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Sample records for slac

  1. SLAC site design aesthetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, F.F.

    1985-10-01

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is a single mission laboratory dedicated to basic research in high energy particle physics. SLAC site also houses Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) which is a multi-mission laboratory for research using beams of ultraviolet light and low energy photons as emitted tangentially from SLAC colliding beam facilities. This paper discusses various aspects of SLAC site design aesthetics under the following headings: (1) imposed footprint of SLAC, (2) description of selected site, (3) use of earth cover for radiation and sight screens, (4) use of landscaping for cosmetic purposes, (5) use of exterior paint colors to soften SLAC impact on neighbors, (6) relocation of SLAC main entrance, (7) relocation of SLAC collider arcs and experimental hall, (8) parking lots and storage yards, and (9) land use zoning at SLAC

  2. SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.; Bell, R.A.; Brown, K.L.

    1980-06-01

    The SLAC LINEAR COLLIDER is designed to achieve an energy of 100 GeV in the electron-positron center-of-mass system by accelerating intense bunches of particles in the SLAC linac and transporting the electron and positron bunches in a special magnet system to a point where they are focused to a radius of about 2 microns and made to collide head on. The rationale for this new type of colliding beam system is discussed, the project is described, some of the novel accelerator physics issues involved are discussed, and some of the critical technical components are described

  3. The SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1985-01-01

    A report is given on the goals and progress of the SLAC Linear Collider. The author discusses the status of the machine and the detectors and give an overview of the physics which can be done at this new facility. He also gives some ideas on how (and why) large linear colliders of the future should be built

  4. The SLAC lasertron project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, C.K.

    1986-10-01

    SLAC has a program underway to develop an efficient high power microwave source for accelerator applications employing a photoemission cathode, the so-called lasertron. After a brief discussion of the lasertron idea, the various elements of the current program are reviewed. A proof-of-principle experiment to build a 35 MW, 70% efficiency, S-band microwave source is nearing completion. Actual RF power testing is expected to begin in late 1986 or early 1987

  5. Sleepless at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dement, William (Stanford Sleep Disorders Center)

    2006-01-23

    Feeling tired? More than 30 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders. Nevertheless, as a society we remain largely ignorant of the significance of sleep in determining the quality of our waking lives. Dr. William Dement, Stanford Professor and one of the world's foremost experts on sleep and sleep deprivation, joins SLAC's Colloquium Series to present exciting new findings in the field of sleep research. You'll never sleep the same again!

  6. SLAC B Factory computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, P.F.

    1992-02-01

    As part of the research and development program in preparation for a possible B Factory at SLAC, a group has been studying various aspects of HEP computing. In particular, the group is investigating the use of UNIX for all computing, from data acquisition, through analysis, and word processing. A summary of some of the results of this study will be given, along with some personal opinions on these topics

  7. Luminosity enhancements at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coward, D.H.

    1984-04-01

    Several ideas are discussed that have been proposed to improve the luminosity at the SPEAR and PEP electron-positron storage rings and to insure good luminosity at the SLAC Linear Collider. There have been two proposals studied recently for SPEAR: a Microbeta insertion using Samarium Cobalt permanent magnets, and a Minibeta insertion using conventional quadrupole magnets. The notations Microbeta and minibeta used here are somewhat arbitrary since the front faces of the first quadrupole magnets for both insertions are at nearly the same distance from the interaction point

  8. SLAC synchronous condenser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corvin, C.

    1995-06-01

    A synchronous condenser is a synchronous machine that generates reactive power that leads real power by 90 degrees in phase. The leading reactive power generated by the condenser offsets or cancels the normal lagging reactive power consumed by inductive and nonlinear loads at the accelerator complex. The quality of SLAC's utility power is improved with the addition of the condenser. The inertia of the condenser's 35,000 pound rotor damps and smoothes voltage excursions on two 12 kilovolt master substation buses, improving voltage regulation site wide. The condenser absorbs high frequency transients and noise in effect ''scrubbing'' the electric system power at its primary distribution source. In addition, the condenser produces a substantial savings in power costs. Federal and investor owned utilities that supply electric power to SLAC levy a monthly penalty for lagging reactive power delivered to the site. For the 1993 fiscal year this totaled over $285,000 in added costs for the year. By generating leading reactive power on site, thereby reducing total lagging reactive power requirements, a substantial savings in electric utility bills is achieved. Actual savings of $150,000 or more a year are possible depending on experimental operations

  9. Environment, Safety & Health at SLAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    and safety of our staff, the community, and the environment as we carry out our scientific mission. We integral to each job. As stewards of our land, SLAC also seeks to minimize pollution to our environment and to protect our resources and biota. See the SLAC Environment, Safety and Health Policy for more

  10. The SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phinney, N.

    1992-01-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has begun a new era of operation with the SLD detector. During 1991 there was a first engineering run for the SLD in parallel with machine improvements to increase luminosity and reliability. For the 1992 run, a polarized electron source was added and more than 10,000 Zs with an average of 23% polarization have been logged by the SLD. This paper discusses the performance of the SLC in 1991 and 1992 and the technical advances that have produced higher luminosity. Emphasis will be placed on issues relevant to future linear colliders such as producing and maintaining high current, low emittance beams and focusing the beams to the micron scale for collisions. (Author) tab., 2 figs., 18 refs

  11. The SLAC polarized electron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Alley, R.; Frisch, J.; Kotseroglou, T.; Mulhollan, G.; Schultz, D.; Tang, H.; Turner, J.; Yeremian, A.D.

    1997-08-01

    Since 1992, the SLAC 3-km linac has operated exclusively with polarized electrons. The polarized electron source is highly reliable, remotely operated and monitored, and able to produce a variety of electron bunch profiles for high-energy physics experiments. The source and its operating characteristics are described. Some implications drawn from the operating experience are discussed

  12. The SLAC NLC source program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caryotakis, G.

    1995-01-01

    The SLAC approach to a future e + e - 1-TeV linear collider, which will probably be an internationally sponsored project at the turn of the century, is a conventional 14-kilometer accelerator operating at 11.4 GHz. SLAC is on the 6th year of a program to develop 50--100 MW klystron sources for the ''Next Linear Collider'' or ''NLC''. The paper traces the development of these tubes and presents experimental results for solenoid-focused klystrons with output circuits of both the standing-wave and traveling-wave variety. In addition, the design of a periodically-focused permanent magnet klystron is discussed and a tape is shown with time-sequenced simulations of the interaction process for such a tube

  13. SLAC Linac Preparations for FACET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been cut at the two-thirds point to provide beams to two independent programs. The last third provides the electron beam for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), leaving the first two-thirds available for FACET, the new experimental facility for accelerator science and test beams. In this paper, we describe this separation and projects to prepare the linac for the FACET experimental program.

  14. GLAST beam test at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engovatov, D.; Anthony, P.; Atwood, W.

    1996-10-01

    In May and June, a beam test for GLAST calorimeter technologies was conducted. A parasitic low intensity electron/tagged photon beam line into the End Station A at SLAC was commissioned and used. The preliminary stage of the test was devoted to measuring the performance of the parasitic beam. In the main test we studied the response of GLAST prototype CsI and scintillating fiber calorimeters to the electrons and photons. Results of this work are discussed

  15. The SLAC polarized electron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, H.; Alley, R.; Frisch, J.

    1995-06-01

    The SLAC polarized electron source employs a photocathode DC high voltage gun with a loadlock and a YAG pumped Ti:sapphire laser system for colliding beam experiments or a flash lamp pumped Ti:sapphire laser for fixed target experiments. It uses a thin, strained GaAs(100) photocathode, and is capable of producing a pulsed beam with a polarization of ≥80% and a peak current exceeding 10 A. Its operating efficiency has reached 99%. The physics and technology of producing high polarization electron beams from a GaAs photocathode will be reviewed. The prospects of realizing a polarized electron source for future linear colliders will also be discussed

  16. Wakefields in SLAC linac collimators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Novokhatski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available When a beam travels near collimator jaws, it gets an energy loss and a transverse kick due to the backreaction of the beam field diffracted from the jaws. The effect becomes very important for an intense short bunch when a tight collimation of the background beam halo is required. In the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC a collimation system is used to protect the undulators from radiation due to particles in the beam halo. The halo is most likely formed from gun dark current or dark current in some of the accelerating sections. However, collimators are also responsible for the generation of wake fields. The wake field effect from the collimators not only brings an additional energy jitter and change in the trajectory of the beam, but it also rotates the beam on the phase plane, which consequently leads to a degradation of the performance of the Free Electron Laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source. In this paper, we describe a model of the wake field radiation in the SLAC linac collimators. We use the results of a numerical simulation to illustrate the model. Based on the model, we derive simple formulas for the bunch energy loss and the average kick. We also present results from experimental measurements that confirm our model.

  17. No conflict between SLAC and Japan's KEK

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Letter from Helen Quinn from SLAC arguing that an article in Nature distorted her comments on the relationship between KEK and SLAC over their separate projects looking at CP violation. The author of the original article replies (1/2 page).

  18. SLAC accelerator operations report: 1995--1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, R.; Allen, C.W.; Anderson, S.; Linebarger, W.; Stanek, M.

    1997-05-01

    Operational statistics for the linear accelerator programs at SLAC are presented, including run-time records for SLC and the fixed-target programs. Also included are summaries of reliability and maintenance-related statistics

  19. New generation control system at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melen, R.

    1981-03-01

    The proposed SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) project will require an Instrumentation and Control system that provides integrated automatic monitoring and control functions. The present SLAC LINAC Instrumentation and Control system will be totally revamped and it will be expanded to include the support of all of the additional accelerator components that will be required for the whole SLC project. This paper describes the functional operation of the new system

  20. SLC Energy Upgrade Program at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.; Allen, M.A.; Cassel, R.L.; Dean, N.R.; Konrad, G.T.; Koontz, R.F.; Lebacqz, J.V.

    1985-03-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) must reach a nominal center-of-mass energy of 100 GeV to fulfill its high energy physics goals. This paper describes the energy upgrade program that is being implemented on the SLAC linear accelerator to meet these goals. It includes a discussion of the design requirements and available technical options, the rationale for the adopted solution, and the technical problems involved in the engineering and production of klystrons and modulators

  1. SLC energy upgrade program at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.; Allen, M.A.; Cassel, R.L.; Dean, N.R.; Konrad, G.T.; Koontz, R.F.; Lebacqz, J.V.

    1985-01-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) must reach a nominal center-of-mass energy of 100 GeV to fulfill its high energy physics goals. This paper describes the energy upgrade program that is being implemented on the SLAC linear accelerator to meet these goals. It includes a discussion of the design requirements and available technical options, the rationale for the adopted solution, and the technical problems involved in the engineering and production of klystrons and modulators

  2. The SLC energy upgrade program at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.; Allen, M.A.; Cassel, R.L.; Dean, N.R.; Konrad, G.T.; Koontz, R.F.; Lebaaqz, J.V.

    1985-01-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) must reach a nominal center-of-mass energy of 100 GeV to fulfill its high energy physics goals. This paper describes the energy upgrade program that is being implemented on the SLAC linear accelerator to meet these goals. It includes a discussion of the design requirements and available technical options, the rationale for the adopted solution, and the technical problems involved in the engineering and production of klystrons and modulators

  3. Longitudinal and transverse wake potentials in SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, K.; Wilson, P.

    1980-01-01

    In a machine with short bunches of high peak currents, such as the SLAC collider, one needs to know the longitudinal wake potential, for the higher mode losses, and the transverse wake potential, since, for bunches passing slightly off axis, the induced transverse forces will tend to cause beam break up. The longitudinal and transverse wakes of the SLAC structure presented here, were calculated by computer using the modal method, and including an analytic extension for higher modes. (Auth.)

  4. SIMS: The SLAC Industrial Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, B.

    1990-01-01

    Kern was the first survey company to market an Industrial Measurement System when it released ECDS (Electronic Coordinate Determination System) in the mid-1980s. Originally written for the PDP-11, a version was later released for the PC (ECDS-PC). SLAC purchased this system in 1986 and immediately began to use it for the alignment of the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider). Although ECDS enabled SLAC to perform tasks with a speed never before achieved, they experienced limitations in the software. Since Kern proved unresponsive and SLAC was unable to purchase the source code for any amount of money, they set about writing their own portions of code. They first wrote a system of menus tailored for their specific alignment tasks, and disabled much of the ECDS menu structure. Due to dissatisfaction with the ECDS bundle adjustment program, they wrote their own bundle adjustment in 1988. A further step towarad having their own complete IMS was to develop a data capture program, a task which has been underway since the beginning of this year. They do not yet have data analysis features that are fully integrated, but they do have stand-alone packages that have been written at SLAC. When they first started tinkering with ECDS there was no intention of developing a complete system, but they now have all the elements of such a system - SIMS, the SLAC Industrial Measurement System

  5. Search for exotic mesons at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonamy, P.; Baggett, N.; Fieguth, T.

    1975-01-01

    The theoretical justification and results from recent experimental searches for backward-produced exotic mesons including two experiments carried out by the collaboration at SLAC are reviewed. The first experiment put upper limits of about 1 to 2 μb for X ++ → (2π, 4π, 6π) ++ and anti ppπ + π + in the reaction π + + p → X ++ + n/sub forward/ at 8.4 GeV/c studied with the SLAC 14 inch rapid cycling bubble chamber triggered by a downstream neutron detector. Also the important features of the recently completed second experiment with the SLAC streamer chamber to study the reaction π - + p → X -- + p/sub forward/ at 14 GeV/c are discussed

  6. Physics results with polarized electrons at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1996-03-01

    Polarized electron beams can play an important role in the dynamics of interactions at high energies. Polarized electron beams at SLAC have been an important part of the physics program since 1970, when they were first proposed for use in testing the spin structure of the proton. Since 1992, the SLAC linear accelerator and the SLC have operated solely with polarized electrons, providing data for tests of QCD in studies of the spin structure of the nucleon and tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model. In the following sections, the performance of the source is summarized, and some of the recent results using the polarized beams are discussed

  7. Operational experience with SLAC's beam containment electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant, T.N.; Crook, K.; Heggie, D.

    1977-03-01

    Considerable operating experience was accumulated at SLAC with an extensive electronic system for the containment of high power accelerated beams. Average beam power at SLAC can approach 900 kilowatts with the potential for burning through beam stoppers, protection collimators, and other power absorbers within a few seconds. Fast, reliable, and redundant electronic monitoring circuits have been employed to provide some of the safeguards necessary for minimizing the risk to personnel. The electronic systems are described, and the design philosophy and operating experience are discussed

  8. Computer control of rf at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, H.D.

    1985-03-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator is presently upgraded for the SLAC Linear Collider project. The energy is to be increased from approximately 31 GeV to 50 GeV. Two electron beams and one positron beam are to be accelerated with high demands on the quality of the beams. The beam specifications are shown. To meet these specifications, all parameters influencing the beams have to be under tight control and continuous surveillance. This task is accomplished by a new computer system implemented at SLAC which has, among many other functions, control over rf accelerating fields. 13 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  9. SLAC physicists develop test for string theory

    CERN Multimedia

    Yajnik, Juhi

    2006-01-01

    "Under certain conditions, string theory solves many of the questions wracking the minds of physicists, but until recently it had one major flaw - it could not be tested. SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) scientists have found a way to test this revolutionary theory, which posits that there are 10 or 11 dimensions in our universe" (1 page)

  10. SLAC accelerator operations report: 1992-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, R.; Allen, C.W.; Inman, T.K.; Linebarger, W.; Stanek, M.

    1995-05-01

    Operational statistics for the linear accelerator programs at SLAC are presented, including run-time records for the SLC, FFTB, and fixed target programs. Also included are summaries of reliability and maintenance-related statistics and a discussion of the analysis tools used to study error messages generated by the control system

  11. Progress report on the SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, J.

    1986-06-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider project (SLC) is reported as being near completion. The performance specifications are tabulated both for the initial form and for eventual goals. Various parts of the SLC are described and the status of their construction is reported, including the front end electron gun and booster, the linac, damping ring, positron source, SLC arcs, and conventional facilities. 5 refs., 12 figs

  12. An overview of the SLAC results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1996-03-01

    The history of nucleon spin-structure measurements goes back to the early days of inelastic electron scattering at SLAC, when Vernon Hughes came with a proposal to accelerate polarized electrons to high energy and to study inelastic scattering from a polarized proton target. The quark model of the proton was new at the time, and the spin-dependent structure functions were an excellent testing ground for that model. The proposal developed into an experiment which became SLAC experiment E80. Subsequent experiments followed those early studies, leading to E130 at SLAC, then EMC at CERN, and a host of later experiments. In 1988 the EMC Collaboration published the first data to reach low x. The asymmetries EMC observed fell below quark model expectations, and the experimentally measured proton sum rule indicated that the spin of the quarks contributed little to the proton spin. The subject of nucleon spin-dependent structure functions was stimulated by this surprising result from EMC. The continuation of the spin-structure studies at SLAC, which have been very active in recent years, was stimulated by the successful development of high-intensity beams of polarized electrons. Table 1 lists the past, present, and planned programs and experiments that grew out of the early work. The rest of the report is divided into the following topics: polarized electrons; polarimetry; the SLAC spectrometers; radiative corrections; the proton measurements; neutron targets; the deuterium and 3 He data; the g 2 structure function; and the 50 GeV upgrade of the SLC

  13. STANFORD (SLAC): B factory construction begins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1994-03-15

    At a ceremony marking the start of construction, members of the US Congress and Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary hailed the new Asymmetric B Factory as the key to continued vitality of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Being built in collaboration with the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the B factory is a $177 million upgrade of the existing PEP electron-positron collider. Scheduled for completion in 1998, the B factory will generate many millions of B mesons, allowing, among other physics, an intensive search for the phenomena of CP violation in the decays of these particles.

  14. Two microcomputer-controller applications at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struven, W.C.; Mallory, K.B.

    1977-03-01

    The SLAC Accelerator Control and Monitoring System, as originally implemented, was a manual (non-computer) control system with provisions to add computers at a later date. Since operation began in 1966, a PDP9 with a PDP8/e ''front end'' was added in the accelerator control room, and most recently, eight PDP8/f's were added in the two mile Klystron Gallery which are linked to the 8/e front end. A data link was added between the PDP9 and an SDS 925 in the Main Control Room. Tough panel interfaces were provided so that the Accelerator and Beam Switchyard could be controlled and monitored from one console

  15. STANFORD (SLAC): B factory construction begins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    At a ceremony marking the start of construction, members of the US Congress and Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary hailed the new Asymmetric B Factory as the key to continued vitality of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Being built in collaboration with the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the B factory is a $177 million upgrade of the existing PEP electron-positron collider. Scheduled for completion in 1998, the B factory will generate many millions of B mesons, allowing, among other physics, an intensive search for the phenomena of CP violation in the decays of these particles

  16. ''ARBOLA'' SLAC branch driver for PDP-11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxoby, G.

    1976-08-01

    The wide use of CAMAC systems in the Large Aperture Solenoid Spectrometer facility led to the design of several dedicated CAMAC interfaces. The one described here features the implementation of bidirectional data transfers, and is used exclusively with the SLAC crate controller, 135-279. Efforts were made to ensure maximum versatility for acquisition of high-energy physics data. Specifications are set forth, and hardware and software (memory address register, word count register, data buffer register, and high-byte register) are described. 4 figures

  17. SLAC-Linac-Collider (SLC) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-02-01

    The proposed SLAC Linear Collider Project (SLC) and its features are described in this paper. In times of ever increasing costs for energy the electron storage ring principle is about to reach its practical limit. A new class of colliding beam beam facilities, the Linear Colliders, are getting more and more attractive and affordable at very high center-of-mass energies. The SLC is designed to be a poineer of this new class of colliding beam facilities and at the same time will serve as a valuable tool to explore the high energy physics at the level of 100 GeV in the center-of-mass system

  18. Binary rf pulse compression experiment at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavine, T.L.; Spalek, G.; Farkas, Z.D.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    Using rf pulse compression it will be possible to boost the 50- to 100-MW output expected from high-power microwave tubes operating in the 10- to 20-GHz frequency range, to the 300- to 1000-MW level required by the next generation of high-gradient linacs for linear for linear colliders. A high-power X-band three-stage binary rf pulse compressor has been implemented and operated at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In each of three successive stages, the rf pulse-length is compressed by half, and the peak power is approximately doubled. The experimental results presented here have been obtained at low-power (1-kW) and high-power (15-MW) input levels in initial testing with a TWT and a klystron. Rf pulses initially 770 nsec long have been compressed to 60 nsec. Peak power gains of 1.8 per stage, and 5.5 for three stages, have been measured. This corresponds to a peak power compression efficiency of about 90% per stage, or about 70% for three stages, consistent with the individual component losses. The principle of operation of a binary pulse compressor (BPC) is described in detail elsewhere. We recently have implemented and operated at SLAC a high-power (high-vacuum) three-stage X-band BPC. First results from the high-power three-stage BPC experiment are reported here

  19. Status of the SLAC Linear Collider Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiening, R.

    1983-01-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider Project has two principal goals. The first is to serve as a prototype for a future very high energy linear electron-positron collider. The second is to quickly, at low cost, achieve sufficient luminosity at 100 GeV center-of-mass energy to explore the physics of the Z 0 . The first goal is important to the future of electron-positron physics because the rapid increase of synchrotron radiation with energy causes the cost of circular storage ring colliders to whereas the cost of linear colliders increases only in proportion to the center-of-mass energy. The second is important because the existance at SLAC of a linear accelerator which can be converted at low cost to collider operation makes possible a unique opportunity to quickly achieve 100 GeV center-of-mass collisions. At the design luminosity of 6.0 x 10 30 many thousands of Z 0 decays should be observed in each day of operation

  20. Physics at the SLC [SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, M.L.

    1990-11-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) was constructed in the years 1983--1987 for two principal reasons: to develop the accelerator physics and technology that are necessary for the construction of future linear electron-positron colliders; and to produce electron-positron collisions at the Z 0 pole and to study the physics of the weak neutral current. To date, the SLC program has been quite successful at achieving the first goal. The machine has produced and collided high energy electron and positron beams of three-micron transverse size. The problems of operating an open geometry detector in an environment that is more akin to those found in fixed-target experiments than in storage rings have largely been solved. As a physics producing venture, the SLC has been less successful than was originally hoped but more successful than is commonly believed. Some of the results that have been produced by the Mark II experiment with a very modest data sample are competitive with those that have been produced with much larger samples by the four LEP collaborations. At the current, time, SLAC is engaged in an ambitious program to upgrade the SLC luminosity and to exploit one of its unique features, a spin polarized electron beam. These lectures are therefore organized into three sections: a brief description of the SLC; a review of the physics results that have been achieved with the Mark II detector; a description of the SLC's future: the realization and use of a polarized electron beam

  1. Pulse modulator developments in support of klystron testing at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.F.; Cassel, R.; Lamare, J. de; Ficklin, D.; Gold, S.; Harris, K.

    1993-01-01

    Several families of high power klystrons in S- and X-Band are being developed in the Klystron Laboratory at SLAC. To support these developments, a number of new pulse modulators are being designed from scratch, or upgraded from existing laboratory test modulators. This paper outlines the modulator parameters available in the SLAC Klystron Laboratory, and discuss two new modulators that are under construction

  2. SLAC workshop on high energy electroproduction and spin physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    These Proceedings contain copies of the transparencies presented at the Workshop on High Energy Electroproduction and Spin Physics held at SLAC on February 5--8, 1992. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring people together to discuss the possibilities for new experiments using the SLAC high intensity electron and photon beams and the facilities of End Station A

  3. Polarized Light Sources for photocathode electron guns at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, M.; Frisch, J.; Witte, K.; Zolotorev, M.

    1992-12-01

    We describe current and future Polarized Light Sources at SLAC for use with photocathode electron guns to produce polarized electron beams. The SLAC experiments SLD and E142 are considered, and are used to define the required parameters for the Polarized Light Sources

  4. SLAC three-body partial wave analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aston, D.; Lasinski, T.A.; Sinervo, P.K.

    1985-10-01

    We present a heuristic description of the SLAC-LBL three-meson partial wave model, and describe how we have implemented it at SLAC. The discussion details the assumptions of the model and the analysis, and emphasizes the methods we have used to prepare and fit the data. 28 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  5. Pulsed rf superconductivity program at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1984-08-01

    Recent tests performed at SLAC on superconducting TM 010 caavities using short rf pulses (less than or equal to 2.5 μs) have established that at the cavity surface magnetic fields can be reached in the vicinity of the theoretical critical fields without an appreciable increase in average losses. Tests on niobium and lead cavities are reported. The pulse method seems to be best suited to study peak field properties of superconductors in the microwave band, without the limitations imposed by defects. The short pulses also seem to be more effective in decreasing the causes of field emission by rf processing. Applications of the pulsed rf superconductivity to high-gradient linear accelerators are also possible

  6. Performance of the SLAC Linear Collider klystrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.; Fowkes, W.R.; Koontz, R.F.; Schwarz, H.D.; Seeman, J.T.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    There are now 200 new, high power 5045 klystrons installed on the two-mile Stanford Linear Accelerator. Peak power per klystron averages over 63 MW. Average energy contribution is above 240 MeV per station. Electron beam energy has been measured as high as 53 GeV. Energy instability due to kylstron malfunction is less than 0.2%. The installed klystrons have logged over one million operating hours with close to 20,00 klystron hours cumulative operating time between failures. Data is being accumulated on klystron operation and failure modes with failure signatures starting to become apparent. To date, no wholesale failure modes have surfaced that would impair the SLAC linear Collider (SLC) program

  7. Parameters of the SLAC Next Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, T.; Adolphsen, C.; Burke, D.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, the authors present the parameters and layout of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC is the SLAC design of a future linear collider using X-band RF technology in the main linacs. The collider would have an initial center-of-mass energy of 0.5 TeV which would be upgraded to 1 TeV and then 1.5 TeV in two stages. The design luminosity is > 5 x 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 at 0.5 TeV and > 10 34 cm -2 sec -1 at 1.0 and 1.5 TeV. They briefly describe the components of the collider and the proposed energy upgrade scenario

  8. SLAC divertor channel entrance thermal stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.L.; Stein, W.; Lu, S.C.; Riddle, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray beams emerging from the new SLAC electron-positron storage ring (PEP) impinge on the entrance to tangential divertor channels causing highly localized heating in the channel structure. Analyses were completed to determine the temperatures and thermally-induced stresses due to this heating. These parts are cooled with water flowing axially over them at 30 0 C. The current design and operating conditions should result in the entrance to the new divertor channel operating at a peak temperature of 123 0 C with a peak thermal stress at 91% of yield. Any micro-cracks that form due to thermally-induced stresses should not propagate to the coolant wall nor form a path for the coolant to leak into the storage ring vacuum. 34 figs., 4 tabs

  9. Cerenkov ring imaging detector development at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, S.H.

    1984-06-01

    The imaging of Cerenkov light on to photosensitive detectors promises to be a powerful technique for identifying particles in colliding beam spectrometers. Toward this end two and three dimensional imaging photon detectors are being developed at SLAC. The present techniques involve photon conversion using easily ionized exotic chemicals like tetrakisdimethyl-amino-ethylene (TMAE) in a drift and amplifying gas mixture of methane and isobutane. Single photoelectrons from Cerenkov light are currently being drifted 20 cm and a new device under study will be used to study drifting up to 80 cm along a magnetic field. A short description of a large device currently being designed for the SLD spectrometer at the Stanford Linear Collider will be given

  10. Accelerator structure bead pull measurement at SLAC

    CERN Document Server

    Lewandowski, J R; Miller, R H; Wang, J W

    2004-01-01

    Microwave measurement and tuning of accelerator structures are important issues for the current and next generation of high energy physics machines. Application of these measurements both before and after high power processing can reveal information about the structure but may be misinterpreted if measurement conditions are not carefully controlled. For this reason extensive studies to characterize the microwave measurements at have been made at SLAC. For the beadpull a reproducible measurement of less than 1 degree of phase accuracy in total phase drift is needed in order to resolve issues such as phase changes due to structure damage during high power testing. Factors contributing to measurement errors include temperature drift, mechanical vibration, and limitations of measurement equipment such as the network analyzer. Results of this continuing effort will be presented.

  11. Microprocessors in physics experiments at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochester, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    The increasing size and complexity of high energy physics experiments is changing the way data are collected. To implement a trigger or event filter requires complex logic which may have to be modified as the experiment proceeds. Simply to monitor a detector, large amounts of data must be processed online. The use of microprocessors or other programmable devices can help to achieve these ends flexibly and economically. At SLAC, a number of microprocessor-based systems have been built and are in use in experimental setups, and others are now being developed. This talk is a review of existing systems and their use in experiments, and of developments in progress and future plans. (orig.)

  12. Microprocessors in physics experiments at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochester, L.S.

    1981-04-01

    The increasing size and complexity of high energy physics experiments is changing the way data are collected. To implement a trigger or event filter requires complex logic which may have to be modified as the experiment proceeds. Simply to monitor a detector, large amounts of data must be processed on line. The use of microprocessors or other programmable devices can help to achieve these ends flexibly and economically. At SLAC, a number of microprocessor-based systems have been built and are in use in experimental setups, and others are now being developed. This talk is a review of existing systems and their use in experiments, and of developments in progress and future plans

  13. SLC status and SLAC future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1990-01-01

    In this presentation, I shall discuss the linear collider program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center as it is now, and as we hope to see it evolve over the next few years. Of greatest interest to the high-energy accelerator physics community gathered here is the development of the linear collider concept, and so I shall concentrate most of this paper on a discussion of the present status and future evolution of the SLC. I will also briefly discuss the research and development program that we are carrying out aimed at the realization of the next generation of higher-energy linear colliders. SLAC has a major colliding-beam storage-ring program as well, including present rings and design studies on future high luminosity projects, but time constraints preclude a discussion of them. (author) 8 figs., 3 tabs

  14. SLAC pulsed X-ray facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipe, N. E.; McCall, R. C.; Baker, E. D.

    1986-05-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) operates a high energy (up to 33 GeV) linear accelerator delivering pulses up to a few microseconds wide. The pulsed nature of the electron beam creates problems in the detection and measurement of radiation both from the accelerator beam and the klystrons that provide the RF power for the accelerator. Hence, a pulsed X-ray facility has been built at SLAC mainly for the purpose of testing the response of different radiation detection instruments to pulsed radiation fields. The X-ray tube consists of an electron gun with a control grid. This provides a stream of pulsed electrons that can be accelerated towards a confined target-window. The window is made up of aluminum 0.051 cm (20 mils) thick, plated on the vacuum side with a layer of gold 0.0006 cm (1/4 mil) thick. The frequency of electron pulses can be varied by an internal pulser from 60 to 360 pulses per second with pulse widths of 360 ns to 5 ms. The pulse amplitude can be varied over a wide range of currents. An external pulser can be used to obtain other frequencies or special pulse shapes. The voltage across the gun can be varied from 0 to 100 kV. The major part of the X-ray tube is enclosed in a large walk-in-cabinet made of 1.9 cm (3/4 in) plywood and lined with 0.32 cm (1/8 in) lead to make a very versatile facility.

  15. SLAC pulsed x-ray facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipe, N.E.; McCall, R.C.; Baker, E.D.

    1986-05-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) operates a high energy (up to 33 GeV) linear accelerator delivering pulses up to a few microseconds wide. The pulsed nature of the electron beam creates problems in the detection and measurement of radiation both from the accelerator beam and the klystrons that provide the rf power for the accelerator. Hence, a pulsed x-ray facility has been built at SLAC mainly for the purpose of testing the response of different radiation detection instruments to pulsed radiation fields. The x-ray tube consists of an electron gun with a control grid. This provides a stream of pulsed electrons that can be accelerated towards a confined target-window. The window is made up of aluminium 0.051 cm (20 mils) thick, plated on the vacuum side with a layer of gold 0.0006 cm (1/4 mil) thick. The frequency of electron pulses can be varied by an internal pulser from 60 to 360 pulses per second with pulse widths of 360 ns to 5 μs. The pulse amplitude can be varied over a wide range of currents. An external pulser can be used to obtain other frequencies or special pulse shapes. The voltage across the gun can be varied from 0 to 100 kV. The major part of the x-ray tube is enclosed in a large walk-in-cabinet made of 1.9 cm (3/4 in) plywood and lined with 0.32 cm (1/8 in) lead to make a very versatile facility. 3 refs., 5 figs

  16. The creation of SLAC leading to 30 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1996-01-01

    The different phases of operation of SLAC which provided the basis of its longevity are outlined. SLAC has been an unusually productive laboratory both in terms of genuinely new revelations and the accumulation of archival data. Current operation of SLAC is divided between fixed target experiments, whose energy has now been extended to 50 GeV, and continued use of the SLC with the SLAC large detector. Because of the availability of polarization, results obtained in the SLC-SLD combination have been competitive with the experiments using LEP at CERN, notwithstanding the significantly larger available luminosities at the much larger LEP machine. In addition the SLC, together with specialized test facilities, constitute a basic laboratory to determine the design of the Next Linear Collider (NLC)

  17. A 100 GeV SLAC Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Zoltan D

    2002-01-01

    The SLAC beam energy can be increased from the current 50 GeV to 100 GeV, if we change the operating frequency from the present 2856 MHz to 11424 MHz, using technology developed for the NLC. We replace the power distribution system with a proposed NLC distribution system as shown in Fig. 1. The four 3 meter s-band 820 nS fill time accelerator sections are replaced by six 2 meter x-band 120 nS fill time sections. Thus the accelerator length per klystron retains the same length, 12 meters. The 4050 65MW-3.5(micro)S klystrons are replaced by 75MW-1.5(micro)S permanent magnet klystrons developed here and in Japan. The present input to the klystrons would be multiplied by a factor of 4 and possibly amplified. The SLED [1] cavities have to be replaced. The increase in beam voltage is due to the higher elastance to group velocity ratio, higher compression ratio and higher unloaded to external Q ratio of the new SLED cavities. The average power input is reduced because of the narrower klystron pulse width and because the klystron electro-magnets are replaced by permanent magnets

  18. Search milli-charged particles at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langeveld, W.G.J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Particles with electric charge q {triple_bond} Qe {le} 10{sup -3} e and masses in the range 1-1000 MeV/c{sup 2} are not excluded by present experiments or by astrophysical or cosmological arguments. A beam dump experiment uniquely suited to the detection of such {open_quotes}milli-charged{close_quotes} particles has been carried out at SLAC, utilizing the short-duration pulses of the SLC electron beam to establish a tight coincidence window for the signal. The detector, a large scintillation counter sensitive to very small energy depositions, provided much greater sensitivity than previous searches. Analysis of the data leads to the exclusion of a substantial portion of the charge-mass plane. In this report, a preliminary mass-dependent upper limit is presented for the charge of milli-charged particles, ranging from Q = 1.7 x 10{sup -5} at milli-charged particle mass 0.1 MeV/c{sup 2} to Q = 9.5 x 10{sup -4} at 100 MeV/c{sup 2}.

  19. Parton distributions from SMC and SLAC data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    We have extracted spin-weighted parton distributions in a proton from recent data at CERN and SLAC. The valence, sea quark and Antiquark spin-weighted distributions are determined separately. The data are all consistent with a small to moderate polarized gluon distribution, so that the anomaly term is not significant in the determination of the constituent contributions to the spin of the proton. We have analyzed the consistency of the results obtained from various sets of data and the Biorken sum rule. Although all data are consistent with the sum rule, the polarized distributions from different experiments vary, even with higher order QCD corrections taken into account. Results split into two models, one set implying a large polarized strange sea which violates the positivity bound, and the other set yielding a smaller polarized strange sea. Only further experiments which extract information about the polarized sea will reconcile these differences. We suggest specific experiments which can be performed to determine the size of the polarized sea and gluons

  20. Wide-band cable systems at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struven, W.

    1983-01-01

    SLAC's first cable TV system was installed in 1979 to remotely monitor a narrow pulse which was generated in the west end of the klystron gallery. When Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) experimental work started at the west end of the accelerator, the original 1979 cable was upgraded to a bidirectional system so that 2 MBaud point-to-point data and several video and 9600 baud channels could be transmitted. The implementation of the SLC requires a complete upgrading of the accelerator control system. The system is based on a distributed processing configuration using a PDP11/780 VAX in the Main Control Center (MCC) and Intel single-board computers in a multibus configuration along the accelerator. The high-speed data linking is supplied by a 1 MBaud Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) Network. The same cable is used to provide video, low-speed data, voice and high-speed point-to-point data services. The transmission system will utilize a wideband midsplit cable facility to collect and distribute signals to all parts of the network

  1. Short wavelength FELs using the SLAC linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1993-08-01

    Recent technological developments have opened the possibility to construct a device which we call a Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS); a fourth generation light source, with brightness, coherence, and peak power far exceeding other sources. Operating on the principle of the free electron laser (FEL), the LCLS would extend the range of FEL operation to much aborter wavelength than the 240 mn that has so far been reached. We report the results of studies of the use of the SLAC linac to drive an LCLS at wavelengths from about 3-100 nm initially and possibly even shorter wavelengths in the future. Lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a low emittance, high peak current, high energy electron beam through a long undulator. Most present FELs use an optical cavity to build up the intensity of the light to achieve lasing action in a low gain oscillator configuration. By eliminating the optical cavity, which is difficult to make at short wavelengths, laser action can be extended to shorter wavelengths by Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE), or by harmonic generation from a longer wavelength seed laser. Short wavelength, single pass lasers have been extensively studied at several laboratories and at recent workshops

  2. Progress report on the SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozanecki, W.

    1987-11-01

    In this paper we report on the status of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC), the prototype of a new generation of colliding beam accelerators. This novel type of machine holds the potential of extending electron-positron colliding beam studies to center-of-mass (c.m.) energies far in excess of what is economically achievable with colliding beam storage rings. If the technical challenges posed by linear colliders are solvable at a reasonable cost, this new approach would provide an attractive alternative to electron-positron rings, where, because of rapidly rising synchrotron radiation losses, the cost and size of the ring increases with the square of the c.m. energy. In addition to its role as a test vehicle for the linear collider principle, the SLC aims at providing an abundant source of Z 0 decays to high energy physics experiments. Accordingly, two major detectors, the upgraded Mark II, now installed on the SLC beam line, and the state-of-the-art SLD, currently under construction, are preparing to probe the Standard Model at the Z 0 pole. The SLC project was originally funded in 1983. Since the completion of construction, we have been commissioning the machine to bring it up to a performance level adequate for starting the high energy physics program. In the remainder of this paper, we will discuss the status, problems and performance of the major subsystems of the SLC. We will conclude with a brief outline of the physics program, and of the planned enhancements to the capabilities of the machine. 26 refs., 7 figs

  3. Status report on the alignment activities at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Cocq, Catherine; Fuss, Brian; Ruland, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This report mainly focuses on the Alignment Engineering Group, which deals with all aspects of activities involving surveying and alignment at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center). These activities are field work, ongoing studies and mapping effort. The majority of fieldwork at SLAC is initiated by the various current physics experiments. As PEP-II switched into operational mode, another major project was fully ramping up: SPEAR. The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) had been preparing the upgrade SPEAR3 (3 GeV, 200 mA). Currently the effort has been to remap the entire SPEAR2 ring including existing magnets but also to map and tie in the connected booster ring. Laser trackers, total stations, and digital levels were used and substantial post processing was necessary to tie everything together. In parallel with field works, several instrumentation studies are in progress on laser tracker and total station, leveling instrumentation and gyro theodolites. Further enhancements have been included in the core network analysis package used at SLAC (LEGO). To keep up with the new installation, SLAC is undergoing an update of its site map. Overall this is a very interesting and dynamic time at SLAC, which celebrated its 40th anniversary on October 2nd 2002. (Y. Tanaka)

  4. Review of the SLAC and Les Houches workshops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1994-12-01

    Polarized Electron Source workshops have been held at varying intervals, beginning in 1983 when Charles Sinclair convened the first at SLAC. Since that time, three workshops were held in conjunction with the International Spin Symposia and two at other occasions. The increasing importance of polarized electron beams at accelerators has stimulated interest in these workshops. Two workshops have been held since the last International Spin Symposium in Nagoya. In 1993, a workshop was held at SLAC, and in 1994 at Les Houches, a polarized electron beam session was held as part of a polarized beam and targets workshop. This report summarizes highlights from the latter two workshops

  5. RF pulse compression in the NLC test accelerator at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavine, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), the authors are designing a Next Linear Collider (NLC) with linacs powered by X-band klystrons with rf pulse compression. The design of the linac rf system is based on X-band prototypes which have been tested at high power, and on a systems-integration test - the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) - which is currently under construction at SLAC. This paper discusses some of the systems implications of rf pulse compression, and the use of pulse compression in the NLCTA, both for peak power multiplication and for controlling, by rf phase modulation, intra-pulse variations in the linac beam energy

  6. SLAC Scanner Processor: a FASTBUS module for data collection and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brafman, H.; Glanzman, T.; Lankford, A.J.; Olsen, J.; Paffrath, L.

    1984-10-01

    A new, general purpose, programmable FASTBUS module, the SLAC Scanner Processor (SSP), is introduced. Both hardware and software elements of SSP operation are discussed. The role of the SSP within the upgraded Mark II Detector at SLAC is described

  7. Review of trigger and on-line processors at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, A.J.

    1984-07-01

    The role of trigger and on-line processors in reducing data rates to manageable proportions in e + e - physics experiments is defined not by high physics or background rates, but by the large event sizes of the general-purpose detectors employed. The rate of e + e - annihilation is low, and backgrounds are not high; yet the number of physics processes which can be studied is vast and varied. This paper begins by briefly describing the role of trigger processors in the e + e - context. The usual flow of the trigger decision process is illustrated with selected examples of SLAC trigger processing. The features are mentioned of triggering at the SLC and the trigger processing plans of the two SLC detectors: The Mark II and the SLD. The most common on-line processors at SLAC, the BADC, the SLAC Scanner Processor, the SLAC FASTBUS Controller, and the VAX CAMAC Channel, are discussed. Uses of the 168/E, 3081/E, and FASTBUS VAX processors are mentioned. The manner in which these processors are interfaced and the function they serve on line is described. Finally, the accelerator control system for the SLC is outlined. This paper is a survey in nature, and hence, relies heavily upon references to previous publications for detailed description of work mentioned here. 27 references, 9 figures, 1 table

  8. Development of the Virtual Visitor Center at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDunn, Ruth

    1999-11-17

    The Virtual Visitor Center (VVC) web site (www2.slac.stanford.edu/vvc) is a ''virtual'' version of the Visitor Center, a mini science museum that opened at SLAC in 1996. The VVC was made public in December 1998. Both centers contribute to SLAC mission regarding education of the next generation and increasing scientific awareness of the public. The site is designed to mimic the real visitor center and allow a larger audience to the information. The intent was to reach the 8th-12th grade audience. Considerable effort was made to organize the content, including color-coding graphical elements for each main topic area. Tables of contents, a search tool, several photo tours, as well as graphical and non-graphical menu bars allow users many methods of navigating the site. The site was developed over almost two years using an estimated .95 FTE, split between a program manager, graphic designer, content provider (theoretical physicist), and a summer intern (high school teacher). As of November 1999, the site consists of 1,147 files, 935 images, 3,080 internal hyperlinks, and 190 external hyperlinks. The site has had over 1 million hits between January and mid-October 1999 and averages about 600 page views each day. Future plans include bringing the web site into compliance with the W3Cs Web Content Accessibility guidelines, thoroughly integrating the glossary terms, continued incorporation of current research at SLAC, and adding more interactivity.

  9. SLAC Users Bulletin No. 102, November 1985-April 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, L.P.; Edminster, D.

    1986-01-01

    The status experimental activities at SLAC is reported, including the long-range schedule and a list of approved high-energy experiments. Work on PEP, SPEAR, and the SLC is included, as well as computing. Such operational data as operating hours and experimental hours are given.

  10. SLAC linear collider: the machine, the physics, and the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1981-11-01

    The SLAC linear collider, in which beams of electrons and positrons are accelerated simultaneously, is described. Specifications of the proposed system are given, with calculated preditions of performance. New areas of research made possible by energies in the TeV range are discussed

  11. Shower Counters for SLAC experiments E142/E143

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borel, H; Grenier, P; Le Meur, J; Lombard, R; Lugol, J C; Marroncle, J; Morgenstern, J; Mouly, J P; Paul, B; Staley, F; Terrien, Y [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d` Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l` Instrumentation Associee; Breton, V; Comptour, C; Crouau, M; Fonvieille, H; Roblin, Y; Savinel, G [Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (France); Gearhart, R [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The two electromagnetic calorimeters each made of 200 lead glass blocks used at SLAC to discriminate between electrons and pions and to measure electron energies are described. Procedures to reconstruct electron showers and to calibrate calorimeters are treated as well as the calorimeter performance. (author). 6 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Development of the Virtual Visitor Center at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDunn, Ruth

    1999-01-01

    The Virtual Visitor Center (VVC) web site (www2.slac.stanford.edu/vvc) is a ''virtual'' version of the Visitor Center, a mini science museum that opened at SLAC in 1996. The VVC was made public in December 1998. Both centers contribute to SLAC mission regarding education of the next generation and increasing scientific awareness of the public. The site is designed to mimic the real visitor center and allow a larger audience to the information. The intent was to reach the 8th-12th grade audience. Considerable effort was made to organize the content, including color-coding graphical elements for each main topic area. Tables of contents, a search tool, several photo tours, as well as graphical and non-graphical menu bars allow users many methods of navigating the site. The site was developed over almost two years using an estimated .95 FTE, split between a program manager, graphic designer, content provider (theoretical physicist), and a summer intern (high school teacher). As of November 1999, the site consists of 1,147 files, 935 images, 3,080 internal hyperlinks, and 190 external hyperlinks. The site has had over 1 million hits between January and mid-October 1999 and averages about 600 page views each day. Future plans include bringing the web site into compliance with the W3Cs Web Content Accessibility guidelines, thoroughly integrating the glossary terms, continued incorporation of current research at SLAC, and adding more interactivity

  13. Laser Safety for the Experimental Halls at SLAC_s Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Michael; Anthony, Perry; /SLAC; Barat, Ken; /LBL, Berkeley; Gilevich, Sasha; Hays, Greg; White, William E.; /SLAC

    2009-01-15

    The LCLS at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will be the world's first source of an intense hard x-ray laser beam, generating x-rays with wavelengths of 1nm and pulse durations less than 100fs. The ultrafast x-ray pulses will be used in pump-probe experiments to take stop-motion pictures of atoms and molecules in motion, with pulses powerful enough to take diffraction images of single molecules, enabling scientists to elucidate fundamental processes of chemistry and biology. Ultrafast conventional lasers will be used as the pump. In 2009, LCLS will deliver beam to the Atomic Molecular and Optical (AMO) Experiment, located in one of 3 x-ray Hutches in the Near Experimental Hall (NEH). The NEH includes a centralized Laser Hall, containing up to three Class 4 laser systems, three x-ray Hutches for experiments and vacuum transport tubes for delivering laser beams to the Hutches. The main components of the NEH laser systems are a Ti:sapphire oscillator, a regen amplifier, green pump lasers for the oscillator and regen, a pulse compressor and a harmonics conversion unit. Laser safety considerations and controls for the ultrafast laser beams, multiple laser controlled areas, and user facility issues are discussed.

  14. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2015 (ASER) for the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabba, Dellilah [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report, prepared by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), SLAC Site Office (SSO), provides a comprehensive summary of the environmental program activities at SLAC for calendar year 2015. Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) are prepared for all DOE sites with significant environmental activities, and distributed to relevant external regulatory agencies and other interested organizations or individuals. To the best of my knowledge, this report accurately summarizes the results of the 2015 environmental monitoring, compliance, and restoration programs at SLAC. This assurance can be made based on SSO and SLAC review of the ASER, and quality assurance protocols applied to monitoring and data analyses at SLAC.

  15. Multi-Device Knob Utility for LCLS at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelazny, Michael

    2009-01-01

    At the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) the Controls Department (CD) has developed a new Multi-Device Knob Utility (MKB) based on the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) toolkit for controlling one or more Process Variables (PVs) in unison, or simultaneously, from a physical knob located in the control room, or from various software tools such as the EPICS Extensible Display Manager (EDM) or a Swing slider in Java. A group of devices are hooked up to a knob, and then the value written to the devices is a simple function of the value of the knob. This is used, most commonly, to create a bump in the electron beam for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Control system variables typically controlled are magnetic fields, phases, and timing offsets. This paper describes the technologies used to implement this utility.

  16. Linac design for the LCLS project at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharadwaj, V.K.; Bane, K.; Clendenin, J.

    1997-05-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC is being designed to produce intense, coherent 0.15-nm x-rays. These x-rays will be produced by a single pass of a 15 GeV bunched electron beam through a long undulator. Nominally, the bunches have a charge of 1 nC, normalized transverse emittances of less than 1.5π mm-mr and an rms bunch length of 20 μm. The electron beam will be produced using the last third of the SLAC 3-km linac in a manner compatible with simultaneous operation of the remainder of the linac for PEP-II. The linac design necessary to produce an electron beam with the required brightness for LCLS is discussed, and the specific linac modifications are described

  17. RF pulse compression in the NLC test accelerator at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavine, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), we are designing a Next Linear Collider (NLC) with linacs powered by X-band klystrons with rf pulse compression. The design of the linac rf system is based on X-band prototypes which have been tested at high power, and on a systems-integration test---the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA)---which is currently under construction at SLAC. This paper discusses some of the systems implications of rf pulse compression, and the use of pulse compression in the NLCTA, both for peak power multiplication and for controlling, by rf phase modulation, intra-pulse variations in the linac beam energy. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  18. Proceedings of the SLAC/KEK ATF lattice workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urakawa, Junji

    1993-04-01

    The SLAC/KEK ATF Lattice Workshop was held on December 8-11, 1992 at KEK, National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. The purpose of this workshop is to critically review the ATF lattice design for any possible improvements, and also to bring SLAC colleagues up to date on recent progress at KEK. At KEK studies on intense multi-bunch beam acceleration and emittance reduction have been actively pursued, evolving into the ATF project since 1990. In 1991 we have launched a large scale reconstruction of the experimental hall. This is to build the shielded housing for the 1.54 GeV injector linac and the test damping ring. Our plan is to begin construction of the linac in March 1993. Some results from the discussions during the Workshop have been already incorporated in the revised ATF lattice design. (J.P.N.)

  19. PEP radiation shielding tests in SLAC A Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ash, W.; DeStaebler, H.; Harris, J.; Jenkins, T.; Murray, J.

    1977-09-01

    Radiation shielding tests designed to simulate possible conditions in and around the PEP experimental halls were conducted. The SLAC A Beam was targeted in the block tunnel at a point about midway between End Station A and Beam Dump East. At that site it was relatively easy to rearrange the concrete block structure to simulate the various shielding configurations under consideration for PEP. Extensive surveys of neutron and ionizing radiation were made. Complete results of the shielding tests are given

  20. Operating experience with the polarized electron gun at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alguard, M.J.; Baum, G.; Clendenin, J.E.; Hughes, V.W.; Lubell, M.S.; Miller, R.H.; Raith, W.; Schuler, K.P.; Sodja, J.

    1977-03-01

    During the two years of operation of the SLAC Polarized Electron Gun (PEGGY), the electron intensity delivered to the target has increased from 7 x 10 7 e - /pulse to 1 x 10 9 e - /pulse. The polarization is 0.85 with no measurable degradation caused by acceleration through the linear accelerator. The predominant cause of downtime is replenishment of lithium, which now averages 43 hours. The lifetime of a lithium load is about 175 hours

  1. Nanosecond electron beam generation and instrumentation at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.F.; Miller, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    The present SLAC injector system, including the latest beam chopping equipment, is discussed, and an updated diagram is given. The present equipment can produce almost any mix of chopped and single bunch beams for experimenters with a high degree of multiple beam compatibility. Topics covered include the grid pulsers, the pulse isolation transformers, the resonant choppers, the nonresonant chopper, the synchronization system, and the fast beam monitors. (PMA)

  2. Plasma lenses for SLAC Final Focus Test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betz, D.; Cline, D.; Joshi, C.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rosenzweig, J.; Su, J.J.; Williams, R.; Chen, P.; Gundersen, M.; Katsouleas, T.; Norem, J.

    1991-01-01

    A collaborative group of accelerator and plasma physicists and engineers has formed with an interest in exploring the use of plasma lenses to meet the needs of future colliders. Analytic and computational models of plasma lenses are briefly reviewed and several design examples for the SLAC Final Focus Test Beam are presented. The examples include discrete, thick, and adiabatic lenses. A potential plasma source with desirable lens characteristics is presented

  3. Status of the SLAC SNOOP diagnostic module for FASTBUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walz, H.V.; Gustavson, D.B.

    1983-03-01

    A SNOOP Diagnostic Module for FASTBUS is under development at SLAC. The SNOOP Module resides on a FASTBUS crate segment and provides diagnostic monitoring and testing capability. It consists of a high-speed ECL front-end to monitor and single-step segment operations, a simple master interface, and a control processor with two serial communication ports. Module features and specifications are summrized, and prototype hardware is shown

  4. Latest Results in SLAC 75-MW PPM Klystrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Haase, A.; Jongewaard, E.; Laurent, L.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.

    2006-01-01

    75 MW X-band klystrons utilizing Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing have been undergoing design, fabrication and testing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) for almost nine years. The klystron development has been geared toward realizing the necessary components for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The PPM devices built to date which fit this class of operation consist of a variety of 50 MW and 75 MW devices constructed by SLAC, KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) and industry. All these tubes follow from the successful SLAC design of a 50 MW PPM klystron in 1996. In 2004 the latest two klystrons were constructed and tested with preliminary results reported at EPAC2004. The first of these two devices was tested to the full NLC specifications of 75 MW, 1.6 microseconds pulse length, and 120 Hz. This 14.4 kW average power operation came with a tube efficiency >50%. The most recent testing of these last two devices will be presented here. Design and manufacturing issues of the latest klystron, due to be tested by the Fall of 2005, are also discussed

  5. Recent Upgrade of the Klystron Modulator at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, M.N.; Burkhart, C.P.; Lam, B.K.; Morris, B.

    2011-01-01

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory employs 244 klystron modulators on its two-mile-long linear accelerator that has been operational since the early days of the SLAC establishment in the sixties. Each of these original modulators was designed to provide 250 kV, 262 A and 3.5 μS at up to 360 pps using an inductance-capacitance resonant charging system, a modified type-E pulse-forming network (PFN), and a pulse transformer. The modulator internal control comprised of large step-start resistor-contactors, vacuum-tube amplifiers, and 120 Vac relays for logical signals. A major, power-component-only upgrade, which began in 1983 to accommodate the required beam energy of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) project, raised the modulator peak output capacity to 360 kV, 420 A and 5.0 μS at a reduced pulse repetition rate of 120 pps. In an effort to improve safety, performance, reliability and maintainability of the modulator, this recent upgrade focuses on the remaining three-phase AC power input and modulator controls. The upgrade includes the utilization of primary SCR phase control rectifiers, integrated fault protection and voltage regulation circuitries, and programmable logic controllers (PLC) -- with an emphasis on component physical layouts for safety and maintainability concerns. In this paper, we will describe the design and implementation of each upgraded component in the modulator control system. We will also report the testing and present status of the modified modulators.

  6. Beam parameter measurements for the SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Blocker, C.; Breidenbach, M.

    1982-01-01

    A stable, closely-controlled, high-intensity, single-bunch beam will be required for the SLAC Linear Collider. The characteristics of short-pulse, low-intensity beams in the SLAC linac have been studied. A new, high-intensity thermionic gun, subharmonic buncher and S-band buncher/accelerator section were installed recently at SLAC. With these components, up to 10 11 electrons in a single S-band bunch are available for injection into the linac. the first 100-m accelerator sector has been modified to allow control of short-pulse beams by a model-driven computer program. Additional instrumentation, including a computerized energy analyzer and emittance monitor have been added at the end of the 100-m sector. The beam intensity, energy spectrum, emittance, charge distribution and the effect of wake fields in the first accelerator sector have been measured. The new source and beam control system will be described and the most recent results of the beam parameter measurements will be discussed

  7. Linear collider research and development at SLAC, LBL and LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattison, T.S.

    1988-10-01

    The study of electron-positron (e + e/sup /minus//) annihilation in storage ring colliders has been very fruitful. It is by now well understood that the optimized cost and size of e + e/sup /minus// storage rings scales as E(sub cm//sup 2/ due to the need to replace energy lost to synchrotron radiation in the ring bending magnets. Linear colliders, using the beams from linear accelerators, evade this scaling law. The study of e/sup +/e/sup /minus// collisions at TeV energy will require linear colliders. The luminosity requirements for a TeV linear collider are set by the physics. Advanced accelerator research and development at SLAC is focused toward a TeV Linear Collider (TLC) of 0.5--1 TeV in the center of mass, with a luminosity of 10/sup 33/--10/sup 34/. The goal is a design for two linacs of less than 3 km each, and requiring less than 100 MW of power each. With a 1 km final focus, the TLC could be fit on Stanford University land (although not entirely within the present SLAC site). The emphasis is on technologies feasible for a proposal to be framed in 1992. Linear collider development work is progressing on three fronts: delivering electrical energy to a beam, delivering a focused high quality beam, and system optimization. Sources of high peak microwave radio frequency (RF) power to drive the high gradient linacs are being developed in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Beam generation, beam dynamics and final focus work has been done at SLAC and in collaboration with KEK. Both the accelerator physics and the utilization of TeV linear colliders were topics at the 1988 Snowmass Summer Study. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  8. Neutron dosimetry at SLAC: Neutron sources and instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.C.; Jenkins, T.M.; McCall, R.C.; Ipe, N.E.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes in detail the dosimetric characteristics of the five radioisotopic type neutron sources ( 238 PuBe, 252 Cf, 238 PuB, 238 PuF 4 , and 238 PuLi) and the neutron instrumentation (moderated BF 3 detector, Anderson-Braun (AB) detector, AB remmeter, Victoreen 488 Neutron Survey Meter, Beam Shut-Off Ionization Chamber, 12 C plastic scintillator detector, moderated indium foil detector, and moderated and bare TLDs) that are commonly used for neutron dosimetry at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). 36 refs,. 19 figs

  9. Commissioning and operation of the nuclear physics injector at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.F.; Iverson, R.; Leyer, G.K.; Miller, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The new Nuclear Physics Injector (NPI) approved for construction in October of 1983 was completed by September of 1984, and delivered short pulse beams for SPEAR ring checkout in mid-October. Long pulse beams of up to 1.6 microsecond length were also demonstrated. The paper describes the startup operation, reviews the performance characteristics, and discusses the beam transport optics used to deliver 1 to 4 GeV beams to nuclear physics experiments in End Station A. The SLAC Nuclear Physics Injector is in full operationexclamation

  10. Commissioning and operation of the nuclear physics injector at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.F.; Miller, R.H.; Leger, G.K.; Iverson, R.

    1985-01-01

    The new Nuclear Physics Injector (NPI) approved for construction in October of 1983 was completed by September of 1984, and delivered short pulse beams for SPEAR ring checkout in mid-October. Long pulse beams of up to 1.6 microsecond length were also demonstrated. The paper describes the start-up operation, reviews the performance characteristics, and discusses the beam transport optics used to deliver 1 to 4 GeV beams to nuclear physics experiments in End Station A. The SLAC Nuclear Physics Injector is in full operation!

  11. SLAC RF Source Research at X-Band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprehn, D.

    2003-01-01

    X-band klystrons capable of 75 MW and utilizing either solenoidal or Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing are undergoing design, fabrication and testing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The klystron development is part of an effort to realize components necessary for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). SLAC has developed a solenoidal-focused X-band klystron which is currently the workhorse of high power component testing for the NLC. A state-of-the-art modulator will drive eight of these tubes which, in turn, will power an rf distribution system referred to as the ''8-pack'' in order to test these modulators and waveguide components. Eventually, in an interest to save millions of dollars per year in the operational cost of the NLC, these tubes will be replaced by PPM klystrons. The PPM devices built to date which fit this class of operation consist of a variety of 50 MW and 75 MW devices constructed by SLAC, KEK (Tsukuba, Japan ), and industry. These tubes follow from the successful 50 MW PPM design of 1996. Recent testing of this particular tube at wider pulsewidths has reached 50 MW at 55 % efficiency, 2.4 μs and 60 Hz. Two 50 MW PPM klystrons produced by industry have been delivered to SLAC. One of these devices arrived with a vacuum suitable for test. Testing during 2001 revealed a serious, but curious, vacuum response which limited the operation to an rf output of ∼40 MW. A 75 MW PPM klystron prototype was first constructed in 1997 and later modified in 1999 to eliminate oscillations. This tube has reached the NLC design target of 75 MW at 1.5 μs though at a significantly reduced rep rate. Two new 75 MW PPM klystrons were constructed and tested in 2002 after a diode was successfully tested in 2001. The new design was aimed at reducing the cost and increasing the reliability of such high-energy devices. The rf circuit and beam focusing for one of these devices was built by industry and incorporated into one of the tubes

  12. Using the SLAC VHF and UHF radio systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struven, W.

    1987-02-01

    The use of the SLAC VHF and UHF Radio Systems and the Tunnel Antenna Systems as they are presently configured is described. The original radio system was built in 1966 and has grown in scope over the years. The Tunnel Antenna Systems were developed for, and first installed in, the PEP ring, and later added to other tunnels and redesigned to cover the UHF range, as well as VHF. The UHF radio system was designed and built for SLC use, and was first used in the SLC Arcs. The three radio systems will be described and the capabilities of each system will be defined

  13. Neutron dosimetry at SLAC: Neutron sources and instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.C.; Jenkins, T.M.; McCall, R.C.; Ipe, N.E.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes in detail the dosimetric characteristics of the five radioisotopic type neutron sources ({sup 238}PuBe, {sup 252}Cf, {sup 238}PuB, {sup 238}PuF{sub 4}, and {sup 238}PuLi) and the neutron instrumentation (moderated BF{sub 3} detector, Anderson-Braun (AB) detector, AB remmeter, Victoreen 488 Neutron Survey Meter, Beam Shut-Off Ionization Chamber, {sup 12}C plastic scintillator detector, moderated indium foil detector, and moderated and bare TLDs) that are commonly used for neutron dosimetry at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). 36 refs,. 19 figs.

  14. Searching for light dark matter with the SLAC millicharge experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, M; Schuster, P

    2013-11-27

    New sub-GeV gauge forces ("dark photons") that kinetically mix with the photon provide a promising scenario for MeV-GeV dark matter and are the subject of a program of searches at fixed-target and collider facilities around the world. In such models, dark photons produced in collisions may decay invisibly into dark-matter states, thereby evading current searches. We reexamine results of the SLAC mQ electron beam dump experiment designed to search for millicharged particles and find that it was strongly sensitive to any secondary beam of dark matter produced by electron-nucleus collisions in the target. The constraints are competitive for dark photon masses in the ~1-30 MeV range, covering part of the parameter space that can reconcile the apparent (g-2)(μ) anomaly. Simple adjustments to the original SLAC search for millicharges may extend sensitivity to cover a sizable portion of the remaining (g-2)(μ) anomaly-motivated region. The mQ sensitivity is therefore complementary to ongoing searches for visible decays of dark photons. Compared to existing direct-detection searches, mQ sensitivity to electron-dark-matter scattering cross sections is more than an order of magnitude better for a significant range of masses and couplings in simple models.

  15. An Automated 476 MHz RF Cavity Processing Facility at SLAC

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, P; Schwarz, H

    2003-01-01

    The 476 MHz accelerating cavities currently used at SLAC are those installed on the PEP-II B-Factory collider accelerator. They are designed to operate at a maximum accelerating voltage of 1 MV and are routinely utilized on PEP-II at voltages up to 750 kV. During the summer of 2003, SPEAR3 will undergo a substantial upgrade, part of which will be to replace the existing 358.54 MHz RF system with essentially a PEP-II high energy ring (HER) RF station operating at 476.3 MHz and 3.2 MV (or 800 kV/cavity). Prior to installation, cavity RF processing is required to prepare them for use. A dedicated high power test facility is employed at SLAC to provide the capability of conditioning each cavity up to the required accelerating voltage. An automated LabVIEW based interface controls and monitors various cavity and test stand parameters, increasing the RF fields accordingly such that stable operation is finally achieved. This paper describes the high power RF cavity processing facility, highlighting the features of t...

  16. Development of X-band klystron technology at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caryotakis, G.

    1997-05-01

    The SLAC design for a 1-TeV collider (NLC) requires klystrons with a performance which is well beyond the state-of-the-art for microwave tubes in the United States or abroad. The electrical specifications for the NLC klystrons are not fully established, but they are approximately as follows: Frequency, 11.4 GHz; Peak Power, 75 MW; Pulse Length, 1.5 μs; Repetition Rate, 180 Hz; Gain, 50 dB; Efficiency, (including beam focusing) 50%. SLAC is in the seventh year of a program to develop these klystrons. The choice of X-band as the operating frequency, along with the sheer size of the NLC, have resulted in some new, most demanding standards for the klystrons which may power this future machine. These are related to the overall efficiency required, to the high rf gradients that must be supported at the output circuit without vacuum breakdown, and to the manufacturing cost of the 5,000-10,000 klystrons needed for the collider

  17. SLACINPT - a FORTRAN program that generates boundary data for the SLAC gun code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, W.L.; Hepburn, J.D.

    1982-03-01

    The FORTRAN program SLACINPT was written to simplify the preparation of boundary data for the SLAC gun code. In SLACINPT, the boundary is described by a sequence of straight line or arc segments. From these, the program generates the individual boundary mesh point data, required as input by the SLAC gun code

  18. The development of the Next Linear Collider at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1992-02-01

    At SLAC, we are pursuing the design of a Next Linear Collider (NLC) which would begin with a center-of-mass energy of 0.5 TeV and be upgradable to at least 1.0 TeV, and possibly 1.5 TeV. The luminosity is designed to be 10 33 cm -2 s -1 at the lower energy and 10 34 cm -2 s -1 at the top energy. In this paper, we discuss the accelerator physics issues which are important in our approach, and also the present state of the technology development. We also review the impact that the SLC has had in the evolution of our basic approach

  19. SLC status and SLAC [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center] future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1989-08-01

    In this presentation, I shall discuss the linear collider program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center as it is now, and as we hope to see it evolve over the next few years. Of greatest interest to the high energy accelerator physics community gathered here is the development of the linear collider concept, and so I shall concentrate most of this paper on a discussion of the present status and future evolution of the SLC. I will also briefly discuss the research and development program that we are carrying out aimed at the realization of the next generation of high-energy linear colliders. SLAC had a major colliding-beam storage-ring program as well, including present rings and design studies on future high-luminosity projects, but time constraints preclude a discussion of them. 8 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Computing and data handling recent experiences at Fermilab and SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, P.S.

    1990-01-01

    Computing has become evermore central to the doing of high energy physics. There are now major second and third generation experiments for which the largest single cost is computing. At the same time the availability of ''cheap'' computing has made possible experiments which were previously considered infeasible. The result of this trend has been an explosion of computing and computing needs. I will review here the magnitude of the problem, as seen at Fermilab and SLAC, and the present methods for dealing with it. I will then undertake the dangerous assignment of projecting the needs and solutions forthcoming in the next few years at both laboratories. I will concentrate on the ''offline'' problem; the process of turning terabytes of data tapes into pages of physics journals. 5 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  1. High gradient tests of SLAC Linear Collider Accelerator Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.W.; Deruyter, H.; Eichner, J.; Fant, K.H.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, T.; Loew, G.A.; Loewen, R.; Menegat, L.

    1994-08-01

    This paper describes the current SLAC R ampersand D program to develop room temperature accelerator structures for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The structures are designed to operate at 11.4 GHz at an accelerating gradient in the range of 50 to 100 MV/m. In the past year a 26 cm constant-impedance traveling-wave section, a 75 cm constant-impedance traveling-wave section, and a 1.8 m traveling-wave section with detuned deflecting modes have been high-power tested. The paper presents a brief description of the RF test setup, the design and manufacturing details of the structures, and a discussion of test results including field emission, RF processing, dark current spectrum and RF breakdown

  2. Electron Bunch Length Measurement for LCLS at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelazny, M.; Allison, S.; Chevtsov, Sergei; Emma, P.; Kotturi, K.d.; Loos, H.; Peng, S.; Rogind, D.; Straumann, T.

    2007-01-01

    At Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) a Bunch Length Measurement system has been developed to measure the length of the electron bunch for its new Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This destructive measurement uses a transverse-mounted RF deflector (TCAV) to vertically streak the electron beam and an image taken with an insertable screen and a camera. The device control software was implemented with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) toolkit. The analysis software was implemented in Matlab(trademark) using the EPICS/Channel Access Interface for Scilab(trademark) and Matlab(trademark) (labCA). This architecture allowed engineers and physicists to develop and integrate their control and analysis without duplication of effort

  3. Thermal stress analysis of the SLAC moveable mask. Addendum 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray beams emerging from the new SLAC electron-positron storage ring (PEP) can impinge on the walls of tangential divertor channels. A moveable mask made of 6061-T6 aluminum is installed in the channel to limit wall heating. The mask is cooled with water flowing axially at 30 0 C. Beam strikes on the mask cause highly localized heating in the channel structure. Analyses were completed to determine the temperatures and thermally-induced stresses due to this heating. The current design and operating conditions should result in the entrance to the moveable mask operating at a peak temperature of 88 0 C with a peak thermal stress at 19% of the yield of 6061-T6 aluminum

  4. SLAC modulator operation and reliability in the SLC Era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, A.R.; Ashton, J.R.

    1992-06-01

    A discussion of the operation and reliability of the 244 modulators in the SLAC linac with an emphasis on the past three years of operation. The linac modulators were designed and built in the 60's, upgraded for the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) in the mid 80s, and despite their age are still reliable accelerator components. The 60s modulator operated at 65 MW peak and 83 kW average power. The upgrade resulted in 150 MW peak output at an average power of 87 kW, a modest increase since the repetition rate was dropped from 360 to 120 Hz. In the present accelerator configuration, the Linac operates as a source of electrons and positrons to a single pass coillider. The classic collider is a storage ring filled with oppositely charged, counter-rotating particles which are allowed to collide until an accelerator fault occurs and the stored beams are aborted. A reasonable storage ring can store and collide particles for as long as eight hours with a 10 or 20 minute filling time. A single pass collider, + on the other hand, can only produce e - and e + collisions at whatever rate the source operates. To be effective the SLC must operate at 120 Hz with a very high degree of reliability and on a continuous basis. Fortunately, the linac has a modest excess of modulator/klystron systems which allows some measure of redundancy and hence some freedom from the constraint that all 244 modulator/klystrons operate simultaneously. Nonetheless, high importance is placed on modulator MTBF and MTRR or, in the parlance of reliability experts and accelerator physicists, availability. This is especially true of the modulators associated with the fundamental requirements of a collider such as injection, compression and positron production

  5. Homologue Structure of the SLAC1 Anion Channel for Closing Stomata in Leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Chen; L Hu; M Punta; R Bruni; B Hillerich; B Kloss; B Rost; J Love; S Siegelbaum; W Hendrickson

    2011-12-31

    The plant SLAC1 anion channel controls turgor pressure in the aperture-defining guard cells of plant stomata, thereby regulating the exchange of water vapour and photosynthetic gases in response to environmental signals such as drought or high levels of carbon dioxide. Here we determine the crystal structure of a bacterial homologue (Haemophilus influenzae) of SLAC1 at 1.20 {angstrom} resolution, and use structure-inspired mutagenesis to analyse the conductance properties of SLAC1 channels. SLAC1 is a symmetrical trimer composed from quasi-symmetrical subunits, each having ten transmembrane helices arranged from helical hairpin pairs to form a central five-helix transmembrane pore that is gated by an extremely conserved phenylalanine residue. Conformational features indicate a mechanism for control of gating by kinase activation, and electrostatic features of the pore coupled with electrophysiological characteristics indicate that selectivity among different anions is largely a function of the energetic cost of ion dehydration.

  6. SLAC to host symposium celebrating 10th anniversary of first website in America

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Many of the programmers, web designers and scientists who collaborated to create the world wide web will be in SLAC for a two-day symposium to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the first website in America.

  7. Support and utilization of the LSI-11 processor family at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieffer, J.; Logg, C.A.; Farwell, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    Microcomputer systems based on the DEC LSI-11 processor family have been in use at SLAC for five years. They are used for a wide variety of applications. The support of these systems is divided into three general areas: engineering, maintenance, and software. Engineering specifies the system to match user requirements. SLAC has been able to design one general purpose system which can be tailored to fit many specific requirements. Maintenance provides system and component diagnostic services and repair. Software support includes software consulting services, assistance in systems design, and the development and support of special purpose operating systems and programs. These support functions are handled as subtasks by three teams in the SLAC Electronics Instrumentation Group. Each of these teams utilizes several LSI-11 systems in the performance of its primary tasks. They work closely together to jointly provide overall support for the larger SLAC community

  8. Transport of LCLS-II 1.3 Ghz cryomodule to SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, M. W.; Arkan, T.; Peterson, T.; Tang, Z.; Boo, S.; Carrasco, M.; Daly, E.; Huque, N.

    2016-06-30

    In a partnership with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) and Jefferson Lab, Fermilab will assemble and test 17 of the 35 total 1.3 GHz cryomodules for the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Project. These include a prototype built and delivered by each Lab. Another two 3.9 GHz cryomodules will be built, tested and transported by Fermilab to SLAC. Each assembly will be transported over-the-road from Fermilab or Jefferson Lab using specific routes to SLAC. The transport system consists of a base frame, isolation fixture and upper protective truss. The strongback cryomodule lifting fixture is described along with other supporting equipment used for both over-the-road transport and local (on-site) transport at Fermilab. Initially, analysis of fragile components and stability studies will be performed in order to assess the risk associated with over-the-road transport of a fully assembled cryomodule.

  9. A possible CO2 conducting and concentrating mechanism in plant stomata SLAC1 channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Shi Du

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The plant SLAC1 is a slow anion channel in the membrane of stomatal guard cells, which controls the turgor pressure in the aperture-defining guard cells, thereby regulating the exchange of water vapour and photosynthetic gases in response to environmental signals such as drought, high levels of carbon dioxide, and bacterial invasion. Recent study demonstrated that bicarbonate is a small-molecule activator of SLAC1. Higher CO(2 and HCO(3(- concentration activates S-type anion channel currents in wild-type Arabidopsis guard cells. Based on the SLAC1 structure a theoretical model is derived to illustrate the activation of bicarbonate to SLAC1 channel. Meanwhile a possible CO(2 conducting and concentrating mechanism of the SLAC1 is proposed. METHODOLOGY: The homology structure of Arabidopsis thaliana SLAC1 (AtSLAC1 provides the structural basis for study of the conducting and concentrating mechanism of carbon dioxide in SLAC1 channels. The pK(a values of ionizable amino acid side chains in AtSLAC1 are calculated using software PROPKA3.0, and the concentration of CO(2 and anion HCO(3(- are computed based on the chemical equilibrium theory. CONCLUSIONS: The AtSLAC1 is modeled as a five-region channel with different pH values. The top and bottom layers of channel are the alkaline residue-dominated regions, and in the middle of channel there is the acidic region surrounding acidic residues His332. The CO(2 concentration is enhanced around 10(4 times by the pH difference between these regions, and CO(2 is stored in the hydrophobic region, which is a CO(2 pool. The pH driven CO(2 conduction from outside to inside balances the back electromotive force and maintain the influx of anions (e.g. Cl(- and NO(3(- from inside to outside. SLAC1 may be a pathway providing CO(2 for photosynthesis in the guard cells.

  10. The design of a semi-custom intergrated circuit for the SLAC SLC timing control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linstadt, E.

    1985-01-01

    A semi-custom (gate array) integrated circuit has been designed for use in the SLAC Linear Collider timing and control system. The design process and SLAC's experiences during the phases of the design cycle are described. Issues concerning the partitioning of the design into semi-custom and standard components are discussed. Functional descriptions of the semi-custom integrated circuit and the timing module in which it is used are given

  11. Acceleration of high charge density electron beams in the SLAC linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, J.C.; Clendenin, J.E.; Jobe, R.K.; Lueth, V.G.; Millich, A.; Ross, M.C.; Seeman, J.T.; Stiening, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) will require both electron and positron beams of very high charge density and low emittance to be accelerated to about 50 GeV in the SLAC 3-km linac. The linac is in the process of being improved to meet this requirement. The program to accelerate an electron beam of high charge density through the first third of the SLC linac is described and the experimental results are discussed. 7 references, 5 figures

  12. Design of a semi-custom integrated circuit for the SLAC SLC timing control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linstadt, E.

    1984-10-01

    A semi-custom (gate array) integrated circuit has been designed for use in the SLAC Linear Collider timing and control system. The design process and SLAC's experiences during the phases of the design cycle are described. Issues concerning the partitioning of the design into semi-custom and standard components are discussed. Functional descriptions of the semi-custom integrated circuit and the timing module in which it is used are given

  13. The 50 GeV program at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1994-03-01

    SLAC has undertaken a modes programs to upgrade the beam energy for fixed target experiments to 50 GeV. This upgrade is possible due to the previous extensive development work on the linac accelerating gradient for the SLC, which has been operational for over five years. The SLC can deliver a beam of energy up to 60 GeV using a pulse compression technique in the rf system which trades pulse length for a higher pulse amplitude. This mode of operation has been reliable and routine for the SLC. However the beam line transport which takes electrons or positrons from the end of the linac to the target in End Station A has not been upgraded from the original design energy of 25 GeV. The 50 GeV upgrade for the fixed target experiments consists in modifying and increasing the number of beam line dipole magnets to reach 50 GeV, plus modernization of the beam line instrumentation and controls. The plans for spin structure experiments using electron beams at energies up to 50 GeV are described

  14. PEP-II Large Power Supplies Rebuild Program at SLAC

    CERN Document Server

    de Lira, Antonio C; Lipari, James J; da Silva Rafael, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    At PEP-II, seven large power supplies (LGPS) are used to power quad magnets in the electron-positron collider region. The LGPS ratings range from 72kW to 270kW, and were installed in 1997. They are unipolar off-line switch mode supplies, with a 6 pulse bridge rectifying 480VAC, 3-phase input power to yield 650VDC unregulated. This unregulated 650VDC is then input into one (or two) IGBT H-bridges, which convert the DC into PWM 16 kHz square wave AC. This high frequency AC drives the primary side of a step-down transformer followed by rectifiers and low pass filters. Over the years, these LGPS have presented many problems mainly in their control circuits, making it difficult to troubleshoot and affecting the overall accelerator availability. A redesign/rebuilding program for these power supplies was established under the coordination of the Power Conversion Department at SLAC. During the 2004 accelerator summer shutdown all the control circuits in these supplies were redesigned and replaced. A new PWM control b...

  15. Present and future colliding beam facilities at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1977-07-01

    In April 1972, the 3-GeV electron positron storage ring, SPEAR, was put into operation at the end of the linear accelerator at Stanford. By the recent discoveries in high energy physics the value of electron-positron storage rings for high energy physics has been clearly demonstrated. This development certainly encouraged the relatively early funding of the new electron-positron storage ring, PEP, at SLAC. In addition to its role as a particle physics research tool, SPEAR has been and remains a priceless model or prototype for larger storage rings like PEP. A few of the recent observations in SPEAR which have important implications to the design of PEP are described. Although the PEP design follows closely the SPEAR concept in many respects, it has its own distinctive and important features which are discussed in detail. Topics discussed include synchrotron-betatron resonances, beam losses, beam bunching, PEP design luminosity and energy, chromaticity correction in PEP, and the high energy cabability of PEP

  16. Final Design of the SLAC P2 Marx Klystron Modulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, M.A.; Benwell, A.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; MacNair, D.; Nguyen, M.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    The SLAC P2 Marx has been under development for two years, and follows on the P1 Marx as an alternative to the baseline klystron modulator for the International Linear Collider. The P2 Marx utilizes a redundant architecture, air-insulation, a control system with abundant diagnostic access, and a novel nested droop correction scheme. This paper is an overview of the design of this modulator. There are several points of emphasis for the P2 Marx design. First, the modulator must be compatible with the ILC two-tunnel design. In this scheme, the modulator and klystron are located within a service tunnel with limited access and available footprint for a modulator. Access to the modulator is only practical from one side. Second, the modulator must have high availability. Robust components are not sufficient alone to achieve availability much higher than 99%. Therefore, redundant architectures are necessary. Third, the modulator must be relatively low cost. Because of the large number of stations in the ILC, the investment needed for the modulator components is significant. High-volume construction techniques which take advantage of an economy of scale must be utilized. Fourth, the modulator must be simple and efficient to maintain. If a modulator does become inoperable, the MTTR must be small. Fifth, even though the present application for the modulator is for the ILC, future accelerators can also take advantage of this development effort. The hardware, software, and concepts developed in this project should be designed such that further development time necessary for other applications is minimal.

  17. SLAC R and D toward a TeV Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.B.

    1988-10-01

    At CERN, KEK, Novosibirsk and SLAC, serious thought is being given to the design of linear colliders in the 0.5--2.0 TeV center-of-mass energy range. This paper reviews current progress at SLAC toward the design of such a collider. No attempt is made here to summarize ongoing work at the other laboratories. However, research on linear colliders is clearly an international effort, and success at SLAC will be greatly expedited by communication and cooperation with other laboratories in the US and abroad. In addition to major programs at the laboratories mentioned above, contributions relevant to linear collider design are being made at DESY, LAL (Orsay), LBL, LLNL and elsewhere. 49 refs., 6 tabs

  18. Essay: Bob Siemann-SLC Days at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O.

    2008-01-01

    Bob Siemann was a great experimentalist and an excellent teacher.We will greatly miss him. Bob came to SLAC in early 1991 to work on the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The SLC was a challenging accelerator which began operating in the late 1980's but still had numerous obstacles to be overcome years into operation. One of the compounding difficulties was making reproducible measurements, since the stability of the collider was poor and the diagnostics were insufficient. Bob dove into this challenge and helped design experiments and diagnostics that provided further clarity. I first got to know Bob while I was still a graduate student, trying to finish my thesis and performing some experimental studies on the SLC, which, at the time, was proving to be very difficult. Most of my expertise had been in beam theory and simulation. Dealing with the real issues of the accelerator was challenging. Bob helped me understand the difference between systematic and statistical errors, and separate operational issues from the fundamental physics. His way of teaching was not to provide an explanation but to ask enough questions so that I could find the answer on my own - this was the best way to learn. I later asked Bob to be a reader on my thesis. As in all things, he took this role extremely seriously. He read through the draft and marked every page to the point where I was regretting my decision. However, his questions again helped me understand my own work better and greatly improved my thesis. Bob was also the de facto leader of an effort focused on the damping rings and the bunch compressors. He was great to work with. He made people think for themselves and refused to simply provide answers. He also worked hard himself, expressing real interest and curiosity. After the studies of the SLC damping rings identified a sawtooth instability due to the vacuum chamber impedance as a source of many downstream fluctuations, Bob took charge of upgrading the rings. As part of this

  19. Development of operator requested control system applications: Experience with the SLC control system at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanek, M.

    1995-01-01

    The SLC Control system at SLAC has evolved into a powerful tool for operation of the accelerator and for troubleshooting the unique problems encountered in extracting maximum performance from the SLC. The evolution has included the development of many custom applications and user interface features generated from accelerator operator and accelerator physicist requests. These applications are written and maintained primarily by the Controls Software Engineering group, and not by the users themselves. The process of developing and supporting user requested control systems applications at SLAC is described, including the effects of organizational structure, formal and informal procedures, and control system architecture

  20. Proceedings of the SLAC/KEK linear collider workshop on damping ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urakawa, J.; Yoshioka, M.

    1992-07-01

    Since the SLAC/KEK joint meeting was first held at SLAC in March 1987, we have had such a meeting annually with the present one the 6th. This meeting is planned to discuss the damping ring issue in particular. We have ever stressed the importance of study of damping rings and considered construction of a test damping ring as key issue for the ATF project, since we started construction of the ATF in 1987. In 1991 we had large-scale reconstruction of a building to make a shielded area where a 1.54 GeV injector linac for the ring is to be installed. (J.P.N.)

  1. Measurement of the longitudinal wakefield and the bunch shape in the SLAC linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, K.L.F.; Decker, F.J.; Seeman, J.T.; Zimmermann, F.

    1997-05-01

    The authors report on measurements of the bunch energy spectrum at the end of the SLAC linac. Using the spectra obtained for two different linac rf phases they obtain both the bunch induced voltage and the longitudinal distribution of the bunch. The measurement results are compared with theoretical predictions. In particular, the induced voltage is in good agreement with that obtained using the calculated wake function for the SLAC linac. This measurement technique may be useful for monitoring changes of the linac bunch shape in the SLC

  2. SLAC High Gradient Testing of a KEK X-Band Accelerator Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewen, Rod

    2000-01-01

    The high accelerating gradients required for future linear colliders demands a better study of field emission and RF breakdown in accelerator structures. Changes in structure geometry, vacuum pumping, fabrication methods, and surface finish can all potentially impact the conditioning process, dark current emission, and peak RF power handling capability. Recent tests at SLAC of KEK's ''M2'' travelling wave x-band accelerator section provides an opportunity to investigate some of these effects by comparing its performance to previously high power tested structures at SLAC. In addition to studying ultimate power limitations, this test also demonstrates the use of computer automated conditioning to reach practical, achievable gradients

  3. BABAR - the detector for the PEP II B Factory at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueth, V.

    1994-09-01

    BABAR refers to the detector that is being designed for the PEP II B-Factory at SLAC to perform a comprehensive study of CP violation in B meson decays. The design requirements and the principal detector components are briefly described. A summary of the expected physics performance is presented

  4. THE SLACS SURVEY. VIII. THE RELATION BETWEEN ENVIRONMENT AND INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treu, Tommaso; Gavazzi, Raphael; Gorecki, Alexia; Marshall, Philip J.; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Bolton, Adam S.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Burles, Scott

    2009-01-01

    We study the relation between the internal structure of early-type galaxies and their environment using 70 strong gravitational lenses from the SLACS Survey. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database is used to determine two measures of overdensity of galaxies around each lens-the projected

  5. dE/dx electronics for MARK II experiment at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, D.; Boyarski, A.; Coupal, D.; Feldman, G.; Paffrath, L.

    1985-10-01

    This paper describes a 100 MHz pulse digitizer for dE/dx measurements on the MARK II drift chamber at SLAC. The electronics provides the read-out of the detector's 5832 sense based on a 16-channel FASTBUS module. The basic element of the module is the TRW 6-bit Flash-ADC

  6. Beam-beam studies for the proposed SLAC/LBL/LLNL B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    1991-05-01

    We present a summary of beam-beam dynamics studies that have been carried out to date for the proposed SLAC/LBL/LLNL B Factory. Most of the material presented here is contained in the proposal's Conceptual Design Report, although post-CDR studies are also presented. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Molecular Evolution of Slow and Quick Anion Channels (SLACs and QUACs/ALMTs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Ingo; Gomez-Porras, Judith Lucia; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Hedrich, Rainer; Geiger, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    Electrophysiological analyses conducted about 25 years ago detected two types of anion channels in the plasma membrane of guard cells. One type of channel responds slowly to changes in membrane voltage while the other responds quickly. Consequently, they were named SLAC, for SLow Anion Channel, and QUAC, for QUick Anion Channel. Recently, genes SLAC1 and QUAC1/ALMT12, underlying the two different anion current components, could be identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression of the gene products in Xenopus oocytes confirmed the quick and slow current kinetics. In this study we provide an overview on our current knowledge on slow and quick anion channels in plants and analyze the molecular evolution of ALMT/QUAC-like and SLAC-like channels. We discovered fingerprints that allow screening databases for these channel types and were able to identify 192 (177 non-redundant) SLAC-like and 422 (402 non-redundant) ALMT/QUAC-like proteins in the fully sequenced genomes of 32 plant species. Phylogenetic analyses provided new insights into the molecular evolution of these channel types. We also combined sequence alignment and clustering with predictions of protein features, leading to the identification of known conserved phosphorylation sites in SLAC1-like channels along with potential sites that have not been yet experimentally confirmed. Using a similar strategy to analyze the hydropathicity of ALMT/QUAC-like channels, we propose a modified topology with additional transmembrane regions that integrates structure and function of these membrane proteins. Our results suggest that cross-referencing phylogenetic analyses with position-specific protein properties and functional data could be a very powerful tool for genome research approaches in general.

  8. Molecular evolution of slow and quick anion channels (SLACs and QUACs/ALMTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo eDreyer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological analyses conducted about 25 years ago detected two types of anion channels in the plasma membrane of guard cells. One type of channel responds slowly to changes in membrane voltage while the other responds quickly. Consequently, they were named SLAC, for SLow Anion Channel, and QUAC, for QUick Anion Channel. Recently, genes SLAC1 and QUAC1/ALMT12, underlying the two different anion current components, could be identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression of the gene products in Xenopus oocytes confirmed the quick and slow current kinetics. In this study we provide an overview on our current knowledge on slow and quick anion channels in plants and analyze the molecular evolution of ALMT/QUAC-like and SLAC-like channels. We discovered fingerprints that allow screening databases for these channel types and were able to identify 192 (177 non-redundant SLAC-like and 422 (402 non-redundant ALMT/QUAC-like proteins in the fully sequenced genomes of 32 plant species. Phylogenetic analyses provided new insights into the molecular evolution of these channel types. We also combined sequence alignment and clustering with predictions of protein features, leading to the identification of known conserved phosphorylation sites in SLAC1-like channels along with potential sites that have not been yet experimentally confirmed. Using a similar strategy to analyze the hydropathicity of ALMT/QUAC-like channels, we propose a modified topology with additional transmembrane regions that integrates structure and function of these membrane proteins. Our results suggest that cross-referencing phylogenetic analyses with position-specific protein properties and functional data could be a very powerful tool for genome research approaches in general.

  9. Identification and biochemical analysis of Slac2-c/MyRIP as a Rab27A-, myosin Va/VIIa-, and actin-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Taruho S; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2005-01-01

    Slac2-c/MyRIP is a specific Rab27A-binding protein that contains an N-terminal synaptotagmin-like protein (Slp) homology domain (SHD, a newly identified GTP-Rab27A-binding motif), but in contrast to the Slp family proteins, it lacks C-terminal tandem C2 domains. In vitro Slac2-c simultaneously directly interacts with both Rab27A and an actin-based motor protein, myosin Va, via its N-terminal SHD and middle region, respectively, consistent with the fact that the overall structure of Slac2-c is similar to that of Slac2-a/melanophilin, a linker protein between Rab27A and myosin Va in the melanosome transport in melanocytes. Unlike Slac2-a, however, the middle region of Slac2-c interacts with two types of myosins, myosin Va and myosin VIIa. In addition, the most C-terminal part of both Slac2-a and Slac2-c functions as an actin-binding domain: it directly interacts with globular and fibrous actin in vitro, and the actin-binding domain of Slac2-a and Slac2-c colocalizes with actin filaments when it is expressed in living cells (i.e., PC12 cells and mouse melanocytes). In this chapter we describe the methods that have been used to analyze the protein-protein interactions of Slac2-c, specifically with Rab27A, myosin Va/VIIa, and actin.

  10. Gallium arsenide digital integrated circuits for controlling SLAC CW-RF systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronan, M.T.; Lee, K.L.; Corredoura, P.; Judkins, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    In order to fill the PEP and SPEAR storage rings with beams from the SLC linac and damping rings, precise control of the linac subharmonic buncher and the damping ring RF is required. Recently several companies have developed resettable GaAs master/slave D-type flip-flops which are capable of operating at frequencies of 3 GHz and higher. Using these digital devices as frequency dividers, one can phase shift the SLAC CW-RF systems to optimize the timing for filling the storage rings. The authors have evaluated the performance of integrated circuits from two vendors for our particular application. Using microstrip circuit techniques, they have built and operated in the accelerator several chassis to synchronize a reset signal from the storage rings to the SLAC 2.856 GHz RF and to phase shift divide-by-four and divide-by-sixteen frequency dividers to the nearest 350 psec bucket required for filling

  11. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathersby, S. P.; Brown, G.; Chase, T. F.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Eichner, J. P.; Frisch, J. C.; Fry, A. R.; Gühr, M.; Hartmann, N.; Hast, C.; Hettel, R.; Jobe, R. K.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Li, R. K., E-mail: lrk@slac.stanford.edu; Lindenberg, A. M.; Makasyuk, I.; May, J. E.; McCormick, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  12. Compliance of SLAC's Laser Safety Program with OSHA Requirements for the Control of Hazardous Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, M.

    2009-01-01

    SLAC's COHE program requires compliance with OSHA Regulation 29CFR1910.147, 'The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout)'. This regulation specifies lockout/tagout requirements during service and maintenance of equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the equipment, or release of stored energy, could cause injury to workers. Class 3B and Class 4 laser radiation must be considered as hazardous energy (as well as electrical energy in associated equipment, and other non-beam energy hazards) in laser facilities, and therefore requires careful COHE consideration. This paper describes how COHE is achieved at SLAC to protect workers against unexpected Class 3B or Class 4 laser radiation, independent of whether the mode of operation is normal, service, or maintenance

  13. Proceedings of the SLC workshop on experimental use of the SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    In March 1981, the SLAC management, together with the SLAC users organization, invited interested physicists to a three day meeting to discuss the laboratory's plans and progress on the new colliding e + e - machine - the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Those attending were encouraged to join together to study the challenges and opportunities presented by the SLC. The study of the parameters for experiments on 100 GeV e + e - collisions, and the reviews of the state-of-the-art in the four areas of detector technology - Tracking, Calorimetry, Particle Identification and Electronics and Computing - were undertaken from a general standpoint, and not from the particular perspective of a specific experimental proposal. Nine sections were prepared separately for the data base

  14. A 2--4 nm Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using the SLAC linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1993-05-01

    We describe the use of the SLAC linac to drive a unique, powerful. short wavelength Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Operating as an FEL, lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a high peak current electron beam through a long undulator by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). The main components are a high-brightness rf photocathode electron gun; pulse compressors; about 1/5 of the SLAC linac; and a long undulator with a FODO quadrupole focussing system. Using electrons below 8 GeV, the system would operate at wavelengths down to about 3 nm, producing ≥10 GW peak power in sub-ps pulses. At a 120 Hz rate the average power is ∼ 1 W

  15. Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Solid Targets at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Taiee [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-25

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We found that these laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source’s (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Additionally, radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 1018 to 7.1x1019 W/cm2 are presented.

  16. Final Report: BaBar Detector and Experimental at SLAC, September 30, 1998 - September 29, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, Dennis J.

    2000-01-01

    The Prairie View AandM University High Energy Physics Group with its contingent of three undergraduates physics majors, joined the BaBar Collaboration at SLAC in September 1994. BaBar is the experiment and detector running in the PEP-II ring at SLAC as part of the Asymmetric B Factory project there to study CP violation and heavy flavor physics. The focus of our effort before this year was with the Muon/Neutral Hadron Detector/Instrumented Flux Return (IFD) subgroup within the BaBar collaboration, and particularly with the GEANT simulation of the IFR-. With the GEANT3 simulation essentially FR-ozen, and the GEANT4 full simulation of the IFR- done, we have decided to redirect our efforts toward other areas

  17. Present and future developments on the SLAC three-kilometer accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.

    1977-07-01

    A review is given of the innovations which have recently been made or are being planned on the SLAC three-kilometer accelerator. A brief review of overall performance statistics is given, the beam is followed from its origin to the experimental areas. The injector with its new polarized guns, some highlights of klystron research, the SLED or SLAC Energy Development Program, which will boost the electron energy into the 30 to 40 GeV range, and some associated beam loading and beam breakup implications are described. Following these, a brief survey of other microwave developments is given. Some of the innovations being implanted in computer control are summarized, and the changes being planned for the generation and delivery of e +- beams to the PEP ring are discussed

  18. Final Report BaBar Detector and Experimental at SLAC, September 30, 1998 - September 29, 1999

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, D J

    2000-01-01

    The Prairie View AandM University High Energy Physics Group with its contingent of three undergraduates physics majors, joined the BaBar Collaboration at SLAC in September 1994. BaBar is the experiment and detector running in the PEP-II ring at SLAC as part of the Asymmetric B Factory project there to study CP violation and heavy flavor physics. The focus of our effort before this year was with the Muon/Neutral Hadron Detector/Instrumented Flux Return (IFD) subgroup within the BaBar collaboration, and particularly with the GEANT simulation of the IFR-. With the GEANT3 simulation essentially FR-ozen, and the GEANT4 full simulation of the IFR- done, we have decided to redirect our efforts toward other areas.

  19. The analog processing system for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter for SLD at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, G.M.; Nelson, D.; Freytag, D.R.

    1986-09-01

    The analog processing system for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter for the SLD project at SLAC is described. Amplification, storage of the analog information, and multiplexing is realized on specially developed hybrids, which will be mounted directly on the detector. This leads to a substantial reduction of the cable plant. Test results for the amplifier and for the sampling and multiplexing hybrid (CDU hybrid) are presented. The latter hybird contains a custom monolithic device, the Calorimeter Data Unit

  20. SLAC linear collider and a few ideas on future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.

    1984-04-01

    This paper comes in two parts. The first part is a progress report on the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) with emphasis on those systems which are of special interest to linear accelerator designers; it sets the stage for a number of contributed papers on specific topics which are also presented at this conference. The second part presents some ideas which are of interest to the design of future linear colliders of higher energies

  1. Status of the SLAC/LBL/LLNL B-factory and the BABAR detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oddone, P.

    1994-10-01

    After a brief introduction on the physics reach of the SLAC/LBL/LLNL Asymmetric B-Factory, the author describes the status of the accelerator and the detector as of the end of 1994. At this time, essentially all major decisions have been made, including the choice of particle identification for the detector. The author concludes this report with the description of the schedule for the construction of both accelerator and detector

  2. Nucleon resonance electroproduction at high momentum transers: Results from SLAC and suggestions for CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keppel, C. [Virginia Union Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Nucleon resonance electroproduction results from SLAC Experiment E14OX are presented. A CEBAF facility with doubled energy would enable similar high momentum transfer measurements to be made with greater accuracy. Of particular interest are the Delta P{sub 33}(1232) resonance form factor and R = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T}, the ratio of the longitudinal and transverse components of the cross section. A suggestion is made to study these quantities in conjunction with Bloom-Gilman duality.

  3. Gas system Upgrade for the BaBar IFR Detector at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulkes, S

    2004-01-01

    A new gas distribution and monitoring system was installed as part of an upgrade of the forward endcap muon detection system (IFR) of the BaBar detector at SLAC. Over 300 gas circuits are controlled and monitored. The return gas flow is monitored by digital bubblers which use photo-gate electronics to count the bubbling rate. The rates are monitored in real time and recorded in a history database allowing studies of flow rate versus chamber performance

  4. SLAC Scanner Processor applications in the data acquisition system for the upgraded Mark II detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barklow, T.; Glanzman, T.; Lankford, A.J.; Riles, K.

    1985-09-01

    The SLAC Scanner Processor is a general purpose, programmable FASTBUS crate/cable master/slave module. This device plays a central role in the readout, buffering and pre-processing of data from the upgraded Mark II detector's new central drift chamber. In addition to data readout, the SSPs assist in a variety of other services, such as detector calibration, FASTBUS system management, FASTBUS system initialization and verification, and FASTBUS module testing. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  5. The status of the SLAC Linear Collider and of the Mark II detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, A.J.

    1987-10-01

    At SLAC we are currently involved in the exciting challenge of commissioning the first example of a new type of colliding beam accelerator, the SLAC Linear Collider, or SLC. The goals of the SLC are two-fold. It will explore the concept of linear colliders, and it will allow the study of physics on the Z 0 resonance. It accomplishes these goals by exploiting the existing SLAC linac and the large visible cross-section of approximately thirty nanobarns of the Z 0 . The MARK II detector will have the opportunity to be first to explore the physics in this regime. This paper briefly reports the status of the SLC and of the MARK II as of early October 1987, at which time commissioning efforts were interrupted in order to place the MARK II detector at the collision point and to incorporate some improvements to the SLC. The first portion of this report highlights some of the milestones achieved in the SLC commissioning and some of the problems encountered. The last portion outlines improvements made to the MARK II for physics at the SLC. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  6. Integrated management tool for controls software problems, requests and project tasking at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogind, D.; Allen, W.; Colocho, W.; DeContreras, G.; Gordon, J.; Pandey, P.; Shoaee, H.

    2012-01-01

    The Accelerator Directorate (AD) Instrumentation and Controls (ICD) Software (SW) Department at SLAC, with its service center model, continuously receives engineering requests to design, build and support controls for accelerator systems lab-wide. Each customer request can vary in complexity from a small software engineering change to a major enhancement. SLAC's Accelerator Improvement Projects (AIPs), along with DOE Construction projects, also contribute heavily to the work load. The various customer requests and projects, paired with the ongoing operational maintenance and problem reports, place a demand on the department that consistently exceeds the capacity of available resources. A centralized repository - comprised of all requests, project tasks, and problems - available to physicists, operators, managers, and engineers alike, is essential to capture, communicate, prioritize, assign, schedule, track, and finally, commission all work components. The Software Department has recently integrated request / project tasking into SLAC's custom online problem tracking 'Comprehensive Accelerator Tool for Enhancing Reliability' (CATER) tool. This paper discusses the newly implemented software request management tool - the workload it helps to track, its structure, features, reports, work-flow and its many usages. (authors)

  7. 6D Phase Space Measurements at the SLAC Gun Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schmerge, J

    2003-01-01

    Proposed fourth generation light sources using SASE FELs to generate short pulse, coherent X-rays require demonstration of high brightness electron sources. The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at SLAC was built to test high brightness sources for the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC. The GTF is composed of an Sband photocathode rf gun with a Cu cathode, emittance compensating solenoid, single 3 m SLAC linac section and e-beam diagnostic section with a UV drive laser system. The longitudinal emittance exiting the gun has been determined by measuring the energy spectrum downstream of the linac as a function of the linac phase. The e-beam pulse width, correlated and uncorrelated energy spread at the linac entrance have been fit to the measured energy spectra using a least square error fitting routine. The fit yields a pulse width of 2.9 ps FWHM for a 4.3 ps FWHM laser pulse width and 2% rms correlated energy spread with 0.07% rms uncorrelated energy spread. The correlated energy spread is enhanced in the lin...

  8. Introduction to high-energy physics and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-03-01

    The type of research done at SLAC is called High Energy Physics, or Particle Physics. This is basic research in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Basic research is research for the sake of learning something. Any practical application cannot be predicted, the understanding is the end in itself. Interactions are how particles behave toward one another, for example some particles attract one another while others repel and still others ignore each other. Interactions of elementary particles are studied to reveal the underlying structure of the universe

  9. The optical design of the spin manipulation system for the SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieguth, T.H.

    1989-03-01

    The optical design of the beam transport lines between the SLAC Linac and the electron damping ring and the design of part of the Linac lattice itself will be modified to accommodate three superconducting solenoids for the purpose of manipulating the polarization of the electron beam. In order to allow arbitrary orientation of the polarization vector, this design will be capable of compensating the fields of two independent solenoids for arbitrary strengths ranging to 7.0 T-m. The method of dealing with the coupling of the betatron functions and the method of handling both the electron and positron beams in the common region are discussed. 8 refs., 5 figs

  10. The proposed alignment system for the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruland, R.E.; Fischer, G.E.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the current state of work in progress with respect to the geometry, alignment requirements, scenarios, and hardware for meeting the tolerances of the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at SLAC. The methods and systems proposed acknowledge that component motion at the micron level, from whatever cause (ground motion, thermal effects, etc.) must be measured on-line and compensated for on relatively short time scales. To provide an integrated alignment/positioning package, some unique designs for reference systems, calibration of effect electric and magnetic centers, and component movers are introduced. 24 refs., 28 figs

  11. TOSCA calculations and measurements for the SLAC SLC damping ring dipole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early, R.A.; Cobb, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    The SLAC damping ring dipole magnet was originally designed with removable nose pieces at the ends. Recently, a set of magnetic measurements was taken of the vertical component of induction along the center of the magnet for four different pole-end configurations and several current settings. The three dimensional computer code TOSCA, which is currently installed on the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center's Cray X-MP, was used to computer field values for the four configurations at current settings near saturation. Comparisons were made for magnetic induction as well as effective magnetic lengths for the different configurations

  12. Z0 physics from the Mark II at the SLC [SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, G.S.

    1989-06-01

    The MARK II detector has started to take data at the new SLAC Linear Collider. The novel aspects of the accelerator and of the MARK II are briefly described. Displays of event pictures from some of the early-on data are presented to illustrate the quality of the data. A first presentation of the results of an energy scan near the Z 0 mass that is currently in progress shows the expected resonant enhancement near 91 GeV. 2 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab

  13. Fast track-finding trigger processor for the SLAC/LBL Mark II Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brafman, H.; Breidenbach, M.; Hettel, R.; Himel, T.; Horelick, D.

    1977-10-01

    The SLAC/LBL Mark II Magnetic Detector consists of various particle detectors arranged in cylindrical symmetry located in and around an axial magnetic field. A versatile, programmable secondary trigger processor was designed and built to find curved tracks in the detector. The system operates at a 10 MHz clock rate with a total processing time of 34 μsec and is used to ''trigger'' the data processing computer, thereby rejecting background and greatly improving the data acquisition aspects of the detector-computer combination

  14. Introduction to high-energy physics and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-03-01

    The type of research done at SLAC is called High Energy Physics, or Particle Physics. This is basic research in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Basic research is research for the sake of learning something. Any practical application cannot be predicted, the understanding is the end in itself. Interactions are how particles behave toward one another, for example some particles attract one another while others repel and still others ignore each other. Interactions of elementary particles are studied to reveal the underlying structure of the universe.

  15. Status of the SLAC/LBL/LLNL B-Factory and the BaBar detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oddone, P.

    1994-08-01

    The primary motivation of the Asymmetric B-Factory is the study of CP violation. The decay of B mesons and, in particular, the decay of neutral B mesons, offers the possibility of determining conclusively whether CP violation is part and parcel of the Standard Model with three generations of quarks and leptons. Alternatively, the authors may discover that CP violation lies outside the present framework. In this paper the authors briefly describe the physics reach of the SLAC/LBL/LLNL Asymmetric B-Factory, the progress on the machine design and construction, the progress on the detector design, and the schedule to complete both projects

  16. Dipole magnets for the SLAC 50 GeV A-Line upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, R.; DeBarger, S.; Spencer, C.M.; Wolf, Z.

    1995-05-01

    The SLAC A-Line is a transport system originally designed to deliver electron beams of up to 25 GeV to fixed target experiments in End Station A. To raise the beam energy capability of the A-Line to 52 GeV, the eight original bending magnets, plus four more of the same type, have been modified by reducing their gaps and adding trim windings to compensate for energy loss due to synchrotron radiation. In this paper the authors describe the modifications that have been completed, and they compare test and measurement results with predicted performance

  17. Upgrade of the SLAC SLED II Pulse Compression System Based on Recent High Power Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlieks, A.E.; Fowkes, W.R.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.

    2011-01-01

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC) it is expected that the high power rf components be able to handle peak power levels in excess of 400 MW. We present recent results of high power tests designed to investigate the RF breakdown limits of the X-band pulse compression system used at SLAC. (SLED-II). Results of these tests show that both the TE 01 -TE 10 mode converter and the 4-port hybrid have a maximum useful power limit of 220-250 MW. Based on these tests, modifications of these components have been undertaken to improve their peak field handling capability. Results of these modifications will be presented. As part of an international effort to develop a new 0.5-1.5 TeV electron-positron linear collider for the 21st century, SLAC has been working towards a design, referred to as 'The Next Linear Collider' (NLC), which will operate at 11.424 GHz and utilize 50-75 MW klystrons as rf power sources. One of the major challenges in this design, or any other design, is how to generate and efficiently transport extremely high rf power from a source to an accelerator structure. SLAC has been investigating various methods of 'pulse compressing' a relatively wide rf pulse ((ge) 1 μs) from a klystron into a narrower, but more intense, pulse. Currently a SLED-II pulse compression scheme is being used at SLAC in the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and in the Accelerator Structures Test Area (ASTA) to provide high rf power for accelerator and component testing. In ASTA, a 1.05 μs pulse from a 50 MW klystron was successfully pulse compressed to 205 MW with a pulse width of 150 ns. Since operation in NLC will require generating and transporting rf power in excess of 400 MW it was decided to test the breakdown limits of the SLED-II rf components in ASTA with rf power up to the maximum available of 400 MW. This required the combining of power from two 50 MW klystrons and feeding the summed power into the SLED-II pulse compressor. Results from this experiment demonstrated that two of

  18. Requirements for use of nonmedical x-ray generators at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busick, D.D.

    1984-09-01

    The risks associated with use of x-ray equipment have long been recognized. While the relative frequency of x-ray damage is small, machine produced x-rays and large radiography sources continue to account for a large percentage of preventable radiation injuries reported worldwide. The intent of this report is to formalize SLAC's radiation safety program as it applies to radiation producing equipment (diffraction, fluorescence analysis and nondestructive testing). It does not apply to the two-mile linac, experimental areas or other x-ray producing equipment directly related to the high energy physics program. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  19. FEL research and development at the SLAC sub-picosecond photon source, SPPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentson, L.; Bolton, P.; Bong, E.; Emma, P.; Galayda, J.; Hastings, J.; Krejcik, P.; Rago, C.; Rifkin, J.; Spencer, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    An upgrade project to the SLAC linac allows ultra-short electron bunches to be interleaved with the routine high-energy physics program operation, for use with an undulator to produce short-pulse, high-brightness X-rays. The linac upgrade comprises of the installation in the summer of 2002 of a bunch compressor chicane of similar design to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) project. A final compression stage in the high-energy Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) line compresses the 28 GeV, 3.4 nC electron bunch to 80 fs FWHM, where a 5 m section of undulator (K=4.45) will produce 1.5 A X-rays with 3x10 7 photons per pulse and a peak brightness of 4x10 24 photons mm -2 mrad -2 s -1 (0.1% BW). The facility will allow us to test the dynamics and associated technology of bunch compression and gain valuable experience for the LCLS using the SLAC linac. New ultra-short electron bunch diagnostic techniques will be developed hand in hand with the same ultra-fast laser technology to be used for LCLS. Issues of high peak power (27 GW) X-ray transport and optics can be addressed at this facility as well as pump-probe and ultra-fast laser timing and stability issues

  20. Gallium arsenide digital integrated circuits for controlling SLAC CW-RF systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronan, M.T.; Lee, K.L.; Corredoura, P.; Judkins, J.G.

    1988-10-01

    In order to fill the PEP and SPEAR storage rings with beams from the SLC linac and damping rings, precise control of the linac subharmonic buncher and the damping ring RF is required. Recently several companies have developed resettable GaAs master/slave D-type flip-flops which are capable of operating at frequencies of 3 GHz and higher. Using these digital devices as frequency dividers, one can phase shift the SLAC CW-RF systems to optimize the timing for filling the storage rings. We have evaluated the performance of integrated circuits from two vendors for our particular application. Using microstrip circuit techniques, we have built and operated in the accelerator several chassis to synchronize a reset signal from the storage rings to the SLAC 2.856 GHz RF and to phase shift divide-by-four and divide-by-sixteen frequency dividers to the nearest 350 psec bucket required for filling. 4 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Single bunch beam loading on the SLAC three-kilometer accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.F.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Wilson, P.B.

    1977-03-01

    Since the report on single bunch beam loading experiments at SLAC at the 1975 Particle Accelerator Conference, it has been possible to obtain a much better understanding and agreement of theoretical and experimental results related to this problem. These improvements were made possible by two developments: the generation of a ''wake-field'' function for the SLAC 3-km slow-wave structure and the use of this function to calculate single bunch energy spectra. The wake-field function which gives the time decay of the fields generated by the passage of a delta-function beam was derived by summing all the TM cylindrically symmetrical modes of an equivalent accelerator cavity. By multiplying this wake-field function by a measured bunch density function and integrating along the bunch, it is possible to calculate the energy of each electron in the bunch. This in turn enables one to predict the energy spectrum for any given phase angle of the bunch with respect to the crest of the rf accelerating wave. Agreement between these calculations and experimental measurements is very good. These results are presented, and the possible sources of some of the remaining discrepancies are discussed

  2. Single bunch beam loading on the SLAC three-kilometer accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.F.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Wilson, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    Since the report on single bunch beam loading experiments at SLAC at the 1975 Particle Accelerator Conference, it has been possible to obtain a much better understanding and agreement of theoretical and experimental results related to this problem. These improvements have been made possible by two developments: the generation of a ''wake-field'' function for the SLAC 3-km slow-wave structure and the use of this function to calculate single bunch energy spectra. The wake-field function which gives the time decay of the fields generated by the passage of a delta-function beam was derived by summing all the TM cylindrically symmetrical modes of an equivalent accelerator cavity. By multiplying this wake-field function by a measured bunch density function and integrating along the bunch, it is possible to calculate the energy of each electron in the bunch. This in turn enables one to predict the energy spectrum for any given phase angle of the bunch with respect to the crest of the rf accelerating wave. Agreement between these calculations and experimental measurements is very good. These results are presented and the possible sources of some of the remaining discrepancies are discussed

  3. Technical Design Report for the FACET-II Project at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-08-26

    Electrons can “surf” on waves of plasma – a hot gas of charged particles – gaining very high energies in very short distances. This approach, called plasma wakefield acceleration, has the potential to dramatically shrink the size and cost of particle accelerators. Research at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has demonstrated that plasmas can provide 1,000 times the acceleration in a given distance compared with current technologies. Developing revolutionary and more efficient acceleration techniques that allow for an affordable high-energy collider has been the focus of FACET, a National User Facility at SLAC. FACET used part of SLAC’s two-mile-long linear accelerator to generate high-density beams of electrons and their antimatter counterparts, positrons. Research into plasma wakefield acceleration was the primary motivation for constructing FACET. In April 2016, FACET operations came to an end to make way for the second phase of SLAC’s x-ray laser, the LCLS-II, which will use part of the tunnel occupied by FACET. FACET-II is a new test facility to provide the unique capability to develop advanced acceleration and coherent radiation techniques with high-energy electron and positron beams. FACET-II represents a major upgrade over current FACET capabilities and the breadth of the potential research program makes it truly unique.

  4. Results of the SLAC LCLS Gun High-Power RF Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowell, D.H.; Jongewaard, E.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; Wang, J.; Lewandowski, J.; Vlieks, A.

    2007-01-01

    The beam quality and operational requirements for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) currently being constructed at SLAC are exceptional, requiring the design of a new RF photocathode gun for the electron source. Based on operational experience at SLAC's GTF and SDL and ATF at BNL as well as other laboratories, the 1.6cell s-band (2856MHz) gun was chosen to be the best electron source for the LCLS, however a significant redesign was necessary to achieve the challenging parameters. Detailed 3-D analysis and design was used to produce near-perfect rotationally symmetric rf fields to achieve the emittance requirement. In addition, the thermo-mechanical design allows the gun to operate at 120Hz and a 140MV/m cathode field, or to an average power dissipation of 4kW. Both average and pulsed heating issues are addressed in the LCLS gun design. The first LCLS gun is now fabricated and has been operated with high-power RF. The results of these high-power tests are presented and discussed

  5. Advocacy for the Archives and History Office of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory: Stages and Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deken, J.

    2009-01-01

    Advocating for the good of the SLAC Archives and History Office (AHO) has not been a one-time affair, nor has it been a one-method procedure. It has required taking time to ascertain the current and perhaps predict the future climate of the Laboratory, and it has required developing and implementing a portfolio of approaches to the goal of building a stronger archive program by strengthening and appropriately expanding its resources. Among the successful tools in the AHO advocacy portfolio, the Archives Program Review Committee has been the most visible. The Committee and the role it serves as well as other formal and informal advocacy efforts are the focus of this case study My remarks today will begin with a brief introduction to advocacy and outreach as I understand them, and with a description of the Archives and History Office's efforts to understand and work within the corporate culture of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. I will then share with you some of the tools we have employed to advocate for the Archives and History Office programs and activities; and finally, I will talk about how well - or badly - those tools have served us over the past decade.

  6. Personnel dose equivalent monitoring at SLAC using lithium-fluoride TLD's [thermoluminescent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, T.M.; Busick, D.D.

    1987-03-01

    TLD's replaced film badges in the early 1970's for all dose equivalent monitoring, both neutron and photon, and for all locations at SLAC. The photon TLD's, composed of Li-7 loaded teflon discs, are calibrated using conventional gamma-ray sources; i.e., Co-60, Cs-137, etc. For these TLD's a nominal value of 1 nC/mrem is used, and is independent of source energy for 100 keV to 3 MeV. Since measured dose equivalents at SLAC are only a small fraction of the allowable levels, it was not deemed necessary to develop neutron dosimeters which would measure dose equivalent accurately for all possible neutron spectra. Today, wallet TLD's, composed of pairs of Li-7 and Li-6 discs, are used, with the Li-6 measuring only thermal neutrons; i.e., they aren't moderated in any way to make them sensitive to neutrons with energies greater than thermal. The assumption is made that there is a correlation between thermal neutron fluences and fast neutron fluences around the research area where almost all neutron doses (exclusive of sealed sources) are received. The calibration factor for these Li-6 TLD's is 1 nC/mrem of fast neutrons. The method of determining the validity of this calibration is the subject of this note. 4 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  7. Measurements of the Z boson resonance parameters at SLC [SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearty, C.

    1989-07-01

    This paper presents the measurement by the Mark II experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider of the parameters of the Z boson resonance. The results are updated from those presented at the SLAC Summer Institute to include all data presented in the most recent Mark II publication, consisting of 19 nb -1 of data at ten different center-of-mass energies between 89.2 and 93.0 GeV. The resonance parameters are extracted by measuring the Z production cross section at a series of center-of-mass energies (scan points) near the Z peak, then fitting these data with the theoretical cross section. The four major aspects of the analysis are the determination at each scan point of the center-of-mass energy (E), the integrated luminosity, the number of Z decays and the expected cross section as a function of the resonance parameters, such as mass and width. I will discuss each of these steps in turn, after a brief description of the Mark II detector, then conclude with the results of the analysis. 7 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Ground motion measurements at the LBL Light Source site, the Bevatron and at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Majer, E.I.; More, V.D.; O'Connell, D.R.; Shilling, R.C.

    1986-12-01

    This report describes the technique for measuring ground motion at the site of the 1.0 to 2.0 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Facility which was known as the Advanced Light Source (in 1983 when the measurements were taken). The results of ground motion measurements at the Light Source site at Building 6 at LBL are presented. As comparison, ground motion measurements were made at the Byerly Tunnel, the Bevatron, Blackberry Canyon, and SLAC at the Spear Ring. Ground Motion at the Light Source site was measured in a band from 4 to 100 Hz. The measured noise is primarily local in origin and is not easily transported through LBL soils. The background ground motion is for the most part less than 0.1 microns. Localized truck traffic near Building 6 and the operation of the cranes in the building can result in local ground motions of a micron or more for short periods of time. The background motion at Building 6 is between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude higher than ground motion in a quiet seismic tunnel, which is representative of quiet sites worldwide. The magnitude of the ground motions at SLAC and the Bevatron are comparable to ground motions measured at the Building 6 Light Source site. However, the frequency signature of each site is very different

  9. Measurements of ultimate accelerating gradients in the SLAC disk-loaded structure. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.W.; Loew, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The work reported here describes measurements made to study the maximum attainable accelerating gradients in a conventional SLAC disk-loaded accelerator section of the constant-gradient type running at 2856 MHz. The objective was to reach an accelerating gradient of at least 100 MV/m. The accelerating gradient at which the SLAC disk-loaded waveguide runs routinely is approx. 9 MV/m (36 MW tubes without SLED) and approx. 12 MV/m with SLED I (2.5 μsec pulse). To reach 100 MV/m in a conventional 3 m constant-gradient section, one would need a klystron with a peak power output of 900 MW. since such a tube is not available, we decided to use a short standing-wave section in which the resonant fields would be allowed to build up. The design criteria for this section, the fabrication, matching and tuning, the experimental set-up and the results are described below

  10. The UCLA/SLAC Ultra-High Gradient Cerenkov Wakefield Accelerator Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Matthew C; Hogan, Mark; Ischebeck, Rasmus; Muggli, Patric; Rosenzweig, James E; Scott, A; Siemann, Robert; Travish, Gil; Walz, Dieter; Yoder, Rodney

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is planned to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range. This new UCLA/SLAC collaboration will take advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its demonstrated ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., sz = 20 μm at Q = 3 nC). The electron beam will be focused down and sent through varying lengths of fused silica capillary tubing with two different sizes: ID = 200 μm / OD = 325 μm and ID = 100 μm / OD = 325 μm. The pulse length of the electron beam will be varied in order to alter the accelerating gradient and probe the breakdown threshold of the dielectric structures. In addition to breakdown studies, we plan to collect and measure coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube to gain information about the strength of the accelerating fields. Status and progress on the experiment are reported.

  11. Production of high intensity electron bunches for the SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.B.

    1987-08-01

    This thesis describes the design and performance of a high intensity electron injecfor for the SLAC Linear Collider. Motivation for the collider and the specifications for the injector are discussed. An analytic theory of the bunching and capture of electrons by rf fields is discussed in the limit of low space charge and small signal. The design and performance of SLAC's main injector are described to illustrate a successful application of this theory. The bunching and capture of electrons by rf fields are then discussed in the limit of high space charge and large signal, and a description of the design of the collider injector follows. In the limit of high space charge forces and large rf signals, the beam dynamics are considerably more complex and numerical simulations are required to predict particle motion. A computer code which models the longitudinal dynamics of electrons in the presence of space charge and rf fields is described. The results of the simulations, the resulting collider injector design and the various components which make up the collider injector are described. These include the gun, subharmonic bunchers, traveling-wave buncher and velocity-of-light accelerator section. Finally, the performance of the injector is described including the beam intensity, bunch length, transverse emittance and energy spectrum. While the final operating conditions differ somewaht from the design, the performance of the collider injector is in good agreement with the numerical simulations and meets all of the collider specifications. 28 refs

  12. SLAC collider injector, RF-drive synchronization and trigger electronics, and 15-AMP thermionic-gun development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.; Miller, R.; McKinney, T.; Wilmunder, A.

    1981-02-01

    The rf drive system for the Collider Injector Development (EL CID) including laser timing, subharmonic buncher drive and phasing, and accelerator rf drive is described. The rf synchronized master trigger generation scheme for the collider is outlined. Also, a 15 amp peak, 200 kV short pulse gun being developed at SLAC as a backup to the Sinclair laser gun is described

  13. Computer modelling of bunch-by-bunch feedback for the SLAC B-factory design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, D.; Fox, J.D.; Hosseini, W.; Klaisner, L.; Morton, P.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Thompson, K.A.; Lambertson, G.

    1991-05-01

    The SLAC B-factory design, with over 1600 high current bunches circulating in each ring, will require a feedback system to avoid coupled-bunch instabilities. A computer model of the storage ring, including the RF system, wave fields, synchrotron radiation loss, and the bunch-by-bunch feedback system is presented. The feedback system model represents the performance of a fast phase detector front end (including system noise and imperfections), a digital filter used to generate a correction voltage, and a power amplifier and beam kicker system. The combined ring-feedback system model is used to study the feedback system performance required to suppress instabilities and to quantify the dynamics of the system. Results are presented which show the time development of coupled bunch instabilities and the damping action of the feedback system. 3 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Production and decay of Z bosons at the SLC [SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, G.J.

    1989-12-01

    My lectures at Cargese covered the very first physics results from the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). At the time of this writing (December 1989), it seems most sensible to present a review of the results that were presented at the school in an updated form. The organization of this report will be to give a brief introduction to linear colliders and the SLC, then to describe the MARK II detector, and finally to review the current status of the three major physics topics discussed at Cargese: the Z line shape, from which we deduce the Z mass and width, and the number of neutrino species, the partonic structure of hadronic decays and a measurement of α s , and searches for new quarks and leptons. 39 refs., 27 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Emittance studies of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell photocathode rf gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, D.T.; Miller, R.H.; Wang, X.J.

    1997-01-01

    The symmetrized 1.6 cell S-band photocathode gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A novel emittance compensation solenoid magnet has also been designed, built and is in operation at the ATF. These two subsystems form an emittance compensated photoinjector used for beam dynamics, advanced acceleration and free electron laser experiments at the ATF. The highest acceleration field achieved on the copper cathode is 150 MV/m, and the guns normal operating field is 130 MV/m. The maximum rf pulse length is 3 micros. The transverse emittance of the photoelectron beam were measured for various injection parameters. The 1 nC emittance results are presented along with electron bunch length measurements that indicated that at above the 400 pC, space charge bunch lengthening is occurring. The thermal emittance, ε o , of the copper cathode has been measured

  16. 600 kV modulator design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, K.; de Lamare, J.; Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1992-07-01

    Preliminary design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) requires a pulse power source to produce a 600 kV, 600 A, 1.4 μs, 0.1% flat top pulse with rise and fall times of approximately 100 ns to power an X-Band klystron with a microperveance of 1.25 at ∼ 100 MW peak RF power. The design goals for the modulator, including those previously listed, are peak modulator pulse power of 340 MW operating at 120 Hz. A three-stage darlington pulse-forming network, which produces a >100 kV, 1.4 μs pulse, is coupled to the klystron load through a 6:1 pulse transformer. Careful consideration of the transformer leakage inductance, klystron capacitance, system layout, and component choice is necessary to produce the very fast rise and fall times at 600 kV operating continuously at 120 Hz

  17. The Spin Structure Function of the Proton from SLAC Experiment E155

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, P

    2004-02-17

    Experiment E155 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) measured the longitudinal and transverse deep inelastic structure functions of the proton and deuteron using a polarized, 48.3 GeV electron beam and solid polarized targets of ammonia ({sup 15}NH{sub 3}) for proton measurements and lithium deuteride ({sup 6}Li{sup 2}H) for deuteron measurements. Three electromagnetic spectrometers at angles of 2.75{sup o}, 5.5{sup o}, and 10.5{sup o} measured the scattered electrons. This work presents an analysis of the longitudinal structure function of the proton, g{sub 1}{sup p}(x, Q{sup 2}). Included is a re-analysis of the proton target polarization data that for the first time corrects a problem encountered which altered those measurements.

  18. Measurement of the Left-Right Asymmetry in Z0 Events at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szumilo, A

    2004-01-05

    Recent results from the 1992 and 1993 left-right asymmetry cross section measurements at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center are presented. Measurements made with SLAC running with a center-of-mass energy at the Z{sup 0}-pole (91.2 GeV) by the SLD detector and an average electron beam polarization of 22.4 {+-} 0.7% for 1992 and 62.6 {+-} 1.2% for 1993. The asymmetry measured was A{sub LR} = 0.100 {+-} 0.044 and A{sub LR} = 0.1656 {+-} 0.0073 for the 1992 and 1993 runs, respectively. This in turn allows them to calculate the weak mixing angle value of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} = 0.2378 {+-} 0.0056 and sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} = 0.2288 {+-} 0.0009 for the two data sets.

  19. Recent SLAC measurements of the spin dependent structure functions for the proton and neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapalac, G.

    1995-09-01

    The authors present results from SLAC experiments E142 and E143 for the spin dependent structure functions of the proton g 1 p (x, Q 2 ) and neutron g 1 n (x,Q 2 ) measured in deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons from a polarized target. Experiment E142 measures ∫ 0 1 g 1 n (x)dx = -0.022 ± 0.011 at 2 > = 2 (GeV/c) 2 using a polarized 3 He target. Experiment E143 measures ∫ 0 1 g 1 p (x)dx = 0.129 ± 0.011 at 2 > = 3 (GeV/c) 2 using a polarized NH 3 target. These results are combined at Q 2 = 3 (GeV/c) 2 to yield ∫ 0 1 [g 1 p (x) - g 1 n (x)]dx = 0.151 ± 0.015. The Bjorken sum rule predicts 0.171 ± 0.008

  20. Single-bunch beam loading on the SLAC two-mile accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.F.

    1976-05-01

    The experiments described were initially prompted by interest in the radiation loss of relativistic electron rings passing through periodic structures. Later the same experiments became relevant to the theory of energy loss of electrons in large storage rings. In both of these cases energy loss to the higher order modes of the respective structures could seriously limit their effective operation. In these experiments, single bunches of electrons with intensities up to 7 x 10 8 electrons per bunch are accelerated through the SLAC three-kilometer accelerator, and their energy spectra are analyzed. Early experiments over a wide energy range (900 MeV to 19 GeV) demonstrated that the energy loss was proportional to the total charge in the bunch but was independent of beam energy. The average energy loss of a single bunch normalized to 10 9 electrons was initially measured to be 38 MeV

  1. Highlights of the SLD Physics Program at the SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willocq, Stephane

    2001-01-01

    Starting in 1989, and continuing through the 1990s, high-energy physics witnessed a flowering of precision measurements in general and tests of the standard model in particular, led by e + e - collider experiments operating at the Z 0 resonance. Key contributions to this work came from the SLD collaboration at the SLAC Linear Collider. By exploiting the unique capabilities of this pioneering accelerator and the SLD detector, including a polarized electron beam, exceptionally small beam dimensions, and a CCD pixel vertex detector, SLD produced a broad array of electroweak, heavy-flavor, and QCD measurements. Many of these results are one of a kind or represent the world's standard in precision. This article reviews the highlights of the SLD physics program, with an eye toward associated advances in experimental technique, and the contribution of these measurements to our dramatically improved present understanding of the standard model and its possible extensions

  2. 3D Modeling Activity for Novel High Power Electron Guns at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2003-01-01

    The next generation of powerful electronic devices requires new approaches to overcome the known limitations of existing tube technology. Multi-beam and sheet beam approaches are novel concepts for the high power microwave devices. Direct and indirect modeling methods are being developed at SLAC to meet the new requirements in the 3D modeling. The direct method of solving of Poisson's equations for the multi-beam and sheet beam guns is employed in the TOPAZ 3D tool. The combination of TOPAZ 2D and EGUN (in the beginning) with MAFIA 3D and MAGIC 3D (at the end) is used in an indirect method to model the high power electron guns. Both methods complement each other to get reliable representation of the beam trajectories. Several gun ideas are under consideration at the present time. The collected results of these simulations are discussed

  3. 3D Modeling Activity for Novel High Power Electron Guns at SLAC

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnykh, Anatoly K

    2003-01-01

    The next generation of powerful electronic devices requires new approaches to overcome the known limitations of existing tube technology. Multi-beam and sheet beam approaches are novel concepts for the high power microwave devices. Direct and indirect modeling methods are being developed at SLAC to meet the new requirements in the 3D modeling. The direct method of solving of Poisson's equations for the multi-beam and sheet beam guns is employed in the TOPAZ 3D tool. The combination of TOPAZ 2D and EGUN (in the beginning) with MAFIA 3D and MAGIC 3D (at the end) is used in an indirect method to model the high power electron guns. Both methods complement each other to get reliable representation of the beam trajectories. Several gun ideas are under consideration at the present time. The collected results of these simulations are discussed.

  4. Highlights of the SLD Physics Program at the SLAC Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willocq, Stephane

    2001-09-07

    Starting in 1989, and continuing through the 1990s, high-energy physics witnessed a flowering of precision measurements in general and tests of the standard model in particular, led by e{sup +}e{sup -} collider experiments operating at the Z{sup 0} resonance. Key contributions to this work came from the SLD collaboration at the SLAC Linear Collider. By exploiting the unique capabilities of this pioneering accelerator and the SLD detector, including a polarized electron beam, exceptionally small beam dimensions, and a CCD pixel vertex detector, SLD produced a broad array of electroweak, heavy-flavor, and QCD measurements. Many of these results are one of a kind or represent the world's standard in precision. This article reviews the highlights of the SLD physics program, with an eye toward associated advances in experimental technique, and the contribution of these measurements to our dramatically improved present understanding of the standard model and its possible extensions.

  5. Study of the spin structure functions of the nucleon: the E143 experiment at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, Philippe

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis, we present the results of the E143 experiment of deep inelastic scattering of 29 GeV polarized electrons from polarized NH 3 and ND 3 targets, at SLAC. The goal of the experiment is the measurement of the spin structure functions g 1 and g 2 of the nucleon which provide information on its internal spin structure. Experimentally, the structure functions are extracted from the measurement of cross section asymmetries. Our measured values of the first moment of g 1 are two and three standard deviations below the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule predictions, for the proton and for the deuteron, respectively. The Bjoerken sum rule, a QCD fundamental prediction, has been confirmed. We find the quark contribution to the nucleon spin to be around 30 pc. Our results on g 2 are well described by the Wandzura-Wilczek expression. (author) [fr

  6. Committee Report of the BEPC-II Project Design Review May 13-15, 2002, SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Traci M.

    2002-08-26

    As part of the US-China Cooperative Program in High Energy Physics for the year 2002, a BEPC-II Upgrade Review meeting was held at SLAC, May 13-15, 2002. The upgrade is aimed at improving the luminosity and performance of the BEPC facility at IHEP in Beijing, China with major upgrades to the injector linac, storage ring, and detector. This review addresses mainly the accelerator related issues. Prior to the review, an updated Draft Design Report was made available to the review team. Most important technical change since April 2001 has been a change from a single-ring configuration to a doublering. The goal of the review is to determine whether BEPC-II, if built as described, will meet the operations and physics goals. The charge to the review team is attached as Appendix A.

  7. SLAC/SPIRES Announces the Top-Cited Papers of 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, Heath B

    2002-01-01

    Physicists who search the literature on elementary particles know that the SLAC library's SPIRES-HEP database provides an essential tool. The database lists virtually every paper published or even preprinted in high energy physics over the past thirty years. The database connects preprint or eprint versions to articles published in journals or conference proceedings, providing access to all phases of the publication history. In addition, most papers have backward links to the papers they cite and forward links to the papers citing them. These citation linkages provide a very effective means of searching the literature on any topic of interest. In the past few years, SPIRES-HEP has been automatically harvesting reference citations from eprints, creating a web of links which indexes the literature in a quite thorough manner. As a byproduct of this citation linkage, SPIRES-HEP can easily search out the papers most highly cited by publications in high-energy physics. The list of papers with the most citations in a given year provides a snapshot of the hottest topics that have engaged the attention of theorists and experimenters. For the past several years, SPIRES-HEP has posted a scientific review of the year's top-cited papers. The whole collection of these reviews can be found on the Web at: http://www.slac.stanford.edu/library/topcites/. We have recently posted the topcite lists for the year 2000. These materials include a list of the papers with more than 100 citations in the past year, and a list of the paper with more than 1000 citations over the history of the SPIRES-HEP database

  8. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.

    2009-01-01

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  9. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  10. Setup and Calibration of SLAC's Peripheral Monitoring Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, C.

    2004-09-03

    The goals of this project were to troubleshoot, repair, calibrate, and establish documentation regarding SLAC's (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's) PMS (Peripheral Monitoring Station) system. The PMS system consists of seven PMSs that continuously monitor skyshine (neutron and photon) radiation levels in SLAC's environment. Each PMS consists of a boron trifluoride (BF{sub 3}) neutron detector (model RS-P1-0802-104 or NW-G-20-12) and a Geiger Moeller (GM) gamma ray detector (model TGM N107 or LND 719) together with their respective electronics. Electronics for each detector are housed in Nuclear Instrument Modules (NIMs) and are plugged into a NIM bin in the station. All communication lines from the stations to the Main Control Center (MCC) were tested prior to troubleshooting. To test communication with MCC, a pulse generator (Systron Donner model 100C) was connected to each channel in the PMS and data at MCC was checked for consistency. If MCC displayed no data, the communication cables to MCC or the CAMAC (Computer Automated Measurement and Control) crates were in need of repair. If MCC did display data, then it was known that the communication lines were intact. All electronics from each station were brought into the lab for troubleshooting. Troubleshooting usually consisted of connecting an oscilloscope or scaler (Ortec model 871 or 775) at different points in the circuit of each detector to record simulated pulses produced by a pulse generator; the input and output pulses were compared to establish the location of any problems in the circuit. Once any problems were isolated, repairs were done accordingly. The detectors and electronics were then calibrated in the field using radioactive sources. Calibration is a process that determines the response of the detector. Detector response is defined as the ratio of the number of counts per minute interpreted by the detector to the amount of dose equivalent rate (in mrem per hour, either calculated

  11. Preliminary Conceptual Design Report for the FACET-II Project at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Mark [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-04-22

    Plasma wakefield acceleration has the potential to dramatically shrink the size and cost of particle accelerators. Research at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has demonstrated that plasmas can provide 1,000 times the acceleration in a given distance compared with current technologies. Developing revolutionary and more efficient acceleration techniques that allow for an affordable high-energy collider is the focus of FACET, a National User Facility at SLAC. The existing FACET National User Facility uses part of SLAC’s two-mile-long linear accelerator to generate high-density beams of electrons and positrons. FACET-II is a new test facility to develop advanced acceleration and coherent radiation techniques with high-energy electron and positron beams. It is the only facility in the world with high energy positron beams. FACET-II provides a major upgrade over current FACET capabilities and the breadth of the potential research program makes it truly unique. It will synergistically pursue accelerator science that is vital to the future of both advanced acceleration techniques for High Energy Physics, ultra-high brightness beams for Basic Energy Science, and novel radiation sources for a wide variety of applications. The design parameters for FACET-II are set by the requirements of the plasma wakefield experimental program. To drive the plasma wakefield requires a high peak current, in excess of 10kA. To reach this peak current, the electron and positron design bunch size is 10μ by 10μ transversely with a bunch length of 10μ. This is more than 200 times better than what has been achieved at the existing FACET. The beam energy is 10 GeV, set by the Linac length available and the repetition rate is up to 30 Hz. The FACET-II project is scheduled to be constructed in three major stages. Components of the project discussed in detail include the following: electron injector, bunch compressors and linac, the positron system, the Sector 20 sailboat and W chicanes

  12. Single-bunch beam loading on the SLAC two-mile accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    The experiments described were initially prompted by interest in the radiation loss of relativistic electron rings passing through periodic structures. Later, the same experiments became relevant to the theory of energy loss of electrons in large storage rings. In both of these cases, energy loss to the higher order modes of the respective structures could seriously limit their effective operation as acceleration devices. In these experiments, single bunches of electrons with intensities up to 7 x 10 8 electrons per bunch are accelerated through the SLAC three-kilometer accelerator, and their energy spectra are analyzed. Early experiments over a wide energy range (900 MeV to 19 GeV) demonstrated that the energy loss was proportional to the total charge in the bunch but was independent of beam energy. The average energy loss of a single bunch normalized to 10 9 electrons was initially measured to be 38 MeV. The experiments, including much of the equipment development, are described and are compared with theoretical predictions made to date

  13. Passive performance monitoring and traffic characteristics on the SLAC internet border

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logg, C.; Cottrell, L.

    2001-01-01

    Understanding how the Internet is used by HEP is critical to optimizing the performance of the inter-lab computing environment. Typically use requirements have been defined by discussions between collaborators. However, later analysis of the actual traffic has show this is often misunderstood and actual use is significantly different to that predicted. Passive monitoring of the real traffic provides insight into the true communications requirements and the performance of a large number of inter-communicating nodes. It may be useful in identifying performance problems that are due to factors other than Internet congestion, especially when compared to other methods such as active monitoring where traffic is generated specifically to measure its performance. Controlled active monitoring between dedicated servers often gives an indication of what can be achieved on a network. Passive monitoring of the real traffic gives a picture of the true performance. The authors will discuss the method and results of collecting and analyzing flows of data obtained from the SLAC Internet border. The insights this has brought to understanding the network will be reviewed and the benefit it can bring to engineering networks will be discussed

  14. An Exploration of Analysis Software at SLAC through the Study of X(3872)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, A.

    2004-01-01

    X(3872), a particle discovered by Belle Labs, has not yet been described in a sufficient enough way by any group to draw definitive conclusions about it. In order to verify the claims of Belle Labs and learn more about X(3872), Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (henceforth SLAC) has undertaken a project to analyze the particle, a subgroup of the BaBar project. The computing systems involved are complex; the tutorials for the software and new software releases both need constant testing and revision. Using a new software release, I tested tutorials for various software used by the BaBar group, including UNIX, Root, and CM2, in an effort to eventually analyze X(3872) data. The offline workbook for the BaBar software needs to be better maintained, and the CM2 tutorials need to be modified and updated. While none of my results contributed directly to the project (i.e. I have no results that add to information about X(3872)), improvement of the tutorials will streamline integration of new scientists into the BaBar group

  15. Application of the code Slac to the study of Ion Extraction Systems in Neutral Injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.; Liniers, M.; Guasp, J.

    1997-01-01

    In this study different extraction geometries for intense ion beams have been analyzed with the code SLAC, in view of its possible application to the neutral injectors of TJ-II. With this aim, we have introduced several modifications in the code in order to correctly simulate the transition between the ion source plasma and the extraction region, which has great impact on the beam optics. These modifications include the introduction of a population of Boltzmann electrons in the transition region, and the implementation of an option to simulate the thermal velocity of the ions in the source. We have found a better agreement between the results obtained with the new version of the code and the experimental data in two well known systems. With this new version of the code two different studies have been carried out: in the first place an optimization of the ATF injectors extraction system for its use on TJ-II, leading to an optimum value of the gap in the energy range 30-40 KeV, and in the second place a systematic study of extraction geometries at 40 KeV. As a result of this second study we have found the combinations of parameters that can be used under different working conditions (e.g. different pulse lengths), leading to acceptable values of the beam divergence. (Author)

  16. STATUS OF X-BAND STANDING WAVE STRUCTURE STUDIES AT SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgashev, Valery A.

    2003-01-01

    The linacs proposed for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) and Japanese Linear Collider (JLC) would contain several thousand X-Band accelerator structures that would operate at a loaded gradient of 50 MV/m. An extensive experimental and theoretical program is underway at SLAC, FNAL and KEK to develop structures that reliably operate at this gradient. The development of standing wave structures is a part of this program. The properties of standing wave structures allow them to operate at the loaded gradient in contrast to traveling wave structures that need conditioning to the unloaded gradient (65 MV/m for NLC/JLC). The gradients in the standing structures tested thus far have been limited by input coupler breakdowns. The behavior of these breakdowns is consistent with a model of pulsed heating due to high magnetic fields. New input couplers have been designed to reduce maximum magnetic fields. This paper discusses design considerations related to high power performance, wakefield suppression and results of high power tests of prototype standing wave structures

  17. High-power rf pulse compression with SLED-II at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nantista, C.

    1993-04-01

    Increasing the peak rf power available from X-band microwave tubes by means of rf pulse compression is envisioned as a way of achieving the few-hundred-megawatt power levels needed to drive a next-generation linear collider with 50--100 MW klystrons. SLED-II is a method of pulse compression similar in principal to the SLED method currently in use on the SLC and the LEP injector linac. It utilizes low-los resonant delay lines in place of the storage cavities of the latter. This produces the added benefit of a flat-topped output pulse. At SLAC, we have designed and constructed a prototype SLED-II pulse-compression system which operates in the circular TE 01 mode. It includes a circular-guide 3-dB coupler and other novel components. Low-power and initial high-power tests have been made, yielding a peak power multiplication of 4.8 at an efficiency of 40%. The system will be used in providing power for structure tests in the ASTA (Accelerator Structures Test Area) bunker. An upgraded second prototype will have improved efficiency and will serve as a model for the pulse compression system of the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator)

  18. Improvements in emittance wake field optimization for the SLAC Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Decker, Franz Josef

    2003-01-01

    The transverse emittances in the SLAC Linear Collider can be severely diluted by collective wakefield effects and dispersion. For the 1997/98 SLC/SLD run important changes were implemented in the way the emittance is optimized. Early in the linac, where the energy spread is large due to BNS damping, the emittance growth is dominated by dispersion. In this regime emittance tuning bumps may introduce additional wakefield tails and their use is now avoided. At the end of the linac the energy spread is minimal and the emittance measurement is most sensitive to wakefield emittance dilution. In previous years, the emittances were tuned on wire scanners located near but not at the end of the linac (after about 90% of its length). Simulations show that emittance growth of up to 100% can occur in the remaining 10%. In this run wire scanners at the entrance of the Final Focus, the last place where the emittances can be measured, were used for the optimization. Screens at the end of the linac allow additional real time ...

  19. The physics program of a high-luminosity asymmetric B Factory at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    A high-luminosity asymmetric energy B Factory, proposed as an upgrade to the PEP storage ring at SLAC, provides the best opportunity to study CP violation as a means of testing the consistency of the Standard Model. If the phenomenon of CP violation is explained by the Standard Model simply through the non-zero angles and phase of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, then there are precise relations between the K-M parameters and the various measurable CP-violating asymmetries in B meson decay. Should these consistency relations fail, the origin of CP violation must lie outside the Standard Model framework. Our measurements would then lead to the first experiment-driven extensions of the Standard Model. The B Factory will also carry out a varied, high-quality program of studies of other aspects of the physics of b quarks, as well as high-precision measurements in τ and charm physics. We describe a detailed series of measurements to be carried out in the first few years at a peak luminosity of 3 x 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 , the initial luminosity goal of the B Factory, as well as the program accessible to a larger data sample

  20. Performance of the PEP-II B-Factory Collider at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, J.; Browne, M.; Cai, Y.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.J.; Donald, M.H.; Ecklund, S.; Erickson, R.A.; Fisher, A.S.; Fox, J.D.; Heifets, S.A.; Iverson, R.H.; Kulikov, A.; Li, N.; Novokhatski, A.; Ross, M.C.; Schuh, P.; Smith, T.J.; Sonnad, K.G.; Stanek, M.; Sullivan, M.K.

    2006-01-01

    PEP-II is an e + e - asymmetric B-Factory Collider located at SLAC operating at the Upsilon 4S resonance (3.1 GeV x 9 GeV). It has reached a luminosity of 9.21 x 10 33 /cm 2 /s and has delivered an integrated luminosity of 710 pb -1 in one day. PEP-II has delivered, over the past six years, an integrated luminosity to the BaBar detector of over 262 fb -1 . PEP-II operates in continuous injection mode for both beams boosting the integrated luminosity. The peak positron current has reached 2.45 A in 1588 bunches. Steady progress is being made in reaching higher luminosity. The goal over the next several years is to reach a luminosity of 2.1 x 10 34 /cm 2 /s. The accelerator physics issues being addressed in PEP-II to reach this goal include the electron cloud instability, beam-beam effects, parasitic beam-beam effects, high RF beam loading, shorter bunches, lower β* y interaction region operation, and coupling control. Figure 1 shows the PEP-II tunnel

  1. Study of the doubly-charmed decays of B mesons with the experiment BABAR in SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbe, P.

    2002-04-01

    The BABAR experiment at SLAC (Stanford linear acceleration center) has been studying since 1999 B meson decays from e + e - collisions at the γ(4S) resonance. The first goal of the collaboration was to measure the sin (2β) CP-violation parameter within the standard model. This measurement requires to know with precision the absolute length scale of the detector. A method to test this scale was developed using nuclear interactions in the beam-pipe material. The longitudinal length scale was then determined at the 1 % level precision. The systematic error associated with length measurement in the detector concerning B meson lifetime and B meson oscillation frequency is then negligible with respect to the other errors. The K meson content of B decays is a key ingredient of the sin (2β) measurement and is used to tag the flavour of the other B in events containing a B decaying to a CP eigenstate. The K charge is correlated to the B flavour. Wrong sign kaons, which can dilute B tagging, can come from wrong sign D decays (B→ DX). Doubly charmed decays (B→ D (*) D-bar (*) K are one possibility to produce wrong sign D decays. The twenty-two decay modes are reconstructed exclusively. The total branching fraction is measured with enough precision to establish that B→ D (*) D-bar (*) K decays are not the only source of wrong sign D mesons in B decays. (author)

  2. Study of the nucleon spin structure functions: the E154 experiment at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatie, Franck

    1998-01-01

    In experiment E154 at SLAC, the spin dependent structure function g 1 n was measured by scattering longitudinally polarized 50 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarized helium 3 target. We report the integral over the measured x range to be ∫ 0.014 0.7 g 1 n (x,5 GeV 2 )dx = -0.0348 ± 0.0033 ± 0.0043 ± 0.0014. We observe relatively large values of g 1 n at low x, calling into question the reliability of the data extrapolation down to x equal 0. Such a divergent behavior seems to disagree with the prediction of the Regge theory but can be quantitatively explained by perturbative QCD. Moreover, we have performed a NLO perturbative QCD analysis of the world data on g 1 , paying careful attention to both the theoretical hypothesis and the calculation of errors. Using a parametrization of the polarized parton distribution at a low scale, we can access the fraction of spin carried by quarks: ΔΣ = 29 ± 6 pc in the MS-bar scheme, and ΔΣ = 37 ± 7 pc in the AB scheme. The gluon contribution to the nucleon spin is not well enough constrained by the current data, but seems to lie between 0 and 2. This study allows us to extract the first moment of the g 1 structure function and we find agreement with the Bjorken sum rule expectations. (author) [fr

  3. The E142 SLAC experiment: measurement of the neutron gn1(x) spin structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roblin, Y.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes the E142 experiment which has been carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC), USA, from October to December 1992. This experiment of polarized inelastic scattering of a 22.6 GeV electron beam on a polarized helium 3 target has allowed the first measurement of the neutron g n 1 (x) spin structure function. The knowledge of this structure function gives informations on the nucleon spin structure. On the other hand, the g n 1 (x) structure function integral value on the 0 2 mean value of 2 GeV 2 after some extrapolations. This value is at about two standard deviations away from the theoretical predictions of the Ellis-Jaffe rule. Thanks to the existing experimental results for the proton (E143 experiment), the Bjorken sum rule has been precisely tested and is perfectly compatible with the theoretical value. The results have allowed to estimate the nucleon spin fraction carried by the quarks. (J.S.). 86 refs., 58 figs., 13 tabs

  4. The NE11 experiment at SLAC and the neutron form factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, L.M.; Lung, A.; Bosted, P.E.

    1993-05-01

    The neutron electromagnetic form factors G En and G Mn , which reflect the charge and magnetization distributions within the neutron, are of fundamental importance for understanding nucleon structure, and are necessary for calculations of processes involving the electromagnetic interaction with complex nuclei. These quantities are functions of Q 2 , the four-momentum transfer squared. SLAC experiment NE11 has measured these form factors out to a Q 2 of 4.0 (GeV/c) 2 with high precision, and the results have been recently published. This paper provides some additional details on the extraction of G Mn and G En from the NE11 measurements. Several formalisms have been developed over the years which attempt to understand the nucleon form factors using basic physical principles. Vector Meson Dominance (VMD) models are based on superpositions of photon couplings to various vector mesons. These models generally involve free parameters which are fit to form factor data at low Q 2 , and are not expected to be valid at high Q 2 . For asymptotically large Q 2 , dimensional scaling methods and perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (pQCD) predict form factor behavior at large Q 2 , but they do not make absolute magnitude predictions. To describe the form factor behavior at intermediate values of Q 2 , a hybrid model by Gari and Kruempelmann (GK) uses VMD constraints at low Q 2 and pQCD constraints at high Q 2 . Free parameters in the model are adjusted to fit existing form factor data. Other approaches include the use of QCD sum rules to make absolute predictions, diquark models, and relativistic constituent quark models

  5. Design of the SLAC RCE Platform: A General Purpose ATCA Based Data Acquisition System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.; Claus, R.; Freytag, M.; Haller, G.; Huffer, M.; Maldonado, S.; Nishimura, K.; O'Grady, C.; Panetta, J.; Perazzo, A.; Reese, B.; Ruckman, L.; Thayer, J.G.; Weaver, M.

    2015-01-01

    The SLAC RCE platform is a general purpose clustered data acquisition system implemented on a custom ATCA compliant blade, called the Cluster On Board (COB). The core of the system is the Reconfigurable Cluster Element (RCE), which is a system-on-chip design based upon the Xilinx Zynq family of FPGAs, mounted on custom COB daughter-boards. The Zynq architecture couples a dual core ARM Cortex A9 based processor with a high performance 28nm FPGA. The RCE has 12 external general purpose bi-directional high speed links, each supporting serial rates of up to 12Gbps. 8 RCE nodes are included on a COB, each with a 10Gbps connection to an on-board 24-port Ethernet switch integrated circuit. The COB is designed to be used with a standard full-mesh ATCA backplane allowing multiple RCE nodes to be tightly interconnected with minimal interconnect latency. Multiple shelves can be clustered using the front panel 10-gbps connections. The COB also supports local and inter-blade timing and trigger distribution. An experiment specific Rear Transition Module adapts the 96 high speed serial links to specific experiments and allows an experiment-specific timing and busy feedback connection. This coupling of processors with a high performance FPGA fabric in a low latency, multiple node cluster allows high speed data processing that can be easily adapted to any physics experiment. RTEMS and Linux are both ported to the module. The RCE has been used or is the baseline for several current and proposed experiments (LCLS, HPS, LSST, ATLAS-CSC, LBNE, DarkSide, ILC-SiD, etc).

  6. Reconstitution of CO2 Regulation of SLAC1 Anion Channel and Function of CO2-Permeable PIP2;1 Aquaporin as CARBONIC ANHYDRASE4 Interactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeise, Brian; Xu, Danyun; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Boron, Walter F.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    Dark respiration causes an increase in leaf CO2 concentration (Ci), and the continuing increases in atmospheric [CO2] further increases Ci. Elevated leaf CO2 concentration causes stomatal pores to close. Here, we demonstrate that high intracellular CO2/HCO3− enhances currents mediated by the Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell S-type anion channel SLAC1 upon coexpression of any one of the Arabidopsis protein kinases OST1, CPK6, or CPK23 in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Split-ubiquitin screening identified the PIP2;1 aquaporin as an interactor of the βCA4 carbonic anhydrase, which was confirmed in split luciferase, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. PIP2;1 exhibited CO2 permeability. Mutation of PIP2;1 in planta alone was insufficient to impair CO2- and abscisic acid-induced stomatal closing, likely due to redundancy. Interestingly, coexpression of βCA4 and PIP2;1 with OST1-SLAC1 or CPK6/23-SLAC1 in oocytes enabled extracellular CO2 enhancement of SLAC1 anion channel activity. An inactive PIP2;1 point mutation was identified that abrogated water and CO2 permeability and extracellular CO2 regulation of SLAC1 activity. These findings identify the CO2-permeable PIP2;1 as key interactor of βCA4 and demonstrate functional reconstitution of extracellular CO2 signaling to ion channel regulation upon coexpression of PIP2;1, βCA4, SLAC1, and protein kinases. These data further implicate SLAC1 as a bicarbonate-responsive protein contributing to CO2 regulation of S-type anion channels. PMID:26764375

  7. An S-type anion channel SLAC1 is involved in cryptogein-induced ion fluxes and modulates hypersensitive responses in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurusu, Takamitsu; Saito, Katsunori; Horikoshi, Sonoko; Hanamata, Shigeru; Negi, Juntaro; Yagi, Chikako; Kitahata, Nobutaka; Iba, Koh; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological evidence suggests that anion channel-mediated plasma membrane anion effluxes are crucial in early defense signaling to induce immune responses and hypersensitive cell death in plants. However, their molecular bases and regulation remain largely unknown. We overexpressed Arabidopsis SLAC1, an S-type anion channel involved in stomatal closure, in cultured tobacco BY-2 cells and analyzed the effect on cryptogein-induced defense responses including fluxes of Cl(-) and other ions, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), gene expression and hypersensitive responses. The SLAC1-GFP fusion protein was localized at the plasma membrane in BY-2 cells. Overexpression of SLAC1 enhanced cryptogein-induced Cl(-) efflux and extracellular alkalinization as well as rapid/transient and slow/prolonged phases of NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS production, which was suppressed by an anion channel inhibitor, DIDS. The overexpressor also showed enhanced sensitivity to cryptogein to induce downstream immune responses, including the induction of defense marker genes and the hypersensitive cell death. These results suggest that SLAC1 expressed in BY-2 cells mediates cryptogein-induced plasma membrane Cl(-) efflux to positively modulate the elicitor-triggered activation of other ion fluxes, ROS as well as a wide range of defense signaling pathways. These findings shed light on the possible involvement of the SLAC/SLAH family anion channels in cryptogein signaling to trigger the plasma membrane ion channel cascade in the plant defense signal transduction network.

  8. Spectral function calculation of angle wakes, wake moments, and misalignment wakes for the SLAC Damped Detuned Structures (DDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.M.; Miller, R.H.; Kroll, N.M.

    1997-05-01

    Transverse wake functions so far reported for the SLAC DDS have been limited to those caused by uniform offset of the drive beam in a straight perfectly aligned structure. The complete description of the betatron oscillations of wake coupled bunches requires an array of wake functions, referred to as moments. Modifications of these arrays induced by structure misalignments are also of interest. In this paper we express the array elements in terms of a spectral function array. Examples are given based upon DDS1

  9. SLAC's Polarized Electron Source LaserSystem and Minimization of Helicity Correlations for the E-158 Parity Violation Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Humensky, T

    2002-01-01

    SLAC E-158 is an experiment designed to make the first measurement of parity violation in Moeller scattering. E-158 will measure the right-left cross-section asymmetry, A sub L sub R sup M sup o sup e sup l sup l sup e sup r , in the elastic scattering of a 45-GeV polarized electron beam off unpolarized electrons in a liquid hydrogen target. E-158 plans to measure the expected Standard Model asymmetry of approx 10 sup - sup 7 to an accuracy of better than 10 sup - sup 8. To make this measurement, the polarized electron source requires for operation an intense circularly polarized laser beam and the ability to quickly switch between right- and left-helicity polarization states with minimal right-left helicity-correlated asymmetries in the resulting beam parameters (intensity, position, angle, spot size, and energy), sup b sup e sup a sup m A sub L sub R 's. This laser beam is produced by a unique SLAC-designed flashlamp-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser and is propagated through a carefully designed set of polarization...

  10. Research and Development Toward a 4.5-1.5 Angstrom Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatchyn, R.; Arthur, J.; Baltay, M.

    1995-08-01

    In recent years significant studies have been initiated on the feasibility of utilizing a portion of the 3km S-band accelerator at SLAC to drive a short wavelength (4.5-1.5 A) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a Free Electron Laser (FEL) operating in the Self- Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime. Electron beam requirements for single-pass saturation in a minimal time include: (1) a peak current in the 7 kA range, (2) a relative energy spread of <0.05%, and (3) a transverse emittance, ε[r-m], approximating the diffraction limit condition ε = λ / 4π, where lambda(m) is the output wavelength. Requirements on the insertion device include field error levels of 0.02% for keeping the electron bunch centered on and in phase with the amplified photons, and a focusing beta of 8 m/rad for inhibiting the dilution of its transverse density. Although much progress has been made in developing individual components and beam processing techniques necessary for LCLS operation down to approx. 20 A, a substantial amount of research and development is still required in a number of theoretical and experimental areas leading to the construction and operation of a 4.5-1.5 A LCLS. In this paper we report on a research and development program underway and in planning at SLAC for addressing critical questions in these areas

  11. A Precision Measurement of the Spin Structure of the Proton at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erbacher, Robin D

    1999-09-22

    E143 at SLAC Endstation A performed deep-inelastic scattering measurements of polarized electrons from polarized protons and deuterons within cryogenic {sup 15}NH{sub 3} and {sup 15}ND{sub 3}, respectively. Data were taken at incident energies of 29.1, 16.2 and 9.7 GeV, and covered the kinematical range x > 0:03 and 0:3 < Q{sup 2} < 12 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The scattered electrons were detected by two spectrometers at angles of 4.5{sup o} and 7.0{sup o}. From these data, the spin-dependent structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p}(x; Q{sup 2}) and g{sub 1}{sup d}(x; Q{sup 2}) were determined. This dissertation describes the experiment, with emphasis on the results on the proton spin structure. The integral of g{sub 1} over the range 0 < x < 1 was found to be {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p} = 0.130 {+-} 0.003 {+-} 0.008 for the proton and {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup d} = 0.044 {+-} 0.003 {+-} 0.004 for the deuteron. Both values are in agreement with world data, and violate the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule by more than 3 standard deviations. The neutron structure function was obtained by combining proton and deuteron results, giving {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup n} = [0.035 {+-} 0.007 {+-} 0.010]. From this the integral {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p}-{Gamma}{sub 1}{sup n} followed, yielding 0.165 {+-} 0.009 {+-} 0.016 at Q{sup 2} = 3 (GeV/c){sup 2}, in agreement with the Bjorken sum rule to within one standard deviation. The Q{sup 2}-dependence of the ratio g{sub 1}/F{sub 1} was determined to be small for Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}, validating the assumption of no Q{sup 2}-dependence used in obtaining the integrals. A small rise with increasing Q{sup 2} was seen in the ratio for Q{sup 2} < 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}, however. The total quark contribution to the spin was found to be {Delta}q = 0.28 {+-} 0.09 for the proton, and {Delta}q = 0.32 {+-} 0.05 for the deuteron. Furthermore, a large negative spin contribution from the strange sea quarks was measured for both nucleons, giving {Delta}s = 0.10 {+-} 0.03 and {Delta}s = -0

  12. Complete Genomes of Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, Two Phylogenetically Distinct Probiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, T. N. C.; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Several spore-forming strains of Bacillus are marketed as probiotics due to their ability to survive harsh gastrointestinal conditions and confer health benefits to the host. We report the complete genomes of two commercially available probiotics, Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, and compare them with the genomes of other Bacillus and Lactobacillus. The taxonomic position of both organisms was established with a maximum-likelihood tree based on twenty six housekeeping proteins. Analysis of all probiotic strains of Bacillus and Lactobacillus reveal that the essential sporulation proteins are conserved in all Bacillus probiotic strains while they are absent in Lactobacillus spp. We identified various antibiotic resistance, stress-related, and adhesion-related domains in these organisms, which likely provide support in exerting probiotic action by enabling adhesion to host epithelial cells and survival during antibiotic treatment and harsh conditions. PMID:27258038

  13. Simulations of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell emittance compensated photocathode RF gun low energy beam line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, D.T.; Miller, R.H.; Winick, H.

    1995-01-01

    A dedicated low energy (2 to 10 MeV) experimental beam line is now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratories Accelerator Test Facility (BNL/ATF) for photocathode RF gun testing and photoemission experiments. The design of the experimental line, using the 1.6 cell photocathode RF gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA RF gun collaboration is presented. Detailed beam dynamics simulations were performed for the 1.6 cell RF gun injector using a solenoidal emittance compensation technique. An experimental program for testing the 1.6 cell RF gun is presented. This program includes beam loading caused by dark current, higher order mode field measurements, integrated and slice emittance measurements using a pepper-pot and RF kicker cavity

  14. Complete Genomes of Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, Two Phylogenetically Distinct Probiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indu Khatri

    Full Text Available Several spore-forming strains of Bacillus are marketed as probiotics due to their ability to survive harsh gastrointestinal conditions and confer health benefits to the host. We report the complete genomes of two commercially available probiotics, Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, and compare them with the genomes of other Bacillus and Lactobacillus. The taxonomic position of both organisms was established with a maximum-likelihood tree based on twenty six housekeeping proteins. Analysis of all probiotic strains of Bacillus and Lactobacillus reveal that the essential sporulation proteins are conserved in all Bacillus probiotic strains while they are absent in Lactobacillus spp. We identified various antibiotic resistance, stress-related, and adhesion-related domains in these organisms, which likely provide support in exerting probiotic action by enabling adhesion to host epithelial cells and survival during antibiotic treatment and harsh conditions.

  15. Complete Genomes of Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, Two Phylogenetically Distinct Probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Indu; Sharma, Shailza; Ramya, T N C; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Several spore-forming strains of Bacillus are marketed as probiotics due to their ability to survive harsh gastrointestinal conditions and confer health benefits to the host. We report the complete genomes of two commercially available probiotics, Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, and compare them with the genomes of other Bacillus and Lactobacillus. The taxonomic position of both organisms was established with a maximum-likelihood tree based on twenty six housekeeping proteins. Analysis of all probiotic strains of Bacillus and Lactobacillus reveal that the essential sporulation proteins are conserved in all Bacillus probiotic strains while they are absent in Lactobacillus spp. We identified various antibiotic resistance, stress-related, and adhesion-related domains in these organisms, which likely provide support in exerting probiotic action by enabling adhesion to host epithelial cells and survival during antibiotic treatment and harsh conditions.

  16. First Measurements of the Longitudinal Bunch Profile at SLAC Using Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation at 28GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.; Molloy, S.; Woods, M.; Kimmitt, M.F.; Blackmore, V.; Doucas, G.; Ottewell, B.; Perry, C.

    2011-01-01

    Coherent Smith-Purcell radiation has been demonstrated as a technique for measuring the longitudinal profile of charged particles bunches in the low to intermediate energy range. However, with the advent of the International Linear Collider, the need has arisen for a non-invasive method of measuring the bunch profile at extremely high energies. Smith-Purcell radiation has been used for the first time in the multi-GeV regime to measure the longitudinal profile of the 28GeV SLAC beam. The experiment has both successfully determined the bunch length, and has also demonstrated its sensitivity to bunch profile changes. The challenges associated with this technique, and its prospects as a diagnostic tool are reported here.

  17. Analytic Electron Trajectories in an Extremely Relativistic Helical Wiggler an Application to the Proposed SLAC E166 Experiment.

    CERN Document Server

    ThomasDonohue, John

    2004-01-01

    The proposed experiment SLAC E166 intends to generate circularly polarized gamma rays of energy 10 MeV by passing a 15 GeV electron beam through a meter long wiggler with approximately 400 periods. Using an analytic model formulated by Rullier and me, I present calculations of electron trajectories. At this extremely high energy the trajectories are described quite well by the model, and an extremely simple picture emerges, even for trajectories that that fail to encircle the axis of the wiggler. Our calculations are successfully compared with standard numerical integration of the Lorentz force equations of motion. In addition, the calculation of the spectrum and angular distribution of the radiated photons is easily carried out.

  18. Research and development toward a 4.5-1.5{angstrom} linac coherent light source (LCLS) at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatchyn, R.; Arthur, J.; Baltay, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    In recent years significant studies have been initiated on the theoretical and technical feasibility of utilizing a portion of the 3km S-band accelerator at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to drive a short wavelength (4.5-1.5 {Angstrom}) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) operating in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime. Electron beam requirements for single-pass saturation include: (1) a peak current in the 3-7 kA range, (2) a relative energy spread of <0.05%, ad (3) a transverse emittance, {epsilon}{le}{lambda}/4{pi}, where {lambda}[m] is the output wavelength. Requirements on the insertion device include field error levels of 0.1-0.2% for keeping the electron bunch centered on and in phase with the amplified photons, and a focusing beta of 4-8 m for inhibiting the dilution of its transverse density. Although much progress techniques necessary for LCLS operation down to {approximately}20 {angstrom}, a substantial amount of research and development is still required in a number of theoretical and experimental areas leading to the construction and operation of a 4.5-1.5 {angstrom} LCLS. In this paper we report on a research and development program underway and in planning at SLAC for addressing critical questions in these areas. These include the construction and operation of a linac test stand for developing laser-driven photocathode rf guns with normalized emittances approaching 1 mm-mr; development of advanced beam compression, stability, an emittance control techniques at multi-GeV energies; the construction and operation of a FEL Amplifier Test Experiment (FATE) for theoretical and experimental studies of SASE at IR wavelengths; an undulator development program to investigate superconducting, hybrid/permanent magnet (hybrid/PM), and pulsed-Cu technologies; theoretical and computational studies of high-gain FEL physics and LCLS component designs.

  19. A precise measurement of the left-right asymmetry of Z Boson production at the SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    We present a precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry of Z boson production (A LR ) observed in 1993 data at the SLAC linear collider. The A LR experiment provides a direct measure of the effective weak mixing angle through the initial state couplings of the electron to the Z. During the 1993 run of the SLC, the SLD detector recorded 49,392 Z events produced by the collision of longitudinally polarized electrons on unpolarized positrons at a center-of-mass energy of 91.26 GeV. A Compton polarimeter measured the luminosity-weighted electron polarization to be (63.4±1.3)%. ALR was measured to be 0.1617±0.0071(stat.)±0.0033(syst.), which determines the effective weak mixing angle to be sin 2 θ W eff = 0.2292±0.0009(stat.)±0.0004(syst.). This measurement of A LR is incompatible at the level of two standard deviations with the value predicted by a fit of several other electroweak measurements to the Standard Model

  20. Design optimization and transverse coherence analysis for an x-ray free electron laser driven by SLAC LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, M.

    1995-01-01

    I present a design study for an X-ray Free Electron Laser driven by the SLAC linac, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The study assumes the LCLS is based on Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). Following a brief review of the fundamentals of SASE, I will provide without derivation a collection of formulas relating SASE performance to the system parameters. These formulas allow quick evaluation of FEL designs and provide powerful tools for optimization in multi-dimensional parameter space. Optimization is carried out for the LCLS over all independent system parameters modeled, subjected to a number of practical constraints. In addition to the optimizations concerning gain and power, another important consideration for a single pass FEL starting from noise is the transverse coherence property of the amplified radiation, especially at short wavelength. A widely used emittance criteria for FELs requires that the emittance is smaller than the radiation wavelength divided by 4π. For the LCLS the criteria is violated by a factor of 5, at a normalized emittance of 1.5 mm-mrad, wavelength of 1.5 angstrom, and beam energy of 15 GeV. Thus it is important to check quantitatively the emittance effect on the transverse coherence. I will examine the emittance effect on transverse coherence by analyzing different transverse modes and show that full transverse coherence can be obtained even at the LCLS parameter regime

  1. Final report for the 1996 DOE grant supporting research at the SLAC/LBNL/LLNL B factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, D.; Wright, D.

    1997-01-01

    This final report discusses Department of Energy-supported research funded through Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) which was performed as part of a collaboration between LLNL and Prairie View A and M University to develop part of the BaBar detector at the SLAC B Factory. This work focuses on the Instrumented Flux Return (IFR) subsystem of BaBar and involves a full range of detector development activities: computer simulations of detector performance, creation of reconstruction algorithms, and detector hardware R and D. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a leading role in the IFR subsystem and has established on-site computing and detector facilities to conduct this research. By establishing ties with the existing LLNL Research Collaboration Program and leveraging LLNL resources, the experienced Prairie View group was able to quickly achieve a more prominent role within the BaBar collaboration and make significant contributions to the detector design. In addition, this work provided the first entry point for Historically Black Colleges and Universities into the B Factory collaboration, and created an opportunity to train a new generation of minority students at the premier electron-positron high energy physics facility in the US

  2. A precise measurement of the left-right asymmetry of Z Boson production at the SLAC linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    We present a precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry of Z boson production (A{sub LR}) observed in 1993 data at the SLAC linear collider. The A{sub LR} experiment provides a direct measure of the effective weak mixing angle through the initial state couplings of the electron to the Z. During the 1993 run of the SLC, the SLD detector recorded 49,392 Z events produced by the collision of longitudinally polarized electrons on unpolarized positrons at a center-of-mass energy of 91.26 GeV. A Compton polarimeter measured the luminosity-weighted electron polarization to be (63.4{+-}1.3)%. ALR was measured to be 0.1617{+-}0.0071(stat.){+-}0.0033(syst.), which determines the effective weak mixing angle to be sin {sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2292{+-}0.0009(stat.){+-}0.0004(syst.). This measurement of A{sub LR} is incompatible at the level of two standard deviations with the value predicted by a fit of several other electroweak measurements to the Standard Model.

  3. Study of the doubly-charmed decays of B mesons with the experiment BABAR in SLAC; Etude des desintegrations doublement charmees des mesons B avec l'experience BABAR a SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbe, P

    2002-04-01

    The BABAR experiment at SLAC (Stanford linear acceleration center) has been studying since 1999 B meson decays from e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at the {gamma}(4S) resonance. The first goal of the collaboration was to measure the sin (2{beta}) CP-violation parameter within the standard model. This measurement requires to know with precision the absolute length scale of the detector. A method to test this scale was developed using nuclear interactions in the beam-pipe material. The longitudinal length scale was then determined at the 1 % level precision. The systematic error associated with length measurement in the detector concerning B meson lifetime and B meson oscillation frequency is then negligible with respect to the other errors. The K meson content of B decays is a key ingredient of the sin (2{beta}) measurement and is used to tag the flavour of the other B in events containing a B decaying to a CP eigenstate. The K charge is correlated to the B flavour. Wrong sign kaons, which can dilute B tagging, can come from wrong sign D decays (B{yields} DX). Doubly charmed decays (B{yields} D{sup (*)}D-bar{sup (*)}) K are one possibility to produce wrong sign D decays. The twenty-two decay modes are reconstructed exclusively. The total branching fraction is measured with enough precision to establish that B{yields} D{sup (*)}D-bar{sup (*)} K decays are not the only source of wrong sign D mesons in B decays. (author)

  4. SLAC/DESY International Workshop on Interactions of Intense Sub-Picosecond X-Rays with Matter, Stanford, CA, January 23-24, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatchyn, Roman

    1998-01-01

    This is the proceedings volume of the 1997 SLAC/DESY International Workshop on Interactions of Intense Sub-picosecond X-Ray Pulses with Matter. The workshop theme evolved out of design and R and D studies, undertaken at SLAC, DESY, and elsewhere [1,2], of the new class of linac-driven X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (XRFELs) operating with photocathode-based, low-emittance electron beams in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime [3]. It can be noted that, following the conclusion of the workshop, funded design study reports on R and D facilities based on these novel sources have been completed and published by both laboratories [4,5]. Topical significance was imparted to the workshop agenda by a series of prior workshops organized to explore scientific and technological applications of linac driven XRFELs [6,7,8,9]. These served to highlight underlying concerns regarding the potential loading effects of the highly intense radiation pulses from this new class of light source on the instrumentation, samples, and experimental phenomena being considered. The primary objectives of the workshop were: (a) to provide tutorial overviews of existing theoretical, numerical, and experimental techniques in the study of interactions of intense, ultra-short radiation pulses with matter, and of their applicability to the parameter regimes of the SLAC and DESY XRFELs; (b) to discuss practical optics and instrumentation issues related to peak and average power density loading; (c) to identify and explore novel concepts and design approaches, with an emphasis on optical instrumentation and experimental physics; (d) to formulate independent or collaborative R and D programs and activities in the areas of theory, numerical simulation, and experimental physics relevant to the linac-driven XRFEL parameter regime

  5. A test facility for the international linear collider at SLAC end station a for prototypes of beam delivery and IR components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildreth, M.D.; Erickson, R.; Frisch, J.

    2006-01-01

    The SLAC Linac can deliver damped bunches with ILC parameters for bunch charge and bunch length to End Station A. A 10Hz beam at 28.5 GeV energy can be delivered there, parasitic with PEP-II operation. We plan to use this facility to test prototype components of the Beam Delivery System and Interaction Region. We discuss our plans for this ILC Test Facility and preparations for carrying out experiments related to collimator wakefields and energy spectrometers. We also plan an interaction region mockup to investigate effects from backgrounds and beam-induced electromagnetic interference. (author)

  6. Design Studies for Flux and Polarization Measurements of Photons and Positrons for SLAC Proposal E166: An experiment to test polarized positron production in the FFTB (LCC-0107)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, M

    2003-10-02

    We present results from design studies carried out to investigate measurements of the flux, spectrum and polarization of undulator photons for SLAC Proposal E166. A transmission Compton polarimeter is considered for measuring the photon circular polarization. We also present results for measuring the flux and spectrum of positrons produced by the undulator photons in an 0.5X{sub 0} Titanium target. And we present some considerations for use of a transmission Compton polarimeter to measure the circular polarization of bremsstrahlung photons emitted by the polarized positrons in a thin radiator.

  7. Second generation SLAC modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, A.R.; Cron, J.C.; Hanselman, R.R.

    1986-06-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory has undertaken the construction of a single pass electron-positron collider. In order to reach required beam energy 235 new klystrons needed upgraded modulator systems. The collider will use 50 GeV electrons and positrons. The increase in accelerator energy from the present 30 GeV necessitates the replacement of existing 35 MW klystrons with new 67 MW units. The doubling of klystron output power required a redesign of the modulator system. The 67 MW klystron needs a 350 kV beam voltage pulse with a 3.7 μs pulse width. A new pulse transformer was designed to deliver the increased voltage and pulse width. Pulse cable design was evaluated to obtain increased reliability of that critical element. The modulator, with the exception of its power supply, was rebuilt to produce the required power increase while enhancing reliability and improving maintainability. An investigation of present thyratron switch tube performance under the new operating conditions resulted in agitation and some warranted panic but these conditions were mitigated after several successful experiments and some evolutionary narrowing of the klystron pulse width. The discussion will cover the upgraded modulator system specifications and some details of the new pulse transformer tank, pulse cable, modulator, and modulator switch tube

  8. Development of an integrated circuit VLSI used for time measurement and selective read out in the front end electronics of the DIRC for the Babar experience at SLAC; Developpement d'un circuit integre VLSI assurant mesure de temps et lecture selective dans l'electronique frontale du compteur DIRC de l'experience babar a slac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, B

    1999-07-01

    This thesis deals with the design the development and the tests of an integrated circuit VLSI, supplying selective read and time measure for 16 channels. This circuit has been developed for a experiment of particles physics, BABAR, that will take place at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center). A first part describes the physical stakes of the experiment, the electronic architecture and the place of the developed circuit in the research program. The second part presents the technical drawings of the circuit, the prototypes leading to the final design and the validity tests. (A.L.B.)

  9. A Precise Measurement of the Spin Structure Functions G**P(2) G**D(2) from SLAC Experiment E155X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNulty, D

    2003-12-18

    A precision measurement of the deep inelastic polarized structure functions g{sub 2}{sup p} (x, Q{sup 2}) and g{sub 2}{sup d} (x, Q{sup 2}) and the virtual photon asymmetries A{sub 2}{sup p}(x, Q{sup 2}) and A{sub 2}{sup d}(x, Q{sup 2}) has been made by the E155x collaboration in the ranges 0.02 < x < 0.8 and 0.7 (GeV/c){sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 20 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The transverse asymmetry (A{sub {perpendicular}}) was measured at SLAC using 29.1 and 32.3 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident on transversely polarized target protons and deuterons; the scattered electrons were detected by three fixed angle spectrometers at 2.75{sup o}, 5.5{sup o}, and 10.5{sup o} from the beam line. g{sub 2} was extracted using the measured A{sub {perpendicular}}, an E155 phenomenological fit to g{sub 1}/F{sub 1}, and the SLAC fit to R(x, Q{sup 2}); the function F{sub 1} was obtained from the most recent NMC fit to F{sub 2}(x, Q{sup 2}). The errors on g{sub 2} for both proton and deuteron are more than three times smaller than those of the previously existing world data set, thus enabling the data to resolve clearly between g{sub 2}{sup ww} and zero as well as make distinctions between various models. In addition, the Burkhardt-Cottingham and Efremov-Leader-Teryaev sum rules were evaluated over the measured kinematic region, as well as the d{sub 2} twist-3 matrix element for the proton and neutron.

  10. Proceedings of the 25th SLAC Summer Institute on Particle Physics: Physics of Leptons (SSI97) , Stanford, CA, August 4-15, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deporcel, Lilian

    1998-01-01

    One hundred ninety-eight physicists from 16 countries gathered at SLAC from August 4 to 15, 1997 to attend the XXV SLAC Summer Institute on Particle Physics. The theme of the school was ''The Physics of Leptons'', commemorating a century since the electron, the first lepton, was discovered. We heard about the electron's role as a probe of the structure of matter, as well as the beautifully precise tests of charged-lepton universality in Z 0 decays. The focus of the school then shifted from the charged leptons to their weak partners, the neutrinos. Summer Institute attendees were not surprised in early 1998 by Super-Kamiokande's announcement of evidence for neutrino mass. After all, they had already seen the mounting evidence, both solar and atmospheric, the preceding August, in a comprehensive review of all nonaccelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments, as well as a topical conference report from Super-Kamiokande. We also heard about the past, present, and future of reactor- and accelerator-based oscillation experiments, including the prospects for terrestrial tests of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly. Leptons in cosmology and as harbingers of physics beyond the Standard Model were the subject of two more lecture series. The three-day topical conference concluding the Institute was highlighted by the Super-Kamiokande neutrino results, and Beppo-Sax's report on the cosmological origin of gamma-ray bursters. As for terrestrial accelerators, SLC, LEP, and the Tevatron put increasing pressure on the electroweak sector through precision measurements, but all direct searches for new phenomena still came up empty

  11. THE BOSS EMISSION-LINE LENS SURVEY. II. INVESTIGATING MASS-DENSITY PROFILE EVOLUTION IN THE SLACS+BELLS STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENS SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Shu Yiping; Arneson, Ryan A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Schlegel, David J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Eisenstein, Daniel J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Wake, David A. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Connolly, Natalia [Department of Physics, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY 13323 (United States); Maraston, Claudia [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Weaver, Benjamin A., E-mail: bolton@astro.utah.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2012-09-20

    We present an analysis of the evolution of the central mass-density profile of massive elliptical galaxies from the SLACS and BELLS strong gravitational lens samples over the redshift interval z Almost-Equal-To 0.1-0.6, based on the combination of strong-lensing aperture mass and stellar velocity-dispersion constraints. We find a significant trend toward steeper mass profiles (parameterized by the power-law density model with {rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -{gamma}}) at later cosmic times, with magnitude d < {gamma} > /dz = -0.60 {+-} 0.15. We show that the combined lens-galaxy sample is consistent with a non-evolving distribution of stellar velocity dispersions. Considering possible additional dependence of <{gamma} > on lens-galaxy stellar mass, effective radius, and Sersic index, we find marginal evidence for shallower mass profiles at higher masses and larger sizes, but with a significance that is subdominant to the redshift dependence. Using the results of published Monte Carlo simulations of spectroscopic lens surveys, we verify that our mass-profile evolution result cannot be explained by lensing selection biases as a function of redshift. Interpreted as a true evolutionary signal, our result suggests that major dry mergers involving off-axis trajectories play a significant role in the evolution of the average mass-density structure of massive early-type galaxies over the past 6 Gyr. We also consider an alternative non-evolutionary hypothesis based on variations in the strong-lensing measurement aperture with redshift, which would imply the detection of an 'inflection zone' marking the transition between the baryon-dominated and dark-matter halo-dominated regions of the lens galaxies. Further observations of the combined SLACS+BELLS sample can constrain this picture more precisely, and enable a more detailed investigation of the multivariate dependences of galaxy mass structure across cosmic time.

  12. Linking stomatal traits and expression of slow anion channel genes HvSLAH1 2 HvSLAC1 with grain yield for increasing salinity tolerance in barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui eLiu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is an environmental and agricultural problem in many parts of the world. One of the keys to breeding barley for adaptation to salinity lies in a better understanding of the genetic control of stomatal regulation. We have employed a range of physiological and molecular techniques (stomata assay, gas exchange, phylogenetic analysis, QTL analysis, and gene expression to investigate stomatal behaviour and genotypic variation in barley cultivars and a genetic population in four experimental trials. A set of relatively efficient and reliable methods were developed for the characterisation of stomatal behaviour of large numbers of varieties and genetic lines. Furthermore, we have found a large genetic variation of gas exchange and stomatal traits in barley in response to salinity stress. Salt-tolerant CM72 showed significantly larger stomatal aperture in 200 mM NaCl treatment than that of salt-sensitive Gairdner. Stomatal traits such as aperture width/length were found to significantly correlate with grain yield in salt treatment. Phenotypic characterisation and QTL analysis of a segregating double haploid population of the CM72/Gairdner resulted in the identification of significant stomatal traits-related QTLs for salt tolerance. Moreover, expression analysis of the slow anion channel genes HvSLAH1 and HvSLAC1 demonstrated that their up-regulation is linked to high barley grain yield in the field.

  13. The Role of Research Universities in Helping Solve our Energy Challenges: A Case Study at Stanford and SLAC (2011 EFRC Summit)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennessey, John

    2011-01-01

    The first speaker in the 2011 EFRC Summit session titled 'Leading Perspectives in Energy Research' was John Hennessey, President of Stanford University. He discussed the important role that the academic world plays as a partner in innovative energy research by presenting a case study involving Stanford and SLAC. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss 'Science for our Nation's Energy Future.' In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  14. SLAH1, a homologue of the slow type anion channel SLAC1, modulates shoot Cl − accumulation and salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Qiu, Jiaen; Henderson, Sam W; Tester, Mark A.; Roy, Stuart J; Gilliham, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Salinity tolerance is correlated with shoot chloride (Cl–) exclusion in multiple crops, but the molecular mechanisms of long-distance Cl– transport are poorly defined. Here, we characterize the in planta role of AtSLAH1 (a homologue of the slow type anion channel-associated 1 (SLAC1)). This protein, localized to the plasma membrane of root stelar cells, has its expression reduced by salt or ABA, which are key predictions for a protein involved with loading Cl– into the root xylem. Artificial microRNA knockdown mutants of AtSLAH1 had significantly reduced shoot Cl− accumulation when grown under low Cl–, whereas shoot Cl– increased and the shoot nitrate/chloride ratio decreased following AtSLAH1 constitutive or stelar-specific overexpression when grown in high Cl–. In both sets of overexpression lines a significant reduction in shoot biomass over the null segregants was observed under high Cl– supply, but not low Cl– supply. Further in planta data showed AtSLAH3 overexpression increased the shoot nitrate/chloride ratio, consistent with AtSLAH3 favouring nitrate transport. Heterologous expression of AtSLAH1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes led to no detectible transport, suggesting the need for post-translational modifications for AtSLAH1 to be active. Our in planta data are consistent with AtSLAH1 having a role in controlling root-to-shoot Cl– transport.

  15. SLAH1, a homologue of the slow type anion channel SLAC1, modulates shoot Cl − accumulation and salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Qiu, Jiaen

    2016-06-23

    Salinity tolerance is correlated with shoot chloride (Cl–) exclusion in multiple crops, but the molecular mechanisms of long-distance Cl– transport are poorly defined. Here, we characterize the in planta role of AtSLAH1 (a homologue of the slow type anion channel-associated 1 (SLAC1)). This protein, localized to the plasma membrane of root stelar cells, has its expression reduced by salt or ABA, which are key predictions for a protein involved with loading Cl– into the root xylem. Artificial microRNA knockdown mutants of AtSLAH1 had significantly reduced shoot Cl− accumulation when grown under low Cl–, whereas shoot Cl– increased and the shoot nitrate/chloride ratio decreased following AtSLAH1 constitutive or stelar-specific overexpression when grown in high Cl–. In both sets of overexpression lines a significant reduction in shoot biomass over the null segregants was observed under high Cl– supply, but not low Cl– supply. Further in planta data showed AtSLAH3 overexpression increased the shoot nitrate/chloride ratio, consistent with AtSLAH3 favouring nitrate transport. Heterologous expression of AtSLAH1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes led to no detectible transport, suggesting the need for post-translational modifications for AtSLAH1 to be active. Our in planta data are consistent with AtSLAH1 having a role in controlling root-to-shoot Cl– transport.

  16. Measurement of the positron polarization at an helical undulator based positron source for the international linear collider ILC. The E-166 experiment at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, Laihem

    2008-06-05

    A helical undulator based polarized positron source is forseen at a future International Linear Collider (ILC). The E-166 experiment has tested this scheme using a one meter long, short-period, pulsed helical undulator installed in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at SLAC. A low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam passing through this undulator generated circularly polarized photons with energies up to about 8 MeV. The generated photons of several MeV with circular polarization are then converted in a relatively thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons. Measurements of the positron polarization have been performed at 5 different energies of the positrons. In addition electron polarization has been determined for one energy point. For a comparison of the measured asymmetries with the expectations detailed simulations were necessary. This required upgrading GEANT4 to include the dominant polarization dependent interactions of electrons, positrons and photons in matter. The measured polarization of the positrons agrees with the expectations and is for the energy point with the highest polarization at 6MeV about 80%. (orig.)

  17. The E142 SLAC experiment: measurement of the neutron g{sup n}{sub 1}(x) spin structure function; Experience E142 au SLAC: mesure de la fonction de structure en spin g{sup n}{sub 1}(x) du neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roblin, Y

    1995-04-21

    This thesis describes the E142 experiment which has been carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC), USA, from October to December 1992. This experiment of polarized inelastic scattering of a 22.6 GeV electron beam on a polarized helium 3 target has allowed the first measurement of the neutron g{sup n}{sub 1}(x) spin structure function. The knowledge of this structure function gives informations on the nucleon spin structure. On the other hand, the g{sup n}{sub 1}(x) structure function integral value on the 0

  18. STANFORD (SLAC): Precision electroweak result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Precision testing of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model has intensified with the recent publication* of results from the SLD collaboration's 1993 run on the Stanford Linear Collider, SLC. Using a highly polarized electron beam colliding with an unpolarized positron beam, SLD physicists measured the left-right asymmetry at the Z boson resonance with dramatically improved accuracy over 1992

  19. Around the laboratories: Rutherford: Successful tests on bubble chamber target technique; Stanford (SLAC): New storage rings proposal; Berkeley: The HAPPE project to examine cosmic rays with superconducting magnets; The 60th birthday of Professor N.N. Bogolyubov; Argonne: Performance of the automatic film measuring system POLLY II

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    Around the laboratories: Rutherford: Successful tests on bubble chamber target technique; Stanford (SLAC): New storage rings proposal; Berkeley: The HAPPE project to examine cosmic rays with superconducting magnets; The 60th birthday of Professor N.N. Bogolyubov; Argonne: Performance of the automatic film measuring system POLLY II

  20. Around the laboratories: Dubna: Physics results and progress on bubble chamber techniques; Stanford (SLAC): Operation of a very rapid cycling bubble chamber; Daresbury: Photographs of visitors to the Laboratory; Argonne: Charge exchange injection tests into the ZGS in preparation for a proposed Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    Around the laboratories: Dubna: Physics results and progress on bubble chamber techniques; Stanford (SLAC): Operation of a very rapid cycling bubble chamber; Daresbury: Photographs of visitors to the Laboratory; Argonne: Charge exchange injection tests into the ZGS in preparation for a proposed Booster

  1. High-precision improved-analytic-exponentiation results for multiple-photon effects in low-angle Bhabha scattering at the SLAC Linear Collider and the CERN e+e- collider LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadach, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ward, B.F.L.; Was, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Starting from an earlier benchmark analytical calculation of the luminosity process e + e-→e + e-+(γ) at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) and the CERN e + e- collider LEP, we use the methods of Yennie, Frautschi, and Suura to develop an analytical improved naive exponentiated formula for this process. The formula is compared to our multiple-photon Monte Carlo event generator BHLUMI (1.13) for the same process. We find agreement on the overall cross-section normalization between the exponentiated formula and BHLUMI below the 0.2% level. In this way, we obtain an important cross-check on the normalization of our higher-order results in BHLUMI and we arrive at formulas which represent the LEP/SLC luminosity process in the below 1% Z 0 physics tests of the SU(2) L xU(1) theory in complete analogy with the famous high-precision Z 0 line-shape formulas for the e + e-→μ + μ - process discussed by Berends et al., for example

  2. Measurement of the CKM matrix angle {gamma} in B{sup {+-}} {yields} D{sup 0} (K{sub S}{pi}{pi}) K{sup *{+-}} using BABAR detector at Slac; Mesure de l'angle {gamma} de la matrice CKM a l'aide des desintegrations B{sup {+-}} {yields} D{sup 0} (K{sub S}{pi}{pi}) K{sup *{+-}} en utilisant le detecteur BABAR a Slac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruvot, St

    2007-07-15

    CP violation in the B mesons system has been studied by the B factories for almost 8 years. After a first success with the high precision measurement of the Unitarity Triangle angle {beta}, they are now facing a new challenge: the study of the 2 last angles, {alpha} and {gamma}, which are still poorly known. The work presented in this thesis is related to the measurement of the angle {gamma} using the B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}K{sup *-} events from data collected by the BABAR detector at Slac (Stanford linear accelerator). The method is based on the interferences between two amplitudes along the Dalitz plot of the three-body decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{pi}{pi}, one related to the V{sub ub} element of the CKM matrix and the other related to the V{sub cb} element. This method has already been used in the measurement of {gamma}in B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}K{sup -} and B{sup -} {yields} D{sup *0}K{sup -} decays. Adding the new mode B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}K{sup *-} helps improving the statistical error of the measurement by 3 degrees which leads to: {gamma} (67 {+-} 28 {+-} 13 {+-} 11) degrees. The first error is statistical, the second one comes from experimental systematic uncertainties and the third one is the systematic uncertainty associated to the model used to describe the Dalitz plot D{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{pi}{pi}. Since this model is a crucial point for the analysis, we describe it in detail. For the future, in order to improve the measurement of {gamma}, it will be necessary to refine the Dalitz model as the number of events available at the B factories will increase. (author)

  3. Relativistic klystron research at SLAC and LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.

    1988-06-01

    We are developing relativistic klystrons as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications such as large linear electron-positron colliders and compact accelerators. We have attained 200 MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here briefly on our experiments so far. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  4. SLAC linear collider conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The linear collider system is described in detail, including the transport system, the collider lattice, final focusing system, positron production, beam damping and compression, high current electron source, instrumentation and control, and the beam luminosity. The experimental facilities and the experimental uses are discussed along with the construction schedule and estimated costs. Appendices include a discussion of space charge effects in the linear accelerator, emittance growth in the collider, the final focus system, beam-beam instabilities and pinch effects, and detector backgrounds. (GHT)

  5. Experiments with polarized electron beams at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, P.

    1977-01-01

    Elastic and deep inelastic scattering of electrons on protons are studied. Cross sections for elastic scattering are plotted, and the parity nonconservation and neutral currents are diagramed for the deep inelastic scattering

  6. KEK/NAGOYA/SLAC: Highly polarized electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    In the push by the Japanese KEK Laboratory, in collaboration with university groups and overseas laboratories, to develop new techniques for the future Japan electronpositron collider (JLC), a recent achievement is a significant increase in the efficient yield of highly polarized electrons

  7. Present SLAC accelerator computer control system features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, V.; Johnson, R.

    1981-02-01

    The current functional organization and state of software development of the computer control system of the Stanford Linear Accelerator is described. Included is a discussion of the distribution of functions throughout the system, the local controller features, and currently implemented features of the touch panel portion of the system. The functional use of our triplex of PDP11-34 computers sharing common memory is described. Also included is a description of the use of pseudopanel tables as data tables for closed loop control functions

  8. SLAC Library - Online Particle Physics Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online Particle Physics Information Compiled by Revised: April, 201 7 This annotated list provides a highly selective set of online resources that are useful to the particle physics community. It & Reports Particle Physics Journals & Reviews Online Journals and Tables of Contents Journal

  9. SLAC modulator system improvements and reliability results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, A.R.

    1998-06-01

    In 1995, an improvement project was completed on the 244 klystron modulators in the linear accelerator. The modulator system has been previously described. This article offers project details and their resulting effect on modulator and component reliability. Prior to the project, the authors had collected four operating cycles (1991 through 1995) of MTTF data. In this discussion, the '91 data will be excluded since the modulators operated at 60 Hz. The five periods following the '91 run were reviewed due to the common repetition rate at 120 Hz

  10. SLAC linear collider conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    The linear collider system is described in detail, including the transport system, the collider lattice, final focusing system, positron production, beam damping and compression, high current electron source, instrumentation and control, and the beam luminosity. The experimental facilities and the experimental uses are discussed along with the construction schedule and estimated costs. Appendices include a discussion of space charge effects in the linear accelerator, emittance growth in the collider, the final focus system, beam-beam instabilities and pinch effects, and detector backgrounds

  11. Monitoring SLAC High Performance UNIX Computing Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettsome, Annette K.

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of the effectiveness and efficiency of computers is important when working with high performance systems. The monitoring of such systems is advantageous in order to foresee possible misfortunes or system failures. Ganglia is a software system designed for high performance computing systems to retrieve specific monitoring information. An alternative storage facility for Ganglia's collected data is needed since its default storage system, the round-robin database (RRD), struggles with data integrity. The creation of a script-driven MySQL database solves this dilemma. This paper describes the process took in the creation and implementation of the MySQL database for use by Ganglia. Comparisons between data storage by both databases are made using gnuplot and Ganglia's real-time graphical user interface

  12. 8 October 2013 - Rolex Director- General G. Marini in the ATLAS Control Room with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and ATLAS Collaboration Senior Physicist C. Rembser; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern at LHC Point 1. Were also present from the Directorate: S. Lettow, Director for Administration and General Infrastructure; from the ATLAS Collaboration: Technische Universitaet Dortmund (DE) J. Jentzsch and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (US) G. Piacquadio.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    8 October 2013 - Rolex Director- General G. Marini in the ATLAS Control Room with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and ATLAS Collaboration Senior Physicist C. Rembser; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern at LHC Point 1. Were also present from the Directorate: S. Lettow, Director for Administration and General Infrastructure; from the ATLAS Collaboration: Technische Universitaet Dortmund (DE) J. Jentzsch and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (US) G. Piacquadio.

  13. The SLAC high-density gaseous polarized 3He target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.; Chupp, T.E.; Smith, T.B.; Cates, G.D.; Driehuys, B.; Middleton, H.; Newbury, N.R.; Hughes, E.W.; Meyer, W.

    1995-01-01

    A large-scale high-pressure gaseous 3 He polarized target has been developed for use with a high-intensity polarized electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This target was used successfully in an experiment to study the spin structure of the neutron. The target provided an areal density of about 7x10 21 nuclei/cm 2 and operated at 3 He polarizations between about 30% and 40% for the six-week duration of the experiment. ((orig.))

  14. The electron damping ring for the SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies-White, W.; Hutton, A.; Harvey, A.

    1987-10-01

    A second damping ring to store and damp two electron bunches for the SLC project was constructed in 1985 and brought into operation early in 1986. Although generally similar to the damping ring (now used for positrons) constructed earlier, there are a number of design improvements and changes. The dipole magnetic field was raised to 2.1 T to improve damping. Sextupole fields were provided by separate permanent magnets, rather than being incorporated in the dipoles. The vacuum chambers, including the beam position monitors, were re-designed for lower longitudinal impedance. A new kicker was developed by Fermilab to handle the two electron bunches. Improvements were made to the dc septum magnet design. Several of the features are described in detail elsewhere. Where possible, the improvements were incorporated in an upgrade of the earlier damping ring

  15. High polarization photocathode R ampersand D at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Takashi; Garwin, E.L.; Prepost, R.; Zaplac, G.H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes recent progress on the development of high polarization photocathodes for polarized electron sources. A strained InGaAs cathode has achieved a maximum electron-spin polarization of 71% and has demonstrated the strain enhancement of polarization for the first time. Strained GaAs cathodes have yielded polarizations as high as 90% with much higher quantum efficiency

  16. Present and future colliding beam facilities at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1977-01-01

    Present state of the 4.1 GeV electron-positron storage ring SPEAR is described. The most important limitations on performance in SPEAR, such as synchrotron-betatron resonances, higher-order mode losses are outlined. Active bunch lengthener was outstalled in SPEAR to reduce the losses. Experiments on the bunch lengthening observed in SPEAR showed that the lengthening mechanism results from bunch instabilities due to the bunch interaction with the environment. SPEAR performance experience provided with effective prototype for directing the design of PEP-the 18 GeV positron-electron storage ring with designed luminosity of 10 32 cm -2 s -1 . Procurements and construction of PEP components are in full swing. The first beam is expeted to go around in the storage ring by October 1979

  17. Spin structure measurements from E143 at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, L.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the proton and deuteron spin structure functions, g{sub 1}{sup p} at beam energies of 29.1, 16.2, and 9.7 GeV, and g{sub 2}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup d} at a beam energy of 29.1 GeV. The integrals {Gamma}{sub p} = {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 1}{sup p} (x, Q{sup 2})dx and {Gamma}{sub d} = {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 1}{sup d}(x, Q{sup 2})dx have been evaluated at fixed Q{sup 2} = 3 (GeV/c){sup 2} using the 29.1 GeV data to yield {Gamma}{sub p} = 0.127 {+-} 0.004(stat.) {+-} 0.010(syst.) and {Gamma}{sub d} = 0.041 {+-} 0.003 {+-} 0.004. The Q{sup 2} dependence of the ratio g{sub 1}/F{sub 1} has been studied and is found to be small for Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Within experimental precision, the g{sub 2} data are well-described by the twist-2 contribution, g{sub 2}{sup ww}. Twist-3 matrix elements have been extracted and are compared to theoretical predictions. The asymmetry A{sub 2} has also been measured and is found to be significantly smaller than the positivity limit {radical}R for both targets A{sub 2}{sup p} is found to be positive and inconsistent with zero.

  18. Some fast beam kicker magnet systems at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Cassel, R.L.; Donaldson, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider requires very fast rise and fall times from its kicker magnets. The damping rings and positron source need either one or two bunches deflected from two or three that are separated in time by about 59 ns. The final focus region kicker magnets need a rise time of less than 700 ns and each one deflects only one bunch. This paper discusses the design and characteristics of a thyratron-switched, castor-oil-filled, coaxial, Blumlein line used for one bunch kicking. It discharges a 118 ns (at the base), 50 kV, 3 kA pulse into a 33 cm long, ferrite-loaded, kicker magnet of rectangular coaxial-line geometry, which in turn is terminated by a matched load. Reference is made to a Fermilab (FNAL) designed magnet and a dual-thyratron pulsar that will deflect two serial bunches in or out of the electron ring. Also, a brief description of the final focus magnet is given. Work is continuing on the various subsystem components to decrease the pulse rise and fall time, flattop ripple and jitter and to reduce some of the sources of noise and hv breakdown

  19. Performance report for Stanford/SLAC Microstore Analog Memory Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freytag, D.R.; Walker, J.T.

    1984-09-01

    Tests of a newly developed Analog Memory Unit (AMU) are described. The device contains 256 analog storage cells consisting of pass transistors, a storage capacitor and a differential read out buffer. By addressing the storage cells sequentially, the shape of the signal present at the input can be recorded in time. Fast response and good amplitude resolution were the design goals for the development. Measurements on individual devices will be presented and the status of hybridized subsystems containing eight AMUs discussed

  20. Advanced damped detuned structure (DDS) development at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.M.; Kroll, N.M.; Miller, R.H.; Ruth, R.D.; Wang, J.W.

    1997-05-01

    The first damped detuned accelerator structure, DDS 1, has been built, tested in the ASSET experiment, and installed in the NLCTA. The planning and construction of a series of further structures, incorporating some modifications, is under way. DDS 2, 3, and 4 all incorporate the same basic design as DDS 1. The manifold design for the last 5 % of the downstream end of the structure has been modified to accommodate improvements in the manifold loads. Calculations based on the spectral function method indicate, on average, a factor two or better reduction in the long range wake. Modest modifications in the distribution of geometrical detuning parameters along the structure which, according to calculations based on spectral function theory, significantly improve the short range wake will be incorporated in DDS 3 and 4. The basic cell configuration will be redesigned in DDS 5 with the intention of improving shunt impedance as well as incorporating further improvements in the wake

  1. SLAC FASTBUS Snoop Module: test results and support software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavson, D.B.; Walz, H.V.

    1985-09-01

    The development of a diagnostic module for FASTBUS has been completed. The Snoop Module is designed to reside on a Crate Segment and provide high-speed diagnostic monitoring and testing capabilities. Final hardware details and testing of production prototype modules are reported. Features of software under development for a stand-alone single Snoop diagnostic system and Multi-Snoop networks will be discussed. 3 refs., 2 figs

  2. SLAC users Bulletin No. 96, August-December 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, L.P.; Edminster, D.

    1983-01-01

    Operational activities for the months of August through December 1983, are reported in the areas of accelerator and research operations, research area and experiment status, accelerator improvements, research division developments, PEP division developments, and publications for the month.

  3. Investigations of Digital Levels at the SLAC Vertical Comparator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassner, G.

    2005-01-01

    Digital levels deliver highly accurate and fast measurements in an automated measuring process. A shortcoming is that they give less accurate measurements in some cases. There are several sources which are known to have a systematic effect on the height reading and therefore have to be investigated for our equipment. One parameter is the scale factor which has to be determined on a regular basis. Other sources for inaccurate height readings are measurements at critical distances and at the end sections of the rod, a defocused set-up and artificial illumination. With the findings of the experiments investigating the aforementioned error sources, rules for our fieldwork were established. The experiments were carried out with our instruments, a Trimble (formerly Zeiss) DiNi 12 (SW Version 1.21) and a Leica DNA--03 (SW Version 3.40). In some cases, when it is not possible to avoid a critical set-up with the digital leveling system, we use the analog level Wild NA3. Therefore the analog rods have to be also controlled. The calibration is performed with a CCD camera which automatically detects the edges in the image and compares them with the interferometer readings. The CCD camera system is also used to determine the height offset between rods

  4. A Cryogenic RF Material Testing Facility at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiquan; Martin, David; Tantawi, Sami; Yoneda, Charles; /SLAC

    2012-06-22

    The authors have developed an X-band SRF testing system using a high-Q copper cavity with an interchangeable flat bottom for the testing of different materials. By measuring the Q of the cavity, the system is capable to characterize the quenching magnetic field of the superconducting samples at different power level and temperature, as well as the surface resistivity. This paper presents the most recent development of the system and testing results.

  5. Tuning the arcs of the SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieguth, T.; Bambade, P.; Barklow, T.; Brown, K.L.; Bulos, F.; Burke, D.L.; Fischer, G.E.; Hutton, A.; Jung, C.; Kheifets, S.A.; Komamiya, S.; Mattison, T.; Murray, J.J.; Phinney, N.; Ritson, D.M.; Sands, M.; Sheppard, J.C.; Spence, W.; Toge, N.; Weinstein, A.; Haissinski, J.; Placidi, M.

    1988-01-01

    New experience with the operation of the SLC Arcs is described. Each of these Arcs consists of sequential second-order achromats. Initial measurements showed that the betatron phase advances were systematically offset from the design values. This effect, combined with the abrupt rolls of the achromats needed to follow the local terrain, led to strong cross-plane coupling and to growth of the betatron oscillations. The methods and modifications developed to establish proper operation of the Arcs are described in this paper

  6. Some fast beam kicker magnet systems at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Cassel, R.L.; Donaldson, A.R.; Genova, L.F.; Grant, J.A.; Mihalka, A.M.; Sukiennicki, B.A.; Tomlin, W.T.; Veldhuizen, F.T.; Walz, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider requires very fast rise and fall times from its kicker magnets. The damping rings and positron source need either one or two bunches deflected from two or three that are separated in time by about 59 ns. The final focus region kicker magnets need a rise time of less than 700 ns and each one deflects only one bunch. This paper discusses the design and characteristics of a thyratron-switched, castor-oil-filled, coaxial, Blumlein line used for one bunch kicking. It discharges a 118 ns (at the base), 50 kV, 3 kA pulse into a 33 cm long, ferrite-loaded, kicker magnet of rectangular coaxial-line geometry, which in turn is terminated by a matched load. Reference is made to a Fermilab (FNAL) designed magnet and a dual-thyratron pulser that deflects two serial bunches in or out of the electron ring. Also, a brief description of the final focus magnet is given

  7. Recent developments in high precision vertex chambers at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, D.R.

    1984-04-01

    Three detectors MARK II, MAC, AND HRS are using or planning small drift chambers placed as close as possible to the interaction print at PEP. There is also a program of development for a gaseous vertex detector for MARK II at SLC. All these programs are reviewed. 13 references

  8. A 96-channel, 500 ps resolution TDC board for the BaBar experiment at SLAC

    CERN Document Server

    Minutoli, S

    2000-01-01

    A TDC board has been designed and built to complete the readout of the Instrumented Flux Return of the BABAR experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The board has 96 input channels and makes use of 3 general purpose TDC chips designed at CERN, with time resolution up to 500 ps and configurable via a Test Access Port (IEEE standard 1149). Data are stored before readout in a multievent buffer. Communication with BABAR DAQ system is realized through 3 serial lines on the backplane connector. All the logic, including internal registers and the interfaces with the BABAR protocol and the TAP controller, is implemented in two fast FPGAs. The board is designed to work at 59.5 MHz clock frequency. (7 refs).

  9. Beam position monitoring system for the proposed asymmetric B Factory at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrin, J.L.

    1992-10-01

    The beam position monitor system of the B Factory is drastically different from the actual PEP system. We present a description of the new configuration and list the features which have been adopted to make this system a highly reliable diagnostic tool. An electrode geometry is suggested, based on the maximum-acceptable power extracted from the beam, and the measurement resolution is estimated by assuming some practical bandwidth and the noise level. Finally, an estimate of the system precision is made by adding up what is expected to be the most significant systematic errors

  10. Observation of dark-current signals from the S-band structures of the SLAC linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assmann, R.; Decker, F.J.; Seidel, M.; Siemann, R.H.; Whittum, D.

    1997-07-01

    It is well known that the electro-magnetic fields in high-gradient RF structures can cause electron emission from the metallic structure walls. If the emitted electrons are captured and accelerated by the accelerating fields so-called dark-current is induced. Dark-currents have been measured and studied for various RF-structures. In this paper the authors present measurements of RF induced signals for the SLC S-band structures. For nominal gradients of 17 MV/m it is shown that the dark-current can be strong enough to significantly reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the SLC beam wire scanners. They also show results from RF measurements in the dipole band. The measurements are compared to more direct observations of dark-current and it is tried to connect the results to possible effects on the accelerated particle beam

  11. XXII SLAC summer institute on particle physics: Proceedings. Particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J; DePorcel, L [eds.

    1996-02-01

    The seven-day school portion of the Institute revolved around the question of dark matter: where is it and what is it? Reviews were given of microlensing searches for baryonic dark matter, of dark matter candidates in the form of neutrinos and exotic particles, and of low-noise detection techniques used to search for the latter. The history of the universe, from the Big Bang to the role of dark matter in the formation of large-scale structure, was also covered. Other lecture series described the astrophysics that might be done with x-ray timing experiments and through the detection of gravitational radiation. As in past years, the lectures each morning were followed by stimulating afternoon discussion sessions, in which students could pursue with the lecturers the topics that most interested them. The Institute concluded with a three-day topical conference covering recent developments in theory and experiment. Highlights from the astrophysical and cosmological arenas included observations of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background, and of the mysterious gamma-ray bursters. From terrestrial accelerators came tantalizing hints of the top quark and marked improvements in precision electroweak measurements, among many other results. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. Summary of SLAC's SEY Measurement On Flat Accelerator Wall Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pimpec, F.; /PSI, Villigen /SLAC

    2007-06-08

    The electron cloud effect (ECE) causes beam instabilities in accelerator structures with intense positively charged bunched beams. Reduction of the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the beam pipe inner wall is effective in controlling cloud formation. We summarize SEY results obtained from flat TiN, TiZrV and Al surfaces carried out in a laboratory environment. SEY was measured after thermal conditioning, as well as after low energy, less than 300 eV, particle exposure.

  13. Proceedings of the Workshop on the SLAC Damping Rings in the 21st Century (DR2000)

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, R

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the Workshop is to assess the status and needs of the Damping Rings for the era of PEP-II. The goal is to have the Rings perform to produce the specified beam parameters with an insignificant amount of downtime. We want to achieve this status by improving the Rings where necessary, not by increasing the maintenance effort. The things that we can act upon in the immediate future are largely engineering issues to improve the integrated availability of the damping rings.

  14. Proceedings of the Workshop on the SLAC Damping Rings in the 21st Century (DR2000)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, Robbin

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the Workshop is to assess the status and needs of the Damping Rings for the era of PEP-II. The goal is to have the Rings perform to produce the specified beam parameters with an insignificant amount of downtime. We want to achieve this status by improving the Rings where necessary, not by increasing the maintenance effort. The things that we can act upon in the immediate future are largely engineering issues to improve the integrated availability of the damping rings

  15. Recent performance, lifetime, and failure modes of the 5045 klystron population at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.F.; Lee, T.G.; Pearson, C.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1992-08-01

    The 65 MW S-Band klystrons (5045) used to power SLC have been in service for over seven years. Currently, 244 of these tubes are in place on the accelerator, operating full power at 120 pulses per second. Enough tubes have now reached end of life, or experienced other failures to allow a good analysis of failure modes, and to project average lifetime for this type of tube. This paper describes the various modes of failure seen in klystrons rammed from SLC service, and provides data on expected lifetime from current production based on accumulated SLC operating experience

  16. Single bunch beam loading experiments on the SLAC two-mile accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.F.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    Several experimental improvements were used in the generation of new data on the dependence of single bunch radiation loss as a function of energy. These results are given, along with an empirical theory to explain these results. The experimental technique used is reviewed. (PMA)

  17. Recent performance, lifetime, and failure modes or the 5045 klystron population at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.F.; Lee, T.G.; Pearson, C.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    The 65 MW S-Band klystrons (5045) used to power SLC have been in service for over seven years. Currently, 244 of these tubes are in place on the accelerator, operating full power at 120 pulses per second. Enough tubes have now reached cathode end of life, or experienced other failures to allow a good analysis of failure modes, and to project average lifetime for this type of tube. This paper describes the various modes of failure seen in klystrons returned from SLC service, and provides data on expected lifetime from current production based on accumulated SLC operating experience. 3 refs., 6 figs

  18. ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin, Volume 23, Fall 2001 Issue (SLAC-J-ICFA-023)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va' Vra, J.

    2003-10-21

    The publication of the ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin is an activity of the Panel on Future Innovation and Development of ICFA (International Committee for Future Accelerators). The Bulletin reports on research and progress in the field of instrumentation with emphasis on application in the field of high-energy physics. It encourages issues of generic instrumentation. This issue has the following articles: (1) ''A Large Area Timing RPC''; (2) ''Applications and New Developments in Resistive Plate Chambers''; and (3) ''Advanced Study of Silicon Photomultipliers''.

  19. Some initial results from the new SLAC [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center] permeameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, J.K.; Early, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    A new permeameter has been built and is now available for testing samples of steel and other ferromagnetic materials for their magnetic characteristics such as permeability, remanent induction, coercive force and saturation induction. The present range of operation for the permeameter is from 0.5 Oe to 1250 Oe. Results are presented for two samples of low-carbon steel as well as some preliminary results for Vanadium Permendur. 4 refs., 8 figs

  20. Study of the emission performance of high-power klystrons: SLAC XK-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Y.

    1981-07-01

    There are hundreds of high power klystrons operated in the Linac gallery and about fifty to sixty tubes fail every year. The lifetime ranges from a few thousand up to seventy thousand hours except those which fail during an early period. The overall percentage of failures due to emission problems is approximately 25%. It is also noted that a 10% increase in mean lifetime of klystrons will reduce the overall cost per hour as much as a 10% increase in efficiency. Therefore, it is useful to find some method to predict the expected life of an individual tube. The final goal has not been attained yet, but some useful information was obtained. It is thought that this information might be helpful for those people who will study this subject further

  1. ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin, Volume 24, Spring 2002 Issue (SLAC-J-ICFA-024)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va' Vra, J.

    2003-10-21

    The publication of the ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin is an activity of the Panel on Future Innovation and Development of ICFA (International Committee for Future Accelerators). The Bulletin reports on research and progress in the field of instrumentation with emphasis on application in the field of high-energy physics. It encourages issues of generic instrumentation. This volume covers the following articles: (1) ''Physics and Chemistry of Aging--Early Developments; (2) ''Summary and Outlook of the International Workshop on Aging Phenomena in Gaseous Detectors (DESY, Hamburg, October 2001)''; (3) ''Studies of Aging and High Voltage Break Down Problems during Development and Operation of MSGC and GEM Detectors for the Inner Tracking System of HERA-B''; and (4) ''Aging of Gaseous Detectors: Assembly Materials and Procedures.

  2. Numerical simulation of the SLAC X-100 klystron using RKTW2D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryne, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1991-05-01

    We have performed numerical simulations of the X-100 klystron being developed at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The X-100 is being developed as a possible source for the next generation of linear collider, and will be required to produce ∼100 MW of power for a duration of ∼800 ns. Our simulations were performed using the simulation programs RKTW1D and RKTW2D, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The codes were used to investigate the operation of the klystron over a wide range of operating conditions. We will present comparisons of the simulation results with experimental results. 3 refs., 5 figs

  3. ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin, Volume 17, Fall 1998 Issue (SLAC-J-ICFA-017)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va' Vra, J.

    2003-10-20

    The authors study the operation of the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) is pure Ar, in comparison to that in Ar-CO{sub 2} mixture. In pure Ar, high GEM gains, of above 700 and 3000 for single and double GEM structures correspondingly, have been obtained. It is observed that the GEM effective gain and its charging-up are strongly affected by electric field values above and below the GEM. Applications to the development of non-aging gas photomultiplier are discussed.

  4. Improving the phase stability of the SLAC rf driveline network for SLC operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, J.N.; Hogg, H.A.

    1983-01-01

    Successful operation of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) will require greater phase stability from the two-mile long rf drive network than previous linac operation did. This paper discusses four proposed modifications of the present system that should help achieve the general objective to reduce all long term temperature and atmospheric pressure induced phase variations to less than 20 0 at 2856 MHz, so that the phase/amplitude detector subsystems, which will control the network output phases relative to a beam reference, will operate within their most accurate ranges

  5. Bermuda Triangle: a subsystem of the 168/E interfacing scheme used by Group B at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxoby, G.J.; Levinson, L.J.; Trang, Q.H.

    1979-12-01

    The Bermuda Triangle system is a method of interfacing several 168/E microprocessors to a central system for control of the processors and overlaying their memories. The system is a three-way interface with I/O ports to a large buffer memory, a PDP11 Unibus and a bus to the 168/E processors. Data may be transferred bidirectionally between any two ports. Two Bermuda Triangles are used, one for the program memory and one for the data memory. The program buffer memory stores the overlay programs for the 168/E, and the data buffer memory, the incoming raw data, the data portion of the overlays, and the outgoing processed events. This buffering is necessary since the memories of 168/E microprocessors are small compared to the main program and the amount of data being processed. The link to the computer facility is via a Unibus to IBM channel interface. A PDP11/04 controls the data flow. 7 figures, 4 tables

  6. Overview of the data acquisition electronics system design for the SLAC Linear Collider Detector (SLD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    The SLD Detector will contain five major electronics subsystems: Vertex, Drift, Liquid Argon Calorimeter, Cerenkov Ring Imaging, and Warm Iron Calorimeter. To implement the approximately 170,000 channels of electronics, extensive miniaturization and heavy use of multiplexing techniques are required. Design criteria for each subsystem, overall system architecture, and the R and D program are described

  7. Calibration of the beam-position monitor system for the SLAC PEP-II B factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.; Smith, S.; Kurita, N.

    1997-06-01

    The Beam-Position Monitors (BPM) for the PEP-II B Factory consist of four 1.5-cm diameter button style pickups mounted on the diagonals of the quadrupole vacuum chambers. Before installation of the vacuum chambers in the quadrupole assemblies, the electrical center of the BPMs is measured with respect to the mechanical center in a calibration test stand. In this paper the calibration test stand is described and the precision and accuracy of the calibrations are presented. After installation of the quadrupole assemblies in the PEP-II tunnel, the passive attenuation for each channel of the system is measured to preserve the accuracy of the calibration. Finally, the active electronics includes an onboard calibrator. Results for these portions of the calibration are presented

  8. ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin, Volume 22, Spring 2001 Issue (SLAC-J-ICFA-022)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va' Vra, J.

    2003-10-21

    The publication of the ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin is an activity of the Panel on Future Innovation and Development of ICFA (International Committee for Future Accelerators). The Bulletin reports on research and progress in the field of instrumentation with emphasis on application in the field of high-energy physics. It encourages issues of generic instrumentation. This volume contains the following articles: (1) ''Gaseous Micropattern Detectors: High-Energy Physics and Beyond''; (2) ''DIRC Dreams Redux: Research Directions for the Next Generation of Internally Reflected Imaging Counters''; and (3) ''Corrosion of Glass Windows in DIRC PMTs''.

  9. Wakefield dependent emittance growth in the SLAC [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center] linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, K.L.F.

    1990-10-01

    In this note we describe the emittance growth we can expect at bunch populations of N = 3,4,5 x 10 10 in the SLC linac. We will discuss briefly the effects of injection jitter, injection drift, and coherent oscillations starting in the middle of the linac. Finally, we will discuss in a more thorough manner the effects of random misalignment errors throughout the linac

  10. LONG TERM STABILITY STUDY AT FNAL AND SLAC USING BINP DEVELOPED HYDROSTATIC LEVEL SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seryi, Andrei

    2003-05-28

    Long term ground stability is essential for achieving the performance goals of the Next Linear Collider. To characterize ground motion on relevant time scales, measurements have been performed at three geologically different locations using a hydrostatic level system developed specifically for these studies. Comparative results from the different sites are presented in this paper.

  11. ICFA Instrumentation Bulletin, Volume 16, Summer 1998 Issue (SLAC-J-ICFA-016)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va' Vra, J.

    2003-10-20

    The authors developed a very low resistivity RPC-type detector, the anode of which was a plate made from materials with resistivity up to 5 x 10{sup 7} {Omega}cm, the cathode being a metallic mesh preceded by a drift region. In such a detector it was actually possible to combine the versatility and high counting-rate capability of metallic PPACs with the extreme robustness and protectiveness of Resistive Plate Chambers. Occasional discharges triggered by large deposits of primary ionization or by extreme counting rates are quenched by the resistive anode and are constrained to the glow discharge phase of the sparking process. The study shows that this discharge affects the detector only locally and the charge released is limited to a few tons of nC. Proportional counting rates of up to 10{sup 5} Hz/mm{sup 2} were achieved at gains above 10{sup 4}. The energy resolution at 6 keV was 20% FWHM. The observed gain-rate trade-off is well-described by an analytic mode, and further improvements may be expected by lowered the resistivity of the anode material. The properties of several custom-made, controllable resistivity, anode materials are described and perspectives of improvement in the performance of the detector are discussed.

  12. The Abort Kicker System for the PEP-II Storage Rings at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delamare, Jeffrey E

    2003-01-01

    The PEP-II project has two storage rings. The HER (High Energy Ring) has up to 1.48 A of election beam at 9 GeV, and the LER (Low Energy Ring) has up to 2.14 A of positron beam at 3.1 GeV. To protect the HER and LER beam lines in the event of a ring component failure, each ring has an abort kicker system which directs the beam into a dump when a failure is detected. Due to the high current of the beams, the beam kick is tapered from 100% to 80% in 7.33 (micro)S (the beam transit time around the ring). This taper distributes the energy evenly across the window which separates the ring from the beam dump such that the window is not damaged. The abort kicker trigger is synchronized with the ion clearing gap of the beam allowing for the kicker field to rise from 0-80% while there is no beam in the kicker magnet. Originally the kicker system was designed for a rise time of 370nS [1], but because the ion clearing gap was reduced in half, so was the rise time requirement for the kicker. This report discusses the design of the system interlocks, diagnostics, and modulator with the modifications necessary to accommodate an ion clearing gap of 185nS

  13. Infrared (IR) vs x-ray power generation in the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatchyn, R.

    1993-05-01

    The LCLS, a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) designed for operation at a first harmonic energy of 300 eV (λ congruent 40 Angstrom) in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime, will utilize electron bunches compressed down to durations of <0.5ps, or lengths of <150 μ. It is natural to inquire whether coherent radiation of this (and longer) wavelength will constitute a significant component of the total coherent output of the FEL. In this paper a determination of a simple upper bound on the IR that can be generated by the compressed bunches is outlines. Under the assumed operating parameters of the LCLS undulator, it is shown that that IR component of the coherent output should be strongly dominated by the x-ray component

  14. From the SLAC linear collider to the next linear collider: A status report and road map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1992-02-01

    In this presentation, I will review what we have learned about linear colliders, the problems that have been uncovered, and the technology-development program aimed at realizing the next high energy machine. I will then close with a few comments on how to get on with the job of building it

  15. Optimizing the injection straight of PEP II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Bloom, E.; Davies-White, W.; Donald, M.; Fairfield, K.; Fieguth, T.; Godfrey, G.; Holtzapple, R.; Hutton, A.; Loew, G.; Miller, R.; Sukiennicki, B.; Wen, H.; Ronan, M.

    1992-04-01

    The asymmetric energy PEP II B Factory proposed as an upgrade of PEP at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center requires both a powerful low emittance source of e - e + and a very reliable and efficient injection system. The SLC linac fulfills the source requirement very well. We describe here the optimization of the optics of the injection straight to insure reliable and efficient injection

  16. XXII SLAC summer institute on particle physics: Proceedings. Particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, J.; DePorcel, L.

    1996-02-01

    The seven-day school portion of the Institute revolved around the question of dark matter: where is it and what is it? Reviews were given of microlensing searches for baryonic dark matter, of dark matter candidates in the form of neutrinos and exotic particles, and of low-noise detection techniques used to search for the latter. The history of the universe, from the Big Bang to the role of dark matter in the formation of large-scale structure, was also covered. Other lecture series described the astrophysics that might be done with x-ray timing experiments and through the detection of gravitational radiation. As in past years, the lectures each morning were followed by stimulating afternoon discussion sessions, in which students could pursue with the lecturers the topics that most interested them. The Institute concluded with a three-day topical conference covering recent developments in theory and experiment. Highlights from the astrophysical and cosmological arenas included observations of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background, and of the mysterious gamma-ray bursters. From terrestrial accelerators came tantalizing hints of the top quark and marked improvements in precision electroweak measurements, among many other results. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  17. The Abort Kicker System for the PEP-II Storage Rings at SLAC.

    CERN Document Server

    Delamare, J E

    2003-01-01

    The PEP-II project has two storage rings. The HER (High Energy Ring) has up to 1.48 A of election beam at 9 GeV, and the LER (Low Energy Ring) has up to 2.14 A of positron beam at 3.1 GeV. To protect the HER and LER beam lines in the event of a ring component failure, each ring has an abort kicker system which directs the beam into a dump when a failure is detected. Due to the high current of the beams, the beam kick is tapered from 100% to 80% in 7.33 (micro)S (the beam transit time around the ring). This taper distributes the energy evenly across the window which separates the ring from the beam dump such that the window is not damaged. The abort kicker trigger is synchronized with the ion clearing gap of the beam allowing for the kicker field to rise from 0-80% while there is no beam in the kicker magnet. Originally the kicker system was designed for a rise time of 370nS [1], but because the ion clearing gap was reduced in half, so was the rise time requirement for the kicker. This report discusses the des...

  18. Electrodisintegration of few body systems at SLAC and the Y scaling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meziani, Z.E.

    1986-10-01

    It is proposed that extraction of the scaling function F(y) from the transverse and longitudinal response functions in inclusive quasi-elastic electron scattering from 3 He and 4 He is a powerful method to either study the validity regime of the impulse approximation by allowing the access to the high nucleon momentum components in these nuclei, or the electromagnetic properties of bound nucleons. 19 refs., 4 figs

  19. Optimizing the injection straight of PEP II asymmetric B factory at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Bloom, E.; Davies-White, W.; Donald, M.; Fairfield, K.; Fieguth, T.; Godfrey, G.; Holtzapple, R.; Hutton, A.; Loew, G.; Miller, R.; Sukiennicki, B.; Wen, H.

    1992-01-01

    The asymmetric energy PEP II B Factory proposed as an upgrade of PEP at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center requires both a powerful low emittance source of e - e + and a very reliable and efficient injection system. The SLC linac fulfills the source requirement very well. We describe here the optimization of the optics of the injection straight to insure reliable and efficient injection

  20. Injection system for the PEP II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieguth, T.; Bloom, E.; Bulos, F.; Davies-White, W.; Donald, M.; Fairfield, K.; Godfrey, G.; Holtzapple, R.; Ronan, M.; Zisman, M.

    1992-01-01

    The asymmetric energy B Factory proposed as an upgrade of PEP at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center will require a highly reliable and efficient injection system. The conceptual design has shown the feasibility of extracting 9 GeV electrons and 3.1 GeV positrons from the existing linac and injecting equal charges into 1658 buckets in each of the two rings of the collider. An injection study group has continued the development and study of this proposal and has generated workable designs for many related systems and subsystems. (author) 3 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  1. Study of the emission performance of high-power klystrons: SLAC XK-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Y.

    1981-07-01

    There are hundreds of high power klystrons operated in the Linac gallery and about fifty to sixty tubes fail every year. The lifetime ranges from a few thousand up to seventy thousand hours except those which fail during an early period. The overall percentage of failures due to emission problems is approximately 25%. It is also noted that a 10% increase in mean lifetime of klystrons will reduce the overall cost per hour as much as a 10% increase in efficiency. Therefore, it is useful to find some method to predict the expected life of an individual tube. The final goal has not been attained yet, but some useful information was obtained. It is thought that this information might be helpful for those people who will study this subject further.

  2. Environmental influences contributing to window failure of the SLAC 50 MW klystron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krienen, F.

    1984-03-01

    The additional heating of the klystron window is due to the intense x-ray level, produced inside the klystron, illuminating the entrance of the output wave guide. Photo-electric effect, although of low efficiency, produces enough electrons at the right location and right phase to start multipactor, which progresses with increasing intensity towards the window. The intercepted charge and the concomitant x-radiation heat the window, but the heating is not the cause of the breakdown per se. The accumulated charge on the window creates electric stress, which comes in addition to the RF stress. It could therefore be a major cause of electrical breakdown. The coating, which is intended to carry this charge off, should have a relaxation time constant small compared to the pulse duration. Unfortunately the coating can not be made conducting enough because it conflicts with the Joule heating in the RF field

  3. A unique power supply for the PEP II klystron at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassel, R.; Nguyen, M.N.

    1997-07-01

    Each of the eight 1.2 MW RF klystrons for the PEP-II storage rings require a 2.5 MVA DC power supply of 83 Kv at 23 amps. The design for the supply was base on three factors, low cost, small size to fit existing substation pads, and good protection against damage to the klystron including klystron gun arcs. The supply uses a 12 pulse 12.5 KV primary thyristor star point controller with primary filter inductor to provide rapid voltage control, good voltage regulation, and fast turn off during klystron tube faults. The supply also uses a unique secondary rectifier, filter capacitor configuration to minimize the energy available under a klystron fault. The voltage control is from 0--90 KV with a regulation of < 0.1% and voltage ripple of < 1% P-P, (< 0.2% RMS) above 60 KV. The supply utilizes a thyristor crowbar, which under a klystron tube arc limits the energy in the klystron arc to < 5 joules. If the thyristor crowbar is disabled the energy supplied is < 40 joules into the arc. The size of the supply was reduced small enough to fit the existing PEP transformer yard pads. The cost of the power supply was < $140 per KVA

  4. The measurement of g1n polarized structure of the neutron by the E154 experiment at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incerti, Sebastien

    1998-01-01

    This thesis presents the precision measurement of the neutron polarized structure g 1 n performed by the E154 collaboration at the Standford Linear Accelerator Center, USA, in autumn 1995, using a 48.3 GeV polarized electron beam scattered off a polarized Helium 3 target. The scattered electrons were detected using two spectrometer arms, covering the deep inelastic scattering range: 0.0134 2 2 2 at an average value of Q 2 = 5 GeV 2 . Two electromagnetic calorimeters have been designed by the LPC in Clermont-Ferrand and the SphN-CEA in Saclay to measure the scattered electron energy and to eject the contaminating hadron background using, a cellular automaton and a neural network, widely described in this thesis. The analysis performed in Clermont-Ferrand and presented in this document led us to the integral on the measurement region of g 1 n equaling: - 0.34 ± 0.003 STAT ± 0.004 SYST ± 0.001 EVOL at Q 2 = 5 GeV 2 , where our data have been evolved to Q 2 = 5 GeV 2 using the next-to-leading order DGLAP evolution equations and a world parametrization of the polarized parton distributions. The Ellis and Jaffe sum rule is clearly violated. Using different low x extrapolations, our integral is compatible with the Bjorken sum rule. The quark contribution to the nucleon spin is ΔΣ = 29 ± 6 % in the M S-bar scheme and ΔΣ = 37 ± 7% in the AB scheme, at Q 2 = 5 GeV 2 . The gluon contribution seems to be positive and within the range: 0 < ΔG < 2. (author)

  5. The Proceedings of the 27th SLAC Summer Institute on CP Violation: In and Beyond the Standard Model (SSI 1999)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaros, J.

    2004-01-01

    The special features of CP violation in the Standard Model are presented. The significance of measuring CP violation in B, K and D decays is explained. The predictions of the Standard Model for CP asymmetries in B decays are analyzed in detail. Then, four frameworks of new physics are reviewed: (1) Supersymmetry provides an excellent demonstration of the power of CP violation as a probe of new physics. (2) Left-right symmetric models are discussed as an example of an extension of the gauge sector. CP violation suggests that the scale of LRS breaking is low. (3) the variety of extensions of the scalar sector are presented and their unique CP violating signatures are emphasized. (4) Vector-like down quarks are presented as an example of an extension of the fermion sector. Their implications for CP asymmetries in B decays are highly interesting

  6. Proceedings of the 24. SLAC summer institute on particle physics: The strong interaction, from hadrons to partons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J.; DePorcel, L.; Dixon, L. [eds.

    1997-06-01

    This conference explored the role of the strong interaction in the physics of hadrons and partons. The Institute attracted 239 physicists from 16 countries to hear lectures on the underlying theory of Quantum Chromodynamics, modern theoretical calculational techniques, and experimental investigation of the strong interaction as it appears in various phenomena. Different regimes in which one can calculate reliably in QCD were addressed in series of lectures on perturbation theory, lattice gauge theories, and heavy quark expansions. Studies of QCD in hadron-hadron collisions, electron-positron annihilation, and electron-proton collisions all give differing perspectives on the strong interaction--from low-x to high-Q{sup 2}. Experimental understanding of the production and decay of heavy quarks as well as the lighter meson states has continued to evolve over the past years, and these topics were also covered at the School. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  7. Analysis and application of microwave radiation from the damping manifolds of the SLAC Damped Detuned Structures (DDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.M.; Seidel, M.; Miller, R.H.

    1997-05-01

    The power spectrum emerging from the damping manifolds of a DDS provides valuable quasi-local information on the displacement of a drive beam from the axis of individual cells, where the displacement may be due to beam offset, small cell misalignment, or a combination of the two. The degree of localization and the indexing of frequency to cell number is determined directly from the spectral function theory. Examples for specific DDS designs will be presented. These relations can be used to determine geometrical misalignment patterns

  8. The Proceedings of the 27th SLAC Summer Institute on CP Violation: In and Beyond the Standard Model (SSI 1999)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaros, J.

    2004-05-17

    The special features of CP violation in the Standard Model are presented. The significance of measuring CP violation in B, K and D decays is explained. The predictions of the Standard Model for CP asymmetries in B decays are analyzed in detail. Then, four frameworks of new physics are reviewed: (1) Supersymmetry provides an excellent demonstration of the power of CP violation as a probe of new physics. (2) Left-right symmetric models are discussed as an example of an extension of the gauge sector. CP violation suggests that the scale of LRS breaking is low. (3) the variety of extensions of the scalar sector are presented and their unique CP violating signatures are emphasized. (4) Vector-like down quarks are presented as an example of an extension of the fermion sector. Their implications for CP asymmetries in B decays are highly interesting.

  9. Advances in the SLAC RDDS: Modeling Manifold Damping and its Effect on the Wakefield for the Next Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Roger M

    2000-01-01

    The RDDS (Rounded Damped Detuned Structure) accelerator damps the transverse wakefield excited by bunches of electrons traversing thousands of linear accelerator structures. Errors in the fabrication of the cells which constitute each structure can result in a wakefield which is resonantly driven by the bunches, leading to BBU (Beam Break Up) and to a substantial growth in the beam emittance. One means to avoid these deleterious effects is to provide additional damping of the manifold, via plating the walls of the manifold with an electrically lossy material such as canthol or by fabricating the wall with stainless steel rather than copper. Results are presented on the wakefield and emittance growth in structures with a moderately lossy manifold

  10. Ba anti Bar status report on the design of a detector for the study of CP violation at PEP-II at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    Experiments designed to measure CP-violating asymmetries in the B meson system must emphasize exclusive state reconstruction with the highest possible resolution and efficiency. In the case of B 0 mesons produced in pairs at the Υ(4S) resonance at an asymmetric e + e - storage ring, this capability must be accompanied by precise vertex reconstruction in the direction of the e + e - beams (henceforth the z direction). These are difficult requirements, beyond the scope of any existing storage ring detector. The challenge of designing an asymmetric storage ring capable of producing the large number of neutral B meson pairs required to measure CP-violating asymmetries in decays to CP eigenstates has been handsomely met in the PEP-II design. As the first asymmetric e + e - storage ring, PEP-II presents a novel set of experimental challenges to a 4π detector. This Status Report describes the design of a new detector fully capable of exploiting the physics opportunities provided by PEP-II

  11. Ba{anti B}ar status report on the design of a detector for the study of CP violation at PEP-II at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    Experiments designed to measure CP-violating asymmetries in the B meson system must emphasize exclusive state reconstruction with the highest possible resolution and efficiency. In the case of B{sup 0} mesons produced in pairs at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance at an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} storage ring, this capability must be accompanied by precise vertex reconstruction in the direction of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams (henceforth the z direction). These are difficult requirements, beyond the scope of any existing storage ring detector. The challenge of designing an asymmetric storage ring capable of producing the large number of neutral B meson pairs required to measure CP-violating asymmetries in decays to CP eigenstates has been handsomely met in the PEP-II design. As the first asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} storage ring, PEP-II presents a novel set of experimental challenges to a 4{pi} detector. This Status Report describes the design of a new detector fully capable of exploiting the physics opportunities provided by PEP-II.

  12. The Proceedings of the 28th SLAC Summer Institute on Particle Physics: Neutrinos From The Lab, The Sun, And The Cosmos (SSI 2000)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaros, J

    2004-05-17

    Interest in cosmic sources of high energy neutrinos dates back to the late 1950's. This paper outlines the interdisciplinary scientific agenda, which span the fields of astronomy, particle physics, and cosmic ray physics. While the general detection principles based on optical Cherenkov radiation have been understood for many years, the unusual geographic locations of suitable detector sites have challenged the ingenuity of experimentalists. Two high energy neutrino programs are now operating (NT200 in Lake Baikal and the AMANDA detector), with the expectation of ushering in the era of multi-messenger astronomy. Two Mediterranean-based programs have made impressive progress. These detectors are optimized to detect neutrinos with energies of the order of 1-10 TeV, although they are capable of detecting neutrinos over a much broader range of energies. For E{sub {nu}} > 10{sup 15} eV, several new ideas are being exploited to expand the effective volume of the detector. These techniques are based on the detection of neutrino-initiated cascades. We describe the ongoing worldwide efforts to develop expandable techniques and offer an assessment of their relative capabilities.

  13. Study of CP violation in the B0 → h+h-(h = π, K) decay by the BaBar detector at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivk, Muriel

    2003-01-01

    The absence of antimatter in the universe imposes the study of the CP symmetry violation. This phenomenon first uncovered in the K meson systems has been recently evidenced in the B meson systems. The B factories PEP-II and KEK-B produce e + e - in the Υ(4S) resonance, which undergoes a decay into charged or neutral BB-bar pairs. Evidencing the CP violation requires a measurement of the difference between the B meson decays towards a precise final state and the B-bar meson decay, i.e. of the CP conjugate antiparticle of B. The work described in this thesis has been carried out since January 2001 with the detector BABAR. Namely, the subject matter of the thesis was the study of the neutral B meson decay into two charmless bodies in the final state B 0 /B 0 -bar → h + h - (h = π, K). Since events in these channels are extremely rare a major task of the analysis is to lower the background as much as possible. The decays allow studying the CP violation namely, through the α angle of the unitarity triangle describing the CP violation in the Standard Model. This new information added to the β angle and to other CKM matrix parameters, already measured, permits strengthening the constraints on the Standard Model parameters. This thesis is structured in three parts. The first one deals with the theory. First it presents a general description of the weak interaction within in the frame of the Standard Model, as well as a description of the B 0 /B 0 -bar system. The second chapter presents the B 0 → π + π - decay which is indeed the core of this thesis. Four theoretical models studied for the interpretation of the results are also described. The second part is devoted to the experimental setup. The PEP-II collider and the BABAR detector are described thoroughly to comprehend the key points of the analysis. The third part presents details of the analysis of experimental results from the data acquisition up to extraction of measurement magnitudes. The chapter four gives a general outlook of the analysis particularly of the event selection. The fundamental variables are here defined and exposed is the principle of the likelihood method used for extraction of the information in the last stage of the analysis. The chapter five is devoted to the fight against the background. The following chapter presents the adjustment made to shape the final stage of analysis which allows extraction of the branching ratios and parameters which measure the CP violation. Finally, the last chapter deals with the interpretation of the results in terms of constraints on parameters of CKM matrix of the Standard Model. Also, the results of Belle experiment are discussed. In conclusion, the following values were obtained for the branching ratios: B(B 0 → π + π - ) = 4.7 ± 0.6 ± 0.2 10 -6 ; B(B 0 → K + π - ) = 17.9 ± 0.9 ± 0.7 10 -6 ; B(B 0 → K + K - ) -6 (90%). These values are in good agreement with the data previously published but they have a higher precision. In the last case only an upper limit is given because the signal is as expected very low. The results for the parameters measuring the CP violation are: A Kπ = - 0.10 ± 0.05 ± 0.02; S ππ = 0.02 ± 0.34 ± 0.05; C ππ = - 0.30 ± 0.25 ± 0.04. These three values are compatible with the absence of CP violation. The interpretation of these results show that is still difficult to constrain significantly the alpha angle with the current statistics and isospin symmetry which is the only solid theoretical frame. Hopefully, the statistics of BABAR will increase till 2006 by a factor of five and the B 0 → π 0 π 0 ) decay branching will be measured sufficiently accurately to allow reaching the α angle. To get stronger constraints the theoretical models should be further elaborated and experimentally checked

  14. The measurement of g{sub 1}{sup n} polarized structure of the neutron by the E154 experiment at SLAC; Mesure de la fonction de structure polarisee g{sub 1}{sup n} du neutron par l`experience E154 au SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Incerti, Sebastien [Ecole Doctorale des Sciences Fondamentales, Universite Blaise Pascal, U.F.R. de Recherche Scientifique et Technique, F-63177 Aubiere (France)

    1998-01-21

    This thesis presents the precision measurement of the neutron polarized structure g{sub 1}{sup n} performed by the E154 collaboration at the Standford Linear Accelerator Center, USA, in autumn 1995, using a 48.3 GeV polarized electron beam scattered off a polarized Helium 3 target. The scattered electrons were detected using two spectrometer arms, covering the deep inelastic scattering range: 0.0134 < x < 0.7 and 1 GeV{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 17 GeV{sup 2} at an average value of Q{sup 2} = 5 GeV{sup 2}. Two electromagnetic calorimeters have been designed by the LPC in Clermont-Ferrand and the SphN-CEA in Saclay to measure the scattered electron energy and to eject the contaminating hadron background using, a cellular automaton and a neural network, widely described in this thesis. The analysis performed in Clermont-Ferrand and presented in this document led us to the integral on the measurement region of g{sub 1}{sup n} equaling: - 0.34 {+-} 0.003{sub STAT} {+-} 0.004{sub SYST} {+-} 0.001{sub EVOL} at Q{sup 2} = 5 GeV{sup 2}, where our data have been evolved to Q{sup 2} = 5 GeV{sup 2} using the next-to-leading order DGLAP evolution equations and a world parametrization of the polarized parton distributions. The Ellis and Jaffe sum rule is clearly violated. Using different low x extrapolations, our integral is compatible with the Bjorken sum rule. The quark contribution to the nucleon spin is {Delta}{Sigma} = 29 {+-} 6 % in the M S-bar scheme and {Delta}{Sigma} = 37 {+-} 7% in the AB scheme, at Q{sup 2} = 5 GeV{sup 2}. The gluon contribution seems to be positive and within the range: 0 < {Delta}G < 2. (author) 245 refs., 170 figs., 60 tabs.

  15. Measurements of Time-Dependent CP-Asymmetry Parameters in B Meson Decays to η(prime)K0 and of Branching Fractions of SU(3) Related Modes with BaBar Experiment at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biassoni, P.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis work we have measured the following upper limits at 90% of confidence level, for B meson decays (in units of 10 -6 ), using a statistics of 465.0 x 10 6 B(bar B) pairs: Β(B 0 → ηK 0 ) 0 → ηη) 0 → η(prime)η(prime)) 0 → ηφ) 0 → ηω) 0 → η(prime)φ) 0 → η(prime)ω) 0 → ηK 0 open an issue related to the large difference compared to the charged mode B + → ηK + branching fraction, which is measured to be 3.7 ± 0.4 ± 0.1 (118). Our results represent substantial improvements of the previous ones (109, 110, 111) and are consistent with theoretical predictions. All these results were presented at Flavor Physics and CP Violation (FPCP) 2008 Conference, that took place in Taipei, Taiwan. They will be soon included into a paper to be submitted to Physical Review D. For time-dependent analysis, we have reconstructed 1820 ± 48 flavor-tagged B 0 → η(prime)K 0 events, using the final BABAR statistic of 467.4 x 10 6 B(bar B) pairs. We use these events to measure the time-dependent asymmetry parameters S and C. We find S = 0.59 ± 0.08 ± 0.02, and C = -0.06 ± 0.06 ± 0.02. A non-zero value of C would represent a directly CP non-conserving component in B 0 → η(prime)K 0 , while S would be equal to sin2β measured in B 0 → J/ψK s 0 (108), a mixing-decay interference effect, provided the decay is dominated by amplitudes of a single weak phase. The new measured value of S can be considered in agreement with the expectations of the 'Standard Model', inside the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Inconsistency of our result for S with CP conservation (S = 0) has a significance of 7.1 standard deviations (statistical and systematics included). Our result for the direct-CP violation parameter C is 0.9 standard deviations from zero (statistical and systematics included). Our results are in agreement with the previous ones (18). Despite the statistics is only 20% larger than the one used in previous measurement, we improved of 20% the error on S and of 14% the error on C. This error is the smaller ever achieved, by both BABAR and Belle, in Time-Dependent CP Violation Parameters measurement is a b → s transition

  16. Measurements of Time-Dependent CP-Asymmetry Parameters in B Meson Decays to η' K0 and of Branching Fractions of SU(3) Related Modes with BaBar Experiment at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biassoni, Pietro [Univ. of Milan (Italy)

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis work we have measured the following upper limits at 90% of confidence level, for B meson decays (in units of 10-6), using a statistics of 465.0 x 106 B$\\bar{B}$ pairs: β(B0 → ηK0) < 1.6 β(B0 → ηη) < 1.4 β(B0 → η'η') < 2.1 β(B0 → ηΦ) < 0.52 β(B0 → ηω) < 1.6 β(B0 → η'Φ) < 1.2 β(B0 → η'ω) < 1.7 We have no observation of any decay mode, statistical significance for our measurements is in the range 1.3-3.5 standard deviation. We have a 3.5σ evidence for B → ηω and a 3.1 σ evidence for B → η'ω. The absence of observation of the B0 → ηK0 open an issue related to the large difference compared to the charged mode B+ → ηK+ branching fraction, which is measured to be 3.7 ± 0.4 ± 0.1 [118]. Our results represent substantial improvements of the previous ones [109, 110, 111] and are consistent with theoretical predictions. All these results were presented at Flavor Physics and CP Violation (FPCP) 2008 Conference, that took place in Taipei, Taiwan. They will be soon included into a paper to be submitted to Physical Review D. For time-dependent analysis, we have reconstructed 1820 ± 48 flavor-tagged B0 → η'K0 events, using the final BABAR statistic of 467.4 x 106 B$\\bar{B}$ pairs. We use these events to measure the time-dependent asymmetry parameters S and C. We find S = 0.59 ± 0.08 ± 0.02, and C = -0.06 ± 0.06 ± 0.02. A non-zero value of C would represent a directly CP non-conserving component in B0 → η'K0, while S would be equal to sin2β measured in B0 → J/ΨKs0 [108], a mixing-decay interference effect, provided the decay is dominated by amplitudes of a single weak phase. The new measured value of S can be considered in agreement with the expectations of the 'Standard Model', inside the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Inconsistency of our result for S with CP conservation (S = 0) has a significance of 7.1 standard deviations (statistical and systematics included). Our result for the direct-CP violation parameter C is 0.9 standard deviations from zero (statistical and systematics included). Our results are in agreement with the previous ones [18]. Despite the statistics is only 20% larger than the one used in previous measurement, we improved of 20% the error on S and of 14% the error on C. This error is the smaller ever achieved, by both BABAR and Belle, in Time-Dependent CP Violation Parameters measurement is a b → s transition.

  17. Whey protein isolate with improved film properties through cross-linking catalyzed by small laccase from Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Wei; Zhang, Chong; Zheng, Meixia; Lu, Zhaoxin; Lu, Fengxia

    2018-08-01

    The effects of small laccase (SLAC) from Streptomyces coelicolor on the properties of whey protein isolate (WPI) films were studied. WPI was catalyze by SLAC without phenolic acid assistance. Particle size distribution results showed that some complexes with higher relative molecular weight formed in WPI samples treated with SLAC. The content of α-helixes decreased while those of β-sheets and random coils increased following SLAC treatment according to circular dichroism results. Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis suggested that some conformational changes occurred in WPI following SLAC treatment. Analysis of WPI films prepared by casting after SLAC treatment indicated that their film properties were all improved, including mechanical properties, solubility, water vapor, oxygen and carbon dioxide barrier properties, film color, light transmission, transparency and thermal properties. Compared with that of the control film, some obvious differences in the morphology of the WPI films were observed following SLAC treatment. This report demonstrates that laccase can directly catalyze protein cross-linking, which may be useful to improve the performance of protein films. In this study, SLAC was applied to WPI edible film during the film-making process. The results showed that SLAC can catalyze WPI cross-linking without phenolic acid assistance, and WPI film properties were improved after SLAC treatment. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER 1999)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Gene

    2000-08-28

    In CY99, SLAC operated under the Work Smart Standards (WSS) Set, which are incorporated in SLAC's Management and Operating contract. The WSS Set includes all applicable statutory and regulatory requirements for public and worker safety and environmental protection. The WSS Set also includes a number of industry standards that were found to be necessary to control specific hazards present at SLAC.

  19. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    sabba, d

    2007-02-03

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2005 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. SLAC effectively applied environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety and environmental management system (ISEMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2005, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing ''greening of the government'' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. There were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations during 2005. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2005, in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and implementing a chemical management system (CMS) to better manage chemical use. Program-specific details are discussed.

  20. Scapholunate advanced collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.; Haller, J.; Resnick, D.

    1989-01-01

    Scapholunate advanced collapse 9SLAC) is a pattern of wrist malalignment (characterized mainly by radiocarpal abnormalities) that has been attributed to osteoarthritis. In order to determine the frequency of SLAC in calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) disease, the authors have reviewed wrist radiographs in 190 cases of this disorder. Forty-two (22%) of these cases reveal wrist abnormalities typical of SLAC. Associated findings include bilateral alterations (63%), abnormal calcification (70%), scapholunate dissociation (70%), and additional compartmental arthropathies. The authors' results confirm that CPPD crystal deposition disease is a major cause of SLAC. They believe, therefore, that this pattern of malalignment is not specific for posttraumatic or spontaneous osteoarthritis of the wrist

  1. Annual Site Environmental Report Prepared for the Department of Energy,under contract number DE-AC03-76SF00515 January - December 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russak, Hillary M.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2001 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Also included are seasonal activities that cross calendar-year divisions. Production of the annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M and O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is federally-funded, research development center with Stanford University as the M and O contractor. The most noteworthy information in this report is summarized in this section. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management in meeting the site's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed to meet the ISMS goals: Worker safety and health are protected; The environment is protected; and Compliance is assured. Throughout 2001, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems. These systems were also the ways SLAC approached implementing the ''Greening of the Government'' initiatives (such as Executive Order 13148). The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC did not receive any notices of violation during 2001. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2001, including improvements in the storm drain system, improved ground water monitoring capabilities, and enhancements to the system to manage the generation of mixed wastes. Environmental program-specific summary details are shown below

  2. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

    2006-04-19

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2002 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded, research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. The most noteworthy information in this report is summarized in this section. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2002, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing ''greening of the government'' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC did not receive any notices of violation during 2002. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2002, in decreasing air emission rates, the storm drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a chemical management system to manage chemical use better.

  3. Annual Site Environmental Report Prepared for the Department of Energy,under contract number DE-AC03-76SF00515 January - December 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russak, Hillary M.

    2003-05-06

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2001 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Also included are seasonal activities that cross calendar-year divisions. Production of the annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is federally-funded, research development center with Stanford University as the M and O contractor. The most noteworthy information in this report is summarized in this section. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management in meeting the site's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed to meet the ISMS goals: Worker safety and health are protected; The environment is protected; and Compliance is assured. Throughout 2001, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems. These systems were also the ways SLAC approached implementing the ''Greening of the Government'' initiatives (such as Executive Order 13148). The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC did not receive any notices of violation during 2001. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2001, including improvements in the storm drain system, improved ground water monitoring capabilities, and enhancements to the system to manage the generation of mixed wastes. Environmental program-specific summary details are shown below.

  4. Particle Physics & Astrophysics (PPA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Scientists at SLAC's Particle Physics and Astrophysics develop and utilize unique instruments from underground to outer space to explore the ultimate laws of nature...

  5. Annual Site Environmental Report, 2007(ASER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabba, D

    2008-01-01

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year (CY) of 2007 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year, i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2007/2008 (October 2007 through May 2008), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M and O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M and O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423 and DOE Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', SLAC effectively implemented and integrated the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2007, SLAC focused on development and implementation of SLAC management systems to ensure continual improvement. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13148. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC continues to demonstrate significant progress in implementing and integrating EMS into day-to-day operations at SLAC. The annual management review and ranking of environmental aspects were completed this year by SLAC's EMS Steering Committee, the Environmental Safety Committee (ESC) and thirteen objectives and targets were established for 2007. For each objective and target, a work plan, or Environmental

  6. Study of the CP violation in B{sup +-} {yields} D{sup 0} K{sup *+-} decays with the BaBar experiment; Etude de la violation de CP dans les desintegrations B{sup +-} {yields} D{sup 0} K{sup *+-} sur l'experience BaBar a SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Therin, G

    2005-05-15

    Using a luminosity of 210.7 fb{sup -1} integrated at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with BaBar experiment, we exclusively reconstruct the B{sup {+-}} to DK{sup *{+-}} decay for constraining the angle {gamma} of the unitarity triangle. Following the method described by Gronau, London et Wyler, the D meson is reconstructed in CP eigenstates: K{sup +}K{sup -}, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, et K{sub s}{pi}{sup 0}, K{sub s}{phi}, K{sub s}{omega}. The interference between amplitudes b-bar {yields} c-bar u s-bar and b-bar {yields} u-bar c s-bar, which contribute to the final states, is the origin of the sensitivity on {gamma}. The technical difficulty comes from the suppression of the second amplitude compared to the first one, which we expect a ratio of the order of 0.1. The small ratio of r{sub B} limits the impact on the {gamma} measurement. Physical observables for this method have been measured: A{sub +} = -0,08 {+-} 0,19 (stat.) {+-} 0,08 (syst.); A{sub -} = -0,26 {+-} 0,40 (stat.) {+-} 0,12 (syst.); R{sub +} = 1,96 {+-} 0,40 (stat.) {+-} 0,11 (syst.); and R{sub -} = 0,65 {+-} 0,26 (stat.) {+-} 0,08 (syst.). An update of the branching ratio is also proposed: BR(B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}K{sup *-}) = (5,31 {+-} 0,29 (stat.) {+-} 0,37 (syst.))*10{sup -4}. (author)

  7. Ground motions and its effects in accelerator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1984-07-01

    This lecture includes a discussion of types of motion, frequencies of interest, measurements at SLAC, some general comments regarding local sources of ground motion at SLAC, and steps that can be taken to minimize the effects of ground motion on accelerators

  8. NPAS Users Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This NPAS Users Guide is primarily intended as a source of information about policies, procedures, and facilities appropriate for users in the program of Nuclear Physics at SLAC (NPAS). General policies and practices are described, the preparation of proposals is discussed, and the services for users is outlined. SLAC experimental facilities are described, and contacts are listed

  9. A measurement of the electroweak asymmetry parameter for the tau lepton using the 1993 and 1994--95 SLD data sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolen, B.D.

    1996-07-01

    A measurement of the electroweak asymmetry parameter A t is presented using e + E LR - → τ + τ - events from the 1993, 1994--95 data runs at the SLD experiment at SLAC. The analysis takes advantage of the polarized electron beam in the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) to improve the precision of the analysis over the standard forward-backward asymmetry techniques

  10. BERKELEY/STANFORD: B factory plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    For the past several years, accelerator physicists at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) have been involved in the design of an Asymmetric B Factory to be sited in the tunnel of the PEP electron-positron collider at SLAC

  11. Weak-electromagnetic interference in polarized eD scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1992-09-01

    Observation of parity non-conservation in deep-inelastic scattering of polarized electrons from deuterium was reported in an experiment at SLAC in 1978. The events at SLAC and elsewhere leading to the successful search for parity non-conservation in the electromagnetic processes are described

  12. Calibration of Geophone Micro-seismic Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowden, G.

    2005-01-01

    This note describes a simple lab bench technique for calibrating the sensitivity and dynamics of the Mark Products L4C geophones used at SLAC for measuring microseismic ground motion and mechanical vibrations of accelerator support structures. Calibration results for SLAC's three L4C geophones are recorded

  13. Microwave measurements of azimuthal asymmetries in accelerating fields of disk-loaded waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.; Deruyter, H.; Defa, W.

    1983-03-01

    This paper presents microwave measurements of azimuthal asymmetries in the accelerating fields of the SLAC disk-loaded waveguide. These field asymmetries lead to rf phase-dependent beam steering which can be detrimental to operation of linear accelerators in general and of the SLAC Linear Collider in particular

  14. Big Machines and Big Science: 80 Years of Accelerators at Stanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loew, Gregory

    2008-12-16

    Longtime SLAC physicist Greg Loew will present a trip through SLAC's origins, highlighting its scientific achievements, and provide a glimpse of the lab's future in 'Big Machines and Big Science: 80 Years of Accelerators at Stanford.'

  15. Elastic and inelastic electron and muon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hand, L.N.

    1977-01-01

    The current status of experiments in the field of elastic and inelastic electron and muon scattering is discussed. The talk is divided into discussions of the single arm inclusive experiments at SLAC and Fermilab; the multiparticle inclusive experiments at SLAC, Fermilab und Cornell, and a description of selected results from exclusive channel measurements on electroproduced final states. (orig.) [de

  16. Positron--Electron Project (PEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    PEP, an 18-GeV electron-positron colliding-beam storage ring facility at SLAC, is being built by a team from LBL and SLAC. Construction is under way and completion is scheduled for Fall of 1979. A summary is given of the design of the facility, and the status of the project is reported

  17. SPIRES I: on-line search guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addis, L.

    1975-06-01

    SPIRES I is the first generation of the on-line Stanford Public Information Retrieval System. Designed as a prototype system, SPIRES I was later moved to the SLAC computing facility where it has been routinely available to SLAC users in the field of high-energy physics. The scope and use of the SPIRES I system are described in this manual

  18. Panel discussion on laboratory accelerator programs: present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1986-09-01

    The present SLAC accelerator program is summarized briefly, and the future of electron-positron colliders is discussed. Present activities discussed include the PEP storage ring, the SPEAR storage ring, the Linear Accelerator, and the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) project. Future prospects include a larger scale linear collider. The stability requirements on acceleration are briefly discussed

  19. Quality assurance manual: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oijala, J.E.

    1988-06-01

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is a DOE-supported research facility that carries out experimental and theoretical research in high energy physics and developmental work in new techniques for particle acceleration and experimental instrumentation. The purpose of this manual is to describe SLAC quality assurance policies and practices in various parts of the Laboratory

  20. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2016 (ASER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabba, Dellilah [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Atapattu, Rohendra [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); DeCamara, Micki [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ford, Ryan [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Giangerelli, April [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hug, Mike [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Johnson, Greg [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ligeti, Olga [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stoddard, Kirk [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tran, Henry [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2017-09-11

    This report provides information about environmental programs during calendar year (CY) 2016 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC).in San Mateo County, California. Activities that overlap the calendar year - e.g., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2015/2016 (October 1, 2015 through May 31, 2016) are also included.

  1. Microwave measurements of azimuthal asymmetries in accelerating fields of disk-loaded waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.; Defa, Wang; Deruyter, H.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents microwave measurements of azymuthal asymmetries in the accelerating fields of the SLAC disk-loaded waveguide. These field asymmetries lead to RF phase-dependent beam steering which can be detrimental to operation of linear accelerators in general and of the SLAC Linear Collider in particular

  2. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, H

    2008-01-01

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year (CY) of 2006 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year; i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2006/2007 (October 2006 through May 2007), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M and O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M and O contractor. SLAC continued to follow the path to self-declare an environmental management system under DOE Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program' and effectively applied environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that Worker safety and health are protected; The environment is protected; and Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2006, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems. These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing 'greening of the government' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. The SLAC Office of Assurance was created during 2006 in response to DOE Order 226.1. During 2006, there were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations, and there were no Notice of Violations issued to SLAC from any of the regulatory agencies that oversee SLAC. In addition, many improvements in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and SLAC's chemical management system (CMS) were continued during 2006 to better manage

  3. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

    2008-02-22

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year (CY) of 2006 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year; i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2006/2007 (October 2006 through May 2007), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. SLAC continued to follow the path to self-declare an environmental management system under DOE Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program' and effectively applied environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that Worker safety and health are protected; The environment is protected; and Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2006, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems. These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing 'greening of the government' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. The SLAC Office of Assurance was created during 2006 in response to DOE Order 226.1. During 2006, there were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations, and there were no Notice of Violations issued to SLAC from any of the regulatory agencies that oversee SLAC. In addition, many improvements in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and SLAC's chemical management system (CMS) were continued during

  4. 1995 Site environmental report, January 1995--December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This report provides information about environmental programs and compliance with environmental regulations in calendar year 1995 (CY95) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national laboratory operated by Stanford University under contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is devoted to experimental and theoretical research in elementary particle physics, in basic sciences using synchrotron radiation, and in accelerator physics and technology. SLAC's Environment, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) Division consists of five departments and a Program Planning Office (PPO). Their shared goal is to help ensure that SLAC operates in compliance with federal, state, and local regulations, as well as DOE Orders related to environment, safety, and health. The five departments are: (1) Environmental Protection and Restoration (EPR), (2) Operational Health Physics (OHP), (3) Radiation Physics (RP), (4) Safety, Health, and Assurance (SHA), and (5) Waste Management (WM). The EPR Department oversees the majority of SLAC's environmental programs, including programs for environmental restoration; waste minimization; air quality; storm water and industrial wastewater; polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); and groundwater. The WM Department coordinates disposal of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste. The OHP Department, in cooperation with the EPR Department, oversees environmental radiological monitoring and dosimetry at SLAC. The SHA Department oversees quality assurance for SLAC's environmental activities. The RP Department conducts beam checkouts of new experiments to ensure shielding adequacy for the protection of the workers and members of the general public. The most significant information in this report is summarized briefly in the following sections

  5. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program: FY 2015 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SLAC,

    2016-04-04

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) encourage innovation, creativity, originality and quality to maintain the Laboratory’s research activities and staff at the forefront of science and technology. To further advance its scientific research capabilities, the Laboratory allocates a portion of its funds for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. With DOE guidance, the LDRD program enables SLAC scientists to make rapid and significant contributions that seed new strategies for solving important national science and technology problems. The LDRD program is conducted using existing research facilities.

  6. Annual Site Environmental Report, 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

    2006-04-19

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2004 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded, research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. The most noteworthy information in this report is summarized in this section. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2004, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing ''greening of the government'' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. There were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations during 2004. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2004, in waste minimization, recycling, decreasing air emission rates, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a chemical management system to manage chemical use better. Program-specific details discussed are: (1) Air Quality--SLAC operates its air quality management program in compliance with its established permit conditions: 2004 was the seventh consecutive year the air quality management program operated without receiving any notices of violation

  7. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2008 (ASER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabba, D.

    2009-01-01

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year of 2008 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year, i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2008/2009 (October 2008 through May 2009), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M and O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M and O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, and DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program, SLAC effectively implements and integrates the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2008, SLAC continued to improve its management systems. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13423 and DOE Orders 450.1A and 430.2B. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC continues to demonstrate significant progress in implementing and integrating EMS into day-to-day operations and construction activities at SLAC. The annual management review and ranking of environmental aspects were completed this year by SLAC's EMS Steering Committee, the Environmental Safety Committee (ESC), and twelve objectives and targets were

  8. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2009(ASER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year of 2009 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year, i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2009/2010 (October 2009 through May 2010), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M and O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M and O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, EO 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program, SLAC effectively implements and integrates the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that Worker safety and health are protected, The environment is protected, and Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2009, SLAC continued to improve its management systems. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13423, EO 13514, and DOE Orders 450.1A and 430.2B. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC continues to demonstrate significant progress in implementing and integrating EMS into day-to-day operations and construction activities at SLAC. SLAC's EMS was audited by a review team from the DOE Oak Ridge Office and the DOE SLAC Site Office (SSO) on March 31, 2009. The review

  9. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2009(ASER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-10-01

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year of 2009 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year, i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2009/2010 (October 2009 through May 2010), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, EO 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program, SLAC effectively implements and integrates the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that Worker safety and health are protected, The environment is protected, and Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2009, SLAC continued to improve its management systems. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13423, EO 13514, and DOE Orders 450.1A and 430.2B. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC continues to demonstrate significant progress in implementing and integrating EMS into day-to-day operations and construction activities at SLAC. SLAC's EMS was audited by a review team from the DOE Oak Ridge Office and the DOE SLAC Site Office (SSO) on March 31, 2009

  10. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2008 (ASER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabba, D.

    2009-11-09

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year of 2008 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year, i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2008/2009 (October 2008 through May 2009), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, and DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program, SLAC effectively implements and integrates the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2008, SLAC continued to improve its management systems. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13423 and DOE Orders 450.1A and 430.2B. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC continues to demonstrate significant progress in implementing and integrating EMS into day-to-day operations and construction activities at SLAC. The annual management review and ranking of environmental aspects were completed this year by SLAC's EMS Steering Committee, the Environmental Safety Committee (ESC), and twelve objectives and targets

  11. Institutional Plan, FY1989--FY1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This report discusses future plans of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Topics covered are: Laboratory Mission; Special Issues; Laboratory Strategic View; Scientific Program at SLAC; Initiatives; Education and Technology Transfer Programs; Site and Facilities; and Resource Projections. 9 tabs

  12. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SSRL at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was built in 1974 to take and use for synchrotron studies the intense x-ray beams from the SPEAR storage ring that...

  13. The role of supersymmetry phenomenology in particle physics

    OpenAIRE

    Wells, James D.

    2000-01-01

    Supersymmetry phenomenology is an important component of particle physics today. I provide a definition of supersymmetry phenomenology, outline the scope of its activity, and argue its legitimacy. This essay derives from a presentation given at the 2000 SLAC Summer Institute.

  14. High performance magnet power supply optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, L.T.

    1975-01-01

    Three types of magnet power supply systems for the joint LBL-SLAC proposed accelerator PEP are discussed. The systems considered include a firing circuit and six-pulse controlled rectifier, transistor systems, and a chopper system. (U.S.)

  15. A valiant little terminal: A VLT user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinstein, A.

    1992-08-01

    VLT came to be used at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center), because SLAC wanted to assess the Amiga's usefulness as a color graphics terminal and T E X workstation. Before the project could really begin, the people at SLAC needed a terminal emulator which could successfully talk to the IBM 3081 (now the IBM ES9000-580) and all the VAXes on the site. Moreover, it had to compete in quality with the Ann Arbor Ambassador GXL terminals which were already in use at the laboratory. Unfortunately, at the time there was no commercial program which fit the bill. Luckily, Willy Langeveld had been independently hacking up a public domain VT100 emulator written by Dave Wecker et al. and the result, VLT, suited SLAC's purpose. Over the years, as the program was debugged and rewritten, the original code disappeared, so that now, in the present version of VLT, none of the original VT100 code remains

  16. A tribute: The discovery of proton constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberger, J.

    1985-01-01

    The author describes the scientific achievements made with SLAC's electron beams and their context in current thinking. This talk covers the realization that the proton, far from being an indivisible particle, has a definite composite structure. (orig./HSI).

  17. New Stanford collider starts at Z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    On 11 April the new SLC Stanford Linear Collider created its first Z particle, inaugurating high energy physics research at this novel machine based on the two-mile linac at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre, SLAC. (orig./HSI).

  18. Signal to background

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Carolyn; Berger, Ben; Brooks, Travis; Riesselmann, Kurt; Steiner, Siri

    2006-01-01

    Breathable foam for fire prevention; swords to plowshares; naming LHC magnets; more than 4000 LHC-related papers in spires database; Fermilab’s remote operations center; LHC summer schools at Fermilab and SLAC.

  19. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barish, B C

    1983-12-31

    Continuing research in high energy physics carried out by the group from the California Institute of Technology. The program includes research in theory, phenomenology, and experimental high energy physics. The experimental program includes experiments at SLAC, FERMILAB, and DESY.

  20. Advanced Electron Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemann, R.

    2005-02-14

    The research into advanced acceleration concepts for electron linear accelerators being pursued at SLAC is reviewed. This research includes experiments in laser acceleration, plasma wakefield acceleration, and mmwavelength RF driven accelerators.

  1. Indiana University high energy physics, Task A: Technical progress report, December 1, 1988--December 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blockus, D.; Brabson, B.B.; Crittenden, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: meson spectroscopy; hybrid search; mesons with unusual quantum numbers; hadronic jets; high mass dimuons; DO collider detector; High Resolution Spectrometer; B factory; Mark II Z/degree/ physics; and SLAC polarization

  2. Modeling and design of an X-band rf photoinjector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Marsh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A design for an X-band rf photoinjector that was developed jointly by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL is presented. The photoinjector is based around a 5.59 cell rf gun that has state-of-the-art features including: elliptical contoured irises; improved mode separation; an optimized initial half cell length; a racetrack input coupler; and coupling that balances pulsed heating with cavity fill time. Radio-frequency and beam dynamics modeling have been done using a combination of codes including PARMELA, HFSS, IMPACT-T, ASTRA, and the ACE3P suite of codes developed at SLAC. The impact of lower gradient operation, magnet misalignment, solenoid multipole errors, beam offset, mode beating, wakefields, and beam line symmetry have been analyzed and are described. Fabrication and testing plans at both LLNL and SLAC are discussed.

  3. The role of supersymmetry phenomenology in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, James D.

    2000-01-01

    Supersymmetry phenomenology is an important component of particle physics today. I provide a definition of supersymmetry phenomenology, outline the scope of its activity, and argue its legitimacy. This essay derives from a presentation given at the 2000 SLAC Summer Institute

  4. Beam-beam issues in asymmetric colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    We discuss generic beam-beam issues for proposed asymmetric e + - e - colliders. We illustrate the issues by choosing, as examples, the proposals by Cornell University (CESR-B), KEK, and SLAC/LBL/LLNL (PEP-II)

  5. Old soldiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riordan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The author describes the history of the spectrometer installed at the SLAC 20-GeV-linac and its use from the study of the electroproduction of resonances to the study of the EMC effect with electrons. (HSI).

  6. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

    2006-04-19

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2003 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the DOE for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management to meet the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2003, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were utilized by SLAC to implement such ''greening of the government'' initiatives like Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. There were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations during 2003. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2003 in waste minimization, recycling, decreasing air emission rates, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a system to better manage chemical use. Program-specific details discussed are: (1) Air Quality--SLAC operates its air quality management program in compliance with established permit conditions; 2003 was the sixth consecutive year the air quality management program operated without any NOVs issued by regulators. Nevertheless, SLAC has an active program to improve its environmental performance in air quality. (2) Hazardous Waste--The Environmental Health Division of the San Mateo County Health Services Agency is the California certified unified permitting agency (CUPA) responsible

  7. Nuclear structure studies by the scattering of medium-energy electrons: Progress report, September 1, 1986-June 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teterson, G.A.; Hicks, R.S.; Dubach, J.F.; Miskimen, R.A.

    1987-06-01

    This paper discusses the experimental electron scattering studies at SLAC and Bates Accelerator Center. Some theoretical work on nucleon-nucleon interactions, electromagnetic interactions, weak interactions and nuclear structure are also discussed

  8. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and furture goals, FY1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barish, B C

    1981-05-08

    Continuing research in high energy physics carried out by the group from the California Institute of Technology. The program includes research in theory, phenomenology, and experimental high energy physics. The experimental program includes experiments at SLAC and FERMILAB.

  9. Tunnel vision for US X-ray free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Construction can begin on a major upgrade to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in the US after the tunnel that will house the facility was cleared of equipment.

  10. Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER 1999)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Gene

    2000-08-28

    This report provides information about environmental programs and compliance with environmental regulations in calendar year 1999 (CY99) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The most noteworthy information in this report is summarized in this section.

  11. Two Word CAMAC I/O module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, L.L.

    1981-05-01

    This note describes the 2 Word I/O subsystem and details its operating characteristics. SLAC drawings in the 926-306 series support this device and should be referenced for construction and connection details

  12. Online Particle Physics Information - Education Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    SLAC Online Particle Physics Information Particle Data Group Particle Physics Education Sites General Sites Background Knowledge Physics Lessons & Activities Astronomy Lessons & Activities Ask -A-Scientist Experiments, Demos and Fun Physics History & Diversity Art in Physics General Sites

  13. Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. receives architectural and engineering design contract from Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. announced that a subsidiary company won a contract from Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to provide architectural and engineering design services for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) conventional facilities" (1/2 page)

  14. First in the web, but where are the pieces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deken, J.M.

    1998-04-01

    The World Wide Web (WWW) does matter to the SLAC Archives and History Office for two very important, and related, reasons. The first reason is that the early Web at SLAC is historically significant: it was the first of its kind on this continent, and it achieved new and important things. The second reason is that the Web at SLAC--in its present and future forms--is a large and changing collection of official documents of the organization, many of which exist in no other form or environment. As of the first week of August, 1997, SLAC had 8,940 administratively-accounted-for web pages, and an estimated 2,000 to 4,000 additional pages that are hard to administratively track because they either reside on the main server in users directories several levels below their top-level pages, or they reside on one of the more than 60 non-main servers at the Center. A very small sampling of the information that SLAC WWW pages convey includes: information for the general public about programs and activities at SLAC; pages which allow physics experiment collaborators to monitor data, arrange work schedules and analyze results; pages that convey information to staff and visiting scientists about seminar and activity schedules, publication procedures, and ongoing experiments; and pages that allow staff and outside users to access databases maintained at SLAC. So, when SLAC's Archives and History Office begins to approach collecting the documents of their WWW presence, what are they collecting, and how are they to go about the process of collecting it. In this paper, the author discusses the effort to archive SLAC's Web in two parts, concentrating on the first task that has been undertaken: the initial effort to identify and gather into the archives evidence and documentation of the early days of the SLAC Web. The second task, which is the effort to collect present and future web pages at SLAC, are also covered, although in less detail, since it is an effort that is only

  15. Making electron beams for the SLC linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Ecklund, S.D.; James, M.B.; Miller, R.H.; Sheppard, J.C.; Sodja, J.; Truher, J.B.; Minten, A.

    1984-01-01

    A source of high-intensity, single-bunch electron beams has been developed at SLAC for the SLC. The properties of these beams have been studied extensively utilizing the first 100-m of the SLAC linac and the computer-based control system being developed for the SLC. The source is described and the properties of the beams are summarized. 9 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  16. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galic, H.; Armstrong, F.E.; von Przewoski, B.

    1994-08-01

    This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  17. IM-135-648-00 IDIM tester instruction manual for the TESTER for (135 to 562) Isolated Digital Input Module for SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieffer, J.

    1983-01-01

    This unit is designed to provide all of the input levels and channels needed to perform complete production and maintenance testing of the SLC Isolated Digital Input Module (SLAC 135 to 562). The manual includes the following sections: specifications; front panel, lights and connectors; reference list; functional description; 82S100 logic equations; test and checkout procedures; appendix A, SLAC 82S100 programming data; and appendix B, JXK-FORTH 135 to 648 program listing

  18. Observations of accelerated high current low emittance beams in the SLC Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, J.T.; Ross, M.C.; Sheppard, J.C.; Stiening, R.F.

    1985-05-01

    The Linac of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is required to accelerate several intense single electron and positron bunches to high energy while not enlarging their small transverse emittances. The improvements needed by the SLAC Linac to meet these goals have very stringent design criteria. As partial systems have become available, beam tests have been performed to confirm the designs. The results of those beam tests are discussed. Future plans of the improvement program are described. 13 refs., 9 figs

  19. Microprocessor controller for phasing the accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howry, S.K.; Wilmunder, A.R.

    1977-03-01

    A microprocessor controller is being developed to perform automatic phasing of the SLAC accelerator. It will replace the existing relay/analog boxes which are ten years old. The new system is all solid state except for the stepping motors that drive the phase shifters. A description is given of the components of the system, the control algorithm, microprocessor hardware and software design and development, and interaction with SLAC's computer control system

  20. Annual Site Environmental Report, 2000 (ASER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russak, Hillary M.

    2001-11-20

    This report provides information about environmental programs and compliance with environmental regulations during 2000 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In addition, updates that may be of special interest, which occurred beyond 2000, are included. The most noteworthy information in this report is summarized in this section. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management systems in meeting the site's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) goals.

  1. Bunch-by-bunch feedback for PEP II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxoby, G.; Claus, R.; Eisen, N.; Fox, J.; Hindi, H.; Hoeflich, J.; Olsen, J.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Linscott, I.

    1993-01-01

    The proposed PEP II B factory at SLAC requires a feedback to damp out longitudinal synchrotron oscillations. A time domain, downsampled, bunch-by-bunch feedback system in which each bunch is treated as an oscillator being driven by disturbances from other bunches is presented as we review the evolution of the system design. Results from a synchrotron oscillation damping experiment conducted at the SLAC/SSRL/SPEAR ring are also presented in this paper

  2. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Armstrong, F.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); von Przewoski, B. [Indiana Univ. Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN (United States)] [and others

    1994-08-01

    This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  3. Tiger Team Assessment of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) near San Francisco, California. SLAC/SSRL is the twenty-eighth DOE site to be assessed by a Tiger Team. SLAC and SSRL are single-purpose laboratories. SLAC is dedicated to experimental and theoretical research in elementary particle physics and to the development of new techniques in high-energy accelerators and elementary particle detectors. SSRL is dedicated to research in atomic and solid-state physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. The purpose of the SLAC/SSRL Tiger Team Assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy with concise information on the following: current ES ampersand H compliance status at the site and the vulnerabilities associated with that compliance status; root causes for noncompliance; adequacy of DOE and SLAC/SSRL ES ampersand H management programs; response actions to address identified problem areas; and effectiveness of self-assessment

  4. Annual Site Environmental Report, 2007(ASER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabba, D

    2008-10-07

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year (CY) of 2007 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year, i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2007/2008 (October 2007 through May 2008), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423 and DOE Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', SLAC effectively implemented and integrated the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2007, SLAC focused on development and implementation of SLAC management systems to ensure continual improvement. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13148. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC continues to demonstrate significant progress in implementing and integrating EMS into day-to-day operations at SLAC. The annual management review and ranking of environmental aspects were completed this year by SLAC's EMS Steering Committee, the Environmental Safety Committee (ESC) and thirteen objectives and targets were established for 2007. For each objective and target, a work

  5. Hazards analysis for the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory x-ray absorption experiments to be performed at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelstein, N.M.; Shuh, D.K.; Bucher, J.B.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the oxidation state(s) of neptunium (Np) in mouse skeleton and in soft tissue by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). If Np is present in sufficient concentration, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) data will be obtained in order to further identify the Np species present. These data will be crucial in understanding the metabolic pathway of Np in mammals which will help in the design of reagents which can eliminate Np from mammals in the event of accidental exposure. It is proposed to run these experiments at the Standard Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). This laboratory is a DOE national user facility located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The 237 Np nucleus decays by the emission of an alpha particle and this particle emission is the principal hazard in handling Np samples. This hazard is mitigated by physical containment of the sample which stops the alpha particles within the containment. The total amount of Np material that will be shipped to and be at SSRL at any one time will be less than 1 gram. This limit on the amount of Np will ensure that SLAC remains a low hazard, non-nuclear facility. The Np samples will be solids or Np ions in aqueous solution. The Np samples will be shipped to SSRL/SLAC OHP. SLAC OHP will inventory the samples and swipe the containers holding the triply contained samples, and then bring them to the SSRL Actinide trailer located outside building 131. The QA counting records from the samples, as measured at LBNL, will be provided to SSRL and SLAC OHP prior to the arrival of the samples at SLAC OHP. In addition, strict monitoring of the storage and experimental areas will be performed in accordance with SLAC/OHP radiation protection procedures to ensure against the release of contamination

  6. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2010 (ASER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabba, D.

    2011-11-11

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year of 2010 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that overlap the calendar year - i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2010/2011 (October 2010 through May 2011) are also included. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, EO 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program, SLAC effectively implements and integrates the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2010, SLAC continued to improve its management systems. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13423, EO 13514, and DOE Orders 450.1A and 430.2B. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. During 2010, there were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations. In addition, many improvements in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater management, groundwater restoration, and SLAC's chemical management system (CMS) were continued. The following are among SLAC's environmental accomplishments for 2010. To facilitate management and identification of future potential greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction opportunities, SLAC voluntarily

  7. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2010 (ASER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabba, D.

    2011-01-01

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year of 2010 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that overlap the calendar year - i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2010/2011 (October 2010 through May 2011) are also included. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M and O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, EO 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program, SLAC effectively implements and integrates the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2010, SLAC continued to improve its management systems. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13423, EO 13514, and DOE Orders 450.1A and 430.2B. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. During 2010, there were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations. In addition, many improvements in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater management, groundwater restoration, and SLAC's chemical management system (CMS) were continued. The following are among SLAC's environmental accomplishments for 2010. To facilitate management and identification of future potential greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction opportunities, SLAC voluntarily completed GHG inventories

  8. [Research in experimental and theoretical high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodek, A.; Ferbel, T.; Melissinos, A.C.

    1989-01-01

    The Experimental High Energy Physics Program is directed toward the execution of experiments at both national and international accelerator facilities. During the next fiscal year, we will be primarily concentrating on the following projects: Fermilab direct photon experiment E706; Tevatron proton-antiproton collider experiment D-Zero; Analysis of Fermilab neutrino experiments and hadron experiment; Analysis of SLAC experiment E140 and all previous SLAC data; Running of the SLAC E140 extension (approved to run in 89/90); SLAC experiment NE11 (ran in 1989); Brookhaven galactic axion experiment; Coherent production of axions and Dellbruck scattering at BNL; The AMY experiment at TRISTAN; and Laser Switched LINAC at the Rochester Laser Laboratory. Projects which are in the completion stages: Search for new states of matter using the Rochester Tandem and SLAC experiment E141 Axion search. Projects in study and planning stages: Nonlinear Compton Scattering at LEP; Production of hybrid mesons in the nuclear coulomb field; Neutrino experiment for the Tevatron upgrade and the SSC; and Involvement in the CDF upgrade and the SSC

  9. Development of multimegawatt klystrons for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caryotakis, G.; Callin, R.; Eppley, K.

    1993-04-01

    A number of experimental klystrons have been constructed and evaluated at SLAC, KEK and INP, aiming toward output power objectives of 100 and 120 MW at 11.4 GHz (SLAC and KEK respectively) or 150 MW at 14 GHz (INP), with pulse lengths on the order of 1 μs. Since rf breakdown is considered to be the principal mechanism limiting power for such tubes, most of the effort has been concentrated on the design of output circuits that reduce rf gradients by distributing fields over a longer region of interaction. Another klystron component receiving emphasis has been the output window, where the approach for future tubes may be to use a circular TE01-mode, half-wave window. Rest results to date in this continuing international effort are: 50 MW with 1 μs pulses, using a traveling-wave output circuit (SLAC and INP), and 85 MW with 200 ns. pulse (SLAC), using two conventional reentrant, but uncoupled, output cavities. At KEK a klystron with a single, but not reentrant, cavity has produced 80 MW in 50 ns pulses. Finally, Haimson has demonstrated 100 MW at 50 ns with a traveling-wave output. This paper addresses primarily the work performed at SLAC during the last two years

  10. The development of seismic guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huggins, R.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the development of Seismic Guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Although structures have always been built conservatively, SLAC management decided to review and update their seismic guidelines. SLAC is about mid-way between the epicenters of the 8.3 Richter magnitude 1906 San Francisco and the 7.2 Loma Prieta Earthquakes. The west end of the two mile long electron/positron particle accelerator lies a half mile from the large San Andreas Fault. Suggestions for seismic planning processes were solicited from local computer manufacturing firms, universities, and federal laboratories. A Committee of the various stakeholders in SLAC`s seismic planning retained an internationally known Seismic Planning Consultant and reviewed relevant standards and drafted Guidelines. A panel of seismic experts was convened to help define the hazard, site response spectra, probabilistic analysis of shaking, and near field effects. The Facility`s structures were assigned to seismic classes of importance, and an initial assessment of a sample of a dozen buildings conducted. This assessment resulted in emergency repairs to one structure, and provided a {open_quotes}reality basis{close_quotes} for establishing the final Guidelines and Administrative Procedures, and a program to evaluate remaining buildings, shielding walls, tunnels, and other special structures.

  11. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  12. A valiant little terminal: A VLT user`s manual. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, A.

    1992-08-01

    VLT came to be used at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center), because SLAC wanted to assess the Amiga`s usefulness as a color graphics terminal and T{sub E}X workstation. Before the project could really begin, the people at SLAC needed a terminal emulator which could successfully talk to the IBM 3081 (now the IBM ES9000-580) and all the VAXes on the site. Moreover, it had to compete in quality with the Ann Arbor Ambassador GXL terminals which were already in use at the laboratory. Unfortunately, at the time there was no commercial program which fit the bill. Luckily, Willy Langeveld had been independently hacking up a public domain VT100 emulator written by Dave Wecker et al. and the result, VLT, suited SLAC`s purpose. Over the years, as the program was debugged and rewritten, the original code disappeared, so that now, in the present version of VLT, none of the original VT100 code remains.

  13. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs

  14. Performance of a 150-MW S-band klystron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprehn, D.; Phillips, R.M.; Caryotakis, G.

    1994-09-01

    As part of an international collaboration, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) klystron group has designed, fabricated, and tested a 60-Hz, 3-μs, 150-MW S-band klystron built for Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY). A test diode with a 535-kV, 700-A electron beam was constructed to verify the gun operation. The first klystron was built and successfully met design specifications. The 375-MW electron beam represents a new record for SLAC accelerator klystrons in terms of voltage, current, energy, and ruggedness of design. The rf output power is a 150% increase over the S-band tubes currently used in the two-mile-long linear accelerator at SLAC. This paper discusses design issues and experimental results of the diode and klystron

  15. Orbit Display's Use of the Physics Application Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelazny, Michael; Chevtsov, Sergei; Chu, Chungming Paul; Fairley, Diane; Krejcik, Patrick; Natampalli, Partha; Rogind, Deborah; White, Greg; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    At the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) the Controls Department (CD) is developing a physics application framework based on the Java(tm) programming language developed by Sun Microsystems. This paper will discuss the first application developed using this approach: a new Orbit Display. The software is being developed by several individuals in reusable Java packages. It relies on the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) toolkit for data collection and XAL - A Java based Hierarchy for Application Programming for model parameters. The Orbit Display tracks and displays electron paths through the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in both a graphical, beam line plot, and tabular format. It contains many features that may be unique to SLAC and is meant to be used both in the control room and by individuals in their offices or at home. Unique features include BSA Beam Synchronous Acquisition (BSA), Orbit Fitting, and Buffered Acquisition.

  16. Electron beam spectrum monitor using synchrotron light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reagan, D.; Hostetler, T.E.

    1979-03-01

    This instrument shows the positions, widths, and shapes of momentum spectra of SLAC beams. It uses synchrotron light produced when the beam is deflected by a magnet. Some of the light is focused on the face of an image splitter consisting of acrylic light pipes. The light pipes illuminate twelve photomultiplier tubes. Pulses from the PM tubes are integrated, multiplexed, and displayed on an oscilloscope. The resolution of the instrument is usually better than 0.2%. It has some advantages over the secondary emitter foil spectrum monitors (SEM's) currently in use at SLAC. It need never be put out of service to avoid disturbing the beam. It is as sensitive as the most sensitive SLAC SEM. (Its performance has been optimized for high-current beams; it can easily be made much more sensitive.) It provides information on a pulse-to-pulse basis and, with better cables, could indicate electron beam pulse shapes

  17. X-Band RF Gun Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlieks, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    In support of the MEGa-ray program at LLNL and the High Gradient research program at SLAC, a new X-band multi-cell RF gun is being developed. This gun, similar to earlier guns developed at SLAC for Compton X-ray source program, will be a standing wave structure made of 5.5 cells operating in the pi mode with copper cathode. This gun was designed following criteria used to build SLAC X-band high gradient accelerating structures. It is anticipated that this gun will operate with surface electric fields on the cathode of 200 MeV/m with low breakdown rate. RF will be coupled into the structure through a final cell with symmetric duel feeds and with a shape optimized to minimize quadrupole field components. In addition, geometry changes to the original gun, operated with Compton X-ray source, will include a wider RF mode separation, reduced surface electric and magnetic fields.

  18. Annual environmental monitoring report, January-December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    Environmental monitoring results continue to demonstrate that, except for penetrating radiation, environmental radiological impact due to SLAC operation is not distinguishable from natural environmental sources. During 1979, the maximum measured neutron dose near the site boundary was not distinguishable from the cosmic ray neutron background. There have been no measurable increases in radioactivity in ground water attributable to SLAC operations since 1966. Because of major new construction, well water samples were not collected and analyzed during 1979. Construction activities have also temporarily placed our sampling stations for the sanitary and storm sewers out of service. They will be reestablished as soon as construction activities permit (mid 1980). Airborne radioactivity released from SLAC continues to make only a negligible environmental impact, and results in a site boundary annual dose of less than 0.3 mrem; this represents less than 0.3% of the annual dose from the natural radiation environment, and about 0.06% of the technical standard

  19. Annual environmental monitoring report, January--December 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    Environmental monitoring results continue to demonstrate that, except for penetrating radiation, environmental radiological impact due to SLAC operation is not distinguishable from natural environmental sources. During 1976 the maximum neutron dose near the site boundary was 3.4 mrem. This represents about 3.4% of the annual dose from natural sources at this elevation and 0.68% of the technical standard of 500 mrem per person annually. There have been no measurable increases in radioactivity in ground water attributable to SLAC operations. Airborne radioactivity released from SLAC also continues to make only a negligible environmental impact and result in a site boundary annual dose of less than 0.01 mrem, which represents less than 0.01% of the annual dose from the natural radiation environment and about 0.002% of the technical standard

  20. Annual environmental monitoring report, January--December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-04-01

    Environmental monitoring results continue to demonstrate that, except for penetrating radiation, environmental radiological impact due to SLAC operation is not distinguishable from natural environmental sources. During 1975 the maximum neutron dose near the site boundary was 15.8 mrem. This represents about 16 percent of the annual dose from natural sources at this elevation and 3.2 percent of the technical standard of 500 mrem per person annually. There have been no measurable increases in radioactivity in ground water attributable to SLAC operations. Airborne radioactivity released from SLAC also continues to make only a negligible environmental impact and results in a site boundary annual dose of less than 2.4 mrem, which represents less than 2.4 percent of the annual dose from the natural radiation environment and about 0.5 percent of the technical standard

  1. Annual environmental monitoring report, January-December 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    Environmental monitoring results continue to demonstrate that environmental radiological impact due to SLAC operation is not easily distinguishable from natural environmental sources. During 1983, the maximum approximated neutron dose near the site boundary was 5 mrem. There have been no measurable increases in radioactivity in ground water attributable to SLAC operations since operation began in 1966. We have never found any evidence of radioactivity in ground water in excess of natural background radioactivity from uranium and thorium decay chains and potassium-40. Airborne radioactivity released from SLAC continues to make only a negligible environmental impact, and results in a site-boundary annual dose of less than 0.3 mrem; this represents less than 0.3% of the annual dose from the natural radiation environment, and about 0.06% of the technical standard. 8 references, 5 figures, 4 tables

  2. Annual environmental monitoring report, January-December 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    Environmental monitoring results continue to demonstrate that environmental radiological impact due to SLAC operation is not distinguishable from natural environmental sources. During 1982, the maximum measured neutron dose near the site boundary was not distinguishable from the cosmic ray neutron background. There have been no measurable increases in radioactivity in ground water attributable to SLAC operations since operation began in 1966. Airborne radioactivity released from SLAC continues to make only a negligible environmental impact, and results in a site boundary annual dose of less than 0.3 mrem; this represents less than 0.3% of the annual dose from the natural radiation environment, and about 0.06% of the technical standard

  3. Electron interactions with nuclei. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    Research includes work at SLAC, Bates, and Saclay research facilities. The high energy program at SLAC concerns inclusive electron scattering from nuclei, electroexcitation of the delta in nuclei, and the design of an electron detection system for the SLAC 1.6 GeV/c magnetic spectrometer. The high energy program at Bates includes quasielastic electron scattering from 1 H, 2 H, 3 He, and 4 He, and electron scattering from 3 H and 3 He. Nuclear structure studies are based on high resolution inelastic electron scattering and include electron scattering from 208 Pb and mercury isotopes, charge densities from low lying states in 86 Sr, and magnetization densities of 205 Tl and 207 Pb. (DWL) 72 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab

  4. Orbit Display's Use of the Physics Application Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelazny, Michael

    2009-01-01

    At the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) the Controls Department (CD) is developing a physics application framework based on the Java(tm) programming language developed by Sun Microsystems. This paper will discuss the first application developed using this approach: a new Orbit Display. The software is being developed by several individuals in reusable Java packages. It relies on the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) toolkit for data collection and XAL - A Java based Hierarchy for Application Programming for model parameters. The Orbit Display tracks and displays electron paths through the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in both a graphical, beam line plot, and tabular format. It contains many features that may be unique to SLAC and is meant to be used both in the control room and by individuals in their offices or at home. Unique features include BSA Beam Synchronous Acquisition (BSA), Orbit Fitting, and Buffered Acquisition.

  5. BaBar - A Community Web Site in an Organizational Setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Bebo

    2003-01-01

    The BABAR Web site was established in 1993 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to support the BABAR experiment, to report its results, and to facilitate communication among its scientific and engineering collaborators, currently numbering about 600 individuals from 75 collaborating institutions in 10 countries. The BABAR Web site is, therefore, a community Web site. At the same time it is hosted at SLAC and funded by agencies that demand adherence to policies decided under different priorities. Additionally, the BABAR Web administrators deal with the problems that arise during the course of managing users, content, policies, standards, and changing technologies. Desired solutions to some of these problems may be incompatible with the overall administration of the SLAC Web sites and/or the SLAC policies and concerns. There are thus different perspectives of the same Web site and differing expectations in segments of the SLAC population which act as constraints and challenges in any review or re-engineering activities. Web Engineering, which post-dates the BABAR Web, has aimed to provide a comprehensive understanding of all aspects of Web development. This paper reports on the first part of a recent review of application of Web Engineering methods to the BABAR Web site, which has led to explicit user and information models of the BABAR community and how SLAC and the BABAR community relate and react to each other. The paper identifies the issues of a community Web site in a hierarchical, semi-governmental sector and formulates a strategy for periodic reviews of BABAR and similar sites. A separate paper reports on the findings of a user survey and selected interviews with users, along with their implications and recommendations for future

  6. BaBar - A Community Web Site in an Organizational Setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Bebo

    2003-07-10

    The BABAR Web site was established in 1993 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to support the BABAR experiment, to report its results, and to facilitate communication among its scientific and engineering collaborators, currently numbering about 600 individuals from 75 collaborating institutions in 10 countries. The BABAR Web site is, therefore, a community Web site. At the same time it is hosted at SLAC and funded by agencies that demand adherence to policies decided under different priorities. Additionally, the BABAR Web administrators deal with the problems that arise during the course of managing users, content, policies, standards, and changing technologies. Desired solutions to some of these problems may be incompatible with the overall administration of the SLAC Web sites and/or the SLAC policies and concerns. There are thus different perspectives of the same Web site and differing expectations in segments of the SLAC population which act as constraints and challenges in any review or re-engineering activities. Web Engineering, which post-dates the BABAR Web, has aimed to provide a comprehensive understanding of all aspects of Web development. This paper reports on the first part of a recent review of application of Web Engineering methods to the BABAR Web site, which has led to explicit user and information models of the BABAR community and how SLAC and the BABAR community relate and react to each other. The paper identifies the issues of a community Web site in a hierarchical, semi-governmental sector and formulates a strategy for periodic reviews of BABAR and similar sites. A separate paper reports on the findings of a user survey and selected interviews with users, along with their implications and recommendations for future.

  7. Reliability and lifetime predictions of SLC klystrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Lee, T.G.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    The energy upgrade of SLAC, with the first of the new 67 MW SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) klystrons, began over four years ago. Today there are over 200 of these klystrons in operation. As a result, there is a wealth of klystron performance and failure information that enables reasonable predictions to be made on life expectancy and reliability. Data from initial tests, follow-up tests and daily operation monitoring on the accelerator is stored for analysis. Presented here are life expectancy predictions with particular emphasis on cathode life. Also, based on this data, the authors will discuss some of the principal modes of failure. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  8. Polarized electron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prepost, R.

    1994-01-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented

  9. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Dodder, D.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G. [Inst. for High Energy Physics, Serpukhov (Russian Federation); Illarionova, N.S. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lehar, F. [CEN Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Oyanagi, Y. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Sciences; Olin, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Frosch, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

    1992-06-01

    This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  10. Making tracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-10-15

    In many modern tracking chambers, the sense wires, rather than being lined up uniformly, are grouped into clusters to facilitate the pattern recognition process. However, with higher energy machines providing collisions richer in secondary particles, event reconstruction becomes more complicated. A Caltech / Illinois / SLAC / Washington group developed an ingenious track finding and fitting approach for the Mark III detector used at the SPEAR electron-positron ring at SLAC (Stanford). This capitalizes on the detector's triggering, which uses programmable logic circuits operating in parallel, each 'knowing' the cell patterns for all tracks passing through a specific portion of the tracker (drift chamber)

  11. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision 1-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Rittenberg, A.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains summaries of 551 approved experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1 January 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  12. 2016 FACET-II Science Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Mark J., ed.

    2017-07-19

    The second in a series of FACET-II Science Workshops was held at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory on October 17-19, 2016 [1]. The workshop drew thirty-five participants from eighteen different institutions including CERN, DESY, Ecole Polytechnique, FNAL, JAI, LBNL, LLNL, Radiabeam, Radiasoft, SLAC, Stony Brook, Strathclyde, Tech-X, Tsinghua, UC Boulder, UCLA and UT Austin. The 2015 workshop [2, 3] helped prioritize research directions for FACET-II. The 2016 workshop was focused on understanding what improvements are needed at the facility to support the next generation of experiments. All presentations are linked to the workshop website as a permanent record.

  13. Nanofibrous Snake Venom Hemostat

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Vivek A.; Wickremasinghe, Navindee C.; Shi, Siyu; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Controlling perioperative bleeding is of critical importance to minimize hemorrhaging and fatality. Patients on anticoagulant therapy such as heparin have diminished clotting potential and are at risk for hemorrhaging. Here we describe a self-assembling nanofibrous peptide hydrogel (termed SLac) that on its own can act as a physical barrier to blood loss. SLac was loaded with snake-venom derived Batroxobin (50 μg/mL) yielding a drug-loaded hydrogel (SB50). SB50 was potentiated to enhance clot...

  14. Computational needs for modelling accelerator components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanerfeld, H.

    1985-06-01

    The particle-in-cell MASK is being used to model several different electron accelerator components. These studies are being used both to design new devices and to understand particle behavior within existing structures. Studies include the injector for the Stanford Linear Collider and the 50 megawatt klystron currently being built at SLAC. MASK is a 2D electromagnetic code which is being used by SLAC both on our own IBM 3081 and on the CRAY X-MP at the NMFECC. Our experience with running MASK illustrates the need for supercomputers to continue work of the kind described. 3 refs., 2 figs

  15. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E., Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.; Olin, A.; Lehar, F.; Moskalev, A.N.; Barkov, B.P.

    1987-03-01

    This report contains summaries of 720 recent and current experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

  16. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Oyanagi, Y. (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan)); Dodder, D.C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Ryabov, Yu.G.; Slabospitsky, S.R. (Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Serpukhov (USSR). Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij); Frosch, R. (Swiss Inst. for Nuclear Research, Villigen (Switzerla

    1989-09-01

    This report contains summaries of 736 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1982 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PSI/SIN, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground experiments. Also given are instructions for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

  17. Update on the Code Intercomparison and Benchmark for Muon Fluence and Absorbed Dose Induced by an 18 GeV Electron Beam After Massive Iron Shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasso, A. [SLAC; Ferrari, A. [CERN; Ferrari, A. [HZDR, Dresden; Mokhov, N. V. [Fermilab; Mueller, S. E. [HZDR, Dresden; Nelson, W. R. [SLAC; Roesler, S. [CERN; Sanami, t.; Striganov, S. I. [Fermilab; Versaci, R. [Unlisted, CZ

    2016-12-01

    In 1974, Nelson, Kase and Svensson published an experimental investigation on muon shielding around SLAC high-energy electron accelerators [1]. They measured muon fluence and absorbed dose induced by 14 and 18 GeV electron beams hitting a copper/water beamdump and attenuated in a thick steel shielding. In their paper, they compared the results with the theoretical models available at that time. In order to compare their experimental results with present model calculations, we use the modern transport Monte Carlo codes MARS15, FLUKA2011 and GEANT4 to model the experimental setup and run simulations. The results are then compared between the codes, and with the SLAC data.

  18. Current Experiments in Particle Physics. 1996 Edition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, Hrvoje

    2003-06-27

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  19. Current experiments in particle physics - particle data group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Lehar, F. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kettle, P.R. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  20. Polarized electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prepost, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented.

  1. Beam dynamics verification in linacs of linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    The SLAC two-mile linac has been upgraded to accelerate high current, low emittance electron and positron beams to be used in the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). After the upgrade was completed, extensive beam studies were made to verify that the design criteria have been met. These tests involved the measurement of emittance, beam phase space orientation, energy dispersion, trajectory oscillations, bunch length, energy spectrum and wakefields. The methods, the systems and the data cross checks are compared for the various measurements. Implications for the next linear collider are discussed. 12 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Measurement of the left-right forward-backward asymmetry for charm quarks with D*+ and D+ mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C.J.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N.J.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bienz, T.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D'Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Daoudi, M.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell'Orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P.Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D.J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; Kim, Y.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; Russell, J.J.; Saxton, O.H.; Schalk, T.

    1995-01-01

    We present a direct measurement of A c =2v c a c /(v 2 c +a 2 c ) from the left-right forward-backward asymmetry of D * + and D + mesons in Z 0 events produced with the longitudinally polarized SLAC Linear Collider beam. These Z 0 →c over bar events are tagged on the basis of event kinematics and decay topology from a sample of hadronic Z 0 decays recorded by the SLAC Large Detector. We measure A 0 c = 0.73 ± 0.22(stat) ± 0.10(syst). copyright 1995 The American Physical Society

  3. The Final Focus Test Beam laser referene system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressler, V.E.; Ruland, R.E.

    1993-05-01

    The original design for the SLAC linac included an alignment reference system with 270 diffraction gratings situated along the 3000 meter linac. These gratings have provided SLAC with a global reference line repeatable to within 200 micro meters. For the Final Focus Test Beam, this laser system has been extended and 13 new diffraction gratings have been installed. Improvements targets and the availability of new instruments allows us to evaluate the performance of the laser reference system at the 510 micro meter level. An explanation of the system and the results of our evaluation are presented

  4. Technical progress report of the Indiana University High Energy Physics Group, December 1, 1979-November 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brabson, B.B.; Crittenden, R.R.; Dzierba, A.R.; Heinz, R.M.; Martin, H.J.; Neal, H.A.; Ogren, H.O.

    1980-01-01

    Research programs during the current contract year are associated with major experiments conducted at SLAC, Fermilab, and CERN. The physics areas under study include an exploration of polarization phenomena in hadron processes, a study of low-p/sub t/ and high-p/sub t/ collisions utilizing the Multiparticle Spectrometer at Fermilab, studies of psi meson production in hadron interactions, and a high-resolution study of e + e- interactions at high energy at SLAC. The status of the various efforts is discussed

  5. Reliability and lifetime predictions of SLC klystrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Lee, T.G.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1989-03-01

    The energy upgrade of SLAC, with the first of the new 67 MW SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) klystrons, began over four years ago. Today there are over 200 of these klystrons in operation. As a result, there is a wealth klystron performance and failure information that enables reasonable predictions to be made on life expectancy and reliability. Data from initial tests, follow-up tests and daily operation monitoring on the accelerator is stores for analysis. Presented here are life expectancy predictions with particular emphasis on cathode life. Also, based on this data, we will discuss some of the principal modes of failure. 3 refs., 2 figs

  6. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.; Olin, A.; Lehar, F.; Moskalev, A.N.; Barkov, B.P.

    1987-03-01

    This report contains summaries of 720 recent and current experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized

  7. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Slabospitsky, S.R.; Olin, A.; Klumov, I.A.

    1989-09-01

    This report contains summaries of 736 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1982 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PSI/SIN, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground experiments. Also given are instructions for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized

  8. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galic, H.; Dodder, D.C.; Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Illarionova, N.S.; Lehar, F.; Oyanagi, Y.; Frosch, R.

    1992-06-01

    This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  9. Current experiments in particle physics - particle data group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galic, H.; Kettle, P.R.

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  10. The MARX Modulator Development Program for the International Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyh, G.E.

    2006-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) Marx Modulator Development Program at SLAC is working towards developing a full-scale ILC Marx ''Reference Design'' modulator prototype, with the goal of significantly reducing the size and cost of the ILC modulator while improving overall modulator efficiency and availability. The ILC Reference Design prototype will provide a proof-of-concept model to industry in advance of Phase II SBIR funding, and also allow operation of the new 10MW L-Band Klystron prototypes immediately upon their arrival at SLAC

  11. Radiation and electrical safety systems for PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.; Constant, T.; Crook, K.; Fitch, J.; Taylor, T.

    1981-02-01

    At SLAC, the Personnel Protection System (PPS) protects people from radiation hazards. For PEP, the system has been expanded to include protection against electrical and RF hazards. This paper describes the overall system design, giving particular attention to the novel features not found in similar systems in other areas of SLAC. These include the Restricted Access Mode to allow limited occupancy in the ring while high voltage or RF may be present, the automatic badge reader system for improving the efficiency of entry logging and control, and the solid state lighting control system for switching large lighting loads with minimum electro-magetic interference

  12. Crystal ball data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chestnut, R.; Kiesling, C.; Bloom, E.; Bulos, F.; Gaiser, J.; Godfrey, G.; Oreglia, M.; Partridge, R.; Peck, C.; Porter, F.; Aschman, D.; Cavali-Sforza, M.; Coyne, D.; Sadrozinski, H.; Kollmann, W.; Richardson, M.

    1979-01-01

    The data acquisition system for the Crystal Ball project at SLAC is described. A PDP-11/t55 using RSX-11M connected to the SLAC Triplex is the basis of the system. A ''physics pipeline'' allows physicists to write their own equipment-monitoring or physics tasks which require event sampling. As well, an interactive analysis package (MULTI) is in the pipeline. Histogram collection and display on the PDP are implemented using the Triplex histogramming package. Various interactive event displays are also implemented

  13. SLC kicker magnet limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassel, R.; Donaldson, A.; Mattison, T.; Bowden, G.; Weaver, J.; Bulos, F.; Fiander, D.

    1991-01-01

    The SLC Damping Ring kicker magnets requires a fast magnetic field rise time of 58 nsec, a peak field of 800 gauss, a pulse amplitude stability of 0.01%, and a reasonable operational lifetime. The original kicker magnets designed by SLAC and at Fermi were not able to fulfill the SLC kicker requirements. Extensive studies were conducted to determine the limitation in the magnets, response of the ferrite in kicker magnet, and the modifications needed to improve the kicker magnet performance. The paper details the SLAC and Fermi kicker magnets limitation of performance

  14. MARK II end cap calorimeter electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jared, R.C.; Haggerty, J.S.; Herrup, D.A.; Kirsten, F.A.; Lee, K.L.; Olson, S.R.; Wood, D.R.

    1985-10-01

    An end cap calorimeter system has been added to the MARK II detector in preparation for its use at the SLAC Linear Collider. The calorimeter uses 8744 rectangular proportional counter tubes. This paper describes the design features of the data acquisition electronics that has been installed on the calorimeter. The design and use of computer-based test stands for the amplification and signal-shaping components is also covered. A portion of the complete system has been tested in a beam at SLAC. In these initial tests, using only the calibration provided by the test stands, a resolution of 18%/√E was achieved

  15. [Experiment studies of electron-positron interactions at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzbach, S.S.; Kofler, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    The High Energy Physics group at the University of Massachusetts has continued its' program of experimental studies of electron-positron interactions at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The group activities have included: analysis of data taken between 1982 and 1990 with the TPC detector at the PEP facility, continuing data collection and data analysis using the SLC/SLD facility, planning for the newly approved B-factory at SLAC, and participation in design studies for future high energy linear colliders. This report will briefly summarize these activities

  16. Surface treatment of disk made by ultra-precision diamond turning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashi, Norio; Higashi, Yasuo; Kudo, Noboru; Higo, Toshiyasu; Besyo, Koutarou; Funahashi, Yoshisato; Nagai, Minoru

    2005-01-01

    The etching treatment is applied to disk surface of X-band accelerator structures before bonding processes such as diffusion bonding and brazing. The KEK etching process was developed by modifying the process given by SLAC, where KEK-made disks are assembled and bonded as one of the collaborating activities between SLAC and KEK. The surface evaluation of the treated disks was performed by SEM (scanning electron microscope) with its magnification of about X500, in addition to the inspection by eye. The information and treatment process specification are described here. (author)

  17. Compilation of current high-energy-physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1980-04-01

    This is the third edition of a compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and ten participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about January 1980, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1976

  18. NLC Mechanical

    Science.gov (United States)

    text only Mechanical Systems.gif (14697 bytes) NLC Home Page NLC Technical SLAC Permanent Magnets Organization Overview The Mechanical Systems Group Organization is shown on the NLC Project Group Organization Chart (Next Linear Collider Technical Web Page). The Mechanical Systems Group operates on a matrixed

  19. Spin structure of the nucleon and polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1994-09-01

    Recent experiments at CERN and SLAC have added new knowledge about the spin structure of the proton and the deuteron. A brief historical background is presented, the status of experiments is discussed, and progress in the understanding of the spin of the nucleon in the context of the quark parton model is summarized

  20. On the ratio of lifetimes for the D+ and D0 mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, B.F.L.

    1982-08-01

    Using the SLAC lattice QCD theory, we derive an effective interaction density for the process c+u-bar→s+d-bar+G, where G is a gluon. In this way, we calculate the ratio of lifetimes for the D + and D 0 mesons. Our result for this ratio is close to unity. (author)

  1. New results make headline news

    CERN Document Server

    Riesselmann, K

    2001-01-01

    SLAC announced this week they had found further examples of CP violation through observing the disintegration of B Mesons. CERN also revealed that the statistical evidence for the Higgs from LEP data recently reanalysed, was no longer as strong as previously thought (2 pages).

  2. An improved search for elementary particles with fractional electric charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.R.

    1996-08-01

    The SLAC Quark Search Group has demonstrated successful operation of a low cost, high mass throughput Millikan apparatus designed to search for fractionally charged particles. About six million silicone oil drops were measured with no evidence of fractional charges. A second experiment is under construction with 100 times greater throughput which will utilize optimized search fluids

  3. ABA signaling in guard cells entails a dynamic protein-protein interaction relay from the PYL-RCAR family receptors to ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Chul; Lim, Chae Woo; Lan, Wenzhi; He, Kai; Luan, Sheng

    2013-03-01

    Plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) serves as an integrator of environmental stresses such as drought to trigger stomatal closure by regulating specific ion channels in guard cells. We previously reported that SLAC1, an outward anion channel required for stomatal closure, was regulated via reversible protein phosphorylation events involving ABA signaling components, including protein phosphatase 2C members and a SnRK2-type kinase (OST1). In this study, we reconstituted the ABA signaling pathway as a protein-protein interaction relay from the PYL/RCAR-type receptors, to the PP2C-SnRK2 phosphatase-kinase pairs, to the ion channel SLAC1. The ABA receptors interacted with and inhibited PP2C phosphatase activity against the SnRK2-type kinase, releasing active SnRK2 kinase to phosphorylate, and activate the SLAC1 channel, leading to reduced guard cell turgor and stomatal closure. Both yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays were used to verify the interactions among the components in the pathway. These biochemical assays demonstrated activity modifications of phosphatases and kinases by their interaction partners. The SLAC1 channel activity was used as an endpoint readout for the strength of the signaling pathway, depending on the presence of different combinations of signaling components. Further study using transgenic plants overexpressing one of the ABA receptors demonstrated that changing the relative level of interacting partners would change ABA sensitivity.

  4. Subsidence of the pit slab at SLC experimental hall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, J.; Himeno, Yoichi; Katsura, Yutaka

    1992-01-01

    Detectors installed at particle accelerator facilities are quite heavy, weighing thousands of tons. On the other hand, ground subsidence caused by the installation of a detector adversely affects the beam line alignment of the collider. It becomes, therefore, very important to figure out the expected amount of ground settlement by means of adequate evaluation methods in advance. At Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), a 1700 mT (metric tons) Mark II detector was replaced with a 4000 mT SLD detector in Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The exchange started in December 1990 and lasted until March 1991, and the amount of ground settlement was measured by SLAC during that period. We performed simulation studies to evaluate the subsidence of the pit slab using several analysis methods. Parameters used for the analyses were decided based on the information of the SLC structure and the ground conditions at the SLAC area. The objective of this study is to verify the applicability of several simulation methods by comparing the analytical results with the actual subsidence data obtained by SLAC

  5. First Beam Test of Nanometer Spot Size Monitor Using Laser Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Walz, D

    2003-01-01

    The nanometer spot size monitor based on the laser interferometry (Laser-Compton Spot Size Monitor) has been tested in FFTB beam line at SLAC. A low emittance beam of 46 GeV electrons, provided by the two-mile linear accelerator, was focused into nanometer spot in the FFTB line, and its transverse dimensions were precisely measured by the spot size monitor.

  6. First Beam Test of Nanometer Spot Size Monitor Using Laser Interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walz, Dieter R

    2003-01-01

    The nanometer spot size monitor based on the laser interferometry (Laser-Compton Spot Size Monitor) has been tested in FFTB beam line at SLAC. A low emittance beam of 46 GeV electrons, provided by the two-mile linear accelerator, was focused into nanometer spot in the FFTB line, and its transverse dimensions were precisely measured by the spot size monitor

  7. Application of local area networks to accelerator control systems at the Stanford Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, J.D.; Linstadt, E.; Melen, R.

    1983-03-01

    The history and current status of SLAC's SDLC networks for distributed accelerator control systems are discussed. These local area networks have been used for instrumentation and control of the linear accelerator. Network topologies, protocols, physical links, and logical interconnections are discussed for specific applications in distributed data acquisition and control system, computer networks and accelerator operations

  8. Heavy Flavor Fragmentation and Decay at SLD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plano, Richard M

    1999-02-24

    Results on heavy quark fragmentation obtained using the SLD detector at the SLAC Linear Collider are presented. This talk will cover the ratio of vector to pseudoscalar charmed meson production, the inclusive B hadron energy distribution, the inclusive particle production in heavy jets compared to their production in light jets, and charged and neutral B meson lifetimes.

  9. Reaction π+p → π+pπ0 (fast) at 16 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, M.; Fortney, L.; Glanzman, T.

    1980-01-01

    An experiment at the SLAC bubble chamber hybrid facility including the lead glass shower detector is discussed. Early results from the reaction π + p → π + pπ 0 , with incident π + at 16 GeV, and π 0 energy > 8 GeV, are discussed

  10. UCLA accelerator research ampersand development. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report discusses work on advanced accelerators and beam dynamics at ANL, BNL, SLAC, UCLA and Pulse Sciences Incorporated. Discussed in this report are the following concepts: Wakefield acceleration studies; plasma lens research; high gradient rf cavities and beam dynamics studies at the Brookhaven accelerator test facility; rf pulse compression development; and buncher systems for high gradient accelerator and relativistic klystron applications

  11. Linear colliders - prospects 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, J.

    1985-06-01

    We discuss the scaling laws of linear colliders and their consequences for accelerator design. We then report on the SLAC Linear Collider project and comment on experience gained on that project and its application to future colliders. 9 refs., 2 figs

  12. System for calibration of SPEAR transport line toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, T.V.; Smith, H.; Crook, K.

    1977-01-01

    A one nanosecond pulse generator was developed for calibration of the intensity monitors (toroids) in the SPEAR transport lines. The generator, located at the toroid, is simple, low cost and resistant to radiation. The generator and its connection to the standard SLAC toroid calibration system are described

  13. [Conduct theoretical and experimental research programs in high energy physics]: Technical progress, Appendix A-2, FTP/A, Item 20,f

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Progress is reported in these areas: neutrino physics; nucleon decay and the intrinsic properties of neutrinos; the D-zero experiment; QCD jet physics and ultrarelativistic nuclear physics; the Colliding Detector at Fermilab; rare kaon decay; the Anomalous Single Photon detector at SLAC; particle theory; neutrino astrophysics and cosmology; and operations and support services

  14. Electronics for the BaBar experiment at PEP-II: A short review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallo, N.

    1999-01-01

    The BaBar detector at the SLAC B-Factory is currently under construction and scheduled for completion at the end of 1998. An innovative data acquisition architecture design has been adopted. Following a brief introduction on the main requirements and concepts, an overview of the architecture, the hardware implementation and status will be presented

  15. Recent results of BABAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, D.

    2001-01-01

    The BABAR detector at SLAC's PEP-II storage ring has collected data amounting to about 30.4 fb -1 until june 2001. Results on CP violation, and in particular search for direct CP violation, and measurement of rare B decays are presented

  16. High Reliability Prototype Quadrupole for the Next Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, Cherrill M

    2001-01-01

    The Next Linear Collider (NLC) will require over 5600 magnets, each of which must be highly reliable and/or quickly repairable in order that the NLC reach its 85% overall availability goal. A multidiscipline engineering team was assembled at SLAC to develop a more reliable electromagnet design than historically had been achieved at SLAC. This team carried out a Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) on a standard SLAC quadrupole magnet system. They overcame a number of longstanding design prejudices, producing 10 major design changes. This paper describes how a prototype magnet was constructed and the extensive testing carried out on it to prove full functionality with an improvement in reliability. The magnet's fabrication cost will be compared to the cost of a magnet with the same requirements made in the historic SLAC way. The NLC will use over 1600 of these 12.7 mm bore quadrupoles with a range of integrated strengths from 0.6 to 132 Tesla, a maximum gradient of 135 Tesla per meter, an adjustment range of 0 to -20% and core lengths from 324 mm to 972 mm. The magnetic center must remain stable to within 1 micron during the 20% adjustment. A magnetic measurement set-up has been developed that can measure sub-micron shifts of a magnetic center. The prototype satisfied the center shift requirement over the full range of integrated strengths

  17. Emotions run high in race for collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, E

    2001-01-01

    The head of KEK expressed his dismay that SLAC has entered into a collaboration with 3 other US labs and proposes to build the next linear collider at Fermilab, Ilinois. KEK wants the next accelerator to be built somewhere in the Asian Pacific region (1 page).

  18. Why is the universe more partial to mater than antimatter?

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "B factory experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) in the USA and at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) in Japan have reached a new milestone in the quest to understand the matter-antimatter imbalance in our universe.

  19. Semi-autonomous controller for data acquisition, the Brilliant ADC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breidenbach, M.; Frank, E.; Hall, J.; Nelson, D.

    1977-10-01

    A set of high speed 16-bit computers and ADC's designed and built for the data collection, compression, and correction system of the SLAC/LBL Mark II Magnetic Detector. The ''Brilliant ADC'' controls the analog multiplexing of a CAMAC crate of data acquisition modules, digitizes the analog data, and executes microprogrammed algorithms for data handling and correction

  20. PC database for high energy preprint collections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haymaker, R.

    1985-06-01

    We describe a microcomputer database used by the high energy group to keep track of preprints in our collection. It is used as a supplement to the SLAC-SPIRES database to retrieve preprints on hand. This was designed as a low overhead system for a small group

  1. Strange meson spectroscopy in K[omega] and K[phi] at 11 GeV/c and Cherenkov ring imaging at SLD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Youngjoon.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis consists of two independent parts; development of Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) system and analysis of high-statistics data of strange meson reactions from the LASS spectrometer. Part 1: The CRID system is devoted to charged particle identification in the SLAC Large Detector (SLD) to study e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  2. Measuring emittances and sigma matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, J.; Rivkin, L.

    1984-03-01

    The method used for measuring emittance at the SLAC Linac and the linear collider damping ring is described. The basis of the method is derived using one two-by-two matrix to specify the state of the input beam (sigma matrix) and another to describe the lens-drift transport system (R-matrix)

  3. The E166 experiment: Development of an undulator-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A longitudinal polarized positron beam is foreseen for the international linear collider (ILC). A proof-of-principle experiment has been performed in the final focus test beam at SLAC to demonstrate the production of polarized positrons for implementation at the ILC. The E166 experiment uses a 1 m long helical undulator in a ...

  4. First results from Mark II at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, G.S.; Alam, M.S.; Blocker, C.A.

    1979-05-01

    First results from the SLAC-LBL Mark II magnetic detector at SPEAR are presented. The performance of the detector is discussed and preliminary results are given on inclusive baryon production R/sub p + anti p/, R/sub Λ + anti Λ/, on decay modes of the D mesons and on two-photon production of eta' mesons

  5. The development of seismic guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huggins, R.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the development of Seismic Guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Although structures have always been built conservatively, SLAC management decided to review and update their seismic guidelines. SLAC is about mid-way between the epicenters of the 8.3 Richter magnitude 1906 San Francisco and the 7.2 Loma Prieta Earthquakes. The west end of the two mile long electron/positron particle accelerator lies a half mile from the large San Andreas Fault. Suggestions for seismic planning processes were solicited from local computer manufacturing firms, universities, and federal laboratories. A Committee of the various stakeholders in SLAC's seismic planning retained an internationally known Seismic Planning Consultant and reviewed relevant standards and drafted Guidelines. A panel of seismic experts was convened to help define the hazard, site response spectra, probabilistic analysis of shaking, and near field effects. The Facility's structures were assigned to seismic classes of importance, and an initial assessment of a sample of a dozen buildings conducted. This assessment resulted in emergency repairs to one structure, and provided a open-quotes reality basisclose quotes for establishing the final Guidelines and Administrative Procedures, and a program to evaluate remaining buildings, shielding walls, tunnels, and other special structures

  6. Preliminary studies on a magneto-optical procedure for aligning RHIC magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.A.; Sikora, R.E.; Shea, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    Colloid dispersions of magnetite were used at SLAC and KEK to locate multipole magnet centers. The authors study here possible adaption of this method, to align RHIC magnets. A procedure for locating magnetic centers with respect to external fiducial markers, using electronic coordinate determination and digital TV image processing is described

  7. HEPiX Summary

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; BONFILLOU, Eric; Dr. WIEBALCK, Arne

    2015-01-01

    The HEPiX forum brings together worldwide Information Technology staff, including system administrators, system engineers, and managers from the High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics laboratories and institutes, to foster a learning and sharing experience between sites facing scientific computing and data challenges. Participating sites include BNL, CERN, DESY, FNAL, IN2P3, INFN, JLAB, NIKHEF, RAL, SLAC, TRIUMF and many others.

  8. Beam trajectory acquisition system for the arcs of the Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrin, J.L.; Ross, M.C.; Scott, B.D.; Wilson, D.S.

    1987-02-01

    This report describes the beam position monitoring system of the collider arcs at the Stanford Linear Collider. This beam position monitoring system is different from others at SLAC in its large amount of hardware and its use of ungated, self-triggered electronics. All of the processing electronics are installed in the accelerator tunnel

  9. FASTBUS introduction and demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logg, C.A.; Paffrath, L.; Bertolucci, B.; Horelick, D.

    1981-05-01

    This poster session paper presents a simplified explanation of the FASTBUS communication protocol and a brief description of the FASTBUS modules and the FASTBUS Operating System (FBOS) being used in the current prototyping efforts at SLAC. A sample session utilizing the FBOS to initialize and exercise a FASTBUS segment is also presented

  10. Workshop on electronuclear physics with internal targets: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.G.; Minehart, R.C.

    1987-05-01

    The Workshop on Electronuclear Physics with Internal Targets was held at SLAC on January 5-8, 1987. The idea for this workshop grew out of interest among physicists at SLAC and MIT/Bates who have been exploring the possibilities for internal targets in the PEP ring at SLAC and in a proposed stretcher ring at MIT/Bates. The aim of the workshop was to bring together physicists from these groups and from other laboratories and universities to discuss the new physics that could be made accessible with internal targets, and to share information on recent developments in internal target technology, on the impact of internal targets on ring operation, and on the detector requirements. The workshop was sponsored by NPAS, the program of Nuclear Physics at SLAC, and it was attended by more than 100 physicists from the US, Canada, Europe, and Japan. The workshop sessions began with two days of invited talks followed by two days of shorter presentations organized by the chairmen of four Working Groups. Written versions of all the plenary talks and all but four of the Working Group talks are presented here

  11. Thyratron-PFN, IGBT Hybrid, and Direct Switched Modulator R and D As it Effects Klystron Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, Saul L

    2000-01-01

    Modulator development is an ongoing program at SLAC. The Stanford Linear Accelerator with its approximately 240 klystrons and modulators operates for 6,000 plus hours a year. This operation gives SLAC an important insight into component and system reliability in the High Voltage environment. The planned NLC is approximately 10 times the size of SLAC and the High Voltage Modulator Klystron systems are one of the largest cost drivers. This paper will contain a brief progress report on the optimized Line Modulator and touch on Solid-State advances, which make Solid State, High Power pulse modulators the wave of the future. Klystron protection remains a critical issue along with modulator reliability, efficiency and cost. Configurations whereby multiple klystrons are paralleled on a single modulator may exacerbate the problem. The majority of this paper will discuss tests at SLAC of klystron arcs on Line-type modulators with single and double klystron loads. This talk may introduce and refer to other talks at this conference and other conferences by National and Foreign Laboratory collaborators and Industry, specifically in relation to DOE SBIR programs

  12. Simple parametrizations of parton distributions with Q$^{2}$ dependence given by asymptotic freedom

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, Andrzej J

    1978-01-01

    The Q/sup 2/ dependence of parton distributions as given by asymptotically free gauge theories can be represented by simple analytic expressions. In particular the sea distributions can be read directly from the first two moments. The results are compared with the SLAC ep data and with the recent Fermilab mu p data. The agreement is good. (32 refs).

  13. Performance of the babar-dirc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwiening, Jochen; Babar-DIRC Collaboration

    2005-01-01

    A new type of ring-imaging Cherenkov detector is being used for hadronic particle identification in the BABAR experiment at the SLAC B Factory (PEP-II). This detector is called DIRC, an acronym for Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov (Light). This paper describes the performance of the DIRC during the first 5 years of operation

  14. A high resolution, single bunch, beam profile monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.

    1992-01-01

    We developed a beam monitoring system which could be used to measure beam profile, size and stability at the final forms of a beamline or collider. The system uses nonimaging bremsstrahlung optics. The immediate use for this system would be examining the final focus spot at the SLAC/FFTR

  15. Summary of the HEPiX autumn meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; VALSAN, Liviu; Dr. WIEBALCK, Arne

    2014-01-01

    The HEPiX forum brings together worldwide Information Technology staff, including system administrators, system engineers, and managers from the High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics laboratories and institutes, to foster a learning and sharing experience between sites facing scientific computing and data challenges. Participating sites include BNL, CERN, DESY, FNAL, IN2P3, INFN, JLAB, NIKHEF, RAL, SLAC, TRIUMF and many others.

  16. Electron scattering violates parity

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Parity violation has been observed in collisions between electrons at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in the US. The resuls, which are in agreement with the Stanford Model of particle physics, also provide a new measurement of the weak charge of the electron (½ page)

  17. Microwave and Electron Beam Computer Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    Research (ONR). SCRIBE was adapted by MRC from the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Beam Trajectory Program, EGUN . oTIC NSECE Acc !,,o For IDL1C I...achieved with SCRIBE. It is a ver- sion of the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) code EGUN (Ref. 8), extensively modified by MRC for research on

  18. RF phase distribution systems at the SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobe, R.K.; Schwarz, H.D.

    1989-04-01

    Modern large linear accelerators require RF distribution systems with minimal phase drifts and errors. Through the use of existing RF coaxial waveguides, and additional installation of phase reference cables and monitoring equipment, stable RF distribution for the SLC has been achieved. This paper discusses the design and performance of SLAC systems, and some design considerations for future colliders. 6 refs., 4 figs

  19. STANFORD: Producing highly polarized electrons (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Electron spin polarization above 70% by photoemission from a specially prepared semiconductor has been achieved by T. Maruyama and E. Garwin of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), R. Prepost and G. Zapalac of Wisconsin, and J. Walker and S. Smith of Berkeley

  20. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. I. A large spectroscopically selected sample of massive early-type lens galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolton, AS; Burles, S; Koopmans, LVE; Treu, T; Moustakas, LA

    2006-01-01

    The Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey is an efficient Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Snapshot imaging survey for new galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses. The targeted lens candidates are selected spectroscopically from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database of galaxy spectra for having multiple

  1. BaBar computing - From collisions to physics results

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    The BaBar experiment at SLAC studies B-physics at the Upsilon(4S) resonance using the high-luminosity e+e- collider PEP-II at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Taking, processing and analyzing the very large data samples is a significant computing challenge. This presentation will describe the entire BaBar computing chain and illustrate the solutions chosen as well as their evolution with the ever higher luminosity being delivered by PEP-II. This will include data acquisition and software triggering in a high availability, low-deadtime online environment, a prompt, automated calibration pass through the data SLAC and then the full reconstruction of the data that takes place at INFN-Padova within 24 hours. Monte Carlo production takes place in a highly automated fashion in 25+ sites. The resulting real and simulated data is distributed and made available at SLAC and other computing centers. For analysis a much more sophisticated skimming pass has been introduced in the past year, ...

  2. How to get a bigger bang from your accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Researchers at SLAC believe they have found a way to substantially shorten the length needed for an accelerator capable of revealing the effects of supersymmetry. They have found a way to put two sextapoles close to the beam focus to limit aberration effects (3 paragraphs).

  3. Review of studies on conventional linear colliders in the S- and X-Band regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.

    1992-07-01

    This paper gives a status report on the conventional approaches to linear colliders at DESY, KEK, SLAC and INP-Protvino in the S- and X-Band regime. Critical topics are reviewed and a discussion of global issues such as future R ampersand D requirements is included

  4. T-expansion and its application to SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karliner, M.

    1984-01-01

    A scheme allowing systematic improvement of variational calculations has been developed at SLAC. This paper contains an outline of the method, as well as some preliminary results of its application to two dimensional spin systems and four dimensional SU(2) lattice guage theory

  5. Retrofitting the 5045 Klystron for Higher Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Aaron; Fazio, Michael; Haase, Andy; Jongewaard, Erik; Kemp, Mark; Neilson, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The 5045 klystron has been in production and accelerating particles at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for over 25 years. Although the design has undergone some changes there are still significant opportunities for improvement in performance. Retrofitting the 5045 for higher efficiencies and a more mono-energetic spent beam profile is presented.

  6. BaBar Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "B factory experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) in the USA and at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) in Japan have reached a new milestone in the quest to understand the matter-antimatter imbalance in our universe. These experiments are used by scientists from around the world, including the UK, to probe such fundamental questions."

  7. Workshop on electronuclear physics with internal targets: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, R.G.; Minehart, R.C. (eds.)

    1987-05-01

    The Workshop on Electronuclear Physics with Internal Targets was held at SLAC on January 5-8, 1987. The idea for this workshop grew out of interest among physicists at SLAC and MIT/Bates who have been exploring the possibilities for internal targets in the PEP ring at SLAC and in a proposed stretcher ring at MIT/Bates. The aim of the workshop was to bring together physicists from these groups and from other laboratories and universities to discuss the new physics that could be made accessible with internal targets, and to share information on recent developments in internal target technology, on the impact of internal targets on ring operation, and on the detector requirements. The workshop was sponsored by NPAS, the program of Nuclear Physics at SLAC, and it was attended by more than 100 physicists from the US, Canada, Europe, and Japan. The workshop sessions began with two days of invited talks followed by two days of shorter presentations organized by the chairmen of four Working Groups. Written versions of all the plenary talks and all but four of the Working Group talks are presented here.

  8. Preliminary results on tests of a Cerenkov ring imaging device employing a photoionizing PWC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durkin, S.; Honma, A.; Leith, D.W.G.S.

    1978-08-01

    A brief description of techniques and problems of ring imaging Cerenkov detectors employing photoionizing PWC's is discussed. Preliminary results on a one dimensional ring imaging device tested at SLAC in May and June of 1978 are then presented. These results include rough measurements of the Cerenkov ring in nitrogen, argon, neon, and helium produced by a collimated positron beam.

  9. Measurement of Branching Fractions and Charge Asymmetries in B+ decays to eta pi+, eta K+, eta rho+ and eta' pi+, and Search for B0 Decays to eta K0 and eta omega

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, B.

    2005-01-01

    We present measurements of branching fractions and charge asymmetries for six B-meson decay modes with an η or η(prime) meson in the final state. The data sample corresponds to 232 million B(bar B) pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e + e - B Factory at SLAC

  10. Ma et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2013) 10(3):442-448 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJTCAM

    Six mice were sacrificed in each group at 3, 7, 14, and ... The fast development of the techniques in cytology and molecular biology ... 72 healthy male C57BL/6 mice, aging 8 weeks and weighing 20 g to 22 g, were supplied by Shanghai Slac.

  11. Technical specification for vacuum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaw, J.

    1987-01-01

    The vacuum systems at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) are primarily of all-metal construction and operate at pressures from 10 -5 to 10 -11 Torr. The primary gas loads during operation result from thermal desorption and beam-induced desorption from the vacuum chamber walls. These desorption rates can be extremely high in the case of hydrocarbons and other contaminants. These specifications place a major emphasis on eliminating contamination sources. The specifications and procedures have been written to insure the cleanliness and vacuum integrity of all SLAC vacuum systems, and to assist personnel involved with SLAC vacuum systems in choosing and designing components that are compatible with existing systems and meet the quality and reliability of SLAC vacuum standards. The specification includes requirements on design, procurement, fabrication, chemical cleaning, clean room practices, welding and brazing, helium leak testing, residual gas analyzer testing, bakeout, venting, and pumpdown. Also appended are specifications regarding acceptable vendors, isopropyl alcohol, bakeable valve cleaning procedure, mechanical engineering safety inspection, notes on synchrotron radiation, and specifications of numerous individual components

  12. Smoke and mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    Comparing the decay times for B-mesons and anti-Bmesons into a charmonium and K-short allows the theory of CP violation to be tested. Preliminary results are in from KEK and SLAC but the error bars are too large for the data to be conclusive at this stage (1 page).

  13. Proceedings of the LLNL technical women`s symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Holtz, E. [ed.

    1994-12-31

    Women from institutions such as LLNL, LBL, Sandia, and SLAC presented papers at this conference. The papers deal with many aspects of global security, global ecology, and bioscience; they also reflect the challenges faced in improving business practices, communicating effectively, and expanding collaborations in the industrial world. Approximately 87 ``abstracts`` are included in six sessions; more are included in the addendum.

  14. The DIRC Particle Identification System for the BaBar Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, I

    2004-06-30

    A new type of ring-imaging Cherenkov detector is being used for hadronic particle identification in the BABAR experiment at the SLAC B Factory (PEP-II). This detector is called DIRC, an acronym for Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov (Light). This paper will discuss the construction, operation and performance of the BABAR DIRC in detail.

  15. A valiant little terminal: A VLT user's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, A.

    1992-08-01

    VLT came to be used at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center), because SLAC wanted to assess the Amiga's usefulness as a color graphics terminal and T{sub E}X workstation. Before the project could really begin, the people at SLAC needed a terminal emulator which could successfully talk to the IBM 3081 (now the IBM ES9000-580) and all the VAXes on the site. Moreover, it had to compete in quality with the Ann Arbor Ambassador GXL terminals which were already in use at the laboratory. Unfortunately, at the time there was no commercial program which fit the bill. Luckily, Willy Langeveld had been independently hacking up a public domain VT100 emulator written by Dave Wecker et al. and the result, VLT, suited SLAC's purpose. Over the years, as the program was debugged and rewritten, the original code disappeared, so that now, in the present version of VLT, none of the original VT100 code remains.

  16. Writing SUBROUTINE HOWFAR for EGS4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.; Jenkins, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to provide guidance, in addition to that given in SLAC-265, in writing SUBROUTINE HOWFAR for both simple and complex geometrical situations. Since most complex geometries can be represented in terms of blocks of simpler geometries, a number of geometry subprograms have been created for use within HOWFAR. They are provided as part of the EGS4 Code System, which means that they are located in files on the EGS4 disk under VM/SP at SLAC. They are also on the EGS4 Distribution Tape that is given out on request by the SLAC Radiation Physics Group. What we hope to accomplish with this note is to show how to create EGS4 geometries in a modular fashion, with particular emphasis on using the macro equivalents of the subroutines in order to gain efficiency. It is assumed that the reader is already familiar with EGS4 and understands the role of the variables USTEP, IDISC, and IRNEW as they apply to SUBROUTINE HOWFAR. If not, then the reader is advised to study Appendix 2 of SLAC-265 first. The tutorial chapter may also provide some insight. 5 refs., 10 figs

  17. Review of results from the Mark 2 experiment at SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coupal, D.P.

    1990-07-01

    This paper reviews results on Z degree physics from the 1989 run of the Mark 2 experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider. Based on about 20 nb -1 we present results on the mass, width and branching ratios of the Z degree boson, the number of light neutrino species, properties of hadronic decays and searches for new particles. 16 refs., 9 figs

  18. Professor Wolfgang Panofsky

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Professor Wolfgang panofsky, who died on September 24 aged 88, was a particle physicists and director of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre (SLAC) in California; with Jack Steinberger, he was the first to isolate the neutral pi meson, one of the subatomic particles which had been predicted by theoretical scientists to account for the strng force which binds the nuclei of atoms." (1 page)

  19. Control of machine functions or transport systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodley, M.D.; Lee, M.J.; Jaeger, J.; King, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    A computer code, COMFORT, has been developed at SLAC for on-line calculation of the strengths of magnetic elements in an electron storage ring or transport beam line, subject to first order fitting constraints on the ring or beam line parameters. This code can also be used off-line as an interactive lattice or beam line design tool

  20. Pulse to pulse klystron diagnosis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, J.; Davidson, V.; Genova, L.; Johnson, R.; Reagan, D.

    1981-03-01

    This report describes a system used to study the behavior of SLAC high powered klystrons operating with a twice normal pulse width of 5 μs. At present, up to eight of the klystrons installed along the accelerator can be operated with long pulses and monitored by this system. The report will also discuss some of the recent findings and investigations