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Sample records for sklodowskite

  1. Leaching action of EJ-13 water on unirradiated UO2 surfaces under unsaturated conditions at 90 degree C: Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Veleckis, E.; Tani, B.S.

    1991-07-01

    A set of experiments, based on the application of the Unsaturated Test method to the reaction of UO 2 with EJ-13 water, has been conducted over a period of 182.5 weeks. One half of the experiments have been terminated, while one half are still ongoing. Solutions that have dripped from UO 2 specimens have been analyzed for all experiments, while the reacted UO 2 surfaces have been examined for only the terminated experiments. A pulse of uranium release from the UO 2 solid, in conjunction with the formation of dehydrated schoepite on the surface of the UO 2 , was observed during the 39- to 96-week period. Thereafter, the uranium release decreased and a second set of secondary phases was observed. The latter phases incorporate cations from the EJ-13 water and include boltwoodite, uranophane, sklodowskite, compreignacite, and schoepite. The experiments are being continued to monitor for additional changes in solution composition and secondary phase formation, and have now reached the 319-week period. 9 refs., 17 figs., 25 tabs

  2. Identification of secondary phases formed during unsaturated reaction of UO2 with EJ-13 water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Tani, B.S.; Veleckis, E.

    1989-01-01

    A set of experiments, wherein UO 2 has been contacted by dripping water, has been conducted over a period of 182.5 weeks. The experiments are being conducted to develop procedures to study spent fuel reaction under unsaturated conditions that are expected to exist over the lifetime of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository site. One half of the experiments have been terminated, while one half are ongoing. Analyses of solutions that have dripped from the reacted UO 2 have been performed for all experiments, while the reacted UO 2 surfaces have been examined for the terminated experiments. A pulse of uranium release from the UO 2 solid, combined with the formation of schoepite on the surface of the UO 2 , was observed between 39 and 96 weeks of reaction. Thereafter, the uranium release decreased and a second set of secondary phases was observed. The latter phases incorporated cations from the EJ-13 water and included boltwoodite, uranophane, sklodowskite, compreignacite, and schoepite. The experiments are continuing to monitor whether additional changes in solution chemistry or secondary phase formation occurs. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  3. 79Se: geochemical and crystallo-chemical retardation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    79 Se is a long-lived (1.1 x 10 6 yrs) fission product which is chemically and radiologically toxic. Under Eh-pH conditions typical of oxidative alteration of spent nuclear fuel, selenite, SeO 3 2- or HSeO 3 - or selenate, SeO 4 2- , are the dominant aqueous species of selenium. Because of the high solubility of metal-selenites and metal-selenates and the low adsorption of selenite and selenate aqueous species by geological materials under alkaline conditions, selenium may be highly mobile. However, 79 Se released from altered fuel may become immobilized by incorporation into secondary uranyl phases as low concentration impurities, and this may significantly reduce the mobility of selenium. Analysis and comparison of the known structures of uranyl phases indicate that (SeO 3 ) may substitute for (SiO 3 OH) in structures of α-uranophane and boltwoodite that are expected to be the dominant alteration products of UO 2 in Si-rich groundwater. The substitutions (SeO 3 ) (SiO 3 OH) in sklodowskite, Mg[(UO 2 )(SiO 3 OH)] 2 (H 2 O) 6 and (SeO 3 ) (PO 4 ) in phurcalite, Ca 2 [(UO 2 ) 3 (PO 4 ) 2 O 2 ](H 2 O) 7 , may occur with the eliminated apical anion being substituted for by an H 2 O group, but experimental investigation is required. The close similarity between the sheets in the structures of rutherfordine, [(UO 2 )(CO 3 )] and [(UO 2 )(SeO 3 )] implies that the substitution (SeO 3 ) (CO 3 ) can occur in rutherfordine, and possibly other uranyl carbonates. However, the substitutions: (SeO 3 ) (SiO 4 ) in soddyite and (SeO 3 ) (PO 4 ) in phosphuranylite may disrupt their structural connectivity and are, therefore, unlikely. (orig.)

  4. Leaching patterns and secondary phase formation during unsaturated leaching of UO2 at 90 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Veleckis, E.; Tani, B.S.

    1991-11-01

    Experiments are being conducted that examine the reaction of UO 2 with dripping oxygenated ground water at 90 degrees C. The experiments are designed to identify secondary phases formed during UO 2 alteration, evaluate parameters controlling U release, and act as scoping tests for studies with spent fuel. This study is the first of its kind that examines the alteration of UO 2 under unsaturated conditions expected to exist at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository site. Results suggest the UO 2 matrix will readily react within a few months after being exposed to simulated Yucca Mountain conditions. A pulse of rapid U release, combined with the formation of dehydrated schoepite on the UO 2 surface, characterizes the reaction between one to two years. Rapid dissolution of intergrain boundaries and spallation of UO 2 granules appears to be responsible for much of the U released. Differential release of the UO 2 granules may be responsible for much of the variation observed between duplicate experiments. Less than 5 wt % of the released U remains in solution or in a suspended form, while the remaining settles out of solution as fine particles or is reprecipitated as secondary phases. Subsequent to the pulse period, U release rates decline and a more stable assemblage of uranyl silicate phases are formed by incorporating cations from the ground water leachant. Uranophane, boltwoodite, and sklodowskite appear as the final solubility limiting phases that form in these tests. This observed paragenetic sequence (from uraninite to schoepite-type phases to uranyl silicates) is identical to those observed in weathered zones of natural uraninite occurrences. The combined results indicate that the release of radionuclides from spent fuel may not be limited by U solubility constraints, but that spallation of particulate matter may be an important, if not the dominant release mechanism affecting release