjell; Heinrich, Joachim; Nowak, Dennis; Sánchez-Ramos, José Luis; Demoly, Pascal; Arenas, Sandra Dorado; Navarro, Ramon Coloma; Schlünssen, Vivi; Raherison, Chantal; Jarvis, Debbie L; Gislason, Thorarinn

    2017-01-01

    Sleep length has been associated with obesity and various adverse health outcomes. The possible association of sleep length and respiratory symptoms has not been previously described. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between sleep length and respiratory symptoms and whether such an association existed independent of obesity. This is a multicentre, cross-sectional, population-based study performed in 23 centres in 10 different countries. Participants (n=5079, 52.3% males) were adults in the third follow-up of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III. The mean±SD age was 54.2±7.1 (age range 39-67 years). Information was collected on general and respiratory health and sleep characteristics. The mean reported nighttime sleep duration was 6.9±1.0 hours. Short sleepers (symptoms (wheezing, waking up with chest tightness, shortness of breath, coughing, phlegm and bronchitis) except asthma after adjusting for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), centre, marital status, exercise and smoking. Excluding BMI from the model covariates did not affect the results. Short sleep was related to 11 out of 16 respiratory and nasal symptoms among subjects with BMI ≥30 and 9 out of 16 symptoms among subjects with BMI symptoms were related to long sleep, both for subjects with BMI symptoms, and this relationship is independent of obesity.

  16. REM dream activity of insomnia sufferers: a systematic comparison with good sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérusse, Alexandra D; De Koninck, Joseph; Pedneault-Drolet, Maude; Ellis, Jason G; Bastien, Célyne H

    2016-04-01

    The dream activity of patients with primary insomnia (PI) has rarely been studied, especially using in-laboratory dream collection, although dreams could be linked to their state of hyperarousal and their negative waking experiences. The objective of the study was to compare patients with PI and good sleeper controls (GSCs) in terms of dream recall frequency and dream content. Polysomnography was recorded in 12 patients with PI and 12 GSCs (aged between 30 and 45 years) for five consecutive nights. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep awakenings were enforced on nights 3 and 5 for dream collections. The REM dream collections revealed that the groups were similar in terms of dream recall frequency (p ≤ 0.7). With respect to dream content variables, the dreams of GSCs tended to comprise more positive emotions (p = 0.06), whereas the dreams of patients with PI were characterized by more negative elements than positive ones (p = 0.001). Subjectively, GSCs characterized their dreams as being more pleasant and containing more joy, happiness, and vividness (p ≤ 0.03) than patients with PI. Finally, elevated negative dream content was associated with lower sleep efficiencies in insomnia (p = 0.004). These results suggest that less positive emotions and greater negative content characterize the dreams of patients with PI, which is in line with their waking experiences. One potential explanation could be hyperarousal exacerbating presleep negative mentation, thus contributing to poorer sleep quality. The lack of difference in dream recall frequency is most likely due to the forced awakening "dream collection" procedure. The study of dream activity seems a promising avenue for understanding the 24-h experience of insomnia better and exploring the potential benefits of dream management techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sleeper Cab Climate Control Load Reduction for Long-Haul Truck Rest Period Idling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lustbader, J. A.; Kreutzer, C.; Adelman, S.; Yeakel, S.; Zehme, J.

    2015-04-29

    Annual fuel use for long-haul truck rest period idling is estimated at 667 million gallons in the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s CoolCab project aims to reduce heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) loads and resulting fuel use from rest period idling by working closely with industry to design efficient long-haul truck climate control systems while maintaining occupant comfort. Enhancing the thermal performance of cab/sleepers will enable smaller, lighter, and more cost-effective idle reduction solutions. In order for candidate idle reduction technologies to be implemented at the original equipment manufacturer and fleet level, their effectiveness must be quantified. To address this need, a number of promising candidate technologies were evaluated through experimentation and modeling to determine their effectiveness in reducing rest period HVAC loads. For this study, load reduction strategies were grouped into the focus areas of solar envelope, occupant environment, and conductive pathways. The technologies selected for a complete-cab package of technologies were “ultra-white” paint, advanced insulation, and advanced curtains. To measure the impact of these technologies, a nationally-averaged solar-weighted reflectivity long-haul truck paint color was determined and applied to the baseline test vehicle. Using the complete-cab package of technologies, electrical energy consumption for long-haul truck daytime rest period air conditioning was reduced by at least 35% for summer weather conditions in Colorado. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's CoolCalc model was then used to extrapolate the performance of the thermal load reduction technologies nationally for 161 major U.S. cities using typical weather conditions for each location over an entire year.

  18. A Prospective Video-Polysomnographic Analysis of Movements during Physiological Sleep in 100 Healthy Sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Ambra; Gabelia, David; Mitterling, Thomas; Poewe, Werner; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit

    2015-09-01

    Video-polysomnography (v-PSG) is the gold standard for the diagnosis of sleep disorders. Quantitative assessment of type and distribution of physiological movements during sleep for the differentiation between physiological and pathological motor activity is lacking. We performed a systematic and detailed analysis of movements during physiological sleep using v-PSG technology. Prospective v-PSG investigation. Academic referral center sleep laboratory. One hundred healthy sleepers aged 19-77 years recruited from a representative population sample after a two-step screening. N/A. All subjects underwent v-PSG. In all cases where electromyographic activity > 100 msec duration was visible during sleep in the mentalis, submentalis, flexor digitorum superficialis, or anterior tibialis muscles, the time-synchronized video was analyzed. Visible movements were classified according to movement type and topography, and movement rates were computed for the different sleep stages. A total of 9,790 movements (median 10.2/h, IQR 4.6-16.2) were analyzed: 99.7% were elementary, 0.3% complex. Movement indices were higher in men than women (men: median 13/h, interquartile range 7.1-29.3, women: median 7.9/h, interquartile range 3.4-14.5; P = 0.006). The majority of movements involved the extremities (87.9%) and were classified as focal (53.3%), distal (79.6%), and unilateral (71.5%); 15.3% of movements were associated with arousals. REM-related movements (median 0.8 sec, IQR 0.5-1.2) were shorter than NREM-related movements (median 1.1 sec, IQR 0.8-1.6; P = 0.001). Moreover, REM-related movements were predominantly myocloniform (86.6%), whereas NREM-related movements were more often non-myocloniform (59.1%, P sleep, and are associated with low arousal rates. REM-related movements were predominantly myocloniform and shorter than NREM movements, indicating different influences on motor control during both sleep states. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  19. THE CAUSES STUDY OF THE PREMATURE DESTRUCTION OF THE CONCRETE SLEEPERS ON THE ZNAMENKA TRACK OF THE IF10 OF THE ODESSA RAILWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kovalenko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the paper is to study the factors that led to the premature destruction of concrete sleepers. Methodology. The express-method of determining the morphology and chemical composition of structural components in concrete, patented by Dnipropetrovsk National University of Railway Transport was used in the paper. Methodology makes it possible to control the morphology and chemical composition of cement crystals as the weakest link in the structure of composite material – concrete, and to predict, in accordance with the recommendations of the German Scientists, the possibility of structural transformation of cement in the solid state, which determines the durability of the composite material. Findings. The mass destruction of concrete sleepers on railways of Ukraine is becoming more frequent every year. Moreover, if such destruction in 2010 appears after 4-5 years of operation, in 2015 it is only after 2-3 years of installing the sleepers on the main railways. The nature of the destruction of concrete sleepers can be noted as malty factors influence on it. The batches of cement and other raw materials have been investigated before using with the standard methods in accredited laboratories of PAC «Ukrgeolbudm» (Kyiv and received a positive evaluation for use in the production of concrete sleepers. However, a significant error in experimental data by standard methods not allowed revealing the critical properties of materials that adversely effect on the durability of rail base concrete. According to the research it was determined that the causes of mass destruction of sleepers are: 1 the inhomogeneity of the macrostructure of the concrete, as a consequence of the use of crushed rock of fraction 5-25 mm; 2 the impact of aggressive environment on the surface of the concrete sleepers; 3 the presence of a secondary structure of sleepers of large ettringite crystals prone to restructuring and the presence of alkaline silicic acid

  20. Sleep-Wake Differences in Relative Regional Cerebral Metabolic Rate for Glucose among Patients with Insomnia Compared with Good Sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Daniel B.; Karim, Helmet T.; Soehner, Adriane M.; Hasler, Brant P.; Wilckens, Kristine A.; James, Jeffrey A.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Price, Julie C.; Rosario, Bedda L.; Kupfer, David J.; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica H.; Franzen, Peter L.; Nofzinger, Eric A.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The neurobiological mechanisms of insomnia may involve altered patterns of activation across sleep-wake states in brain regions associated with cognition, self-referential processes, affect, and sleep-wake promotion. The objective of this study was to compare relative regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglc) in these brain regions across wake and nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep states in patients with primary insomnia (PI) and good sleeper controls (GS). Methods: Participants included 44 PI and 40 GS matched for age (mean = 37 y old, range 21–60), sex, and race. We conducted [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography scans in PI and GS during both morning wakefulness and NREM sleep at night. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to test for group (PI vs. GS) by state (wake vs. NREM sleep) interactions in relative rCMRglc. Results: Significant group-by-state interactions in relative rCMRglc were found in the precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex, left middle frontal gyrus, left inferior/superior parietal lobules, left lingual/fusiform/occipital gyri, and right lingual gyrus. All clusters were significant at Pcorrected sleep and wakefulness. Significant group-by-state interactions in relative rCMRglc suggest that insomnia is associated with impaired disengagement of brain regions involved in cognition (left frontoparietal), self-referential processes (precuneus/posterior cingulate), and affect (left middle frontal, fusiform/lingual gyri) during NREM sleep, or alternatively, to impaired engagement of these regions during wakefulness. Citation: Kay DB, Karim HT, Soehner AM, Hasler BP, Wilckens KA, James JA, Aizenstein HJ, Price JC, Rosario BL, Kupfer DJ, Germain A, Hall MH, Franzen PL, Nofzinger EA, Buysse DJ. Sleep-wake differences in relative regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose among patients with insomnia compared with good sleepers. SLEEP 2016;39(10):1779–1794. PMID:27568812

  1. A prospective questionnaire study in 100 healthy sleepers: non-bothersome forms of recognizable sleep disorders are still present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauscher, Birgit; Mitterling, Thomas; Bode, Aleke; Ehrmann, Laura; Gabelia, David; Biermayr, Marlene; Walters, Arthur Scott; Poewe, Werner; Högl, Birgit

    2014-06-15

    Despite several polysomnographic normative studies and multiple surveys of sleep disorders in the general population, few data have been collected on healthy sleepers. We aimed to survey the characteristics of healthy sleep. We prospectively investigated the sleep history of 100 subjects of a representative population sample who reported undisturbed sleep and in whom relevant sleep disorders were ruled out by a two-step screening procedure. Approximately four subjects had to be contacted for identifying 1 eligible subject who participated. The median reported time in bed was from 23:00 (21:30-02:00) to 07:00 (05:30-11:00). The total sleep duration was 7.3 h (5-10 h), varying from 7.5 h in the age group ≤ 30 years to 7 h in subjects aged 40-60 years and to 8 h in subjects > 60 years (p = 0.002). The median sleep efficiency was high (93.3%, range: 55.6% to 100%). Fifty-one subjects reported occasional snoring. Forty-five subjects reported sporadic non-bothersome sleep-related movement disorders (25 sleep-related leg cramps, 22 lifetime bruxism, 5 restless legs syndrome), and 36 had a history of sporadic non-bothersome parasomnias (27 nightmares, 12 sleepwalking, 1 sleep paralysis). In this population of healthy sleepers, snoring is the most common finding. Moreover, non-bothersome forms of recognizable sleep-related movement disorders and parasomnias are surprisingly common. These findings may suggest that diagnostic criteria of sleep disorders should not only be based on the presence of symptoms but also account for a minimum frequency or discomfort.

  2. A new genus and species of blind sleeper (Teleostei: Eleotridae) from Oaxaca, Mexico: First obligate cave gobiiform in the Western Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Stephen J.; Chakrabarty, Prosanta

    2016-01-01

    Caecieleotris morrisi, new genus and species of sleeper (family Eleotridae), is described from a submerged freshwater cave in a karst region of the northern portion of the State of Oaxaca, Mexico, Río Papaloapan drainage, Gulf of Mexico basin. The new species represents the first cave-adapted sleeper known from the Western Hemisphere and is one of only 13 stygobitic gobiiforms known worldwide, with all others limited in distribution to the Indo-Pacific region. The new taxon represents a third independent evolution of a hypogean lifestyle in sleepers, the others being two species ofOxyeleotris (O. caeca and O. colasi) from New Guinea and a single species, Bostrychus microphthalmus, from Sulawesi. Caecieleotris morrisi, new species, is distinguished from epigean eleotrids of the Western Atlantic in lacking functional eyes and body pigmentation, as well as having other troglomorphic features. It shares convergent aspects of morphology with cave-dwelling species of Oxyeleotris and B. microphthalmus but differs from those taxa in lacking cephalic pores and head squamation, among other characters. Description of C. morrisi, new species, brings the total number of eleotrid species known from Mexico to 12. Seven of these, including the new species, occur on the Atlantic Slope.

  3. Racial Profiling and Moral Panic: Operation Thread and the Al-Qaeda Sleeper Cell that Never Was

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Odartey-Wellington

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In August 2003, Canadian and international media broke news of Operation Thread, executed by the Canadian state security apparatus to apprehend 23 South-Asian Muslim members of a “possible Al-Qaeda sleeper cell” in the Greater Toronto Area. After exposing the suspects to domestic and international opprobrium, the state security apparatus conceded that the allegations of terrorism were unfounded. Using material from the National Post and The Globe and Mail, this paper interrogates the mass mediation of Operation Thread as a case of racial profiling situated in a moral panic over “Islamic terrorism” that was created by a section of the Canadian news media and the state security apparatus. Particularly, it shows that the media contested the discourse of the state security apparatus, thus reflecting the contested nature of news as a social power resource. However, there is still a need for the media to be more critical when dealing with cases such as Operation Thread that are informed by racial profiling post September 11.

  4. The association between prolonged sleep onset latency and heart rate dynamics among young sleep-onset insomniacs and good sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Jung; Kuo, Terry B J; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2015-12-30

    A blunting of heart rate (HR) reduction during sleep has been reported to be associated with increased all-cause mortality. An increased incident of cardiovascular events has been observed in patients with insomnia but the relationship between nighttime HR and insomnia remains unclear. Here we investigated the HR patterns during the sleep onset period and its association with the length of sleep onset latency (SOL). Nineteen sleep-onset insomniacs (SOI) and 14 good sleepers had their sleep analyzed. Linear regression and nonlinear Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) of the HR slope were performed in order to analyze HR dynamics during the sleep onset period. A significant depression in HR fluctuation was identified among the SOI group during the sleep onset period when linear regression and HHT analysis were applied. The magnitude of the HR reduction was associated with both polysomnography-defined and subjective SOL; moreover, we found that the linear regression and HHT slopes of the HR showed great sensitivity with respect to sleep quality. Our findings indicate that HR dynamics during the sleep onset period are sensitive to sleep initiation difficulty and respond to the SOL, which indicates that the presence of autonomic dysfunction would seem to affect the progress of falling asleep. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Water's Way at Sleepers River watershed – revisiting flow generation in a post-glacial landscape, Vermont USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, James B.; Sebestyen, Stephen D.; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.; McGlynn, Brian L.; Dunne, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The Sleepers River Research Watershed (SRRW) in Vermont, USA, has been the site of active hydrologic research since 1959 and was the setting where Dunne and Black demonstrated the importance and controls of saturation-excess overland flow (SOF) on streamflow generation. Here, we review the early studies from the SRRW and show how they guided our conceptual approach to hydrologic research at the SRRW during the most recent 25 years. In so doing, we chronicle a shift in the field from early studies that relied exclusively on hydrometric measurements to today's studies that include chemical and isotopic approaches to further elucidate streamflow generation mechanisms. Highlights of this evolution in hydrologic understanding include the following: (i) confirmation of the importance of SOF to streamflow generation, and at larger scales than first imagined; (ii) stored catchment water dominates stream response, except under unusual conditions such as deep frozen ground; (iii) hydrometric, chemical and isotopic approaches to hydrograph separation yield consistent and complementary results; (iv) nitrate and sulfate isotopic compositions specific to atmospheric inputs constrain new water contributions to streamflow; and (v) convergent areas, or ‘hillslope hollows’, contribute disproportionately to event hydrographs. We conclude by summarizing some remaining challenges that lead us to a vision for the future of research at the SRRW to address fundamental questions in the catchment sciences.

  6. STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTIC OF ICHTHYOPLANKTON IN A SMALL RIVER FLOWING WITHIN A BAR PLAIN OF THE DNIPRO RIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Abramiuk

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Using as an example of a small river, which flows through a bar plain of the Dnipro, to study species composition of the littoral ichthyoplankton, dynamics of its structure during the season and its diversity in different parts of the river. Methodology. The littoral ichthyoplankton was investigated during four seasons of 2011-2014 on the Vita river, a right tributary of the Dnipro affected by the operation of Kaniv HPP. The research covered the main channel, a permanent backwater connected with the channel, as well as temporarily flooded areas of the floodplain and separated from the channel oxbow lakes. Samples were collected with standard sweep nets and Bagenal buoyant nets. Identification of young fish was carried out under binocular microscope MBS-9. Early life stages of larvae were determined according to the system of V. Vasnetsov. Species diversity of ichthyoplankton was assessed by the Shannon index. Findings. The littoral ichthyoplankton during May-July mostly consisted of limnophilic fish larvae belonging to a family Cyprinidae. In the river channel and the backwater at the beginning of the period the larvae of roach (Rutilus rutilus prevailed, later they were substituted by larvae of more thermophilic species, among which the rudd (Scardinius erythrophthalmus was the most abundant. In the oxbow lakes and temporarily flooded areas in spring the coastal ichthyoplankton was mainly structured by larvae of Carassius sp. and the rudd, in summer the larvae assemblages of oxbow lakes were quantitatively dominated by the sunbleak (Leucaspius delineatus. In areas covered with vegetation the larvae of invasive Chinese sleeper (Perccottus glenii were firstly found. Rheophilic species among young fish were absent, which indicates unfavorable conditions for their spawning at present hydrologic regime of the river. Originality. For the first time the coastal communities of early young fish in a small tributary of the Dnipro were

  7. Sleep-Wake Differences in Relative Regional Cerebral Metabolic Rate for Glucose among Patients with Insomnia Compared with Good Sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Daniel B; Karim, Helmet T; Soehner, Adriane M; Hasler, Brant P; Wilckens, Kristine A; James, Jeffrey A; Aizenstein, Howard J; Price, Julie C; Rosario, Bedda L; Kupfer, David J; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica H; Franzen, Peter L; Nofzinger, Eric A; Buysse, Daniel J

    2016-10-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms of insomnia may involve altered patterns of activation across sleep-wake states in brain regions associated with cognition, self-referential processes, affect, and sleep-wake promotion. The objective of this study was to compare relative regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMR glc ) in these brain regions across wake and nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep states in patients with primary insomnia (PI) and good sleeper controls (GS). Participants included 44 PI and 40 GS matched for age (mean = 37 y old, range 21-60), sex, and race. We conducted [ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography scans in PI and GS during both morning wakefulness and NREM sleep at night. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to test for group (PI vs. GS) by state (wake vs. NREM sleep) interactions in relative rCMR glc . Significant group-by-state interactions in relative rCMR glc were found in the precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex, left middle frontal gyrus, left inferior/superior parietal lobules, left lingual/fusiform/occipital gyri, and right lingual gyrus. All clusters were significant at P corrected Insomnia was characterized by regional alterations in relative glucose metabolism across NREM sleep and wakefulness. Significant group-by-state interactions in relative rCMR glc suggest that insomnia is associated with impaired disengagement of brain regions involved in cognition (left frontoparietal), self-referential processes (precuneus/posterior cingulate), and affect (left middle frontal, fusiform/lingual gyri) during NREM sleep, or alternatively, to impaired engagement of these regions during wakefulness. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  8. Validated Metrics of Quick Flow Improve Assessments of Streamflow Generation Processes at the Long-Term Sleepers River Research Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebestyen, S. D.; Shanley, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    There are multiple approaches to quantify quick flow components of streamflow. Physical hydrograph separations of quick flow using recession analysis (RA) are objective, reproducible, and easily calculated for long-duration streamflow records (years to decades). However, this approach has rarely been validated to have a physical basis for interpretation. In contrast, isotopic hydrograph separation (IHS) and end member mixing analysis using multiple solutes (EMMA) have been used to identify flow components and flowpath routing through catchment soils. Nonetheless, these two approaches are limited by data from limited and isolated periods (hours to weeks) during which more-intensive grab samples were analyzed. These limitations oftentimes make IHS and EMMA difficult to generalize beyond brief windows of time. At the Sleepers River Research Watershed (SRRW) in northern Vermont, USA, we have data from multiple snowmelt events over a two decade period and from multiple nested catchments to assess relationships among RA, IHS, and EMMA. Quick flow separations were highly correlated among the three techniques, which shows links among metrics of quick flow, water sources, and flow path routing in a small (41 ha), forested catchment (W-9) The similarity in responses validates a physical interpretation for a particular RA approach (the Ekhardt recursive RA filter). This validation provides a new tool to estimate new water inputs and flowpath routing for more and longer periods when chemical or isotopic tracers may not have been measured. At three other SRRW catchments, we found similar strong correlations among the three techniques. Consistent responses across four catchments provide evidence to support other research at the SRRW that shows that runoff generation mechanisms are similar despite differences in catchment sizes and land covers.

  9. Seasonal patterns in metazoan parasite community of the "Fat Sleeper" Dormitator latifrons (Pisces: Eleotridae from Tres Palos Lagoon, Guerrero, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Violante-González

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Dormitator is among the most important fish genera in the Mexican Pacific coastal lagoon systems. In Tres Palos Lagoon, the Fat Sleeper Dormitator latifrons is one of the most significant species based on catch volume, although it is only consumed locally. Very little information exists on this species’ parasitofauna. Composition and temporal variation in the metazoan parasite community structure of Dormitator latifrons from Tres Palos Lagoon (99º47’ W, 16º48’ N, Guerrero, Mexico, were determined using seasonal samples taken between April 2000 and June 2002. Ten parasite species (55 817 individuals were recovered from 219 examined hosts. These species included eight helminths (Ascocotyle (Phagicola longa, Echinochasmus leopoldinae, Clinostomum complanatum, Pseudoacanthostomum panamense, Saccocoelioides lamothei, Parvitaenia cochlearii, Contracaecum sp. and Neoechinorhynchus golvani and two crustaceans (Argulus sp. and Ergasilus sp.. Five of the helminth species exhibited seasonal variation in their infection dynamics associated with environmental changes during the dry and rainy seasons. The variations in the infection dynamics generated changes in the community structure over time. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (3: 1419-1427. Epub 2008 September 30.Entre abril del 2000 y junio del 2002 se efectuó un estudio para determinar la composición y la variación temporal en la estructura de la comunidad de parásitos metazoarios del popoyote Dormitator latifrons en la laguna de Tres Palos, Guerrero, México, a partir de muestras temporales. Se recuperaron diez especies de parásitos (55 817 individuos de 219 hospederos examinados. Estas especies incluyeron ocho helmintos (Ascocotyle (Phagicola longa, Echinochasmus leopoldinae, Clinostomum complanatum, Pseudoacanthostomum panamense, Saccocoelioides lamothei, Parvitaenia cochlearii, Contracaecum sp. y Neoechinorhynchus golvani y dos crustáceos (Argulus sp. y Ergasilus sp.. Cinco de las especies de

  10. Sleep and Respiration in 100 Healthy Caucasian Sleepers--A Polysomnographic Study According to American Academy of Sleep Medicine Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitterling, Thomas; Högl, Birgit; Schönwald, Suzana Veiga; Hackner, Heinz; Gabelia, David; Biermayr, Marlene; Frauscher, Birgit

    2015-06-01

    Despite differences between American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and Rechtschaffen and Kales scoring criteria, normative values following the current AASM criteria are lacking. We investigated sleep and respiratory variables in healthy adults over the lifespan, and established polysomnographic normative values according to current standards. Prospective polysomnographic investigation. Academic referral hospital sleep laboratory. One hundred healthy sleepers aged 19-77 y were selected from a representative population sample by a two-step screening. N/A. All subjects underwent one full-night polysomnography. Sleep and arousals were scored according to AASM standards. Respiration was scored according to AASM 2007 and 2012 criteria in order to compare both methods. Percentile curves showed age-related differences in sleep architecture: a decrease was found for sleep efficiency [≤ 30 y: 87.0 (71.9-94.1)% versus > 60 y: 79.7 (44.5-90.9)%], total sleep time [≤ 30 y: 413.5 (345.6-451.9) min versus > 60 y: 378.3 (216.0-440.0) min], the percentages of N3 [≤ 30 y 20.7 (15.2-37.5)% versus > 60 y: 14.9 (2.4-35.6)%] and rapid eye movement sleep [≤ 30 y 15.5 (7.5-23.6)% versus. > 60 y: 10.3 (1.9-21.9)%], whereas the percentage of wake time after sleep onset increased with age [≤ 30 y 6.0 (1.9-22.8)% versus > 60 y: 15.2 (6.3-48.7)%]. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was higher when applying the AASM 2012 criteria [AHI AASM 2007 0.7 (0.0-21.5)/h versus 2012: 1.7 (0.0-25)/h; P 15/h. This study provides normative data on sleep macrostructure, microstructure, and respiration in adults following AASM standards. Furthermore, we demonstrated that respiration scoring according to AASM 2012 results in higher AHIs, and challenge the use of age-independent respiratory cutoff values. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  11. Inactivity/sleep in two wild free-roaming African elephant matriarchs - Does large body size make elephants the shortest mammalian sleepers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravett, Nadine; Bhagwandin, Adhil; Sutcliffe, Robert; Landen, Kelly; Chase, Michael J; Lyamin, Oleg I; Siegel, Jerome M; Manger, Paul R

    2017-01-01

    The current study provides details of sleep (or inactivity) in two wild, free-roaming African elephant matriarchs studied in their natural habitat with remote monitoring using an actiwatch subcutaneously implanted in the trunk, a standard elephant collar equipped with a GPS system and gyroscope, and a portable weather station. We found that these two elephants were polyphasic sleepers, had an average daily total sleep time of 2 h, mostly between 02:00 and 06:00, and displayed the shortest daily sleep time of any mammal recorded to date. Moreover, these two elephants exhibited both standing and recumbent sleep, but only exhibited recumbent sleep every third or fourth day, potentially limiting their ability to enter REM sleep on a daily basis. In addition, we observed on five occasions that the elephants went without sleep for up to 46 h and traversed around 30 km in 10 h, possibly due to disturbances such as potential predation or poaching events, or a bull elephant in musth. They exhibited no form of sleep rebound following a night without sleep. Environmental conditions, especially ambient air temperature and relative humidity, analysed as wet-bulb globe temperature, reliably predict sleep onset and offset times. The elephants selected novel sleep sites each night and the amount of activity between sleep periods did not affect the amount of sleep. A number of similarities and differences to studies of elephant sleep in captivity are noted, and specific factors shaping sleep architecture in elephants, on various temporal scales, are discussed.

  12. Inactivity/sleep in two wild free-roaming African elephant matriarchs – Does large body size make elephants the shortest mammalian sleepers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravett, Nadine; Bhagwandin, Adhil; Sutcliffe, Robert; Landen, Kelly; Chase, Michael J.; Lyamin, Oleg I.; Siegel, Jerome M.; Manger, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    The current study provides details of sleep (or inactivity) in two wild, free-roaming African elephant matriarchs studied in their natural habitat with remote monitoring using an actiwatch subcutaneously implanted in the trunk, a standard elephant collar equipped with a GPS system and gyroscope, and a portable weather station. We found that these two elephants were polyphasic sleepers, had an average daily total sleep time of 2 h, mostly between 02:00 and 06:00, and displayed the shortest daily sleep time of any mammal recorded to date. Moreover, these two elephants exhibited both standing and recumbent sleep, but only exhibited recumbent sleep every third or fourth day, potentially limiting their ability to enter REM sleep on a daily basis. In addition, we observed on five occasions that the elephants went without sleep for up to 46 h and traversed around 30 km in 10 h, possibly due to disturbances such as potential predation or poaching events, or a bull elephant in musth. They exhibited no form of sleep rebound following a night without sleep. Environmental conditions, especially ambient air temperature and relative humidity, analysed as wet-bulb globe temperature, reliably predict sleep onset and offset times. The elephants selected novel sleep sites each night and the amount of activity between sleep periods did not affect the amount of sleep. A number of similarities and differences to studies of elephant sleep in captivity are noted, and specific factors shaping sleep architecture in elephants, on various temporal scales, are discussed. PMID:28249035

  13. Subjective-Objective Sleep Discrepancy Is Associated With Alterations in Regional Glucose Metabolism in Patients With Insomnia and Good Sleeper Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Daniel B; Karim, Helmet T; Soehner, Adriane M; Hasler, Brant P; James, Jeffrey A; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica H; Franzen, Peter L; Price, Julie C; Nofzinger, Eric A; Buysse, Daniel J

    2017-11-01

    Sleep discrepancies are common in primary insomnia (PI) and include reports of longer sleep onset latency (SOL) than measured by polysomnography (PSG) or "negative SOL discrepancy." We hypothesized that negative SOL discrepancy in PI would be associated with higher relative glucose metabolism during nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in brain networks involved in conscious awareness, including the salience, left executive control, and default mode networks. PI (n = 32) and good sleeper controls (GS; n = 30) completed [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scans during NREM sleep, and relative regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglc) was measured. Sleep discrepancy was calculated by subtracting PSG-measured SOL on the PET night from corresponding self-report values the following morning. We tested for interactions between group (PI vs. GS) and SOL discrepancy for rCMRglc during NREM sleep using both a region of interest mask and exploratory whole-brain analyses. Significant group by SOL discrepancy interactions for rCMRglc were observed in several brain regions (pcorrected PSG-measured SOL) was associated with significantly higher relative rCMRglc in the right anterior insula and middle/posterior cingulate during NREM sleep. In GS, more positive SOL discrepancy (self-reported Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Inactivity/sleep in two wild free-roaming African elephant matriarchs - Does large body size make elephants the shortest mammalian sleepers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Gravett

    Full Text Available The current study provides details of sleep (or inactivity in two wild, free-roaming African elephant matriarchs studied in their natural habitat with remote monitoring using an actiwatch subcutaneously implanted in the trunk, a standard elephant collar equipped with a GPS system and gyroscope, and a portable weather station. We found that these two elephants were polyphasic sleepers, had an average daily total sleep time of 2 h, mostly between 02:00 and 06:00, and displayed the shortest daily sleep time of any mammal recorded to date. Moreover, these two elephants exhibited both standing and recumbent sleep, but only exhibited recumbent sleep every third or fourth day, potentially limiting their ability to enter REM sleep on a daily basis. In addition, we observed on five occasions that the elephants went without sleep for up to 46 h and traversed around 30 km in 10 h, possibly due to disturbances such as potential predation or poaching events, or a bull elephant in musth. They exhibited no form of sleep rebound following a night without sleep. Environmental conditions, especially ambient air temperature and relative humidity, analysed as wet-bulb globe temperature, reliably predict sleep onset and offset times. The elephants selected novel sleep sites each night and the amount of activity between sleep periods did not affect the amount of sleep. A number of similarities and differences to studies of elephant sleep in captivity are noted, and specific factors shaping sleep architecture in elephants, on various temporal scales, are discussed.

  15. Ichthyofauna species of the upper Kaniv reservoir and mouth area of the Desna River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Sytnik

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available It was studied the fish species of the upper part of Kaniv reservoir (Kyiv water area and the mouth area of the Desna River. The found and preceding data of ichthyological research were compared. The changes in the fish population were analyzed. Two new invasive alien fish species were discovered in the Kaniv reservoir and Desna River: Amur sleeper (Perccotus glenii and Stone moroco (Pseudorasdora parva. Generally the ichthyofauna composition of these water bodies was supplemented with seven unmarketable and dirt species.

  16. Morphological and molecular analyses of a new species of Saccocoelioides Szidat, 1954 (Haploporidae Nicoll, 1914) in the fat sleeper Dormitator maculatus (Bloch) (Perciformes: Eleotridae) from the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Gómez, L; Pinacho-Pinacho, C D; Hernández-Orts, J S; Sereno-Uribe, A L; García-Varela, M

    2017-07-01

    Saccocoelioides olmecae n. sp. is described from specimens recovered from the intestine of the fat sleeper Dormitator maculatus (Bloch) (Perciformes: Eleotridae) collected in six localities along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. The new species is mainly distinguished from the other three described species of Saccocoelioides Szidat, 1954 from North and Middle America (i.e. S. sogandaresi Lumsden, 1963, S. chauhani Lamothe-Argumedo, 1974 and S. lamothei Aguirre-Macedo & Violante-González, 2008) by having an elongated body, a sac-like caecum, a uterus that extends to the first third of body and by having vitelline follicles longitudinally elongated reaching the posterior end of the body. Sequences of the large subunit (LSU) of the ribosomal DNA, including the domain D1-D3, and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) were used independently and concatenated to corroborate the morphological distinction among S. olmecae n. sp., S. chauhani and S. lamothei from freshwater and brackish-water fish from Middle America. The genetic divergence estimated among the three species of Saccocoelioides was very low: 1% for LSU and from 1 to 4% for ITS2. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses for each dataset and both datasets combined revealed that S. olmecae n. sp. represents an independent clade with moderate bootstrap support and posterior probabilities. This is the third species of Saccocoelioides described in Mexico, and the 17th species from the Americas.

  17. Railway sleepers made of alkali activated fly ash concrete Durmientes de vías de ferrocarril hechos de hormigón de ceniza volante activadas con álcalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Palomo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the tracks that comprise the world railway network are estimated to contain nearly three billion sleepers, over 400 million of which are made of concrete. At the same time, over 50% of the world demand for sleepers (around 20 million units per year was for the concrete version; and between 2% and 5% of the concrete ties that are laid on tracks every year are to replace or renew worn elements. Concrete durability, however, depends on many factors. And in this context it should be noted that the characteristics of the in-plant industrial process involved in manufacturing precast concrete units differs in a number of ways from in situ construction, vesting these units with properties that distinguish them, in terms of durability, from in situ concrete under the conditions generally prevailing on construction sites. Generally speaking, it is widely admitted that the activation process of fly ashes allows obtaining a material with similar cementing features to those characterising Ordinary Portland Cement. Actually, the alkali activation of fly ashes is a singular procedure by which the powder originated in the power plants is mixed with certain alkaline dissolution and cured under a certain temperature to make solid materials. Contrary to conventional concrete, however, this new type of concrete can attain high strength over a very short time (1 day and do develop excellent durability propertiesActualmente se estima que las vías de ferrocarril a nivel mundial contienen aproximadamente tres billones de durmientes, de los cuales 400 millones son de hormigón. Conjuntamente, sobre el 50% de la demanda mundial por durmientes (estimada en 20 millones anualmente fue por durmientes de hormigón; además, entre el 2% y 5% de los durmientes de hormigón son utilizados en reemplazar elementos dañados. La durabilidad del hormigón, sin embargo, depende de muchos factores. En este contexto se debe hacer notar que el proceso de prefabricación de

  18. The life cycle of Asymphylodora perccotti sp. n. (Trematoda: Lissorchiidae) in the Russian Southern Far East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besprozvannykh, Vladimir V; Ermolenko, Alexey V; Atopkin, Dmitry M

    2012-06-01

    Specimens of Asymphylodora perccotti sp. n. (Trematoda: Lissorchidae) were found in the esophagus of the freshwater fish Perccottus glenii (Odobantidae) taken from the Bolshaya Ussurka River Basin (Primorsky Region, Russian Southern Far East). The first intermediate host of this trematode is a gastropod, Parafossarulus manchouricus, and the secondary hosts are the same mollusk and Boreoelona ussuriensis. Specimens of the new species are similar to A. amnicolae identified by Stunkard in 1959, but the mature worms have larger suckers and shorter ceca. The cercariae of these species are distinguished by body, suckers and pharynx size. These organs in A. perccotti sp. n. are more than one-third larger than what is observed in A. amnicolae. In addition, the new species lacks the capacity for progenesis. Finally, the new species is unusual in that it resides in the fish esophagus instead of the intestine, as is common for most Asymphylodora species. Partial ribosomal DNA sequences and phylogenetic reconstruction sequence data indicate that these worms represent a new digenean species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Personality Characteristics of Long and Short Sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Mervyn K.; Mooney, Dean K.

    1975-01-01

    The present study used a variety of personality tests to compare long- and short-sleeping college students and a stepwise multiple regression analysis in order to arrive at a pattern analysis and to include a test for the effect of possible repressor variables. (Author)

  20. Sleepers' Lag: Study on Motion and Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raca, Mirko; Tormey, Roland; Dillenbourg, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Body language is an essential source of information in everyday communication. Low signal-to-noise ratio prevents us from using it in the automatic processing of student behaviour, an obstacle that we are slowly overcoming with advanced statistical methods. Instead of profiling individual behaviour of students in the classroom, the idea is to…

  1. Waking Up the Sleepers: HIV Latency and Reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoi Ping Mok

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In a patient infected with HIV-1, the presence of latently infected cells from which the virus can be reactivated and rekindle HIV infection in the patient necessitates lifelong administration of antiretroviral treatment. The biology of HIV latency and viral silencing is now becoming clearer at a molecular and cellular level. However, our understanding of HIV-1 latency in vivo is still inadequate. Attempts to therapeutically reactivate the virus in infected patients have yielded disappointing results. This article reviews the research and clinical findings and discusses current thinking on the subject of HIV latency and reactivation.

  2. Growth and mortality of sleeper fish, Bostrychus africanus from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    January 2015 to August 2016) from the Upper New Calabar River. This was aimed at ascertaining the present state of the stock following increased exploitation Analyses were run using the FISAT package. Growth estimates by the Von Bertalanffy ...

  3. The George Wallace Shooting: News Diffusion and the Sleeper Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfatt, Thomas M.; And Others

    Previous studies conclude that the assassination attempt on George C. Wallace was a news event of high, but not maximum, importance, implying that the majority of respondents in any sample would report first learning of the attack via mass media sources. The authors interviewed 144 persons in Ann Arbor, Michigan, regarding their awareness of the…

  4. "Together we stand". Ruth Sleeper and the early years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodies, K E

    1999-01-01

    On June 16, 1952, the National League of Nursing Education (NLNE), an organization that since 1912 had been instrumental in the crusade to advance nursing education in America, convened autonomously for the last time. Later that month, in a landmark incorporation, it would cease to function as an independent agency and would, instead, become the nucleus of the new, broad-based organization known as the National League for Nursing (1). During the final convention, a bittersweet "Hail and Farewell" luncheon was held, in which members reflected on the history of the NLNE and the future tasks of the new NLN. In a paper entitled "Nursing Moves Forward," chairman Pearl McIver asked the simple question that was on everyone's lips: "What then lies ahead for nursing?" (2, p. 184).

  5. Determinants of perceived sleep quality in normal sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goelema, M S; Regis, M; Haakma, R; van den Heuvel, E R; Markopoulos, P; Overeem, S

    2017-09-20

    This study aimed to establish the determinants of perceived sleep quality over a longer period of time, taking into account the separate contributions of actigraphy-based sleep measures and self-reported sleep indices. Fifty participants (52 ± 6.6 years; 27 females) completed two consecutive weeks of home monitoring, during which they kept a sleep-wake diary while their sleep was monitored using a wrist-worn actigraph. The diary included questions on perceived sleep quality, sleep-wake information, and additional factors such as well-being and stress. The data were analyzed using multilevel models to compare a model that included only actigraphy-based sleep measures (model Acti) to a model that included only self-reported sleep measures to explain perceived sleep quality (model Self). In addition, a model based on the self-reported sleep measures and extended with nonsleep-related factors was analyzed to find the most significant determinants of perceived sleep quality (model Extended). Self-reported sleep measures (model Self) explained 61% of the total variance, while actigraphy-based sleep measures (model Acti) only accounted for 41% of the perceived sleep quality. The main predictors in the self-reported model were number of awakenings during the night, sleep onset latency, and wake time after sleep onset. In the extended model, the number of awakenings during the night and total sleep time of the previous night were the strongest determinants of perceived sleep quality, with 64% of the variance explained. In our cohort, perceived sleep quality was mainly determined by self-reported sleep measures and less by actigraphy-based sleep indices. These data further stress the importance of taking multiple nights into account when trying to understand perceived sleep quality.

  6. Chronic Moderate Sleep Restriction in Older Long Sleepers and Older Average Duration Sleepers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Youngstedt, Shawn D.; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Bootzin, Richard R.; Kripke, Daniel F.; Cooper, Jonnifer; Dean, Lauren R.; Catao, Fabio; James, Shelli; Vining, Caitlyn; Williams, Natasha J.; Irwin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have consistently shown that sleeping < . 7. h and ≥. 8. h is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. The risks of short sleep may be consistent with results from experimental sleep deprivation studies. However, there has been little study of chronic moderate sleep restriction and little evaluation of older adults who might be more vulnerable to negative effects of sleep restriction, given their age-related morbidities. Moreover, the risks of long sleep have ...

  7. Nonlinear Finite Element Modelling of Railway Turnout System considering Bearer/Sleeper-Ballast Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sae Siew

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rail turnouts are built to enable flexibility in the rail network as they allow for vehicles to switch between various tracks, therefore maximizing the utilisation of existing rail infrastructure. In general, railway turnouts are a safety-critical and expensive feature to a rail system as they suffer aggressive operational loads, in comparison to a plain rail track, and thus require frequent monitoring and maintenance. In practice, great consideration is given to the dynamic interaction between the turnouts components as a failed component may have adverse effects on the performance of neighbouring components. This paper presents a nonlinear 3D finite element (FE model, taking into account the nonlinearities of materials, in order to evaluate the interaction and behaviour of turnout components. Using ABAQUS, the finite element model was developed to simulate standard concrete bearers with 60 kg/m rail and with a tangential turnout radius of 250 m. The turnout structure is supported by a ballast layer, which is represented by a nonlinearly deformable tensionless solid. The numerical studies firstly demonstrate the importance of load transfer mechanisms in the failure modes of the turnout components. The outcome will lead to a better design and maintenance of railway turnouts, improving public safety and operational reliability.

  8. Pillow use: the behaviour of cervical pain, sleep quality and pillow comfort in side sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Susan J; Grimmer-Somers, Karen; Trott, Patricia

    2009-12-01

    A random allocation single blind block design pillow field study was undertaken to investigate the behaviour of cervico-thoracic spine pain in relation to pillow use. Participants (N=106) who reported preference for side sleep position with one pillow were recruited via a telephone survey and newspaper advertisement. They recorded sleep quality and pillow comfort ratings, frequency of retiring and waking cervical pain and duration of waking cervical pain while sleeping for a week on their usual pillow, polyester, foam, feather and rubber pillows of regular shape and a foam contour pillow. Analysis was undertaken comparing sleep quality, pillow comfort, waking and temporal cervical pain reports, between the usual pillow and the trial pillows, between pillows of differing content and foam pillows of differing shape. This study provides evidence to support recommendation of rubber pillows in the management of waking cervical pain, and to improve sleep quality and pillow comfort. The rubber pillow performed better than subjects' own pillow in most instances. Subjects' own pillow performed similarly to foam and polyester pillows, and there is no evidence that the use of a foam contour pillow has advantages over the regular shaped pillows. Feather pillows should not be recommended.

  9. The Sleeper and the Spindle de Neil Gaiman : quand les reines prennent leur destin en main

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Schneider

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dans le recueilintitulé "Rags and Bones: New Twists on Timeless Tales", chaque auteur choisissait un conte qui l’avait particulièrement touché (soit inspiré, émerveillé ou profondément agacé, le désossait et le reconstruisait à l’attention des jeunes lecteurs actuels. Ainsi, réécrit d’un point de vue contemporain, chacun des contes du recueil se propose, tout en rendant hommage aux textes sources, de soulever un débat particulier. Nous axerons le nôtre autour du destin des personnages féminins.

  10. Analytical Study of the Wide Sleepers on Asphalt Trackbed in Consideration of Nonlinear Contact Condition

    OpenAIRE

    BuSeog Ju; JinWook Lee; SeongHyeok Lee; WooYoung Jung

    2013-01-01

    Recent years, domestic and international interest towards high-speed railway increases dramatically. As a consequence, researchers have shown interested on the track types and upper structure of railway too. Currently, generally used roadbed structure utilizes classical track. This structure has shown drawbacks including increased maintenance costs, train operation/run-ability at high speed, and decrease of passenger comfort. Therefore, many researches were conducted in order to overcome thes...

  11. Six-month-old infant long sleepers prefer a human face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wanqi; Wang, Guanghai; Jiang, Yanrui; Song, Yuanjin; Dong, Shumei; Lin, Qingmin; Deng, Yujiao; Zhu, Qi; Jiang, Fan

    Sleep is known to influence socio-emotional regulation among children and preschoolers, whereas little is known about the association between sleep and social preference during infancy. In the current study, habitual sleep of 49 infants aged around six months old were surveyed by questionnaire, and their social preference was revealed by their preferential gaze in three conditions: (1) a human face paired with an object (ie, a cup), (2) a human face paired with an animal face (ie, a dog), and (3) a dog face paired with a cup. In general, images with richer social information (ie, a human face and dog) attracted infants' gaze significantly more than nonsocial images (ie, cup). Infants with shorter sleep duration (ie, preference toward a human face when paired with a dog than infants with longer sleep duration. Our findings suggest an early positive link between sleep duration and preference towards socially rich stimuli (eg, a human face) during infancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Black yeast diversity on creosoted railway sleepers changes with ambient climatic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gümral, R.; Tümgör, A.; Saraçlı, M.A.; Yıldıran, S.T.; Ilkit, M.; de Hoog, G.S.

    2014-01-01

    The environmental isolation of opportunistic pathogenic black yeasts, which are responsible for a wide spectrum of human infections, is essential to understanding the ecology of clinical fungi. Extreme outdoor environments polluted with aromatic hydrocarbons support the growth of black yeasts in

  13. Black Yeast Diversity on Creosoted Railway Sleepers Changes with Ambient Climatic Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gumral, Ramazan; Tumgor, Aysegul; Saracli, Mehmet Ali; Yildiran, Sinasi Taner; Ilkit, Macit; de Hoog, G. Sybren

    2014-01-01

    The environmental isolation of opportunistic pathogenic black yeasts, which are responsible for a wide spectrum of human infections, is essential to understanding the ecology of clinical fungi. Extreme outdoor environments polluted with aromatic hydrocarbons support the growth of black yeasts in

  14. Respiratory symptoms are more common among short sleepers independent of obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björnsdóttir, Erla; Janson, Christer; Lindberg, Eva

    2017-01-01

    symptoms and whether such an association existed independent of obesity. METHODS: This is a multicentre, cross-sectional, population-based study performed in 23 centres in 10 different countries. Participants (n=5079, 52.3% males) were adults in the third follow-up of the European Community Respiratory......, both for subjects with BMI independent of obesity....

  15. Next-generation invaders? Hotspots for naturalised sleeper weeds in Australia under future climates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Englert Duursma

    Full Text Available Naturalised, but not yet invasive plants, pose a nascent threat to biodiversity. As climate regimes continue to change, it is likely that a new suite of invaders will emerge from the established pool of naturalised plants. Pre-emptive management of locations that may be most suitable for a large number of potentially invasive plants will help to target monitoring, and is vital for effective control. We used species distribution models (SDM and invasion-hotspot analysis to determine where in Australia suitable habitat may occur for 292 naturalised plants. SDMs were built in MaxEnt using both climate and soil variables for current baseline conditions. Modelled relationships were projected onto two Representative Concentration Pathways for future climates (RCP 4.5 and 8.5, based on seven global climate models, for two time periods (2035, 2065. Model outputs for each of the 292 species were then aggregated into single 'hotspot' maps at two scales: continental, and for each of Australia's 37 ecoregions. Across Australia, areas in the south-east and south-west corners of the continent were identified as potential hotspots for naturalised plants under current and future climates. These regions provided suitable habitat for 288 and 239 species respectively under baseline climates. The areal extent of the continental hotspot was projected to decrease by 8.8% under climates for 2035, and by a further 5.2% by 2065. A similar pattern of hotspot contraction under future climates was seen for the majority of ecoregions examined. However, two ecoregions - Tasmanian temperate forests and Australian Alps montane grasslands - showed increases in the areal extent of hotspots of >45% under climate scenarios for 2065. The alpine ecoregion also had an increase in the number of naturalised plant species with abiotically suitable habitat under future climate scenarios, indicating that this area may be particularly vulnerable to future incursions by naturalised plants.

  16. Next-Generation Invaders? Hotspots for Naturalised Sleeper Weeds in Australia under Future Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Erin; Hughes, Lesley; Downey, Paul O.; Leishman, Michelle R.

    2013-01-01

    Naturalised, but not yet invasive plants, pose a nascent threat to biodiversity. As climate regimes continue to change, it is likely that a new suite of invaders will emerge from the established pool of naturalised plants. Pre-emptive management of locations that may be most suitable for a large number of potentially invasive plants will help to target monitoring, and is vital for effective control. We used species distribution models (SDM) and invasion-hotspot analysis to determine where in Australia suitable habitat may occur for 292 naturalised plants. SDMs were built in MaxEnt using both climate and soil variables for current baseline conditions. Modelled relationships were projected onto two Representative Concentration Pathways for future climates (RCP 4.5 and 8.5), based on seven global climate models, for two time periods (2035, 2065). Model outputs for each of the 292 species were then aggregated into single ‘hotspot’ maps at two scales: continental, and for each of Australia’s 37 ecoregions. Across Australia, areas in the south-east and south-west corners of the continent were identified as potential hotspots for naturalised plants under current and future climates. These regions provided suitable habitat for 288 and 239 species respectively under baseline climates. The areal extent of the continental hotspot was projected to decrease by 8.8% under climates for 2035, and by a further 5.2% by 2065. A similar pattern of hotspot contraction under future climates was seen for the majority of ecoregions examined. However, two ecoregions - Tasmanian temperate forests and Australian Alps montane grasslands - showed increases in the areal extent of hotspots of >45% under climate scenarios for 2065. The alpine ecoregion also had an increase in the number of naturalised plant species with abiotically suitable habitat under future climate scenarios, indicating that this area may be particularly vulnerable to future incursions by naturalised plants. PMID:24386353

  17. The relationship between brain morphology and polysomnography in healthy good sleepers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias A Reinhard

    Full Text Available Normal sleep continuity and architecture show remarkable inter-individual variability. Previous studies suggest that brain morphology may explain inter-individual differences in sleep variables.Thirty-eight healthy subjects spent two consecutive nights at the sleep laboratory with polysomnographic monitoring. Furthermore, high-resolution T1-weighted MRI datasets were acquired in all participants. EEG sleep recordings were analyzed using standard sleep staging criteria and power spectral analysis. Using the FreeSurfer software for automated segmentation, 174 variables were determined representing the volume and thickness of cortical segments and the volume of subcortical brain areas. Regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship with polysomnographic and spectral EEG power variables.The analysis did not provide any support for the a-priori formulated hypotheses of an association between brain morphology and polysomnographic variables. Exploratory analyses revealed that the thickness of the left caudal anterior cingulate cortex was positively associated with EEG beta2 power (24-32 Hz during REM sleep. The volume of the left postcentral gyrus was positively associated with periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMS.The function of the anterior cingulate cortex as well as EEG beta power during REM sleep have been related to dreaming and sleep-related memory consolidation, which may explain the observed correlation. Increased volumes of the postcentral gyrus may be the result of increased sensory input associated with PLMS. However, due to the exploratory nature of the corresponding analyses, these results have to be replicated before drawing firm conclusions.

  18. Next-generation invaders? Hotspots for naturalised sleeper weeds in Australia under future climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duursma, Daisy Englert; Gallagher, Rachael V; Roger, Erin; Hughes, Lesley; Downey, Paul O; Leishman, Michelle R

    2013-01-01

    Naturalised, but not yet invasive plants, pose a nascent threat to biodiversity. As climate regimes continue to change, it is likely that a new suite of invaders will emerge from the established pool of naturalised plants. Pre-emptive management of locations that may be most suitable for a large number of potentially invasive plants will help to target monitoring, and is vital for effective control. We used species distribution models (SDM) and invasion-hotspot analysis to determine where in Australia suitable habitat may occur for 292 naturalised plants. SDMs were built in MaxEnt using both climate and soil variables for current baseline conditions. Modelled relationships were projected onto two Representative Concentration Pathways for future climates (RCP 4.5 and 8.5), based on seven global climate models, for two time periods (2035, 2065). Model outputs for each of the 292 species were then aggregated into single 'hotspot' maps at two scales: continental, and for each of Australia's 37 ecoregions. Across Australia, areas in the south-east and south-west corners of the continent were identified as potential hotspots for naturalised plants under current and future climates. These regions provided suitable habitat for 288 and 239 species respectively under baseline climates. The areal extent of the continental hotspot was projected to decrease by 8.8% under climates for 2035, and by a further 5.2% by 2065. A similar pattern of hotspot contraction under future climates was seen for the majority of ecoregions examined. However, two ecoregions - Tasmanian temperate forests and Australian Alps montane grasslands - showed increases in the areal extent of hotspots of >45% under climate scenarios for 2065. The alpine ecoregion also had an increase in the number of naturalised plant species with abiotically suitable habitat under future climate scenarios, indicating that this area may be particularly vulnerable to future incursions by naturalised plants.

  19. Turning rough sleepers into responsible citizens : Third way policies on homelessness in England and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr Lia van Doorn; E. Tonkens

    2001-01-01

    On the eve of the twenty-first century, it is a scandal that there are still people sleeping rough on our streets. This is not a situation we can continue to tolerate in a modern and civil society. These were the words of Tony Blair in his foreword to the policy document Rough Sleeping, The

  20. Consistent high prevalence of Exophiala dermatitidis, a neurotropic opportunist, on railway sleepers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazdanparast, S.A.; Mohseni, S.; De Hoog, G. S.; Aslani, N.; Sadeh, A.; Badali, H.

    Environmental isolation of black yeasts potentially causing human disorders is essential for understanding ecology and routes of infection. Several Exophiala species show prevalence for man-made environments rich in monoaromatic compounds, such as creosote-treated or petroleum-stained railway

  1. O gigante dormente: O lugar nos trilhos da ferrovia Norte-Sul / The railway sleeper giant: The place in the tracks of the North-South railroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlete Mendes Mendes da Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Great Engineering Projects are events that change the space, altering their natural and socio-cultural elements. The socio-spatial effects of these developments can be positive and / or negative. The construction of the North – South railway is considered a major project. This suggests a path with railways of approximately 2100 km across the Midwest and north of the country, connecting the north with the Carajás Railroad and south with the Central Atlantic Railroad. With that reduces freight costs for long distances, and can raise the economic development of the Brazilian Cerrado. Despite the developmental objectives of the FNS, this paper seeks to reflect on the impact that the railroad can bring to the rural and urban in the city of Anápolis - GO, taking place as a category of this analysis. There is no way to integrate, include, accommodate a large number of people who ‘has no place’ in society exclusionary. Moreover, the forms of inclusion and reinstatement are increasingly encountered and degrading little to a condition of social welfare. Aiming to spatialize and illustrate this reflection, the geographical treatment that is intended to give the perspective of space - place mentions the construction of a major infrastructure project in the transport logistics Mid- Region the Center of Goiás, at the southern entrance of the city of Anápolis, in State of Goiás, the North South Railway - FNS and its socio-spatial implications.

  2. Guavinella tropica n. gen., n. sp. (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae) from the gills of the bigmouth sleeper, Gobiomorus dormitor (Perciformes: Eleotridae), from Mexico

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mendoza-Franco, E. F.; Scholz, Tomáš; Cabanas-Carranza, G.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 1 (2003), s. 26-31 ISSN 1525-2647 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : Monogenea * Dactylogyridae * fish parasite Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.575, year: 2003

  3. The developmental feature of the sleep problems in adolescence : The approach for the application to educational stage

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Hideki; Hayashi, Mitsuo; Hori, Tadao

    1997-01-01

    To clarify the actual feature of the sleep problems in adolescence from the points of view sleep loss, circadian rhythm, and development, the survey for five years was performed on 523 students in a College of Technology. The survey results were analyzed in regard to the Sleep Habits Scales and the Life Habits Scales. These scales were (1) Long sleeper-Short sleeper, (2) Good sleeper-Poor sleeper, (3) Sleep phase advanced type-Sleep phase delayed type, (4) Morningness-Eveningness, (5) Regnlar...

  4. An examination of sleep health, lifestyle and mental health in junior high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hideki; Taira, Kazuhiko; Arakawa, Masashi; Masuda, Atushi; Yamamoto, Yukari; Komoda, Yoko; Kadegaru, Hathuko; Shirakawa, Shuichiro

    2002-06-01

    The factors that influence sleep health and mental health in junior high school students' lifestyles was examined. The proportion of students who replied that they feel bad in the morning, and who do not have breakfast was significantly higher in poor sleepers. The proportion of students who regularly take exercise was significantly lower among poor sleepers. Compared with good sleepers, poor sleepers had a higher number of illnesses and their General Health Questionnaire score was worse. The study's results suggest that sleep health is closely related to both physical and mental health, and that habits such as exercise, and regular sleeping and eating, are important for maintaining and improving students' sleep health.

  5. Hráč, spáč, stvořitel, vypravěč Borgesovo dílo pohledem (romantické ironie // THE PLAYER, THE SLEEPER, THE CREATOR, THE NARRATOR. The work of Jorge Luis Borges from the perspective of romantic irony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vít Kazmar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article tries to offer a reading of Borges’ fiction through the theory of romantic irony. First, it briefly outlines the “history of irony”, beginning with the approach of Plato’s Socrates, continuing with the late antiquity and its mostly rhetorical interpretation of irony as a means of expressing a thought through its opposite. The real focus of the article is the romantic irony, in particular the views of Friedrich Schlegel, who was one of the chief theoreticians of German romanticism. The reading of Borges’ short stories is attempted, the point of departure being two Shekel’s fragments that offer contrasting and complementary possibilities of interpretation. The first explains romantic irony in the context of the notion of chaos and possibility, the second draws on the concept of parabasis, known from the theory of Ancient Greek drama. The first interpretation tries to show Borges’ poetics as a poetics of possibility; the short story Library of Babel serves as an example. The second interpretation shows how the motives of waking up, creation and game can all be connected through the concept of parabasis and shows a group of Borges’ text, including some poems, that can be considered ironic in this special sense.

  6. Subjective memory complaints in an elderly population with poor sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Suk-Hoon; Yoon, In-Young; Lee, Sang Don; Kim, Tae; Lee, Chung Suk; Han, Ji Won; Kim, Ki Woong; Kim, Chan-Hyung

    2017-05-01

    The association between sleep disturbances and cognitive decline in the elderly has been putative and controversial. We evaluated the relation between subjective sleep quality and cognitive function in the Korean elderly. Among 459 community-dwelling subjects, 352 subjects without depression or neurologic disorders (mean age 68.2 ± 6.1) were analyzed in this study. All the participants completed the Korean version of the consortium to establish a registry for Alzheimer's disease neuropsychological battery (CERAD-KN) as an objective cognitive measure and subjective memory complaints questionnaire (SMCQ). Based on the Pittsburgh sleep quality index, two types of sleepers were defined: 'good sleepers' and 'poor sleepers'. There were 192 good sleepers (92 men) and 160 poor sleepers (51 men). Poor sleepers reported more depressive symptoms and more use of sleep medication, and showed higher SMCQ scores than good sleepers, but there was no difference in any assessments of CERAD-KN. In the regression analysis, depressive symptoms and subjective sleep quality were associated with subjective memory complaints (β = 0.312, p sleep quality was associated with subjective memory complaints, but not with objective cognitive measures. As subjective memory complaints might develop into cognitive disorders, poor sleep quality in the elderly needs to be adequately controlled.

  7. Influence of environmental pollution with creosote oil or its vapors on biomass and selected physiological groups of microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyśko-Łupicka, Teresa; Cybulska, Krystyna; Kołosowski, Paweł; Telesiński, Arkadiusz; Sudoł, Adam

    2017-11-01

    Survival of microorganisms in soils from treatment facility and landfill of wooden railway sleepers contaminated with creosote oil as well as in two types of soils with different content of organic carbon, treated with creosote oil vapors, was assessed. Microbiological assays including determination of: the biomass of living microorganisms method and the number of proteolytic, lipolytic and amylolytic microorganisms were carried out under laboratory conditions. Chromatography analysis of the soil extract from railway sleepers treatment facility was performed using GC/MS. The highest biomass and the number of tested microorganisms were determined in soils from wooden railway sleepers landfill, while the lowest in soil from the railway sleepers treatment facility. Vapors of creosote oil, regardless of the soil type, significantly increased only the number of lipolytic bacteria.

  8. Sound : Albumid, singlid / Ülo Külm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Külm, Ülo

    1998-01-01

    Uutest albumitest Helloween "Better than raw", Primus "Rhinoplasty", Unbelievable Truth "Almost here", Dallas "Sleepers entertainer" (eesti), Massive Attack "Mezzanine" ja singlist Busta Rhymes "Turn it up /Fire it up"

  9. Restless Legs Syndrome -- Causes and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... miles): 10 25 50 Share: Essentials in Sleep Insomnia Overview & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis & Self Tests Treatment Sleep Apnea Overview & Facts ... Self Test & Diagnosis Treatment Snoring Overview and Facts Causes and Symptoms Self Tests & ... Insomnia Short Sleeper Hypersomnias Narcolepsy Insufficient ...

  10. Sleep Eduction: Treatment & Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... miles): 10 25 50 Share: Essentials in Sleep Insomnia Overview & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis & Self Tests Treatment Sleep Apnea Overview & Facts ... Self Test & Diagnosis Treatment Snoring Overview and Facts Causes and Symptoms Self Tests & ... Insomnia Short Sleeper Hypersomnias Narcolepsy Insufficient ...

  11. Restless Legs Syndrome -- Self-Tests and Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... miles): 10 25 50 Share: Essentials in Sleep Insomnia Overview & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis & Self Tests Treatment Sleep Apnea Overview & Facts ... Self Test & Diagnosis Treatment Snoring Overview and Facts Causes and Symptoms Self Tests & ... Insomnia Short Sleeper Hypersomnias Narcolepsy Insufficient ...

  12. Find a Sleep Center Near You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... miles): 10 25 50 Share: Essentials in Sleep Insomnia Overview & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis & Self Tests Treatment Sleep Apnea Overview & Facts ... Self Test & Diagnosis Treatment Snoring Overview and Facts Causes and Symptoms Self Tests & ... Insomnia Short Sleeper Hypersomnias Narcolepsy Insufficient ...

  13. Parasomnias

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... miles): 10 25 50 Share: Essentials in Sleep Insomnia Overview & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis & Self Tests Treatment Sleep Apnea Overview & Facts ... Self Test & Diagnosis Treatment Snoring Overview and Facts Causes and Symptoms Self Tests & ... Insomnia Short Sleeper Hypersomnias Narcolepsy Insufficient ...

  14. Voluntary Self-Control of Sleep to Facilitate Quasi-Continuous Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-06-01

    normal sleepers have provided rather coltn findings on WPM. the nature of short nocturnal sleep periods . Adult nocturnal sleep has been reported in...recuperative value of brief sleep periods , what is important is that these "short sleepers" have fewer awakenings and less time In transition stages of...In recent years,. from en entirely different theoretical perspective, 10. investigators have studied short, regularly intermittent sleep periods by an

  15. Subjective sleep complaints indicate objective sleep problems in psychosomatic patients: a prospective polysomnographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Michael; Dietz, Marie; Veauthier, Christian; Fietze, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the relationship between subjective complaints and polysomnographical parameters in psychosomatic patients. Method A convenience sample of patients from a psychosomatic inpatient unit were classified according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) as very poor sleepers (PSQI >10, n=80) and good sleepers (PSQI psychosomatic patients and suggest that even in this patient group, respective sleep complaints are more than just the expression of general somatization or lamenting. PMID:27570468

  16. Sleep Quality Among Low-Income Young Women in Southeast Texas Predicts Changes in Perceived Stress Through Hurricane Ike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhao Helen; Stevens, Richard G; Tennen, Howard; North, Carol S; Grady, James J; Holzer, Charles

    2015-07-01

    To document the time course of perceived stress among women through the period of a natural disaster, to determine the effect of sleep quality on this time course, and to identify risk factors that predict higher levels of perceived stress. Longitudinal study from 2006-2012. Community-based family planning clinics in southeast Texas. There were 296 women aged 18-31 y who experienced Hurricane Ike, September 2008. Cohen Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) was administered every 2 mo from 6 mo before to 12 mo after Hurricane Ike. Sleep quality was assessed 1 mo after Hurricane Ike using the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Good sleep was defined as a PSQI summary score sleep as a score ≥ 5. Hurricane Ike stressors (e.g., property damage, subjective stressors) and pre-Ike lifetime major life events and emotional health (e.g., emotional dysregulation, self-control) were also assessed. Over the entire period of 18 mo (6 mo before and 12 mo after the hurricane), perceived stress was significantly higher among poor sleepers compared to good sleepers, and only good sleepers showed a significant decrease in perceived stress after Hurricane Ike. In addition, a higher level of perceived stress was positively associated with greater Ike damage among poor sleepers, whereas this correlation was not observed among good sleepers. In the final multivariate longitudinal model, Ike-related subjective stressors as well as baseline major life events and emotional dysregulation among poor sleepers predicted higher levels of perceived stress over time; among good sleepers, additional factors such as lower levels of self-control and having a history of a psychiatric disorder also predicted higher levels of perceived stress. Sleep quality after Hurricane Ike, an intense natural disaster producing substantial damage, impacted changes in perceived stress over time. Our findings suggest the possibility that providing victims of disasters with effective interventions to improve sleep quality

  17. The risks of sleeping "too much". Survey of a National Representative Sample of 24671 adults (INPES health barometer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Léger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A significant U-shaped association between sleep duration and several morbidity (obesity, diabetes or cardiovascular disease and mortality risks has been regularly reported. However, although the physiological pathways and risks associated with "too short sleep" (<5 hours/day have been well demonstrated, little is known about "too much sleeping". PURPOSE: To explore socio-demographic characteristics and comorbidities of "long sleepers" (over 10 hours/day from a nationally representative sample of adults. METHODS: A cross-sectional nationally representative sample of 24,671 subjects from 15 to 85-year-old. An estimated total sleep time (TST on non-leisure days was calculated based on a specifically designed sleep log which allows to distinguish "long sleepers" from "short sleepers" (<5 hours/day. Insomnia was assessed according to the International classification of sleep disorders (ICSD-2. RESULTS: The average TST was 7 hours and 13 minutes (+/- 17 minutes. Six hundred and twelve subjects were "long sleepers" (2.7% and 1969 "short sleepers" (7.5%. Compared to the whole group, "long sleepers" were more often female, younger (15-25 year-old or older (above 65 year-old, with no academic degree, mostly clerks and blue collar workers. "Long sleepers" were significantly more likely to have psychiatric diseases and a greater body mass index (BMI. However, long sleep was not significantly associated with the presence of any other chronic medical disease assessed. Conversely, short sleep duration was significantly associated with almost all the other chronic diseases assessed. CONCLUSIONS: In the general population, sleeping too much was associated with psychiatric diseases and higher BMI, but not with other chronic medical diseases.

  18. Prospects for co-firing of clean coal and creosote-treated waste wood at small-scale power stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zandersons Janis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available If a small-scale clean coal fueled power plant is co-fueled with 5% of creosote-treated used-up sleeper wood, the decontamination by carbonisation at 500 °C in an indirectly heated rotary kiln with the diameter 1.7 m and effective length 10 m can be realized. It should be included in the "3R Clean Coal Carbonisation Plant" system, which processes coal. It will improve the heat balance of the system, since the carbonisation of wood will deliver a lot of high caloricity pyroligneous vapour to the joint furnace of the "3R Clean Coal Carbonisation Plant". Pine wood sleeper sapwood contains 0.25% of sulphur, but the average pine sleeper wood (sapwood and heartwood 0.05% of sulphur. Most of the sulphur is lost with the pyroligneous vapour and burned in the furnace. Since the "3R Clean Coal Carbonisation Plant" is equipped with a flue gases cleaning system, the SO2 emission level will not exceed 5 mg/m3. The charcoal of the sapwood portion of sleepers and that of the average sleeper wood will contain 0.22% and 0.035% of sulphur, respectively. The increase of the carbonisation temperature does not substantially decrease the sulphur content in charcoal, although it is sufficiently low, and the charcoal can be co-fired with clean coal. The considered process is suitable for small power plants, if the biomass input in the common energy balance is 5 to 10%. If the mean distance of sleepers transportation for Central and Eastern Europe is estimated not to exceed 200 km, the co-combustion of clean coal and carbonized sleepers would be an acceptable option from the environmental and economic points of view.

  19. Sleep-related attentional bias in insomnia: A state-of-the-science review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kamelia; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Espie, Colin A; MacMahon, Kenneth M A; Woods, Heather Cleland; Kyle, Simon D

    2015-12-01

    Prominent models of insomnia posit that sleep-related attentional bias plays an important role in the development and maintenance of insomnia. Here we conduct the first systematic review of the sleep-related attentional bias construct, indexed through reaction time-based experimental tasks. Literature search identified 13 studies that met pre-defined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Included studies involved between-group comparisons (poor sleepers versus controls), as well as sleep manipulations and correlational investigations with healthy sleepers. For studies involving comparisons between poor sleepers and healthy controls, effect size estimates were computed for task-relevant dependent variables. Six of the nine studies comparing poor sleepers and controls revealed statistically significant group differences in support of a differential sleep-related attentional bias (medium-to-large effect sizes), with flicker, dot-probe and Posner tasks being most sensitive to group effects. Due to the paucity of studies and variability in design and measurement, no conclusions could be reached regarding manipulation or induction of attentional bias in good sleepers. Results from the relatively small number of studies support the presence of sleep-related attentional bias in insomnia; however, its role in the development and/or maintenance of insomnia remains to be elucidated. We set out a research agenda aimed at advancing the understanding of sleep-related attention bias. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The stuff that dreams aren't made of: why wake-state and dream-state sensory experiences differ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, D

    1993-06-01

    It is adaptive for individuals to be continuously alert and responsive to external stimuli (such as the sound and odor of an approaching predator or the cry of an infant), even during sleep. Natural selection thus has disfavored the occurrence during sleep of hallucinations that compromise external vigilance. In the great majority of mammalian species, including Homo sapiens, closed eyes and immobility are basic aspects of sleep. Therefore, (a) visual and movement sensory modalities (except kinesthesis) do not provide the sleeper with accurate information about the external environment or the sleeper's relationship to that environment; (b) the sleeper's forebrain "vigilance mechanism" does not monitor these modalities; hence (c) visual and movement hallucinations--similar or identical to percepts--can occur during sleep without compromising vigilance. In contrast, the other sensory modalities do provide the sleeper with a continuous flow of information about the external environment or the sleeper's relationship to that environment, and these modalities are monitored by the vigilance mechanism. Hallucinations of kinesthesis, pain, touch, warmth, cold, odor, and sound thus would compromise vigilance, and their occurrence during sleep has been disfavored by natural selection. This vigilance hypothesis generates novel predictions about dream phenomenology and REM-state neurophysiology and has implications for the general study of imagery.

  1. Development of standard weight equations for Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico amphidromous fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Patrick B.; Kwak, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    We collected and compiled length and weight information from four countries and one commonwealth to develop standard weight (Ws) equations for three amphidromous fish species native to the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico regions: mountain mullet Agonostomus monticola (N = 9,768 individuals, 52 populations), river goby Awaous banana (N = 1,847 individuals, 62 populations), and bigmouth sleeper Gobiomorus dormitor (N = 2,983 individuals, 53 populations). Linear and quadratic Ws equations for three quartiles (25%, median, 75%) are presented for these three species. The length-weight relationship from eight lentic bigmouth sleeper populations was significantly different from that of lotic populations, reflecting higher weights of juvenile fish (equations were developed for lotic populations of bigmouth sleepers. W(s) equations were not developed from lentic bigmouth sleeper populations alone due to the low number of applicable populations caused by life history constraints; the equation from combined lentic and lotic populations is suggested for application to lentic bigmouth sleeper populations. These morphometric relationships for amphidromous fishes may improve the ability to assess existing and potential sport fisheries and allow ecological assessment based on fish condition.

  2. Sleep duration and body mass index and waist circumference among U.S. adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Earl S; Li, Chaoyang; Wheaton, Anne G; Chapman, Daniel P; Perry, Geraldine S; Croft, Janet B

    2014-02-01

    To examine the form of the relationship between sleep duration and anthropometric measures and possible differences in these relationships by gender and race or ethnicity. Data for 13,742 participants aged ≥20 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2010 were used. Sleep duration was categorized as ≤6 (short sleepers), 7-9, and ≥10 hours (long sleepers). Short sleepers were as much as 1.7 kg/m² (SE 0.4) heavier and had 3.4 cm (SE 1.0) more girth than long sleepers. Among participants without depression or a diagnosed sleep disorder, sleep duration was significantly associated with body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference in an inverse linear association in the entire sample, men, women, whites, African Americans, and participants aged 20-39 years. No evidence for statistical interaction by gender and race or ethnicity was observed. Regression coefficients were notably stronger among adults aged 20-39 years. Compared to participants who reported sleeping 7-9 hours per night, short sleepers were more likely to be obese and have abdominal obesity. In this nationally representative sample of US adults, an inverse linear association most consistently characterized the association between sleep duration and BMI and waist circumference. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  3. The subjective meaning of sleep quality: a comparison of individuals with and without insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Allison G; Stinson, Kathleen; Whitaker, Katriina L; Moskovitz, Damian; Virk, Harvinder

    2008-03-01

    "Sleep quality" is poorly defined yet ubiquitously used by researchers, clinicians and patients. While poor sleep quality is a key feature of insomnia, there are few empirical investigations of sleep quality in insomnia patients. Accordingly, our aim was to investigate the subjective meaning of sleep quality among individuals with insomnia and normal sleepers. Cross sectional between groups (insomnia vs. good sleeper). Analyses were conducted across three outcome variables: (1) a "Speak Freely" procedure in which participants' descriptions of good and poor sleep quality nights were analysed, (2) a "Sleep Quality Interview" in which participants judged the relative importance of variables included in previous research on sleep quality and (3) a sleep quality diary completed over seven consecutive nights. University Department of Psychiatry. Individuals with insomnia (n = 25) and normal sleepers (n = 28). N/A. Both the insomnia and normal sleeper groups defined sleep quality by tiredness on waking and throughout the day, feeling rested and restored on waking, and the number of awakenings they experienced in the night. The insomnia group had more requirements for judging sleep to be of good quality. The meaning of sleep quality among individuals with insomnia and normal sleepers was broadly similar. A comprehensive assessment of a patient's appraisal of their sleep quality may require an assessment of waking and daytime variables.

  4. Prognostic Importance of Sleep Quality in Patients With Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Suk; Lennie, Terry A; Heo, Seongkum; Song, Eun Kyeung; Moser, Debra K

    2016-11-01

    Poor sleep quality is common and is associated with poor quality of life and health status in patients with heart failure. However, few investigators have focused on the impact of impaired sleep quality on survival in heart failure. To examine whether self-reported sleep quality is associated with prognosis in patients with heart failure. The study sample consisted of 204 patients with heart failure. Sleep quality was measured with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Poor sleepers were defined as patients with scores greater than 5 on the index. Patients were followed up for a median of 364 days to determine cardiac events (a composite of cardiac death, hospitalizations, or emergency department visits for cardiac reasons). Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression was used to examine whether poor sleepers were at a higher risk than good sleepers for shorter cardiac event-free survival after covariates were adjusted for. Of 204 patients, 129 (63%) reported poor sleep quality. Poor sleepers were 2.5 times more likely to have a shorter cardiac event-free survival (95% CI, 1.164-5.556) than were good sleepers after covariates were controlled for. Impaired sleep quality was prevalent in patients with heart failure and was associated with poor cardiac event-free survival. Clinicians should assess and manage sleep quality in patients with heart failure to improve outcomes. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  5. Does objectively assessed sleep at five years predict sleep and psychological functioning at 14 years? - Hmm, yes and no!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Serge; Hatzinger, Martin; Stadler, Christina; Bolten, Margarete; von Wyl, Agnes; Perren, Sonja; von Klitzing, Kai; Stadelmann, Stephanie; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith

    2015-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that objectively assessed sleep at kindergarten level predicts sleep and psychological functioning in adolescence. Thirty-seven adolescents aged 14 years (SD = 1.3), of 67 participants assessed as preschoolers, took part in a follow-up study nine years later. Participants completed a series of questionnaires related to sleep and psychological functioning. Sleep-EEG clusters of poor, normal and good sleepers assessed as children nine years earlier were used as predictors for subjective sleep and psychological functioning in adolescence. At the age of 14, those who were normal and good sleepers rather than poor sleepers at the age of five had more positive psychological functioning on dimensions including mental toughness, peer relationship, self-esteem, and perceived stress, but did not differ in current sleep patterns. Objectively assessed sleep patterns at the age of five are predictive of aspects of psychological functioning during adolescence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Diabetic nephropathy: a strong predictor of sleep quality in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edalat-Nejad, Mahnaz; Jafarian, Nahid; Yousefichaijan, Parsa

    2014-07-01

    Sleep complaints are common in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Sleep quality (SQ) is a predictor of quality of life and mortality risk in HD. The aim of this study was to examine factors that may have a role in SQ. In this cross-sectional analytic study, 138 end-stage renal disease patients receiving maintenance HD for >3 months were included. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to measure individual's SQ. Patients with a global PSQI score >5 were assumed as poor sleepers. Eighty-eight patients (64%) were classified as poor sleepers. Poor sleepers were older and more likely had diabetes. They had significantly higher serum ferritin and calcium levels and lower serum parathyroid hormone level (all P-values attention to the care of this subgroup with regard to the diagnosis and management of sleep complaints.

  7. Is daily routine important for sleep? An investigation of social rhythms in a clinical insomnia population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Taryn G; Carney, Colleen E; Haynes, Patricia; Harris, Andrea L

    2015-02-01

    Social rhythms, also known as daily routines (e.g. exercise, of school or work, recreation, social activities), have been identified as potential time cues to help to regulate the biological clock. Past research has shown links between regularity and healthy sleep. This study examined the regularity and frequency of daytime activities in a clinical insomnia population and a good sleeper comparison group. Participants (N = 69) prospectively monitored their sleep and daily activities for a 2-week period. Although participants with insomnia and good sleepers had similar levels of activity, relative to good sleepers, those with insomnia were less regular in their activities. Findings from this study add to the growing number of studies that highlight the relative importance of the regularity of daytime activities on sleep. Accordingly, future research should test treatment components that focus on regulating daytime activities, which would likely improve treatment outcomes.

  8. Professional correlates of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Damien; Massuel, Marie-Anne; Metlaine, Arnaud

    2006-02-01

    Insomnia is a highly prevalent disorder that affects daytime functioning, behavior, and quality of life. Several reports have shown that insomnia impacts on the workforce and is associated with an increased risk of absenteeism. However, few workplace studies have been performed. Our study attempted to evaluate the professional correlates of insomnia by comparing a group of workers with insomnia to a matched group of good sleepers. The main objective measure was absenteeism. Accidents, self-esteem at work, job satisfaction, and efficiency at work were also investigated. Pairs of workers with insomnia (according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition definition) and good sleepers, matched by age, sex, and occupational status, were interviewed by their occupational physician and also answered a self-administered questionnaire on work-related criteria. Objective data on absenteeism (number of days absent from work) were provided by the employers' health resource databases. Paris and the Ile de France region (France). Seven hundred eighty-five subjects completed the questionnaire. We retained 369 pair (ie, 738 subjects) for analysis. Insomniacs missed work twice as often as good sleepers. The difference between insomniacs and good sleepers in terms of absenteeism was particularly high for blue-collar workers (odds ratio = 3.0) and men (odds ratio = 2.31). Insomniacs had also a higher accident rate while driving and, strikingly, a 3-fold greater risk of having 2 or 3 serious road accidents. They also reported poor self-esteem at work, less job satisfaction, and less efficiency at work, compared with good sleepers. Our study found an objective increase in absenteeism in insomniacs compared with good sleepers.

  9. Patterns of sleep quality during and after postacute rehabilitation in older adults: a latent class analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jennifer L; Dzierzewski, Joseph M; Mitchell, Michael; Fung, Constance H; Jouldjian, Stella; Alessi, Cathy A

    2013-12-01

    Sleep quality is related to emotional, physical, psychological and cognitive functioning and functional independence in later life. After acute health events, older adults are likely to utilize postacute rehabilitation services to improve functioning and facilitate return to independent living. Patterns of how sleep changes with postacute rehabilitation, and predictors of such patterns, are unknown. The current investigation employed latent class analysis (LCA) methods to classify older adults (n = 233) into groups based on patterns of self-reported sleep quality pre-illness, during postacute rehabilitation and up to 1 year following postacute rehabilitation. Using LCA, older adults were grouped into (1) consistently good sleepers (46%), (2) good sleepers who transitioned into poor sleepers (34%), (3) consistently poor sleepers (14%) and (4) poor sleepers who transitioned into good sleepers (6%). In three planned analyses, pain was an independent predictor of membership in classes 1 or 2 (good pre-illness sleep quality) versus classes 3 or 4 (poor pre-illness sleep quality), and of membership in class 1 (consistently good sleep) versus class 2 (good sleep that transitioned to poor sleep). A lower Mini-Mental State Examination score was a predictor of membership in class 1 versus class 2. There were no statistically significant predictors of membership in class 3 versus class 4. Demographics, comorbidities and depressive symptoms were not significant predictors of class membership. These findings have implications for identification of older adults at risk for developing poor sleep associated with changes in health and postacute rehabilitation. The findings also suggest that pain symptoms should be targeted to improve sleep during postacute rehabilitation. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  10. Seven to eight hours of sleep a night is associated with a lower prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and reduced overall cardiometabolic risk in adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Chaput

    Full Text Available Previous studies looking at the relationship between sleep duration and the metabolic syndrome have only used a dichotomous approach (presence/absence and failed to adjust for important confounding factors. The objective of the present study was to examine the association between self-reported sleep duration and features of the metabolic syndrome in adults.A cross-sectional analysis from the Quebec Family Study (Canada was conducted on 810 participants aged 18 to 65 years. Participants were categorized as short (≤6 h, adequate (7-8 h or long (≥9 h sleepers. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's criteria.Overall, 24.6% of the sample had the metabolic syndrome. A U-shaped relationship between sleep duration and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (33.3%, 22.0% and 28.8% in short, adequate and long sleepers, respectively was observed (P<0.01. Only short sleepers had a significant increase in the odds of having the metabolic syndrome (OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.08-2.84 compared to adequate sleepers after adjustment for age, sex, smoking habits, highest education level, total annual family income, alcohol consumption, coffee intake, menopausal status, daily caloric intake, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Likewise, the clustered cardiometabolic risk score (i.e. continuous risk score based on the metabolic syndrome components was significantly higher in short sleepers compared to adequate sleepers after adjustment for covariates (P<0.05.Sleeping ≤6 h per night is associated with an elevated cardiometabolic risk score and an increase in the odds of having the metabolic syndrome after adjusting for possible confounders. These results strongly suggest that short sleep duration is a risk factor for the metabolic syndrome.

  11. The association between self-reported sleep quality and metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Chang Hung

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Short and long sleep duration are associated with metabolic syndrome. However, there is limited research on the association between sleep quality and metabolic syndrome, and thus the aim of this study is to investigate this relationship. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The cross-sectional baseline data were collected from the decoded database of the Prevention Health Center of National Cheng Kung University Hospital from 2002 to 2006. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was according to the statement of the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. A higher global PSQI score indicates poorer sleep quality, and a global PSQI score greater than five differentiates poor from good sleepers. RESULTS: Of the 3,435 subjects recruited, 899 (26.2% had metabolic syndrome. Subjects with metabolic syndrome had higher PSQI and prevalence of poor sleepers than those without metabolic syndrome. The multivariate lineal regression analysis showed that female gender, metabolic syndrome, sleep duration, snoring, alcohol drinking, and habitual exercise were independent predictors of PSQI. When substituting metabolic syndrome with the five components, hyperglycemia and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C were positively associated with PSQI. The multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that female gender, metabolic syndrome, sleep duration, and snoring were independently associated with being poor sleepers. Of the five components, only low HDL-C was an independent predictor of being poor sleepers. CONCLUSIONS: Subjects with metabolic syndrome have higher global PSQI scores and a higher risk of being poor sleepers. Of the five components of metabolic syndrome, hyperglycemia and low HDL-C are independently associated with the global PSQI scores, while low HDL-C is an independent predictor of being poor sleepers.

  12. [The relationship between sleep quality and diabetic autonomic neuropathy in elder patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Lina; Guo, Lixin

    2016-03-01

    To explore the relationship between the sleep quality and diabetic autonomic neuropathy of elder patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A total of 90 elder patients with diabetes in Beijing Hospital was enrolled in this study. Questionnaires of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index(PSQI) were completed to evaluate the quality of sleep and Holter was applied to evaluate heart rate variability (HRV). Other related clinical data such as, catecholamine[epinephrine(E); norepinephrine(NE); dopamine(DA)]and diabetes complications were also collected after admission to the hospital. Patients were divided into three groups: the poor-sleeper group, the common-sleeper group and the good-sleeper group according to PSQI score. HRV and the level of catecholamine were compared among three groups. The level of HRV including meanNN [(743 ± 58) ms vs(824 ± 99)ms and (837 ± 104)ms], ASDNN [(30 ± 10)ms vs (39 ± 14)ms and (41 ± 14)ms], very low frequency(VLF)[(15.33 ± 6.10)ms(2) vs(22.11 ± 7.94)ms(2) and (22.66 ± 7.87)ms(2)], low frequency (LF)[(8.30 ± 3.95) ms(2) vs(12.58 ± 6.11)ms(2) and(12.81 ± 6.96)ms(2)] and LF/high frequency(HF)[(1.23 ± 0.32) vs (1.56 ± 0.46) and (1.47 ± 0.42)] in the poor-sleeper group were lower than in both the common-sleeper group and good-sleeper group (all PSleep quality is associated with the severity of diabetic autonomic neuropathy and might be one of clinical features for diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS OF INTERACTION OF TRACK AND ROLLING STOCK ON CROSSOVERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Arbuzov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Recently on the Ukrainian railways network more attention is paid to the cases of violations in the maintenance of crossovers, which may lead to deterioration of the train traffic safety conditions. As a rule, such violations occur as a result of inaccuracies during crossover pegging and laying, as well as are the consequence of impact of rolling stock and thermal forces. The appearance of geometrical irregularities can also be triggered by violation of the scheme of layout of concrete sleepers in the crossover turnout curve with intertrack spaces of less than 5.3 m. Therefore, we have decided to analyze the impact of the presence of deviations from the layout scheme of the sleepers and geometric irregularities on the conditions of track and rolling stock interaction based on the results of experimental investigations. It was also decided to establish a connection between the stress-strain states of the track and the presence of short sleepers. Methodology. The effect of deviations from the layout scheme of the sleepers and geometric irregularities on the interaction conditions of track and rolling stock was studied by means of theoretical calculations and experimental research. The experimental research covered the area on the non-public railway tracks that meets the required conditions for scientific and research work on the territory of «Transinvestservice» company. Findings. The distribution of stresses and forces acting on a railway track depending on speed movement of experienced rolling stock was obtained. In addition we obtained the data on the influence of the sleeper geometric parameters on its stress-strain state. Originality. For the first time the paper assessed the impact of rolling stock in the presence of geometrical irregularities and asymmetrically truncated sleepers within the crossover connection part on the stress-strain state of track in this zone. In addition, we compared the results for the area with common and

  14. structural reliability of the nigerian grown abura timber bridge beam

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ENGR. J. I. AGUWA

    2013-07-02

    Jul 2, 2013 ... hardwoods and Abura is one of them. Most timber used in the building construction are softwoods but in structures like bridges and railway sleepers, hardwoods are specially used. [5]. Construction activities using vast quantities of locally available raw materials are major steps towards industrialization and ...

  15. Specific EEG sleep pattern in the prefrontal cortex in primary insomnia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Perrier

    Full Text Available To assess the specific prefrontal activity in comparison to those in the other main cortical areas in primary insomnia patients and in good sleepers.Fourteen primary insomnia patients and 11 good sleepers were included in the analysis. Participants completed one night of polysomnography in the sleep lab. Power spectra were calculated during the NREM (Non-rapid eyes movements and the REM (Rapid eyes movements sleep periods at prefrontal, occipital, temporal and central electrode positions.During the NREM sleep, the power spectra did not differ between groups in the prefrontal cortex; while primary insomnia patients exhibited a higher beta power spectrum and a lower delta power spectrum compared to good sleepers in other areas. During the REM sleep, the beta1 power spectrum was lower in the prefrontal cortex in primary insomnia patients compared to good sleepers; while no significant difference between groups was obtained for the other areas.The present study shows a specific prefrontal sleep pattern during the whole sleep period. In addition, we suggest that primary insomnia patients displayed a dysfunction in the reactivation of the limbic system during the REM sleep and we give additional arguments in favor of a sleep-protection mechanism displayed by primary insomnia patients.

  16. EVALUATION OF FUEL CELL AUXILIARY POWER UNITS FOR HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL TRUCKS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A large number of heavy-duty trucks idle a significant amount. Heavy-duty line-haul truck engines idle about 30-50% of the time the engine is running. Drivers idle engines to power climate control devices (e.g., heaters and air conditioners) and sleeper compartment accessories (e...

  17. A new record of the non-native fish species Butis koilomatodon (Bleeker 1849 (Teleostei: Eleotridae for southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riguel Feltrin Contente

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the second record of the Indo-Pacific invasive mud sleeper, Butis koilomatodon, for coastal São Paulo in southeastern Brazil, and represents the southernmost record for this species in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean. The risks of a potential invasion mediated by anthropogenic impacts on the area of occurrence are also discussed.

  18. Sleep duration and eating behaviors of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, R A; McTighe, S; Juarez, M

    1986-02-01

    31 short-sleeping college students tended to eat more small meals or snacks than 37 long sleepers, all of whom were satisfied with their sleep. This disrupted pattern of larger meals was predicted from work of Elomaa and Johansson with rats who were partially REM-sleep deprived.

  19. (AJST) SELECTION AND TESTING OF BALLAST STONES FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    ABSTRACT: Ballast is broken pieces of hard rocks such as sandstones, schist, etc. approximately 25-. 60 mm size, over which the railway tracks are laid. The function of the ballast is to transfer the applied load over a large surface, provide adequate elasticity, prevent creep and hold the sleepers in position. Also under wet ...

  20. Responses of stream nitrate and DOC loadings to hydrological forcing and climate change in an upland forest of the northeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen D. Sebestyen; Elizabeth W. Boyer; James B. Shanley

    2009-01-01

    In coming decades, higher annual temperatures, increased growing season length, and increased dormant season precipitation are expected across the northeastern United States in response to anthropogenic forcing of global climate. We synthesized long-term stream hydrochemical data from the Sleepers River Research Watershed in Vermont, United States, to explore the...

  1. Specific EEG sleep pattern in the prefrontal cortex in primary insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Joy; Clochon, Patrice; Bertran, Françoise; Couque, Colette; Bulla, Jan; Denise, Pierre; Bocca, Marie-Laure

    2015-01-01

    To assess the specific prefrontal activity in comparison to those in the other main cortical areas in primary insomnia patients and in good sleepers. Fourteen primary insomnia patients and 11 good sleepers were included in the analysis. Participants completed one night of polysomnography in the sleep lab. Power spectra were calculated during the NREM (Non-rapid eyes movements) and the REM (Rapid eyes movements) sleep periods at prefrontal, occipital, temporal and central electrode positions. During the NREM sleep, the power spectra did not differ between groups in the prefrontal cortex; while primary insomnia patients exhibited a higher beta power spectrum and a lower delta power spectrum compared to good sleepers in other areas. During the REM sleep, the beta1 power spectrum was lower in the prefrontal cortex in primary insomnia patients compared to good sleepers; while no significant difference between groups was obtained for the other areas. The present study shows a specific prefrontal sleep pattern during the whole sleep period. In addition, we suggest that primary insomnia patients displayed a dysfunction in the reactivation of the limbic system during the REM sleep and we give additional arguments in favor of a sleep-protection mechanism displayed by primary insomnia patients.

  2. Bose-Einstein Condensation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    travel, music, and food are optimally satisfied by listening to Hindi film music half as old as he is while eating potato chips in a sleeper coach. R Nityananda. In 1924 Bose introduced a counting rule for the states of a gas of photons which explained Planck's law for thermal radiation at one stroke. Einstein not only recognised ...

  3. Habitual sleep duration and eating disorders in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, R A; Rozette, E

    1986-02-01

    To measure the relationship between habitual sleep duration and eating disorders, the responses of groups of 34 short- and 43 longer-sleeping college students to the EAT-26 Test were compared. The short-sleepers scored twice as high and were five times more likely to exhibit abnormal eating patterns than the longer-sleeping group.

  4. Self-reported consistency of normal habitual sleep durations of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, R A; Pellegrini, R J; Hawkins, J; Moore, J D

    1978-10-01

    A relationship between hours of sleep/night and the consistency of this normal daily sleep duration was observed for 763 college students who had rated themselves as good sleepers with stable and fairly well established patterns of sleep. Congruent with a limited literature, these data suggest that shorter sleep durations are likely, for college students, to be relatively recently acquired patterns of sleep.

  5. Selection and testing of ballast stones for underground railway tracks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ballast is broken pieces of hard rocks such as sandstones, schist, etc. approximately 25- 60 mm size, over which the railway tracks are laid. The function of the ballast is to transfer the applied load over a large surface, provide adequate elasticity, prevent creep and hold the sleepers in position. Also under wet conditions, ...

  6. Sleep duration and insulin resistance in individuals without type 2 diabetes: the PPP-Botnia study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyykkönen, Antti-Jussi; Isomaa, Bo; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Eriksson, Johan G; Groop, Leif; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Räikkönen, Katri

    2014-08-01

    Both short and long sleep duration may increase risk of type 2 diabetes (diabetes). We studied if short and long sleep durations were associated with insulin resistance (IR) and insulin secretion in individuals without diabetes, and if the associations remained after we excluded individuals who reported more frequent and severe complaints of sleep apnea and insomnia. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed for 722 adults without diabetes. Indices of IR and insulin secretion were calculated. Sleep duration and complaints of sleep apnea and insomnia were self-reported. In comparison to average sleepers (6-9 h/night), short sleepers (< 6 h/night) had higher 120-min insulin and AUC glucose, and long sleepers (≥ 9 h/night) had higher fasting and 120-min insulin, 120-min glucose, and HOMAIR and lower Insulin Sensitivity Index. After adjusting for confounders and after excluding individuals who reported more frequent and severe complaints of sleep apnea and insomnia, long sleep duration remained significantly associated with IR and insulin secretion. Long but not short sleep duration is associated with IR and insulin secretion in individuals without diabetes whether or not accompanied by sleep complaints. Long sleepers may benefit from targeted preventions and interventions that aim at reducing risk of future diabetes.

  7. Patients with primary insomnia in the sleep laboratory: do they present with typical nights of sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirscher, Verena; Unbehaun, Thomas; Feige, Bernd; Nissen, Christoph; Riemann, Dieter; Spiegelhalder, Kai

    2015-08-01

    The validity of sleep laboratory investigations in patients with insomnia is important for researchers and clinicians. The objective of this study was to examine the first-night effect and the reverse first-night effect in patients with chronic primary insomnia compared with good sleeper controls. A retrospective comparison of a well-characterised sample of 50 patients with primary insomnia and 50 good sleeper controls was conducted with respect to 2 nights of polysomnography, and subjective sleep parameters in the sleep laboratory and the home setting. When comparing the first and second sleep laboratory night, a significant first-night effect was observed across both groups in the great majority of the investigated polysomnographic and subjective variables. However, patients with primary insomnia and good sleeper controls did not differ with respect to this effect. Regarding the comparison between the sleep laboratory nights and the home setting, unlike good sleeper controls, patients with primary insomnia reported an increased subjective sleep efficiency on both nights (in part due to a reduced bed time) and an increased subjective total sleep time on the second night. These results suggest that even the second sleep laboratory night does not necessarily provide clinicians and researchers with a representative insight into the sleep perception of patients with primary insomnia. Future studies should investigate whether these findings also hold for other patient populations. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  8. Insomnia among Adolescents: Implications for Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jack R.

    Adolescent underachievers may be, in fact, victims of insomnia or other types of sleep disorders. Insomnia is a greatly overlooked affliction that affects approximately 13% of the adolescent population, creating daytime side-effects that could impair intellectual functioning, such as imposing learning constraints. Poor sleepers among the…

  9. The Olympic dream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Caitlyn

    2010-05-01

    Rough sleepers are a very visible sign that even the most 'civilised' of societies have a long way to go. Yet rough sleeping may soon be a thing of the past. Caitlyn Donaldson finds out why you should struggle to find anyone in London without accommodation while enjoying the sporting events of 2012.

  10. On the interaction between wheels and rails in railway dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slivsgaard, Eva Charlotte

    for the track: A simple model of the whole track as one rigid body following each wheelset. An elastic model where the rails are modelled as Euler-Bernoulli beams discretely supported by rigid sleepers. The simple model is used to find the influence of a flexible track on the dynamics of the single-axle bogie...

  11. Heritability and mortality risk of insomnia-related symptoms: a genetic epidemiologic study in a population-based twin cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hublin, Christer; Partinen, Markku; Koskenvuo, Markku; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2011-07-01

    Our aim was to estimate heritability in phenotypic insomnia and the association between insomnia and mortality. Representative follow-up study. 1990 survey of the Finnish Twin Cohort (N = 12502 adults; 1554 monozygotic and 2991 dizygotic twin pairs). Current insomnia-related symptoms (insomnia in general, difficulty in initiating sleep, sleep latency, nocturnal awakening, early morning awakening, and non-restorative sleep assessed in the morning and during the day) were asked. Latent class analysis was used to classify subjects into different sleep quality classes. Quantitative genetic modelling was used to estimate heritability. Mortality data was obtained from national registers until end of April 2009. The heritability estimates of each symptom were similar in both genders varying from 34% (early morning awakening) to 45% (nocturnal awakening). The most parsimonious latent class analysis produced 3 classes: good sleepers (48%), average sleepers (up to weekly symptoms, 40%), and poor sleepers (symptoms daily or almost daily, 12%). The heritability estimate for the cluster was 46% (95% confidence interval 41% to 50%). In a model adjusted for smoking, BMI, and depressive symptoms, the all-cause mortality of poor sleepers was elevated (excess mortality 55% in men and 51% in women). Further adjustment for sleep length, use of sleep promoting medications, and sleep apnea-related symptoms did not change the results. Insomnia-related symptoms were common in both genders. The symptoms and their clusters showed moderate heritability estimates. A significant association was found between poor sleep and risk of mortality, especially in those with somatic disease.

  12. to view fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    listening to Hindi film music half as old as he is while eating potato chips in a sleeper coach. R Nityananda. In 1924 Bose introduced a counting rule for the states of a gas of photons which explained Planck's law for thermal radiation at one stroke. Einstein not only recognised the importance of this idea but immediately ...

  13. Pop / Erkki Luuk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Luuk, Erkki, 1971-

    2003-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: Lionel Marchetti "RISS (l'avalanche)", Scooter "The Stadium Techno Experience", Kojak "Every Room On Every Floor", Mike Oldfield "Tubular Bells 2003", Stereophonics "You Gotta Go There To Come Back", Sleepy Sleepers "Kekkonen", M Ward "Transfiguratuon Of Vincent", Molotov "Dance And Dense Denso"

  14. 75 FR 27385 - Petition for Waiver of Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... each car are as follows: New York Central ``Hickory Creek,'' Observation/Lounge/ Sleeper, 1948, 28, $35... includes operating these cars on various short line railroads. For example, the New York Central ``Hickory... petitioned for a permanent waiver of compliance for six passenger cars from the requirements of the Railroad...

  15. Parametric analysis of rail vehicle parameters influencing ride ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the influence of rail vehicle parameters on vertical and lateral ride behavior. The analysis considers coupled vertical-lateral 37 degrees of freedom mathematical model of an Indian Railway General Sleeper ICF coach formulated using Largangian dynamics. Both vertical and lateral irregularities of the ...

  16. Relationships between questionnaire ratings of sleep quality and polysomnography in healthy adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerlund, A.; Trolle-Lagerros, Y.; Kecklund, L.G.; Axelsson, J.; Akerstedt, T.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between polysomnographic sleep and subjective habitual sleep quality and restoration from sleep. Thirty-one normal sleepers completed the Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire and multiple home polysomnography recordings (n = 2-5). Using linear regression, sleep

  17. Effect of sleep quality on hemodynamic response to exercise and heart rate recovery in apparently healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Murat; Yildiz, Abdulkadir; Demir, Melike; Bilik, Mehmet Z; Ozaydogdu, Necdet; Aktan, Adem; Isik, Ferhat; Demir, Suleyman; Yazgan, Umit C; Toprak, Nizamettin

    2014-12-01

    Poor sleep quality has an unfavorable impact on autonomic nervous system activity, especially that of the cardiovascular (CV) system. The heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) at rest and during exercise, along with the heart rate recovery (HRR), were examined in poor sleepers and compared with individuals with good sleep quality. A total of 113 healthy individuals were enrolled to the study. All participants performed treadmill stress testing. Sleep quality of participants was assessed by using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire: 48 subjects were categorized as ‘poor sleepers’ (PSQI score > 6 points), and the rest were grouped as ‘good sleepers’. The poor sleepers showed higher resting HR (p exercise (p=0.046) and less HR increase with exercise (chronotropic incompetence) (p=0.002) compared with individuals who reported good sleep quality. In addition, the poor sleepers demonstrated reduced heart rate recovery at the 1st and 3rd minute of recovery (p=0.005 and 0.037, respectively) compared with good sleepers. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that only resting diastolic BP was the independent predictor of HRE. The PSQI score was positively correlated with resting HR; while it was negatively correlated with HR response to exercise, HRR1 and HRR index-1. This cross-sectional study emphasizes the effect of poor sleep quality on unfavorable cardiovascular outcome indicators of the treadmill stress test.

  18. Vorming van thyllen in geveld beukenhout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebes, K.

    1937-01-01

    After felling, beech wood may form thyloses, blocking the xylem vessels, so that they can not be sufficiently impregnated with creosote. This decreases the durability and value of the wood for such purposes as railway sleepers. Ebes found that thyloses may be formed throughout the year through pits

  19. Using high-frequency sampling to detect effects of atmospheric pollutants on stream chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen D. Sebestyen; James B. Shanley; Elizabeth W. Boyer

    2009-01-01

    We combined information from long-term (weekly over many years) and short-term (high-frequency during rainfall and snowmelt events) stream water sampling efforts to understand how atmospheric deposition affects stream chemistry. Water samples were collected at the Sleepers River Research Watershed, VT, a temperate upland forest site that receives elevated atmospheric...

  20. Bridge approach slabs for Missouri DOT field evaluation of alternative and cost efficient bridge approach slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Based on a recent study on cost efficient alternative bridge approach slab (BAS) designs (Thiagarajan et : al. 2010) has recommended three new BAS designs for possible implementation by MoDOT namely a) 20 feet cast-inplace : slab with sleeper slab (C...

  1. Sleep and Food Choice in a Dutch Student Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenaars, Cathalijn H C; Klinkenberg, Inge P M; Aussems, Audrey; Borger, Nedim; Faatz, Vivian; Hak, Anneloes; Houben, Ellen; Ramackers, Joyce; Snackers, Daphne; Kalsbeek, A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The increased risk of obesity among short sleepers is most likely explained by increased energy intake. However, food intake could not only be altered quantitavely but also qualitatively. Therefore, we performed a correlational analysis on self-reported food intake and sleep in 51

  2. Sleep and Food Choice in a Dutch Student Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenaars, Cathalijn H. C.; Klinkenberg, Inge P. M.; Aussems, Audrey; Borger, Nedim; Faatz, Vivian; Hak, Anneloes; Houben, Ellen; Ramackers, Joyce; Snackers, Daphne; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2015-01-01

    The increased risk of obesity among short sleepers is most likely explained by increased energy intake. However, food intake could not only be altered quantitavely but also qualitatively. Therefore, we performed a correlational analysis on self-reported food intake and sleep in 51 students from

  3. Cumulative association of obstructive sleep apnea severity and short sleep duration with the risk for hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascaline Priou

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and short sleep duration are individually associated with an increased risk for hypertension (HTN. The aim of this multicenter cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis of a cumulative association of OSA severity and short sleep duration with the risk for prevalent HTN. Among 1,499 patients undergoing polysomnography for suspected OSA, 410 (27.3% previously diagnosed as hypertensive and taking antihypertensive medication were considered as having HTN. Patients with total sleep time (TST <6 h were considered to be short sleepers. Logistic regression procedures were performed to determine the independent association of HTN with OSA and sleep duration. Considering normal sleepers (TST ≥6 h without OSA as the reference group, the odds ratio (OR (95% confidence intervals for having HTN was 2.51 (1.35-4.68 in normal sleepers with OSA and 4.37 (2.18-8.78 in short sleepers with OSA after adjustment for age, gender, obesity, diabetes, depression, current smoking, use of thyroid hormones, daytime sleepiness, poor sleep complaint, time in bed, sleep architecture and fragmentation, and study site. The risk for HTN appeared to present a cumulative association with OSA severity and short sleep duration (p<0.0001 for linear trend. The higher risk for HTN was observed in short sleepers with severe OSA (AHI ≥30 (OR, 4.29 [2.03-9.07]. In patients investigated for suspected OSA, sleep-disordered breathing severity and short sleep duration have a cumulative association with the risk for prevalent HTN. Further studies are required to determine whether interventions to optimize sleep may contribute to lower BP in patients with OSA.

  4. Prevalence, symptomatic features, and factors associated with sleep disturbance/insomnia in Japanese patients with type-2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narisawa, Hajime; Komada, Yoko; Miwa, Takashi; Shikuma, Junpei; Sakurai, Mamoru; Odawara, Masato; Inoue, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    To clarify the prevalence and symptomatic characteristics of sleep disturbance/insomnia among type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM) Japanese patients. A cross-sectional survey of Japanese patients with the disorder was conducted. Participants consisted of 622 type-2 DM patients (mean 56.1±9.56 years) and 622 sex- and age-matched controls. Participants' scores in the Japanese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI-J), the Japanese version of the 12-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), the Medical Outcomes Study 8-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-8), and the glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) of type-2 DM patients were analyzed. There were 253 poor sleepers (43.9%) in the type-2 DM group as a result of dichotomization with the PSQI-J cutoff total score of 5.5. The type-2 DM group recorded a higher mean PSQI-J total score ( P <0.01) and manifested poorer sleep maintenance. Poor sleepers in both groups had lower mental component summary from SF-8 (MCS), physical component summary from SF-8 (PCS), and CES-D than good sleepers, and good sleepers in both groups had higher MCS, PCS, and CES-D than poor sleepers. Higher body mass index, presence of smoking habit, and living alone were significantly associated with sleep disturbance/insomnia symptoms, but HbA1c was not associated with sleep disturbance/insomnia in the type-2 DM group. Individuals affected with type-2 DM are likely to experience sleep problems, characterized by disturbance in sleep maintenance. Sleep disturbance/insomnia symptoms in DM patients might considerably reduce health-related quality of life.

  5. Eating behavior by sleep duration in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Jung, Molly; Patel, Sanjay R; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Arens, Raanan; Ramos, Alberto; Redline, Susan; Rock, Cheryl L; Van Horn, Linda

    2015-12-01

    Sleep is an important pillar of health and a modifiable risk factor for diabetes, stroke and obesity. Little is known of diet and sleep patterns of Hispanics/Latinos in the US. Here we examine eating behavior as a function of sleep duration in a sub-sample of 11,888 participants from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, a community-based cohort study of Hispanics aged 18-74 years in four US cities. Using a cross-sectional probability sample with self-report data on habitual sleep duration and up to two 24-h dietary recalls, we quantified the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI-2010) score, a measure of diet quality, and intake of selected nutrients related to cardiovascular health. Linear regression models were fit to estimate least-square means of usual nutrient intake of saturated fats, potassium density, fiber, calcium, caffeine and the AHEI-2010 score by sleep duration adjusting for age, sex, Hispanic/Latino background, income, employment status, education, depressive symptomology, and years lived in the US. Distribution of calories over the day and association with sleep duration and BMI were also examined. Short sleepers (≤6 h) had significantly lower intake of potassium, fiber and calcium and long sleepers (≥9 h) had significantly lower intake of caffeine compared to others sleepers after adjusting for covariates. However no difference in the AHEI-2010 score was seen by sleep duration. Significantly more long sleepers, compared to intermediate and short sleepers, reported having ≥30% total daily calories before bedtime. Not consuming a snack or meal within 3 h before bedtime was associated with higher AHEI-2010 scores. These findings identify novel differences in dietary patterns by sleep duration in a Hispanic/Latino cohort in the U.S. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT02060344. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sleep schedules and school performance in Indigenous Australian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunden, Sarah; Magee, Chris; Attard, Kelly; Clarkson, Larissa; Caputi, Peter; Skinner, Timothy

    2018-04-01

    Sleep duration and sleep schedule variability have been related to negative health and well-being outcomes in children, but little is known about Australian Indigenous children. Data for children aged 7-9 years came from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children and the National Assessment Program-Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). Latent class analysis determined sleep classes taking into account sleep duration, bedtimes, waketimes, and variability in bedtimes from weekdays to weekends. Regression models tested whether the sleep classes were cross-sectionally associated with grade 3 NAPLAN scores. Latent change score modeling then examined whether the sleep classes predicted changes in NAPLAN performance from grades 3 to 5. Five sleep schedule classes were identified: normative sleep, early risers, long sleep, variable sleep, and short sleep. Overall, long sleepers performed best, with those with reduced sleep (short sleepers and early risers) performing the worse on grammar, numeracy, and writing performance. Latent change score results also showed that long sleepers performed best in spelling and writing and short sleepers and typical sleepers performed the worst over time. In this sample of Australian Indigenous children, short sleep was associated with poorer school performance compared with long sleep, with this performance worsening over time for some performance indicators. Other sleep schedules (eg, early wake times and variable sleep) also had some relationships with school performance. As sleep scheduling is modifiable, this offers opportunity for improvement in sleep and thus performance outcomes for these and potentially all children. Copyright © 2018 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Selection for long and short sleep duration in Drosophila melanogaster reveals the complex genetic network underlying natural variation in sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbison, Susan T; Serrano Negron, Yazmin L; Hansen, Nancy F; Lobell, Amanda S

    2017-12-01

    Why do some individuals need more sleep than others? Forward mutagenesis screens in flies using engineered mutations have established a clear genetic component to sleep duration, revealing mutants that convey very long or short sleep. Whether such extreme long or short sleep could exist in natural populations was unknown. We applied artificial selection for high and low night sleep duration to an outbred population of Drosophila melanogaster for 13 generations. At the end of the selection procedure, night sleep duration diverged by 9.97 hours in the long and short sleeper populations, and 24-hour sleep was reduced to 3.3 hours in the short sleepers. Neither long nor short sleeper lifespan differed appreciably from controls, suggesting little physiological consequences to being an extreme long or short sleeper. Whole genome sequence data from seven generations of selection revealed several hundred thousand changes in allele frequencies at polymorphic loci across the genome. Combining the data from long and short sleeper populations across generations in a logistic regression implicated 126 polymorphisms in 80 candidate genes, and we confirmed three of these genes and a larger genomic region with mutant and chromosomal deficiency tests, respectively. Many of these genes could be connected in a single network based on previously known physical and genetic interactions. Candidate genes have known roles in several classic, highly conserved developmental and signaling pathways-EGFR, Wnt, Hippo, and MAPK. The involvement of highly pleiotropic pathway genes suggests that sleep duration in natural populations can be influenced by a wide variety of biological processes, which may be why the purpose of sleep has been so elusive.

  8. Habitual sleep patterns and the distribution of body mass index: cross-sectional findings among Swedish men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Anna; Bottai, Matteo; Adami, Hans-Olov; Bellocco, Rino; Nyrén, Olof; Åkerstedt, Torbjörn; Lagerros, Ylva Trolle

    2014-10-01

    To compare distributions of body mass index (BMI) between individuals with different habitual sleep patterns. We performed cross-sectional analyses of 40,197 Swedish adults (64% women), who reported sleep duration and quality, weight, height, and possible confounding factors in 1997. Using quantile regression, we estimated associations between sleep patterns and selected percentiles of the distribution of BMI. While the medians were similar, larger adjusted values of BMI were estimated in the upper part of the distribution among men and women with short sleep (≤5 h) compared with medium-length sleep (6-8 h). For example, in men, the 90th percentile of BMI was 0.80 kg/m(2) (95% confidence interval: 0.17-1.43 kg/m(2)) higher among short sleepers. In women, long sleepers (≥9 h) also showed larger values in the upper part of the BMI distribution; the 90th percentile was 1.23 kg/m(2) (0.42-2.04 kg/m(2)) higher than in medium-length sleepers. In male long sleepers, smaller values were estimated in the lower part of the BMI distribution; the 10th percentile was 0.84 kg/m(2) lower (0.35-1.32 kg/m(2)) than in medium-length sleepers. The 90th percentile of BMI in women with poor-quality compared with good-quality sleep was larger by 0.82 kg/m(2) (0.47-1.16 kg/m(2)); the 10th percentile was smaller by 0.17 kg/m(2) (0.02-0.32 kg/m(2)). Short, long or poor-quality sleepers showed larger, or smaller, values at the tails of the BMI distribution, but similar medians. Hence, unfavorable sleep patterns and BMI were associated only in a subset of this study population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Monthly fluctuations of insomnia symptoms in a population-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Charles M; Leblanc, M; Ivers, H; Bélanger, L; Mérette, Chantal; Savard, Josée; Jarrin, Denise C

    2014-02-01

    To document the monthly changes in sleep/insomnia status over a 12-month period; to determine the optimal time intervals to reliably capture new incident cases and recurrent episodes of insomnia and the likelihood of its persistence over time. Participants were 100 adults (mean age = 49.9 years; 66% women) randomly selected from a larger population-based sample enrolled in a longitudinal study of the natural history of insomnia. They completed 12 monthly telephone interviews assessing insomnia, use of sleep aids, stressful life events, and physical and mental health problems in the previous month. A total of 1,125 interviews of a potential 1,200 were completed. Based on data collected at each assessment, participants were classified into one of three subgroups: good sleepers, insomnia symptoms, and insomnia syndrome. At baseline, 42 participants were classified as good sleepers, 34 met criteria for insomnia symptoms, and 24 for an insomnia syndrome. There were significant fluctuations of insomnia over time, with 66% of the participants changing sleep status at least once over the 12 monthly assessments (51.5% for good sleepers, 59.5% for insomnia syndrome, and 93.4% for insomnia symptoms). Changes of status were more frequent among individuals with insomnia symptoms at baseline (mean = 3.46, SD = 2.36) than among those initially classified as good sleepers (mean = 2.12, SD = 2.70). Among the subgroup with insomnia symptoms at baseline, 88.3% reported improved sleep (i.e., became good sleepers) at least once over the 12 monthly assessments compared to 27.7% whose sleep worsened (i.e., met criteria for an insomnia syndrome) during the same period. Among individuals classified as good sleepers at baseline, risks of developing insomnia symptoms and syndrome over the subsequent months were, respectively, 48.6% and 14.5%. Monthly assessment over an interval of 6 months was found most reliable to estimate incidence rates, while an interval of 3 months proved the most

  10. Monthly Fluctuations of Insomnia Symptoms in a Population-Based Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Charles M.; LeBlanc, M.; Ivers, H.; Bélanger, L.; Mérette, Chantal; Savard, Josée; Jarrin, Denise C.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To document the monthly changes in sleep/insomnia status over a 12-month period; to determine the optimal time intervals to reliably capture new incident cases and recurrent episodes of insomnia and the likelihood of its persistence over time. Design: Participants were 100 adults (mean age = 49.9 years; 66% women) randomly selected from a larger population-based sample enrolled in a longitudinal study of the natural history of insomnia. They completed 12 monthly telephone interviews assessing insomnia, use of sleep aids, stressful life events, and physical and mental health problems in the previous month. A total of 1,125 interviews of a potential 1,200 were completed. Based on data collected at each assessment, participants were classified into one of three subgroups: good sleepers, insomnia symptoms, and insomnia syndrome. Results: At baseline, 42 participants were classified as good sleepers, 34 met criteria for insomnia symptoms, and 24 for an insomnia syndrome. There were significant fluctuations of insomnia over time, with 66% of the participants changing sleep status at least once over the 12 monthly assessments (51.5% for good sleepers, 59.5% for insomnia syndrome, and 93.4% for insomnia symptoms). Changes of status were more frequent among individuals with insomnia symptoms at baseline (mean = 3.46, SD = 2.36) than among those initially classified as good sleepers (mean = 2.12, SD = 2.70). Among the subgroup with insomnia symptoms at baseline, 88.3% reported improved sleep (i.e., became good sleepers) at least once over the 12 monthly assessments compared to 27.7% whose sleep worsened (i.e., met criteria for an insomnia syndrome) during the same period. Among individuals classified as good sleepers at baseline, risks of developing insomnia symptoms and syndrome over the subsequent months were, respectively, 48.6% and 14.5%. Monthly assessment over an interval of 6 months was found most reliable to estimate incidence rates, while an

  11. Framework for Railway Phase-based Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Rui; Landex, Alex; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    and compared. A case study is introduced in the article to demonstrate how the framework works to compare timber sleepers and concrete sleepers from strategic planning level. Two Life Cycle Cost oriented policies are discussed to illustrate: high quality track is necessity to improve the cost efficiency......In the railway field, planning the maintenance and renewal strategy from Life Cycle Cost (LCC) perspective gets more and more attentions recent years. The new approach looks at all the costs through the infrastructure life span and use the annuity (continuing payment with a fixed total annual...... spending) to evaluate the project alternatives. The comparison result can identify the most cost-efficient solution in a long run and therefore reduce the overall costs. This article defines a phase-based framework to guide the railway maintenance and renewal project planning at strategic level...

  12. Proposal of Screening Method of Sleep Disordered Breathing Using Fiber Grating Vision Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hirooki; Nakamura, Hidetoshi; Nakajima, Masato

    Every conventional respiration monitoring technique requires at least one sensor to be attached to the body of the subject during measurement, thereby imposing a sense of restraint that results in aversion against measurements that would last over consecutive days. To solve this problem, we developed a respiration monitoring system for sleepers, and it uses a fiber-grating vision sensor, which is a type of active image sensor to achieve non-contact respiration monitoring. In this paper, we verified the effectiveness of the system, and proposed screening method of the sleep disordered breathing. It was shown that our system could equivalently measure the respiration with thermistor and accelerograph. And, the respiratory condition of sleepers can be grasped by our screening method in one look, and it seems to be useful for the support of the screening of sleep disordered breathing.

  13. Sleep Management Strategy and Performance in an Extreme Mountain Ultra-marathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussel, Mathias; Laroppe, Julien; Hurdiel, Rémy; Girard, Julien; Poletti, Laurence; Thil, Catherine; Didelot, Antoine; Chenuel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    We intended to assess the relationship between sleep strategies and performance during the North-Face Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc 2013, to test the hypothesis that sleep management can influence athletic performance. Almost all runners specifically adopted sleep management strategies before the race. Among the finishers 72% didn't sleep at all during the race and 28% took a least one break for sleep. Non-sleepers completed the race faster than the sleepers (P = 0.0008). Race time was positively correlated with drowsiness (P sleep management strategy based on increased sleep time before the race completed the race faster (P = 0.0258). Most finishers seemed to be aware of the importance of developing sleep management strategies and increasing sleep time some nights before the race appeared to be the most relevant strategy to improve performance.

  14. Stress and sleep disturbances in female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shih-Yu; Wuertz, Caroline; Rogers, Rebecca; Chen, Yu-Ping

    2013-11-01

    To describe the sleep characteristics and examine the associations among perceived stress, sleep disturbances, depressive symptoms, and physical symptoms among female college students. A total of 103 students completed a battery of questionnaires. The students experienced high stress during the school year. The majority of them slept less than 6 hours during weekdays and experienced moderate fatigue. High stress levels are associated with sleep disturbances, less nocturnal total sleep time, higher fatigue severity, and more depressive symptoms. Perceived stress and sleep disturbances are significant predictors for depressive symptoms and physical symptoms. Compared to the good sleepers, the poor sleepers reported more daytime sleepiness, depressive symptoms, and physical symptoms. Interventions to reduce stress and improve sleep are critically needed in college education.

  15. The Carotid Choke: To Sleep, Perchance to Die?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Wedlake

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This is an examination of the carotid choke, also known as the “sleeper hold.” We will be concerned with types of sleeper holds, what part of the neck is affected, and how. This is commonly referred to as a “blood choke.” There is differentiation between blood chokes and air chokes (strangulation. This article will cover application, effects, result over short and long terms, and ramifications of drug usage and mental state. We will not include the effects of a choke on the trachea, or pressure or strikes to the back of the neck. This article is presented from two perspectives; that of a martial arts practitioner/instructor and that of a physician.

  16. AHp 21: QQ Destiny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pad+ma dbang chen པདྨ་དབང་ཆེན།

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available I heard this story when I was a student in Xi'an City. I added to it, using pieces of other stories I have heard, and my imagination. A gentle breeze blew across everyone's face, creating a feeling of pleasure. Sunshine brought the earth to life in the same way a clanging bell jars sleepers awake. Birds flitted in a cloudless blue sky announcing spring's immanent arrival ... ...

  17. A new record of the non-native fish species Butis koilomatodon (Bleeker 1849 (Teleostei: Eleotridae for southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riguel Feltrin Contente

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2016v29n2p113 This work reports the second record of the Indo-Pacific invasive mud sleeper, Butis koilomatodon, for coastal São Paulo in southeastern Brazil, and represents the southernmost record for this species in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean. The risks of a potential invasion mediated by anthropogenic impacts on the area of occurrence are also discussed.

  18. Detection of damaged supports under railway track based on frequency shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Longqi; Zhang, Yao; Lie, Seng Tjhen

    2017-03-01

    In railway transportation systems, the tracks are usually fastened on sleepers which are supported by the ballast. A lot of research has been conducted to guarantee the safety of railway track because of its importance, and more concern is expressed about monitoring of track itself such as railway level and alignment. The ballast and fasteners which provide strong support to the railway track are important as well whereas the detection of loose or missing fasteners and damaged ballast mainly relies on visual inspection. Although it is reliable when the fastener is missing and the damaged ballast is on the surface, it provides less help if the fastener is only loose and the damaged ballast is under the sleepers, which are however frequently observed in practice. This paper proposes an approach based on frequency shift to identify the damaged supports including the loose or missing fasteners and damaged ballast. In this study, the rail-sleeper-ballast system is modeled as an Euler beam evenly supported by a series of springs, the stiffness of which are reduced when the fastener is loose or missing and the ballast under the sleepers is damaged. An auxiliary mass is utilized herein and when it is mounted on the beam, the natural frequencies of the whole system will change with respect to the location of the auxiliary mass. The auxiliary mass induced frequency shift is analyzed and it is found the natural frequencies change periodically when the supports are undamaged, whereas the periodicity will be broken due to damaged supports. In fact, the natural frequencies drop clearly when the auxiliary mass moves over the damaged support. A special damage index only using the information of the damaged states is proposed and both numerical and experimental examples are carried out to validate the proposed method.

  19. Self-Reported Sleep Quality Predicts Poor Cognitive Performance in Healthy Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Robert D. Nebes; Daniel J. Buysse; Edythe M. Halligan; Patricia R. Houck; Timothy H. Monk

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relation between sleep quality and cognitive performance in older adults, controlling for common medical comorbidities. Participants were community volunteers who, while not selected on the basis of their sleep, did report substantial variability in sleep quality. Good and poor sleepers differed on tests of working memory, attentional set shifting, and abstract problem solving but not on processing speed, inhibitory function, or episodic memory. Poor sleep was also ass...

  20. Slab track

    OpenAIRE

    Golob, Tina

    2014-01-01

    The last 160 years has been mostly used conventional track with ballasted bed, sleepers and steel rail. Ensuring the high speed rail traffic, increasing railway track capacities, providing comfortable and safe ride as well as high reliability and availability railway track, has led to development of innovative systems for railway track. The so-called slab track was first built in 1972 and since then, they have developed many different slab track systems around the world. Slab track was also b...

  1. Smoking, Screen-Based Sedentary Behavior, and Diet Associated with Habitual Sleep Duration and Chronotype: Data from the UK Biobank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Freda; Malone, Susan Kohl; Lozano, Alicia; Grandner, Michael A.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sleep duration has been implicated in the etiology of obesity but less is known about the association between sleep and other behavioral risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Purpose The aim of this study was to examine the associations among sleep duration, chronotype, and physical activity, screen-based sedentary behavior, tobacco use, and dietary intake. Methods Regression models were used to examine sleep duration and chronotype as the predictors and cardiovascular risk factors as outcomes of interest in a cross-sectional sample of 439,933 adults enrolled in the UK Biobank project. Results Short sleepers were 45 % more likely to smoke tobacco than adequate sleepers (9.8 vs. 6.9 %, respectively). Late chronotypes were more than twice as likely to smoke tobacco than intermediate types (14.9 vs. 7.4 %, respectively). Long sleepers reported 0.61 more hours of television per day than adequate sleepers. Early chronotypes reported 0.20 fewer daily hours of computer use per day than intermediate chronotypes. Early chronotypes had 0.25 more servings of fruit and 0.13 more servings of vegetables per day than late chronotypes. Conclusions Short and long sleep duration and late chronotype are associated with greater likelihood of cardiovascular risk behaviors. Further work is needed to determine whether these findings are maintained in the context of objective sleep and circadian estimates, and in more diverse samples. The extent to which promoting adequate sleep duration and earlier sleep timing improves heart health should also be examined prospectively. PMID:27056396

  2. Global Proliferation-Dynamics, Acquisition Strategies, and Responses. Volume 2. Nuclear Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    4There is some dispute about the ability of the chemical exchange ( CHEMEX ) process to enrich to weapons grade. 19 Table 2-3. Dedicated uranium...interest in EMIS in other third world countries. Chemex (chemical exchange) and laser isotope enrichment may be two other potential proliferation sleepers... Chemex has been largely 20 unproven in enriching uranium to a weapons-grade level, although it is considered to be more efficient than gaseous

  3. The association between periodontitis and sleep duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romandini, Mario; Gioco, Gioele; Perfetti, Giorgio; Deli, Giorgio; Staderini, Edoardo; Laforì, Andreina

    2017-05-01

    Due to its potential to influence systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, and to predispose to bacterial infections, sleep duration could potentially be a risk factor for periodontitis. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate if there was in 2012 an association between periodontitis and sleep duration in a representative sample of the South Korean population. A total of 5812 subjects representative of 39.4 million of adults were examined. Multivariate logistic regressions were applied controlling for age, gender, education, smoking status, alcoholism and consumption frequency of coffee, tea, chocolate and red wine. Compared to the group sleeping ≤5 h/day, the adjusted odds ratios for periodontitis prevalence defined as Community Periodontal Index (CPI) = 4 were OR = 2.46 (95% CI: 1.20-5.06) in the 6 h/day sleepers group, OR = 2.66 (95% CI: 1.35-5.25) in the 7 h/day sleepers group, OR = 2.29 (95% CI: 1.13-4.63) in the 8 h/day sleepers group and OR = 4.27 (95% CI: 1.83-9.97) in the ≥9 h/day sleepers group. The association has shown to be highlighted in middle-aged people, females, non-smokers, lower educated, with lower lead and higher cadmium blood levels and with higher carotene dietary intake ones and to be partially mediated by lipid profile alterations, diabetes, serum Vitamin D levels and WBC count. A novel, direct and independent association between sleep duration and the prevalence of periodontitis was found. However, it needs to be investigated how the factors influencing the sleep duration affect this association. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. General Recommendations on Fatigue Risk Management for the Canadian Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    civilian world. For example, analyses of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound , Alaska, the 1984 toxic gas leaks in Bhopal, India...in Table 4 in Annex B.  Sleep Apnea – pauses in breathing during sleep, associated with loud snoring  Narcolepsy – inherited disorder...regarding whether they were pathological disorders Long or short sleeper, snoring , and sleep talking Other sleep disorders Unspecified disorders

  5. Joint associations of insomnia and sleep duration with prevalent diabetes: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cespedes, Elizabeth M; Dudley, Katherine A; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Zee, Phyllis C; Daviglus, Martha L; Shah, Neomi A; Talavera, Gregory A; Gallo, Linda C; Mattei, Josiemer; Qi, Qibin; Ramos, Alberto R; Schneiderman, Neil; Espinoza-Giacinto, Rebeca A; Patel, Sanjay R

    2016-05-01

    Inadequate sleep quantity and quality are associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. This relationship is not well-examined in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos, and prior analyses may be confounded by sleep apnea. This cross-sectional study examined joint associations of sleep duration and insomnia with diabetes among diverse U.S. Hispanic/Latinos. Baseline data on sleep quantity and quality were obtained from 15,227 participants (mean age 41; range 18-74 years) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Complex survey multinomial logistic regression was used to examine associations between prevalent diabetes and six phenotypes defined by cross-classifying sleep duration (short ≤6 h, average >6-9 h, long >9 h) and insomnia, adjusting for sex, age, site and Hispanic/Latino background interaction, education, physical activity, diet quality, and sleep apnea. In the weighted population, 14% had diabetes, 28% had insomnia, 9% were short sleepers, and 19% were long sleepers. Compared with those with average sleep and no insomnia, those with short sleep and insomnia were more likely to have diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.46; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02, 2.11). Average sleepers with insomnia (1.28; 95% CI 1.02, 1.61) and long sleepers without insomnia (1.33; 95% CI 1.07, 1.65) also had elevated odds of diabetes. Further adjustment for body mass index attenuated associations, except with long sleep without insomnia. Both decreased quantity and quality of sleep are associated with diabetes in Hispanic/Latinos, with the greatest odds among those with short sleep duration and insomnia. The association is largely explained by obesity. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Laboratory Note: Effect on Sleep Latency of Pre-Sleep AEP (Auditory Evoked Potential) Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    benefit in this form of sleep -onset insomnia . Bohlin (1,2) has suggested that the facilitation of sleep onset by repetitive auditory stimuli was...click procedure as described here is probably not a clinically useful technique for the treatment of sleep -onset insomnia . In a previous study (6), the...in many behavioral and cognitive techniques taught to improve pre- sleep habits in poor sleepers. It is also important to note that, in sleep laboratory

  7. Epidemiology of exercise and sleep*

    OpenAIRE

    Youngstedt, Shawn D; Kline, Christopher E

    2006-01-01

    Although exercise is widely believed to improve sleep, experimental evidence has found acute and chronic exercise to exert only modest effects on subsequent sleep. However, these studies are limited in that they have primarily used good sleepers (floor/ceiling effects). In contrast to experimental studies, epidemiologic studies have consistently reported significant positive associations between self-reported exercise habits and better self-reported sleep. This association has been confirmed ...

  8. Poor sleep in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøe Lunde, Hanne Marie; Aae, Tommy F; Indrevåg, William; Aarseth, Jan; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Bø, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Poor sleep is a frequent symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Sleep may be influenced by MS-related symptoms and adverse effects from immunotherapy and symptomatic medications. We aimed to study the prevalence of poor sleep and the influence of socio-demographic and clinical factors on sleep quality in MS- patients. A total of 90 MS patients and 108 sex-and age- matched controls were included in a questionnaire survey. Sleep complaints were evaluated by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and a global PSQI score was used to separate good sleepers (≤ 5) from poor sleepers (>5). Excessive daytime sleepiness, the use of immunotherapy and antidepressant drugs, symptoms of pain, depression, fatigue and MS-specific health related quality of life were registered. Results were compared between patients and controls and between good and poor sleepers among MS patients. MS patients reported a higher mean global PSQI score than controls (8.6 vs. 6.3, p = 0.001), and 67.1% of the MS patients compared to 43.9% of the controls (p = 0.002) were poor sleepers. Pain (p = 0.02), fatigue (p = 0.001), depression (p = 0.01) and female gender (p = 0.04) were associated with sleep disturbance. Multivariate analyses showed that female gender (p = 0.02), use of immunotherapy (p = 005) and a high psychological burden of MS (p = 0.001) were associated with poor sleep among MS patients. Poor sleep is common in patients with MS. Early identification and treatment of modifiable risk factors may improve sleep and quality of life in MS.

  9. Effects of railway track design on the expected degradation: Parametric study on energy dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadri, Mehran; Steenbergen, Michaël

    2018-04-01

    This paper studies the effect of railway track design parameters on the expected long-term degradation of track geometry. The study assumes a geometrically perfect and straight track along with spatial invariability, except for the presence of discrete sleepers. A frequency-domain two-layer model is used of a discretely supported rail coupled with a moving unsprung mass. The susceptibility of the track to degradation is objectively quantified by calculating the mechanical energy dissipated in the substructure under a moving train axle for variations of different track parameters. Results show that, apart from the operational train speed, the ballast/substructure stiffness is the most significant parameter influencing energy dissipation. Generally, the degradation increases with the train speed and with softer substructures. However, stiff subgrades appear more sensitive to particular train velocities, in a regime which is mostly relevant for conventional trains (100-200 km/h) and less for high-speed operation, where a stiff subgrade is always favorable and can reduce the sensitivity to degradation substantially, with roughly a factor up to 7. Also railpad stiffness, sleeper distance and rail cross-sectional properties are found to have considerable effect, with higher expected degradation rates for increasing railpad stiffness, increasing sleeper distance and decreasing rail profile bending stiffness. Unsprung vehicle mass and sleeper mass have no significant influence, however, only against the background of the assumption of an idealized (invariant and straight) track. Apart from dissipated mechanical energy, the suitability of the dynamic track stiffness is explored as an engineering parameter to assess the sensitivity to degradation. It is found that this quantity is inappropriate to assess the design of an idealized track.

  10. Poor sleep in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanne Marie Bøe Lunde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poor sleep is a frequent symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Sleep may be influenced by MS-related symptoms and adverse effects from immunotherapy and symptomatic medications. We aimed to study the prevalence of poor sleep and the influence of socio-demographic and clinical factors on sleep quality in MS- patients. METHODS: A total of 90 MS patients and 108 sex-and age- matched controls were included in a questionnaire survey. Sleep complaints were evaluated by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and a global PSQI score was used to separate good sleepers (≤ 5 from poor sleepers (>5. Excessive daytime sleepiness, the use of immunotherapy and antidepressant drugs, symptoms of pain, depression, fatigue and MS-specific health related quality of life were registered. Results were compared between patients and controls and between good and poor sleepers among MS patients. RESULTS: MS patients reported a higher mean global PSQI score than controls (8.6 vs. 6.3, p = 0.001, and 67.1% of the MS patients compared to 43.9% of the controls (p = 0.002 were poor sleepers. Pain (p = 0.02, fatigue (p = 0.001, depression (p = 0.01 and female gender (p = 0.04 were associated with sleep disturbance. Multivariate analyses showed that female gender (p = 0.02, use of immunotherapy (p = 005 and a high psychological burden of MS (p = 0.001 were associated with poor sleep among MS patients. CONCLUSIONS: Poor sleep is common in patients with MS. Early identification and treatment of modifiable risk factors may improve sleep and quality of life in MS.

  11. Sleep deprivation is associated with lower diet quality indices and higher rate of general and central obesity among young female students in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighatdoost, Fahimeh; Karimi, Golgis; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Azadbakht, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Short sleep duration and low diet quality are associated with weight gain. However, little is known about the relationship between sleep duration and the quality of diets. Therefore, we aimed to compare the diet quality indices and anthropometric measures between short and longer sleepers. This cross-sectional study consisted of 410 female youths who were chosen among students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences based on stratified random sampling method. Dietary intake assessment was done using a semiquantitative validated food frequency questionnaire. Sleep duration was estimated using self-reported nocturnal sleep duration by each person. Anthropometric measures were done using standard protocols. Diet quality indices (including dietary energy density, dietary diversity scores, healthy eating index, nutrient adequacy ratio, and mean adequacy ratio) were calculated using the standard definition. Subjects who slept less than 6 h/d were more likely to be overweight and obese (P = 0.0001) and also abdominally obese (P = 0.03). They also consumed more dietary energy (2406 ± 825 versus 2092 ± 700 kcal/d; P = 0.01, respectively) and carbohydrates (58.1 ± 16.2% versus 51.6 ± 10.3%; P = 0.03) but a lower amount of fiber (12 ± 7 versus 18 ± 7 g/d; P = 0.04), fruits (2.4 ± 0.6 versus 3.1 ± 0.7 servings/d; P = 0.04), whole grains (0.9 ± 0.1 versus 1.3 ± 0.1 servings/d; P = 0.04), and beans (0.3 ± 0.1 versus 0.8 ± 0.1 servings/d; P = 0.04). All diet quality indices were significantly lower among short sleepers (P sleep duration and obesity in young female youths. It might be derived from lower diet quality among short sleepers more than longer sleepers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Biodegradation of Phenolic Compounds in Creosote Treated Wood Waste by a Composting Microbial Culture Augmented with the Fungus Thermoascus aurantiacus

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel E. Ghaly; Bopeng Zhang; Deepika Dave

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: Creosote is used as a wood preservative and water proof agent in railway sleepers, utility poles, buildings foundations and fences and garden furniture. It is a mixture of over 300 hydrocarbons which include 75% polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 2-17% phenolic compounds and 10-18% heterocyclic organic compounds. Exposure to creosote may result in several health problems including damage to kidney, liver, eyes and skin. Potential contamination of soil and water exist from cr...

  13. Sleep and Food Choice in a Dutch Student Population

    OpenAIRE

    Leenaars, Cathalijn H.C.; Klinkenberg, Inge P.M.; Aussems, Audrey; Borger, Nedim; Faatz, Vivian; Hak, Anneloes; Houben, Ellen; Ramackers, Joyce; Snackers, Daphne; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The increased risk of obesity among short sleepers is most likely explained by increased energy intake. However, food intake could not only be altered quantitavely but also qualitatively. Therefore, we performed a correlational analysis on self-reported food intake and sleep in 51 students from Maastricht and surroundings. RESULTS: Students that slept longer had a lower caloric intake: ρ = -0.378, p = 0.006, the amount of calories consumed per minute awake remaining relatively sta...

  14. Railway diagnosis of electric transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushkov Vladimir Sergeevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in noise level at cities is increasing the requirements to functional interaction of road users - pedestrians and drivers - with the parameters of the environment as a leading component of Afferentation synthesis in the complicated complex of locomotive activity. City noise is one of the most widespread factors of unfavorable living and working conditions. The noise of high intensity provokes diseases, lowers labor activity. At present, many large cities pay much attention to electric vehicles. The authors present an analysis of the poor state of tram track in areas of high noise and vibration of car and under-sleeper base design. A negative effect of noise and vibration on the formation of urban areas environment is shown as well as the impact of these conditions on the person. The advantages of the application of electric transport are specified, noise displacement curve of railway and under sleeper base is plotted depending on the frequency of the applied load and the modulus of elasticity, as well as under sleeper base vibroacceleration depending on time. The authors offer a systematic study on the basis of a mathematical model of the sources of noise in the process of a tram motion.

  15. The role of emotional eating and stress in the influence of short sleep on food consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dweck, Julia S; Jenkins, Steve M; Nolan, Laurence J

    2014-01-01

    Short sleep duration is associated with elevated body mass index (BMI) and increased energy consumption. The present studies were conducted to determine what role emotional eating and stress might play in these relationships. The first was an exploratory questionnaire study in which sleep quality and duration were measured in conjunction with the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire in 184 women. Emotional and external eating scores were significantly higher in those who reported poor sleep quality (but were not related to sleep duration). In a second study of 64 women who were provided with snacks in the laboratory under stressed and control conditions, elevated food consumption was observed in those who scored high on emotional eating and who reported short sleep (a significant stress × emotional eating × sleep duration interaction) but not in those who reported poor sleep quality. No effects were found in liking or wanting of food and few effects were found on appetite. BMI was not related to sleep duration or sleep quality in either study. The results suggest that the relationship between short sleep and elevated food consumption exists in those who are prone to emotional eating. An external stressor elevated consumption in normal sleepers to the level observed in short sleepers, however, it did not significantly elevate consumption in short sleepers. Future examinations of the effects of sleep duration and quality on food consumption should examine emotional eating status. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Optimization of Vibration Reduction Ability of Ladder Tracks by FEM Coupled with ACO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ladder track, which has drawn increased attention in scientific communities, is an effective method for reducing vibrations from underground railways. In order to optimize the vibration reduction ability of ladder track, a new method, that is, the finite element method (FEM coupled with ant colony optimization (ACO, has been proposed in this paper. We describe how to build the FEM model verified by the vibration tests in the Track Vibration Abatement and Control Laboratory and how to couple the FEM with ACO. The density and elasticity modulus of the sleeper pad are optimized using this method. After optimization, the vibration acceleration level of the supporting platform in the 1–200 Hz range was reduced from 102.8 dB to 94.4 dB. The optimized density of the sleeper pad is 620 kg/m3, and the optimized elasticity modulus of the sleeper pad is 6.25 × 106 N/m2.

  17. Characterization of hybridization within a secondary contact region of the inshore fish, Bostrychus sinensis, in the East China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shaoxiong; Mishra, Mrinal; Wu, Haohao; Liang, Shuang; Miyamoto, Michael M

    2018-01-01

    The northwest Pacific marginal seas are a primary center of phylogeographic and evolutionary research, because of their dynamic geographic history of falling and rising sea levels during the glaciations and interglaciations of the last one million years. Here we present new molecular and morphological data for geographic samples of the four-eyed sleeper (Bostrychus sinensis), which reinforce the evidence for secondary contact and hybridization between two phylogeographic lineages in the East China Sea. Specifically, we find that the secondary contact region is characterized by a low frequency of hybridization, where mitochondrial DNA introgression is relatively common, whereas F 1 hybrids are correspondingly scarce. Furthermore, the adult standard lengths of the two phylogeographic lineages vary geographically in a manner that is consistent with reproductive character displacement. Collectively, the molecular and morphological data document that sleeper hybridization conforms to the classic "tension zone" model, where alleles are lost via reduced hybrid viability and/or positive assortative mating but are then replenished by dispersal from south of the secondary contact region. They also indicate that the two phylogeographic lineages are at an incipient stage of the speciation process. These results and conclusions for the four-eyed sleeper are presented as a case study for future research on the vicariance, secondary contact, and hybridization of marine groups in the northwest Pacific marginal seas.

  18. Sleep quality and health-related quality of life among long-term survivors of (non-) Hodgkin lymphoma in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammersen, Friederike; Lewin, Philip; Gebauer, Judith; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka; Brabant, Georg; Katalinic, Alexander; Waldmann, Annika

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated sleep quality and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among long-term survivors of Hodgkin (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The aim was to explore the impact of personal and health-related factors on sleep quality as well as associations between sleep quality and HRQOL. For the postal survey, participants with a minimum age of 18 years initially treated between 1998 and 2008 were recruited via the population-based cancer registry in Schleswig-Holstein, Northern Germany. Questionnaires included amongst others the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36v1). Descriptive and comparative statistics were performed. Additionally, a regression analysis was conducted to identify predictors of sleep quality. In total, we recruited 515 participants (398 NHL, 117 HL) with a mean age of 63.1 years. Approximately half of the survivors were classified as good sleepers. HRQOL scores differed between good and poor sleepers with lower scores in poor sleepers. In a prediction model, self-reported depression, exhaustion, higher age, inability to work, endocrinological disorders and female gender classified as predictors of sleep quality. This study highlights the impact of sleep quality on HRQOL in long-term survivors of NHL and HL. Thus, sleep quality should be routinely assessed during follow-up of cancer survivors with special attention to patients with potential risk factors.

  19. Railway track geometry degradation due to differential settlement of ballast/subgrade - Numerical prediction by an iterative procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jens C. O.; Li, Xin

    2018-01-01

    An iterative procedure for numerical prediction of long-term degradation of railway track geometry (longitudinal level) due to accumulated differential settlement of ballast/subgrade is presented. The procedure is based on a time-domain model of dynamic vehicle-track interaction to calculate the contact loads between sleepers and ballast in the short-term, which are then used in an empirical model to determine the settlement of ballast/subgrade below each sleeper in the long-term. The number of load cycles (wheel passages) accounted for in each iteration step is determined by an adaptive step length given by a maximum settlement increment. To reduce the computational effort for the simulations of dynamic vehicle-track interaction, complex-valued modal synthesis with a truncated modal set is applied for the linear subset of the discretely supported track model with non-proportional spatial distribution of viscous damping. Gravity loads and state-dependent vehicle, track and wheel-rail contact conditions are accounted for as external loads on the modal model, including situations involving loss of (and recovered) wheel-rail contact, impact between hanging sleeper and ballast, and/or a prescribed variation of non-linear track support stiffness properties along the track model. The procedure is demonstrated by calculating the degradation of longitudinal level over time as initiated by a prescribed initial local rail irregularity (dipped welded rail joint).

  20. Sleep quality and health-related quality of life among long-term survivors of (non- Hodgkin lymphoma in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Hammersen

    Full Text Available This study investigated sleep quality and health-related quality of life (HRQOL among long-term survivors of Hodgkin (HL and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL. The aim was to explore the impact of personal and health-related factors on sleep quality as well as associations between sleep quality and HRQOL. For the postal survey, participants with a minimum age of 18 years initially treated between 1998 and 2008 were recruited via the population-based cancer registry in Schleswig-Holstein, Northern Germany. Questionnaires included amongst others the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36v1. Descriptive and comparative statistics were performed. Additionally, a regression analysis was conducted to identify predictors of sleep quality. In total, we recruited 515 participants (398 NHL, 117 HL with a mean age of 63.1 years. Approximately half of the survivors were classified as good sleepers. HRQOL scores differed between good and poor sleepers with lower scores in poor sleepers. In a prediction model, self-reported depression, exhaustion, higher age, inability to work, endocrinological disorders and female gender classified as predictors of sleep quality. This study highlights the impact of sleep quality on HRQOL in long-term survivors of NHL and HL. Thus, sleep quality should be routinely assessed during follow-up of cancer survivors with special attention to patients with potential risk factors.

  1. Perceived fitness protects against stress-based mental health impairments among police officers who report good sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Markus; Kellmann, Micheal; Elliot, Catherine; Hartmann, Tim; Brand, Serge; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Pühse, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    This study examined a cognitive stress-moderation model that posits that the harmful effects of chronic stress are decreased in police officers who perceive high levels of physical fitness. It also determined whether the stress-buffering effect of perceived fitness is influenced by officers' self-reported sleep. A total of 460 police officers (n=116 females, n=344 males, mean age: M=40.7; SD=9.7) rated their physical fitness and completed a battery of self-report stress, mental health, and sleep questionnaires. Three-way analyses of covariance were performed to examine whether officers' self-reported mental health status depends on the interaction between stress, perceived fitness and sleep. Highly stressed officers perceived lower mental health and fitness and were overrepresented in the group of poor sleepers. Officers with high fitness self-reports revealed increased mental health and reported good sleep. In contrast, poor sleepers scored lower on the mental health index. High stress was more closely related to low mental health among poor sleepers. Most importantly, perceived fitness revealed a stress-buffering effect, but only among officers who reported good sleep. High perceived fitness and good sleep operate as stress resilience resources among police officers. The findings suggest that multimodal programs including stress management, sleep hygiene and fitness training are essential components of workplace health promotion in the police force.

  2. Transitions in sleep problems from late adolescence to young adulthood: A longitudinal analysis of the effects of peer victimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ling-Yin; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Lin, Linen Nymphas; Wu, Chi-Chen; Yen, Lee-Lan

    2018-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period with high vulnerability to sleep problems. However, research identifying distinct patterns and underlying determinants of sleep problems is scarce. This study investigated discrete subgroups of, changes in, and stability of sleep problems. We also examined whether peer victimization influenced sleep problem subgroups and transitions in patterns of sleep problems from late adolescence to young adulthood. Sex differences in the effects of peer victimization were also explored. In total, 1,455 male and 1,399 female adolescents from northern Taiwan participated in this longitudinal study. Latent transition analysis was used to examine changes in patterns of sleep problems and the effects of peer victimization on these changes. We identified three subgroups of sleep problems in males and two in females, and found that there was a certain level of instability in patterns of sleep problems during the study period. For both sexes, those with greater increases in peer victimization over time were more likely to change from being a good sleeper to a poor sleeper. The effects of peer victimization on baseline status of sleep problems, however, was only significant for males, with those exposed to higher levels of peer victimization more likely to be poor sleepers at baseline. Our findings reveal an important role of peer victimization in predicting transitions in patterns of sleep problems. Intervention programs aimed at decreasing peer victimization may help reduce the development and escalation of sleep problems among adolescents, especially in males. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Sensory gating in primary insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairston, Ilana S; Talbot, Lisa S; Eidelman, Polina; Gruber, June; Harvey, Allison G

    2010-06-01

    Although previous research indicates that sleep architecture is largely intact in primary insomnia (PI), the spectral content of the sleeping electroencephalographic trace and measures of brain metabolism suggest that individuals with PI are physiologically more aroused than good sleepers. Such observations imply that individuals with PI may not experience the full deactivation of sensory and cognitive processing, resulting in reduced filtering of external sensory information during sleep. To test this hypothesis, gating of sensory information during sleep was tested in participants with primary insomnia (n = 18) and good sleepers (n = 20). Sensory gating was operationally defined as (i) the difference in magnitude of evoked response potentials elicited by pairs of clicks presented during Wake and Stage II sleep, and (ii) the number of K complexes evoked by the same auditory stimulus. During wake the groups did not differ in magnitude of sensory gating. During sleep, sensory gating of the N350 component was attenuated and completely diminished in participants with insomnia. P450, which occurred only during sleep, was strongly gated in good sleepers, and less so in participants with insomnia. Additionally, participants with insomnia showed no stimulus-related increase in K complexes. Thus, PI is potentially associated with impaired capacity to filter out external sensory information, especially during sleep. The potential of using stimulus-evoked K complexes as a biomarker for primary insomnia is discussed.

  4. Non-contact and Unrestrained Respiration Monitoring System for Sleeping Person Using Near-infrared Bright Spots Matrix Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hirooki; Aoki, Hiroichi; Nakajima, Masato

    Measurement of biological information appears to be an effective method to obtain an understanding of health conditions measures to maintain and improve the health of elderly people. However, every conventional bioinstrumentation technique imposes a sense of restraint that results in aversion against measurements that would last over consecutive days. To solve this problem, we propose a system for monitoring the respiration of sleepers, and it uses a fiber grating vision sensor, which is a type of optical range finder, to achieve non-contact and unrestrained monitoring. The signals obtained by the system include the respiration rate, shifts of the ventilation, and the body movement interval of the sleeper. The information enables to investigate the stability of the sleeper throughout the night. We examined the measuring accuracy, validity, and effectiveness of our proposed system. And all-night monitoring performed at elderly care facility revealed that respiratory disturbances during sleep occurred in many of the residents and that sleep apnea is a common syndrome, especially among residents who have senile dementia or have had a stroke. We were able to carry out the all-night monitoring with this system for a total of about 370 times, according to our schedule, without experiencing any failure, accident, or interruption. Our proposed system is highly effective for monitoring elderly dementia patients who are likely to become uncooperative during measurement with existing monitoring methods that use certain amounts of restraint.

  5. Prevalence, symptomatic features, and factors associated with sleep disturbance/insomnia in Japanese patients with type-2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narisawa H

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hajime Narisawa,1 Yoko Komada,1 Takashi Miwa,2 Junpei Shikuma,2 Mamoru Sakurai,2 Masato Odawara,2 Yuichi Inoue1,3 1Department of Somnology, 2Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, 3Japan Somnology Center, Institute of Neuropsychiatry, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, Japan Purpose: To clarify the prevalence and symptomatic characteristics of sleep disturbance/insomnia among type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM Japanese patients.Methods: A cross-sectional survey of Japanese patients with the disorder was conducted. Participants consisted of 622 type-2 DM patients (mean 56.1±9.56 years and 622 sex- and age-matched controls. Participants’ scores in the Japanese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI-J, the Japanese version of the 12-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D, the Medical Outcomes Study 8-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-8, and the glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c of type-2 DM patients were analyzed.Results: There were 253 poor sleepers (43.9% in the type-2 DM group as a result of dichotomization with the PSQI-J cutoff total score of 5.5. The type-2 DM group recorded a higher mean PSQI-J total score (P<0.01 and manifested poorer sleep maintenance. Poor sleepers in both groups had lower mental component summary from SF-8 (MCS, physical component summary from SF-8 (PCS, and CES-D than good sleepers, and good sleepers in both groups had higher MCS, PCS, and CES-D than poor sleepers. Higher body mass index, presence of smoking habit, and living alone were significantly associated with sleep disturbance/insomnia symptoms, but HbA1c was not associated with sleep disturbance/insomnia in the type-2 DM group.Conclusion: Individuals affected with type-2 DM are likely to experience sleep problems, characterized by disturbance in sleep maintenance. Sleep disturbance/insomnia symptoms in DM patients might considerably reduce health-related quality of life. Keywords: cross

  6. The effects of ballast on the sound radiation from railway track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianying; Thompson, David; Jeong, Hongseok; Squicciarini, Giacomo

    2017-07-01

    In a conventional railway track, the rails are laid on sleepers, usually made of concrete, which are supported by a layer of coarse stones known as ballast. This paper focuses on quantifying the influence that the ballast has on the noise produced by the vibration of the track, particularly on the rail and sleeper radiation ratios. A one-fifth scale model of a railway track has been used to conduct acoustic and vibration measurements. This includes reduced-scale ballast that has been produced with stone sizes in the correct proportions. Two different scaling factors (1:√5 and 1:5) have been adopted for the stone sizes in an attempt to reproduce approximately the acoustic properties of full-scale ballast. It is shown that, although a scale factor of 1:√5 gives a better scaling of the acoustic properties, the stones scaled at 1:5 also give acceptable results. The flow resistivity and porosity of this ballast sample have been measured. These have been used in a local reaction model based on the Johnson-Allard formulation to predict the ballast absorption, showing good agreement with measurements of the absorption coefficient. The effects of the presence of the ballast on the noise radiation from a reduced-scale steel rail and concrete sleeper have been investigated experimentally with the ballast located on a rigid foundation. Comparisons are made with the corresponding numerical predictions obtained by using the boundary element method, in which the ballast is represented by a surface impedance. Additionally the finite element method has been used in which the porous medium is considered as an equivalent fluid. From these results it is shown that the extended reaction model gives better agreement with the measurements. Finally, the effects of the ballast vibration on the sleeper radiation have also been investigated for a case of three sleepers embedded in ballast. The ballast vibration is shown to increase the sound radiation by between 1 and 4.5 dB for

  7. Subjective sleep complaints indicate objective sleep problems in psychosomatic patients: a prospective polysomnographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linden M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Michael Linden,1,2 Marie Dietz,1 Christian Veauthier,3 Ingo Fietze3 1Research Group Psychosomatic Rehabilitation, Charité University Medicine Berlin, 2Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Rehabilitation Centre Seehof, Teltow, 3Interdisciplinary Center of Sleep Medicine, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany Objective: To elucidate the relationship between subjective complaints and polysomnographical parameters in psychosomatic patients.Method: A convenience sample of patients from a psychosomatic inpatient unit were classified according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI as very poor sleepers (PSQI >10, n=80 and good sleepers (PSQI <6, n=19. They then underwent a polysomnography and in the morning rated their previous night’s sleep using a published protocol (Deutschen Gesellschaft für Schlafforschung und Schlafmedizin morning protocol [MP].Results: In the polysomnography, significant differences were found between very poor and good sleepers according to the PSQI with respect to sleep efficiency and time awake after sleep onset. When comparing objective PSG and subjective MP, the polysomnographical sleep onset latency was significantly positively correlated with the corresponding parameters of the MP: the subjective sleep onset latency in minutes and the subjective evaluation of sleep onset latency (very short, short, normal, long, very long were positively correlated with the sleep latency measured by polysomnography. The polysomnographical time awake after sleep onset (in minutes was positively correlated with the subjective time awake after sleep onset (in minutes, evaluation of time awake after sleep onset (seldom, normal often, and subjective restfulness. The polysomnographical total sleep time (TST was positively correlated with the subjective TST. Conversely, the polysomnographical TST was negatively correlated with the evaluation of TST (high polysomnographical TST was correlated with the subjective

  8. Effect of a warm footbath before bedtime on body temperature and sleep in older adults with good and poor sleep: an experimental crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wen-Chun; Wang, Lee; Kuo, Ching-Pyng; Lo, Chyi; Chiu, Ming-Jang; Ting, Hua

    2013-12-01

    The decrease in core body temperature before sleep onset and during sleep is associated with dilation of peripheral blood vessels, which permits heat dissipation from the body core to the periphery. A lower core temperature coupled with a higher distal (hands and feet) temperature before sleep are associated with shorter sleep latency and better sleep quality. A warm footbath is thought to facilitate heat dissipation to improve sleep outcomes. This study examined the effect of a warm footbath (40°C water temperature, 20-min duration) on body temperature and sleep in older adults (≥55 years) with good and poor sleep. Two groups and an experimental crossover design was used. Forty-three adults responded to our flyer and 25 participants aged 59.8±3.7 years (poor sleeper with a Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score≥5=17; good sleepers with a Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scoretemperatures (core, abdomen, and foot) and polysomnography recorded for 3 consecutive nights. The first night was for adaptation and sleep apnea screening. Participants were then randomly assigned to either the structured foot bathing first (second night) and non-bathing second (third night) condition or the non-bathing first (second night) and foot bathing second (third night) condition. A footbath before sleep significantly increased and retained foot temperatures in both good and poor sleepers. The pattern of core temperatures during foot bathing was gradually elevated (poor sleepers vs. good sleepers=+0.40±0.58°C vs. +0.66±0.17°C). There were no significant changes in polysomnographic sleep and perceived sleep quality between non-bathing and bathing nights for both groups. A footbath of 40°C water temperature and 20-min duration before sleep onset increases foot temperatures and distal-proximal skin temperature gradients to facilitate vessel dilatation and elevates core temperature to provide heat load to the body. This footbath does not alter sleep in older adults with good and

  9. Measuring quality of sleep and autonomic nervous function in healthy Japanese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Miki Sato,1 Yuko Yasuhara,2 Tetsuya Tanioka,2 Yukie Iwasa,2 Masafumi Miyake,3 Toshiyuki Yasui,2 Masahito Tomotake,2 Haruo Kobayashi,4 Rozzano C Locsin51Department of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Shikoku University, 2Department of Nursing, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3Tokushima Prefectural Minami Health Care Center, Tokushima, 4Faculty of Medical Welfare, Kawasaki University of Medical Welfare, Kurashiki, Japan; 5Christine E Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USAAbstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between quality of sleep and autonomic nervous functioning in healthy adult Japanese women using three measures, namely, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI for subjective assessment of sleep quality, actigraphy for objective assessment of sleep, and heart rate variability using high frequency and low frequency domains. Participants were 31 healthy women in their 20s to 40s who met the selection criteria, including having normal monthly menstrual periods. Participants were categorized as good or poor sleepers according to their PSQI score. Median correlation coefficients of activity count and high frequency were −0.62 (range −0.43 to −0.84 for good sleepers and −0.45 (range 0.003 to −0.64 for poor sleepers. Good sleepers showed a significantly higher correlation of activity count and high frequency (Z=−2.11, P<0.05. Median correlation coefficients of activity count and low frequency/high frequency were 0.54 (range 0.29–0.73 for good sleepers and 0.41 (range 0.11–0.63 for poor sleepers. The PSQI, actigraphy data, and heart rate variability results showed positive correlations between sleep time as measured by PSQI and duration of inactivity as measured by actigraphy (r=0.446, P<0.05 and sleep time as measured by actigraphy (r=0.377, P<0.05, and a negative correlation between sleep time as measured by PSQI and the

  10. The relationship between sleep duration and fruit/vegetable intakes in UK adults: a cross-sectional study from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, Janet E; Burley, Victoria J; Hardie, Laura J

    2018-01-01

    Objectives There is increasing evidence to suggest an association between sleep and diet. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between sleep duration and fruit/vegetable (FV) intakes and their associated biomarkers in UK adults. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Data from The National Diet and Nutrition Survey. Participants 1612 adults aged 19–65 years were included, pregnant/breastfeeding women were excluded from the analyses. Outcome measures Sleep duration was assessed by self-report, and diet was assessed by 4-day food diaries, disaggregation of foods containing FV into their components was conducted to determine total FV intakes. Sleep duration was divided into: short (8 hours/day) sleep periods. Multiple regression adjusting for confounders was used for analyses where sleep duration was the exposure and FV intakes and their associated biomarkers were the outcomes. Restricted cubic spline models were developed to explore potential non-linear associations. Results In adjusted models, long sleepers (LS) consumed on average 28 (95% CI −50 to −6, p=0.01) g/day less of total FV compared to reference sleepers (RS), whereas short sleepers (SS) consumed 24 g/day less (95% CI −42 to –6, p=0.006) and had lower levels of FV biomarkers (total carotenoids, β-carotene and lycopene) compared to RS. Restricted cubic spline models showed that the association between sleep duration and FV intakes was non-linear (pimportant implications for lifestyle and behavioural change policy. PMID:29703857

  11. Patterns and predictors of sleep quality before, during, and after hospitalization in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierzewski, Joseph M; Mitchell, Michael; Rodriguez, Juan Carlos; Fung, Constance H; Jouldjian, Stella; Alessi, Cathy A; Martin, Jennifer L

    2015-01-15

    The impact of hospitalization on sleep in late-life is underexplored. The current study examined patterns of sleep quality before, during, and following hospitalization, investigated predictors of sleep quality patterns, and examined predictors of classification discordance between two suggested clinical cutoffs used to demarcate poor/good sleep. This study included older adults (n = 163; mean age 79.7 ± 6.9 years, 31% female) undergoing inpatient post-acute rehabilitation. Upon admission to inpatient post-acute rehabilitation, patients completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) retrospectively regarding their sleep prior to hospitalization. They subsequently completed the PSQI at discharge, and 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 1 year post discharge. Patient demographic and clinical characteristics (pain, depression, cognition, comorbidity) were collected upon admission. Using latent class analysis methods, older adults could be classified into (1) Consistently Good Sleepers and (2) Chronically Poor Sleepers based on patterns of self-reported sleep quality pre-illness, during, and up to 1 year following inpatient rehabilitation. This pattern was maintained regardless of the clinical cutoff employed (> 5 or > 8). Logistic regression analyses indicated that higher pain and depressive symptoms were consistently associated with an increased likelihood of being classified as a chronic poor sleeper. While there was substantial classification discordance based on clinical cutoff employed, no significant predictors of this discordance emerged. Clinicians should exercise caution in assessing sleep quality in inpatient settings. Alterations in the cutoffs employed may result in discordant clinical classifications of older adults. Pain and depression warrant detailed considerations when working with older adults on inpatient units when poor sleep is a concern. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  12. Association between quality of sleep and health-related quality of life in persons with diabetes mellitus type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani-Issa, Wegdan; Al-Shujairi, Arwa M; Patrick, Linda

    2017-12-20

    To estimate the relationship of sleep quality with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in persons with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMT2) living in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). DMT2 is an epidemic health condition in the UAE that has enormous impacts on heath, and consequent effects on HRQOL. However, because of an absence of screening for quality of sleep, people with DMT2 who experience poor sleep are likely to go untreated, which may compound the distressing impacts of DMT2 on their HRQOL. This is a cross-sectional quantitative research design. A sample of 268 participants with DMT2 were recruited from community healthcare settings in the UAE using cluster sampling. Participants completed questionnaires, including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the World Health Organization HRQOL. Data analysis used descriptive and correlational statistics. Of the 268 participants, 34% identified as "poor sleepers" and 55% had poor HRQOL. Poor sleepers showed significantly lower scores for HRQOL than good sleepers. The global PSQI scores were found to be independently predictive of global HRQOL. Subjective perceptions of sleep quality, the use of sleep medications and impaired daytime functioning were the variables found to have the highest correlations with global HRQOL and its four domains. This study found that people with DMT2 who indicate experiencing poor quality sleep are more likely to show a negative correlation with HRQOL. Additional research is needed to investigate how poor sleep may impact the health of people with DMT2. Findings suggest that assessment of sleep quality should be an essential component of diabetes care. Understanding sleep practices may aid public health practitioners and other healthcare providers in the design of culturally appropriate interventions to improve sleep quality in persons with DMT2. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Quality of sleep and its determinants among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Northwest of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshirgaran, Seyed Morteza; Ataei, Jafar; Malek, Ayyoub; Iranparvar-Alamdari, Manochehr; Aminisani, Nayyereh

    2017-07-15

    To examine sleep quality and its determinants among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This is a cross-sectional study conducted among diabetic patients referring to Ardabil diabetes clinic in Northwest of Iran. Information on sleep quality was collected using Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). A questionnaire was used to collect data on sociodemographic lifestyle factors and psychological distress. This questionnaire was completed through an interview, and clinical information was extracted from patient's record. Data analysis was done using SPSS software version 23 and univariate and multivariate analyses. Study participants consist of 256 people with T2DM the majority of whom were women (70%), and mean age of participants was 54.06 ± 9.09. The mean of total score of PSQI was 5.56 ± 3.34. Relative to younger age group, the middle-aged people with T2DM were twice more likely to be poor sleeper; the adjusted OR was 2.03 (95%CI: 1.01-4.08); and those with longer duration of diabetes were about 1.8 times more likely to report poor quality of sleep (ORadj = 1.77, 95%CI: 0.98-3.13). Participants with cholesterol level ≥ 240 mg/dL were about twice more likely to be poor sleeper (ORadj = 1.99, 95%CI: 1.01-3.94). The odds of being poor sleeper increased as the level of distress increased (1.84-4.09). As indicated by the results of the present study, some factors including age, duration of disease, psychological distress and high level of cholesterol were independently associated with poor sleep quality.

  14. Track dynamic behavior at rail welds at high speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guangwen; Xiao, Xinbiao; Guo, Jun; Wen, Zefeng; Jin, Xuesong

    2010-06-01

    As a vehicle passing through a track with different weld irregularities, the dynamic performance of track components is investigated in detail by using a coupled vehicle-track model. In the model, the vehicle is modeled as a multi-body system with 35 degrees of freedom, and a Timoshenko beam is used to model the rails which are discretely supported by sleepers. In the track model, the sleepers are modeled as rigid bodies accounting for their vertical, lateral and rolling motions and assumed to move backward at a constant speed to simulate the vehicle running along the track at the same speed. In the study of the coupled vehicle and track dynamics, the Hertizian contact theory and the theory proposed by Shen-Hedrick-Elkins are, respectively, used to calculate normal and creep forces between the wheel and the rails. In the calculation of the normal forces, the coefficient of the normal contact stiffness is determined by transient contact condition of the wheel and rail surface. In the calculation of the creepages, the lateral, roll-over motions of the rail and the fact that the relative velocity between the wheel and rail in their common normal direction is equal to zero are simultaneously taken into account. The motion equations of the vehicle and track are solved by means of an explicit integration method, in which the rail weld irregularities are modeled as local track vertical deviations described by some ideal cosine functions. The effects of the train speed, the axle load, the wavelength and depth of the irregularities, and the weld center position in a sleeper span on the wheel-rail impact loading are analyzed. The numerical results obtained are greatly useful in the tolerance design of welded rail profile irregularity caused by hand-grinding after rail welding and track maintenances.

  15. Biomechanical procedure to assess sleep restriction on motor control and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, G S; Noriega, C L; Soares, D F; Forner-Cordero, A

    2017-07-01

    The analysis of sleep quality during long periods and its impact on motor control and learning performance are crucial aspects for human health. The aim of this study is to analyze effects of chronic sleep restriction on motor performance. It is intended to establish motor control indicators in sleep quality analysis. A wearable actigraphy that records accelerometry, ambient light, and body temperature was used to monitor the sleep habits of 12 healthy subjects for two weeks before performing motor control and learning tests. The day of the motor test, the subjects filled two questionnaires about the quality of sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index - PSQI) and sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale - ESS). Afterwards they performed a coincident timing task that consisted of hitting a virtual target falling on the screen with the hand. An elbow flexion in the horizontal plane had to be performed on the correct time to reach the real target on a table at the same time as the virtual target on the screen. The subjects performed three sets of acquisition and transfer blocks of the coincident timing task. The subjects were clustered in two groups based on the PSQI and ESS scores. Actigraphy and motor control parameters (L5, correct responses, time variance) were compared between groups and experimental sets. The group with better sleep parameters did show a constant performance across blocks of task acquisition while the bad sleeper group improved from the first to the second acquisition block. Despite of this improvement, their performance is not better than the one of the good sleepers group. Although the number of subjects is low and it should be increased, these results indicate that the subjects with better sleep converged rapidly to a high level of performance, while the worse sleepers needed more trials to learn the task and their performance was not superior to the other group.

  16. Examining maladaptive beliefs about sleep across insomnia patient groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Colleen E; Edinger, Jack D; Morin, Charles M; Manber, Rachel; Rybarczyk, Bruce; Stepanski, Edward J; Wright, Helen; Lack, Leon

    2010-01-01

    Unhelpful beliefs about sleep have been linked to insomnia, and increasing one's cognitive flexibility about sleep has been linked to posttreatment sleep improvement. This study evaluated whether levels of such beliefs differ across insomnia groups and whether there are particular beliefs that differ for specific insomnia subtypes. Participants (N=1384) were people with insomnia and good sleepers ranging from 18 to 89 years old (mean=42.6; S.D.=19.4). Data from previous studies at five insomnia clinical sites were pooled to examine responses on the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep Scale (DBAS) across differing insomnia groups. Group analyses revealed that those from community-based insomnia clinics and those who are hypnotic-dependent generally had the highest levels of unhelpful sleep-related beliefs. With the exception of beliefs about sleep needs (wherein only community sleep clinic patients had high scores relative to good sleepers), all insomnia groups had higher scores on the 16-item DBAS (DBAS-16) than good sleepers. A validity analysis suggested that a DBAS-16 index score of >3.8 represented the level of unhelpful beliefs associated with clinically significant insomnia, although a slightly lower cutoff may be useful for identifying an unhelpful degree of sleep-related beliefs in highly screened primary-insomnia-only and medical patient groups. This study offers descriptive data for the use of DBAS-16 across insomnia subgroups, which will help the user understand what degree of maladaptive sleep beliefs is most strongly associated with clinically significant levels of insomnia. Results also may have implications for cognitive targeting during treatment for particular insomnia groups.

  17. Characterizing Adult Sleep Behavior Over 20 Years-The Population-Based Doetinchem Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomers, Margot L; Hulsegge, Gerben; van Oostrom, Sandra H; Proper, Karin I; Verschuren, W M Monique; Picavet, H Susan J

    2017-07-01

    To describe sleep duration patterns of adults over a 20-year period; to compare sociodemographic, lifestyle, and health characteristics across these patterns; and to relate the patterns to sleep quality. The study population consisted of 3695 adults aged 20 to 59 years at baseline. Five measurements of self-reported sleep duration were used to compose seven patterns from 1987 to 2012: persistent short (≤6 hours), moderate (7-8 hours), or long (≥9 hours) sleep duration and several changing patterns (varying and became short, moderate, or long sleepers). Multinomial logistic regression analyses were used to compare characteristics across sleep duration patterns. About 56% of the adults had persistent moderate sleep duration over 20 years. This group had a better sleep quality than the other groups. Of the adults who changed in their sleep duration (40%), 43% became a short sleeper. Sleep duration patterns that deviate from persistent moderate sleep duration were associated with physical inactivity during leisure time (odds ratios [ORs] and 95% confidence intervals [95% CIs] varied between 1.26 [1.04-1.53] and 1.58 [1.06-2.37]) and with poor self-rated health (ORs [95% CIs] varied between 1.50 [1.20-1.87] and 2.15 [1.48-3.12]). Nearly half of the adults did not have persistent moderate sleep duration over a 20-year period and more than one-sixth became short sleeper. This is reason for concern considering the adverse health status associated with short and long sleep duration. Leisure-time physical activity is a potential important target to prevent unfavorable changes in sleep duration over the life course. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of the Sleep Research Society].

  18. Sleep Duration, Mortality, and Heredity-A Prospective Twin Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn; Narusyte, Jurgita; Alexanderson, Kristina; Svedberg, Pia

    2017-10-01

    A number of studies have shown a U-shaped association between sleep duration and mortality. Since sleep duration is partly genetically determined, it seems likely that its association with mortality is also genetically influenced. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence on heredity on the association between sleep duration and mortality. We used a cohort of 14267 twins from the Swedish Twin Registry. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, adjusted for a number of covariates, confirmed a clear U shape with a hazard ratio (HR) = 1.34 and 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.15-1.57 for a sleep duration of ≤6.5 hours and HR = 1.18 (CI = 1.07-1.30) for sleep of ≥9.5 hours. Reference value was 7.0 hours. A co-twin analysis of 1942 twins discordant on mortality showed a HR = 2.66 (CI = 1.17-6.04) for long (≥9.5 hours) sleep in monzygotic twins and an HR = 0.66 (CI = 0.20-2.14) for short (sleep. In dizygotic twins, no association was significant. The heritability for mortality was 28% for the whole group, while it was 86% for short sleepers and 42% for long sleepers. Thus, the link with mortality for long sleep appears to be more due to environmental factors than to heredity, while heritability dominates among short sleepers. We found that both long and short sleep were associated with higher total mortality, that the difference in mortality within twin pairs is associated with long sleep, and that short sleep has a higher heritability for mortality, while long sleep is associated with more environmental influences on mortality. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Sleep patterns and predictors of disturbed sleep in a large population of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Hannah G; Reider, Brian D; Whiting, Annie B; Prichard, J Roxanne

    2010-02-01

    To characterize sleep patterns and predictors of poor sleep quality in a large population of college students. This study extends the 2006 National Sleep Foundation examination of sleep in early adolescence by examining sleep in older adolescents. One thousand one hundred twenty-five students aged 17 to 24 years from an urban Midwestern university completed a cross-sectional online survey about sleep habits that included the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, the Horne-Ostberg Morningness-Eveningness Scale, the Profile of Mood States, the Subjective Units of Distress Scale, and questions about academic performance, physical health, and psychoactive drug use. Students reported disturbed sleep; over 60% were categorized as poor-quality sleepers by the PSQI, bedtimes and risetimes were delayed during weekends, and students reported frequently taking prescription, over the counter, and recreational psychoactive drugs to alter sleep/wakefulness. Students classified as poor-quality sleepers reported significantly more problems with physical and psychological health than did good-quality sleepers. Students overwhelmingly stated that emotional and academic stress negatively impacted sleep. Multiple regression analyses revealed that tension and stress accounted for 24% of the variance in the PSQI score, whereas exercise, alcohol and caffeine consumption, and consistency of sleep schedule were not significant predictors of sleep quality. These results demonstrate that insufficient sleep and irregular sleep-wake patterns, which have been extensively documented in younger adolescents, are also present at alarming levels in the college student population. Given the close relationships between sleep quality and physical and mental health, intervention programs for sleep disturbance in this population should be considered. Copyright 2010 Society for Adolescent Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder dimensions and sluggish cognitive tempo symptoms in relation to college students' sleep functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stephen P; Luebbe, Aaron M; Langberg, Joshua M

    2014-12-01

    This study examined separate inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive dimensions of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as well as sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) symptoms, in relation to college students' sleep functioning. Participants were 288 college students (ages 17-24; 65 % female; 90 % non-Hispanic White; 12 % self-reported having an ADHD diagnoses) who completed measures of ADHD/SCT symptoms and sleep functioning. Participants reported obtaining an average of 6.8 h of sleep per night (only 26 % reported obtaining ≥8 h of sleep) and having a sleep onset latency of 25 min. 63 % were classified as "poor sleepers," and poor sleepers had higher rates of ADHD and SCT symptoms than "good sleepers". Path analysis controlling for ADHD status and psychiatric medication use was used to determine associations between psychopathology and sleep functioning domains. Above and beyond covariates and other psychopathologies, hyperactivity (but not impulsivity) was significantly associated with poorer sleep quality, longer sleep latency, shorter sleep duration, and more use of sleep medications. SCT symptoms (but not inattention) were significantly associated with poorer sleep quality and increased nighttime sleep disturbance (e.g., having bad dreams, waking up in the middle of the night, feeling too cold or too hot). Both inattention and SCT were associated with greater daytime dysfunction. Regression analyses demonstrated that hyperactivity predicted sleep quality above and beyond the influence of daytime dysfunction, and inattention and SCT predicted daytime dysfunction above and beyond sleep quality. Further studies are needed to examine the interrelations of nighttime sleep functioning, ADHD/SCT, and daytime dysfunction, as well to elucidate mechanisms contributing to related functional impairments.

  1. Short sleep duration is associated with greater alcohol consumption in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, Jean-Philippe; McNeil, Jessica; Després, Jean-Pierre; Bouchard, Claude; Tremblay, Angelo

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the association between sleep duration and alcohol consumption in adults (301 men and 402 women aged 18-64years) from the greater Quebec City area. Sleep duration (self-reported), alcohol consumption (3-day food record and questions on drinking habits), and disinhibition eating behavior trait (score ≥ 6 on the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire) were assessed. Participants were categorized as short- ( ≤ 6h), average- (7-8h) or long- ( ≥ 9h) duration sleepers. Overall, short-duration sleepers consumed significantly more alcohol than the two other sleep-duration groups. After adjusting for relevant covariates, short sleep duration was associated with an increase in the odds of exceeding the recommendations for sensible weekly alcohol intake of 14 drinks for men and 7 drinks for women compared to those sleeping between 7 and 8h (OR 1.87, 95%CI 1.03-3.54, both sexes combined). In both men and women, daily alcohol intake was significantly higher in short-duration sleepers having a high disinhibition eating behavior trait. However, the prevalence of a binge drinking occasion (i.e. ≥5 drinks on one occasion) was more common in men than women. Men sleeping less than 6h per night with a disinhibited eating behavior were more likely to report binge drinking (41% of them). In summary, the combination of short sleep duration with disinhibited eating behavior is associated with greater alcohol intake in adults. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hybrid Discrete Element - Finite Element Simulation for Railway Bridge-Track Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewunruen, S.; Mirza, O.

    2017-10-01

    At the transition zone or sometimes called ‘bridge end’ or ‘bridge approach’, the stiffness difference between plain track and track over bridge often causes aggravated impact loading due to uneven train movement onto the area. The differential track settlement over the transition has been a classical problem in railway networks, especially for the aging rail infrastructures around the world. This problem is also additionally worsened by the fact that the construction practice over the area is difficult, resulting in a poor compaction of formation and subgrade. This paper presents an advanced hybrid simulation using coupled discrete elements and finite elements to investigate dynamic interaction at the transition zone. The goal is to evaluate the dynamic stresses and to better understand the impact dynamics redistribution at the bridge end. An existing bridge ‘Salt Pan Creek Railway Bridge’, located between Revesby and Kingsgrove, has been chosen for detailed investigation. The Salt Pan Bridge currently demonstrates crushing of the ballast causing significant deformation and damage. Thus, it’s imperative to assess the behaviours of the ballast under dynamic loads. This can be achieved by modelling the nonlinear interactions between the steel rail and sleeper, and sleeper to ballast. The continuum solid elements of track components have been modelled using finite element approach, while the granular media (i.e. ballast) have been simulated by discrete element method. The hybrid DE/FE model demonstrates that ballast experiences significant stresses at the contacts between the sleeper and concrete section. These overburden stress exists in the regions below the outer rails, identify fouling and permanent deformation of the ballast.

  3. Sleep disturbances, body fat distribution, food intake and/or energy expenditure: pathophysiological aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, Ari

    2015-01-01

    Data from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have illustrated a relationship between short sleep duration (SSD) and weight gain. Individuals with SSD are heavier and gain more weight over time than normal-duration sleepers. This sleep-obesity relationship may have consequences for obesity treatments, as it appears that short sleepers have reduced ability to lose weight. Laboratory-based clinical studies found that experimental sleep restriction affects energy expenditure and intake, possibly providing a mechanistic explanation for the weight gain observed in chronic short sleepers. Specifically, compared to normal sleep duration, sleep restriction increases food intake beyond the energetic costs of increased time spent awake. Reasons for this increased energy intake after sleep restriction are unclear but may include disrupted appetite-regulating hormones, altered brain mechanisms involved in the hedonic aspects of appetite, and/or changes in sleep quality and architecture. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disorder at the intersection of sleep and obesity, and the characteristics of the disorder illustrate many of the effects of sleep disturbances on body weight and vice versa. Specifically, while obesity is among the main risk factors for OSA, the disorder itself and its associated disturbances in sleep quality and architecture seem to alter energy balance parameters and may induce further weight gain. Several intervention trials have shown that weight loss is associated with reduced OSA severity. Thus, weight loss may improve sleep, and these improvements may promote further weight loss. Future studies should establish whether increasing sleep duration/improving sleep quality can induce weight loss. PMID:25372728

  4. The relationship between serum asymmetric dimethylarginine levels and subjective sleep quality in normotensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aribas, Alpay; Kayrak, Mehmet; Tekinalp, Mehmet; Akilli, Hakan; Alibasic, Hayrudin; Yildirim, Serkan; Gunduz, Mehmet; Taner, Alpaslan; Unlu, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Poor sleep quality (SQ) is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Additionally, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. However, no sufficient data regarding the relationship between ADMA levels and SQ have been reported. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the association between SQ and ADMA levels in normotensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The study participants consisted of 78 normotensive type 2 diabetics. The SQ of all participants was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Patients with a global PSQI score > 5 were defined as "poor sleepers." Factors associated with poor SQ were analyzed using a multiple regression model. Serum ADMA levels were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. The median ADMA levels of the poor sleepers were increased compared with patients defined as good sleepers (5.5 [4.2 to 6.6] vs. 4.4 [2.9 to 5.4], p sleep latency (p sleep efficiency (p = 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that ADMA levels (odds ratio [OR], 1.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16 to 2.44; p = 0.01) and body mass index (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.31; p = 0.04) were associated with poor SQ independently of glomerular filtration rate, sex, age, duration of diabetes, hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure. Self-reported SQ was independently associated with ADMA levels in normotensive patients with diabetes mellitus.

  5. Relationship between Sleep Quality and Quality of Life in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarraf, Payam; Azizi, Sepeher; Moghaddasi, Abdorreza Naser; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Tafakhori, Abbas; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa

    2014-12-01

    Impaired quality of life (QOL) is an issue considered in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). There are limited studies evaluated poor sleep and impaired QOL in these cases. The aim of this study was to evaluate quality of sleep and poor sleep in Iranian patients with MS and the relationship between Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) score and QOL subscales. One-hundred and fourteen cases with definite MS due to MC Donald criteria enrolled who referred to MS clinic of Sina and Imam Hospitals were enrolled. Patients asked to fill valid and reliable Persian versions of PSQI and MSQOL-54 questionnaires. Demographic data (sex, age), duration of the disease, education level and marital status were extracted from patients medical files. After neurological examination, Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) was assessed. Ninety-one (79.8%) patients were female and 23 (20.2%) were male. Mean age and EDSS was 34.7 ± 9.6 years and 2.3 (median: 1.5). Mean PSQI score and overall QOL score were 4.5 and 57. Sixty-seven cases were good sleepers (PSQI ≤ 5) and 47 were poor sleepers (PSQI > 5). Except five subscales, all others were significantly different between good and poor sleepers. There was significant positive correlation between PSQI score and EDSS (r = 0.24, P < 0.001) and negative correlation between EDSS and physical and mental health (r = -0.48, P < 0.001, r = -0.43, P < 0.001). EDSS and total PSQI score were independent predictors of physical and mental health composites. Sleep quality as a factor which affecting QOL should be considered and evaluated properly in MS patients.

  6. Relationship between sleep quality and quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Sarraf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Impaired quality of life (QOL is an issue considered in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. There are limited studies evaluated poor sleep and impaired QOL in these cases. The aim of this study was to evaluate quality of sleep and poor sleep in Iranian patients with MS and the relationship between Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI score and QOL subscales. Methods: One-hundred and fourteen cases with definite MS due to MC Donald criteria enrolled who referred to MS clinic of Sina and Imam Hospitals were enrolled. Patients asked to fill valid and reliable Persian versions of PSQI and MSQOL-54 questionnaires. Demographic data (sex, age, duration of the disease, education level and marital status were extracted from patients medical files. After neurological examination, Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS was assessed. Results: Ninety-one (79.8% patients were female and 23 (20.2% were male. Mean age and EDSS was 34.7 ΁ 9.6 years and 2.3 (median: 1.5. Mean PSQI score and overall QOL score were 4.5 and 57. Sixty-seven cases were good sleepers (PSQI ≤ 5 and 47 were poor sleepers (PSQI > 5. Except five subscales, all others were significantly different between good and poor sleepers. There was significant positive correlation between PSQI score and EDSS (r = 0.24, P < 0.001 and negative correlation between EDSS and physical and mental health (r = −0.48, P < 0.001, r = −0.43, P < 0.001. EDSS and total PSQI score were independent predictors of physical and mental health composites. Conclusions: Sleep quality as a factor which affecting QOL should be considered and evaluated properly in MS patients.

  7. Increased plasma orexin-A levels in patients with insomnia disorder are not associated with prepro-orexin or orexin receptor gene polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shi; Huang, Weiwei; Lu, Shanshan; Lu, Lili; Li, Guohua; Chen, Xu; Liu, Xiaomin; Lv, Xin; Zhao, Zhangning; Duan, Ruisheng; Du, Yifeng; Tang, Jiyou

    2017-02-01

    Orexins, also known as hypocretins, play a regulatory role in the sleep-wake cycle by activating orexin receptors. Previous animal studies have shown that sleep deprivation can elevate orexinergic peptide levels. However, the relationship between insomnia disorder and orexin-A levels in humans has not been explored. In the current study, we examined plasma orexin-A levels in patients with insomnia disorder and in normal sleepers. We also studied the possible mechanisms underlying changes in orexin-A levels between the study groups; this included investigations of prepro-orexin and orexin receptor gene polymorphisms as well as exploration of other variables. We measured plasma orexin-A levels in 228 patients with insomnia disorder and 282 normal sleepers. The results indicated that the patients with insomnia disorder had significantly higher orexin-A levels than normal sleepers (63.42±37.56 vs. 54.84±23.95pg/ml). A positive relationship was detected between orexin-A level and age in patients with insomnia disorder. Orexin-A levels were elevated in relation to course of insomnia, as well as in relation to increased Insomnia Severity Index score. None of the evaluated prepro-orexin gene single nucleotide polymorphisms were informative between the two study populations. After sequencing all orexin receptor exons, one variation (rs2271933) in the OX1R gene and one variation (rs2653349) in the OX2R gene were found. However, no significant differences were found in either genotypic or allelic frequency distributions between the two study groups. It is suggested that the increased plasma orexin-A levels in patients with insomnia disorder are associated with the course and severity of insomnia, but not with prepro-orexin and orexin receptor gene polymorphisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Morphology of Gnathostoma spp. isolated from natural hosts in Sinaloa, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Camacho, Sylvia P; Willms, Kaethe; Ramos, Magda Zazueta; del Carmen de la Cruz Otero, Maria; Nawa, Yukifumi; Akahane, Hiroshige

    2002-07-01

    Gnathostomosis is an emerging public health problem in Sinaloa, Mexico, where an increasing number of human cases have been diagnosed since 1989. The present study was carried out to determine the presence of the parasite in other natural hosts from the area. Birds, fish, opossums and raccoons were captured from local dams and lagoons. The flesh from bird and fish specimens was ground and examined under a 100 W light bulb. Larvae were processed for light and electron microscopy. A total of 368 advanced stage 3 (AL3) larvae were found in 300 ichthyophagous birds, with Egretta alba exhibiting the highest infection rate. A total of 4,156 fish were examined, of which six species were infected with AL3 larvae: Arius guatemalensis (blue sea catfish), Dormitator latifrons (Pacific fat sleeper), Gobiomorus sp. (fat sleeper), Oreochromis sp. (Nile tilapia), Cichlasoma beani (Sinaloan cichlid or green guapote) and Eleotris picta (spotted sleeper). Twenty larvae from birds were used to infect domestic cats and dogs. Young adult worms were recovered from the stomach of a cat with a 17 day infection and from a dog with a 35 day infection. Larvae exhibited four rows of hooklets on the head bulb, whereas the young adults had nine rows of hooklets. The cuticular spines of adult worms along the body evolved from single-pointed, bi- or trifurcated spines. Nuclei were counted in intestinal cells examined in serial sections of larvae recovered from a great heron and a fish, in which a mean of 1.6 nuclei/cell was found, corresponding to data published for Gnathostoma binucleatum. Although the external morphology of both larvae and adults are in agreement with previous descriptions of Gnathostoma spinigerum, the results indicate that natural host infections in Sinaloa may be caused by either G. spinigerum or G. binucleatum.

  9. The Association Between Sleep Duration and Hand Grip Strength in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: The Yilan Study, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsi-Chung; Hsu, Nai-Wei; Chou, Pesus

    2017-04-01

    Different pathomechanisms may underlie the age-related decline in muscle mass and muscle power in older adults. This study aimed to examine the independent relationship between sleep duration and muscle power. Older adults, aged 65 years and older, were randomly selected to participate in a community-based survey in Yilan city, Taiwan. Data on self-reported sleep duration, sociodemographic information, lifestyle, chronic medical and mental health conditions, sleep-related parameters, and anthropometric measurements were collected. Participants who slept ≤4 hr, 5 hr, 6-7 hr, 8 hr, and ≥9 hr were defined as shortest, short, mid-range, long, and longest sleepers, respectively. Muscle power was estimated using hand grip strength. A total of 1081 individuals participated. Their average age was 76.3 ± 6.1 years, and 59.4% were female. After controlling for covariates, including muscle mass of the upper extremities, both long (estimated mean [95% confidence interval, CI]: 19.2 [18.2-20.2], p = .03) and longest sleepers (estimated mean [95% CI]: 17.8 [16.4-19.2], p = .001) had weaker hand grip strength than mid-range sleepers (estimated mean [95% CI]: 20.9 [20.3-21.4]). When stratified by sex, the association between longest sleep duration and weaker hand grip strength was noted among men only. Older adults with long sleep duration had weaker hand grip strength irrespective of muscle mass. This finding suggests that decreased muscle power may mediate or confound the relationship between long sleep duration and adverse health outcomes. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Relationships between sleep quality, physical fitness and body mass index in college freshmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S P; Chen, Y H

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association between poor sleep quality with BMI and health-related physical fitness among college freshmen. The participants were college freshmen enrolled in 2011. Sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). A global PSQI score of 5 and total sleep time (TST) of 7 hours were used to differentiate between poor and good sleepers. Various Body Mass Index (BMI) ranges were used to categorize groups of underweight, normal weight and overweight. Health-related fitness was measured by Sit-And-Reach, Curl-Up, and Run/Walk Tests. A substantial proportion of college students were affected by poor sleep quality. Significantly more females were poor sleepers and had a TST shorter than 7 hrs. No difference in the proportions of participants categorized based on BMI between male and female students. Males generally scored better on health-related physical fitness tests than females. All results of physical fitness tests were significantly correlated with BMI, sleep quality (global PSQI), and TST in both males and females. Pool sleepers were associated with a higher BMI and lower performance of physical fitness. TST was negatively associated with BMI and time length to complete 1600-m or 800-m Run/Walk Test, and positively correlated with the performance of Sit-And-Reach and Curl-Up Tests in both genders. Poorer sleep quality and decreased TST were associated with lower performance in health-related physical fitness assessment among college students. Health promotion and educational programs for young adults should emphasize the importance of sleep quality and TST.

  11. Sleep Habits and Susceptibility to Upper Respiratory Illness: the Moderating Role of Subjective Socioeconomic Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Aric A; Janicki-Deverts, Denise; Adler, Nancy E; Hall, Martica; Cohen, Sheldon

    2017-02-01

    Sleep is a predictor of infectious illness that may depend on one's socioeconomic status (SES). This study aimed to investigate the moderating effects of objective and subjective SES on sleep-clinical cold risk link and test whether nasal inflammation serves as a plausible biological pathway. This study combined data (n = 732) from three viral challenge studies. Measures of self-reported sleep and objective and subjective measures of SES were obtained. Participants were quarantined and administrated rhinovirus (RV) or influenza virus and monitored over 5 (RV) or 6 (influenza) days for the development of a cold. Symptom severity, including mucus production and nasal clearance time, and levels of nasal cytokines (interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β) were measured prior to administration and each day during the quarantined period. Subjective SES, but not objective SES, moderated associations between shorter sleep duration and increased likelihood of a clinical cold. Compared to ≥8-hour sleepers, ≤6-hour sleepers with low subjective SES were at increased risk for developing a cold (OR = 2.57, 95% CI 1.10-6.02). There was no association between sleep duration and colds in high subjective SES participants. Among infected individuals who reported low subjective SES, shorter sleep duration was associated with greater mucus production. There was no evidence that markers of nasal inflammation mediated the link between sleep duration and cold susceptibility among those reporting low subjective SES. Subjective SES may reflect an important social factor for understanding vulnerability to and protection against infectious illness among short sleepers.

  12. Modern technologies of local injection anesthesia in dental practice

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    Sohov S.Т.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the importance of using the new system Quick Sleeper for local anesthesia, to highlight benefits of quick and comfortable anesthesia. Material and Methods. The examination of effectiveness, convenience of this kind of anesthesia has been carried out. Results. All patients, taking part in this examination, confirmed more comfortable condition after this anesthesia than conductor and infiltration methods of anesthesia. The effect of anesthesia is better than after conductor anesthesia. Conclusion. This technology guarantees equal introduction and spread of anesthetic, independently of tissue density, eliminating the risk of carpule breakage.

  13. Developmental Trajectories of Sleep Problems from Childhood to Adolescence Both Predict and Are Predicted by Emotional and Behavioral Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Biyao; Isensee, Corinna; Becker, Andreas; Wong, Janice; Eastwood, Peter R; Huang, Rae-Chi; Runions, Kevin C; Stewart, Richard M; Meyer, Thomas; Brüni, L G; Zepf, Florian D; Rothenberger, Aribert

    2016-01-01

    Although the prevalence rates of sleep disorders at different stages of childhood and adolescence have been well established, little is known about the developmental course of general sleep problems. This also holds true for the bidirectional relationship between sleep problems and emotional as well as behavioral difficulties. This longitudinal study investigated the general pattern and the latent trajectory classes of general sleep problems from a large community sample aged 5-14 years. In addition, this study examined the predictive value of emotional/behavioral difficulties (i.e., anxiety/depression, attention problems, and aggressive behavior) on sleep problems latent trajectory classes, and vice-versa. Participants ( N = 1993) were drawn from a birth cohort of Western Australian children born between 1989 and 1991 who were followed until 14 years of age. Sleep problems were assessed at ages 5, 8, 10, and 14, respectively, whereas anxiety/depression, attention problems, and aggressive behavior were assessed at ages 5 and 17 years. Latent growth curve modeling revealed a decline in an overall pattern of sleep problems during the observed 10-year period. Anxiety/depression was the only baseline factor that predicted the longitudinal course of sleep problems from ages 5 to 14 years, with anxious and depressed participants showing faster decreasing patterns of sleep problems over time than those without anxiety or depression. Growth mixture modeling identified two classes of sleep problem trajectories: Normal Sleepers (89.4%) and Troubled Sleepers (10.6%). Gender was randomly distributed between these groups. Childhood attention problems, aggressive behavior, and the interaction between gender and anxiety/depression were significantly predictive of membership in the group of Troubled Sleepers . Group membership in Troubled Sleepers was associated with higher probability of having attention problems and aggressive behavior in mid-adolescence. Boys and girls with

  14. Developmental Trajectories of Sleep Problems from Childhood to Adolescence Both Predict and Are Predicted by Emotional and Behavioral Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Biyao; Isensee, Corinna; Becker, Andreas; Wong, Janice; Eastwood, Peter R.; Huang, Rae-Chi; Runions, Kevin C.; Stewart, Richard M.; Meyer, Thomas; Brüni, L. G.; Zepf, Florian D.; Rothenberger, Aribert

    2016-01-01

    Although the prevalence rates of sleep disorders at different stages of childhood and adolescence have been well established, little is known about the developmental course of general sleep problems. This also holds true for the bidirectional relationship between sleep problems and emotional as well as behavioral difficulties. This longitudinal study investigated the general pattern and the latent trajectory classes of general sleep problems from a large community sample aged 5–14 years. In addition, this study examined the predictive value of emotional/behavioral difficulties (i.e., anxiety/depression, attention problems, and aggressive behavior) on sleep problems latent trajectory classes, and vice-versa. Participants (N = 1993) were drawn from a birth cohort of Western Australian children born between 1989 and 1991 who were followed until 14 years of age. Sleep problems were assessed at ages 5, 8, 10, and 14, respectively, whereas anxiety/depression, attention problems, and aggressive behavior were assessed at ages 5 and 17 years. Latent growth curve modeling revealed a decline in an overall pattern of sleep problems during the observed 10-year period. Anxiety/depression was the only baseline factor that predicted the longitudinal course of sleep problems from ages 5 to 14 years, with anxious and depressed participants showing faster decreasing patterns of sleep problems over time than those without anxiety or depression. Growth mixture modeling identified two classes of sleep problem trajectories: Normal Sleepers (89.4%) and Troubled Sleepers (10.6%). Gender was randomly distributed between these groups. Childhood attention problems, aggressive behavior, and the interaction between gender and anxiety/depression were significantly predictive of membership in the group of Troubled Sleepers. Group membership in Troubled Sleepers was associated with higher probability of having attention problems and aggressive behavior in mid-adolescence. Boys and girls with

  15. Sleep quality, depression, and quality of life in elderly hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turkmen K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Kultigin Turkmen,1 Fatih Mehmet Erdur,1 Ibrahim Guney,2 Abduzhappar Gaipov,1 Faruk Turgut,3 Lutfullah Altintepe,2 Mustafa Saglam,1 Halil Zeki Tonbul,1 Emaad M Abdel-Rahman41Division of Nephrology, Meram School of Medicine, Necmettin Erbakan University, Meram, Konya, Turkey; 2Division of Nephrology, Meram Research and Training Hospital, Meram, Konya, Turkey; 3Division of Nephrology, Iskenderun State Hospital, Iskenderun, Hatay, Turkey; 4Division of Nephrology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USAObjective: Both the incidence and the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD in elderly patients are increasing worldwide. Elderly ESRD patients have been found to be more prone to depression than the general population. There are many studies that have addressed the relationship between sleep quality (SQ, depression, and health related quality of life (HRQoL in ESRD patients, but previous studies have not confirmed the association in elderly hemodialysis (HD patients. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to demonstrate this relationship in elderly HD patients.Patients and methods: Sixty-three elderly HD patients (32 females and 31 males aged between 65 and 89 years were included in this cross-sectional study. A modified Post-Sleep Inventory (PSI, the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form health survey, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were applied.Results: The prevalence of poor sleepers (those with a PSI total sleep score [PSI-4 score] of 4 or higher was 71% (45/63, and the prevalence of depression was 25% (16/63. Of the 45 poor sleepers, 15 had depression, defined as a BDI score of 17 or higher. Poor sleepers had a significantly higher rate of diabetes mellitus (P = 0.03, significantly higher total BDI scores, and lower Physical Component Scale scores (ie, lower HRQoL than good sleepers. The PSI-4 score correlated negatively with Physical Component Scale (r = −0.500, P < 0.001 and Mental Component Scale

  16. Relationship between sleep pattern and efficacy of calorie-restricted Mediterranean diet in overweight/obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliai, Giuditta; Dinu, Monica; Casini, Alessandro; Sofi, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    The association between the sleep pattern and the effectiveness of a calorie-restricted Mediterranean diet in people with overweight/obesity has been investigated in this study. Four hundred and three subjects were provided with a calorie-restricted Mediterranean diet and followed for 9 months. Personal information, including sleep pattern, was obtained at the baseline. Body weight and composition were measured every 3 months. Poor sleepers reported to have significantly (p sleeping 6-8 or >8 h/day had an increased probability of losing fat mass than women who reported sleeping sleep pattern is necessary to maintain body weight and optimal body composition.

  17. Study of the post-derailment safety measures on low-speed derailment tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lirong; Wang, Kaiyun; Lin, Jianhui; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Zaigang; Song, Xinwu; Du, Gaofeng

    2016-07-01

    Prevention of train from derailment is the most important issue for the railway system. Keeping derailed vehicle close to the track centreline is beneficial to minimise the severe consequences associated with derailments. In this paper, the post-derailment safety measures are studied based on low-speed derailment tests. Post-derailment devices can prevent deviation of the train from the rail by catching the rail, and they are mounted under the axle box. Considering the different structures of vehicles, both trailer and motor vehicles are equipped with the safety device and then separately used in low-speed derailment tests. In derailment tests, two kinds of track, namely the CRTS-I slab ballastless track and the CRTS-II bi-block sleeper ballastless track, are adopted to investigate the effect of the track types on the derailment. In addition, the derailment speed and the weight of the derailed vehicle are also taken into account in derailment tests. The test results indicate that the post-derailment movement of the vehicle includes running and bounce. Reducing the derailment speed and increasing the weight of the head of the train are helpful to reduce the possibility for derailments. For the CRTS-I slab ballastless track, the safety device can prevent trailer vehicles from deviating from the track centreline. The gearbox plays an important role in controlling the lateral displacement of motor vehicle after a derailment while the safety device contributes less to keep derailed motor vehicles on the track centreline. The lateral distance between the safety device and rails should be larger than 181.5 mm for protecting the fasteners system. And for the CRTS-II bi-block sleeper ballastless track, it helps to decrease the post-derailment distance due to the longitudinal impacts with sleepers. It can also restrict the lateral movement of derailed vehicle due to the high shoulders. The results suggest that, CRTS-II bi-block sleeper ballastless track should be widely used

  18. THE MOBILITY OF CCA ELEMENTS IN SOILS

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    Engin Derya Gezer

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available CCA was firstly developed in 1933 and has been extensively used to impregnate utility poles and railroad sleepers in all over the world. However, the leachate elements from CCA treated wood products may alter soil and water properties and may have some negative influence on environment and other living organisms. In this study, mobility of CCA elements in different types of soils and their reactions with soils were reviewed and summarized. Generally, the concentrations of copper, chromium and arsenic in the soil which leach out from CCA treated-utility poles decrease with the increase of soil depth and distance soil sample take from utility poles.

  19. Cognitive processes and their association with persistence and remission of insomnia: findings from a longitudinal study in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norell-Clarke, Annika; Jansson-Fröjmark, Markus; Tillfors, Maria; Harvey, Allison G; Linton, Steven J

    2014-03-01

    Insomnia is a common health problem that affects about 10% of the population. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the association between cognitive processes and the persistence and remission from insomnia in the general population. In a longitudinal design, 2333 participants completed a survey on night time and daytime symptoms, and cognitive processes. Follow-up surveys were sent out six months and 18 months after the first assessment. Participants were categorised as having persistent insomnia, being in remission from insomnia or being a normal sleeper. Cognitive processes distinguished between people with persistent insomnia and normal sleepers. Specifically, worry, dysfunctional beliefs, somatic arousal, selective attention and monitoring, and safety behaviours increased the likelihood of reporting persistent insomnia rather than normal sleep. For people with insomnia, more worry about sleep at baseline predicted persistent insomnia but not remission later on. Lower selective attention and monitoring, and use of safety behaviours over time increased the likelihood of remission from insomnia. In general, these results remained, when psychiatric symptoms and medical complaints were added to the models. The findings support that certain cognitive processes may be associated with persistence and remission of insomnia. Clinical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Use of Deconstructed Tires as Elastic Elements in Railway Tracks

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    Miguel Sol-Sánchez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Elastic elements such as rail pads, under sleeper pads and under ballast mats are railway components that allow for a reduction in track deterioration and vibrations. And they are furthermore commonly used to obtain an optimal vertical stiffness of the infrastructure. However, the use of elastomeric materials can increase construction costs and the consumption of raw materials. Thus, the utilization of used tire layers offers an alternative to reuse an abundant waste reducing the cost of elastic elements. In addition, an innovator technique allows deconstructing tire layers without grinding up the material, reducing production costs at the same time that tire properties are remained. This research is focused on the study of the viability of developing elastic components from used tire layers by evaluating the influence of thickness, the resistance capacity of the elements and their behavior in a ballast box. Results indicate the ability of tire pads to manufacture elastic elements (rail pads, under sleeper pads and under ballast mats to be used in railway tracks.

  1. Short sleep duration is associated with B-type natriuretic peptide levels and predicts the death of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Sako, Akahito; Yanai, Hidekatsu

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the associations of sleep duration with all-cause mortality, glycemic control, and other clinical parameters of patients with type 2 diabetes. From April 2013 to December 2015, we conducted a retrospective cohort study. Study participants were divided into three groups according to their sleep duration. Multiple regression analysis and Cox proportional hazards analysis were performed to assess the independent associations of sleep duration with clinical parameters and all-cause mortality. We enrolled 1233 patients who were then followed for 860 ± 264 days. During the follow-up period, 20 patients (1.6%) died. Sleep duration inversely associated with plasma B-type natriuretic peptide levels (β = -0.203, p = 0.012) in short (<7 h) sleepers, whereas it was positively associated with hemoglobin A1c levels (β = 0.156, p = 0.021) in long (≥9 h) sleepers. Moreover, Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that short sleep duration was a significant predictor of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio = 0.473; confidence interval 0.248-0.905, p = 0.024). Short sleep duration may serve as a prognostic indicator of mortality in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes and may increase cardiovascular stress. Adequate sleep is essential for the management of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Fracture toughness estimation of ballast stone used in Iranian railway

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    I. Ferestade

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ballast is a layer composed of crushed stone basically with diameters of 20–60 mm, on which sleepers and rails are set. Ballast is used to withstand vertical, horizontal and lateral forces applied on sleepers and to hold the line in operative conditions. Ballast deterioration induced by crashed stones is a major issue of track instability as the ballast layer quality depending on the materials used and their densities should be focused on. Therefore, ballast should be resistant against loads applied, and the fracture toughness of ballast stone is of great importance. For this purpose, the fracture toughness of two kinds of ballast stones used in Iranian railway, i.e. Gaduk (limestone and Anjylavnd (andesite, is investigated experimentally in this paper. The quality of ballast stone is evaluated in different weather conditions. Numerical results shown that the Anjylavnd stone is more appropriate for rainy and cold weather when there is a probability of fracturing due to frozen water captured in ballast.

  3. A review of a GP registrar-run mobile health clinic for homeless people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, A; Irving, N; O'Neill, J; Flanagan, E

    2017-08-01

    Homeless people have excessively high morbidity and mortality rates, yet they face barriers accessing primary care. A mobile health clinic, staffed by GP registrars, was developed to provide services to homeless people, particularly rough sleepers and sex workers. The aims were to improve access to primary care and to challenge the stereotypes and prejudices of GP registrars through direct contact with homeless people. This was a qualitative study; questionnaires were completed on the mobile health clinic and two focus groups were conducted. All service users were asked to complete a questionnaire over a 3 month period. Two focus groups were conducted with 6 and 14 GP registrars who had worked on the bus. There was an 80% response rate (116 of 145). Fifty-two percent had no Medical Card meaning that they had no way to access the free primary care to which they are entitled. Had the clinic not been available, over half would not have sought further treatment and 16% would have gone to an Emergency Department. Ninety-one percent of users rated the service 10/10. The focus groups found that GP registrars who worked on the mobile health clinic had decreased negative stereotypes, increased empathy, and more knowledge of homeless issues. Furthermore, they intended to ensure that homeless people will not face discrimination in their future practice. A GP Registrar-run Mobile Health Clinic achieved its aims of improving access to primary care for rough sleepers and sex workers, and challenging stereotypes of GP Registrars.

  4. The behaviour of mosquitoes in relation to humans under holed bednets: the evidence from experimental huts

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    Seth R Irish

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The physical integrity of bednets is a concern of national malaria control programs, as it is a key factor in determining the rate of replacement of bednets. It is largely assumed that increased numbers of holes will result in a loss of protection of sleepers from potentially infective bites. Experimental hut studies are valuable in understanding mosquito behaviour indoors, particularly as it relates to blood feeding and mortality. This review summarises findings from experimental hut studies, focusing on two issues: (i the effect of different numbers or sizes of holes in bednets and (ii feeding behaviour and mortality with holed nets as compared with unholed nets. As might be expected, increasing numbers and area of holes resulted in increased blood feeding by mosquitoes on sleepers. However, the presence of holes did not generally have a large effect on the mortality of mosquitoes. Successfully entering a holed mosquito net does not necessarily mean that mosquitoes spend less time in contact with the net, which could explain the lack in differences in mortality. Further behavioural studies are necessary to understand mosquito behaviour around nets and the importance of holed nets on malaria transmission.

  5. The microstructure of sleep in primary insomnia: an overview and extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feige, Bernd; Baglioni, Chiara; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Hirscher, Verena; Nissen, Christoph; Riemann, Dieter

    2013-08-01

    The present review was undertaken to summarize studies elucidating sleep microstructural differences in chronic insomnia. The etiology of insomnia is still unknown, whereas the hyperarousal concept has gained much attention with respect to pathophysiology. According to this model, insomnia is characterized by significant hyperarousal on an autonomous and central nervous level. Objective findings derived from polysomnography frequently show much less severe differences to good sleepers than subjective sleep complaints assessed by self-rating questionnaires. However, using more fine-grained methods to characterize the electrophysiology of sleep in insomnia, rather distinct differences between the sleep of good sleepers and patients with insomnia have been noted. These methods include the spectral analysis of the sleep EEG, micro-arousal and CAP (cyclic alternating pattern) analysis as well as the assessment of event-related potentials (ERPs) during night-sleep. The application of these methods shows stronger correlations with the subjective experience of disturbed sleep than standard sleep EEG scoring. An overview of the relevant empirical evidence is presented, previous investigations are extended and a theoretical synthesis within the framework of the hyperarousal concept of insomnia is attempted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Association between Subjective Memory Complaints and Sleep within Older African American Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamaldo, Alyssa A; Wright, Regina S; Aiken-Morgan, Adrienne T; Allaire, Jason C; Thorpe, Roland J; Whitfield, Keith E

    2017-06-13

    The purpose of the current study is to examine the association between subjective memory complaints and sleep (quantity and quality) in African American older adults. Participants from the Baltimore Study of Black Aging (BSBA; n = 351; mean age = 71.99) completed a self-report sleep scale, subjective memory complaint scale, global cognitive status measure, and demographic questionnaire. Worse overall sleep quality was significantly associated with subjective reports of difficulty recalling the placement of objects, recalling specific facts from reading materials, and worse memory currently compared to the past. Specific sleep parameters (e.g., longer sleep latency and shorter sleep duration) were associated with negative appraisals of participants' ability to do specific tasks involving memory (e.g., difficulty recalling placement of objects). Participants classified as poor sleepers (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI] total score > 5) were more likely to report worse memory now compared to the past than participants classified as good sleepers (PSQI total score ≤ 5). Evaluation of sleep may be warranted when older adults, particularly African Americans, communicate concerns regarding their memory. Insufficient sleep may be a useful marker of acute daytime dysfunction and, perhaps, cognitive decline. Given memory problems are the hallmark of dementia, our findings support further evaluation of whether poor sleep can aid in the diagnosis of cognitive impairment. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Tackling Health Disparities for People Who Are Homeless? Start with Social Determinants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Background: Homelessness is associated with enormous health inequalities, including shorter life expectancy, higher morbidity and greater usage of acute hospital services. Viewed through the lens of social determinants, homelessness is a key driver of poor health, but homelessness itself results from accumulated adverse social and economic conditions. Indeed, in people who are homeless, the social determinants of homelessness and health inequities are often intertwined, and long term homelessness further exacerbates poor health. Aggregated health service data can mask this, and case histories thus provide important insights. Methods: This paper presents three case histories of homeless patients seen at an inner city public hospital in Perth, Western Australia. The case histories draw on several data sources: hospital data, information collected from rough sleepers and clinical observations. Estimates of the cost to the health system of the observed hospital usage by the three patients are included. Findings: The case histories illustrate the interplay of social determinants of health in homelessness that help explain the high level of hospital usage by rough sleepers. The cumulative healthcare costs for the three individuals over a 33 months period were substantial. Hospital attendance plummeted even in the short term when housing needs were addressed. Conclusions: Treating homelessness as a combined health and social issue is critical to improving the abysmal health outcomes of people experiencing homelessness. In addition, the enormous economic costs of hospital care for people who are homeless can be reduced when housing and other social determinants are taken into account. PMID:29292758

  8. The effect of shift rotation on employee cortisol profile, sleep quality, fatigue, and attention level: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Shu-Fen; Chung, Min-Huey; Chen, Chiung-Hua; Hegney, Desley; O'Brien, Anthony; Chou, Kuei-Ru

    2011-03-01

    Disrupted circadian rhythm, especially working night duty together with irregular sleep patterns, sleep deprivation, and fatigue, creates an occupational health risk associated with diminished vigilance and work performance. This study reviewed the effect of shift rotations on employee cortisol profile, sleep quality, fatigue, and attention level. Researchers conducted a systematic review of relevant articles published between 1996 and 2008 that were listed on the following databases: SCOPUS, OVID, Blackwell Science, EBSCO Host, PsycINFO, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and CEPS. A total of 28 articles were included in the review. Previous research into the effects of shift work on cortisol profiles, sleep quality, fatigue, and attention used data assessed at evidence Levels II to IV. Our systematic review confirmed a conflict between sleep-wake cycle and light-dark cycle in night work. Consequences of circadian rhythm disturbance include disruption of sleep, decreased vigilance, general feeling of malaise, and decreased mental efficiency. Shift workers who sleep during the day (day sleepers) experience cortisol secretion increases, which diminish the healing power of sleep and enjoy 1 to 4 hours less sleep on average than night sleepers. Sleep debt accumulation results in chronic fatigue. Prolonged fatigue and inadequate recovery result in decreased work performance and more incidents. Rotation from day shift to night shift and its effect on shift workers was a special focus of the articles retained for review. Disturbed circadian rhythm in humans has been associated with a variety of mental and physical disorders and may negatively impact on work safety, performance, and productivity.

  9. The association between prenatal sleep quality and obstetric outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hsuan-Man; Ko, Shu-Hua; Chen, Chung-Hey

    2014-09-01

    Pregnancy-associated sleep disorder is a new category on the latest version of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders. It is a significant problem for pregnant women. The present follow-up study assesses the association between sleep quality during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy and obstetric-neonatal outcomes. A prospective follow-up study design was used. Follow-up examination of the obstetric birth records in the immediate postpartum period were carried out on 128 second-trimester and 120 third-trimester women and their newborns in two hospitals in Taiwan. Poor sleep quality was identified using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Data were collected from October 2007 to June 2008. The prevalence of poor sleepers (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score > 5) was 58% for second-trimester participants and 66% for third-trimester participants; participants who were unemployed reported a significantly higher prevalence of poor sleep quality than those who were employed. Subsequent review of the participant's obstetric birth records revealed that third-trimester poor sleepers were more likely to have had a vacuum-assisted delivery. This study identified poor sleep quality during the third trimester as a novel risk factor for vacuum-assisted delivery. We suggest that prenatal healthcare providers focus greater attention to the sleep disturbance condition of pregnant women and provide proactive sleep counseling to facilitate pregnant women's adjustment to the new psychosocial and physiological demands of motherhood.

  10. Does self-reported sleep quality predict poor cognitive performance among elderly living in elderly homes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Motassem S; Hamza, Sarah A; El Akkad, Rania M; Abdel Galeel, Yamen I I

    2013-01-01

    Sleep complaints are common among elderly, especially institutionalized elderly, as they experience poorer sleep quality and higher use of sedative hypnotics, when compared to community-dwelling elderly. Recent findings suggest that there may be a relationship between poor quality of sleep and cognitive deficits. This study aimed at studying the relation between sleep quality and cognitive performance in older adults living in elderly homes. 100 elderly living in an elderly home in El Mansoura, Egypt, were recruited in this study, 50 cases with subjective poor quality of sleep and 50 controls with subjective good quality of sleep as assessed by Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI). Each participant went through comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA), including geriatric depression scale (GDS), assessment of cognitive function by mini mental state examination (MMSE). 52% of poor sleepers showed impaired MMSE, while only 24% of good sleepers had impaired MMSE. Both orientation and (attention and calculation) were more affected (P = 0.027 and 0.035, respectively). Linear correlation coefficient between PSQI and different variables revealed significant negative correlation with total MMSE score, attention and calculation. Poor quality of sleep is related to cognitive impairment among elderly living in elderly homes and this problem should be taken in consideration among this group of elders.

  11. Menopause is associated with self-reported poor sleep quality in women without vasomotor symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hao-Chang; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Ou, Horng-Yih; Wu, Jin-Shang; Yang, Yi-Ching; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between menopause and self-reported sleep quality in Chinese women without vasomotor symptoms. Cross-sectional data were collected from a decoded database of the National Cheng Kung University Hospital. Menopause was defined as absence of menses for at least 12 months or a history of hysterectomy and oophorectomy. Self-reported sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). A higher global PSQI score indicates poorer self-reported sleep quality, and a global PSQI score greater than 5 differentiates poor sleepers from good sleepers. Of the 1,088 women recruited, 353 (32.4%) were in postmenopause status. Postmenopausal women had higher mean (SD) global PSQI scores (8.0 [3.3] vs. 6.1 [2.2], P menopause (β = 1.532; 95% CI, 1.135 to 1.949; P menopause (odds ratio, 1.453; 95% CI, 1.030 to 2.051; P menopause and snoring are associated with an increased risk of poor self-reported sleep quality independently of cardiometabolic factors and lifestyle, whereas long sleep duration is associated with a decreased risk of poor self-reported sleep quality.

  12. Sleep Duration and White Matter Quality in Middle-Aged Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Kristine; Nasrallah, Ilya; Hoang, Tina D; Lauderdale, Diane S; Knutson, Kristen L; Carnethon, Mercedes R; Launer, Lenore J; Lewis, Cora E; Sidney, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Sleep duration has been associated with risk of dementia and stroke, but few studies have investigated the relationship between sleep duration and brain MRI measures, particularly in middle age. In a prospective cohort of 613 black and white adults (mean age = 45.4 years) enrolled in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, participants reported typical sleep duration, dichotomized into moderate sleep duration (> 6 to ≤ 8 h) and short sleep duration (≤ 6 h) at baseline (2005-2006). Five years later, we obtained brain MRI markers of white matter including fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and white matter hyperintensities. Compared to moderate sleepers, short sleepers had an elevated ratio of white matter hyperintensities to normal tissue in the parietal region (OR = 2.31, 95% CI: 1.47, 3.61) adjusted for age, race/sex, education, hypertension, stroke/TIA, depression, smoking status, and physical activity. White matter diffusivity was also higher, approximately a 0.2 standard deviation difference, in frontal, parietal, and temporal white matter regions, among those reporting shorter sleep duration in (P sleep duration was associated with worse markers of white matter integrity in midlife. These mid-life differences in white matter may underlie the link between poor sleep and risk of dementia and stroke. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  13. Physical Activity in Relation to Sleep Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junxin; Yang, Binbin; Varrasse, Miranda; Ji, Xiaopeng; Wu, MaoChun; Li, Manman; Li, Kun

    2018-02-27

    This cross-sectional study was conducted to describe physical activity and sleep in 290 community-dwelling Chinese older adults and to examine the association between physical activity and poor sleep outcomes. Almost half of the sample were poor sleepers. The majority of the sample regularly participated in walking, some household activity and light sports; yet, only a small portion were involved in work-related activity or in strenuous sports. A greater level of overall physical activity [Odds Ratio (OR) =0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) = (0.73,0.86)], leisure-time exercise [OR=0.77, 95%CI=(0.68,0.85)], and household activity [OR=0.66, 95%CI= (0.56,0.78)] were associated with reduced likelihood of being poor sleepers and other poor sleep outcomes, independent of covariates including age, sex, education, family income, the number of children, drinking, and sleep hygiene. Future larger scale studies that incorporate both objective and subjective measures are needed to further examine the association and to explore the effects of different types of activity on sleep and other well-beings in older adults.

  14. Tackling Health Disparities for People Who Are Homeless? Start with Social Determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Amanda; Wood, Lisa

    2017-12-08

    Homelessness is associated with enormous health inequalities, including shorter life expectancy, higher morbidity and greater usage of acute hospital services. Viewed through the lens of social determinants, homelessness is a key driver of poor health, but homelessness itself results from accumulated adverse social and economic conditions. Indeed, in people who are homeless, the social determinants of homelessness and health inequities are often intertwined, and long term homelessness further exacerbates poor health. Aggregated health service data can mask this, and case histories thus provide important insights. This paper presents three case histories of homeless patients seen at an inner city public hospital in Perth, Western Australia. The case histories draw on several data sources: hospital data, information collected from rough sleepers and clinical observations. Estimates of the cost to the health system of the observed hospital usage by the three patients are included. The case histories illustrate the interplay of social determinants of health in homelessness that help explain the high level of hospital usage by rough sleepers. The cumulative healthcare costs for the three individuals over a 33 months period were substantial. Hospital attendance plummeted even in the short term when housing needs were addressed. Treating homelessness as a combined health and social issue is critical to improving the abysmal health outcomes of people experiencing homelessness. In addition, the enormous economic costs of hospital care for people who are homeless can be reduced when housing and other social determinants are taken into account.

  15. The Use of Deconstructed Tires as Elastic Elements in Railway Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol-Sánchez, Miguel; Moreno-Navarro, Fernando; Rubio-Gámez, Mª Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Elastic elements such as rail pads, under sleeper pads and under ballast mats are railway components that allow for a reduction in track deterioration and vibrations. And they are furthermore commonly used to obtain an optimal vertical stiffness of the infrastructure. However, the use of elastomeric materials can increase construction costs and the consumption of raw materials. Thus, the utilization of used tire layers offers an alternative to reuse an abundant waste reducing the cost of elastic elements. In addition, an innovator technique allows deconstructing tire layers without grinding up the material, reducing production costs at the same time that tire properties are remained. This research is focused on the study of the viability of developing elastic components from used tire layers by evaluating the influence of thickness, the resistance capacity of the elements and their behavior in a ballast box. Results indicate the ability of tire pads to manufacture elastic elements (rail pads, under sleeper pads and under ballast mats) to be used in railway tracks. PMID:28788168

  16. A dynamic wheel-rail impact analysis of railway track under wheel flat by finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Jian; Gu, Yuantong; Murray, Martin Howard

    2013-06-01

    Wheel-rail interaction is one of the most important research topics in railway engineering. It involves track impact response, track vibration and track safety. Track structure failures caused by wheel-rail impact forces can lead to significant economic loss for track owners through damage to rails and to the sleepers beneath. Wheel-rail impact forces occur because of imperfections in the wheels or rails such as wheel flats, irregular wheel profiles, rail corrugations and differences in the heights of rails connected at a welded joint. A wheel flat can cause a large dynamic impact force as well as a forced vibration with a high frequency, which can cause damage to the track structure. In the present work, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model for the impact analysis induced by the wheel flat is developed by the use of the FE analysis (FEA) software package ANSYS and validated by another validated simulation. The effect of wheel flats on impact forces is thoroughly investigated. It is found that the presence of a wheel flat will significantly increase the dynamic impact force on both rail and sleeper. The impact force will monotonically increase with the size of wheel flats. The relationships between the impact force and the wheel flat size are explored from this FEA and they are important for track engineers to improve their understanding of the design and maintenance of the track system.

  17. Interaction between hippocampal and striatal systems predicts subsequent consolidation of motor sequence memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève Albouy

    Full Text Available The development of fast and reproducible motor behavior is a crucial human capacity. The aim of the present study was to address the relationship between the implementation of consistent behavior during initial training on a sequential motor task (the Finger Tapping Task and subsequent sleep-dependent motor sequence memory consolidation, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and total sleep deprivation protocol. Our behavioral results indicated significant offline gains in performance speed after sleep whereas performance was only stabilized, but not enhanced, after sleep deprivation. At the cerebral level, we previously showed that responses in the caudate nucleus increase, in parallel to a decrease in its functional connectivity with frontal areas, as performance became more consistent. Here, the strength of the competitive interaction, assessed through functional connectivity analyses, between the caudate nucleus and hippocampo-frontal areas during initial training, predicted delayed gains in performance at retest in sleepers but not in sleep-deprived subjects. Moreover, during retest, responses increased in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex in sleepers whereas in sleep-deprived subjects, responses increased in the putamen and cingulate cortex. Our results suggest that the strength of the competitive interplay between the striatum and the hippocampus, participating in the implementation of consistent motor behavior during initial training, conditions subsequent motor sequence memory consolidation. The latter process appears to be supported by a reorganisation of cerebral activity in hippocampo-neocortical networks after sleep.

  18. Sleep Quality and Academic Performance Among Medical College Students

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    Ameer Kadhim Al-Humairi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:Sleep plays a very important role in a human health. Poor sleep quality remains as a frequent feature of student life. Quantity and quality of sleep in addition to average sleep time are strongly linked with students’ learning abilities and academic performance. Subjects and method:The study was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted to assess sleep quality among medical college students – University of Babylon using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. This study was done during April 2016. Results:Mean age of students was (20.63 ± 0.65. Majority was female. According to PSQI(60.4% of students were poor sleeper. Significant association between quality of sleep and academic performance was found in our study, (72.9% of those fail in one or more subjects have poor sleep quality. Conclusion: Poor sleep quality was regarded as an important problem among medical college students. Majority of students (60.4% was poor sleepers. Our study shows significant relation between sleep quality and academic performance among students of Babylon University –College of Medicine.

  19. Tackling Health Disparities for People Who Are Homeless? Start with Social Determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Stafford

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Homelessness is associated with enormous health inequalities, including shorter life expectancy, higher morbidity and greater usage of acute hospital services. Viewed through the lens of social determinants, homelessness is a key driver of poor health, but homelessness itself results from accumulated adverse social and economic conditions. Indeed, in people who are homeless, the social determinants of homelessness and health inequities are often intertwined, and long term homelessness further exacerbates poor health. Aggregated health service data can mask this, and case histories thus provide important insights. Methods: This paper presents three case histories of homeless patients seen at an inner city public hospital in Perth, Western Australia. The case histories draw on several data sources: hospital data, information collected from rough sleepers and clinical observations. Estimates of the cost to the health system of the observed hospital usage by the three patients are included. Findings: The case histories illustrate the interplay of social determinants of health in homelessness that help explain the high level of hospital usage by rough sleepers. The cumulative healthcare costs for the three individuals over a 33 months period were substantial. Hospital attendance plummeted even in the short term when housing needs were addressed. Conclusions: Treating homelessness as a combined health and social issue is critical to improving the abysmal health outcomes of people experiencing homelessness. In addition, the enormous economic costs of hospital care for people who are homeless can be reduced when housing and other social determinants are taken into account.

  20. Sleep duration, cognitive decline, and dementia risk in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Espeland, Mark A; Brunner, Robert L; Lovato, Laura C; Wallace, Robert B; Leng, Xiaoyan; Phillips, Lawrence S; Robinson, Jennifer G; Kotchen, Jane M; Johnson, Karen C; Manson, JoAnn E; Stefanick, Marcia L; Sarto, Gloria E; Mysiw, W Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Consistent evidence linking habitual sleep duration with risks of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia is lacking. We conducted a prospective study on 7444 community-dwelling women (aged 65-80 y) with self-reported sleep duration, within the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study in 1995-2008. Incident MCI/dementia cases were ascertained by validated protocols. Cox models were used to adjust for multiple sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, depression, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and other clinical characteristics. We found a statistically significant (P = .03) V-shaped association with a higher MCI/dementia risk in women with either short (≤6 hours/night) or long (≥8 hours/night) sleep duration (vs. 7 hours/night). The multicovariate-adjusted hazard for MCI/dementia was increased by 36% in short sleepers irrespective of CVD, and by 35% in long sleepers without CVD. A similar V-shaped association was found with cognitive decline. In older women, habitual sleep duration predicts the future risk for cognitive impairments including dementia, independent of vascular risk factors. Copyright © 2016 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Media devices, family relationships and sleep patterns among adolescents in an urban area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continente, Xavier; Pérez, Anna; Espelt, Albert; López, Maria José

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to describe sleep patterns and to examine the association between short sleep time and family relationships and the availability of media devices among adolescents. A cross-sectional study based on a self-reported questionnaire was performed among a representative sample of adolescents (13-19 years old) enrolled during the 2011-2012 academic year in high schools in Barcelona, Spain. Adolescents reported sleep patterns and family-related variables such as family relationships, the availability of media devices in the bedroom, and watching television at dinner. Sleep time was then calculated from sleep patterns. Multivariate Poisson regression analyses with robust variance were conducted to determine the association between short sleep time (media device (television, console, or computer) in their bedroom. Adolescents with a computer in their bedroom and with poorer family relationships were more likely to be short sleepers. In boys, frequently watching TV at dinner and living in a disorganized family were also associated with short sleep time. There is a high prevalence of short sleepers. Media availability, media use and family relationships should be considered in multi-component educational interventions addressed to both adolescents and parents to reduce short sleep time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Reduced anterior internal capsule white matter integrity in primary insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelhalder, Kai; Regen, Wolfram; Prem, Martin; Baglioni, Chiara; Nissen, Christoph; Feige, Bernd; Schnell, Susanne; Kiselev, Valerij G; Hennig, Jürgen; Riemann, Dieter

    2014-07-01

    Chronic insomnia is one of the most prevalent central nervous system diseases, however, its neurobiology is poorly understood. Up to now, nothing is known about the integrity of white matter tracts in insomnia patients. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used in a well-characterized sample of primary insomnia (PI) patients and good sleeper controls to fill this void. Voxelwise between-group comparisons of fractional anisotropy (FA) were performed in 24 PI patients (10 males; 14 females; 42.7 ± 14.5 years) and 35 healthy good sleepers (15 males; 20 females; 40.1 ± 9.1 years) with age and sex as covariates. PI patients showed reduced FA values within the right anterior internal capsule and a trend for reduced FA values in the left anterior internal capsule. The results suggest that insomnia is associated with a reduced integrity of white matter tracts in the anterior internal capsule indicating that disturbed fronto-subcortical connectivity may be a cause or consequence of the disorder.

  3. Association between stress-related sleep reactivity and cognitive processes in insomnia disorder and insomnia subgroups: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palagini, Laura; Faraguna, Ugo; Mauri, Mauro; Gronchi, Alessia; Morin, Charles M; Riemann, Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Stress-related sleep reactivity, sleep-related cognitions, and psychological factors play an important role in insomnia. The aim was to investigate their possible association in Insomnia Disorder, insomnia subgroups, and healthy subjects. The cross-sectional study consisted of 93 subjects who met diagnostic criteria for Insomnia Disorder according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5) and of 30 healthy subjects. Survey instruments included the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST), Dysfunctional Beliefs about Sleep scale (DBAS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS). Descriptive statistics, Pearson correlations, χ(2)-test, and multiple linear regression were performed. FIRST and SAS best determined the insomnia subjects vs good sleepers (FIRST χ(2) = 109.6, p insomnia, stress-related sleep reactivity, and psychological factors, such as anxiety symptoms, may distinguish insomnia subjects from good sleepers; (2) sleep reactivity and sleep-related cognitions seem interrelated, unhelpful beliefs may affect the stress reactivity; (3) psychological factors may influence sleep quality and the severity of insomnia; (4) these important sleep-related variables may have similar associations in insomnia subgroups; they may constitute the core factors for insomnia development and maintenance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Multivariate Heteroscedasticity Models for Functional Brain Connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof Seiler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Functional brain connectivity is the co-occurrence of brain activity in different areas during resting and while doing tasks. The data of interest are multivariate timeseries measured simultaneously across brain parcels using resting-state fMRI (rfMRI. We analyze functional connectivity using two heteroscedasticity models. Our first model is low-dimensional and scales linearly in the number of brain parcels. Our second model scales quadratically. We apply both models to data from the Human Connectome Project (HCP comparing connectivity between short and conventional sleepers. We find stronger functional connectivity in short than conventional sleepers in brain areas consistent with previous findings. This might be due to subjects falling asleep in the scanner. Consequently, we recommend the inclusion of average sleep duration as a covariate to remove unwanted variation in rfMRI studies. A power analysis using the HCP data shows that a sample size of 40 detects 50% of the connectivity at a false discovery rate of 20%. We provide implementations using R and the probabilistic programming language Stan.

  5. American time use survey: sleep time and its relationship to waking activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basner, Mathias; Fomberstein, Kenneth M; Razavi, Farid M; Banks, Siobhan; William, Jeffrey H; Rosa, Roger R; Dinges, David F

    2007-09-01

    To gain some insight into how various behavioral (lifestyle) factors influence sleep duration, by investigation of the relationship of sleep time to waking activities using the American Time Use Survey (ATUS). Cross-sectional data from ATUS, an annual telephone survey of a population sample of US citizens who are interviewed regarding how they spent their time during a 24-hour period between 04:00 on the previous day and 04:00 on the interview day. Data were pooled from the 2003, 2004, and 2005 ATUS databases involving N=47,731 respondents older than 14 years of age. N/A. Adjusted multiple linear regression models showed that the largest reciprocal relationship to sleep was found for work time, followed by travel time, which included commute time. Only shorter than average sleepers (leisure activities, while both short ( or =8.5 h) watched more TV than the average sleeper. The extent to which sleep time was exchanged for waking activities was also shown to depend on age and gender. Sleep time was minimal while work time was maximal in the age group 45-54 yr, and sleep time increased both with lower and higher age. Work time, travel time, and time for socializing, relaxing, and leisure are the primary activities reciprocally related to sleep time among Americans. These activities may be confounding the frequently observed association between short and long sleep on one hand and morbidity and mortality on the other hand and should be controlled for in future studies.

  6. Arousal from sleep mechanisms in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Patricia; Kato, Ineko; Richardson, Heidi L; Yang, Joel S C; Montemitro, Enza; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2010-08-01

    Arousals from sleep allow sleep to continue in the face of stimuli that normally elicit responses during wakefulness and also permit awakening. Such an adaptive mechanism implies that any malfunction may have clinical importance. Inadequate control of arousal in infants and children is associated with a variety of sleep-related problems. An excessive propensity to arouse from sleep favors the development of repeated sleep disruptions and insomnia, with impairment of daytime alertness and performance. A lack of an adequate arousal response to a noxious nocturnal stimulus reduces an infant's chances of autoresuscitation, and thus survival, increasing the risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The study of arousability is complicated by many factors including the definition of an arousal; the scoring methodology; the techniques used (spontaneous arousability versus arousal responses to endogenous or exogenous stimuli); and the confounding factors that complicate the determination of arousal thresholds by changing the sleeper's responses to a given stimulus such as prenatal drug, alcohol, or cigarette use. Infant age and previous sleep deprivation also modify thresholds. Other confounding factors include time of night, sleep stages, the sleeper's body position, and sleeping conditions. In this paper, we will review these different aspects for the study of arousals in infants and also report the importance of these studies for the understanding of the pathophysiology of some clinical conditions, particularly SIDS. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. PRESERVAÇÃO DE MADEIRAS NO BRASIL: HISTÓRICO, CENÁRIO ATUAL E TENDÊNCIAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Marcelo Vidal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to show a comprehensive literature review about wood preservation in Brazil, since the earliest years until 2011. Brazil is rich in natural resources and wood has always occurred in abundance. With the industrial growing, there was the necessity of using wood with low natural durability but with chemical preservative treatment. Wood chemical treatment began in late XIX century, mainly to attend the big demand of sleepers to railroads. Only during the 60’s, wood preservation gained market with the increase of scientific researches, elaboration of technical standards and building industrial plants for wood preservation. From this point on, few advances have been reached. In 2011, Eucalyptus and Pinus, were the main species used in wood preservation plants that adopts the vacuum-pressure process. In small production scale, diffusion process is adopted. Copper chromium arsenate (CCA and Copper chromium borate (CCB are the most preservatives utilised with some creosote utilisation. The treatedwood production is concentrated in fence posts, poles and sleepers. As a trend, the wood preservation must reach new markets, such as building constructions, wood packages and crossarms, and also to intensify the traditional uses. Although there are a lot of researches about chemicals for wood preservation, CCA must keep by the years, once alternative products do not present the same efficacy or clear effects about human health and environment.

  8. Sleep habits and sleep complaints in Austria: current self-reported data on sleep behaviour, sleep disturbances and their treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlhofer, Josef; Seidel, S; Klösch, G; Moser, D; Anderer, P; Saletu, B; Bolitschek, J; Popovic, R; Lehofer, M; Mallin, W; Fugger, B; Holzinger, B; Kerbl, R; Saletu, A; Machatschke, I H; Pavelka, R; Högl, B

    2010-12-01

    To acquire current information on sleep habits, disturbances and treatment options in the adult population of Austria and compare results with previously collected data. A representative sample of the Austrian population (women: n = 522, men: n = 478). Seventy-five percent reported daily sleep-duration between 6 and 8 h. In 76%, sleep latency was sleep maintenance. Longer sleep on weekends was prevalent in 54%, 23% took a nap. Concerning sleep environment, 31% reported sleeping alone; the rest had a constant or occasional bed partner. Sleep disturbances such as sleep disruption or prolonged sleep latency were reported by 18%. Predominant symptoms included snoring/apneas (22%), nightmares (22%) and restless legs (21%). Daytime tiredness was reported by 17% and sleepiness by 20%. Twenty-four percent did not take treatment. Only 7% asked for medical help: 96% consulted their physician; 47% tried to change their way of living. Sleep promoting drugs were taken by 7%. Sleep improving measures were: sleep promoters (45%), general measures (20%), consultation of general practitioner (20%), psychotherapy (6%), and technical tools (3%). Comparison with a dataset of 1993 revealed only a slight increase in short sleepers and a slight decrease in long sleepers. Subjectively reported sleep disorders proved to be relatively stable between 1993 and 2007. Copyright © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Munksgaard.

  9. The burden of insomnia in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishima K

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kazuo Mishima,1 Marco daCosta DiBonaventura,2 Hillary Gross2 1Department of Psychophysiology, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan; 2Kantar Health, New York, NY, USA Objectives: Several studies have suggested that patients who experience insomnia report a number of significant impairments. However, despite this literature, fewer studies have focused on the burden of insomnia among patients in Japan. The objective of the current study is to extend this work in Japan to further understand the effect of insomnia on health-related quality of life (hrQOL. Further, another objective is to understand general predictors of hrQOL among patients with insomnia. Methods: Data from the 2012 Japan National Health and Wellness Survey, an annual, cross-sectional study of adults aged 18 years or older, were used (N=30,000. All National Health and Wellness Survey respondents were categorized based on the incidence of self-reported insomnia diagnosis and prescription medication usage (clinical insomniacs under treatment versus [vs] good sleepers without insomnia or insomnia symptoms. Comparisons among different groups were made using multiple regression models controlling for demographics and health history. Results: Clinical insomniacs (n=1,018; 3.4% reported significantly worse hrQOL compared with good sleepers (n=20,542 (mental component summary: 34.2 vs 48.0; physical component summary: 48.0 vs 52.8; health utilities: 0.61 vs 0.76; all P<0.05. Health behaviors (smoking, exercise, alcohol use and comorbidities were the strongest predictors of health utilities for clinical insomniacs. For all three clinical insomniac subgroups of interest, those with a physical comorbidity but not a psychiatric one, those with a psychiatric comorbidity but not a physical one, and those without either a physical or psychiatric comorbidity, large decrements in health utilities were observed for respondents who did

  10. Peruvians’ sleep duration: analysis of a population-based survey on adolescents and adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo M. Carrillo-Larco

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sleep duration, either short or long, has been associated with diseases such as obesity, type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Characterizing the prevalence and patterns of sleep duration at the population-level, especially in resource-constrained settings, will provide informative evidence on a potentially modifiable risk factor. The aim of this study was to explore the patterns of sleep duration in the Peruvian adult and adolescent population, together with its socio-demographic profile.Material and Methods. A total of 12,424 subjects, mean age 35.8 years (SD ±17.7, 50.6% males, were included in the analysis. This is a cross-sectional study, secondary analysis of the Use of Time National Survey conducted in 2010. We used weighted means and proportions to describe sleep duration according to socio-demographic variables (area and region; sex; age; education attainment; asset index; martial and job status. We used Poisson regressions, taking into account the multistage sampling design of the survey, to calculate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Main outcomes were short- (<6 h and long-sleep duration (≥ 9 h.Results. On average, Peruvians slept 7.7 h (95% CI [7.4–8.0] on weekdays and 8.0 h (95% CI [7.8–8.1] during weekends. The proportions of short- and long-sleep, during weekdays, were 4.3% (95% CI [2.9%–6.3%] and 22.4% (95% CI [14.9%–32.1%], respectively. Regarding urban and rural areas, a much higher proportion of short-sleep was observed in the former (92.0% vs. 8.0%; both for weekdays and weekends. On the multivariable analysis, compared to regular-sleepers (≥ 6 to <9 h, short-sleepers were twice more likely to be older and to have higher educational status, and 50% more likely to be currently employed. Similarly, relative to regular-sleep, long-sleepers were more likely to have a lower socioeconomic status as per educational attainment.Conclusions. In this

  11. Relationships Between Sleep Quality and Pain-Related Factors for People with Chronic Low Back Pain: Tests of Reciprocal and Time of Day Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart, James I; Burns, John W; Post, Kristina M; Smith, David A; Porter, Laura S; Burgess, Helen J; Schuster, Erik; Buvanendran, Asokumar; Fras, Anne Marie; Keefe, Francis J

    2017-06-01

    Poor sleep quality among people with chronic low back pain appears to be related to worse pain, affect, poor physical function, and pain catastrophizing. The causal direction between poor sleep and pain remains an open question, however, as does whether sleep quality exerts effects on low back pain differently across the course of the day. This daily diary study examined lagged temporal associations between prior night sleep quality and subsequent day pain, affect, physical function and pain catastrophizing, the reverse lagged temporal associations between prior day pain-related factors and subsequent night sleep quality, and whether the time of day during which an assessment was made moderated these temporal associations. Chronic low back pain patients (n = 105) completed structured electronic diary assessments five times per day for 14 days. Items included patient ratings of their pain, affect, physical function, and pain catastrophizing. Collapsed across all observations, poorer sleep quality was significantly related to higher pain ratings, higher negative affect, lower positive affect, poorer physical function, and higher pain catastrophizing. Lagged analyses averaged across the day revealed that poorer prior night sleep quality significantly predicted greater next day patient ratings of pain, and poorer physical function and higher pain catastrophizing. Prior poorer night sleep quality significantly predicted greater reports of pain, and poorer physical function, and higher pain catastrophizing, especially during the early part of the day. Sleep quality × time of day interactions showed that poor sleepers reported high pain, and negative mood and low function uniformly across the day, whereas good sleepers reported relatively good mornings, but showed pain, affect and function levels comparable to poor sleepers by the end of the day. Analyses of the reverse causal pathway were mostly nonsignificant. Sleep quality appears related not only to pain intensity

  12. MODELING OF RAILWAY TRACK OPERATION AS A SYSTEM OF QUASI-ELASTIC ORTHOTROPIC LAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sychev Vyacheslav Petrovich

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors give a solution to the problem of the impact of a rolling stock on the rail track on the basis of modeling a railway track as a multi-layered space, introducing each of the layers is a quasi-elastic orthotropic layer with cylindrical anisotropy in the polar coordinate system. The article describes wave equations, taking into account the rotational inertia of cross sectional and transverse shear strains. From the point of view of classical structural mechanics train path can be represented as a multilayer system comprising separate layers with different stiffness, lying on the foundation being the elastic-isotropic space. Winkler model provides that the basis is linearly deformable space, there are loads influencing its surface. These loads are transferred through a layered deformable half-space. This representation is used in this study as an initial approximation. For more accurate results of the deformation of a railway track because of rolling dynamic loads it is proposed to present a railway track in the form of a layered structure, where each element (assembled rails and sleepers, ballast section, the soil in the embankment, basement soils is modeled as a planar quasi-elastic orthotropic layer with cylindrical anisotropy. The equations describing the dynamic behaviour of flat element in a polar coordinate system are hyperbolic in nature and take into account the rotational inertia of the cross sectional and the transverse shear strains. This allows identifying the impact on the final characteristics of the blade wave effects, and oscillatory processes. In order to determine the unknown functions included in the constitutive equations it is proposed to use decomposition in power series in spatial coordinate and time. In order to determine the coefficients of ray series for the required functions, it is necessary to differentiate the defining wave equations k times on time, to take their difference on the different

  13. Scaling analysis of heart beat fluctuations data and its relationship with cyclic alternating pattern data during sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    de León-Lomelí, R.; Murguía, J. S.; Chouvarda, I.; Méndez, M. O.; González-Galván, E.; Alba, A.

    2016-01-01

    During sleep there exists a nonlinear dynamic phenomenon, which is called cyclic alternating pattern. This phenomenon is generated in the brain and is composed of a series of events of short duration known as A-phases. It has been shown that A-phases can be found in other physiological systems such as the cardiovascular. However, there is no evidence that shows the temporal influence of the A-phases with the cardiovascular system. For this purpose, we consider the scaling method known as detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The analysis was carried out in well sleepers and insomnia people, and the numerical results show an increment in the scaling parameter for the insomnia subjects compared with the normal ones. In addition, the results of the heart dynamics suggests a persistent behavior toward the 1/f-noise.

  14. Psychometric properties and clinical relevance of the adolescent sleep hygiene scale in Dutch adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Eduard J; van Kampen, Ris K A; van Kooten, Tamar; Meijer, Anne Marie

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated reliability, validity, and clinical relevance of the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale (ASHS) in Dutch adolescents. The Dutch translation of the ASHS was administered to 186 normal-sleeping adolescents and 112 adolescents with insomnia. Their sleep variables were measured using sleep logs and questionnaires. From the insomnia group, scores were also obtained after six weeks of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (n=58) or waiting list (n=22). The full scale of the ASHS had acceptable internal consistency. The results showed moderate to strong correlations of the ASHS (domains) with sleep quality, sleep duration and chronic sleep reduction. Furthermore, the Dutch ASHS was able to discriminate between normal sleepers and adolescents with insomnia, and scores of adolescents with insomnia improved after treatment. These findings confirm the importance of sleep hygiene in adolescent sleep, and contribute to the validity of the ASHS and its applicability in research and clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Numerical Modelling of the Dynamic Response of High-Speed Railway Bridges Considering Vehicle-Structure and Structure-Soil-Structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucinskas, Paulius; Agapii, L.; Sneideris, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the dynamic analysis of a multi-support bridge structure exposed to high-speed railway traffic. The proposed computational model has a unified approach for simultaneously accounting for the bridge structure response, soil response and forces induced by the vehicle...... by the bridge displacements and track unevenness together with the frequency-domain solution of the bridge structure coupled with the subsoil. The effects caused by different soil properties and stratification, as well as different vehicle speeds are determined and compared........ The bridge structure is modelled in three dimensions based on the finite element method using two-noded three-dimensional beam elements. The track structure is composed of three layers: rail, sleepers and deck which are connected through spring-dashpot systems. The vehicle travelling along a bridge...

  16. Three-dimensional Finite Element Modelling of Composite Slabs for High Speed Rails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlilo, Nhlanganiso; Kaewunruen, Sakdirat

    2017-12-01

    Currently precast steel-concrete composite slabs are being considered on railway bridges as a viable alternative replacement for timber sleepers. However, due to their nature and the loading conditions, their behaviour is often complex. Present knowledge of the behaviour of precast steel-concrete composite slabs subjected to rail loading is limited. FEA is an important tool used to simulate real life behaviour and is widely accepted in many disciples of engineering as an alternative to experimental test methods, which are often costly and time consuming. This paper seeks to detail FEM of precast steel-concrete slabs subjected to standard in-service loading in high-speed rail with focus on the importance of accurately defining material properties, element type, mesh size, contacts, interactions and boundary conditions that will give results representative of real life behaviour. Initial finite element model show very good results, confirming the accuracy of the modelling procedure

  17. The effect of self-reported habitual sleep quality and sleep length on autobiographical memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murre, Jaap M J; Kristo, Gert; Janssen, Steve M J

    2014-01-01

    A large number of studies have recently shown effects of sleep on memory consolidation. In this study the effects of the sleep quality and sleep length on the retention of autobiographical memories are examined, using an Internet-based diary technique (Kristo, Janssen, & Murre, 2009). Each of over 600 participants recorded one recent personal event and was contacted after a retention interval that ranged from 2 to 46 days. Recall of the content, time, and details of the event were scored and related to sleep quality and sleep length as measured with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that poor sleep quality, but not short sleep length, was associated with significantly lower recall at the longer retention periods (30-46 days), but not at the shorter ones (2-15 days), although the difference in recall between good and poor sleepers was small.

  18. Development of a Web Exercise Video for Patients With Shoulder Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Hye; Song, Mi Ryeong

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a Web video designed to promote regular shoulder joint exercise on a continuous basis among patients with shoulder joint disease. This is a methodological research. A shoulder joint exercise video was developed through the five stages of the ADDIE model: analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation. The video demonstrates exercises that stretch and strengthen the joints and muscles of the shoulders. Stretching exercises include the pendulum, forward elevation, outer rotation, crossover arm stretch, inner rotation, and the sleeper; strengthening exercises include dumbbell exercises, a chair exercise, wall push-ups, and rowing. This Web exercise video can be used as an educational resource for preventing shoulder joint diseases by middle-aged and elderly people and those seeking to restore shoulder joint function damaged by shoulder joint diseases.

  19. Manifestations of Insomnia in Sleep Apnea: Implications for Screening and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailes, Sally; Rizzo, Dorrie; Baltzan, Marc; Grad, Roland; Pavilanis, Alan; Creti, Laura; Fichten, Catherine S; Libman, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the presence, type, and severity of insomnia complaints in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients and to assess the utility of the Sleep Symptom Checklist (SSC) for case identification in primary care. Participants were 88 OSA patients, 57 cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) patients, and 14 healthy controls (Ctrl). Each completed a sleep questionnaire as well as the SSC, which includes insomnia, daytime functioning, psychological, and sleep disorder subscales. Results showed that OSA patients could be grouped according to 3 insomnia patterns: no insomnia (OSA), n = 21; insomnia (OSA-I), n = 30, with a subjective complaint and disrupted sleep; and noncomplaining poor sleepers (OSA-I-NC), n = 37. Comparisons among the OSA, CBT-I, and Ctrl groups demonstrate distinct profiles on the SSC subscales, indicating its potential utility for both case identification and treatment planning.

  20. Psychometric Properties of the Consensus Sleep Diary in Those With Insomnia Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maich, Kristin H G; Lachowski, Angela M; Carney, Colleen E

    2018-01-01

    The Consensus Sleep Diary (CSD) is a standardized, prospective tool for tracking nightly subjective sleep. The current study evaluated the validity and utility of the CSD, with consideration for challenges inherent to psychometric evaluation of diary measures. Results showed that the CSD indices differentiated good sleepers from those with insomnia and were associated with similar objective indices and a subjective insomnia severity measure. The ability to detect treatment improvements after cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) was tested by comparing pre- and post-CBT-I CSD indices with a subjective rating of insomnia symptom severity. Improvement in insomnia symptom severity was significantly related to improvement on the CSD indices. Completion rate of the CSD amongst participants across all 14 days was 99.8%. These findings provide support for the validity, clinical utility, and usability of the CSD.

  1. Validation of the Portuguese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI-PT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio João, Karine Alexandra; Becker, Nathália Brandolim; de Neves Jesus, Saul; Isabel Santos Martins, Rute

    2017-01-01

    The present study was realised to validate the Portuguese version of the PSQI. The instrument PSQI-PT was applied to 347 Portuguese community-dwelling adults aged 18-69 years old. The resulting data was used to perform the psychometric analysis to validate the instrument. No structural modifications to the questionnaire were necessary during the adaptation process. The scores for the PSQI-PT showed an adequate internal consistency. The principal component analysis (PCA) produced good factor loading for all items. Finally, the analysis of demographic variables showed that age and literacy influence the values for the "Global Sleep Quality" (GSQ) in this Portuguese sample. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the PSQI-PT is a valid and reliable instrument for the assessment of sleep quality with the advantage of allowing community-dwelling adults differentiation between good and poor sleepers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep among older adults with and without insomnia complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, C M; Stone, J; Trinkle, D; Mercer, J; Remsberg, S

    1993-09-01

    This study examined the beliefs and attitudes about sleep among 145 older adults. Ss were either chronic insomniacs (n = 74) or self-defined good sleepers (n = 71). They rated their level of agreement or disagreement (visual analog scale) with 28 statements tapping various beliefs, expectations, and attributions about several sleep-related themes. The results showed that insomniacs endorsed stronger beliefs about the negative consequences of insomnia, expressed more hopelessness about the fear of losing control of their sleep, and more helplessness about its unpredictability. These findings suggest that some beliefs and attitudes about sleep may be instrumental in perpetuating insomnia. The main clinical implication is that these cognitions should be identified and targeted for alteration in the management of late-life insomnia.

  3. Parent-based sleep education workshops in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Hannah E; McGrew, Susan G; Artibee, Kay; Surdkya, Kyla; Goldman, Suzanne E; Frank, Kim; Wang, Lily; Malow, Beth A

    2009-08-01

    To determine if parents can successfully teach their children with autism spectrum disorders to become better sleepers, we piloted small group parent education workshops focused on behavioral sleep strategies. Workshops consisted of three 2-hour sessions conducted over consecutive weeks by 2 physicians. Curricula included establishing effective daytime and nighttime habits, initiating a bedtime routine, and optimizing parental interactions at bedtime and during night wakings. Baseline and treatment questionnaires and actigraphy were analyzed in 20 children, ages 3 to 10 years. Improvements after treatment were seen in the total scale and several insomnia-related subscales of the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire. Actigraphy documented reduced sleep latency in children presenting with sleep onset delay. Improvements were also noted in measures of sleep habits and daytime behavior. Brief parent-based behavioral sleep workshops in children with autism spectrum disorders appear effective in improving subjective and objective measures of sleep, sleep habits, and daytime behavior.

  4. Sleep Quality Improvement During Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsawh, Holly J; Bomyea, Jessica; Stein, Murray B; Cissell, Shadha H; Lang, Ariel J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of sleep complaints among individuals with anxiety disorders, few prior studies have examined whether sleep quality improves during anxiety treatment. The current study examined pre- to posttreatment sleep quality improvement during cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for panic disorder (PD; n = 26) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n = 24). Among sleep quality indices, only global sleep quality and sleep latency improved significantly (but modestly) during CBT. Sleep quality improvement was greater for treatment responders, but did not vary by diagnosis. Additionally, poor baseline sleep quality was independently associated with worse anxiety treatment outcome, as measured by higher intolerance of uncertainty. Additional intervention targeting sleep prior to or during CBT for anxiety may be beneficial for poor sleepers.

  5. Marginal overweight operating scenario for DOE's initiative I highway casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.V.; Loud, G.C.; Heitzman, A.C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper assesses the potential transport of high-capacity Initiative I highway casks under development by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) as permitted marginal overweight shipments that: exceed a gross vehicle weight (gvw) limit of 80,000, but weight less than 96,000 pounds; follow axle and axle group weight limits adopted by the Surface Transportation Assistance Act (STAA) of 1982; conform to dimensional restrictions to operate on most major highways; and comply with the Federal Bridge Formula. The marginal overweight tractor-trailer would operate in normal open-quotes over-the-roadclose quotes mode and comply with all laws and regulations. The vehicle would have a sleeper berth and two drivers - one to drive while the other provides escort and communications services and accumulates required off-duty time

  6. Sleep Quality Improvement During Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsawh, Holly J.; Bomyea, Jessica; Stein, Murray B.; Cissell, Shadha H.; Lang, Ariel J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of sleep complaints among individuals with anxiety disorders, few prior studies have examined whether sleep quality improves during anxiety treatment. The current study examined pre- to post-treatment sleep quality improvement during cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for panic disorder (PD; n = 26) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n = 24). Among sleep quality indices, only global sleep quality and sleep latency improved significantly (but modestly) during CBT. Sleep quality improvement was greater for treatment responders, but did not vary by diagnosis. Additionally, poor baseline sleep quality was independently associated with worse anxiety treatment outcome, as measured by higher intolerance of uncertainty. Additional intervention targeting sleep prior to or during CBT for anxiety may be beneficial for poor sleepers. PMID:26244485

  7. On the vertical interaction between a three-axle bogie and track

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazilu Traian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the ‘moving wheel’ model is used aiming to analysis new aspects of the interaction between three-axle bogie and track due to the harmonic roughness of the rail. The three-axle bogie of a locomotive is considered and its model is reduced to three loaded wheels running along a rail supported on a continuous elastic foundation. The track model consists of a Euler-Bernoulli beam resting on elastic foundation including two elastic layers (Winkler model representing the rail pad and ballast and one inertial layer for sleepers. The rail deflection due to the moving dead loads of the wheels is calculated and the frequency response functions of the wheels, rail in the contact points and contact forces are analysed, including the three resonance frequencies.

  8. Banal no more: an essay on the film Hannah Arendt, with special reference to Eichmann and the Nazi killing groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Bennett

    2015-04-01

    This movie review and essay about the recent film Hannah Arendt by director Margarethe von Trotta seeks to examine Arendt's controversial term "banality of evil" as well as the nature of Arendt's misperception of Adolph Eichmann as thoughtless, and to situate Eichmann's personality within recent understandings of totalitarian group behavior and organizational killers. What emerges is that Arendt was unable to understand Eichmann's ruthless indifference to others as well as his attraction to being a Nazi and to organized mass killing. This paper examines Mann's (2005) formulation of different levels of functional attraction to totalitarian perpetrators, in which a racial morality is imposed and restrictions to eliminist violence are removed. Under such group conditions, violent "sleeper" needs emerge and are rationalized by political beliefs. In conclusion, the term "banality of evil" has little explanative value, while violent mass murder continues to this day as a totalitarian solution.

  9. Mercury on the move during snowmelt in Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, James B.; Schuster, P.F.; Reddy, M.M.; Roth, D.A.; Taylor, Howard E.; Aiken, G.

    2002-01-01

    Although mercury (Hg) emissions peaked in the United States over the last 20 to 40 years and are now declining, they remain well above natural background levels in soils and sediments. Only a small fraction of the Hg deposited from the atmosphere to the terrestrial landscape runs off in streamflow. However, some of this Hg is methylated in the environment and can potentially bioaccumulate to the top of food webs, posing a hazard to people who eat fish, especially children and pregnant women. What factors determine the amount of Hg that runs off in streams? During the 2000 snowmelt at Sleepers River in Vermont, strong correlations were found between dissolved and particulate mercury and the respective dissolved and particulate organic carbon fractions, even when data were pooled from 10 streams of diverse watershed size and land cover. Episodic export of particulate Hg during the highest flows appears to be the dominant mechanism of Hg movement.

  10. Influence of temperature, mixing and time of residue on the degradation of organic trace materials during thermal treatment of waste wood; Einfluss von Temperatur, Durchmischung und Verweilzeit auf den Abbau organischer Spurenstoffe bei der thermischen Behandlung von Abfallholz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, M. [Clausthaler Umwelttechnik-Institut GmbH (CUTEC), Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Griebel, H. [Fels-Werke GmbH, Goslar (Germany); Scholz, R. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Energieverfahrenstechnik und Brennstofftechnik

    1998-09-01

    Waste wood, e.g. window frames or sleepers treated with coal tar pitch, are usually incinerated after crushing and removal of foreign materials (glass, metal etc.). Organic trace elements, e.g. PAH, PCB, chlorobenzenes, PCDD and PCDF must be removed after combustion. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Abfallhoelzer, wie z.B. Fensterrahmen oder mit Steinkohlenteerpech behandelte Eisenbahnschwellen, werden nach Zerkleinerung und Abtrennung von Wert- und Stoerstoffen (Glas, Metalle usw.) haeufig in Rostsystemen thermisch behandelt. Bei der Diskussion der Prozessbedingungen liegt ein besonderer Schwerpunkt in der Fragestellung nach geeigneten Abbaubedingungen fuer organische Spurenstoffe wie polyaromatische Kohlenwasserstoffe (PAK), polychlorierte Biphenyle (PCB), Chlorbenzole, polychlorierte Dibenzodioxine (PCDD) und polychlorierte Dibenzofurane (PCDF) im Nachverbrennungsprozess. (orig./SR)

  11. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Sleep Disturbance in a Large HIV-Infected Adult Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allavena, C; Guimard, T; Billaud, E; De la Tullaye, S; Reliquet, V; Pineau, S; Hüe, H; Supiot, C; Chennebault, J-M; Michau, C; Hitoto, H; Vatan, R; Raffi, F

    2016-02-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluates the prevalence and factors associated with sleep disturbances in French adult HIV-infected outpatients. Patients fullfilled a self-administered questionnaire on their health behavior, sleep attitudes (Pittsburgh sleep quality index, PSQI), quality of life and depression; 1354 patients were enrolled. Median sleeping time was 7 h. Poor sleep quality was observed in 47 % of the patients, and moderate to serious depressive symptoms in 19.7 %. Factors significantly associated with sleep disturbances were depression, male gender, active employment, living single, tobacco-smoking, duration of HIV infection, nevirapine or efavirenz-including regimen. Prevalence of poor sleepers is high in this HIV adult outpatient population. Associated factors seem poorly specific to HIV infection and more related to social and psychological status. Taking care of these disturbances may prove to be an effective health management strategy.

  12. Sleep-related cognitive processes, arousal, and emotion dysregulation in insomnia disorder: the role of insomnia-specific rumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palagini, Laura; Moretto, Umberto; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Carney, Colleen

    2017-02-01

    Insomnia-specific rumination has presented in subjects with insomnia. Research has identified hyperarousal as a key factor, with both trait and state components. It has been shown that emotion dysregulation also plays a role in insomnia. Hence, the aim was to investigate how insomnia rumination is associated with both trait- and state-dependent arousal and emotion dysregulation in insomnia. Sixty-eight subjects with insomnia disorder (DSM-5) and 36 good sleepers were evaluated using: Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Daytime Insomnia Symptom Response Scale (DISRS), Arousal Predisposition Scale (APS), Pre-sleep Arousal Scale (PSAS), and Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS). Univariate and multivariate regression analyses and mediation analyses were performed. Subjects with insomnia (F 41, mean age 50.2 ± 10) presented higher scores than good sleepers (F 22, mean age 49.7 ± 14) in all the scales (ISI, DISRS, APS, PSAS, DERS; p cognitive B = 0.22, p cognitive and somatic arousal (p = 0.02), and the association between trait hyperarousal and emotion dysregulation (Z = 2.3, p = 0.04). In insomnia, specific rumination is related to both trait predisposition to arousal and to state-dependent arousal. It is also related to emotion dyregulation. Insomnia-specific ruminative response style may modulate the complex association between trait- and state-dependent arousal factors and arousal and emotion regulation in insomnia. In this framework, a broad range of cognitive processes may be considered when dealing with subjects with insomnia: the use of rumination-oriented psychological strategies could be important. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Depression and quality of sleep in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trbojević-Stanković Jasna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sleep disorders and psychological disturbances are common in end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients. However, despite their frequency and importance, such conditions often go unnoticed, since all patients do not clearly manifest fully expressed symptoms. Objective. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of depression and poor sleep quality and to examine the association between these disorders and demographic, clinical and treatment-related characteristics of ESRD patients on hemodialysis (HD. Methods. The study included 222 patients (132 men and 90 women, mean age 57.3±11.9 years, from 3 HD centers in Central Serbia, which provided us with biochemical parameters and demographic data. Sleep quality and depression were assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, respectively. Results. The average BDI was 16.1±11.3. Depressed patients were significantly older (p=0.041, had a significantly lower dialysis adequacy (p=0.027 and a significantly worse quality of sleep (p<0.001, while they did not show significant difference as regarding sex, employment, marital status, comorbidities, dialysis type, dialysis vintage, shift and laboratory parameters. The average PSQI was 7.8±4.5 and 64.2% of patients were poor sleepers. Poor sleepers were significantly older (p=0.002, they were more often females (p=0.027 and had a significantly higher BDI (p<0.001, while other investigated variables were not correlated with sleep quality. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between BDI and PSQI (r=0.604; p<0.001. Conclusion. Depression and poor sleep quality are frequent and interrelated among HD patients.

  14. Field testing of different chemical combinations as odour baits for trapping wild mosquitoes in The Gambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Jawara

    Full Text Available Odour baited traps have potential use in population surveillance of insect vectors of disease, and in some cases for vector population reduction. Established attractants for human host-seeking mosquitoes include a combination of CO(2 with L-lactic acid and ammonia, on top of which additional candidate compounds are being tested. In this field study in rural Gambia, using Latin square experiments with thorough randomization and replication, we tested nine different leading candidate combinations of chemical odorants for attractiveness to wild mosquitoes including anthropophilic malaria vectors, using modified Mosquito Magnet-X (MM-X counterflow traps outside experimental huts containing male human sleepers. Highest catches of female mosquitoes, particularly of An. gambiae s.l. and Mansonia species, were obtained by incorporation of tetradecanoic acid. As additional carboxylic acids did not increase the trap catches further, this 'reference blend' (tetradecanoic acid with L-lactic acid, ammonia and CO(2 was used in subsequent experiments. MM-X traps with this blend caught similar numbers of An. gambiae s.l. and slightly more Mansonia and Culex mosquitoes than a standard CDC light trap, and these numbers were not significantly affected by the presence or absence of human sleepers in the huts. Experiments with CO(2 produced from overnight yeast cultures showed that this organic source was effective in enabling trap attractiveness for all mosquito species, although at a slightly lower efficiency than obtained with use of CO(2 gas cylinders. Although further studies are needed to discover additional chemicals that increase attractiveness, as well as to optimise trap design and CO(2 source for broader practical use, the odour-baited traps described here are safe and effective for sampling host-seeking mosquitoes outdoors and can be incorporated into studies of malaria vector ecology.

  15. The influence of sex and age on the relationship between sleep duration and metabolic syndrome in Korean adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Katherine M; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Kim, Jieun; Oh, Kyungwon; Suh, Il

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the influence of sex and age on the relationship between sleep duration and metabolic syndrome in a nationally representative population. We used data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2001-2010) and enrolled 24,511 participants aged 20-79 years. Sleep duration was categorized into five groups: ≤5, 6, 7 (referent), 8, and ≥9h/day. Age was categorized into three groups: younger (20-39y), middle-aged (40-59y), and older (60-79y). The association between sleep duration and metabolic syndrome was assessed in the total, separately in men and women, then in six groups based on sex and age. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome by sleep category demonstrated a U-shaped pattern in the total population. However, after adjusting for age, education, occupation, exercise, smoking, alcohol, and body mass index, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome increased in long sleepers (OR 1.31; 95% CI 1.14-1.51) but not in short sleepers (OR 1.00; 95% CI 0.89-1.11). The relationship between sleep duration and metabolic syndrome varied by sex and age-long sleep (≥9h/day) was positively associated with metabolic syndrome only in younger (OR 2.13; 95% CI 1.38-3.28) and middle-aged (OR 1.63; 95% CI 1.21-2.21) women. Short sleep (≤5h/day) was not associated with metabolic syndrome in any sex and age groups. However, extremely short sleep (≤4h/day) was associated with metabolic syndrome in middle-aged men (OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.05-2.96). These data suggest that sex and age significantly modify the relationship between sleep duration and metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Association of usual sleep quality and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes in Japanese: A cross sectional study. Sleep and Food Registry in Kanagawa (SOREKA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika Sakamoto

    Full Text Available Excessively short and long sleep durations are associated with type 2 diabetes, but there is limited information about the association between sleep quality and diabetes. Accordingly, the present study was performed to investigate this relationship.The subjects were 3249 patients with type 2 diabetes aged 20 years or older. Sleep quality was assessed by using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. A higher global PSQI score indicates worse sleep quality, and a global PSQI score >5 differentiates poor sleepers from good sleepers.The mean global PSQI score was 5.94 ± 3.33, and 47.6% of the patients had a score of 6 or higher. Regarding the components of the PSQI, the score was highest for sleep duration, followed by subjective sleep quality and then sleep latency in decreasing order. When the patients were assigned to HbA1c quartiles (≤ 6.5%, 6.6-7.0%, 7.1-7.8%, and ≥ 7.9%, the top quartile had a significantly higher global PSQI score than the other quartiles. The top HbA1c quartile had a sleep duration of only 6.23 ± 1.42 hours, which was significantly shorter than in the other quartiles. Also, sleep latency was 25.3 ± 31.8 minutes in the top quartile, which was significantly longer (by approximately 20 minutes than in the other quartiles. When analysis was performed with adjustment for age, gender, BMI, smoking, and other confounders, the global PSQI score was still significantly higher and sleep duration was shorter in the top HbA1c quartile (HbA1c ≥ 7.9%.Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes were found to have poor subjective sleep quality independently of potential confounders, especially those with inadequate glycemic control. Impairment of sleep quality was associated with both increased sleep latency and a shorter duration of sleep.

  17. Prevalence and Correlates of Disordered Sleep in Southeast Asian Indians with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarabalan Rajendran

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSleep disturbances are common in individuals with diabetes. Patients with diabetes have higher rates of insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness and increased incidence of restless leg syndrome. The purpose of our study was to investigate the prevalence and determine the predictors of sleep dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes in a southeast Asian Indian population.MethodsWe enrolled 120 patients with type 2 diabetes who attended an endocrinology clinic in a tertiary-care hospital. After we collected their demographic data, we recorded their anthropometric measurements. Fasting, postprandial blood glucose values and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c values were then obtained. Quality of sleep was evaluated in all the patients through the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, which is a questionnaire that assesses sleep quality and disturbances over a monthlong period. A Global Sleep Quality score ≥5 discriminates between good and poor sleepers.ResultsThe mean global PSQI score was 7.08 (standard deviation, 3.89, which suggested poor sleep quality in this population. Sixty-nine percent of patients had a global PSQI score ≥5, indicating that they were "poor sleepers." The global PSQI score positively correlated with the duration of diabetes and was also independent of other variables such as age, gender, body mass index, HbA1c, or medications.ConclusionWe found a high prevalence of sleep dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes. We also found a significant correlation between duration of diabetes and quality of sleep, independent of other variables. It is important for physicians to address the quality and duration of sleep in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  18. Sleep Patterns and Predictors of Poor Sleep Quality among Medical Students in King Khalid University, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Aesha Farheen; Al-Musa, Hasan; Al-Amri, Hasan; Al-Qahtani, Abdulkareem; Al-Shahrani, Mushabab; Al-Qahtani, Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    Sleep problems and poor sleep quality are important issues for medical students. This study aimed to investigate the sleep patterns, measure the prevalence of poor sleep quality, and identify the predictors of poor sleep among medical students in King Khalid University (KKU), Saudi Arabia. This cross-sectional study enrolled 318 medical students during October-November, 2015. Participants were selected by convenience sampling and data were collected using self-administered questionnaires to obtain information regarding socio-demographic variables and indicators of sleep quality. The overall mean sleep quality score was 6.79 with a standard deviation of 3.06. Poor sleep quality was reported by 74.2% students. Significantly high mean sleep quality scores (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) were observed for students with very poor subjective sleep quality (mean = 10.50, SD = 2.58), least sleep efficiency (mean = 11.21, SD = 2.23), shorter sleep duration (mean = 7.83, SD = 2.88), sleep onset latency more than 30 minutes (mean = 7.82, SD = 2.53), sleeping after midnight (mean = 7.53, SD = 2.95), and use of sleep aiding medication (mean = 8.78, SD = 3.5). Significant differences were observed between good sleepers and poor sleepers regarding these sleep characteristics. Poor sleep was predicted by sleep behaviours such as going to sleep after midnight (AOR = 2.18, 95% CI: 1.20, 3.94) and sleep duration of less than seven hours (AOR = 7.49, 95% CI: 4.24, 13.22). Medical students of KKU have poor sleep quality. Longer sleep latency, going to sleep after midnight, and shorter sleep duration are important problems in this group.

  19. Clinical and Polysomnographic Predictors of the Natural History of Poor Sleep in the General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Bixler, Edward O.; Singareddy, Ravi; Shaffer, Michele L.; Calhoun, Susan L.; Karataraki, Maria; Vela-Bueno, Antonio; Liao, Duanping

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Approximately 8-10% of the general population suffers from chronic insomnia, whereas another 20-30% of the population has insomnia symptoms at any given time (i.e., poor sleep). However, few longitudinal studies have examined risk factors of the natural history of poor sleep, and none have examined the role of polysomnographic (PSG) variables. Design: Representative longitudinal study. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: From a random, general population sample of 1,741 individuals of the adult Penn State Cohort, 1,395 were followed up after 7.5 yr. Measurements: Full medical evaluation and 1-night PSG at baseline and telephone interview at follow-up. Results: The rate of incident poor sleep was 18.4%. Physical (e.g., obesity, sleep apnea, and ulcer) and mental (e.g., depression) health conditions and behavioral factors (e.g., smoking and alcohol consumption) increased the odds of incident poor sleep as compared to normal sleep. The rates of persistent, remitted, and poor sleepers who developed chronic insomnia were 39%, 44%, and 17%, respectively. Risk factors for persistent poor sleep were physical health conditions combined with psychologic distress. Shorter objective sleep duration and a family history of sleep problems were risk factors for poor sleep evolving into chronic insomnia. Conclusions: Poor sleep appears to be primarily a symptom of physical and mental health conditions, whereas the persistence of poor sleep is associated with psychologic distress. Importantly, sleep apnea appears to be associated with incident poor sleep but not with chronic insomnia. Finally, this study suggests that objective short sleep duration in poor sleepers is a biologic marker of genetic predisposition to chronic insomnia. Citation: Fernandez-Mendoza J; Vgontzas AN; Bixler EO; Singareddy R; Shaffer ML; Calhoun SL; Karataraki M; Vela-Bueno A; Liao D. Clinical and polysomnographic predictors of the natural history of poor sleep in the general population

  20. Daily rhythms of the sleep-wake cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waterhouse Jim

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The amount and timing of sleep and sleep architecture (sleep stages are determined by several factors, important among which are the environment, circadian rhythms and time awake. Separating the roles played by these factors requires specific protocols, including the constant routine and altered sleep-wake schedules. Results from such protocols have led to the discovery of the factors that determine the amounts and distribution of slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep as well as to the development of models to determine the amount and timing of sleep. One successful model postulates two processes. The first is process S, which is due to sleep pressure (and increases with time awake and is attributed to a 'sleep homeostat'. Process S reverses during slow wave sleep (when it is called process S'. The second is process C, which shows a daily rhythm that is parallel to the rhythm of core temperature. Processes S and C combine approximately additively to determine the times of sleep onset and waking. The model has proved useful in describing normal sleep in adults. Current work aims to identify the detailed nature of processes S and C. The model can also be applied to circumstances when the sleep-wake cycle is different from the norm in some way. These circumstances include: those who are poor sleepers or short sleepers; the role an individual's chronotype (a measure of how the timing of the individual's preferred sleep-wake cycle compares with the average for a population; and changes in the sleep-wake cycle with age, particularly in adolescence and aging, since individuals tend to prefer to go to sleep later during adolescence and earlier in old age. In all circumstances, the evidence that sleep times and architecture are altered and the possible causes of these changes (including altered S, S' and C processes are examined.

  1. Insomnia Severity Index: psychometric properties with Chinese community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Doris S F

    2010-10-01

    This paper is a report of a study to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index. Despite the high prevalence of insomnia in older people and its detrimental impact on well-being and healthcare costs, this problem is almost always undetected and consequently under-treated. The Insomnia Severity Index is psychometrically sound in measuring perceived insomnia severity. However, it has had very limited application in non-White populations. An instrument validation study was carried out between October 2008 and April 2009. The Insomnia Severity Index was translated into Chinese using Brislin's model and administered to a convenience sample of 585 older Chinese people recruited from three community centres for elders. Other instruments were also administered, including the Chinese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Geriatric Depression Scale. Cronbach's alpha of the Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index was 0.81, with item-to-total correlations in the range of 0.34-0.67. Construct validity was supported by its moderate relationship with the Chinese Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and sleep efficiency. The Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index also indicated more severe level of insomnia in older people who reported depressed mood on the Geriatric Depression Scale. Discriminant validity was supported as the Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index could discriminate poorer sleepers from normal sleepers. Exploratory factor analysis identified a two-factor structure for the Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index in measuring the severity and impacts of insomnia on the Chinese older people. The Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index is a culturally-relevant and psychometrically-sound instrument for assessing severity and impact of insomnia in Chinese community-dwelling older people. Nurses can use this tool to assess older people's perceptions of insomnia. © 2010 The

  2. No improvement in race performance by naps in male ultra-endurance cyclists in a 600-km ultra-cycling race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Wirth, Andrea; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2012-04-30

    Ultra-endurance performance is of increasing popularity. We investigated the associations between anthropometry, training and support during racing, with race performance in 67 male recreational ultra-endurance cyclists participating in the 'Swiss Cycling Marathon' over 600 kilometres, an official qualifier for the cycling ultra-marathon 'Paris-Brest-Paris'. The 54 finishers showed no differences in anthropometry and did not train differently compared to the 13 non-finishers. During the race, the finishers were significantly more frequently racing alone than being followed by a support crew. After bivariate analysis, percent body fat (r = 0.43), the cycling distance per training unit (r = -0.36), the duration per training unit (r = -0.31) and the sleep time during the race (r = 0.50) were related to overall race time. The 23 non-sleepers in the finisher group completed the race within (mean and IQR) 1,567 (1,453-1,606) min, highly significantly faster than the 31 sleepers with 1,934 (1,615-2,033) min (P = 0.0003). No variable of support during the race was associated with race time. After multivariate analysis, percent body fat (P = 0.026) and duration per training unit (P = 0.005) remained predictor variables for race time. To summarize, for a successful finish in a cycling ultra-marathon over 600 kilometres such as the 'Swiss Cycling Marathon', percent body fat and duration per training unit were related to race time whereas equipment and support during the race showed no association. Athletes with naps were highly significantly slower than athletes without naps.

  3. Relationship between Chronic Short Sleep Duration and Childhood Body Mass Index: A School-Based Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Pileggi

    Full Text Available To assess relationship between obesity and chronic shorter sleep duration in children and to determine if lack of sleep represents an independent determinant of childhood Body Mass Index.This cross-sectional study was conducted in all children enrolled in the fifth class (approximately 10 years of age of all public primary schools in Catanzaro (Southern Italy. The overall response rate was 62% resulting in 542 participating children. Parents completed a questionnaire with information on their demographics and socio-economic characteristics, their health status, characteristics of their child birth and health status. The sleeping habits were investigated in the 3 months preceding the consultation and parents were asked to indicate hours of bedtime and wake-up of their children. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to examine the association between child BMI and chronic lack of sleep.36.7% of the children surveyed were overweight or obese. A quarter of children did not routinely play sports and many of them spent more than an hour a day watching TV (60.7% and using videogames or computer (51.1%. Widespread dietary habits were inadequate, especially concerning vegetables and fruit intake with more than 95% of children who consumed insufficient amounts. The average duration of sleep was equal to 9.4 (SD = ±0.6 hours, and the short-sleepers accounted for 38.9% of the total sample. The results of multivariate analysis showed a significant 0.77 Kg/m(2 increase of BMI for children classified as short compared to normal sleepers (95%CI = 0.16-1.38, p = 0.01.Chronic lack of sleep appears to be associated to higher BMI even in middle childhood and strongly suggests that public health strategies, focused on promoting healthy lifestyles should include an innovative approach to ensure an adequate duration of sleep at night especially in children, alongside more traditional approaches.

  4. Emotional memory processing is influenced by sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempesta, Daniela; De Gennaro, Luigi; Natale, Vincenzo; Ferrara, Michele

    2015-07-01

    The recall of emotional memory is enhanced after sleep and is hindered by sleep deprivation. We used an emotional memory task to assess whether poor sleep quality, as well as sleep deprivation, may influence the accuracy of memory recognition, but also the affective tone associated with the memory. Seventy-five subjects, divided into poor sleeper (PS), good sleeper (GS), and sleep deprivation (SD) groups, completed two recall (R) sessions: R1, 1 h after the encoding phase; and R2, after one night of sleep for PS and GS groups and after one night of sleep deprivation for the SD group. During the encoding phase, the participants rated valence and arousal of 90 pictures. During R1 and R2, the participants first made a yes/no memory judgment of the 45 target pictures intermingled with 30 non-target pictures, then rated valence and arousal of each picture. Recognition accuracy was higher for the PS and GS groups compared to the SD group for all pictures. Emotional valence of the remembered pictures was more negative after sleep deprivation and poor quality sleep, while it was preserved after a good sleep. These results provide the first evidence that poor sleep quality negatively affects emotional valence of memories, within the context of preserved emotional memory consolidation. It is suggested that low sleep quality and lack of sleep may impose a more negative affective tone to memories. The reported effects are not to be ascribed to depressive mood, but to a specific influence of poor sleep quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Attention bias for sleep-related stimuli in primary insomnia and delayed sleep phase syndrome using the dot-probe task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMahon, Kenneth M A; Broomfield, Niall M; Espie, Colin A

    2006-11-01

    Cognitive models of primary insomnia (PI) suggest attention bias as a maintaining process. This study used a hallmark measure of attention bias, the dot-probe task, to determine whether attention bias to sleep-related stimuli is present in individuals with PI. Control groups of good sleepers (GS) and individuals with delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS), a sleep disorder with no presumed cognitive pathway and, hence, no predicted association with attention bias, were included. A between-groups (PI, DSPS, GS) design was employed. Participants completed a dot-probe task with stimuli comprising sleep-related and neutral words, balanced for length and frequency of usage. It was predicted a priori that PI would show greater attention bias to sleep stimuli compared with GS and DSPS groups. No difference between GS and DSPS was predicted. Sixty-three individuals completed the study (PI = 21; DSPS = 22; GS = 20), with those in PI and DSPS classified by International Classification of Sleep Disorders criteria according to self-report sleep diaries and actigraphy. GS scored Sleep Quality Index, reported being good sleepers, and met no criteria for a current or previous sleep disorder. N/A. As predicted, PI showed increased vigilance for sleep-related stimuli relative to GS and DSPS. No differences between GS and those with DSPS were found. The PI group showed shorter response latencies relative to the GS and DSPS groups. Results support an association between attention bias and PI. Further work must determine whether or not attention bias is a causal factor. Speeded responses in the PI group suggest heightened arousal, indicating that physiologic factors may play a related role.

  6. Nocturnal insomnia symptoms and stress-induced cognitive intrusions in risk for depression: A 2-year prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Vivek; Drake, Christopher L.

    2018-01-01

    Nearly half of US adults endorse insomnia symptoms. Sleep problems increase risk for depression during stress, but the mechanisms are unclear. During high stress, individuals having difficulty falling or staying asleep may be vulnerable to cognitive intrusions after stressful events, given that the inability to sleep creates a period of unstructured and socially isolated time in bed. We investigated the unique and combined effects of insomnia symptoms and stress-induced cognitive intrusions on risk for incident depression. 1126 non-depressed US adults with no history of DSM-5 insomnia disorder completed 3 annual web-based surveys on sleep, stress, and depression. We examined whether nocturnal insomnia symptoms and stress-induced cognitive intrusions predicted depression 1y and 2y later. Finally, we compared depression-risk across four groups: non-perseverators with good sleep, non-perseverators with insomnia symptoms, perseverators with good sleep, and perseverators with insomnia symptoms. Insomnia symptoms (β = .10–.13, p insomnia had the highest rates of depression (13.0%), whereas good sleeping non-perseverators had the lowest rates (3.3%, Relative Risk = 3.94). Perseverators with sleep latency >30 m reported greater depression than good sleeping perseverators (t = 2.09, p < .04). Cognitive intrusions following stress creates a depressogenic mindset, and nocturnal wakefulness may augment the effects of cognitive arousal on depression development. Poor sleepers may be especially vulnerable to cognitive intrusions when having difficulty initiating sleep. As treatable behaviors, nighttime wakefulness and cognitive arousal may be targeted to reduce risk for depression in poor sleepers. PMID:29438400

  7. Association of usual sleep quality and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes in Japanese: A cross sectional study. Sleep and Food Registry in Kanagawa (SOREKA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Rika; Yamakawa, Tadashi; Takahashi, Kenichiro; Suzuki, Jun; Shinoda, Minori Matsuura; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Danno, Hirosuke; Tsuchiya, Hirohisa; Waseda, Manabu; Takano, Tatsuro; Minagawa, Fuyuki; Takai, Masahiko; Masutani, Tomohide; Nagakura, Jo; Shigematsu, Erina; Ishikawa, Masashi; Nakajima, Shigeru; Kadonosono, Kazuaki; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2018-01-01

    Excessively short and long sleep durations are associated with type 2 diabetes, but there is limited information about the association between sleep quality and diabetes. Accordingly, the present study was performed to investigate this relationship. The subjects were 3249 patients with type 2 diabetes aged 20 years or older. Sleep quality was assessed by using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). A higher global PSQI score indicates worse sleep quality, and a global PSQI score >5 differentiates poor sleepers from good sleepers. The mean global PSQI score was 5.94 ± 3.33, and 47.6% of the patients had a score of 6 or higher. Regarding the components of the PSQI, the score was highest for sleep duration, followed by subjective sleep quality and then sleep latency in decreasing order. When the patients were assigned to HbA1c quartiles (≤ 6.5%, 6.6-7.0%, 7.1-7.8%, and ≥ 7.9%), the top quartile had a significantly higher global PSQI score than the other quartiles. The top HbA1c quartile had a sleep duration of only 6.23 ± 1.42 hours, which was significantly shorter than in the other quartiles. Also, sleep latency was 25.3 ± 31.8 minutes in the top quartile, which was significantly longer (by approximately 20 minutes) than in the other quartiles. When analysis was performed with adjustment for age, gender, BMI, smoking, and other confounders, the global PSQI score was still significantly higher and sleep duration was shorter in the top HbA1c quartile (HbA1c ≥ 7.9%). Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes were found to have poor subjective sleep quality independently of potential confounders, especially those with inadequate glycemic control. Impairment of sleep quality was associated with both increased sleep latency and a shorter duration of sleep.

  8. Bedtime and its correlates among secondary school children in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusrat, Maliha; Khan, Aziz; Hamid, Sadaf; Hussain, Arwa Abbas; Kadir, Muhammad Masood

    2012-11-01

    To determine the demographic and lifestyle predictors of bedtime among secondary school children in Karachi, Pakistan, and to assess what variables of daytime functioning correlate with bedtimes. The cross-sectional study was conducted between September and October 2007, among secondary school students aged 10-16 years, in the socio-economically diverse city of Karachi. Data was collected using a pre-tested self-reporting questionnaire, and analysed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis on SPSS version 15. A p value of students in the study, 102 (18.92%) were male and 437 (81.07%) were female. Of the total, 401 (74.4%) slept late (after 10pm). Homework and TV shows were more frequent reasons of bedtime among the late-sleepers, whereas parental influence was reported more by the early-sleepers. Advancing grade at school, father's profession as doctor or engineer and sleeping alone in the room were independent predictors of late bedtime on multivariate analysis (pStudents who were older, did not share a bed, or slept for >3 hours during the afternoon, were more likely to sleep after 10pm on univariate analysis only (pStudents sleeping late were more likely to get less daily and nocturnal sleep, wake-up later, require multiple wake up reminders in the morning, fall asleep in a morning class and feel tired during the day (pless likely to feel that they got adequate sleep to be fresh in the morning (pstudents to allow optimal daytime functioning.

  9. Objective measures of sleep duration and continuity in major depressive disorder with comorbid hypersomnolence: a primary investigation with contiguous systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, David T; Cook, Jesse D; Goldstein, Michael R

    2017-06-01

    Hypersomnolence plays an important role in the presentation, treatment and course of mood disorders. However, there has been relatively little research that examines objective measures of sleep duration and continuity in patients with depression and hypersomnolence, despite the use of these factors in sleep medicine nosological systems. This study compared total sleep time and efficiency measured by naturalistic actigraphic recordings followed by ad libitum polysomnography (PSG; without prescribed wake time) in 22 patients with major depressive disorder and co-occurring hypersomnolence against age- and sex-matched healthy sleeper controls. The major depressive disorder and co-occurring hypersomnolence group demonstrated significantly longer sleep duration compared with healthy sleeper controls quantified by sleep diaries, actigraphy and ad libitum PSG. No between-group differences in sleep efficiency (SE), latency to sleep or wake after sleep onset were observed when assessed using objective measures. To further contextualize these findings within the broader scientific literature, a systematic review was performed to identify other comparable investigations. A meta-analysis of pooled data demonstrated patients with mood disorders and co-occurring hypersomnolence have significantly greater sleep duration and similar SE compared with healthy controls when assessed using ad libitum PSG. These results suggest current sleep medicine nosology that distinguishes hypersomnia associated with psychiatric disorders primarily as a construct characterized by low SE and increased time in bed may not be accurate. Future studies that establish the biological bases hypersomnolence in mood disorders, as well as clarify the accuracy of nosological thresholds to define excessive sleep duration, are needed to refine the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  10. The Natural History of Insomnia: Acute Insomnia and First-onset Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jason G.; Perlis, Michael L.; Bastien, Célyne H.; Gardani, Maria; Espie, Colin A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: While many studies have examined the association between insomnia and depression, no studies have evaluated these associations (1) within a narrow time frame, (2) with specific reference to acute and chronic insomnia, and (3) using polysomnography. In the present study, the association between insomnia and first-onset depression was evaluated taking into account these considerations. Design: A mixed-model inception design. Setting: Academic research laboratory. Participants: Fifty-four individuals (acute insomnia [n = 33], normal sleepers [n = 21]) with no reported history of a sleep disorder, chronic medical condition, or psychiatric illness. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Participants were assessed at baseline (2 nights of polysomnography and psychometric measures of stress and mood) and insomnia and depression status were reassessed at 3 months. Individuals with acute insomnia exhibited more stress, poorer mood, worse subjective sleep continuity, increased N2 sleep, and decreased N3 sleep. Individuals who transitioned to chronic insomnia exhibited (at baseline) shorter REM latencies and reduced N3 sleep. Individuals who exhibited this pattern in the transition from acute to chronic insomnia were also more likely to develop first-onset depression (9.26%) as compared to those who remitted from insomnia (1.85%) or were normal sleepers (1.85%). Conclusion: The transition from acute to chronic insomnia is presaged by baseline differences in sleep architecture that have, in the past, been ascribed to Major Depression, either as heritable traits or as acquired traits from prior episodes of depression. The present findings suggest that the “sleep architecture stigmata” of depression may actually develop over the course transitioning from acute to chronic insomnia. Citation: Ellis JG; Perlis ML; Bastien CH; Gardani M; Espie CA. The natural history of insomnia: acute insomnia and first-onset depression. SLEEP 2014;37(1):97-106. PMID

  11. Insomnia with physiological hyperarousal is associated with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Bixler, Edward O; Sun, Yuanfeng; Zhou, Junying; Ren, Rong; Li, Tao; Tang, Xiangdong

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that insomnia with objective short sleep duration is associated with a higher risk of hypertension, and it has been speculated that the underlying mechanism is physiological hyperarousal. In this study, we tested whether insomnia with physiological hyperarousal measured by Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT), a standard test of sleepiness/alertness, is associated with increased risk of hypertension. Two hundred nineteen chronic insomniacs and 96 normal sleepers were included in this study. Chronic insomnia was defined based on standard diagnostic criteria with symptoms lasting ≥6 months. All subjects underwent 1 night in laboratory polysomnography followed by a standard MSLT. We used the median mean MSLT value (ie, >14 minutes) and the 75th percentile of mean MSLT value (ie, >17 minutes) to define hyperarousal. Hypertension was defined based either on blood pressure measures or on diagnosis treatment by a physician. After controlling for age, sex, body mass index, apnea-hypopnea index, diabetes mellitus, smoking, alcohol, and caffeine use, insomnia combined with MSLT >14 minutes increased the odds of hypertension by 300% (odds ratio=3.27; 95% confidence interval=1.20-8.96), whereas insomnia combined with MSLT >17 minutes increased even further the odds of hypertension by 400% (odds ratio=4.33; 95% confidence interval=1.48-12.68) compared with normal sleepers with MSLT ≤14 minutes. Insomnia associated with physiological hyperarousal is associated with a significant risk of hypertension. Long MSLT values may be a reliable index of the physiological hyperarousal and biological severity of chronic insomnia. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Insomnia with objective short sleep duration is associated with longer duration of insomnia in the Freiburg Insomnia Cohort compared to insomnia with normal sleep duration, but not with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, Anna F; Hertenstein, Elisabeth; Kyle, Simon D; Baglioni, Chiara; Feige, Bernd; Nissen, Christoph; McGinness, Alastair J; Riemann, Dieter; Spiegelhalder, Kai

    2017-01-01

    To replicate the association between insomnia with objective short sleep duration and hypertension, type 2 diabetes and duration of insomnia. Retrospective case-control study. Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Center-University of Freiburg. 328 patients with primary insomnia classified according to DSM-IV criteria (125 males, 203 females, 44.3 ± 12.2 years). N/A. All participants were investigated using polysomnography, blood pressure measurements, and fasting routine laboratory. Insomnia patients with short sleep duration (insomnia compared to those with normal sleep duration (≥ 6 hours) in the first night of laboratory sleep. Insomnia patients who were categorised as short sleepers in either night were not more likely to suffer from hypertension (systolic blood pressure of ≥ 140 mm Hg, diastolic blood pressure of ≥ 90 mm Hg, or a previously established diagnosis). Data analysis showed that insomnia patients with objective short sleep duration were not more likely to suffer from type 2 diabetes (fasting plasma glucose level of ≥ 126 mg/dl, or a previously established diagnosis). However, the diabetes analysis was only based on a very small number of diabetes cases. As a new finding, insomnia patients who were categorised as short sleepers in either night presented with increases in liver enzyme levels. The finding on insomnia duration supports the concept of two distinct sub-groups of insomnia, namely insomnia with, and without, objectively determined short sleep duration. However, our data challenges previous findings that insomnia patients with short sleep duration are more likely to suffer from hypertension.

  13. Contribution of Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidants to the Relationship between Sleep Duration and Cardiometabolic Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagasabai, Thirumagal; Ardern, Chris I

    2015-12-01

    To explore the interrelationship and mediating effect of factors that are beneficial (i.e., antioxidants) and harmful (i.e., inflammation and oxidative stress) to the relationship between sleep and cardiometabolic health. Cross-sectional data from the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Nationally representative population sample from the US. Age ≥ 20 y with sleep data; final analytical sample of n = 2,079. N/A. Metabolic syndrome was classified according to the Joint Interim Statement, and sleep duration was categorized as very short, short, adequate, and long sleepers (≤ 4, 5-6, 7-8, and ≥ 9 h per night, respectively). The indirect mediation effect was quantified as large (≥ 0.25), moderate (≥ 0.09), modest (≥ 0.01), and weak (sleep duration categories, whereas oxidative stress was elevated among short and very short sleepers. Select sleep duration- cardiometabolic health relationships were mediated by C-reactive protein (CRP), γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT), carotenoids, uric acid, and vitamins C and D, and were moderated by sex. Specifically, moderate-to-large indirect mediation by GGT, carotenoids, uric acid, and vitamin D were found for sleep duration-waist circumference and -systolic blood pressure relationships, whereas vitamin C was a moderate mediator of the sleep duration-diastolic blood pressure relationship. Several factors related to inflammation, oxidative stress, and antioxidant status were found to lie on the casual pathway of the sleep duration-cardiometabolic health relationship. Further longitudinal studies are needed to confirm our results. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  14. Analgesics Self-Medication and its Association with Sleep Quality among Medical Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Vandana; Aslami, Ahmad Nadeem

    2016-12-01

    Self medication especially with analgesics is a common practice among undergraduate medical students. Variation in analgesic self medication prevalence and pattern is often seen due to geographical and target population differences. The mutual influence of pain and sleep quality might persuade students self medication behaviour. To assess analgesic self medication and its association with sleep quality among the medical undergraduates. A cross-sectional questionnaire based study was conducted from December 2015 to February 2016 among 320 medical undergraduates. The information about socio-demographic profile, symptoms, types of analgesics, source of information and reason for analgesic self medication was collected. The sleep quality of students was assessed by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). The qualitative variables were expressed as percentages. Odds Ratio (OR) with 95% Confidence Interval (CI) was also calculated. Chi-square test was used. Analgesic self medication prevalence was 49.7%, more prevalence seen among males, seniors, urban residents and students of working parents. Headache (48.4%) was the most common cause and paracetamol (79.7%) was most frequent drug used, based on knowledge obtained through textbook and internet (47.1%). Mildness of symptoms (49.1%) was the most important motivation behind self medication. Analgesic use was more (57.4%) among "poor sleepers" compared to "normal sleepers" (45.2%). Despite having easy accessibility to expert consultations, high prevalence of analgesic self medication among medical students and its association with poor sleep quality is a distressing issue. This indicates an urgent need of awareness programmes about harmful effects of self medication and healthy sleep practices.

  15. Enhancing CBT for Chronic Insomnia: A Randomised Clinical Trial of Additive Components of Mindfulness or Cognitive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Mei Yin; Ree, Melissa J; Lee, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Although cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for insomnia has resulted in significant reductions in symptoms, most patients are not classified as good sleepers after treatment. The present study investigated whether additional sessions of cognitive therapy (CT) or mindfulness-based therapy (MBT) could enhance CBT in 64 participants with primary insomnia. All participants were given four sessions of standard CBT as previous research had identified this number of sessions as an optimal balance between therapist guidance and patient independence. Participants were then allocated to further active treatment (four sessions of CT or MBT) or a no further treatment control. The additional treatments resulted in significant improvements beyond CBT on self-report and objective measures of sleep and were well tolerated as evidenced by no dropouts from either treatment. The effect sizes for each of these additional treatments were large and clinically significant. The mean scores on the primary outcome measure, the Insomnia Severity Index, were 5.74 for CT and 6.69 for MBT, which are within the good-sleeper range. Treatment effects were maintained at follow-up. There were no significant differences between CT and MBT on any outcome measure. These results provide encouraging data on how to enhance CBT for treatment of insomnia. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. CBT treatments for insomnia can be enhanced using recent developments in cognitive therapy. CBT treatments for insomnia can be enhanced using mindfulness-based treatments. Both cognitive therapy and mindfulness produce additional clinically significant change. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Influence of uneven rail irregularities on the dynamic response of the railway track using a three-dimensional model of the vehicle-track system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, Meysam; Zakeri, Jabbar Ali; Esmaeili, Morteza; Shadfar, Morad

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model of the vehicle-track interaction is developed to investigate the coupled behaviour of vehicle-track system, in the presence of uneven irregularities at left/right rails. The railway vehicle is simplified as a 3D multi-rigid-body model, and the track is treated as the two parallel beams on a layered discrete support system. Besides the car-body, the bogies and the wheel sets, the sleepers are assumed to have roll degree of freedom, in order to simulate the in-plane rotation of the components. The wheel-rail interface is treated using a nonlinear Hertzian contact model, coupling the mathematical equations of the vehicle-track systems. The dynamic interaction of the entire system is numerically studied in time domain, employing Newmark's integration method. The track irregularity spectra of both the left/right rails are taken into account, as the inputs of dynamic excitations. The dynamic responses of the track system induced by such irregularities are obtained, particularly in terms of the vertical (bounce) and roll displacements. The numerical model of the present research is validated using several benchmark models reported in the literature, for both the smooth and unsmooth track conditions. Four sample profiles of the measured rail irregularities are considered as the case studies of excitation sources, examining their influences on the dynamic behaviour of the coupled system. The results of numerical simulations demonstrate that the motion of track system is significantly influenced by the presence of uneven irregularities in left/right rails. Dynamic response of the sleepers in the roll direction becomes more sensitive to the rail irregularities, as the unevenness severity of the parallel profiles (quantitative difference between left and right rail spectra) is increased. The severe geometric deformation of the track in the bounce-pitch-roll directions is mainly related to such profile unevenness (cross-level) in left/right rails.

  17. Effects of two stretching methods on shoulder range of motion and muscle stiffness in baseball players with posterior shoulder tightness: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Taishi; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Nishishita, Satoru; Yanase, Ko; Fujita, Kosuke; Umehara, Jun; Ji, Xiang; Ibuki, Satoko; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2016-09-01

    The cross-body stretch and sleeper stretch are widely used for improving flexibility of the posterior shoulder. These stretching methods were modified by Wilk. However, few quantitative data are available on the new, modified stretching methods. A recent study reported the immediate effects of stretching and soft tissue mobilization on the shoulder range of motion (ROM) and muscle stiffness in subjects with posterior shoulder tightness. However, the long-term effect of stretching for muscle stiffness is unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of 2 stretching methods, the modified cross-body stretch (MCS) and the modified sleeper stretch (MSS), on shoulder ROM and muscle stiffness in baseball players with posterior shoulder tightness. Twenty-four college baseball players with ROM limitations in shoulder internal rotation were randomly assigned to the MCS or MSS group. We measured shoulder internal rotation and horizontal adduction ROM and assessed posterior shoulder muscle stiffness with ultrasonic shear wave elastography before and after a 4-week intervention. Subjects were asked to perform 3 repetitions of the stretching exercises every day, for 30 seconds, with their dominant shoulder. In both groups, shoulder internal rotation and horizontal adduction ROM were significantly increased after the 4-week intervention. Muscle stiffness of the teres minor decreased in the MCS group, and that of the infraspinatus decreased in the MSS group. The MCS and MSS are effective for increasing shoulder internal rotation and horizontal adduction ROM and decreasing muscle stiffness of the infraspinatus or teres minor. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The natural history of insomnia: acute insomnia and first-onset depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jason G; Perlis, Michael L; Bastien, Célyne H; Gardani, Maria; Espie, Colin A

    2014-01-01

    While many studies have examined the association between insomnia and depression, no studies have evaluated these associations (1) within a narrow time frame, (2) with specific reference to acute and chronic insomnia, and (3) using polysomnography. In the present study, the association between insomnia and first-onset depression was evaluated taking into account these considerations. A mixed-model inception design. Academic research laboratory. Fifty-four individuals (acute insomnia [n = 33], normal sleepers [n = 21]) with no reported history of a sleep disorder, chronic medical condition, or psychiatric illness. N/A. Participants were assessed at baseline (2 nights of polysomnography and psychometric measures of stress and mood) and insomnia and depression status were reassessed at 3 months. Individuals with acute insomnia exhibited more stress, poorer mood, worse subjective sleep continuity, increased N2 sleep, and decreased N3 sleep. Individuals who transitioned to chronic insomnia exhibited (at baseline) shorter REM latencies and reduced N3 sleep. Individuals who exhibited this pattern in the transition from acute to chronic insomnia were also more likely to develop first-onset depression (9.26%) as compared to those who remitted from insomnia (1.85%) or were normal sleepers (1.85%). The transition from acute to chronic insomnia is presaged by baseline differences in sleep architecture that have, in the past, been ascribed to Major Depression, either as heritable traits or as acquired traits from prior episodes of depression. The present findings suggest that the "sleep architecture stigmata" of depression may actually develop over the course transitioning from acute to chronic insomnia.

  19. Insomnia and Relationship with Anxiety in University Students: A Cross-Sectional Designed Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choueiry, Nour; Salamoun, Tracy; Jabbour, Hicham; El Osta, Nada; Hajj, Aline; Rabbaa Khabbaz, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disorders (SDs) are now recognized as a public health concern with considerable psychiatric and societal consequences specifically on the academic life of students. The aims of this study were to assess SDs in a group of university students in Lebanon and to examine the relationship between SDs and anxiety. An observational cross-sectional study was conducted at Saint-Joseph University, Lebanon, during the academic year 2013-2014. Four questionnaires were face-to-face administered to 462 students after obtaining their written consent: Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item scale (GAD-7). The prevalence of clinically significant insomnia was 10.6% (95% CI: 7.8-13.4%), more frequent in first year students. ISI mean score was 10.06 (SD = 3.76). 37.1% of the participants were poor sleepers. Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and poor sleep were significantly more frequent among participants with clinical insomnia (p = 0.031 and 0.001 respectively). Clinically significant anxiety was more frequent in students suffering from clinical insomnia (p = 0.006) and in poor sleepers (p = 0.003). 50.8% of the participants with clinically significant anxiety presented EDS versus 30.9% of those with no clinically significant anxiety (p<0.0001). The magnitude of SDs in this sample of Lebanese university students demonstrate the importance of examining sleep health in this population. Moreover, the link between SD and anxiety reminds us of the importance of treating anxiety as soon as detected and not simply targeting the reduction of sleep problems.

  20. Insomnia and Relationship with Anxiety in University Students: A Cross-Sectional Designed Study.

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    Nour Choueiry

    Full Text Available Sleep disorders (SDs are now recognized as a public health concern with considerable psychiatric and societal consequences specifically on the academic life of students. The aims of this study were to assess SDs in a group of university students in Lebanon and to examine the relationship between SDs and anxiety.An observational cross-sectional study was conducted at Saint-Joseph University, Lebanon, during the academic year 2013-2014. Four questionnaires were face-to-face administered to 462 students after obtaining their written consent: Insomnia Severity Index (ISI, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item scale (GAD-7.The prevalence of clinically significant insomnia was 10.6% (95% CI: 7.8-13.4%, more frequent in first year students. ISI mean score was 10.06 (SD = 3.76. 37.1% of the participants were poor sleepers. Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS and poor sleep were significantly more frequent among participants with clinical insomnia (p = 0.031 and 0.001 respectively. Clinically significant anxiety was more frequent in students suffering from clinical insomnia (p = 0.006 and in poor sleepers (p = 0.003. 50.8% of the participants with clinically significant anxiety presented EDS versus 30.9% of those with no clinically significant anxiety (p<0.0001.The magnitude of SDs in this sample of Lebanese university students demonstrate the importance of examining sleep health in this population. Moreover, the link between SD and anxiety reminds us of the importance of treating anxiety as soon as detected and not simply targeting the reduction of sleep problems.

  1. Psychomotor performance deficits and their relation to prior nights' sleep among individuals with primary insomnia.

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    Edinger, Jack D; Means, Melanie K; Carney, Colleen E; Krystal, Andrew D

    2008-05-01

    To examine psychomotor (reaction time) performance deficits and their relation to subjective and objective sleep measures among individuals with primary insomnia (PI). This study was conducted at affiliated VA and academic medical centers using a matched-groups, cross-sectional research design. Seventy-nine (43 women) individuals with PI (MAge = 50.0 +/- 17.1 y) and 84 (41 women) well-screened normal sleepers (MAge = 48.6 +/- 16.8 y). Participants underwent 3 nights of polysomnography (PSG) followed by daytime testing with a 4-trial multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). Before each MSLT nap, they rated their sleepiness and completed a performance battery that included simple reaction time (SRT), continuous performance (CPT), and 4 switching attention (SAT) tests. Performance measures included the mean response latency and the standard deviation of each subject's within-test response latencies. PI sufferers reported greater (P = 0.001) daytime sleepiness, but were significantly (P = 0.02), more alert than normal sleepers on the MSLT. Multivariate analyses showed the PI group had significantly longer response latencies and greater response variability across many of the subtests than did the controls. Regression analyses showed that both PSG- and diary-based sleep measures contributed to the prediction of daytime performance indices, although objective wake time after sleep onset appeared the best single predictor of the daytime measures. Results confirm that PI sufferers do show relative psychomotor performance deficits when responding to challenging reaction time tasks, and these deficits appear related to both objective and subjective sleep deficits. Findings support PI patients' diurnal complaints and suggest the usefulness of complex reaction time tasks for assessing them.

  2. Factors associated with access to care and healthcare utilization in the homeless population of England.

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    Elwell-Sutton, Tim; Fok, Jonathan; Albanese, Francesca; Mathie, Helen; Holland, Richard

    2017-03-01

    People experiencing homelessness are known to have complex health needs, which are often compounded by poor access to healthcare. This study investigates the individual-level factors associated with access to care and healthcare utilization among homeless people in England. A cross-sectional sample of 2505 homeless people from 19 areas of England was used to investigate associations with access to care and healthcare utilization. Rough sleepers were much less likely to be registered with a general practitioner (GP) (odds ratio (OR) 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.30-0.66) than single homeless in accommodation (reference group) or the hidden homeless (OR 1.48, 95% CI 0.88-2.50). Those who had recently been refused registration by a GP or dentist also had lower odds of being admitted to hospital (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.91) or using an ambulance (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.54-0.99). The most vulnerable homeless people face the greatest barriers to utilizing healthcare. Rough sleepers have particularly low rates of GP registration and this appears to have a knock-on effect on admission to hospital. Improving primary care access for the homeless population could ensure that some of the most vulnerable people in society are able to access vital hospital services which they are currently missing out on. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Fatigue and depression and sleep problems among hemodialysis patients in a tertiary care center

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    Bincy Joshwa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High prevalence of sleep problems, fatigue and depression are reported in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD patients. To assess fatigue, depression, sleep problems and their co-relates among MHD patients in a tertiary care center in India, we studied 47 patients on MHD for >3 months. Patients demographic, medical and co-morbidity profile were recorded. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (poor sleeper if score >5 and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (EPSS, abnormal daytime sleepiness if score >13 were used to assess sleep abnormalities and quality. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI was used to screen for depression. Depression was classified on BDI scores as mild-moderate (score 11-30 and severe (score >30. Fatigue Severity Scale was used to assess fatigue (score ≥36 indicates fatigue. The correlations of these parameters among themselves and with social and demographic parameters were also analyzed. The mean age of the study population was 37.1 ± 13.1 (range 19-65 years years, with 89.3% being males. The majority (68.1% of the MHD patients was poor sleepers, but only five (10.6% patients had borderline or abnormal daytime sleepiness. Of the patients, 44.7% reported fatigue and (72.3% had depression (mild to moderate in 59.7% and severe in 12.6%. Fatigue scores were found to be significantly associated with lesser frequency of dialysis (P < 0.05. There was higher daytime sleepiness in patients who were working (mean EPSS score 6.2 ± 3.7 than who were unemployed (mean EPSS score 3.9 ± 2.7. Depression was found to be higher in those who were paying for the treatment themselves (mean BDI score 20 ± 11.8 as compared with those who were getting medical expenditure reimbursed (mean BDI score 12.9 ± 8.8. Fatigue positively correlated with that of daytime sleepiness (P = 0.02, poor nighttime sleep (P = 0.02 and depression (P=0.006. In the present study, there was no correlation (P <0.05 found between daytime and night time sleep and depression. We found a high

  4. Poor sleep quality predicts decreased cognitive function independently of chronic mountain sickness score in young soldiers with polycythemia stationed in Tibet.

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    Kong, Fan-Yi; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shi-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the association between poor sleep and cognitive function in people with polycythemia at high altitude. The aim of this study was to survey the sleep quality of individuals with polycythemia at high altitude and determine its association with cognitive abilities. We surveyed 230 soldiers stationed in Tibet (all men; mean age 21-52±4.30 yr) at altitudes ranging from 3658 to 3996 m. All participants were given a blood tests for hemoglobin level and a questionnaire survey of cognitive function. Polycythemia was defined as excessive erythrocytosis (Hb≥21 g/dL in men or ≥19 g/dL in women). Poor sleepers were defined as having a global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score (PSQI)>5. Cognitive abilities were determined by the Chinese revision of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and the Benton Visual Retention Test. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine the association between the PSQI and cognitive function. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the independent effect of sleep quality on cognitive function. The global PSQI score of enrolled participants was 8.14±3.79. Seventy-five (32.6%) soldiers were diagnosed with polycythemia. The proportion of poor sleepers was 1.45 times greater in those with polycythemia compared with those without polycythemia [95% (confidence interval) CI 1.82-2.56], and they had a statistically significant lower score for cognitive function. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the global PSQI score was negatively associated with IQ (β=0.11, 95% CI -0.16 to -0.05) and digit symbol scores (β=0.66, 95% CI -0.86 to -0.44). Poor sleep quality was determined to be an independent predictor of impaired IQ [odds ratio (OR) 1.59, 95% CI 1.30-1.95] and digit symbol score (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.07-1.31) in logistic regression analysis. The present study showed that for young soldiers with polycythemia at high altitude impaired subjective sleep quality was an independent

  5. Sleep quality among relatively younger patients with initial diagnosis of hypertension: dippers versus non-dippers.

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    Yilmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Yalta, Kenan; Turgut, Okan Onur; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Yucel, Oguzhan; Bektasoglu, Gokhan; Tandogan, Izzet

    2007-01-01

    Sleep is a basic physiological process. Normal sleep yields decrease in sympathetic activity, blood pressure (BP) and heart rate. Those, who do not have expected decrease in their BP are considered "non-dippers". We aimed to determine if there was any association between the non-dipping status and sleep quality, designed a cross-sectional study, and enrolled and evaluated the sleep quality of relatively young patients with an initial diagnosis of hypertension. Seventy-five consecutive patients, diagnosed to have stage 1 hypertension by their primary physicians, were referred to our study. Patients had newly diagnosed with stage 1 hypertension. Patients with a prior use of any anti-hypertensive medication were not included. Eligible patients underwent the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), which has an established role in evaluating sleep disturbances. All patients underwent ambulatory BP monitoring. There were 42 non-dipper patients (mean age = 47.5+/-11.9 years, 24 male/18 female), as a definition, 31 dipper hypertensive patients (mean age = 48.5+/-12.8 years, 21 male/10 female) and two with white coat hypertension. Daytime systolic and diastolic mean BPs were not significantly different between the two groups. Night-time mean systolic and diastolic BPs were significantly higher in non-dippers compared with dippers. PSQI scores, globally, were significantly higher in non-dippers compared with dippers. Total PSQI score was not correlated with body mass index. It was noticed that, individually, sleep quality, sleep efficiency and sleep disturbance scores were significantly higher in non-dippers. Being a poor sleeper in terms of high PSQI score (total score>5) was associated with 2.955-fold increased risk of being a non-dipper (95% confidence interval 1.127-7.747). We showed that the risk of having non-dipping hypertension, a risk factor for poor cardiovascular outcomes among hypertensive individuals, was tripled (odds ratios) among poor sleepers. We think that

  6. Habitual short sleep impacts frontal switch mechanism in attention to novelty.

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    Gumenyuk, Valentina; Roth, Thomas; Korzyukov, Oleg; Jefferson, Catherine; Bowyer, Susan; Drake, Christopher L

    2011-12-01

    Reduced time in bed relative to biological sleep need is common. The impact of habitual short sleep on auditory attention has not been studied to date. In the current study, we utilized novelty oddball tasks to evaluate the effect of habitual short sleep on brain function underlying attention control processes measured by the mismatch negativity (MMN, index of pre-attentive stage), P3a (attention-dependent), and P3b (memory-dependent) event related brain potentials (ERPs). An extended time in bed in a separate study was used to evaluate the possible reversal of the impairments of these processes in habitual short sleepers. Ten self-defined short sleepers (total sleep time [TST] ≤ 6 h) and 9 normal-sleeping subjects with TST 7-8 h, participated. ERPs were recorded via a 64-channel EEG system. Two test conditions: "ignore" and "attend" were implemented. The ERPs were analyzed and compared between groups on the 2 task conditions and frontal/central/parietal electrodes by 3-factor ANOVA. Sleep diary data were compared between groups by t-test. Sleep was recorded by the Zeo sleep monitoring system for a week in both habitual and extended sleep conditions at home. The main findings of the present study show that short sleeping individuals had deficiency in activity of the MMN and P3a brain responses over frontal areas compared to normal-sleeping subjects. The P3b amplitude was increased over frontal areas and decreased over parietal with respect to the control group. Extension of time in bed for one week increased TST (from 5.7 h to 7.4 h), and concomitantly MMN amplitude increased from -0.1 μV up to -1.25 μV over frontal areas. Reduced time in bed is associated with deficiency of the neuronal process associated with change detection, which may recover after one week of sleep extension, whereas attention-dependent neural processes do not normalize after this period of time in habitually short sleeping individuals and may require longer recovery periods.

  7. Survey of maternal sleep practices in late pregnancy in a multi-ethnic sample in South Auckland, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Robin S; Chelimo, Carol; Mitchell, Edwin A; Okesene-Gafa, Kara; Thompson, John M D; Taylor, Rennae S; Hutchison, B Lynne; McCowan, Lesley M E

    2017-06-17

    The Auckland Stillbirth study demonstrated a two-fold increased risk of late stillbirth for women who did not go to sleep on their left side. Two further studies have confirmed an increased risk of late stillbirth with supine sleep position. As sleep position is modifiable, we surveyed self-reported late pregnancy sleep position, knowledge about sleep position, and views about changing going-to-sleep position. Participants in this 2014 survey were pregnant women (n = 377) in their third trimester from South Auckland, New Zealand, a multi-ethnic and predominantly low socio-economic population. An ethnically-representative sample was obtained using random sampling. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors independently associated with non-left sided going-to-sleep position in late pregnancy. Respondents were 28 to 42 weeks' gestation. Reported going-to-sleep position in the last week was left side (30%), right side (22%), supine (3%), either side (39%) and other (6%). Two thirds (68%) reported they had received advice about sleep position. Non-left sleepers were asked if they would be able to change to their left side if it was better for their baby; 87% reported they would have little or no difficulty changing. Women who reported a non-left going-to-sleep position were more likely to be of Maori (aOR 2.64 95% CI 1.23-5.66) or Pacific (aOR 2.91 95% CI 1.46-5.78) ethnicity; had a lower body mass index (BMI) (aOR 0.93 95% CI 0.89-0.96); and were less likely to sleep on the left-hand side of the bed (aOR 3.29 95% CI 2.03-5.32). Maternal going-to-sleep position in the last week was side-lying in 91% of participants. The majority had received advice to sleep on their side or avoid supine sleep position. Sleeping on the left-hand side of the bed was associated with going-to-sleep on the left side. Most non-left sleepers reported their sleeping position could be modified to the left side suggesting a public health intervention about sleep

  8. Survey of chemical contaminants in the Hanalei River, Kaua'i, Hawai'i, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orazio, Carl E.; May, Thomas W.; Gale, Robert W.; Meadows, John C.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Echols, Kathy R.; Steiner, William W.M.; Berg, Carl J.

    2007-01-01

    The Hanalei River on the island of Kaua'i in Hawai'i was designated an American Heritage River in 1998, providing special attention to natural resource protection, economic revitalization, and historic and cultural preservation. Agricultural, urban, and tourism-related activities are potential sources of contamination within the Hanalei River watershed. The objective of this study was to measure certain persistent organic chemicals and elements in the Hanalei River.During a relatively low-flow period in December of 2001, samples of native Akupa sleeper fish (Eleotris sandwicensis), freshwater Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea), giant mud crab (Scylla serrata), surface water, and stream bed sediment were collected from a lower estuarine reach of the river near its mouth at Hanalei Bay and from an upper reach at the Hanalei National Wildlife Refuge. Samples were analyzed for residues of urban and agricultural chemicals including organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and elements (including mercury, lead, cadmium, arsenic, and selenium). Organic contaminants were extracted from the samples with solvent, enriched, and then analyzed by gas chromatographic analysis with electron capture or mass spectrometric detection. Samples were acid-digested for semi-quantitative analysis for elements by inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and for quantitative analysis by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls in biota, surface water, and bed sediment sampled from the Hanalei River ranged from nondetectable to very low levels. Polychlorinated biphenyls were below detection in all samples. Dieldrin, the only compound detected in the water samples, was present at very low concentrations of 1-2 nanograms per liter. Akupa sleeper fish and giant mud crabs from the lower reach ranged from 1 to 5 nanograms per gram (wet weight

  9. Postprandial thermogenesis and substrate oxidation are unaffected by sleep restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, Ari; Rising, Russell; Wolfe, Scott; Albu, Jeanine B.; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives The extent to which alterations in energy expenditure (EE) in response to sleep restriction contribute to the short sleep-obesity relationship is not clearly defined. Short sleep may induce changes in resting metabolic rate (RMR), thermic effect of food (TEF), and postprandial substrate oxidation. Subjects/Methods Ten females (age and BMI: 22-43 y and 23.4-28 kg/m2) completed a randomized, crossover study assessing the effects of short (4 h/night) and habitual (8 h/night) sleep duration on fasting and postprandial RMR and respiratory quotient (RQ). Measurements were taken after 3 nights using whole-room indirect calorimetry. The TEF was assessed over a 6-h period following consumption of a high-fat liquid meal. Results Short vs. habitual sleep did not affect RMR (1.01 ± 0.05 and 0.97 ± 0.04 kcal/min; p=0.23). Fasting RQ was significantly lower after short vs. habitual sleep (0.84 ± 0.01 and 0.88 ± 0.01; p=0.028). Postprandial EE (short: 1.13 ± 0.04 and habitual: 1.10 ± 0.04, p=0.09) and RQ (short: 0.88 ± 0.01 and habitual: 0.88 ± 0.01, p=0.50) after the high-fat meal were not different between conditions. TEF was similar between conditions (0.24 ± 0.02 kcal/min in both; p=0.98), as was the ~6-h incremental area under the curve (1.16 ± 0.10 and 1.17 ± 0.09 kcal/min x 356 min after short and habitual sleep, respectively; p=0.92). Conclusions Current findings observed in non-obese healthy premenopausal women do not support the hypothesis that alterations in TEF and postprandial substrate oxidation are major contributors to the higher rate of obesity observed in short sleepers. In exploring a role of sleep duration on EE, research should focus on potential alterations in physical activity to explain the increased obesity risk in short sleepers. PMID:24352294

  10. Lifecycle Assessments of Railway Bridge Transitions Exposed to Extreme Climate Events

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    Sadudee Setsobhonkul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Railway track components located at bridge transition zones or approach areas suffer from impact load and vibrations caused by abrupt changes in track stiffness on the bridge and the subgrade. The numerous strategies that can be used to mitigate these abrupt track stiffness changes rely on one of two concepts. The first concept is that of providing a gradual stiffness change, and the second is that of equalizing the track stiffness. A number of such mitigation methods have been developed and implemented over recent decades. Construction activities associated with these methods require various materials, processes, and uses of time, costs, and carbon emissions. In this study, eight of the most common techniques for railway bridge transition mitigation, including under ballast mats (UBMs, soft baseplates, under sleeper pads (USPs, rail pads, embankment treatments, transition slabs, ballast bonding, and wide sleepers, are compared. This study benchmarks the costs and carbon emissions of these eight mitigation techniques over the 50-year lifespan of a railway system subject to identical probabilities of four environmental scenarios: a control case, extremely high temperatures, extremely low temperatures, and flash flooding. This unprecedented study systemically investigates the effectiveness of the mitigation methods while considering the effects of 30 and 100 m bridge span lengths. Our results indicate that railway engineers should adopt different mitigation methods for different scenarios. The soft baseplate is the most appropriate method for a short-span bridge in the control case and the case of flash flooding, while ballast bonding is better for long-span railway bridges. Embankment treatment is recommended for both high- and low-extreme temperatures. However, its applicability is limited when the differential track stiffness is extremely high. Hence, alternatives that are 5–25% more expensive are proposed in parallel. The alternative

  11. Sleep quality in Chinese patients with rheumatoid arthritis: contributing factors and effects on health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Genkai; Fu, Ting; Yin, Rulan; Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Xia, Yunfei; Li, Liren; Gu, Zhifeng

    2016-11-16

    Poor sleep quality is common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and may lead to disease aggravation and decreased health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The increasing prevalence of poor sleep in RA patients is associated with adverse demographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics. However, there are currently no known reported studies related to the effects of sleep quality on HRQoL in RA patients from China. This cross-sectional study aims to evaluate the contributors of poor sleep and the effects of sleep quality on HRQoL in Chinese RA patients. A self-report survey was administered to 131 RA patients and 104 healthy individuals using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) for sleep quality. RA patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for anxiety and depression, the 28-joint Disease Activity Score for disease activity, the 10 cm Visual Analog Scale for pain, the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index for functional capacity and the Short Form 36 health survey for HRQoL. Blood samples were taken to gain some biochemical indicators (e.g., erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, rheumatoid factor, and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide). Independent samples t-tests, Chi square analysis, logistic regression modeling and linear regression were used to analyze these data. Our results found that the prevalence of poor sleep (PSQI ≥ 5) was 78.6% and the mean global score of PSQI was 7.93 (SD 3.98) in patients, which were significantly higher than the controls (18.7% and 3.88 (SD 1.89), respectively). There were significant correlations among synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, pain, disease activity, functional capacity, anxiety/depression and sleep quality in RA patients. Meanwhile, logistic regression models identified disease activity and depression as predictors of poor sleep quality. Poor RA sleepers had impaired HRQoL than good RA sleepers, and sleep

  12. Chemical and isotopic evolution of a layered eastern U.S. snowpack and its relation to stream-water composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, J.B.; Kendall, C.; Albert, M.R.; Hardy, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    The chemical, isotopic, and morphologic evolution of a layered snowpack was investigated during the winter of 1993-94 at Sleepers River Research Watershed in Danville, Vermont. The snowpack was monitored at two small basins: a forested basin at 525 m elevation, and an agricultural basin at 292 m elevation. At each site, the snowpack morphology was characterized and individual layers were sampled seven times during the season. Nitrate and 8d18O profiles in the snowpack remained relatively stable until peak accumulation in mid-March, except near the snow surface, where rain-on-snow events caused water and nitrate movement down to impeding ice layers. Subsequently, water and nitrate moved more readily through the ripening snowpack. As the snowpack evolved, combined processes of preferential ion elution, isotopic fractionation, and infiltration of isotopically heavy rainfall caused the pack to become depleted in solutes and isotopically enriched. The release of nitrate and isotopically depleted water was reflected in patterns of nitrate concentrations and ??18O of meltwater and stream water. Results supported data from the previous year which suggested that streamflow in the forested basin during snowmelt was dominated by groundwater discharge.

  13. The Consumption of Dietary Antioxidant Vitamins Modifies the Risk of Obesity among Korean Men with Short Sleep Duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miae Doo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Short sleep duration has been reported to be associated with various health problems. This study examined the influence of sleep duration on the odds of being obese in relation to the consumption of dietary antioxidant vitamins among 3941 Korean men between 40 and 69 years of age. After adjusting for age, education, household income, marital status, insomnia, smoking and drinking status, participants with short sleep duration (<6 h had significantly higher body mass index (p = 0.005, body fat mass (p = 0.010, body fat percentage (p = 0.021, waist circumference (p = 0.029, as well as the odds ratio (OR of risk of obesity [OR (95% CI = 1.467 (1.282–1.678], compared to participants with optimal sleep duration (≥7 h. Short sleepers with a low consumption of dietary antioxidant vitamins had a higher risk of obesity than those with a high consumption of dietary antioxidant vitamins; however, this relationship did not hold among those with optimal sleep duration. Although a causal relationship among sleep-related variables could not be definitively demonstrated because of this study’s cross-sectional design, our results suggested that the increased risk of obesity associated with short sleep duration may be modified by the consumption of dietary antioxidant vitamins.

  14. Information processing during NREM sleep and sleep quality in insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceklic, Tijana; Bastien, Célyne H

    2015-12-01

    Insomnia sufferers (INS) are cortically hyperaroused during sleep, which seems to translate into altered information processing during nighttime. While information processing, as measured by event-related potentials (ERPs), during wake appears to be associated with sleep quality of the preceding night, the existence of such an association during nighttime has never been investigated. This study aims to investigate nighttime information processing among good sleepers (GS) and INS while considering concomitant sleep quality. Following a multistep clinical evaluation, INS and GS participants underwent 4 consecutive nights of PSG recordings in the sleep laboratory. Thirty nine GS (mean age 34.56±9.02) and twenty nine INS (mean age 43.03±9.12) were included in the study. ERPs (N1, P2, N350) were recorded all night on Night 4 (oddball paradigm) during NREM sleep. Regardless of sleep quality, INS presented a larger N350 amplitude during SWS (p=0.042) while GS showed a larger N350 amplitude during late-night stage 2 sleep (p=0.004). Regardless of diagnosis, those who slept objectively well showed a smaller N350 amplitude (p=0.020) while those who slept subjectively well showed a smaller P2 (pInformation processing seems to be associated with concomitant subjective and objective sleep quality for both GS and INS. However, INS show an alteration in information processing during sleep, especially for inhibition processes, regardless of their sleep quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Prediction and measurements of vibrations from a railway track lying on a peaty ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picoux, B.; Rotinat, R.; Regoin, J. P.; Le Houédec, D.

    2003-10-01

    This paper introduces a two-dimensional model for the response of the ground surface due to vibrations generated by a railway traffic. A semi-analytical wave propagation model is introduced which is subjected to a set of harmonic moving loads and based on a calculation method of the dynamic stiffness matrix of the ground. In order to model a complete railway system, the effect of a simple track model is taken into account including rails, sleepers and ballast especially designed for the study of low vibration frequencies. The priority has been given to a simple formulation based on the principle of spatial Fourier transforms compatible with good numerical efficiency and yet providing quick solutions. In addition, in situ measurements for a soft soil near a railway track were carried out and will be used to validate the numerical implementation. The numerical and experimental results constitute a significant body of useful data to, on the one hand, characterize the response of the environment of tracks and, on the other hand, appreciate the importance of the speed and weight on the behaviour of the structure.

  16. Nightmares and oxygen desaturations: is sleep apnea related to heightened nightmare frequency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schredl, Michael; Schmitt, Judith; Hein, Gerhard; Schmoll, Tina; Eller, Sabine; Haaf, Janina

    2006-12-01

    In the 19th century, several authors held the view that nightmares are caused by oxygen shortage. The present study was designed to study nightmare frequency in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and its relationship to respiratory parameters. A brief questionnaire was administered to 323 patients with sleep apnea syndrome before their first laboratory night. The reduction in nightmare frequency in the sleep apnea group was explained by the reduced dream recall frequency. Despite some illustrative examples of a correlation between oxygen desaturation and dream content, the respiratory parameters as measures of sleep apnea syndrome severity did not correlate substantially with nightmare frequency. Psychiatric comorbidity and an intake of psychotropic medication were associated with heightened nightmare frequency in this sample. It must be concluded that the oxygen hypothesis did not play a major role in explaining the occurrence of nightmares. As this might be partly explained by adaptation to the nightly desaturation periods, it will be fruitful to apply experimental procedures that interrupt airflow during (rapid eye movement) REM sleep for short periods in a systematic way without the knowledge of the sleeper and to then study their effects on dream content. Some patients reported a correlation between daytime stressors and nightmares, which is in line with modern etiological models of nightmares.

  17. The role of prescription medications in the association of self-reported sleep duration and obesity in U.S. adults, 2007-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawman, Hannah G; D Fryar, Cheryl; Gu, Qiuping; Ogden, Cynthia L

    2016-10-01

    Previous research has not investigated the role of prescription medication in sleep-obesity associations despite the fact that 56% of U.S. adults take at least one prescription medication. Data from n = 16,622 adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2012) were used to examine how the association between obesity and self-reported sleep duration varied by total number of prescription medications used in the past 30 days and by select classes of prescription medications including anxiolytics/sedatives/hypnotics, antidepressants, sleep aids, anticonvulsants, thyroid agents, and metabolic agents. Logistic regression analyses showed a significant inverse linear association of sleep duration and obesity, regardless of the total number of prescription medications individuals were taking. Each additional hour of sleep was associated with a 10% decrease in the odds of obesity. Results suggest that increased sleep duration is associated with lower odds of having obesity overall, even for long-duration sleepers (≥9 h), and this association does not differ for those taking antidepressants, thyroid agents, metabolic agents, and multiple prescription medications. The relationship between sleep duration and obesity was similar among all prescription medication users and nonusers. The potential for a nonlinear association between sleep duration and obesity may be important to examine in some specific prescription medication classes. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  18. Sleep-wake patterns in patients with cirrhosis: all you need to know on a single sheet. A simple sleep questionnaire for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnese, Sara; Middleton, Benita; Skene, Debra J; Morgan, Marsha Y

    2009-10-01

    Sleep-wake abnormalities are common in patients with cirrhosis but their evaluation is time consuming and laborious. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of a simple Sleep Timing and Sleep Quality Screening questionnaire (STSQS) against an established sleep quality questionnaire and daily sleep diaries. The study population comprised 87 patients with cirrhosis and 19 healthy volunteers. All participants completed the STSQS (sleep quality score range 1-9) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI; total score range: 0-21; scores >5 identify 'poor' sleepers); a subgroup of 35 patients and 12 healthy volunteers also kept daily sleep diaries for 2 weeks. Patients slept significantly less well than the healthy volunteers (total PSQI score: 8.4+/-4.9 vs. 4.6+/-2.5, p4: sensitivity 75%, specificity 93%; patients: STSQS sleep quality >3: sensitivity 83%, specificity 70%). The STSQS provided estimates of habitual sleep timing variables which did not significantly differ from the average data recorded in the sleep diaries, although more variability was observed in the patients. The STSQS provides acceptable estimates of sleep quality and sleep timing and could be used to identify patients with cirrhosis whose sleep behaviour might require further assessment.

  19. Stress-based fatigue reliability analysis ofthe rail fastening spring clipunder traffic loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Mohammadzadeh

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the rail fastening systems play an important role for preserving the connection between the rails and sleepers in various conditions. In this paper, stress based concept is used to develop a comprehensive approach for fatigue reliability analysisof fastening spring clip. Axle load, speed and material properties are assumed to be random variables. First, track and train models are analyzed dynamically in order to achieve displacement time history of fas-tening spring clip. Then this displacement time history is applied to the fastening spring clip in FE software to obtain variable ampli-tude of stresses. Crack nucleation life is calculated by rain-flow method and Palmgren-Miner linear damage rule. First Order Relia-bility Method (FORM and Monte-Carlosimulation technique are employed for the reliability index estimations. The influences of various random variables on the probability of failure are investi-gated by sensitivity analysis. The results show that the equivalent stress range and material parameter have significant effect on fa-tigue crack nucleation.

  20. The Spanish version of the Insomnia Severity Index: a confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Rodriguez-Muñoz, Alfredo; Vela-Bueno, Antonio; Olavarrieta-Bernardino, Sara; Calhoun, Susan L; Bixler, Edward O; Vgontzas, Alexandros N

    2012-02-01

    To examine the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) and to determine its factor structure with confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Self-reported information was collected from a sample of 500 adults (mean age 39.13 [standard deviation 15.85]years) drawn from a population of medical students and their social networks. Together with the ISI, a measure of the subjective severity of insomnia, subjects completed the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and the Profile of Mood States to study concurrent validity of the ISI. CFA was used to test alternative models to ascertain the factorial structure of the ISI. The Spanish version of the ISI showed adequate indices of internal consistency (Cronbach's α=0.82). CFA showed that a three-factor structure provided a better fit to the data than one-factor and two-factor structures. The ISI was significantly correlated with poor sleep quality, fatigue, anxiety, and depression, and discriminated between good and poor sleepers. The ISI is a reliable and valid instrument to assess the subjective severity of insomnia in Spanish-speaking populations. Its three-factor structure (i.e., night-time sleep difficulties, sleep dissatisfaction and daytime impact of insomnia) makes it a psychometrically robust and clinically useful measure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Good and Bad Sleep in Childhood: A Questionnaire Survey amongst School Children in Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Ficca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite its clinical importance, the issue of subjective sleep quality in children remains unexplored. Here we investigate, in school-aged children, the prevalence of bad sleep perception and its relationships with sleep habits and daytime functioning, to provide hints on its possible determinants. Subjective sleep perception, sleep habits, and daytime functioning were studied through a questionnaire survey in a sample of 482 children (6–12 yrs.. Being “bad sleeper” was reported by 6.9% of the sample. Compared to the “good sleepers”, these subjects displayed shorter sleep duration on schooldays, longer sleep latencies, and a more pronounced evening preference, beyond more frequent insufficient sleep. Though no differences emerged in sleepiness, bad sleepers showed higher impairments in daytime functioning, indicated by more frequent depressed mood and impulsivity. These distinctive features might be very important to precociously detect those children who are possibly more vulnerable to sleep disturbances and whose sleep-wake rhythms evolution should be paid particular attention thereafter.

  2. Patterns and Predictors of Sleep Quality Within the First Year After Lung Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatigati, Angela; Alrawashdeh, Mohammad; Zaldonis, Jenna; Dabbs, Annette DeVito

    2016-03-01

    Sleep quality affects health and self-management in chronic illness. Limited research has examined patterns and predictors of sleep quality and its impact on self-management and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among lung transplant recipients (LTRs). The aims of this study were to identify the patterns, predictors, and impact of poor sleep quality on self-management behaviors and HRQOL the first year after lung transplantation. Secondary analysis of 75 LTRs who participated in a randomized controlled trial. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was administered at baseline, 2, 6, and 12 months after transplant; 12-month PSQI was dichotomized categorizing good versus poor sleepers. Predictors were measured at the time of transplant; self-management and HRQOL were measured at 12 months. Logistic regression identified predictors of poor sleep. Correlations examined poor sleep quality, self-management behaviors, and HRQOL. Sleep quality was relatively stable during the first year, and 24 of the 75 (32%) of the sample met criteria for poor sleep quality at 12 months. The only multivariate predictor of poor sleep was female gender (odds ratio = 3.421; P = .026); the mental component of HRQOL was the only outcome associated with poor sleep (r = -.348; P sleep through year 1. More females reported poor sleep quality, and sleep quality was inversely related to mental HRQOL by 12 months. Knowledge of these relationships may help identify LTRs at the greatest risk for poor sleep and guide strategies to promote sleep and optimize HRQOL. © 2016, NATCO.

  3. Slow wave sleep in the chronically fatigued: Power spectra distribution patterns in chronic fatigue syndrome and primary insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Daniel; Mairesse, Olivier; Verbanck, Paul; Le Bon, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    To investigate slow wave sleep (SWS) spectral power proportions in distinct clinical conditions sharing non-restorative sleep and fatigue complaints without excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), namely the chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and primary insomnia (PI). Impaired sleep homeostasis has been suspected in both CFS and PI. We compared perceived sleep quality, fatigue and sleepiness symptom-intensities, polysomnography (PSG) and SWS spectral power distributions of drug-free CFS and PI patients without comorbid sleep or mental disorders, with a good sleeper control group. Higher fatigue without EDS and impaired perceived sleep quality were confirmed in both patient groups. PSG mainly differed in sleep fragmentation and SWS durations. Spectral analysis revealed a similar decrease in central ultra slow power (0.3-0.79Hz) proportion during SWS for both CFS and PI and an increase in frontal power proportions of faster frequencies during SWS in PI only. The latter was correlated to affective symptoms whereas lower central ultra slow power proportions were related to fatigue severity and sleep quality impairment. In combination with normal (PI) or even increased SWS durations (CFS), we found consistent evidence for lower proportions of slow oscillations during SWS in PI and CFS. Observing normal or increased SWS durations but lower proportions of ultra slow power, our findings suggest a possible quantitative compensation of altered homeostatic regulation. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Covert waking brain activity reveals instantaneous sleep depth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M McKinney

    Full Text Available The neural correlates of the wake-sleep continuum remain incompletely understood, limiting the development of adaptive drug delivery systems for promoting sleep maintenance. The most useful measure for resolving early positions along this continuum is the alpha oscillation, an 8-13 Hz electroencephalographic rhythm prominent over posterior scalp locations. The brain activation signature of wakefulness, alpha expression discloses immediate levels of alertness and dissipates in concert with fading awareness as sleep begins. This brain activity pattern, however, is largely ignored once sleep begins. Here we show that the intensity of spectral power in the alpha band actually continues to disclose instantaneous responsiveness to noise--a measure of sleep depth--throughout a night of sleep. By systematically challenging sleep with realistic and varied acoustic disruption, we found that sleepers exhibited markedly greater sensitivity to sounds during moments of elevated alpha expression. This result demonstrates that alpha power is not a binary marker of the transition between sleep and wakefulness, but carries rich information about immediate sleep stability. Further, it shows that an empirical and ecologically relevant form of sleep depth is revealed in real-time by EEG spectral content in the alpha band, a measure that affords prediction on the order of minutes. This signal, which transcends the boundaries of classical sleep stages, could potentially be used for real-time feedback to novel, adaptive drug delivery systems for inducing sleep.

  5. A Feasibility Study on the Application of Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF Steel Slag for Railway Ballast Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taehoon Koh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Railway ballast, for which natural crushed stone aggregates have been generally used, is an essential track component for the distribution of train loads along the rails and sleepers to the roadbed. However, the use of natural crushed stone aggregate causes environmental destruction as well as dust production in train service. This paper evaluates the feasibility of using the basic oxygen furnace (BOF steel slag as railway ballast material. A series of physical and chemical quality tests are performed to investigate the characteristics of the materials associated with the effect of aging period due to the remaining free CaO and MgO in the BOF steel slag. Three different aging periods (i.e., 0, 3, and 6 months are used to compare with various standards and the properties of the crushed stone aggregates. It is demonstrated that the physical and chemical properties of the BOF steel slag with different aging periods satisfy all requirements of standards sufficiently. Especially, the BOF steel slag without aging (i.e., 0 month provides the similar physical and chemical properties, when compared to the BOF steel slag with aging (i.e., 3 and 6 months. Thus, it is possible to apply the BOF steel slag regardless of aging periods to the railway ballast materials instead of natural crushed stone aggregates.

  6. Tea-drinking habit among new university students: associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hsiu Chen; Wang, Chi-Jane; Cheng, Shu Hui; Sun, Zih-Jie; Chen, Po See; Lee, Chih-Ting; Lin, Shih-Hsien; Yang, Yen Kuang; Yang, Yi-Ching

    2014-02-01

    The habit of drinking tea is highly prevalent in Asian countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of tea drinking and to explore the correlated factors on tea drinking among young new students in the university, using a validated self-reported questionnaire. This study was carried out with 5936 new students in a university in Taiwan. It comprised a self-administered structured questionnaire, including items related to personal and medical history, and lifestyle habits, using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the 12-item Chinese Health Questionnaire (CHQ-12). Anthropometric measurements and laboratory tests were also performed. In total, 2065 (36.1%) students were in the tea-drinking group. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed the following factors were significant predictors of tea drinking: postgraduate students (p coffee drinking (p < 0.001), alcohol drinking (p < 0.001), minor mental morbidity (p = 0.009), poorer sleepers (p = 0.037), higher body mass index (p = 0.004), and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (p < 0.001). Our data showed that the tea-drinking habit was correlated with higher body mass index, which was contrary to the findings of a previous study. In clinical practice, perhaps we could consider more tea-drinking-related factors when we suggest tea consumption. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Restless legs syndrome in migraine patients: prevalence and severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oosterhout, W P J; van Someren, E J W; Louter, M A; Schoonman, G G; Lammers, G J; Rijsman, R M; Ferrari, M D; Terwindt, G M

    2016-06-01

    Our aim was to study not only the prevalence but more importantly the severity and the correlation between sleep quality and restless legs syndrome (RLS) in a large population of well-defined migraine patients as poor sleep presumably triggers migraine attacks. In a large cross-sectional and observational study, data on migraine and RLS were collected from 2385 migraine patients (according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders ICHD-IIIb) and 332 non-headache controls. RLS severity (International RLS Study Group severity scale) and sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) were assessed. Risk factors for RLS and RLS severity were calculated using multivariable-adjusted regression models. Restless legs syndrome prevalence in migraine was higher than in controls (16.9% vs. 8.7%; multivariable-adjusted odds ratio 1.83; 95% confidence interval 1.18-2.86; P = 0.008) and more severe (adjusted severity score 14.5 ± 0.5 vs. 12.0 ± 1.1; P = 0.036). Poor sleepers were overrepresented amongst migraineurs (50.1% vs. 25.6%; P Restless legs syndrome is not only twice as prevalent but also more severe in migraine patients, and associated with decreased sleep quality. © 2016 EAN.

  8. Role of sleep timing in caloric intake and BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Kelly G; Reid, Kathryn J; Kern, Andrew S; Zee, Phyllis C

    2011-07-01

    Sleep duration has been linked to obesity and there is also an emerging literature in animals demonstrating a relationship between the timing of feeding and weight regulation. However, there is a paucity of research evaluating timing of sleep and feeding on weight regulation in humans. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of sleep timing in dietary patterns and BMI. Participants included 52 (25 females) volunteers who completed 7 days of wrist actigraphy and food logs. Fifty-six percent were "normal sleepers" (midpoint of fast food, full-calorie soda and lower fruit and vegetable consumption. Higher BMI was associated with shorter sleep duration, later sleep timing, caloric consumption after 8:00 PM, and fast food meals. In multivariate models, sleep timing was independently associated with calories consumed after 8:00 PM and fruit and vegetable consumption but did not predict BMI after controlling for sleep duration. Calories consumed after 8:00 PM predicted BMI after controlling for sleep timing and duration. These findings indicate that caloric intake after 8:00 PM may increase the risk of obesity, independent of sleep timing and duration. Future studies should investigate the biological and social mechanisms linking timing of sleep and feeding in order to develop novel time-based interventions for weight management.

  9. Sleep Quality of Professional Firefighters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrdad, Ramin; Haghighi, Khosro Sadeghniiat; Esfahani, Amir Hossein Naseri

    2013-01-01

    Background: Firefighting is a unique job with contradictious demands that expose firefighters to many well documented causal factors of sleep debt, but no studies in Iran and only a few worldwide studies have investigated their sleep quality while sleep problems may lead to catastrophes especially in critical service workers. The aim of this study is to evaluate sleep quality and its related factors among a sample of professional Iranian firefighters. Methods: Using simple random sampling method in a cross-sectional study, 427 personnel of fire and rescue service were invited. They completed the Persian version of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and a data collection sheet about their demographic and occupational features during an individual face to face interview in central office and firehouses throughout Tehran. Response rate was 88.7%. Results: The mean ± SD global PSQI score was 7.97 ± 3.77. Sleep latency was the component of PSQI with the greatest degree of abnormality. 69.9% of participants were poor sleepers. Interestingly, we found no significant differences between sleep quality of shift workers and non shift workers. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, only having another job, smoking and years of job experience were predictors of poor sleep. Conclusions: In comparison with adult population of Tehran, sleep quality deterioration is notably more common in Tehran firefighters which require health promotion interventions to prevent its serious adverse outcomes. PMID:24130955

  10. Sleep quality of professional firefighters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Firefighting is a unique job with contradictious demands that expose firefighters to many well documented causal factors of sleep debt, but no studies in Iran and only a few worldwide studies have investigated their sleep quality while sleep problems may lead to catastrophes especially in critical service workers. The aim of this study is to evaluate sleep quality and its related factors among a sample of professional Iranian firefighters. Methods: Using simple random sampling method in a cross-sectional study, 427 personnel of fire and rescue service were invited. They completed the Persian version of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and a data collection sheet about their demographic and occupational features during an individual face to face interview in central office and firehouses throughout Tehran. Response rate was 88.7%. Results: The mean ± SD global PSQI score was 7.97 ± 3.77. Sleep latency was the component of PSQI with the greatest degree of abnormality. 69.9% of participants were poor sleepers. Interestingly, we found no significant differences between sleep quality of shift workers and non shift workers. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, only having another job, smoking and years of job experience were predictors of poor sleep. Conclusions: In comparison with adult population of Tehran, sleep quality deterioration is notably more common in Tehran firefighters which require health promotion interventions to prevent its serious adverse outcomes.

  11. Influence of increasing amount of recycled concrete powder on mechanical properties of cement paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topič, Jaroslav; Prošek, Zdeněk; Plachý, Tomáš

    2017-09-01

    This paper deals with using fine recycled concrete powder in cement composites as micro-filler and partial cement replacement. Binder properties of recycled concrete powder are given by exposed non-hydrated cement grains, which can hydrate again and in small amount replace cement or improve some mechanical properties. Concrete powder used in the experiments was obtained from old railway sleepers. Infrastructure offer more sources of old concrete and they can be recycled directly on building site and used again. Experimental part of this paper focuses on influence of increasing amount of concrete powder on mechanical properties of cement paste. Bulk density, shrinkage, dynamic Young’s modulus, compression and flexural strength are observed during research. This will help to determine limiting amount of concrete powder when decrease of mechanical properties outweighs the benefits of cement replacement. The shrinkage, dynamic Young’s modulus and flexural strength of samples with 20 to 30 wt. % of concrete powder are comparable with reference cement paste or even better. Negative effect of concrete powder mainly influenced the compression strength. Only a 10 % cement replacement reduced compression strength by about 25 % and further decrease was almost linear.

  12. Cu,Cr and As determination in preserved woods (Eucalyptus ssp.) by X-ray fluorescence spectrometries; Determinacao de cobre, cromo e arsenio em madeira preservada (Eucalyptus sp.) pelas espectrometrias de fluorescencia de raios X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira Junior, Sergio Matias

    2014-07-01

    Brazil produces around 2.2 millions of cubic meters of treated wood to meet the annual demand of railway, electric, rural and construction sectors. The most used wood species are eucalyptus (Eucalyptus ssp.) and pine (Pinus ssp.).The treated woods used for poles, sleepers, fence posts and plywoods should be according to Brazilian norms requirements. The most usual wood preservative products used in Brazil are CCA (chromated copper arsenate) and CCB (copper chromium and boron salt). The analytical methods, such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), plasma inductively coupled optical emission spectrometry (ICPOES) and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRFS) have been used for the analytical control of those treatment processes. In this work, the eucalyptus trees (Eucalyptus ssp) samples was obtained from Minas Gerais State, Brazil, cut plantation areas. Under pressure, eucalyptus wood samples were submitted to different concentration of CCA solution reaching 3.9, 6.7, 9.1, 12.4 and 14.0 kg of CCA by m-³ sapwood retentions. Samples in cylinders and sawdust forms were obtained from treated wood samples. Copper, chromium and arsenic determination was performed using the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRFS), portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (PXRFS), flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and instrumental neutron activation analysis. In this work, the method of analysis, sensitivity, precision and accuracy performances of the related techniques were outlined. (author)

  13. The variable response-stimulus interval effect and sleep deprivation: an unexplored aspect of psychomotor vigilance task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Adrienne M; Basner, Robert C; Stern, Yaakov; Rakitin, Brian C

    2009-10-01

    The Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) contains variable response-stimulus intervals (RSI). Our goal is to investigate the effect of RSI on performance to determine whether sleep deprivation affects the ability to attend to events across seconds and whether this effect is independent of impairment in sustaining attention across minutes, as measured by time on task. A control group following their normal sleep routines and 3 groups exposed to 54 hours of total sleep deprivation performed a 10-minute PVT every 6 hours for 9 total test runs. Sleep deprivation occurred in a sleep laboratory with continuous behavioral monitoring; the control group took the PVT at home. Eighty-four healthy sleepers (68 sleep deprivation, 16 controls; 22 women; aged 18-35 years). Across groups, as the RSI increased from 2 to 10 seconds, mean RT was reduced by 69 milliseconds (main effect of RSI, P sleep deprivation and RSI effects. As expected, there was a significant interaction of sleep deprivation and time on task for mean RT (P = 0.002). Time on task and RSI effects were independent. Parallel analyses of percentage of lapses and percentage of false starts produced similar results. We demonstrate that the cognitive mechanism of attention responsible for response preparation across seconds is distinct from that for maintaining attention to task performance across minutes. Of these, only vigilance across minutes is degraded by sleep deprivation. Theories of sleep deprivation should consider how this pattern of spared and impaired aspects of attention may affect real-world performance.

  14. Cu,Cr and As determination in preserved woods (Eucalyptus ssp.) by X-ray fluorescence spectrometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira Junior, Sergio Matias

    2014-01-01

    Brazil produces around 2.2 millions of cubic meters of treated wood to meet the annual demand of railway, electric, rural and construction sectors. The most used wood species are eucalyptus (Eucalyptus ssp.) and pine (Pinus ssp.).The treated woods used for poles, sleepers, fence posts and plywoods should be according to Brazilian norms requirements. The most usual wood preservative products used in Brazil are CCA (chromated copper arsenate) and CCB (copper chromium and boron salt). The analytical methods, such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), plasma inductively coupled optical emission spectrometry (ICPOES) and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRFS) have been used for the analytical control of those treatment processes. In this work, the eucalyptus trees (Eucalyptus ssp) samples was obtained from Minas Gerais State, Brazil, cut plantation areas. Under pressure, eucalyptus wood samples were submitted to different concentration of CCA solution reaching 3.9, 6.7, 9.1, 12.4 and 14.0 kg of CCA by m-³ sapwood retentions. Samples in cylinders and sawdust forms were obtained from treated wood samples. Copper, chromium and arsenic determination was performed using the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRFS), portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (PXRFS), flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and instrumental neutron activation analysis. In this work, the method of analysis, sensitivity, precision and accuracy performances of the related techniques were outlined. (author)

  15. Increased use-dependent plasticity in chronic insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Rachel E; Galea, Joseph M; Gamaldo, Alyssa A; Gamaldo, Charlene E; Allen, Richard P; Smith, Michael T; Cantarero, Gabriela; Lam, Barbara D; Celnik, Pablo A

    2014-03-01

    During normal sleep several neuroplasticity changes occur, some of which are considered to be fundamental to strengthen memories. Given the evidence linking sleep to neuroplasticity, it is conceivable that individuals with chronic sleep disruption, such as patients with chronic insomnia (CI), would experience abnormalities in neuroplastic processes during daytime. Protocols testing use-dependent plasticity (UDP), one of the mechanisms underlying formation of motor memories traces, provide a sensitive measure to assess neuroplasticity in the context of motor training. A well-established transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigm was used to evaluate the ability of patients with CI and age-matched good sleeper controls to undergo UDP. We also investigated the effect of insomnia on intracortical motor excitability measures reflecting GABAergic and glutamatergic mechanisms. Human Brain Physiology Laboratory, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. We found that patients with CI experienced increased UDP changes relative to controls. This effect was not due to differences in motor training. In addition, patients with CI showed enhanced intracortical facilitation relative to controls, in the absence of changes in intracortical inhibitory measures. This study provides the first evidence that patients with chronic insomnia have an increased plasticity response to physical exercise, possibly due to larger activation of glutamatergic mechanisms. This suggests a heightened state of neuroplasticity, which may reflect a form of maladaptive plasticity, similar to what has been described in dystonia patients and chronic phantom pain after amputation. These results could lead to development of novel treatments for chronic insomnia.

  16. Crew Factors in Flight Operations. 8; A Survey of Fatigue Factors in Corporate/Executive A Viation Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Co, Elizabeth L.; Gregory, Kevin B.; Miller, Donna L.

    2000-01-01

    Corporate flight crews face unique challenges including unscheduled flights, quickly changing schedules, extended duty days, long waits, time zone changes, and peripheral tasks. Most corporate operations are regulated by Part 91 FARs which set no flight or duty time limits. The objective of this study was to identify operationally significant factors that may influence fatigue, alertness, and performance in corporate operations. In collaboration with the National Business Aircraft Association and the Flight Safety Foundation, NASA developed and distributed a retrospective survey comprising 107 questions addressing demographics, home sleep habits, flight experience, duty schedules, fatigue during operations, and work environment. Corporate crewmembers returned 1,488 surveys. Respondents averaged 45.2 years of age, had 14.9 years of corporate flying experience, and 9,750 total flight hours. The majority (89%) rated themselves as 'good' or 'very good' sleepers at home. Most (82%) indicated they are subject to call for duty and described an average duty day of 9.9 h. About two-thirds reported having a daily duty time limit and over half (57%) reported a daily flight time limit. Nearly three-quarters (71%) acknowledged having 'nodded off' during a flight. Only 21% reported that their flight departments offer training on fatigue issues. Almost three-quarters (74%) described fatigue as a 'moderate' or 'serious' concern, and a majority (61%) characterized it as a common occurrence. Most (85%) identified fatigue as a 'moderate' or 'serious' safety issue.

  17. Quality of sleep for hospitalized patients in Rasoul-Akram hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari Jolfaei, Atefeh; Makvandi, Alena; Pazouki, Abdolreza

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbances have negative effects on medical conditions, mental health and cognitive performance. It was shown that about 60% of inpatients suffer from sleep problems. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between sleep quality and other factors in the inpatients of Rasoul-e-Akram hospital. In this cross-sectional study, all the hospitalized patients in twelve wards of Rasoul-e-Akram hospital during September 2012, were examined. Sleeping habits of 209 inpatients of different wards were assessed through the Persian version of Pittsburgh Sleep Questionnaire (PSQI). A self-designed 18- question questionnaire was conducted for all patients in order to assess their attitude to interior and atmosphere of wards. Content validity and test retest reliability were evaluated. The pain level was also measured by the visual analog scale (VAS) and scores analyzed by the statistical methods of frequency, percentage, chi-square and logistic regression. The mean of the total scores in PSQI was 8.8±4.8 and 70.8% of the patients were 'poor sleepers' (global PSQI> 5). Age and gender had no effect on the PSQI total score, but the number of roommates, type of the ward, hospitalization period, presence and severity of pain, taking sleep medication and attitude toward the overall atmosphere and interior of wards have caused deviation in scores. Sleep problems are quite frequent in medical inpatients. Pain management and modification of the ward interior and atmosphere can impact inpatients sleep quality.

  18. Sleep as a component of the performance triad: the importance of sleep in a military population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentino, Cynthia V; Purvis, Dianna L; Murphy, Kaitlin J; Deuster, Patricia A

    2013-01-01

    Sleep habits among military populations are problematic. Poor sleep hygiene occurs in parallel with the global increase in obesity and metabolic syndrome and contributes to a decrease in performance. The extent of sleep issues needs to be quantified to provide feedback for optimizing warfighter performance and readiness. This study assessed various health behaviors and habits of US Army Soldiers and their relationship with poor sleep quality by introducing a set of new questions into the Comprehensive Soldier and Family Fitness (CSF2) Global Assessment Tool (GAT). Subjects included 14,148 US Army Active, Reserve, and National Guard members (83.4% male) who completed the GAT, a self-report questionnaire that measures 4 fitness dimensions: social, family, emotional, and spiritual. Approximately 60 new questions, including ones on sleep quality, within the fifth CSF2 dimension (physical) were also answered. A sleep score was calculated from 2 questions validated in the Pittsburgh Insomnia Rating Scale (0 to 6). Poor sleepers (5-6) were significantly (Psleep quality in a group of military personnel and indicated significant associations between quality of sleep and physical performance, nutritional habits, measures of obesity, lifestyle behaviors and measures of psychosocial status. Targeted educational interventions and resources are needed to improve sleep patterns based on behaviors that can be most easily modified.

  19. Radiotelemetry and hydroacoustic (sonar) technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick, P.H.; McKinley, R.S.

    1996-12-01

    The environmental impacts that the development of hydro-electric power plants have on resident fish stock was discussed. A study was conducted in which hydroacoustic and radiotelemetry technologies were integrated to show their combined and efficient use as remote sensing systems to collect reliable and quantitative fisheries data in the vicinity of operating hydroelectric stations. Phase One of this study focused on developing the integrated technology and evaluating the system in a laboratory. Phase Two involved field studies in which the combined technology was evaluated at the Upper Salmon Hydro-Electric Generating Station in Newfoundland, the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station on Lake Ontario, and the Kettle Lake Hydro-Electric Facility in Manitoba. In the active tag-passive sonar scenario, the radio tag transmitted information and activated the passive sonar system. In the sleeper tag-active sonar scenario the radio tag was activated by an operating sonar system. A unique hydrophone was developed and inserted into a radio tag which allowed for continuous monitoring of fish stocks and their migration. The system could be useful particularly in remote areas to remotely monitor marked fish using a series of sonobuoys. refs., tabs., figs

  20. Real-Time Distributed Strain Monitoring of a Railway Bridge during Train Passage by Using a Distributed Optical Fiber Sensor Based on Brillouin Optical Correlation Domain Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuk-Jin Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the monitoring of distributed strain of rail and girder of a railway bridge occurring during train passage over the bridge’s entire section on a real-time basis by applying a developed distributed optical fiber sensor based on Brillouin Optical Correlation Domain Analysis (BOCDA. The distributed optical fiber sensor system and an algorithm to control as well as to analyze Brillouin gain spectrum signals were also developed. A single-mode optical fiber was attached in the longitudinal direction on the rail and the lower flange of the girder to be used as a sensing fiber of the BOCDA system. Changes in the girder’s strain at the center point of the bridge during the passage of a commercial train were measured at 9 Hz, and the accuracy of this measurement was validated by comparing the measured data with the data from strain gauge. In addition, the distributed strain of a girder and the rail with a length of 40.26 m was measured in real time with a spatial resolution of 31.1 cm. Based on the results of the rail’s strain distribution, the study could identify the location where excessive strain occurred due to an influence of unsupported sleepers on girder of the bridge.

  1. The impact of economic downturns and budget cuts on homelessness claim rates across 323 local authorities in England, 2004–12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loopstra, Rachel; Reeves, Aaron; Barr, Ben; Taylor-Robinson, David; McKee, Martin; Stuckler, David

    2016-01-01

    Background It is unclear why rates of homelessness claims in England have risen since 2010. We used variations in rates across local authorities to test the impact of economic downturns and budget cuts. Methods Using cross-area fixed effects models of data from 323 UK local authorities between 2004 and 2012, we evaluated associations of changes in statutory homelessness rates with economic activity (Gross Value Added per capita), unemployment, and local and central government expenditure. Results Each 10% fall in economic activity was associated with an increase of 0.45 homelessness claims per 1000 households (95% CI: 0.10–0.80). Increasing rates of homelessness were also strongly linked with government reductions in welfare spending. Disaggregating types of welfare expenditure, we found that strongest associations with reduced homelessness claims were spending on social care, housing services, discretionary housing payments and income support for older persons. Conclusions Recession and austerity measures are associated with significant increases in rates of homelessness assistance. These findings likely understate the full burden of homelessness as they only capture those who seek aid. Future research is needed to investigate what is happening to vulnerable groups who may not obtain assistance, including those with mental health problems and rough sleepers. PMID:26364320

  2. Sleep quality and body mass index in college students: the role of sleep disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Perla A; Flores, Melissa; Robles, Elias

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and its comorbidities have emerged as a leading public health concern. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and sleep patterns, including duration and disturbances. A convenience sample of 515 college students completed an online survey consisting of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and self-reported height and weight to calculate BMI. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed using components of the PSQI as predictors of overweight (BMI ≥ 25). One-third of the participants had BMI ≥ 25, and 51% were poor-quality sleepers (PSQI > 5). Controlling for age and sex, only sleep disturbances were associated with overweight (odds ratio = 1.66, 95% confidence interval [1.08, 2.57]). Sleep disturbances, rather than sleep duration, predicted overweight among young adults; this is consistent with the most recent evidence in the literature. These findings support expanding the scope of wellness programs to promote healthy sleep among students.

  3. Sleep patterns and disorders among university students in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaad, Shafika; Costanian, Christy; Haddad, Georges; Tannous, Fida

    2014-01-01

    Insufficient sleep is a significant public health issue with adverse medical consequences. Sleep disturbances are common among university students and have an effect on this group's overall health and functioning. The aim of this study was to investigate sleep habits and disorders in a population of university students across Lebanon. This was a cross-sectional study carried out in 2012 among 735 students aged 18-25 yrs. old, enrolled at six universities across Lebanon. The Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to assess sleep quality and habits. Less than half of the total study population (47.3%) were good sleepers (PSQIsleep difficulties than females (57.8% vs. 40.8%). The majority (60%) of males vs. 40% of females had trouble performing daily activities more than once per week (P=0.02). Results of the multivariate analysis revealed that reporting poor sleep quality was strongly associated with daytime dysfunction and sleep- enhancing medication use especially more than once per week. This is the first study to describe the nature of sleep problems among university students in Lebanon. This study suggests that sleep problems among Lebanese college students were common and such problems may interfere with daily performance. Findings from this study have important implications for programs intended to improve academic performance by targeting sleep habits of students.

  4. Tea-drinking habit among new university students: Associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu Chen Tseng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The habit of drinking tea is highly prevalent in Asian countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of tea drinking and to explore the correlated factors on tea drinking among young new students in the university, using a validated self-reported questionnaire. This study was carried out with 5936 new students in a university in Taiwan. It comprised a self-administered structured questionnaire, including items related to personal and medical history, and lifestyle habits, using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and the 12-item Chinese Health Questionnaire (CHQ-12. Anthropometric measurements and laboratory tests were also performed. In total, 2065 (36.1% students were in the tea-drinking group. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed the following factors were significant predictors of tea drinking: postgraduate students (p < 0.001, coffee drinking (p < 0.001, alcohol drinking (p < 0.001, minor mental morbidity (p = 0.009, poorer sleepers (p = 0.037, higher body mass index (p = 0.004, and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (p < 0.001. Our data showed that the tea-drinking habit was correlated with higher body mass index, which was contrary to the findings of a previous study. In clinical practice, perhaps we could consider more tea-drinking-related factors when we suggest tea consumption.

  5. Does cosleeping contribute to lower testosterone levels in fathers? Evidence from the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettler, Lee T; McKenna, James J; McDade, Thomas W; Agustin, Sonny S; Kuzawa, Christopher W

    2012-01-01

    Because cross-species evidence suggests that high testosterone (T) may interfere with paternal investment, the relationships between men's transition to parenting and changes in their T are of growing interest. Studies of human males suggest that fathers who provide childcare often have lower T than uninvolved fathers, but no studies to date have evaluated how nighttime sleep proximity between fathers and their offspring may affect T. Using data collected in 2005 and 2009 from a sample of men (n = 362; age 26.0 ± 0.3 years in 2009) residing in metropolitan Cebu, Philippines, we evaluated fathers' T based on whether they slept on the same surface as their children (same surface cosleepers), slept on a different surface but in the same room (roomsharers), or slept separately from their children (solitary sleepers). A large majority (92%) of fathers in this sample reported practicing same surface cosleeping. Compared to fathers who slept solitarily, same surface cosleeping fathers had significantly lower evening (PM) T and also showed a greater diurnal decline in T from waking to evening (both p0.2). These results are consistent with previous findings indicating that daytime father-child interaction contributes to lower T among fathers. Our findings specifically suggest that close sleep proximity between fathers and their offspring results in greater longitudinal decreases in T as men transition to fatherhood and lower PM T overall compared to solitary sleeping fathers.

  6. Does cosleeping contribute to lower testosterone levels in fathers? Evidence from the Philippines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee T Gettler

    Full Text Available Because cross-species evidence suggests that high testosterone (T may interfere with paternal investment, the relationships between men's transition to parenting and changes in their T are of growing interest. Studies of human males suggest that fathers who provide childcare often have lower T than uninvolved fathers, but no studies to date have evaluated how nighttime sleep proximity between fathers and their offspring may affect T. Using data collected in 2005 and 2009 from a sample of men (n = 362; age 26.0 ± 0.3 years in 2009 residing in metropolitan Cebu, Philippines, we evaluated fathers' T based on whether they slept on the same surface as their children (same surface cosleepers, slept on a different surface but in the same room (roomsharers, or slept separately from their children (solitary sleepers. A large majority (92% of fathers in this sample reported practicing same surface cosleeping. Compared to fathers who slept solitarily, same surface cosleeping fathers had significantly lower evening (PM T and also showed a greater diurnal decline in T from waking to evening (both p0.2. These results are consistent with previous findings indicating that daytime father-child interaction contributes to lower T among fathers. Our findings specifically suggest that close sleep proximity between fathers and their offspring results in greater longitudinal decreases in T as men transition to fatherhood and lower PM T overall compared to solitary sleeping fathers.

  7. Does more sleep matter? Differential effects of NREM- and REM-dominant sleep on sleepiness and vigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, D; Mairesse, O; Newell, J; Verbanck, P; Peigneux, P; Deliens, G

    2015-05-01

    We investigated effects of NREM and REM predominant sleep periods on sleepiness and psychomotor performances measured with visual analog scales and the psychomotor vigilance task, respectively. After one week of stable sleep-wake rhythms, 18 healthy sleepers slept 3hours of early sleep and 3hours of late sleep, under polysomnographic control, spaced by two hours of sustained wakefulness between sleep periods in a within subjects split-night, sleep interruption protocol. Power spectra analysis was applied for sleep EEG recordings and sleep phase-relative power proportions were computed for six different frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, sigma, beta and gamma). Both sleep periods presented with similar sleep duration and efficiency. As expected, phasic NREM and REM predominances were obtained for early and late sleep conditions, respectively. Albeit revealing additive effects of total sleep duration, our results showed a systematic discrepancy between psychomotor performances and sleepiness levels. In addition, sleepiness remained stable throughout sustained wakefulness during both conditions, whereas psychomotor performances even decreased after the second sleep period. Disregarding exchanges for frequency bands in NREM or stability in REM, correlations between outcome measures and EEG power proportions further evidenced directional divergence with respect to sleepiness and psychomotor performances, respectively. Showing that the functional correlation pattern changed with respect to early and late sleep condition, the relationships between EEG power and subjective or behavioral outcomes might however essentially be related to total sleep duration rather than to the phasic predominance of REM or NREM sleep. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. The impact of economic downturns and budget cuts on homelessness claim rates across 323 local authorities in England, 2004-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loopstra, Rachel; Reeves, Aaron; Barr, Ben; Taylor-Robinson, David; McKee, Martin; Stuckler, David

    2016-09-01

    It is unclear why rates of homelessness claims in England have risen since 2010. We used variations in rates across local authorities to test the impact of economic downturns and budget cuts. Using cross-area fixed effects models of data from 323 UK local authorities between 2004 and 2012, we evaluated associations of changes in statutory homelessness rates with economic activity (Gross Value Added per capita), unemployment, and local and central government expenditure. Each 10% fall in economic activity was associated with an increase of 0.45 homelessness claims per 1000 households (95% CI: 0.10-0.80). Increasing rates of homelessness were also strongly linked with government reductions in welfare spending. Disaggregating types of welfare expenditure, we found that strongest associations with reduced homelessness claims were spending on social care, housing services, discretionary housing payments and income support for older persons. Recession and austerity measures are associated with significant increases in rates of homelessness assistance. These findings likely understate the full burden of homelessness as they only capture those who seek aid. Future research is needed to investigate what is happening to vulnerable groups who may not obtain assistance, including those with mental health problems and rough sleepers. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health.

  9. Climatic and geomorphic controls on low flow hydrograph recession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, D. G.; Daley, M.; Kasaee Roodsari, B.; Shaw, S. B.; McNamara, J.

    2017-12-01

    Large scale operational hydrologic models should be capable of predicting seasonally low flow and stream intermittency as well as peak flow and inundation. We contrast examples of controls on low flow exerted by geomorphic and climatic setting at small catchment study sites in the Northeast and Northwest of the USA to indicate differences in hydrologic processes. Both regions accumulate winter snowpack and have an extended spring freshet, but the Reynolds Creek CZO and Dry Creek Experimental Watershed (both in Idaho mountains) experience a protracted summer drought, with occasional storms whereas precipitation free periods greater than five days are uncommon in the hilly Sleepers River (Vermont), and Yellow Barn State Forest (New York) and at Ley Creek, on a glacial plain (New York). At both Dry Creek and Reynolds Creek, headwater stream flow direction was transverse to groundwater, and below field capacity discharge was well related to either the ground water surface or corresponded to inversion of the hydraulic gradient over the depth of the soil. At all sites except Ley Creek, the headwaters became intermittent as the main tributary discharge declined, often disconnecting the surface source springs and seeps from the valley bottom stream. At the Idaho sites recession analysis for main stem was further complicated by consumptive use for irrigation and domestic wells. Modeling the recession characteristics of these various settings and across stream orders results in a variety of exponent values for power law scaling approaches that indicate the importance of site context for modeling low flow.

  10. Dynamic modelling of high speed ballasted railway trakcs: Analysis of the behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego, I.; Rivas, A.; Sanchez-Cambronero, S.; Lajara, J.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the paper is to present a numerical model for a ballasted railway track that includes the dynamic effect of a moving train load and predicts the values of the vertical stiffness of the infrastructure. This model is therefore deemed to be a tool for the evaluation of the state of the track during service situations as well as a predictive model of the behaviour of the system. Consequently, it will be very useful when sizing the cross section of a new railway line is required.The main modelling tool is the finite element method. In regard to this, the application of damping elements to avoid the elastic wave reflection on the boundaries of the numerical domain will be studied. The proposed dynamic analysis consider the change in time of the value of the train load, but not the change in position along the tracks.In the end, a set of suggestions for the numerical model with moving loads will be summarize aiming for the mitigation of the unusual behaviour of the contact surface between the ballast and the sleepers. (Author)

  11. The influence of train running direction and track supports position on the behaviour of transition zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sañudo Ortega, R.; Miranda Manzanares, M.; Markine, V.; Dell' Olio, L.

    2016-07-01

    Different types of track infrastructure can be found along railway lines. Separation zones between these different types of structures are the source of a lot of problems. Transition zones on a railway line represent a gradual solution for the problems between conventional railway structure and singular structures located at different points along the line. The different nature, positioning and geometry used with the materials generate changes in the stiffness on both sides of these singular zones leading to an increase in wear and a loss of geometry, with the associated maintenance costs. This article describes the use of mathematical modelling to represent the behaviour of these zones as a function of train running direction and track supports. Available research into transition zones has not studied these separation points where high increases in load are generated for very short periods of time. Finite elements are used to model two types of track (conventional ballasted track and slab track), using a vehicle to dynamically simulate the behaviour in these zones as a function of train running direction and the position of track supports. The magnitudes analysed were the vertical stresses and the vertical displacements under the sleepers and the supports in both types of structure. The results show increased stresses at the separation zone between both structures which varied in magnitude and position depending most of track supports’ location than the train running direction. (Author)

  12. Prevalence and risk factors of poor sleep quality among Chinese elderly in an urban community: results from the Shanghai aging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianfeng; Zhu, Guoxing; Zhao, Qianhua; Guo, Qihao; Meng, Haijiao; Hong, Zhen; Ding, Ding

    2013-01-01

    Sleep disorders causes a significant negative effect on mental and physical health, particularly among the elderly. The disease burden and risk factors of poor sleep quality of the elderly need to be verified using a validated form of measurement in urban mainland China. This study included 1086 community residents aged ≥ 60 years who completed the Chinese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (CPSQI). Poor sleeper was defined by a CPSQI global score of >5. Subjects also accepted the neurological and neuropsychological assessments, including the Mini-Mental State Examination, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, and Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (ZSAS). A history of chronic diseases was confirmed by the medical records of each participant. The prevalence of poor sleep quality in this population was 41.5% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 38.6-44.5%), with a higher rate observed in elderly females (45.8% [95% CI = 41.9-49.7%]) than that in elderly males (35.8% [95% CI = 31.4-40.1%]). The prevalence rate increased with age, from 32.1% (95% CI = 27.8-36.4%) in those aged 60-69 years to 52.5% (95% CI = 45.9-59.1%) in those aged ≥ 80 years (p value for trendsleep quality. Poor sleep quality is highly prevalent among elderly Chinese residents in urban Shanghai. Growing attention and comprehensive countermeasures involving psycho-social and personal activities might alleviate the sleep problem in the elderly.

  13. Sleep quality of German soldiers before, during and after deployment in Afghanistan-a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danker-Hopfe, Heidi; Sauter, Cornelia; Kowalski, Jens T; Kropp, Stefan; Ströhle, Andreas; Wesemann, Ulrich; Zimmermann, Peter L

    2017-06-01

    In this prospective study, subjective sleep quality and excessive daytime sleepiness prior to, during and after deployment of German soldiers in Afghanistan were examined. Sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; PSQI) and daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale; ESS) were assessed in 118 soldiers of the German army, who were deployed in Afghanistan for 6 months (deployment group: DG) and in 146 soldiers of a non-deployed control group (CG) at baseline. Results of the longitudinal analysis are reported, based on assessments conducted prior to, during the deployment and afterwards in the DG, and in the CG in parallel. Sleep quality and daytime sleepiness in the DG were already impaired during the predeployment training phase and remained at that level during the deployment phase, which clearly indicates the need for more attention on sleep in young soldiers, already at this early stage. The percentage of impaired sleepers decreased significantly after deployment. Programmes to teach techniques to improve sleep and reduce stress should be implemented prior to deployment to reduce sleep difficulties and excessive daytime sleepiness and subsequent psychiatric disorders. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  14. Sleep and biomarkers of atherosclerosis in elderly Alzheimer caregivers and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Känel, Roland; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Dimsdale, Joel E; Mills, Paul J; Mausbach, Brent T; Ziegler, Michael G; Patterson, Thomas L; Grant, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Perturbed sleep might contribute to cardiovascular disease by accelerating atherosclerosis. Sleep is poor in Alzheimer caregivers who are also a group at increased cardiovascular risk. To test the hypothesis that impaired sleep relates to elevated levels of biomarkers of atherosclerosis in community-dwelling elderly and that this association would possibly be stronger in caregivers than in non-caregiving controls. We studied 97 Alzheimer caregivers and 48 non-caregiving controls (mean age 71 +/- 8 years, 72% women) who underwent wrist actigraphy at their homes. Measures of objective sleep were averaged across 3 consecutive nights. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was administered by an interviewer to rate subjective sleep quality. Morning fasting blood samples were collected to determine measures of inflammation, coagulation and endothelial dysfunction. There were independent associations between decreased subjective sleep quality and increased levels of fibrin D-dimer (p = 0.022, DeltaR(2) = 0.029) and von Willebrand factor antigen (p = 0.029, DeltaR(2) = 0.034) in all participants. Percent sleep (p = 0.025) and subjective sleep quality (p = 0.017) were lower in caregivers than in controls. In caregivers, the correlation between decreased percent sleep and elevated levels of interleukin-6 (p = 0.042, DeltaR(2) = 0.039) and C-reactive protein (p caregivers. The findings provide one explanation for the increased cardiovascular risk in elderly poor sleepers and dementia caregivers in particular. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. A New Measure of Hallucinatory States and a Discussion of REM Sleep Dreaming as a Virtual Laboratory for the Rehearsal of Embodied Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Clemens; Speth, Jana

    2018-01-01

    Hallucinatory states are experienced not only in connection with drugs and psychopathologies but occur naturally and spontaneously across the human circadian cycle: Our nightly dreams bring multimodal experiences in the absence of adequate external stimuli. The current study proposes a new, tighter measure of these hallucinatory states: Sleep onset, REM sleep, and non-REM sleep are shown to differ with regard to (a) motor imagery indicating interactions with a rich imaginative world, and (b) cognitive agency that could enable sleepers to recognize their hallucinatory state. Mentation reports from the different states were analysed quantitatively with regard to two grammatical-semantic constructs, motor agency and cognitive agency. The present results support earlier physiological and psychological evidence in revealing a decline in cognitive functions and an increase in simulated interactions with a hallucinatory world, en route to normal REM sleep. This leads us to introduce the hypothesis that REM sleep, which exhibits remarkably high levels of (simulated) sensorimotor processes, may have evolved to serve as a virtual laboratory for the development and rehearsal of embodied cognition. The new measure of hallucinatory states presented here may also hold implications for the study of executive functions and (meta-)cognitions, which might be interesting, for example, for the investigation of lucid dreaming. Copyright © 2017 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  16. Comparative Mitogenomics of the Genus Odontobutis (Perciformes: Gobioidei: Odontobutidae) Revealed Conserved Gene Rearrangement and High Sequence Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhihong; Yang, Xuefen; Bercsenyi, Miklos; Wu, Junjie; Yu, Yongyao; Wei, Kaijian; Fan, Qixue; Yang, Ruibin

    2015-01-01

    To understand the molecular evolution of mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) in the genus Odontobutis, the mitogenome of Odontobutis yaluensis was sequenced and compared with those of another four Odontobutis species. Our results displayed similar mitogenome features among species in genome organization, base composition, codon usage, and gene rearrangement. The identical gene rearrangement of trnS-trnL-trnH tRNA cluster observed in mitogenomes of these five closely related freshwater sleepers suggests that this unique gene order is conserved within Odontobutis. Additionally, the present gene order and the positions of associated intergenic spacers of these Odontobutis mitogenomes indicate that this unusual gene rearrangement results from tandem duplication and random loss of large-scale gene regions. Moreover, these mitogenomes exhibit a high level of sequence variation, mainly due to the differences of corresponding intergenic sequences in gene rearrangement regions and the heterogeneity of tandem repeats in the control regions. Phylogenetic analyses support Odontobutis species with shared gene rearrangement forming a monophyletic group, and the interspecific phylogenetic relationships are associated with structural differences among their mitogenomes. The present study contributes to understanding the evolutionary patterns of Odontobutidae species. PMID:26492246

  17. EEG Power During Waking and NREM Sleep in Primary Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, You Meme; Pietrone, Regina; Cashmere, J. David; Begley, Amy; Miewald, Jean M.; Germain, Anne; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pathophysiological models of insomnia invoke the concept of 24-hour hyperarousal, which could lead to symptoms and physiological findings during waking and sleep. We hypothesized that this arousal could be seen in the waking electroencephalogram (EEG) of individuals with primary insomnia (PI), and that waking EEG power would correlate with non-REM (NREM) EEG. Methods: Subjects included 50 PI and 32 good sleeper controls (GSC). Five minutes of eyes closed waking EEG were collected at subjects' usual bedtimes, followed by polysomnography (PSG) at habitual sleep times. An automated algorithm and visual editing were used to remove artifacts from waking and sleep EEGs, followed by power spectral analysis to estimate power from 0.5–32 Hz. Results: We did not find significant differences in waking or NREM EEG spectral power of PI and GSC. Significant correlations between waking and NREM sleep power were observed across all frequency bands in the PI group and in most frequency bands in the GSC group. Conclusions: The absence of significant differences between groups in waking or NREM EEG power suggests that our sample was not characterized by a high degree of cortical arousal. The consistent correlations between waking and NREM EEG power suggest that, in samples with elevated NREM EEG beta activity, waking EEG power may show a similar pattern. Citation: Wu YM; Pietrone R; Cashmere JD; Begley A; Miewald JM; Germain A; Buysse DJ. EEG power during waking and NREM sleep in primary insomnia. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(10):1031-1037. PMID:24127147

  18. Using Continuous In-situ Measurement of Fluorescence to Reveal Hot Spots and Hot Moments of Dissolved Organic Matter Dynamics in a Forested Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, K. A.; Hosen, J. D.; Raymond, P. A.; Stubbins, A.; Shanley, J. B.

    2017-12-01

    River systems serve as net carbon exporters from land to the ocean, fueling downstream aquatic ecosystem food webs. Fluorescence signatures of aquatic organic matter can be used as a proxy for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and can characterize DOC composition, reactivity, and source to improve our understanding of ecological processes. In-situ measurement of fluorescence using fifteen-minute interval data logging allows greater temporal resolution than laboratory studies. However, in-situ data must be corrected for interferences from temperature, absorbance and turbidity changes occurring in the field. We installed multiparameter water quality sondes (Eureka Mantas) and in-situ fluorometers (Turner Designs Cyclops) at sites nested within streams and riparian zones in the Sleepers River Research Watershed in Vermont in 2017. We coupled these measurements with simultaneous intensive field sampling campaigns and laboratory analysis of DOC and fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrices. The data loggers from the nested sites recorded fluorescence peaks responding to discharge events and tracked changes in fluorescence occurring from upstream to downstream sites. Laboratory results confirm a nonlinear, hysteretic relationship between discharge and DOC where peak DOC lags peak discharge. This hysteresis is predicted to be controlled by multiple flow paths and DOC sources (i.e. groundwater, overland flow). We conclude that continuous in-situ records of river water fluorescence can be used to inform ecological processes and test new hypotheses concerning dissolved organic matter dynamics in watersheds.

  19. The exploratory power of sleep effort, dysfunctional beliefs and arousal for insomnia severity and polysomnography-determined sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertenstein, Elisabeth; Nissen, Christoph; Riemann, Dieter; Feige, Bernd; Baglioni, Chiara; Spiegelhalder, Kai

    2015-08-01

    Differences between subjective sleep perception and sleep determined by polysomnography (PSG) are prevalent, particularly in patients with primary insomnia, indicating that the two measures are partially independent. To identify individualized treatment strategies, it is important to understand the potentially different mechanisms influencing subjective and PSG-determined sleep. The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent three major components of insomnia models, i.e., sleep effort, dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep, and presleep arousal, are associated with subjective insomnia severity and PSG-determined sleep. A sample of 47 patients with primary insomnia according to DSM-IV criteria and 52 good sleeper controls underwent 2 nights of PSG and completed the Glasgow Sleep Effort Scale, the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep Scale, the Pre-Sleep Arousal Scale and the Insomnia Severity Index. Regression analyses were conducted to investigate the impact of the three predictors on subjective insomnia severity and PSG- determined total sleep time. All analyses were adjusted for age, gender, depressive symptoms and group status. The results showed that subjective insomnia severity was associated positively with sleep effort. PSG-determined total sleep time was associated negatively with somatic presleep arousal and dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep. This pattern of results provides testable hypotheses for prospective studies on the impact of distinct cognitive and somatic variables on subjective insomnia severity and PSG-determined total sleep time. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  20. Does subjective sleep affect cognitive function in healthy elderly subjects? The Proof cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint Martin, Magali; Sforza, Emilia; Barthélémy, Jean Claude; Thomas-Anterion, Catherine; Roche, Frédéric

    2012-10-01

    Some epidemiological data are available on the association between sleep duration and sleep quality, sleep complaints, and the aging related cognitive impairment in the elderly. In this study we examined a large sample of healthy elderly subjects to assess the relationship between sleep quality, subjective cognitive complaints, and neuropsychological performance. A total of 272 elderly subjects (mean age 74.8 ± 1.1 years) were recruited from a population-based cross-sectional study on aging and cardiovascular morbidity. All subjects filled in self-assessment questionnaires evaluating cognitive function, anxiety, depression, sleep-related parameters, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Ambulatory polygraphy and extensive neuropsychological tests were also performed. Based on the total PSQI score, subjects were classified as good sleepers (GS, PSQIsleep did not affect the subjective cognitive function score, subjective cognitive impairment being mainly related to anxiety, depression, and sleep medication intake. No significant differences were seen between GS and PS in any of the objective cognitive function tests except for the Trail Making Test A (TMA-A), processing speed being longer in the PS group (psleep-related breathing disorders nor gender affected cognitive performance. Our results suggest that in healthy elderly subjects, subjective sleep quality and duration did not significantly affect subjective and objective cognitive performances, except the attention level, for that the interference of sleep medication should be considered. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The responsibility to care for single homeless people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, M; Warnes, A M

    2001-11-01

    This paper examines the reasons why in contemporary Britain many single homeless people with severe physical and mental health problems and welfare needs do not receive the treatment, care and financial support that they manifestly need, and in particular considers the interaction between their personal characteristics and the organisation and the obligations of services. Homelessness is a complex concept associated with problems of housing, health, social care and income. The greatest weaknesses of the service system are that no single agency has a statutory responsibility to ensure that vulnerable homeless people are served, and none of the generalist welfare agencies have a duty to seek out those who do not present. As a result, single homeless people fall between the housing, health and social services and amass exceptional unmet needs. The paper appraises the approaches to single homeless people's problems that have recently been introduced by the Rough Sleepers' Unit (RSU), and discusses the ways in which current reforms of the welfare services may impact on the situation of homeless people. With the possibility that the RSU's prime responsibility for commissioning single homeless people's services will transfer to local authorities in 2002, the paper concludes by specifying the implications for voluntary and statutory providers and makes recommendations about the attribution of the responsibility to care for this vulnerable group.

  2. The effects of suppressing intrusive thoughts on dream content, dream distress and psychological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröner-Borowik, Tana; Gosch, Stefanie; Hansen, Kathrin; Borowik, Benjamin; Schredl, Michael; Steil, Regina

    2013-10-01

    Suppressing unwanted thoughts can lead to an increased occurrence of the suppressed thought in dreams. This is explainable by the ironic control theory, which theorizes why the suppression of thoughts might make them more persistent. The present study examined the influence of thought suppression on dream rebound, dream distress, general psychiatric symptomatology, depression, sleep quality and perceived stress. Thirty healthy participants (good sleepers) were investigated over a period of 1 week. Half were instructed to suppress an unwanted thought 5 min prior to sleep, whereas the other half were allowed to think of anything at all. Dream content was assessed through a dream diary. Independent raters assessed whether or not the dreams were related to the suppressed target thought. The results demonstrated increased target-related dreams and a tendency to have more distressing dreams in the suppression condition. Moreover, the data imply that thought suppression may lead to significantly increased general psychiatric symptomatology. No significant effects were found for the other secondary outcomes. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  3. Transient insomnia versus chronic insomnia: a comparison study of sleep-related psychological/behavioral characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chien-Ming; Lin, Shih-Chun; Cheng, Chung-Ping

    2013-10-01

    Vulnerability to transient insomnia is regarded as a predisposing factor for chronic insomnia. However, most individuals with transient insomnia do not develop chronic insomnia. The current study investigated the differential contributing factors for these two conditions to further the understanding of this phenomenon. Chronic insomnia patients and normal sleepers with high and low vulnerability to transient insomnia completed measures of pre-sleep arousal, dysfunctional sleep beliefs, and sleep-related safety behaviors. Both cognitive and somatic pre-sleep arousals were identified as significant predictors for transient insomnia. Dysfunctional beliefs regarding worry about insomnia and cognitive arousal were predictors for chronic insomnia. Sleep-related safety behavior, although correlated with insomnia severity, was not a significant predictor for both conditions. Dysfunctional beliefs associated with worry and losing control over sleep are the most critical factors in differentiating chronic insomnia from transient insomnia. These factors should be addressed to help prevent individuals with high sleep vulnerability from developing chronic sleep disturbance. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Nizhny Novgorod Belyana barge in the XIX century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippov Yury V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses a unique Belyana barge, which was built in the Nizhny Novgorod region for several centuries. Belyana as a type of vessels was designed for transportation of logs, sleepers, beams, planks and other forest products from the Upper to the Lower Volga. Originally, the center of Belyana construction was the village of Baki, which was situated on the Vetluga River, a tributary of the Volga River. The Belyana construction technique spread from the Vetluga river banks further to Nizhny Novgorod, and then to Perm region. Almost all aspects of Belyana construction starting from the logging finishing with its floating to the lower Volga, and also cost of transported products in the prices of the XIX century are disclosed. Due to Belyana is truly a popular invention, it was built by traditional methods, relying solely on the centuries-old experience. Any drawings for the construction never existed, that’s why the author relied on preserved photographs and drawings in the historical reconstruction of this unique vessel. At the beginning of the article a brief overview of the geographical location of Nizhny Novgorod, as well as the names of wooden ships which were sailing on Volga and its tributaries in the same times with Belyana are given. At the end of the article practical recommendations on possible reconstruction of Belyana and using it as an interactive museum of ethnography are given.

  5. Relationship of sleep quantity and quality with 24-hour urinary catecholamines and salivary awakening cortisol in healthy middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jihui; Ma, Ronald C W; Kong, Alice P S; So, Wing Yee; Li, Albert M; Lam, Sui Ping; Li, Shirley Xin; Yu, Mandy W M; Ho, Chung Shun; Chan, Michael H M; Zhang, Bin; Wing, Yun Kwok

    2011-02-01

    a. Explore the stability in sleep/wake patterns of middle-aged adults over a 3-year follow-up period. b. Explore the relationship between objectively measured sleep indices, urinary catecholamines, and salivary cortisol. Naturalistic follow-up for sleep/wake patterns (n = 114) by 2-week sleep log and cross-sectional design for objective sleep assessments and hormonal measures (n = 96) at follow-up period nearly 3 years after baseline measurements. Community Healthy middle-aged adults N/A. There were high correlations between baseline and follow-up period (2.6 ± 0.5 years) on sleep/wake patterns (r = 0.6-0.79) as measured by 2-week sleep log. For wave 2 cross-sectional study, objective poor sleepers (3-day actigraphy sleep efficiency sleep time, longer sleep onset latency, and lower sleep efficiency were correlated with higher 24-h urinary E and NE (all P sleep quality on 24-h urinary catecholamines was stronger in males than females. Increased sympathetic activity as measured by 24-h urinary catecholamines might play a critical role in the pathogenesis mediating the relationship of insufficient sleep (quantity and quality) with subsequent cardiovascular and metabolic complications. Salivary awakening cortisol was not associated with sleep quantity and quality in healthy middle-aged adults.

  6. Respiratory Symptoms, Sleep, and Quality of Life in Patients With Advanced Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Vivian W Q; Chen, Elaine J; Jian, Hong; Zhou, Zhen; Zhu, Jingfen; Li, Guohong; He, Yaping

    2017-02-01

    Maintenance of quality of life and symptom management are important in lung cancer therapy. To the author's knowledge, the interplay of respiratory symptoms and sleep disturbance in affecting quality of life in advanced lung cancer remains unexamined. The study was designed to examine the relationships among respiratory symptoms, sleep disturbance, and quality of life in patients with advanced lung cancer. A total of 128 patients with advanced lung cancer (from chest oncology inpatient-units in Shanghai, China) participated in the study. They completed two questionnaires: the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Symptomatic breathing difficulty, coughing, shortness of breath, and tightness in the chest were reported in 78.1%, 70.3%, 60.9%, and 60.2% of the patients, respectively. Sleep disturbance affected 62.5% of the patients. The patients with severe respiratory symptoms were more likely to be poor sleepers and to have a lower quality of life. After the covariates were controlled for, regression analysis showed that respiratory symptoms and sleep disturbance were significant indicators of quality of life. In addition, some of the effect of the respiratory symptoms on quality of life was mediated by sleep disturbance. Respiratory symptoms and sleep disturbance were common in the advanced lung cancer patients and had a negative impact on their quality of life; sleep disturbance may mediate the relationship between respiratory symptoms and quality of life. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Relation of dreams to waking concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Rosalind; Agargun, Mehmet Y; Kirkby, Jennifer; Friedman, Julie Kabat

    2006-03-30

    To test that dreams are influenced by the pre-sleep waking emotional concerns of the sleeper and have an effect on waking adaptation, 20 depressed and 10 control subjects, who were all going through a divorce, were enrolled in a repeated measures study lasting 5 months. A Current Concerns test was administered on three occasions before nights when every REM period was interrupted to record recalled mental content. The degree of waking concern about the ex-spouse correlated significantly with the number of dreams in which the former partner appeared as a dream character. Those who were in remission at the follow-up evaluation had a higher percentage of well-developed dreams than those who remained depressed. Dreams of the former spouse reported by those in remission differed from those who remained depressed in the expression of dream affect and in the within-dream linkage among units of associated memory material. Dreams of the former spouse that are reported by those who are not in remission lack affect and connection to other memories.

  8. Screen and nonscreen sedentary behavior and sleep in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Vanessa C; O'Loughlin, Erin K; O'Loughlin, Jennifer; Constantin, Evelyn; Pigeon, Étienne

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the associations between screen (computer, videogame, TV) and nonscreen (talking on the phone, doing homework, reading) sedentary time, and sleep in adolescents. Data were drawn from AdoQuest, a prospective investigation of 1843 grade 5 students aged 10-12 years at inception in the greater Montreal (Canada) area. Data for this cross-sectional analysis on screen and nonscreen sedentary time, sleep duration, and daytime sleepiness were collected in 2008-2009 from 1233 participants (67% of 1843) aged 14-16 years. Computer and videogame use >2 hours per day was associated with 17 and 11 fewer minutes of sleep per night, respectively. Computer use and talking on the phone were both associated with being a short sleeper (2 hours of computer use or talking on the phone per day had higher daytime sleepiness scores (11.9 and 13.9, respectively) than participants who reported d2 hours per day (9.7 and 10.3, respectively). Computer use and time spent talking on the phone are associated with short sleep and more daytime sleepiness in adolescents. Videogame time is also associated with less sleep. Clinicians, parents, and adolescents should be made aware that sedentary behavior and especially screen-related sedentary behavior may affect sleep duration negatively and is possibly associated with daytime sleepiness. Copyright \\© 2016 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reminders of Social Connection Can Attenuate Anthropomorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Jennifer A; Tchalova, Kristina; Fenerci, Can

    2016-12-01

    It is a fundamental human need to secure and sustain a sense of social belonging. Previous research has shown that individuals who are lonely are more likely than people who are not lonely to attribute humanlike traits (e.g., free will) to nonhuman agents (e.g., an alarm clock that makes people get up by moving away from the sleeper), presumably in an attempt to fulfill unmet needs for belongingness. We directly replicated the association between loneliness and anthropomorphism in a larger sample ( N = 178); furthermore, we showed that reminding people of a close, supportive relationship reduces their tendency to anthropomorphize. This finding provides support for the idea that the need for belonging has causal effects on anthropomorphism. Last, we showed that attachment anxiety-characterized by intense desire for and preoccupation with closeness, fear of abandonment, and hypervigilance to social cues-was a stronger predictor of anthropomorphism than loneliness was. This finding helps clarify the mechanisms underlying anthropomorphism and supports the idea that anthropomorphism is a motivated process reflecting the active search for potential sources of connection.

  10. Stepping Stones Triple P seminars for parents of a child with a disability: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofronoff, Kate; Jahnel, Diana; Sanders, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Parents of children with a developmental disability require tailored parenting support, as their families have special needs and are at risk of increased burden. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Stepping Stones Triple P seminars, a brief group intervention for parents of a child with a disability. There were two seminars that presented parenting strategies to improve both child behavior and parenting variables implicated in the development and maintenance of child problem behavior. Fifty-three parents participated in this randomized controlled trial. Each had a child, aged two to ten, with a disability. The results indicated significant reductions in child behavior problems, the use of dysfunctional parenting styles, and parental conflict reported by parents in the intervention group compared to a waitlist group. The results were maintained at 3-month follow-up and there was evidence of a sleeper effect for parenting confidence. This study demonstrated that the seminars provide a promising intervention for parents of children with a disability. Limitations and implications for future research are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Three-dimensional dynamic analyses of track-embankment-ground system subjected to high speed train loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Zheng, Changjie

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model was developed to investigate dynamic response of track-embankment-ground system subjected to moving loads caused by high speed trains. The track-embankment-ground systems such as the sleepers, the ballast, the embankment, and the ground are represented by 8-noded solid elements. The infinite elements are used to represent the infinite boundary condition to absorb vibration waves induced by the passing of train load at the boundary. The loads were applied on the rails directly to simulate the real moving loads of trains. The effects of train speed on dynamic response of the system are considered. The effect of material parameters, especially the modulus changes of ballast and embankment, is taken into account to demonstrate the effectiveness of strengthening the ballast, embankment, and ground for mitigating system vibration in detail. The numerical results show that the model is reliable for predicting the amplitude of vibrations produced in the track-embankment-ground system by high-speed trains. Stiffening of fill under the embankment can reduce the vibration level, on the other hand, it can be realized by installing a concrete slab under the embankment. The influence of axle load on the vibration of the system is obviously lower than that of train speed.

  12. Composites for Timber-Replacement Bearers in Railway Switches and Crossings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakdirat Kaewunruen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in composite materials have resulted in their pilot adoption in railway industry, such as ‘fibre-reinforced foamed urethane (FFU’, ‘geopolymer concrete’, ‘recycled polymer’, and ‘CarbonLoc composite’. Railway track support systems are critical for safe and reliable operations of railway tracks. There are two types of support structures, which can be designed to be either a slab or a cluster of discrete bearers or sleepers. The choice of turnout support system depends on asset management strategy of the rail operators or maintainers. The aim of this paper is to present the criteria, fundamental and multi-disciplinary issues for the design and practical selection of composite materials in railway turnout systems. As a case study, a full-scale trial to investigate in-situ behaviours of a turnout grillage system using an alternative material, ‘fibre-reinforced foamed urethane (FFU’ bearers, is presented. Influences of the composite bearers on track geometry (recorded by track inspection vehicle ‘AK Car’ and based on survey data, track settlement, track dynamics, and acoustic characteristics are highlighted in this paper. Comparative studies of composite materials for railway track applications are reviewed and presented in order to improve material design process. This state-of-the-art review paper will also focus on practicality and environmental risks of composite components in railway built environments. It embraces the requirement considerations of new materials for use as safety-critical track elements.

  13. Three-Dimensional Dynamic Analyses of Track-Embankment-Ground System Subjected to High Speed Train Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Fu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional finite element model was developed to investigate dynamic response of track-embankment-ground system subjected to moving loads caused by high speed trains. The track-embankment-ground systems such as the sleepers, the ballast, the embankment, and the ground are represented by 8-noded solid elements. The infinite elements are used to represent the infinite boundary condition to absorb vibration waves induced by the passing of train load at the boundary. The loads were applied on the rails directly to simulate the real moving loads of trains. The effects of train speed on dynamic response of the system are considered. The effect of material parameters, especially the modulus changes of ballast and embankment, is taken into account to demonstrate the effectiveness of strengthening the ballast, embankment, and ground for mitigating system vibration in detail. The numerical results show that the model is reliable for predicting the amplitude of vibrations produced in the track-embankment-ground system by high-speed trains. Stiffening of fill under the embankment can reduce the vibration level, on the other hand, it can be realized by installing a concrete slab under the embankment. The influence of axle load on the vibration of the system is obviously lower than that of train speed.

  14. 1987 Robert E. Horton Award to Thomas Dunne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Thomas

    Robert Horton demonstrated in his seminal 1945 paper that physically based quantitative models for landscape evolution can be constructed by using predicted overland flow in a sediment transport equation for sheetwash. He envisioned drainage network evolution by infiltration-limited overland flow as a process of channel incision, network growth, and then abstraction to a stable channel network fed by hillslopes too short for channel initiation. Not until the work of Tom Dunne in the late 1960s in the Sleepers River watershed, Vermont, was it realized that overland flow, and consequently hillslope evolution, could occur by an entirely different mechanism than that proposed by Horton. Dunne showed that in certain predictable zones of the landscape, exfiltration from saturated grounds adds to precipitation on the soil surface to form what he later called saturation overland flow. Many researchers have since found that this form of overland flow occurs in humid and semiarid landscapes throughout the world. So clear is Dunne's contribution to defining this process that some refer to it as the “Dunne mechanism” to distinguish it from “Horton overland flow.” His work also documented unquestionably the applicability of the partial area concept in explaining runoff generation. Because of this work, his research in snowmelt runoff, and his subsequent authorship with Luna Leopold of the widely used book entitled Water in Environmental Planning, Dunne has established himself as a leader of process hydrology.

  15. A psychological treatment programme for traumatised ex military personnel in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Sánchez España

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A large proportion of homeless people in the UK are former members of the armed services and suffer from a mental illness. In fact, homelessness itself can be considered a symptom or manifestation of other underlying psychological difficulties. For these reasons Community Housing and Therapy (CHT considers that providing psychological therapies to treat the homeless population is a more effective way of tackling the problem of homelessness, as it addresses the roots of the problem. This approach is one which is beginning to be recognised by leading agencies in the field. At the same time, the provision of psychological therapies for symptoms such as depression and anxiety has become accepted through the Department of Health’s (DoH Increased Access to Psychological Therapies ( IAPT initiative. Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder that homeless people suffer and it is well documented that psychological treatments for depression can be extremely effective. As well as approaching homelessness from the angle of psychological therapies, CHT in its work with the ex-service community has become increasingly aware that there are a large number of non statutory homeless that do not get the same attention as rough sleepers.

  16. Otolith microchemistry of tropical diadromous fishes: spatial and migratory dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William E.; Kwak, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Otolith microchemistry was applied to quantify migratory variation and the proportion of native Caribbean stream fishes that undergo full or partial marine migration. Strontium and barium water chemistry in four Puerto Rico, U.S.A., rivers was clearly related to a salinity gradient; however, variation in water barium, and thus fish otoliths, was also dependent on river basin. Strontium was the most accurate index of longitudinal migration in tropical diadromous fish otoliths. Among the four species examined, bigmouth sleeper Gobiomorus dormitor, mountain mullet Agonostomus monticola, sirajo goby Sicydium spp. and river goby Awaous banana, most individuals were fully amphidromous, but 9-12% were semi-amphidromous as recruits, having never experienced marine or estuarine conditions in early life stages and showing no evidence of marine elemental signatures in their otolith core. Populations of one species, G. dormitor, may have contained a small contingent of semi-amphidromous adults, migratory individuals that periodically occupied marine or estuarine habitats (4%); however, adult migratory elemental signatures may have been confounded with those related to diet and physiology. These findings indicate the plasticity of migratory strategies of tropical diadromous fishes, which may be more variable than simple categorization might suggest.

  17. Serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonists in the treatment of insomnia: present status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, J M

    2010-03-01

    Benzodiazepine (BZD) and non-BZD hypnotics improve sleep induction and sleep maintenance. BZD induces a further reduction of slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, whereas SWS and REM values remain decreased during non-BZD administration. There is evidence indicating that the nonselective serotonin 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor antagonists, ritanserin, ketanserin, seganserin and ICI-169369, the selective 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist eplivanserin and the 5-HT(2A) receptor inverse agonist pimavanserin, increase SWS in subjects with normal sleep. In addition, it has been shown that prior administration of ritanserin prevents the nitrazepam-induced suppression of SWS in normal subjects. Of note, ritanserin also induced an increase of SWS in poor sleepers, patients with chronic primary insomnia and psychiatric patients with a generalized anxiety disorder or a mood disorder. The 5-HT(2A) receptor inverse agonist APD-125 gave rise to a similar effect in patients with chronic primary insomnia. Thus, presently available evidence tends to indicate that the association of a 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist or a 5-HT(2A) receptor inverse agonist with a BZD or a non-BZD hypnotic could be a valid alternative to normalize SWS in patients with primary or comorbid insomnia. Copyright 2010 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  18. The interaction between sleep quality and academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrberg, K; Dresler, M; Niedermaier, S; Steiger, A; Genzel, L

    2012-12-01

    Sleep quality has significant effects on cognitive performance and is influenced by multiple factors such as stress. Contrary to the ideal, medical students and residents suffer from sleep deprivation and stress at times when they should achieve the greatest amount of learning. In order to examine the relationship between sleep quality and academic performance, 144 medical students undertaking the pre-clinical board exam answered a survey regarding their subjective sleep quality (Pittsburgh sleep quality index, PSQI), grades and subjective stress for three different time points: semester, pre- and post-exam. Academic performance correlated with stress and sleep quality pre-exam (r = 0.276, p performance meant low sleep quality and high stress), however not with the stress or sleep quality during the semester and post-exam. 59% of all participants exhibited clinically relevant sleep disturbances (PSQI > 5) during exam preparation compared to 29% during the semester and 8% post-exam. This study shows that in medical students it is not the generally poor sleepers, who perform worse in the medical board exams. Instead students who will perform worse on their exams seem to be more stressed and suffer from poor sleep quality. However, poor sleep quality may negatively impact test performance as well, creating a vicious circle. Furthermore, the rate of sleep disturbances in medical students should be cause for intervention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Excessive Daytime Sleepiness, Poor Quality Sleep, and Low Academic Performance in Medical Students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Duque, Manuel Enrique; Echeverri Chabur, Jorge Enrique; Machado-Alba, Jorge Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Quality of sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) affect cognitive ability and performance of medical students. This study attempts to determine the prevalence of EDS, sleep quality, and assess their association with poor academic performance in this population. A descriptive, observational study was conducted on a random sample of 217 medical students from the Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira, who completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire and the Epworth sleepiness scale. Sociodemographic, clinic and academic variables were also measured. Multivariate analyses for poor academic performance were performed. The included students had a mean age of 21.7±3.3 years, of whom 59.4% were men. Almost half (49.8%) had EDS criteria, and 79.3% were poor sleepers (PSQI ≥ 5), while 43.3% had poor academic performance during the last semester. The bivariate analysis showed that having used tobacco or alcohol until intoxicated, fairly bad subjective sleep quality, sleep efficiency performance. Sleep efficiency academic performance (P=.024; OR = 4.23; 95% CI, 1.12-15.42) in the multivariate analysis. A poor sleep quality determined by low efficiency was related to poor academic achievement at the end of semester in medical students. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Sleepwalking, violence and desire in the middle ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLehose, William

    2013-12-01

    This study discusses the phenomenon of medieval sleepwalking as a disorder of body and soul. In the thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries, medical and natural philosophical writers began to identify the category of the sleepwalker with unusual precision: the most common example of the disorder involved an aristocrat who rose, armed himself, and mounted his horse, all the while imagining that he was fighting enemies or hunting deer. Explanations for this extraordinary behaviour involved the physiology of sleep and the functioning of the brain. In particular, theorists believed that the imagination, a storehouse of images located towards the front of the brain, took control because reason and sensation had been disabled during sleep. As a consequence, daytime fears and traumas could come to the fore for some sleepers, causing them to act and react in their sleep in ways they could not, or were not willing to do, in their waking, rational state. As such, medieval medical writers viewed sleepwalking as a dangerous, disordered state which called into question the Aristotelian divide between waking and sleeping as well as the categories of reason, sensation and voluntary motion.

  1. Self-reported sleep duration and cognitive performance in older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, June C; Groeger, John A; Cheng, Grand H; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Chee, Michael W L

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is important for optimal cognitive functioning across the lifespan. Among older adults (≥55 years), self-reported short and long sleep durations have been repeatedly, albeit inconsistently, reported to elevate the risk for poor cognitive function. This meta-analytic review quantitatively summarizes the risk for poorer cognitive function among short and long sleepers in older adults. Eligible publications were searched online and manually. A total of 35 independent samples (N = 97,264) from 11 cross-sectional and seven prospective cohort studies were included. Pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were derived using random-effects models. Self-reported short and long sleep increased the odds for poor cognitive function by 1.40 (CI = 1.27-1.56) and 1.58 times (CI = 1.43-1.74), respectively. Effect sizes varied across studies and may have been moderated by both study type (cross-sectional and prospective) and cognitive domain assessed. For cross-sectional studies, extreme sleep durations were significantly associated with poorer multiple-domain performance, executive functions, verbal memory, and working memory capacity. Prospective cohort studies revealed the significant long-term impact of short and long sleep on multiple-domain performance only. These findings establish self-reported extreme sleep duration as a risk factor for cognitive aging. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence of psychological stress, depression and anxiety among medical students in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy, Mohamed; Hamed, Sherifa A

    2017-09-01

    Poor psychological health in medical students has been reported nationwide. This study estimated the prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress symptoms among medical students who were enrolled in a public university in Upper Egypt and determine the association of these morbidities with the students' basic socio-demographic variables. This cross-sectional study included 700 students. A self-administered, questionnaire for the socio-demographic characteristics, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS 21) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire were used for assessment. High frequencies of depression (65%), anxiety (73%) and stress (59.9%) were reported. Stress scores were significantly higher than depression and anxiety (P=0.001). 55.7% were poor sleepers. In univarate analysis, females, those living in the University campus/students' residence facility, in the preclinical years and with lower academic achievement had higher scores of DASS and PSQI compared to their comparative partners. Significant correlations were reported between stress with depression, anxiety and PQSI scores (P=0.0001). In multivariate analysis, stress scores were significantly associated with female sex, depression and anxiety scores. We conclude that depression, anxiety and stress symptoms are common in medical students of Assiut University relative to other schools and female gender was significantly correlated with these findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Self-Reported Sleep Duration and Weight-Control Strategies Among US High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Anne G.; Perry, Geraldine S.; Chapman, Daniel P.; Croft, Janet B.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To determine if self-reported sleep duration was associated with weight-control behaviors among US high school students. Design: National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Setting: United States, 2007. Participants: US high school students (N = 12,087). Measurements: Students were asked if they had engaged in several weight-control behaviors during the 30 days before the survey to lose or maintain weight. Self-reported sleep duration categories included very short (≤ 5 h), short (6 or 7 h), referent moderate (8 or 9 h), and long (≥ 10 h). Sex-specific logistic regression analyses with race/ethnicity, grade, and body mass index category as covariates were conducted using SUDAAN to account for complex study design. Results: Approximately half the students reported short sleep duration (51.8% of males and 54.3% of females), whereas very short sleep durations were reported by another 14.8% of males and 16.9% of females. Among males, very short sleepers were significantly (P sleep duration was associated with dieting and three unhealthy weight-control behaviors in this population. If our findings are confirmed, intervention studies should be conducted to examine the effect of educational interventions. Citation: Wheaton AG; Perry GS; Chapman DP; Croft JB. Self-reported sleep duration and weight-control strategies among US high school students. SLEEP 2013;36(8):1139-1145. PMID:23904673

  4. Sleep duration and risk of obesity among a sample of Victorian school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Bridget; Malakellis, Mary; Whelan, Jill; Millar, Lynne; Swinburn, Boyd; Allender, Steven; Strugnell, Claudia

    2016-03-09

    Insufficient sleep is potentially an important modifiable risk factor for obesity and poor physical activity and sedentary behaviours among children. However, inconsistencies across studies highlight the need for more objective measures. This paper examines the relationship between sleep duration and objectively measured physical activity, sedentary time and weight status, among a sample of Victorian Primary School children. A sub-sample of 298 grades four (n = 157) and six (n = 132) Victorian primary school children (aged 9.2-13.2 years) with complete accelerometry and anthropometry data, from 39 schools, were taken from a pilot study of a larger state based cluster randomized control trial in 2013. Data comprised: researcher measured height and weight; accelerometry derived physical activity and sedentary time; and self-reported sleep duration and hypothesised confounding factors (e.g. age, gender and environmental factors). Compared with sufficient sleepers (67 %), those with insufficient sleep (sleep and objectively measured physical activity levels or sedentary time was found. The strong positive relationship between weight status and sleep deprivation merits further research though PA and sedentary time do not seem to be involved in the relationship. Strategies to improve sleep duration may help obesity prevention initiatives in the future.

  5. Stepping Stones Triple P: an RCT of a parenting program with parents of a child diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittingham, Koa; Sofronoff, Kate; Sheffield, Jeanie; Sanders, Matthew R

    2009-05-01

    Whilst the Triple P Positive Parenting Program has a large evidence base (Sanders, Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review 2:71-90, 1999; Sanders, Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 68:624-640, 2000) and preliminary evidence indicates that Stepping Stones Triple P is also efficacious (Roberts, Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 35(2):180-193, 2006), to date Stepping Stones has not been evaluated with the ASD population. Fifty-nine families with a child with ASD aged between 2 and 9 participated in this randomized controlled trial. The results demonstrate significant improvements in parental reports of child behaviour and parenting styles with the treatment effects for child behaviour, parental over reactivity and parental verbosity being maintained at follow-up 6 months later. Further, the results suggest significant improvements in parental satisfaction and conflict about parenting as well as a sleeper effect for parental efficacy. The results indicate that Stepping Stones Triple P is a promising intervention for parents of children with ASD. Limitations and future research are also addressed.

  6. Sleep Duration and Age-Related Changes in Brain Structure and Cognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, June C.; Loh, Kep Kee; Zheng, Hui; Sim, Sam K.Y.; Chee, Michael W.L.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the contribution of sleep duration and quality to age-related changes in brain structure and cognitive performance in relatively healthy older adults. Design: Community-based longitudinal brain and cognitive aging study using a convenience sample. Setting: Participants were studied in a research laboratory. Participants: Relatively healthy adults aged 55 y and older at study commencement. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging and neuropsychological assessment every 2 y. Subjective assessments of sleep duration and quality and blood samples were obtained. Each hour of reduced sleep duration at baseline augmented the annual expansion rate of the ventricles by 0.59% (P = 0.007) and the annual decline rate in global cognitive performance by 0.67% (P = 0.050) in the subsequent 2 y after controlling for the effects of age, sex, education, and body mass index. In contrast, global sleep quality at baseline did not modulate either brain or cognitive aging. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein, a marker of systemic inflammation, showed no correlation with baseline sleep duration, brain structure, or cognitive performance. Conclusions: In healthy older adults, short sleep duration is associated with greater age-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline. These associations are not associated with elevated inflammatory responses among short sleepers. Citation: Lo JC, Loh KK, Zheng H, Sim SK, Chee MW. Sleep duration and age-related changes in brain structure and cognitive performance. SLEEP 2014;37(7):1171-1178. PMID:25061245

  7. Chronotype differences in circadian rhythms of temperature, melatonin, and sleepiness as measured in a modified constant routine protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Lack

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Leon Lack, Michelle Bailey, Nicole Lovato, Helen WrightSchool of Psychology, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaAbstract: Evening chronotypes typically have sleep patterns timed 2–3 hours later than morning chronotypes. Ambulatory studies have suggested that differences in the timing of underlying circadian rhythms as a cause of the sleep period differences. However, differences in endogenous circadian rhythms are best explored in laboratory protocols such as the constant routine. We used a 27-hour modified constant routine to measure the endogenous core temperature and melatonin circadian rhythms as well as subjective and objective sleepiness from hourly 15-minute sleep opportunities. Ten (8f morning type individuals were compared with 12 (8f evening types. All were young, healthy, good sleepers. The typical sleep onset, arising times, circadian phase markers for temperature and melatonin and objective sleepiness were all 2–3 hours later for the evening types than morning types. However, consistent with past studies the differences for the subjective sleepiness rhythms were much greater (5–9 hours. Therefore, the present study supports the important role of subjective alertness/sleepiness in determining the sleep period differences between morning and evening types and the possible vulnerability of evening types to delayed sleep phase disorder.Keywords: chronotype, constant routine, circadian rhythms, sleep propensity, subjective sleepiness

  8. The association between sleep duration, snoring and prevalent type 2 diabetes mellitus with regard to gender and menopausal status: the CKB study in Zhejiang rural area, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hai-Bin; Wang, Hao; Hu, Ru-Ying; Zhong, Jie-Ming; Qian, Yi-Jian; Wang, Chun-Mei; Xie, Kai-Xu; Chen, Ling-Li; Gong, Wei-Wei; Guo, Yu; Bian, Zheng; Chen, Zheng-Ming; Li, Li-Ming; Yu, Min

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the association between sleep duration, snoring and diabetes according to gender and menopausal status in rural China. The data were part of the baseline survey of China Kadoorie Biobank, from a rural county in the south-east costal Zhejiang province. Participants including 24,027 men and 33,677 women aged 30-79 years were enrolled during 2004-2008. Multivariable logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for diabetes. Sleep duration was shown to have a U-shaped association with diabetes in women, in particular in postmenopausal women after adjustment for potential confounders. Compared with 7-h sleepers, ORs (95 % CIs) of sleep duration ≤5 and ≥10 h for diabetes were 1.32 (1.02-1.69) and 1.30 (1.03-1.65), respectively, in postmenopausal women (P for quadratic trend = 0.016). However, this U-shaped association was not obvious in men and premenopausal women. Frequently snoring was positively associated with diabetes in all participants. However, this association was not independent of socioeconomic status, health behaviors, obesity and chronic diseases. With increasing sleep duration, the proportion of frequently snoring increased in all participants (P trend snoring had linear trend with sleep duration. Postmenopausal status and the duration of menopause increased the odds of diabetes.

  9. Insomnia in a displaced population is related to war-associated remembered stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basishvili, Tamar; Eliozishvili, Marine; Maisuradze, Lia; Lortkipanidze, Nani; Nachkebia, Nargiz; Oniani, Tengiz; Gvilia, Irma; Darchia, Nato

    2012-08-01

    Although traumatic events are presumed to cause sleep disturbances, particularly insomnia, sleep in populations subjected to forced displacement has received little attention. The present study examined the prevalence of insomnia and associated factors in internally displaced persons (IDPs) from Abkhazia 15 years after displacement to Tbilisi. Detailed subjective information about sleep-wake habits, sleep-related and stress-related parameters were obtained from 87 IDPs categorized into good sleepers and insomniacs. The Insomnia Severity Index, Perceived Stress Scale and Beck Depression Inventory were administered. The incidence of insomnia was 41.4%. The majority of insomniacs strongly believed that war-related stress accounted for the onset of their insomnia. Stepwise regression (95% confidence interval) revealed four variables significantly associated with insomnia status: self-estimated influence of war related stress (odds ratio (OR) = 2.51), frequency of nightmares (OR = 1.6), Perceived Stress Scale score (OR = 1.14) and Beck Depression Inventory score (OR = 1.12). Insomnia in IDPs was strongly related to war-associated remembered stress. ‛Over thinking' about major stress exposure enhanced IDPs' vulnerability to insomnia. These findings have implications for the management of insomnia and associated impairment of daytime functioning in IDPs. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Sleep characteristics and cardiovascular events in a large Swedish cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Anna; Bellocco, Rino; Sundström, Johan; Adami, Hans-Olov; Åkerstedt, Torbjörn; Trolle Lagerros, Ylva

    2013-06-01

    Limited evidence suggests that the association between sleep duration and cardiovascular events is strongest in individuals who also report sleep disturbances. We investigated sleep duration and insomnia symptoms in relation to incident cardiovascular events in the Swedish National March Cohort comprising 41,192 adults. Habitual sleep duration and difficulty falling asleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, early morning awakening, and nonrestorative sleep were self-reported in 1997. During 13.2 years of follow-up, we identified 4,031 events (myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, or death from cardiovascular disease) in the Swedish National Patient Register and the Cause of Death Register. After adjustment for potential confounders, short sleep duration (≤5 h) was associated with slightly increased risks of overall cardiovascular events and, specifically, myocardial infarction: hazard ratio, HR (95% confidence interval) 1.24 (1.06-1.44) and 1.42 (1.15-1.76), respectively. These HRs were attenuated as we included BMI, depressive symptoms and other relevant covariates in our analysis. Insomnia symptoms per se were unrelated to risk. However, in a joint analysis, there was some evidence that short sleepers who reported frequent insomnia symptoms had the highest HRs (1.26-1.39) of overall cardiovascular events. Short sleep or insomnia symptoms without the other conferred no increased risk. Our results suggest that symptoms of sleep disturbance should be taken into account when assessing the association between short sleep and cardiovascular disease.

  11. Increased EEG sigma and beta power during NREM sleep in primary insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelhalder, Kai; Regen, Wolfram; Feige, Bernd; Holz, Johannes; Piosczyk, Hannah; Baglioni, Chiara; Riemann, Dieter; Nissen, Christoph

    2012-12-01

    The hyperarousal model of primary insomnia suggests that a deficit of attenuating arousal during sleep might cause the experience of non-restorative sleep. In the current study, we examined EEG spectral power values for standard frequency bands as indices of cortical arousal and sleep protecting mechanisms during sleep in 25 patients with primary insomnia and 29 good sleeper controls. Patients with primary insomnia demonstrated significantly elevated spectral power values in the EEG beta and sigma frequency band during NREM stage 2 sleep. No differences were observed in other frequency bands or during REM sleep. Based on prior studies suggesting that EEG beta activity represents a marker of cortical arousal and EEG sleep spindle (sigma) activity is an index of sleep protective mechanisms, our findings may provide further evidence for the concept that a simultaneous activation of wake-promoting and sleep-protecting neural activity patterns contributes to the experience of non-restorative sleep in primary insomnia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Stress and sleep reactivity: a prospective investigation of the stress-diathesis model of insomnia.

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    Drake, Christopher L; Pillai, Vivek; Roth, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    To prospectively assess sleep reactivity as a diathesis of insomnia, and to delineate the interaction between this diathesis and naturalistic stress in the development of insomnia among normal sleepers. Longitudinal. Community-based. 2,316 adults from the Evolution of Pathways to Insomnia Cohort (EPIC) with no history of insomnia or depression (46.8 ± 13.2 y; 60% female). None. Participants reported the number of stressful events they encountered at baseline (Time 1), as well as the level of cognitive intrusion they experienced in response to each stressor. Stressful events (OR = 1.13; P insomnia one year hence (Time 2). Intrusion mediated the effects of stressful events on risk for insomnia (P insomnia (OR = 1.78; P insomnia as a function of intrusion was significantly higher in individuals with high sleep reactivity. Trait sleep reactivity also constituted a significant risk for depression (OR = 1.67; P Insomnia at Time 2 significantly mediated this effect (P insomnia, and that it triggers insomnia by exacerbating the effects of stress-induced intrusion. Sleep reactivity is also a precipitant of depression, as mediated by insomnia. These findings support the stress-diathesis model of insomnia, while highlighting sleep reactivity as an important diathesis. Drake CL, Pillai V, Roth T. Stress and sleep reactivity: a prospective investigation of the stress-diathesis model of insomnia.

  13. Insomnia and sleep misperception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, C H; Ceklic, T; St-Hilaire, P; Desmarais, F; Pérusse, A D; Lefrançois, J; Pedneault-Drolet, M

    2014-10-01

    Sleep misperception is often observed in insomnia individuals (INS). The extent of misperception varies between different types of INS. The following paper comprised sections which will be aimed at studying the sleep EEG and compares it to subjective reports of sleep in individuals suffering from either psychophysiological insomnia or paradoxical insomnia and good sleeper controls. The EEG can be studied without any intervention (thus using the raw data) via either PSG or fine quantitative EEG analyses (power spectral analysis [PSA]), identifying EEG patterns as in the case of cyclic alternating patterns (CAPs) or by decorticating the EEG while scoring the different transient or phasic events (K-Complexes or sleep spindles). One can also act on the on-going EEG by delivering stimuli so to study their impact on cortical measures as in the case of event-related potential studies (ERPs). From the paucity of studies available using these different techniques, a general conclusion can be reached: sleep misperception is not an easy phenomenon to quantify and its clinical value is not well recognized. Still, while none of the techniques or EEG measures defined in the paper is available and/or recommended to diagnose insomnia, ERPs might be the most indicated technique to study hyperarousal and sleep quality in different types of INS. More research shall also be dedicated to EEG patterns and transient phasic events as these EEG scoring techniques can offer a unique insight of sleep misperception. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Patients with Insomnia: A Repeated Measurement Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Spiegelhalder

    Full Text Available Chronic insomnia is one of the most prevalent central nervous system disorders. It is characterized by increased arousal levels, however, the neurobiological causes and correlates of hyperarousal in insomnia remain to be further determined. In the current study, magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used in the morning and evening in a well-characterized sample of 20 primary insomnia patients (12 females; 8 males; 42.7 ± 13.4 years and 20 healthy good sleepers (12 females; 8 males; 44.1 ± 10.6 years. The most important inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters of the central nervous system, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA and glutamate/glutamine (Glx, were assessed in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. The primary hypothesis, a diurnal effect on GABA levels in patients with insomnia, could not be confirmed. Moreover, the current results did not support previous findings of altered GABA levels in individuals with insomnia. Exploratory analyses, however, suggested that GABA levels in the ACC may be positively associated with habitual sleep duration, and, thus, reduced GABA levels may be a trait marker of objective sleep disturbances. Moreover, there was a significant GROUP x MEASUREMENT TIME interaction effect on Glx in the DLPFC with increasing Glx levels across the day in the patients but not in the control group. Therefore, Glx levels may reflect hyperarousal at bedtime in those with insomnia. Future confirmatory studies should include larger sample sizes to investigate brain metabolites in different subgroups of insomnia.

  15. Variations in Daily Sleep Quality and Type 1 Diabetes Management in Late Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Sara L; Queen, Tara L; Butner, Jonathan; Wiebe, Deborah; Berg, Cynthia A

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE : To determine how between- and within-person variability in perceived sleep quality were associated with adolescent diabetes management. A total of 236 older adolescents with type 1 diabetes reported daily for 2 weeks on sleep quality, self-regulatory failures, frequency of blood glucose (BG) checks, and BG values. Average, inconsistent, and daily deviations in sleep quality were examined.  RESULTS : Hierarchical linear models indicated that poorer average and worse daily perceived sleep quality (compared with one's average) was each associated with more self-regulatory failures. Sleep quality was not associated with frequency of BG checking. Poorer average sleep quality was related to greater risk of high BG. Furthermore, inconsistent and daily deviations in sleep quality interacted to predict higher BG, with more consistent sleepers benefitting more from a night of high-quality sleep.  CONCLUSIONS : Good, consistent sleep quality during late adolescence may benefit diabetes management by reducing self-regulatory failures and risk of high BG. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Analisis Penyebab Nyeri dan Ketidaknyamanan dalam Bekerja pada Pengrajin Keset Kain Limbah–Pringapus Semarang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rida Zuraida

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This research identified any kind of work condition and craftsman’s posture that trigger the pain and discomfort for craftsman of doormat in Pringapus, Semarang. Observation of the work condition is conducted including work facilities and their posture during sewing process. To identify their pain and discomfort, Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ is used as reference. The result is used as an input for rapid upper limb assessment worksheet (RULA to determine the level of the risk. RULA’s final score is indicated the conditionsneed further investigation and change may be needed. Based on the analysis using fishbone diagram, to overcome pain/discomfort in the area of the neck and the shoulder, high adjustment of table and seat is suggested, because the evidence shows they trigger the craftsmen’s bad posture. For pain/discomfort of back and waist, the seat should have good back support. Whereas for the hip, the craftsman suggested to use the seat with thick and wider sleeper, so they can sit comfortably. For foot problems, to relieve the pain for their free feet, it is suggested to use a bench that functions as foot rest; and for the sewing feet, it is suggested to give heels support so the sewers' heels can be free from strain while sewing.

  17. Factors related to self-reported social anxiety symptoms among incoming university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shu Hui; Sun, Zih-Jie; Lee, I Hui; Lee, Chih-Ting; Chen, Kao Chin; Tsai, Chung Hung; Yang, Yen Kuang; Yang, Yi Ching

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the lifestyle/social, personality trait and mental factors among incoming university students with higher self-reported social anxiety symptoms (SAS). A total of 5126 incoming university students were recruited. The test battery included a self-administered questionnaire that examined personal lifestyle, the Measurement of Support Functions, the Chinese Internet Addiction Scale-Revision, the Organizational Citizenship Behaviour Scale, the Social Phobia Inventory, the suicide ideation from the Brief Symptoms Rating Scale and the Pittsburgh Sleep Questionnaire. SAS (23.7%) were prevalent. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that the significant predictors of higher levels of SAS were being an undergraduate student and a non-smoker, having lower Measurement of Support Functions score (poorer social support), having higher Chinese Internet Addiction Scale-Revision score (Internet addiction), having lower Organizational Citizenship Behaviour Scale score (less altruistic behaviour), having suicide ideation and having higher Pittsburgh Sleep Questionnaire score (poorer sleeper). Given the high prevalence of SAS among university students, it is necessary to build a better strategy to detect students with potential social anxiety-related problems/disorders or other mental problems early on. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidants Contribute to Selected Sleep Quality and Cardiometabolic Health Relationships: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagasabai, Thirumagal; Ardern, Chris I

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is vital for cardiometabolic health, but a societal shift toward poor sleep is a prominent feature of many modern cultures. Concurrently, factors such as diet and lifestyle have also changed and may mediate the relationship between sleep quality and cardiometabolic health. Objectives were to explore (1) the interrelationship and (2) mediating effect of inflammation, oxidative stress, and antioxidants on sleep quality and cardiometabolic health. Cross-sectional data from the US National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey 2005-06 (≥20 y; N = 2,072) was used. Cardiometabolic health was defined as per the Joint Interim Statement; overall sleep quality was determined from six sleep habits and categorized as good, fair, poor, and very poor. Fair quality sleepers had optimal inflammation, oxidative stress, and antioxidant levels. Inflammation was above the current clinical reference range across all sleep quality categories, while oxidative stress was only within the clinical reference range for fair sleep quality. Selected sleep quality-cardiometabolic health relationships were mediated by inflammation, oxidative stress, and antioxidants and were moderated by sex. Our results provide initial evidence of a potential role for inflammation, oxidative stress, and antioxidants in the pathway between poor sleep quality-cardiometabolic decline. Further prospective research is needed to confirm our results.

  19. Transition into daylight saving time influences the fragmentation of the rest-activity cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuulio-Henriksson Annamari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Daylight saving time is widely adopted. Little is known about its influence on the daily rest-activity cycles. We decided to explore the effects of transition into daylight saving time on the circadian rhythm of activity. Methods We monitored the rest-activity cycles with the use of wrist-worn accelerometer on a sample of ten healthy adults for ten days around the transition into summer time. Identical protocols were carried out on the same individuals in two consecutive years, yielding data on 200 person-days for analysis in this study. Results There was no significant effect on the rest-activity cycle in the sample as a whole. Fragmentation of the rest-activity cycle was enhanced in a subgroup of persons having sleep for eight hours or less (P = 0.04 but reduced in those who preferred to sleep for more than eight hours per night (P = 0.05. The average level of motor activity was increased in persons having the morning preference for daily activity patterns (P = 0.01. Conclusion Transition into daylight saving time may have a disruptive effect on the rest-activity cycle in those healthy adults who are short-sleepers or more of the evening type.

  20. A brief afternoon nap following nocturnal sleep restriction: which nap duration is most recuperative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Amber; Lack, Leon

    2006-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the benefits of different length naps relative to no nap and to analyze the electroencephalographic elements that may account for the benefits. A repeated-measures design included 5 experimental conditions: a no-nap control and naps of precisely 5, 10, 20, and 30 minutes of sleep. Nocturnal sleep restricted to about 5 hours in participants' homes was followed by afternoon naps at 3:00 PM and 3 hours of postnap testing conducted in a controlled laboratory environment. Twenty-four healthy, young adults who were good sleepers and not regular nappers. The 5-minute nap produced few benefits in comparison with the no-nap control. The 10-minute nap produced immediate improvements in all outcome measures (including sleep latency, subjective sleepiness, fatigue, vigor, and cognitive performance), with some of these benefits maintained for as long as 155 minutes. The 20-minute nap was associated with improvements emerging 35 minutes after napping and lasting up to 125 minutes after napping. The 30-minute nap produced a period of impaired alertness and performance immediately after napping, indicative of sleep inertia, followed by improvements lasting up to 155 minutes after the nap. These findings suggest that the 10-minute nap was overall the most effective afternoon nap duration of the nap lengths examined in this study. The implications from these results also suggest a need to consider a process occurring in the first 10 minutes of sleep that may account for the benefits associated with brief naps.

  1. The short-term benefits of brief and long naps following nocturnal sleep restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietzel, A J; Lack, L C

    2001-05-01

    The purpose was to remedy the lack of experimental studies directly comparing the effects of brief and long daytime naps following nocturnal sleep restriction. Twelve young adult healthy sleepers participated in a repeated measures design comparing the effects of no nap, a 10-minute nap, and a 30-minute afternoon nap in each case following a night of 4.7 hours of total sleep time. Objective and subjective alertness measures and cognitive performance measures were taken before, then 5, 35, and 60 minutes after the termination of the nap. N/A. N/A. N/A. In the no nap condition measures showed either no change or a decreases of alertness and performance across the testing period. Following the 10-minute nap there was an immediate improvement in subjective alertness and cognitive performance which was sustained for the hour of post nap testing. Immediately following the 30 minute nap most measures of alertness and performance declined but showed some recovery by the end of testing. Because the delayed benefits following the 30-minute nap may be due to sleep inertia, longer post-nap testing periods should be investigated. However, we conclude that the detrimental effects of sleep restriction were more rapidly and significantly ameliorated, at least within the hour following the nap, by a 10-minute afternoon nap.

  2. The effects of railway transportation on the enrichment of heavy metals in the artificial soil on railway cut slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaoqiong; Wang, KeXiu; Ai, Ying Wei; Li, Wei; Gao, Hongying; Fang, Chen

    2014-02-01

    Heavy metal contamination in the artificial soils on the railway cut slopes may have great influence on the revegetation of the cut slopes. The purpose of this study was to assess the variation of heavy metal contamination levels with railway operation time and analyze their possible resources. A total of 100 soil samples from four cut slopes, which were affected by railway transportation for different years, were analyzed for metal pollution (Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe). The concentrations of Cd, Pb showed increasing trend with increasing operation time of railways, while such trend was not found in Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe. According to the soil quality standard of China, Cd was considered to have considerable contamination, while Pb has less, but Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe have none. Moreover, cadmium exhibited remarkably higher levels rather than those reported in other studies. Enrichment factors and ecological index showed that Cd and Pb showed a moderate enrichment and a considerable ecological risk in most of the soil samples. The results of descriptive statistic, principal component analysis, cluster analysis and correlation analysis were totally consistent with each other. Their results revealed that Cr, Cu, Zn and Fe had common origins, and they may come from natural resources. While Cd and Pb were significantly influenced by railway transportation, leaked cargos, fuel combustion, the use of lubricate oils and sleeper impregnation oils during railway transportation may be their main resources.

  3. The relationship between lifestyle regularity and subjective sleep quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Timothy H.; Reynolds, Charles F 3rd; Buysse, Daniel J.; DeGrazia, Jean M.; Kupfer, David J.

    2003-01-01

    In previous work we have developed a diary instrument-the Social Rhythm Metric (SRM), which allows the assessment of lifestyle regularity-and a questionnaire instrument--the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), which allows the assessment of subjective sleep quality. The aim of the present study was to explore the relationship between lifestyle regularity and subjective sleep quality. Lifestyle regularity was assessed by both standard (SRM-17) and shortened (SRM-5) metrics; subjective sleep quality was assessed by the PSQI. We hypothesized that high lifestyle regularity would be conducive to better sleep. Both instruments were given to a sample of 100 healthy subjects who were studied as part of a variety of different experiments spanning a 9-yr time frame. Ages ranged from 19 to 49 yr (mean age: 31.2 yr, s.d.: 7.8 yr); there were 48 women and 52 men. SRM scores were derived from a two-week diary. The hypothesis was confirmed. There was a significant (rho = -0.4, p subjects with higher levels of lifestyle regularity reported fewer sleep problems. This relationship was also supported by a categorical analysis, where the proportion of "poor sleepers" was doubled in the "irregular types" group as compared with the "non-irregular types" group. Thus, there appears to be an association between lifestyle regularity and good sleep, though the direction of causality remains to be tested.

  4. Adult insecure attachment plays a role in hyperarousal and emotion dysregulation in Insomnia Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palagini, Laura; Petri, Eleonora; Novi, Martina; Caruso, Danila; Moretto, Umberto; Riemann, Dieter

    2018-04-01

    Studies show that unhelpful cognitive processes play a role in insomnia, whereas interpersonal factors have been less studied in insomnia. Attachment theory can be used as a cognitive-interpersonal framework for understanding insomnia. Because attachment insecurity (vs security) is related to psychiatric disorders the objective was to study the attachment style in insomnia. To this aim sixty-four subjects with Insomnia Disorder (DSM-5) and 38 good sleepers were evaluate in a cross-sectional study with: Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ), Arousal Predisposition Scale (APS), Pre-Sleep Arousal Scale (PSAS) and Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS). Differences in means between groups were assessed using t-test or Mann-Whitney U/Wilcoxon test. Linear/multiple regression analyses were performed. Subjects with insomnia (mean age 47.1 + 13 yrs) presented an insecure attachment style and higher scores in all the scales (ASQ, APS, PSAS, DERS p attachment was related to hyperarousal trait (p = 0.02), pre-sleep hyperarousal (p = 0.04) and emotion dysregulation (p = 0.002). In conclusion subjects with insomnia showed an insecure attachment which was related to hyperarousal trait, pre-sleep hyperarousal and emotion dysregulation. It may intervene in the trajectory of insomnia starting from predisposition to perpetuation. Clinical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Development of Sleep Medicine: A Historical Sketch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Hartmut; Salzarulo, Piero

    2016-07-15

    For centuries the scope of sleep disorders in medical writings was limited to those disturbances which were either perceived by the sleeper him- or herself as troublesome, such as insomnia, or which were recognized by an observer as strange behavioral acts during sleep, such as sleepwalking or sleep terrors. Awareness of other sleep disorders, which are caused by malfunction of a physiological system during sleep, such as sleep-related respiratory disorders, were widely unknown or ignored before sleep monitoring techniques became available, mainly in the second half of the 20(th) century. Finally, circadian sleep-wake disorders were recognized as a group of disturbances by its own only when chronobiology and sleep research began to interact extensively in the last two decades of the 20(th) century. Sleep medicine as a medical specialty with its own diagnostic procedures and therapeutic strategies could be established only when key findings in neurophysiology and basic sleep research allowed a breakthrough in the understanding of the sleeping brain, mainly since the second half of the last century. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  6. Moving to Learn: How Guiding the Hands Can Set the Stage for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Neon; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2016-09-01

    Previous work has found that guiding problem-solvers' movements can have an immediate effect on their ability to solve a problem. Here we explore these processes in a learning paradigm. We ask whether guiding a learner's movements can have a delayed effect on learning, setting the stage for change that comes about only after instruction. Children were taught movements that were either relevant or irrelevant to solving mathematical equivalence problems and were told to produce the movements on a series of problems before they received instruction in mathematical equivalence. Children in the relevant movement condition improved after instruction significantly more than children in the irrelevant movement condition, despite the fact that the children showed no improvement in their understanding of mathematical equivalence on a ratings task or on a paper-and-pencil test taken immediately after the movements but before instruction. Movements of the body can thus be used to sow the seeds of conceptual change. But those seeds do not necessarily come to fruition until after the learner has received explicit instruction in the concept, suggesting a "sleeper effect" of gesture on learning. Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  7. Sleep paralysis, sexual abuse, and space alien abduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Richard J; Clancy, Susan A

    2005-03-01

    Sleep paralysis accompanied by hypnopompic ('upon awakening') hallucinations is an often-frightening manifestation of discordance between the cognitive/perceptual and motor aspects of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Awakening sleepers become aware of an inability to move, and sometimes experience intrusion of dream mentation into waking consciousness (e.g. seeing intruders in the bedroom). In this article, we summarize two studies. In the first study, we assessed 10 individuals who reported abduction by space aliens and whose claims were linked to apparent episodes of sleep paralysis during which hypnopompic hallucinations were interpreted as alien beings. In the second study, adults reporting repressed, recovered, or continuous memories of childhood sexual abuse more often reported sleep paralysis than did a control group. Among the 31 reporting sleep paralysis, only one person linked it to abuse memories. This person was among the six recovered memory participants who reported sleep paralysis (i.e. 17% rate of interpreting it as abuse-related). People rely on personally plausible cultural narratives to interpret these otherwise baffling sleep paralysis episodes.

  8. Hippocampal substructural vulnerability to sleep disturbance and cognitive impairment in patients with chronic primary insomnia: magnetic resonance imaging morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Eun Yeon; Kim, Hosung; Suh, Sooyeon; Hong, Seung Bong

    2014-07-01

    Despite compelling evidence from animal studies indicating hippocampal subfield-specific vulnerability to poor sleep quality and related cognitive impairment, there have been no human magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies investigating the relationship between hippocampal subfield volume and sleep disturbance. Our aim was to investigate the pattern of volume changes across hippocampal subfields in patients with primary insomnia relative to controls. Pointwise morphometry allowed for volume measurements of hippocampal regions on T1-weighted MRI. University hospital. Twenty-seven unmedicated patients (age: 51.2 ± 9.6 y) and 30 good sleepers as controls (50.4 ± 7.1 y). N/A. We compared hippocampal subfield volumes between patients and controls and correlated volume with clinical and neuropsychological features in patients. Patients exhibited bilateral atrophy across all hippocampal subfields (P sleep quality (higher Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and higher arousal index of polysomnography) (r 0.45, P sleep fragmentation and related chronic stress condition. Atrophy in the CA3-4-DG region was associated with impaired cognitive functions in patients. These observations may provide insight into pathophysiological mechanisms that make patients with chronic sleep disturbance vulnerable to cognitive impairment. Joo EY, Kim H, Suh S, Hong SB. Hippocampal substructural vulnerability to sleep disturbance and cognitive impairment in patients with chronic primary insomnia: magnetic resonance imaging morphometry.

  9. Ontogeny of morningness-eveningness across the adult human lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randler, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Sleep timing of humans can be classified alongside a continuum from early to late sleepers, with some people (larks) having an early activity, early bed, and rise times and others (owls) with a more nocturnally orientated activity. Only a few studies reported that morningness-eveningness changes significantly during the adult lifespan based on community samples. Here, I applied a different methodological approach to seek for evidence for the age-related changes in morningness-eveningness preferences by using a meta-data from all available studies. The new aspect of this cross-sectional approach is that only a few studies themselves address the age-related changes of the adult lifespan development, but that many studies are available that provide exactly the data needed. The studies came from 27 countries and included 36,939 participants. Age was highly significantly correlated with scores on the Composite Scale of Morningness ( r = 0.70). This relationship seems linear, because a linear regression explained nearly the same amount of variance compared to other models such as logarithmic, quadratic, or cubic models. The standard deviation of age correlated with the standard deviation of CSM scores ( r = 0.55), suggesting when there is much variance in age in a study; in turn, there is much variance in morningness. This meta-analytical approach shows that morningness-eveningness changes across the adult lifespan and that older age is related to higher morningness.

  10. Insomnia in anxiety: sleep EEG changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdet, C; Goldenberg, F

    1994-01-01

    Anxiety is often paired with sleep disturbances and both interact in a quite complex manner. Sleep (and vigilance) problems are often included in the descriptive definition or in the diagnostic criteria for anxiety disorders. Nevertheless, if anxiety may cause sleep disturbances, it is also known that sleep deprivation may produce symptoms which fall within the symptom complex of anxiety. In this paper, some of the methodological issues encountered when studying sleep and anxiety are discussed. Polygraphic recordings of sleep in anxious patients have consistently shown an increased sleep latency and, quite often, also exhibited a reduced sleep time, a reduced total sleep time, less slow-wave sleep, a greater arousal index and an increased duration of wakefulness during sleep. From our own study, we also report anomalies of the first night cycle in anxious poor sleepers who are otherwise indistinguishable from normal controls (with regard to the 'classical' sleep parameters). We have also observed the large interindividual variability of numbers of sleep parameters in anxious people. The question of a potential heterogeneity of the studied groups with regard to their clinical presentation as well as their sleep profile has been raised through our research as well. It is apparent that strategies for exploring the source of the potential heterogeneity of anxiety disorders are still needed.

  11. Homeless who accessed a healthy living centre in Swansea, South Wales: an assessment of the impact of oral ill-health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Wayne; Keauffling, Janet

    2009-07-01

    To quantify the way that oral diseases affect the lives of homeless and vulnerable people in Swansea, using the short-form Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). A convenience sample of people using the services of a healthy living centre for the homeless was surveyed using a questionnaire and the short-form OHIP-14. One hundred subjects were recruited to the study. The mean score for the OHIP-14 was 21.8 (SD 17.0). The most commonly reported impacts experienced were problems with toothache, discomfort, ability to relax, and feeling ashamed regarding the appearance of teeth. Of the different categories of homeless people, rough sleepers experienced higher levels of impact (P=0.004). Those having more than 20 teeth were more likely to experience lower levels of impact (P=0.001). The survey highlighted an increased prevalence of oral health impacts in this special needs group. In addition to physical factors, psychosocial factors must be considered, particularly with regard to appearance and psychological disability and discomfort, in the development of services.

  12. Sleep and Productivity Benefits of Digital Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia: A Randomized Controlled Trial Conducted in the Workplace Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostock, Sophie; Luik, Annemarie I; Espie, Colin A

    2016-07-01

    Evaluating digital cognitive behavioral therapy (dCBT) for insomnia in a workplace environment. Within a randomized controlled trial in a Fortune 500 company, we randomized 270 self-identified poor sleepers [180 M/90 F: mean age 33.6 years (23 to 56 years)] to dCBT (n = 135) or waiting list (WL, n = 135). dCBT comprised six online sessions delivered by an animated therapist. Major assessments were at baseline and posttreatment. Sleep Condition Indicator (SCI) scores were significantly higher for the dCBT group [interaction term: F (1,485) = 15.63, P < 0.0001], representing Cohen's d of 1.10 following dCBT (d = 0.34 for WL). On the Work Productivity and Impairment questionnaire, "presenteeism" demonstrated significant improvements following dCBT [F(1,485) = 10.99, P = 0.001: d = 0.64 for dCBT, d = 0.09 for WL]. Effects for "abseenteeism" failed to reach statistical significance (P = 0.101). dCBT is effective in improving sleep and work-based productivity in adults with insomnia.

  13. Advantage of using high strength self compacting concrete for precast product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdono, Ferryandy; Agustin, Winda; Soeprapto, Gambiro; Sunarso, Mukhlis

    2017-11-01

    According to the development in the world of construction, the need for precast concrete also increases. Now the day there are many products with narrow range reinforcement and difficult dimensions. The ordinary concrete is difficult to pour in a mold with narrow range reinforcement inside without vibrator because the concrete can't fill in the gaps between the bars. SCC (Self Compacting Concrete) is a concrete that precast concrete industry needs to. The using of SCC also supports the green construction through the cement reducing and reducing the use of vibrator that requires not less energy. This research is using EFNARC standard as a condition of admission SCC (filling ability, passing ability, segregation resistance), and performed well against the application of the product by the production of Railway Sleeper without using a vibrator. The results of this study, the LB-2 and LB-3 qualified as SCC and compressive strength is expected that greater than 70 MPa, as well as products quality, is equal to standard and can be mass produced with the efficiency of the price of concrete up to 11%.

  14. Late Sleeping Affects Sleep Duration and Body Mass Index in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh G.Kathrotia1,

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available During adolescence, there is a tendency to sleep late andsleep less because of altered psychosocial and life-stylechanges. Recent studies have demonstrated the link betweensleeping less and gaining weight in children, adolescents, andadults. We studied the effect of late sleeping and sleepingless on body mass index (BMI in medical college freshmen.All participants were adolescents (104 male and 38 femaleadolescents, mean age 17.77±0.79 years. After obtaininginformed consent, they filled out a questionnaire about theirsleeping habits. Height and weight were measured after abrief history taking and clinical examination. BMI increasedsignificantly with decrease in total sleep duration and withdelayed bedtime. Late sleeping individuals (after midnighthad significantly less sleep duration (6.78 hours v 7.74 hours,P<0.001, more day time sleepiness (85.2% v 69.3%,P=0.033 and more gap between dinner time and going tosleep (234.16 min v 155.45 min, P<0.001. Increased BMI inlate sleepers may be explained by low physical activity duringthe day caused by excess sleepiness and increased calorieintake with a gap of 5-6 hours between dinner and sleep.Sleep habits of late sleeping and sleeping less contribute toincrease BMI in adolescents.

  15. Sleep quality in women with systemic lupus erythematosus: contributing factors and effects on health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbagher, Leila; Gholamrezaei, Ali; Hosseini, Naeimeh; Sayed Bonakdar, Zahra

    2016-03-01

    Sleep quality disturbances are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We evaluated sleep quality and its contributors in women with SLE. Also we evaluated the effects of sleep quality disturbance on patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Sleep quality was assessed in 77 women with SLE (age 36.5 ± 10.1 years) using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Disease activity and cumulative disease damage were assessed with standard indices. Patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and LupusQoL. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to find contributors of poor sleep quality and association of sleep quality with HRQoL. Poor sleep quality was present in 44 patients (57.1%). Poor sleepers were older (P = 0.015) and had higher body mass index (P = 0.027) and more severe anxiety (P psychological factors were determinants of sleep quality in our study. Studies with objective sleep measures as well as interventional studies are warranted in this regard. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis in Turkish children

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    Secil Ozkan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : To determine the prevalence of primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (PMNE and assess risk factors that can cause this disease. Methods : After the determination of 15 primary schools in the provincial center of Ankara, questionnaires were given to 15,150 students to be answered by their parents. Detailed urologic history was obtained and physical examination applied to the students whose parents answered the questionnaire. After excluding children with polysymptomatic NE, 14060 questionnaires of MNE patients were evaluated. Demographic features with social and medical history of students and their parents, general approach of family to the children, school success of the students and general behavioral attitudes, method of toilet training and the presence of nocturnal enuresis were questioned. Results : MNE was determined in 9.0% (n: 1266 of the students and nocturnal enuresis frequency was higher in boys than girls (P< 0.05. Univariate analysis revealed gender, method of toilet training, sleep problems, school success, and general approach of the family to children and general behavioral attitudes of the children as significant factors. In logistic regression analysis; age, male gender, toilette training with threatening method, deep sleeper, sleep walking, being introverted and shy, significantly increases the risk of nocturnal enuresis. Conclusions : The current study suggests that the methods of toilet training are extremely important to prevent bedwetting and behavioral disorders due to enuresis. Parents should be well-informed about the appropriate toilet training method.

  17. Short sleep duration is associated with increased obesity markers in European adolescents: effect of physical activity and dietary habits. The HELENA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaulet, M; Ortega, F B; Ruiz, J R; Rey-López, J P; Béghin, L; Manios, Y; Cuenca-García, M; Plada, M; Diethelm, K; Kafatos, A; Molnár, D; Al-Tahan, J; Moreno, L A

    2011-10-01

    Adequate sleep is a critical factor for adolescent's health and health-related behaviors. (a) to describe sleep duration in European adolescents from nine countries, (b) to assess the association of short sleep duration with excess adiposity and (c) to elucidate if physical activity (PA), sedentary behaviors and/or inadequate food habits underlie this association. A sample of 3311 adolescents (1748 girls) aged 12.5-17.49 years from 10 European cities in Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Spain and Sweden was assessed in the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence Study between 2006 and 2008. We measured anthropometric data, sleep duration, PA (accelerometers and questionnaire), television watching and food habits (Food Frequency Questionnaire). Average duration of daily sleep was 8 h. Shorter sleepers showed higher values of BMI, body fat, waist and hip circumferences and fat mass index (Pwatching TV (Pobesity parameters. In European adolescents, short sleep duration is associated with higher adiposity markers, particularly in female adolescents. This association seems to be related to both sides of the energy balance equation due to a combination of increased food intake and more sedentary habits.

  18. Sleep duration is a potential risk factor for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chi-Yuan; Wu, Jin-Shang; Yang, Yi-Ching; Shih, Chi-Chen; Wang, Ru-Hsueh; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2011-06-01

    U-shaped patterns have been observed for the relationship between sleep duration and diabetes. In addition, prediabetes is associated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. However, there are few studies investigating the relationship between sleep duration and prediabetes/newly diagnosed diabetes. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between sleep duration and prediabetes/newly diagnosed diabetes in a Taiwanese population. After excluding the subjects with a high risk of obstructive sleep apnea, those with a positive history of diabetes, or those taking hypnotic drugs, a total of 3470 adults were recruited from a health checkup center. Each subject completed a self-administrated structured questionnaire on sleep duration and lifestyle factors. Prediabetes/diabetes was defined following the definition of the American Diabetes Association. Subjects with different sleep durations were classified into short (sleep duration among the 3 glycemic groups. In multinomial regression, both short and long sleepers had a higher risk of newly diagnosed diabetes; and the odds ratio were 1.55 (95% confidence interval, 1.07-2.24) and 2.83 (1.19-6.73), respectively. However, sleep duration was not found to relate to prediabetes. In conclusion, both short and long sleep durations were independently associated with newly diagnosed diabetes, but not with prediabetes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Digues et polders littoraux : réflexions après la tempête Xynthia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernand Verger

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Les digues de polders littoraux comprennent plusieurs catégories : digues de mer, digues de rebras, digues dormantes et digues ruinées. Dans le marais Poitevin, la tempête Xynthia, pendant laquelle la mer a atteint un niveau exceptionnel, a submergé l'ensemble du réseau des digues. Elle a permis de prendre conscience de l'état du réseau des digues et de l'absence d'une ligne continue de digues dormantes d'un niveau suffisant pour limiter l'extension de l'inondation.Des solutions adoptées ailleurs en Europe, comme la transformation des polders en polders d'été ou la dépoldérisation n'ont pas été envisagées. La réparation à l'identique, avec un renforcement a été adoptée. D'une façon plus générale, des indices sont proposés pour aider à la gestion des polders littoraux. Ces indices doivent tenir compte de la valeur écosystémique des schorres dont la biodiversité et la productivité sont exceptionnelles. La nécessité de quantifier les enjeux – ce qui est certes difficile – apparaît d'autant plus nécessaire que la montée du niveau de la mer risque de contraindre une politique de maintien rigide du trait de côte à des investissements disproportionnés à long terme.Polder dikes coasts include several categories: sea dikes, sleeper dikes and devastated levees. In Marais Poitevin, during the storm Xynthia, the entire network of dikes has been flooded due to the exceptional level of the sea at that time. This situation has raised awareness of the status network of the current network of levees and of the lack of a continuous line of sleeper levees at a sufficient level to limit the extent of the flooding.Solutions adopted elsewhere in Europe, such as processing of the polders in summer polders or depolderization have not been considered. The decision has been taken to repair at the same and to reinforce the previous defences. In a more general way, the elaboration of indexes has been done to improve the

  20. A hydrometric and geochemical approach to test the transmissivity feedback hypothesis during snowmelt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, K.A.; Shanley, J.B.; McDonnell, Jeffery J.

    1999-01-01

    To test the transmissivity feedback hypothesis of runoff generation, surface and subsurface waters were monitored and sampled during the 1996 snowmelt at various topographic positions in a 41 ha forested headwater catchment at Sleepers River, Vermont. Two conditions that promote transmissivity feedback existed in the catchment during the melt period. First, saturated hydraulic conductivity increased toward land surface, from a geometric mean of 3.6 mm h-1 in glacial till to 25.6 mm h-1 in deep soil to 54.0 mm h-1 in shallow soil. Second, groundwater levels rose to within 0.3 m of land surface at all riparian sites and most hillslope sites at peak melt. The importance of transmissivity feedback to streamflow generation was tested at the catchment scale by examination of physical and chemical patterns of groundwater in near-stream (discharge) and hillslope (recharge/lateral flow) zones, and within a geomorphic hollow (convergent flow). The presence of transmissivity feedback was supported by the abrupt increase in streamflow as the water table rose into the surficial, transmissive zone; a flattening of the groundwater level vs. streamflow curve occurred at most sites. This relation had a clockwise hysteresis (higher groundwater level for given discharge on rising limb than at same discharge on falling limb) at riparian sites, suggesting that the riparian zone was the dominant source area during the rising limb of the melt hydrograph. Hysteresis was counterclockwise at hillslope sites, suggesting that hillslope drainage controlled the snowmelt recession. End member mixing analysis using Ca, Mg, Na, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and Si showed that stream chemistry could be explained as a two-component mixture of groundwater high in base cations and an O-horizon/overland flow water high in DOC. The dominance of shallow flow paths during events was indicated by the high positive correlation of DOC with streamflow (r2 = 0.82). Despite the occurrence of transmissivity

  1. Climate change and biological invasions: evidence, expectations, and response options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, Philip E

    2017-08-01

    A changing climate may directly or indirectly influence biological invasions by altering the likelihood of introduction or establishment, as well as modifying the geographic range, environmental impacts, economic costs or management of alien species. A comprehensive assessment of empirical and theoretical evidence identified how each of these processes is likely to be shaped by climate change for alien plants, animals and pathogens in terrestrial, freshwater and marine environments of Great Britain. The strongest contemporary evidence for the potential role of climate change in the establishment of new alien species is for terrestrial arthropods, as a result of their ectothermic physiology, often high dispersal rate and their strong association with trade as well as commensal relationships with human environments. By contrast, there is little empirical support for higher temperatures increasing the rate of alien plant establishment due to the stronger effects of residence time and propagule pressure. The magnitude of any direct climate effect on the number of new alien species will be small relative to human-assisted introductions driven by socioeconomic factors. Casual alien species (sleepers) whose population persistence is limited by climate are expected to exhibit greater rates of establishment under climate change assuming that propagule pressure remains at least at current levels. Surveillance and management targeting sleeper pests and diseases may be the most cost-effective option to reduce future impacts under climate change. Most established alien species will increase their distribution range in Great Britain over the next century. However, such range increases are very likely be the result of natural expansion of populations that have yet to reach equilibrium with their environment, rather than a direct consequence of climate change. To assess the potential realised range of alien species will require a spatially explicit approach that not only

  2. A novel BHLHE41 variant is associated with short sleep and resistance to sleep deprivation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Renata; Kavakli, Ibrahim Halil; Goel, Namni; Cardinale, Christopher J; Dinges, David F; Kuna, Samuel T; Maislin, Greg; Van Dongen, Hans P A; Tufik, Sergio; Hogenesch, John B; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pack, Allan I

    2014-08-01

    Earlier work described a mutation in DEC2 also known as BHLHE41 (basic helix-loophelix family member e41) as causal in a family of short sleepers, who needed just 6 h sleep per night. We evaluated whether there were other variants of this gene in two well-phenotyped cohorts. Sequencing of the BHLHE41 gene, electroencephalographic data, and delta power analysis and functional studies using cell-based luciferase. We identified new variants of the BHLHE41 gene in two cohorts who had either acute sleep deprivation (n = 200) or chronic partial sleep deprivation (n = 217). One variant, Y362H, at another location in the same exon occurred in one twin in a dizygotic twin pair and was associated with reduced sleep duration, less recovery sleep following sleep deprivation, and fewer performance lapses during sleep deprivation than the homozygous twin. Both twins had almost identical amounts of non rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. This variant reduced the ability of BHLHE41 to suppress CLOCK/BMAL1 and NPAS2/BMAL1 transactivation in vitro. Another variant in the same exome had no effect on sleep or response to sleep deprivation and no effect on CLOCK/BMAL1 transactivation. Random mutagenesis identified a number of other variants of BHLHE41 that affect its function. There are a number of mutations of BHLHE41. Mutations reduce total sleep while maintaining NREM sleep and provide resistance to the effects of sleep loss. Mutations that affect sleep also modify the normal inhibition of BHLHE41 of CLOCK/BMAL1 transactivation. Thus, clock mechanisms are likely involved in setting sleep length and the magnitude of sleep homeostasis. Pellegrino R, Kavakli IH, Goel N, Cardinale CJ, Dinges DF, Kuna ST, Maislin G, Van Dongen HP, Tufik S, Hogenesch JB, Hakonarson H, Pack AI. A novel BHLHE41 variant is associated with short sleep and resistance to sleep deprivation in humans. SLEEP 2014;37(8):1327-1336.

  3. Bendiocarb, a potential alternative against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae in Benin, West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irish Seth

    2010-07-01

    by the sleepers about the safety and smell of fenitrothion.

  4. Experimental hut evaluation of bednets treated with an organophosphate (chlorpyrifos-methyl or a pyrethroid (lambdacyhalothrin alone and in combination against insecticide-resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbel Vincent

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrethroid resistant mosquitoes are becoming increasingly common in parts of Africa. It is important to identify alternative insecticides which, if necessary, could be used to replace or supplement the pyrethroids for use on treated nets. Certain compounds of an earlier generation of insecticides, the organophosphates may have potential as net treatments. Methods Comparative studies of chlorpyrifos-methyl (CM, an organophosphate with low mammalian toxicity, and lambdacyhalothrin (L, a pyrethroid, were conducted in experimental huts in Côte d'Ivoire, West Africa. Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes from the area are resistant to pyrethroids and organophosphates (kdr and insensitive acetylcholinesterase Ace.1R. Several treatments and application rates on intact or holed nets were evaluated, including single treatments, mixtures, and differential wall/ceiling treatments. Results and Conclusion All of the treatments were effective in reducing blood feeding from sleepers under the nets and in killing both species of mosquito, despite the presence of the kdr and Ace.1R genes at high frequency. In most cases, the effects of the various treatments did not differ significantly. Five washes of the nets in soap solution did not reduce the impact of the insecticides on A. gambiae mortality, but did lead to an increase in blood feeding. The three combinations performed no differently from the single insecticide treatments, but the low dose mixture performed encouragingly well indicating that such combinations might be used for controlling insecticide resistant mosquitoes. Mortality of mosquitoes that carried both Ace.1R and Ace.1S genes did not differ significantly from mosquitoes that carried only Ace.1S genes on any of the treated nets, indicating that the Ace.1R allele does not confer effective resistance to chlorpyrifos-methyl under the realistic conditions of an experimental hut.

  5. The association between self-reported sleep quality and overweight in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hao-Chang; Yang, Yi-Ching; Ou, Horng-Yih; Wu, Jin-Shang; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2013-03-01

    Sleep quality and obesity are associated with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome. However, there is limited research on the association between sleep quality and obesity, and thus the aim of this study is to investigate this relationship in a Chinese population. Subjects were recruited from the Prevention Health Center of National Cheng Kung University Hospital. Anthropometric data and metabolic parameters were measured. Being overweight or obese was defined according to the recommendations of the Department of Health in Taiwan. Sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Of the total 2,803 subjects, 1,059 were classified as normal weight, 1,127 were overweight, and 617 were obese. The global PSQI score were 6.30 ± 2.56, 6.61 ± 2.96, and 7.02 ± 2.95 in subjects who were normal weight, overweight, and obese, respectively (test for trend, P gender, being overweight, obesity, sleep duration, and alcohol drinking were significantly associated with global PSQI scores, and in the multivariate logistic regression model, female gender, being overweight, obesity, and sleep duration were independent predictors of poor sleepers after controlling for age, gender, BMI or different weight statuses, sleep duration, alcohol drinking, smoking, habitual exercise, hypertension, newly diagnosed diabetes, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, triglyceride, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and alanine aminotransferase. In conclusion, female gender, being overweight, obesity, and sleep duration were associated with poor sleep quality independent of cardiometabolic risk factors. In clinical practice, subjects who are obese, or even only overweight, should be evaluated for the presence of sleep disturbance. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  6. Transposable Elements: Powerful Contributors to Angiosperm Evolution and Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Keith R.; McComb, Jen A.; Greene, Wayne K.

    2013-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are a dominant feature of most flowering plant genomes. Together with other accepted facilitators of evolution, accumulating data indicate that TEs can explain much about their rapid evolution and diversification. Genome size in angiosperms is highly correlated with TE content and the overwhelming bulk (>80%) of large genomes can be composed of TEs. Among retro-TEs, long terminal repeats (LTRs) are abundant, whereas DNA-TEs, which are often less abundant than retro-TEs, are more active. Much adaptive or evolutionary potential in angiosperms is due to the activity of TEs (active TE-Thrust), resulting in an extraordinary array of genetic changes, including gene modifications, duplications, altered expression patterns, and exaptation to create novel genes, with occasional gene disruption. TEs implicated in the earliest origins of the angiosperms include the exapted Mustang, Sleeper, and Fhy3/Far1 gene families. Passive TE-Thrust can create a high degree of adaptive or evolutionary potential by engendering ectopic recombination events resulting in deletions, duplications, and karyotypic changes. TE activity can also alter epigenetic patterning, including that governing endosperm development, thus promoting reproductive isolation. Continuing evolution of long-lived resprouter angiosperms, together with genetic variation in their multiple meristems, indicates that TEs can facilitate somatic evolution in addition to germ line evolution. Critical to their success, angiosperms have a high frequency of polyploidy and hybridization, with resultant increased TE activity and introgression, and beneficial gene duplication. Together with traditional explanations, the enhanced genomic plasticity facilitated by TE-Thrust, suggests a more complete and satisfactory explanation for Darwin’s “abominable mystery”: the spectacular success of the angiosperms. PMID:24065734

  7. Cognitive Performance, Sleepiness, and Mood in Partially Sleep Deprived Adolescents: The Need for Sleep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, June C; Ong, Ju Lynn; Leong, Ruth L F; Gooley, Joshua J; Chee, Michael W L

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the effects of sleep restriction (7 nights of 5 h time in bed [TIB]) on cognitive performance, subjective sleepiness, and mood in adolescents. A parallel-group design was adopted in the Need for Sleep Study. Fifty-six healthy adolescents (25 males, age = 15-19 y) who studied in top high schools and were not habitual short sleepers were randomly assigned to Sleep Restriction (SR) or Control groups. Participants underwent a 2-w protocol consisting of 3 baseline nights (TIB = 9 h), 7 nights of sleep opportunity manipulation (TIB = 5 h for the SR and 9 h for the control groups), and 3 nights of recovery sleep (TIB = 9 h) at a boarding school. A cognitive test battery was administered three times each day. During the manipulation period, the SR group demonstrated incremental deterioration in sustained attention, working memory and executive function, increase in subjective sleepiness, and decrease in positive mood. Subjective sleepiness and sustained attention did not return to baseline levels even after 2 recovery nights. In contrast, the control group maintained baseline levels of cognitive performance, subjective sleepiness, and mood throughout the study. Incremental improvement in speed of processing, as a result of repeated testing and learning, was observed in the control group but was attenuated in the sleep-restricted participants, who, despite two recovery sleep episodes, continued to perform worse than the control participants. A week of partial sleep deprivation impairs a wide range of cognitive functions, subjective alertness, and mood even in high-performing high school adolescents. Some measures do not recover fully even after 2 nights of recovery sleep. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 497. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  8. Concomitant changes in sleep duration and body weight and body composition during weight loss and 3-mo weight maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, Sanne P M; Camps, Stefan G J A; Gonnissen, Hanne K J; Westerterp, Klaas R; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2013-07-01

    An inverse relation between sleep duration and body mass index (BMI) has been shown. We assessed the relation between changes in sleep duration and changes in body weight and body composition during weight loss. A total of 98 healthy subjects (25 men), aged 20-50 y and with BMI (in kg/m(2)) from 28 to 35, followed a 2-mo very-low-energy diet that was followed by a 10-mo period of weight maintenance. Body weight, body composition (measured by using deuterium dilution and air-displacement plethysmography), eating behavior (measured by using a 3-factor eating questionnaire), physical activity (measured by using the validated Baecke's questionnaire), and sleep (estimated by using a questionnaire with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale) were assessed before and immediately after weight loss and 3- and 10-mo follow-ups. The average weight loss was 10% after 2 mo of dieting and 9% and 6% after 3- and 10-mo follow-ups, respectively. Daytime sleepiness and time to fall asleep decreased during weight loss. Short (≤7 h) and average (>7 to weight loss. This change in sleep duration was concomitantly negatively correlated with the change in BMI during weight loss and after the 3-mo follow-up and with the change in fat mass after the 3-mo follow-up. Sleep duration benefits from weight loss or vice versa. Successful weight loss, loss of body fat, and 3-mo weight maintenance in short and average sleepers are underscored by an increase in sleep duration or vice versa. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01015508.

  9. Analysis of A-phase transitions during the cyclic alternating pattern under normal sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Martin Oswaldo; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Alba, Alfonso; Bianchi, Anna Maria; Grassi, Andrea; Arce-Santana, Edgar; Milioli, Guilia; Terzano, Mario Giovanni; Parrino, Liborio

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of the EEG signal during the B-phase and A-phases transitions of the cyclic alternating pattern (CAP) during sleep is presented. CAP is a sleep phenomenon composed by consecutive sequences of A-phases (each A-phase could belong to a possible group A1, A2 or A3) observed during the non-REM sleep. Each A-phase is separated by a B-phase which has the basal frequency of the EEG during a specific sleep stage. The patterns formed by these sequences reflect the sleep instability and consequently help to understand the sleep process. Ten recordings from healthy good sleepers were included in this study. The current study investigates complexity, statistical and frequency signal properties of electroencephalography (EEG) recordings at the transitions: B-phase--A-phase. In addition, classification between the onset-offset of the A-phases and B-phase was carried out with a kNN classifier. The results showed that EEG signal presents significant differences (p sleep stages. The statistical analysis of variance shows that more than 80% of the A-phase onset and offset is significantly different from the B-phase. The classification performance between onset or offset of A-phases and background showed classification values over 80% for specificity and accuracy and 70% for sensitivity. Only during the A3-phase, the classification was lower. The results suggest that neural assembles that generate the basal EEG oscillations during sleep present an over-imposed coordination for a few seconds due to the A-phases. The main characteristics for automatic separation between the onset-offset A-phase and the B-phase are the energy at the different frequency bands.

  10. Association between nighttime sleep duration, midday naps, and glycemic levels in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Shinya; Hirose, Sachie; Kakutani, Miki; Fujiwara, Masayoshi; Nishiyama, Mitsuru; Terada, Yoshio; Ninomiya, Hitoshi

    2018-04-01

    To clarify the relationship between nighttime sleep duration, midday naps, and glycemic control in Japanese patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (n = 355) or impaired glucose tolerance (n = 43). A total of 398 patients completed a self-administered questionnaire on sleep duration/quality and were divided into five groups according to their self-reported nighttime sleep duration: 8 h. Each group was further divided into two subgroups each according to the presence or absence of midday naps. Poor glycemic control was defined as HbA1c ≥ 7.0%. Short nighttime sleep (<5 h), poor sleep induction, daytime sleepiness, and low sleep satisfaction were associated with high HbA1c levels. HbA1c was higher in the short nighttime sleep/no nap group than in non-nappers with different nighttime sleep duration, whereas the short nighttime sleep/nap group showed similar HbA1c levels to the other nap subgroups. In multivariate logistic regression models, after adjusting for a number of potential confounders, short (<5 h) nighttime sleep without nap was significantly associated with poor glycemic control compared with 6-7 h nighttime sleep without nap (OR [95% CI]: 7.14 [2.20-23.20]). However, taking naps reduced this risk for poor glycemic control in short sleepers. Other risk factors for poor glycemic control were low sleep satisfaction (1.73 [1.10-2.70]) and poor sleep induction (1.69 [1.14-2.50]). Poor sleep quality and quantity could aggravate glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. Midday naps could mitigate the deleterious effects of short nighttime sleep on glycemic control. UMIN 000017887. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantity and Quality of Sleep and Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuccio, Francesco P.; D'Elia, Lanfranco; Strazzullo, Pasquale; Miller, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the relationship between habitual sleep disturbances and the incidence of type 2 diabetes and to obtain an estimate of the risk. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a systematic search of publications using MEDLINE (1955–April 2009), EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library and manual searches without language restrictions. We included studies if they were prospective with follow-up >3 years and had an assessment of sleep disturbances at baseline and incidence of type 2 diabetes. We recorded several characteristics for each study. We extracted quantity and quality of sleep, how they were assessed, and incident cases defined with different validated methods. We extracted relative risks (RRs) and 95% CI and pooled them using random-effects models. We performed sensitivity analysis and assessed heterogeneity and publication bias. RESULTS We included 10 studies (13 independent cohort samples; 107,756 male and female participants, follow-up range 4.2–32 years, and 3,586 incident cases of type 2 diabetes). In pooled analyses, quantity and quality of sleep predicted the risk of development of type 2 diabetes. For short duration of sleep (≤5–6 h/night), the RR was 1.28 (95% CI 1.03–1.60, P = 0.024, heterogeneity P = 0.015); for long duration of sleep (>8–9 h/night), the RR was 1.48 (1.13–1.96, P = 0.005); for difficulty in initiating sleep, the RR was 1.57 (1.25–1.97, P < 0.0001); and for difficulty in maintaining sleep, the RR was 1.84 (1.39–2.43, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Quantity and quality of sleep consistently and significantly predict the risk of the development of type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms underlying this relation may differ between short and long sleepers. PMID:19910503

  12. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN INFANT NIGHTTIME-SLEEP LOCATION AND ATTACHMENT SECURITY: NO EASY VERDICT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileva-Seitz, Viara R; Luijk, Maartje P C M; van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Hofman, Albert; Verhulst, Frank C; Tiemeier, Henning

    2016-01-01

    We tested whether mother-infant bed-sharing is associated with increased secure infant-mother attachment, a previously unexplored association. Frequency of bed-sharing and mothers' nighttime comforting measures at 2 months were assessed with questionnaires in 550 Caucasian mothers from a population-based cohort. Attachment security was assessed with the Strange Situation Procedure (M.D.S. Ainsworth, M.C. Blehar, E. Waters, & S. Wall, 1978) at 14 months. When using a dichotomous variable, "never bed-sharing" (solitary sleepers) versus "any bed-sharing," the relative risk of being classified as insecurely attached for solitary-sleeping infants (vs. bed-sharers) was 1.21 (95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.40). In multivariate models, solitary sleeping was associated with greater odds of insecure attachment, adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.50, 95% CI = 1.02-2.20) and, in particular, with greater odds of resistant attachment, adjusted OR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.10-2.76); and with a lower attachment security score, β = -0.12, t(495) = -2.61, p = .009. However, we found no evidence of a dose-response association between bed-sharing and secure attachment when using a trichotomous bed-sharing variable based on frequency of bed-sharing. Our findings demonstrate some evidence that solitary sleeping is associated with insecure attachment. However, the lack of a dose-response association suggests that further experimental study is necessary before accepting common notions that sharing a bed leads to children who are better or not better adjusted. © 2015 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  13. Evaluation of fuel cell auxiliary power units for heavy-duty diesel trucks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Farshchi, Mohammad; Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Dwyer, Harry A.; Sperling, Daniel [California Univ., Inst. of Transportation Studies, Davis, CA (United States); Gouse, S. William III [Freightliner LLC, Portland, OR (United States); Harris, D. Bruce; King, Foy G. Jr. [US Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Lipman, Timothy E. [California Univ., Renewable and Appropriate Energy Lab. (RAEL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    A large number of heavy-duty trucks idle a significant amount. Heavy-duty line-haul truck engines idle about 20-40% of the time the engine is running, depending on season and operation. Drivers idle engines to power climate control devices (e.g., heaters and air conditioners) and sleeper compartment accessories (e.g., refrigerators, microwave ovens, and televisions) and to avoid start-up problems in cold weather. Idling increases air pollution and energy use, as well as wear and tear on engines. Efforts to reduce truck idling in the US have been sporadic, in part because it is widely viewed in the trucking industry that further idling restrictions would unduly compromise driver comfort and truck operations. The auxiliary power units (APUs) available to replace the idling of the diesel traction engine all have had limited trucking industry acceptance. Fuel cells are a promising APU technology. Fuel cell APUs have the potential to greatly reduce emissions and energy use and save money. In this paper, we estimate costs and benefits of fuel cell APUs. We calculate the payback period for fuel cell APUs to be about 2.6-4.5 years. This estimate is uncertain since future fuel cell costs are unknown and cost savings from idling vary greatly across the truck fleet. The payback period is particularly sensitive to diesel fuel consumption at idle. Given the large potential environmental and economic benefits of fuel cell APUs, the first major commercial application of fuel cells may be as truck APUs. (Author)

  14. Cognition, temperament, and cerebral blood flow velocity in toddlers and preschool children with sleep-disordered breathing or behavioral insomnia of childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Rachael; Lushington, Kurt; Keage, Hannah A D; Blunden, Sarah; Kennedy, J Declan; Schembri, Mark; Wabnitz, David; Martin, A James; Kohler, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive decrements, problematic behaviors, and increased cerebral blood flow velocities (CBFVs) have been reported in children aged 3-7 years with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Whether similar impairments exist in younger children or those with behavioral insomnia of childhood (BIC) remains unclear. This study aimed to compare cognition and temperament in children aged 1-5 years with SDB or BIC to healthy control children, and to investigate whether cognitive or behavioral deficits associated with sleep problems are related to changes in CBFV. Toddlers and preschool-aged children (12-67 months) who had been referred for the clinical evaluation of SDB (n = 20) or BIC (n = 13) and a comparative sample of non-snoring healthy sleepers (controls; n = 77) were recruited from the community. Children underwent cognitive assessment (Mullen's Scale of Early Learning) and measurement of resting bilateral CBFV in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) using Transcranial Doppler. Parents completed temperament scales (Early Childhood or Childhood Behavior Questionnaire), a sleep problem questionnaire (Pediatric Sleep Problem Survey Instrument) and performed home-based pediatric sleep monitoring (Actigraphy and Sleep Diary). SDB children demonstrated impaired receptive skills, more hyperactive and energetic temperaments, and higher bilateral CBFV than controls and children with BIC. Logistic regression analyses indicated that impaired cognition, temperamental difficulties, and increased CBFV are independently associated with SDB. During early childhood, problematic temperaments, cognitive deficits, and altered cerebrovascular functioning are associated with SDB but not BIC. CBFV does not appear to mediate these daytime deficits and instead may be an independent outcome of SDB. The findings support the need for an early intervention in pediatric SDB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. EFFECT OF SCAPULAR STABILISATION EXERCISES FOR TYPE 2 SCAPULAR DYSKINESIS IN SUBJECTS WITH SHOULDER IMPINGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Shankar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abnormal altered scapular position during rest or motion have been termed as Scapular Dyskinesia. Scapula Dyskinesia Type-2 is one type of dyskinesia in which there is a visual prominence of entire medial border of scapula that occurs due to weakness of the serratus anterior and tightness of posterior shoulder joint capsule that results in reduction in glenohumeral flexion and abduction, resulting in decreased acromial elevation. This type of dyskinesia is commonly seen in Secondary impingement of shoulder. Rehabilitation generally begins and focused on axio-humeral and scapula- humeral than axio-scapular muscle. Early application of closed kinetic exercises on scapular stabilization and its effect of application on scapular dyskinesia type 2 is unknown. The study was proposed to find the effect of scapular stabilization exercise for type 2 Scapular Dyskinesia in subjects with shoulder impingement. Methods: An experimental study design, 7 male patients with mean age 37 years diagnosed with Shoulder impingement associated with Type 2 scapular dyskinesia were included in the study. The protocol includes closed kinematic chain exercises (scapula clock, Black burn exercises, Sleepers stretch, and thera band exercises aimed to balance force couple of upper, lower trapezius and serratus anterior. Duration of intervention was 3 sessions per week for 2 weeks. Outcome measurements such as Lateral scapular slide test and SPADI were measured pre and post interventions. Results: Analysis using Paired ‘t’ test as a parametric test found that there is statistically significant difference p<0.000 when pre to post interventions means were compared within the groups showing significant improvement in post SPADI and lateral scapular slide test. Conclusion: It is concluded that Scapula stabilization exercise protocol found to be effective in Scapular type-2 Dyskinesia.

  16. Delayed sleep onset in depressed young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glozier, Nicholas; O'Dea, Bridianne; McGorry, Patrick D; Pantelis, Christos; Amminger, Günter Paul; Hermens, Daniel F; Purcell, Rosemary; Scott, Elizabeth; Hickie, Ian B

    2014-02-08

    The circadian abnormality of delayed sleep phase has been suggested to characterise a subgroup of depressed young adults with different risk factors and course of illness. We aim to assess the prevalence and factors, particularly substance use, associated with such delay in a large help-seeking cohort of young people with mental health problems. From a consecutively recruited sample of 802 help-seeking young people, 305 (38%) had at least moderate depressive symptoms (QIDS-C16 >10), sleep data and did not have a chronic severe mental illness. Demographic and clinical characteristics were evaluated through self report and clinical interview. Delayed sleep phase was defined as a sleep onset between the hours of 02:00 a.m. - 06:00 a.m. and the characteristics of this group were compared to normal phase sleepers. Delayed sleep onset was reported amongst 18% (n = 56/305) of the depressed group compared to 11% of the non-depressed young people. Amongst the depressed group, delayed sleep onset was associated with tobacco, alcohol and cannabis misuse and short sleep duration (x̅: 5.8 hrs vs. x̅: 7.8 hrs). There were no differences in demographic factors, personality traits or symptoms. Tobacco smoking was very common: In logistic regression analyses only tobacco use (OR 2.28, 95% CI: 1.04 - 5.01) was associated with delayed sleep onset. There was no interaction with age. Delayed sleep onset was twice as common in depressed young people as the general population and young people with other mental health problems, and is a potential marker for a subgroup of mood disorders. Those with delayed sleep onset were not more severely depressed but had short sleep duration, a risk for chronic psychological ill health, and higher levels of tobacco use. Nicotine use was common in this group, has biological evidence as a sleep disrupter, and requires specifically addressing in this population.

  17. Coral colonisation of an artificial reef in a turbid nearshore environment, Dampier Harbour, western Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Blakeway

    Full Text Available A 0.6 hectare artificial reef of local rock and recycled concrete sleepers was constructed in December 2006 at Parker Point in the industrial port of Dampier, western Australia, with the aim of providing an environmental offset for a nearshore coral community lost to land reclamation. Corals successfully colonised the artificial reef, despite the relatively harsh environmental conditions at the site (annual water temperature range 18-32°C, intermittent high turbidity, frequent cyclones, frequent nearby ship movements. Coral settlement to the artificial reef was examined by terracotta tile deployments, and later stages of coral community development were examined by in-situ visual surveys within fixed 25 x 25 cm quadrats on the rock and concrete substrates. Mean coral density on the tiles varied from 113 ± 17 SE to 909 ± 85 SE per m(2 over five deployments, whereas mean coral density in the quadrats was only 6.0 ± 1.0 SE per m(2 at eight months post construction, increasing to 24.0 ± 2.1 SE per m(2 at 62 months post construction. Coral taxa colonising the artificial reef were a subset of those on the surrounding natural reef, but occurred in different proportions--Pseudosiderastrea tayami, Mycedium elephantotus and Leptastrea purpurea being disproportionately abundant on the artificial reef. Coral cover increased rapidly in the later stages of the study, reaching 2.3 ± 0.7 SE % at 62 months post construction. This study indicates that simple materials of opportunity can provide a suitable substrate for coral recruitment in Dampier Harbour, and that natural colonisation at the study site remains sufficient to initiate a coral community on artificial substrate despite ongoing natural and anthropogenic perturbations.

  18. Everyday territories: homelessness, outreach work and city space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robin James; Hall, Tom

    2017-07-18

    This article develops a situational approach to understanding urban public life and, in particular, the production of urban territories. Our aim is to examine the ways in which city space might be understood as comprising multiple, shifting, mobile and rhythmed territories. We argue that such territories are best understood through attending to their everyday production and negotiation, rather than handling territory as an a priori construct. We develop this argument from the particular case of the street-level politics of homelessness and street care. The experience of street homelessness and the provision of care in the public spaces of the city is characterised by precarious territorial claims made and lost. We describe some of the ways in which care work with rough sleepers is itself precarious; 'homeless', in lacking a distinct setting in which it might get done. Indeed, outreach work takes place within and affirms homeless territories. The affirmation of territory is shown to be central to the relationship developed between the workers and their rough sleeping clients. We also show, however, the ways in which outreach workers operate on territory not their own, twice over. Outreach work is precarious in that it is practised within, and can run counter to, other territorial productions in which the experience of urban need and the work and politics of care are entangled. In sum, this article aims to move beyond static and binary understandings by developing a mobile and situational approach to city space which recognises the intensive yet overlooked work of territorial production. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  19. Illness narratives of people who are homeless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkanson, Cecilia; Öhlén, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Multiple illnesses are common in all homeless populations. While most previous studies have focused on experiences of mental illness, there is a scarcity of studies about experiences of bodily illness among people who are homeless. This study aimed to explore illness narratives of people who are homeless, and how homelessness as a social context shapes the experience of multiple and/or advancing somatic conditions. The design was a qualitative single-case study, using interpretive description. Data were generated through interviews, with nine participants who were homeless rough sleepers in Stockholm, Sweden, recruited while receiving care in a support home for homeless people with complex care needs. The findings revealed experiences of illness embedded in narratives about falling ill, being ill, and the future. The particularity of these illness narratives and the way that they are shaped by homelessness give rise to several observations: the necessity of a capable body for survival; chaos and profound solitude in illness and self-care management; ambiguous feelings about receiving care, transitioning from independence, and "freedom" in the streets to dependency and being institutionalized; and finally, the absence of hope and desire for recovery or a better future. The narratives are discussed from the perspective of Frank's four types of illness stories (restitution, chaos, quest, and testimony). The findings stress that to provide appropriate care and support to people who are homeless and have multiple and/or advancing somatic conditions, health care professionals need to be informed both about the individual's biography and about the circumstances under which illness and self-care takes place in the streets.

  20. Approaches to stream solute load estimation for solutes with varying dynamics from five diverse small watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulenbach, Brent T.; Burns, Douglas A.; Shanley, James B.; Yanai, Ruth D.; Bae, Kikang; Wild, Adam; Yang, Yang; Yi, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Estimating streamwater solute loads is a central objective of many water-quality monitoring and research studies, as loads are used to compare with atmospheric inputs, to infer biogeochemical processes, and to assess whether water quality is improving or degrading. In this study, we evaluate loads and associated errors to determine the best load estimation technique among three methods (a period-weighted approach, the regression-model method, and the composite method) based on a solute's concentration dynamics and sampling frequency. We evaluated a broad range of varying concentration dynamics with stream flow and season using four dissolved solutes (sulfate, silica, nitrate, and dissolved organic carbon) at five diverse small watersheds (Sleepers River Research Watershed, VT; Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH; Biscuit Brook Watershed, NY; Panola Mountain Research Watershed, GA; and Río Mameyes Watershed, PR) with fairly high-frequency sampling during a 10- to 11-yr period. Data sets with three different sampling frequencies were derived from the full data set at each site (weekly plus storm/snowmelt events, weekly, and monthly) and errors in loads were assessed for the study period, annually, and monthly. For solutes that had a moderate to strong concentration–discharge relation, the composite method performed best, unless the autocorrelation of the model residuals was diagnostics could be used to approximate overall accuracies and annual precisions. For the period-weighed approach, errors were lower when the variance in concentrations was lower, the degree of autocorrelation in the concentrations was higher, and sampling frequency was higher. The period-weighted approach was most sensitive to sampling frequency. For the regression-model and composite methods, errors were lower when the variance in model residuals was lower. For the composite method, errors were lower when the autocorrelation in the residuals was higher. Guidelines to determine the best

  1. Development of Viscoelastic Multi-Body Simulation and Impact Response Analysis of a Ballasted Railway Track under Cyclic Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Nishiura

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of a large number of deformable bodies is often difficult because complex high-level modeling is required to address both multi-body contact and viscoelastic deformation. This necessitates the combined use of a discrete element method (DEM and a finite element method (FEM. In this study, a quadruple discrete element method (QDEM was developed for dynamic analysis of viscoelastic materials using a simpler algorithm compared to the standard FEM. QDEM easily incorporates the contact algorithm used in DEM. As the first step toward multi-body simulation, the fundamental performance of QDEM was investigated for viscoelastic analysis. The amplitude and frequency of cantilever elastic vibration were nearly equal to those obtained by the standard FEM. A comparison of creep recovery tests with an analytical solution showed good agreement between them. In addition, good correlation between the attenuation degree and the real physical viscosity was confirmed for viscoelastic vibration analysis. Therefore, the high accuracy of QDEM in the fundamental analysis of infinitesimal viscoelastic deformations was verified. Finally, the impact response of a ballast and sleeper under cyclic loading on a railway track was analyzed using QDEM as an application of deformable multi-body dynamics. The results showed that the vibration of the ballasted track was qualitatively in good agreement with the actual measurements. Moreover, the ballast layer with high friction reduced the ballasted track deterioration. This study suggests that QDEM, as an alternative to DEM and FEM, can provide deeper insights into the contact dynamics of a large number of deformable bodies.

  2. Abnormal Intrinsic Functional Hubs in Severe Male Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Evidence from a Voxel-Wise Degree Centrality Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haijun; Li, Lan; Shao, Yi; Gong, Honghan; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Xianjun; Ye, Chenglong; Nie, Si; Chen, Liting; Peng, Dechang

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with changes in brain structure and regional function in certain brain areas. However, the functional features of network organization in the whole brain remain largely uncertain. The purpose of this study was to identify the OSA-related spatial centrality distribution of the whole brain functional network and to investigate the potential altered intrinsic functional hubs. Forty male patients with newly confirmed severe OSA on polysomnography, and well-matched good sleepers, participated in this study. All participants underwent a resting-state functional MRI scan and clinical and cognitive evaluation. Voxel-wise degree centrality (DC) was measured across the whole brain, and group difference in DC was compared. The relationship between the abnormal DC value and clinical variables was assessed using a linear correlation analysis. Remarkably similar spatial distributions of the functional hubs (high DC) were found in both groups. However, OSA patients exhibited a pattern of significantly reduced regional DC in the left middle occipital gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, left superior frontal gyrus, and bilateral inferior parietal lobule, and DC was increased in the right orbital frontal cortex, bilateral cerebellum posterior lobes, and bilateral lentiform nucleus, including the putamen, extending to the hippocampus, and the inferior temporal gyrus, which overlapped with the functional hubs. Furthermore, a linear correlation analysis revealed that the DC value in the posterior cingulate cortex and left superior frontal gyrus were positively correlated with Montreal cognitive assessment scores, The DC value in the left middle occipital gyrus and bilateral inferior parietal lobule were negatively correlated with apnea-hypopnea index and arousal index in OSA patients. Our findings suggest that OSA patients exhibited specific abnormal intrinsic functional hubs including relatively reduced and increased DC. This expands

  3. Interactive effects of sleep duration and morning/evening preference on cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Freda; Malone, Susan Kohl; Grandner, Michael A; Lozano, Alicia; Perkett, Mackenzie; Hanlon, Alexandra

    2018-02-01

    Sleep duration and morningness/eveningness (circadian preference) have separately been associated with cardiovascular risk factors (i.e. tobacco use, physical inactivity). Interactive effects are plausible, resulting from combinations of sleep homeostatic and circadian influences. These have not been examined in a population sample. Multivariable regression models were used to test the associations between combinations of sleep duration (short [≤6 h], adequate [7-8 h], long [≥9 h]) and morning/evening preference (morning, somewhat morning, somewhat evening, evening) with the cardiovascular risk factors of tobacco use, physical inactivity, high sedentary behaviour, obesity/overweight and eating fewer than 5 daily servings of fruit and vegetables, in a cross-sectional sample of 439 933 adults enrolled in the United Kingdom Biobank project. Participants were 56% female, 95% white and mean age was 56.5 (SD = 8.1) years. Compared with adequate sleep with morning preference (referent group), long sleep with evening preference had a relative odds of 3.23 for tobacco use, a 2.02-fold relative odds of not meeting physical activity recommendations, a 2.19-fold relative odds of high screen-based sedentary behaviour, a 1.47-fold relative odds of being obese/overweight and a 1.62-fold relative odds of morning or somewhat morning preference was associated with a lower prevalence and odds for all cardiovascular risk behaviours except fruit and vegetable intake. Long sleepers with evening preference may be a sleep phenotype at high cardiovascular risk. Further work is needed to examine these relationships longitudinally and to assess the effects of chronotherapeutic interventions on cardiovascular risk behaviours. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  4. Relationship of Sleep Duration with Sociodemographic Characteristics, Lifestyle, Mental Health, and Chronic Diseases in a Large Chinese Adult Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shibin; Li, Bo; Wu, Yanhua; Ungvari, Gabor S; Ng, Chee H; Fu, Yingli; Kou, Changgui; Yu, Yaqin; Sun, Hong-Qiang; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2017-03-15

    Pattern of sleep duration and its correlates have rarely been reported in China. This study examined the sleep duration and its relationship with sociodemographic variables, lifestyle, mental health, and chronic diseases in a large Chinese adult population. This cross-sectional study used multistage stratified cluster sampling. A total of 17,320 participants from Jilin province were selected and interviewed using standardized assessment tools. Basic socio-demographic and clinical data were collected. Sleep duration was classified as short ( 9 h per day) and medium sleep (7-9 h per day). The mean age of the sample was 42.60 ± 10.60 y, with 51.4% being female. The mean sleep duration was 7.31 ± 1.44 h. Short and long sleepers accounted for 30.9% and 6.9% of the sample, respectively. Multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed that older age, current smoking, irregular meal pattern, lack of physical exercise, poor mental health, and chronic diseases or multimorbidity were positively associated with short sleep. Being married and living in rural areas were, however, negatively associated with short sleep. In addition, living in rural area, current smoking, current alcohol use and lack of physical exercise were positively associated with long sleep, while older age and lower education were negatively associated with long sleep. Given the high frequency of short sleep and its negative effect on health, health professionals should pay more attention to sleep patterns in general health care. Nationwide epidemiologic surveys in China are needed to further explore the relationship between sleep duration and health. © 2017 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  5. Concentrations and content of mercury in bark, wood, and leaves in hardwoods and conifers in four forested sites in the northeastern USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Yanai, Ruth D; Driscoll, Charles T; Montesdeoca, Mario; Smith, Kevin T

    2018-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is deposited from the atmosphere to remote areas such as forests, but the amount of Hg in trees is not well known. To determine the importance of Hg in trees, we analyzed foliage, bark and bole wood of eight tree species at four sites in the northeastern USA (Huntington Forest, NY; Sleepers River, VT; Hubbard Brook, NH; Bear Brook, ME). Foliar concentrations of Hg averaged 16.3 ng g-1 among the hardwood species, which was significantly lower than values in conifers, which averaged 28.6 ng g-1 (p < 0.001). Similarly, bark concentrations of Hg were lower (p < 0.001) in hardwoods (7.7 ng g-1) than conifers (22.5 ng g-1). For wood, concentrations of Hg were higher in yellow birch (2.1-2.8 ng g-1) and white pine (2.3 ng g-1) than in the other species, which averaged 1.4 ng g-1 (p < 0.0001). Sites differed significantly in Hg concentrations of foliage and bark (p = 0.02), which are directly exposed to the atmosphere, but the concentration of Hg in wood depended more on species (p < 0.001) than site (p = 0.60). The Hg contents of tree tissues in hardwood stands, estimated from modeled biomass and measured concentrations at each site, were higher in bark (mean of 0.10 g ha-1) and wood (0.16 g ha-1) than in foliage (0.06 g ha-1). In conifer stands, because foliar concentrations were higher, the foliar pool tended to be more important. Quantifying Hg in tree tissues is essential to understanding the pools and fluxes of Hg in forest ecosystems.

  6. Sleep duration and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and energy drinks among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampasa-Kanyinga, Hugues; Hamilton, Hayley A; Chaput, Jean-Philippe

    2018-04-01

    To examine the relationship between sleep duration and consumption of sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs) and energy drinks (EDs) among adolescents. Data on 9,473 adolescents aged 11-20 years were obtained from the 2015 cycle of the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey, a province-wide and cross-sectional school based survey of students in middle and high school. Respondents self-reported their sleep duration and consumption of SSBs and EDs. Those who did not meet the age-appropriate sleep duration recommendation were considered short sleepers. Overall, 81.4% and 12.0% of respondents reported that they had at least one SSBs and EDs in the past week, respectively. Males were more likely than females to consume SSBs and EDs. High school students were more likely than those in middle school to report drinking EDs. After adjusting for multiple covariates, results from logistic regression analyses indicated that short sleep duration was associated with greater odds of SSB consumption in middle school students (odd ratio (OR) = 1.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.18-2.11), but not those in high school (OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.86-1.31). Short sleep duration was associated with greater odds of ED consumption in both middle (OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.10-2.34) and high school (OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.38-2.30) students. Short sleep duration was associated with consumption of EDs in middle and high school students and with SSBs in middle school students only. Future studies are needed to establish causality and to determine whether improving sleep patterns can reduce the consumption of SSBs and EDs among adolescents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Associated Factors of Sleep Quality and Behavior among Students of Two Tertiary Institutions in Northern Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, P P;