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Sample records for skin manifestations

  1. Skin Manifestations of Endocrine Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkesen, Cuyan

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine diseases may result in changes in cutaneous function and morphology, which cause various skin manifestations, including nonspecific or pathognomonic signs. Some of these manifestations are already known dermatologic diseases with only increased frequency in this patient group. As a result the skin may the play role of a screen displaying endocrine disorders, either due to hormone excess or deficiency. Awareness of the skin manifestations may permit prompt and adequate approach to the patients, and therefore facilitate the early diagnosis of the endocrine disease and even be life saving. Some of these manifestations may be recognized clinically, but sometimes they need to be confirmed histopathologically. In this article, many endocrine diseases and their associated skin lesions will be reviewed briefly.

  2. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: late skin manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Marckmann, Peter; Rossen, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a serious disease that occurs in patients with severe renal disease and is believed to be caused by gadolinium-containing contrast agents. A detailed description of the late skin manifestations of NSF is important to help dermatologists...... and nephrologists recognize the disease. OBSERVATIONS: We studied 17 patients with NSF late in the disease. All patients showed epidermal atrophy and hairlessness of the affected regions, primarily the lower legs. Affected areas were symmetrically distributed and hyperpigmented in most cases. Eleven patients showed......: This descriptive case series of patients with NSF gives a detailed clinical picture of the skin manifestations late in the disease. It demonstrates that the clinical picture in the late stage has a varied presentation and that NSF has a significant effect on the quality of life....

  3. Skin manifestations of chronic kidney disease.

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    Robles-Mendez, J C; Vazquez-Martinez, O; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2015-10-01

    Skin manifestations associated with chronic kidney disease are very common. Most of these conditions present in the end stages and may affect the patient's quality of life. Knowledge of these entities can contribute to establishing an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Severe renal pruritus is associated with increased mortality and a poor prognosis. Nail exploration can provide clues about albumin and urea levels. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a preventable disease associated with gadolinium contrast. Comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism, can lead to acquired perforating dermatosis and calciphylaxis, respectively. Effective and innovative treatments are available for all of these conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  4. MR imaging manifestations of skin tumors

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    Kim, Jeong-hyon; Kim, Jee Young [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Chun, Kyung Ah [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Uijeongbu St. Mary Hospital, Uijeongbu, Gyeonggi-do (Korea); Jee, Won-Hee [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea); Sung, Mi-Sook [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Holy family Hospital, Bucheon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea)

    2008-11-15

    In this study, we evaluated MR imaging findings of skin tumors and categorized them into four types: (1) discrete mass lesions of the dermis and epidermis, (2) mass lesions of the subcutis with or without abutment to the skin, (3) diffuse or localized skin thickening without a true mass, and (4) a skin mass with bone destruction. The categorization of MR images may be useful in the differential diagnosis of skin tumors. (orig.)

  5. Skin manifestations in a case of trisomy 16 mosaicism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ousager, Lilian Bomme; Brandrup, Flemming; Andersen, Charlotte Brasch

    2006-01-01

    We present a 48-year-old man with unilateral dermatological manifestations including hypertrichosis, telangiectasia, hyperkeratosis and hyperpigmentation. Additional findings included skeletal abnormalities and left-sided hearing loss. Skin biopsies showed changes characteristic of porokeratosis....

  6. Skin manifestations of growth hormone-induced diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Kogia, Christina; Abdel-Naser, Mohamed Badawy; Chrousos, George P

    2016-09-01

    The human skin is a well-organized organ bearing different types of cells in a well-structured interference to each other including epidermal and follicular keratinocytes, sebocytes, melanocytes, dermal papilla cells and fibroblasts, endothelial cells, sweat gland cells as well as nerves. Several hormones act on different cell types of the skin, while it is also considered an endocrine organ secreting hormones that act at several sites of the organism. GH receptors are found in almost all cell types forming the skin, while IGF-1 receptors' expression is restricted to the epidermal keratinocytes. Both Growth Hormone (GH) excess, as in the case of Acromegaly in adults, or Gigantism in growing children, and GH deficiency states lead to skin manifestations. In case of GH excess the main dermatological findings are skin thickening, coarsening of facial features, acrochordons, puffy hands and feet, oily skin and hyperhidrosis, while GH deficiency, on the contrary, is characterized by thin, dry skin and disorder of normal sweating. Moreover, special disorders associated with GH excess may have specific characteristics, as is the case of café-au-lait spots in Neurofibromatosis, or big café-au-lait skin hyperpigmented regions with irregular margins, as is the case in McCune-Albright syndrome. Meticulous examination of the skin may therefore contribute to the final diagnosis in cases of GH-induced disorders.

  7. Skin manifestations and immunological parameters in childhood food allergy.

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    Oehling, A; Fernández, M; Córdoba, H; Sanz, M L

    1997-01-01

    According to Hansen's contact rule, the digestive system should be considered as the main shock organ, yet in food allergy, this is not the case. Very often specific food triggers clinical manifestations not involving the digestive system; that is, reactions are manifested either in the respiratory system, as asthma or rhinitis, or in the skin. In these cases the BALT (broncho-alveolar lymphoid tissue) and GALT (gastrointestinal lymphoid tissue) units play a basic role in the sensitizations. The purpose of this study was to determine the most frequent skin manifestations of food allergy among children, and the most frequently involved foods. We also thought it interesting to evaluate the diagnostic reliability of the different standard immunological parameters utilized by the study team in food allergy. All patients underwent intracutaneous tests with 12 groups of the most frequent food allergens, as well as serum IgE, antigen-specific IgE against foods, and antigen-specific histamine release tests. Antigen-specific IgG4 determination was performed in some cases. The results obtained confirmed previous studies, the most common manifestations being: angioedema (48%), followed by urticaria (31%) and atopic dermatitis (21%). Regarding the frequency of sensitization to different food allergens, in mono- or polisensitization, fish and egg stand out in our environment. Certain food allergens are more frequently responsible for specific skin manifestations. Thus, for fish sensitization, the most frequent skin manifestation is atopic dermatitis (50%); for egg sensitization, angioedema is the most frequent skin manifestation (50%); and for milk, urticaria (50%). Finally, and in agreement with previous works regarding the diagnostic reliability of in vitro techniques, we found that the histamine release test offered the highest percentage of diagnostic reliability. Only for sensitization to milk proteins did antigen-specific IgE demonstrate higher reliability. Once again, we

  8. Weight loss and skin manifestations in obese patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Nina Rica Wium; Jensen, Peter; Kirchner Larsson, Lena

    Objective To examine if psoriatic patients can achieve a weight loss to the same extent as non-psoriatic patients To describe the effect of weight loss on the cutaneous manifestations. Conclusion Patients with psoriasis achieved a weight loss, similar to non-psoriatic patients, of 12...... % of their body weight following calorie restriction for 12 weeks. Taken together with recent literature the findings suggest that weight loss has a potential to reduce skin manifestations. Weight loss might also attenuate the increased cardiovascular and diabetes risks posed by obese psoriatric patients....

  9. Task Force on Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) and Non-criteria APS Manifestations (II): thrombocytopenia and skin manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, R; Tektonidou, M G; Espinosa, G; Cabral, A R; González, E B; Erkan, D; Vadya, S; Adrogué, H E; Solomon, M; Zandman-Goddard, G; Shoenfeld, Y

    2011-02-01

    The objectives of the 'Task Force on Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) and Non-criteria APS Manifestations' were to assess the clinical utility of the international consensus statement on classification criteria and treatment guidelines for the catastrophic APS, to identify and grade the studies that analyze the relationship between the antiphospholipid antibodies and the non-criteria APS manifestations, and to present the current evidence regarding the accuracy of these non-criteria APS manifestations for the detection of patients with APS. This article summarizes the studies analyzed on thrombocytopenia and skin manifestations, and presents the recommendations elaborated by the Task Force after this analysis.

  10. The relationship between skin manifestations and CD4 counts among hiv positive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rad, F.; Ghaderi, E.; Moradi, G.; Mafakheri, L.

    2008-01-01

    Skin manifestations are common clinical features among HIV positive patients. The aim of this study was to document skin manifestations and their relationships with CD4 cell counts among HIV positive patients in Sanandaj. This was a descriptive study. The patients were examined for skin disorders by a dermatologist and CD4 counts were obtained from the patient's medical records. Independent samples T test were used for data analysis. In this study 66 (94.3%) patients had at least one skin problem. Fungal infections were the most common cause. The eight most common types of mucocutaneous problems were gingivitis, pallor, itching, photosensitivity, seborrheic dermatitis, candidiasis, folliculitis and tinea versicolor. The most common manifestation was gingivitis. Mean CD4 cell counts were lower in individuals with viral and bacterial skin diseases (P <0.05). The results of this study indicated that skin problems were common among HIV positive patients. Patients with advanced stages of skin disorders had relatively lower CD4 counts. Therefore examination of skin is recommended for all HIV positive patients for early detection of skin disorders, as early diagnosis and management of dermatologic problems will improve the quality of life in HIV positive patients. (author)

  11. Skin manifestations of acromegaly - a study of 34 cases

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    Arya Kavita

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The common dermatological manifestations seen in 34 cases of acromegaly were changes in facial appearance, enlargement of hands and feet, intolerance to heat and sweating, carpal tunnel syndrome, hirsutism, acrochordons and acanthosis nigricans. The mean estimated age of onset was 32.8 years in males and 31.7 years in females, while the mean age at the time of diagnosis was 38.6 years and 36.1 years for males and females respectively, with a slight male preponderance noted.

  12. Pygmy quadrupole resonance as a manifestation of the nuclear skin

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    Tsoneva, Nadia [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Lenske, Horst [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Recently, a new mode of nuclear excitation called pygmy quadrupole resonance (PQR) was theoretically predicted in the framework of energy-density functional (EDF) theory plus three-phonon quasiparticle-phonon model (QPM) in Sn isotopic chain. It is closely connected with higher order multipole vibrations of nuclear skin induced by the action of the electromagnetic and hadronic external fields. The predictions initiated new experiments using ({sup 17}O,{sup 17}O{sup '}γ), (α,α{sup '}γ) and (γ,γ{sup '}) reactions which were carried out in {sup 124}Sn nucleus. The aim was to probe for the first time experimentally, the possibility of existence of PQR. The detailed analysis of the obtained experimental results in comparison with the EDF+QPM theory indicates clearly the presence of a multitude of discrete low-energy 2{sup +} excitations of neutron type which can be addressed to PQR mode. The independent measurements of B(E2) values with different probes and the theory allow to identify the dominant isoscalar character of these states. Furthermore, newly determined γ-decay branching ratios exclude a statistical origin of the PQR strength. The latter are important to discriminate between PQR and multiphonon excitations.

  13. Skin manifestations in sulfur mustard exposed victims with ophthalmologic complications: Association between early and late phase

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    Somayeh Hejazi, MD

    Full Text Available Context: Sulfur mustard (SM was used during the Iraq-Iran war (1980–1988. Exposed veterans continue to suffer from its ocular, skin, and respiratory complications. Objective: We aimed to evaluate associations between early (at the time of acute exposure and decades later skin manifestations in individuals with severe ophthalmologic complications secondary to sulfur mustard exposure. Materials and methods: One hundred forty-nine veterans with severe ocular injuries were evaluated for acute and chronic skin complications. Logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between early and late skin manifestations. Results: Late skin complaints were observed in nearly all survivors who had early skin lesions (131 out of 137; 95.62%. Seven out of 12 patients (58.33% who did not have early skin lesions ultimately developed late skin complications. There was a significant relationship between the presence of lesions at the time of exposure and developing late skin complaints (two-sided Fisher's exact test, OR = 15.59, p < 0.001. There was an association between having at least one early skin lesion and occurrence of late skin complications. Survivors with blisters at the time of chemical exposure were more likely to complain of itching (95% CI: 3.63–25.97, p < 0.001, burning (OR = 11.16; 95% CI: 2.97–41.89, p < 0.001, pigmentation changes (OR = 10.17; 95% CI: 2.54–40.75, p = 0.001, dryness (OR = 6.71, 95% CI: 1.22–37.01, p = 0.03 or cherry angioma (OR = 2.59; 95% CI:1.21–5.55, p = 0.01 during the late phase. Using multivariate logistic models, early blisters remained significantly associated with latent skin complaints. Of note, the genitalia and great flexure areas were the most involved anatomical sites for both early and late skin lesions in SM exposed survivors. Conclusion: According to this study, the presence of blisters at the time of exposure to SM is the most important predictor of developing

  14. The skin as a window to the blood: Cutaneous manifestations of myeloid malignancies.

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    Li, Alvin W; Yin, Emily S; Stahl, Maximilian; Kim, Tae Kon; Panse, Gauri; Zeidan, Amer M; Leventhal, Jonathan S

    2017-11-01

    Cutaneous manifestations of myeloid malignancies are common and have a broad range of presentations. These skin findings are classified as specific, due to direct infiltration by malignant hematopoietic cells, or non-specific. Early recognition and diagnosis can have significant clinical implications, as skin manifestations may be the first indication of underlying hematologic malignancy, can reflect the immune status and stage of disease, and cutaneous reactions may occur from conventional and targeted agents used to treat myeloid disease. In addition, infections with cutaneous involvement are common in immunocompromised patients with myeloid disease. Given the varying presentations, dermatologic findings associated with myeloid malignancies can pose diagnostic challenges for hematologists and dermatologists. In this clinical review intended for the practicing hematologist/oncologist, we discuss the presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prognostic value of the most common cutaneous manifestations associated with myeloid malignancies using illustrative macro- and microscopic figures and with a special emphasis on practical considerations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Granulomatous slack skin. Histopathology diagnosis preceding clinical manifestations by 12 years.

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    Goldsztajn, Karen O; Moritz Trope, Beatriz; Ribeiro Lenzi, Maria Elisa; Cuzzi, Tullia; Ramos-E-Silva, Marcia

    2012-12-31

    Granulomatous slack skin is a very rare subtype of T-cell cutaneous lymphoma, characterized by the slow development of cutaneous sagging, especially on flexural areas. Its behavior is indolent and the treatment, in the majority of cases, disappointing. We report a 54-year-old black patient with granulomatous slack skin, who at the beginning of the investigation showed intense xeroderma and generalized lymph node enlargement. The diagnosis was established based on histopathologic findings long before the disease's characteristic clinical presentation appeared. During the twelve years of follow-up, the clinical manifestation evolved to marked skin looseness, most predominant in flexural regions, illustrating the clinical hallmark of granulomatous slack skin, long after first histological abnormalities were observed.

  16. Catheter-related Mycobacterium abscessus bacteremia manifested with skin nodules, pneumonia, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-Hsin Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although previously rare, catheter-related bloodstream infection caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria is now increasingly encountered, especially among cancer patients who have catheters implanted for chemotherapy treatments. A 73-year-old female patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML had Mycobacterium abscessus bacteremia with manifestations of multiple skin nodules, pneumonia, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy 4 months after the implantation of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC for the delivery of chemotherapy. The catheter-related M. abscessus bacteremia was confirmed by positive blood cultures of specimens drawn from a PICC line and a peripheral vein. She defervesced with the administration of meropenem, amikacin, levofloxacin, clarithromycin, and by the removal of PICC. Her fever subsided for 3 months with the disappearance of skin and lung lesions; however, she died of AML relapse. Bacteremia and skin infection caused by M. abscessus can be detected by culture and pathological examinations and should be considered in leukemia patients with a PICC. With appropriate laboratory diagnosis, M. abscessus bacteremia with disseminated infections can improve with catheter removal and combination antimicrobial therapy.

  17. Different patterns of skin manifestations associated with parvovirus B19 primary infection in adults.

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    Mage, Valentia; Lipsker, Dan; Barbarot, Sébastien; Bessis, Didier; Chosidow, Olivier; Del Giudice, Pascal; Aractingi, Sélim; Avouac, Jérôme; Bernier, Claire; Descamps, Vincent; Dupin, Nicolas

    2014-07-01

    Skin involvement is reported during primary parvovirus B19 infection in adults. We sought to describe the cutaneous presentations associated with parvovirus B19 primary infection in adults. We conducted a descriptive, retrospective, multicenter study. The patients included (>18 years old) had well-established primary infections with parvovirus B19. Twenty-nine patients were identified between 1992 and 2013 (17 women, 12 men). The elementary dermatologic lesions were mostly erythematous (86%) and often purpuric (69%). Pruritus was reported in 48% of cases. The rash predominated on the legs (93%), trunk (55%), and arms (45%), with a lower frequency of facial involvement (20%). Four different but sometimes overlapping patterns were identified (45%): exanthema, which was reticulated and annular in some cases (80%); the gloves-and-socks pattern (24%); the periflexural pattern (28%); and palpable purpura (24%). The limitations of this study were its retrospective design and possible recruitment bias in tertiary care centers. Our findings suggest that primary parvovirus B19 infection is associated with polymorphous skin manifestations with 4 predominant, sometimes overlapping, patterns. The acral or periflexural distribution of the rash and the presence of purpuric or annular/reticulate lesions are highly suggestive of parvovirus B19 infection. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Associative link of clinical manifestations of the secondary syphilis of skin and mucosa with histocompatibility antigens Class I

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    S. V. Koshkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty patients with different clinical symptoms of secondary syphilis (ulcer chancres, pustular syphilis, hypertrophic papules, widespread leukoderma and alopecia were examined in order to study the distribution pattern of histocompatibility antigens of the first class in patients with secondary syphilis of the skin and mucous membranes. As a result of the study, the presence of an associative relationship between the distribution pattern of histocompatibility antigens of the first class and various clinical manifestations in patients with secondary syphilis was established.

  19. Blood to skin recirculation of CD4+ memory T cells associates with cutaneous and systemic manifestations of psoriatic disease.

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    Diani, Marco; Galasso, Marco; Cozzi, Chiara; Sgambelluri, Francesco; Altomare, Andrea; Cigni, Clara; Frigerio, Elena; Drago, Lorenzo; Volinia, Stefano; Granucci, Francesca; Altomare, Gianfranco; Reali, Eva

    2017-07-01

    Blood to skin recirculation could play a role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. To investigate this possibility we dissected the phenotype of circulating T cells in psoriasis patients, calculated the correlation the clinical parameters of the disease and performed a parallel bioinformatics analysis of gene expression data in psoriatic skin. We found that circulating CCR6 + CD4 + T EM and T EFF cells significantly correlated with systemic inflammation. Conversely, the percentage of CXCR3 + CD4 + T EM cells negatively correlated with the severity of the cutaneous disease. Importantly CLA + CD4 + T CM cells expressing CCR6 + or CCR4 + CXCR3 + negatively correlated with psoriasis severity suggesting recruitment to the skin compartment. This assumption was reinforced by gene expression data showing marked increase of CCR7 and CLA-encoding gene SELPLG expression in psoriatic skin and strong association of their expression. The data enlightens a role for CD4 + T cells trafficking between blood and skin in cutaneous and systemic manifestations of psoriasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Retinitis pigmentosa, cutis laxa, and pseudoxanthoma elasticum-like skin manifestations associated with GGCX mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kariminejad, Ariana; Bozorgmehr, Bita; Najafi, Abdolhamid; Khoshaeen, Atefeh; Ghalandari, Maryam; Najmabadi, Hossein; Kariminejad, Mohamad H; Vanakker, Olivier M; Hosen, Mohammad J; Malfait, Fransiska; Quaglino, Daniela; Florijn, Ralph J; Bergen, Arthur A B; Hennekam, Raoul C

    Gamma-glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX) mutations have been reported in patients with a pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE)-like phenotype, loose redundant skin, and multiple vitamin K-dependent coagulation factor deficiencies. We report on the clinical findings and molecular results in 13 affected members of

  1. Retinitis pigmentosa, cutis laxa, and pseudoxanthoma elasticum-like skin manifestations associated with GGCX mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kariminejad, Ariana; Bozorgmehr, Bita; Najafi, Abdolhamid; Khoshaeen, Atefeh; Ghalandari, Maryam; Najmabadi, Hossein; Kariminejad, Mohamad H.; Vanakker, Olivier M.; Hosen, Mohammad J.; Malfait, Fransiska; Quaglino, Daniela; Florijn, Ralph J.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Hennekam, Raoul C.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX) mutations have been reported in patients with a pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE)-like phenotype, loose redundant skin, and multiple vitamin K-dependent coagulation factor deficiencies. We report on the clinical findings and molecular results in 13 affected members of

  2. Nailfold capillaroscopic changes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: correlations with disease activity, skin manifestation and nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenavandeh, S; Habibi, S

    2017-08-01

    Introduction The clinical expression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the consequence of endothelial cell damage leading to serious multiple organ dysfunction. The aim of this study was to assess the association between nailfold capillaroscopic changes and disease activity, skin and renal involvement in patients with SLE. Methods Demographic variables, clinical manifestations and laboratory data of 108 patients with SLE were investigated. Nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC) was performed in all patients. Result Morphological changes in NFC were observed in 102 out of 108 (94.4%) SLE patients. Minor changes were found in 33 (30.6%) and major changes in 69 (63.9%) cases. The disease activity was significantly higher in the patients with major changes ( p  0.05), except for the elongated capillary loops, which were seen more often in patients with renal involvement than in patients without it ( p < 0.03). Conclusion The results of the study showed that capillary changes (abnormal capillaroscopy) were very common in patients with SLE, although there were no specific patterns like the ones in scleroderma patients, and some changes may be associated with disease activity, especially in patients with active skin involvement.

  3. Compatibility of Clinical Manifestation with Skin Prick Test Result and Food Provocation Test in Food Cross Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Lubis, Azwin; Barlianto, Wisnu; Endaryanto, Anang; Harsono, Ariyanto

    2017-01-01

    Background: Subjective diagnostic test of food allergy is hugely biased, resulting in irrational diet avoidance. Additional objective tools by skin prick test following food provocation test resulting more accurate cause and prevalence on population. Purpose: To evaluate the compatibility of clinical symptoms with skin prick test and provocation test for imunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated food allergy in Dr. Soetomo Hospital Surabaya. Methods: Cross sectional observational analytic study. Patient...

  4. Skin Manifestation of Unsuspecting Prostate Cancer Detected by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT Performed To Assess Underlying Multiple Myeloma

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    AbAziz, Aini; Mahaletchumy, Thanuja; Chung, Junekey [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2013-12-15

    Skin metastases from either prostate adenocarcinoma or multiple myeloma rarely occur. We report the case of a 73-year-old man with multiple myeloma who presented with multiple subcutaneous nodules 3 years after his initial diagnosis. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging was suggestive of a concomitant second primary from the prostate. This case highlights not only a rare initial manifestation of prostate cancer, but also the role of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in detecting a clinically unsuspected second malignancy. It potentially corroborates the possible association of both diseases, as has been reported before.

  5. Extrinsic skin ageing in German, Chinese and Japanese women manifests differently in all three groups depending on ethnic background, age and anatomical site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierkötter, Andrea; Hüls, Anke; Yamamoto, Ai; Stolz, Sabine; Krämer, Ursula; Matsui, Mary S; Morita, Akimichi; Wang, Sijia; Li, Zhiwen; Jin, Li; Krutmann, Jean; Schikowski, Tamara

    2016-09-01

    It has been suggested that extrinsic skin ageing manifests differently in Caucasians versus East Asians. In particular, from previous studies it was concluded that Caucasians are more prone to develop wrinkles, whereas pigment spot formation is the hallmark of extrinsic skin ageing in East Asians. However, these assumptions are based on a very limited number of studies which did not include different East Asian populations. We here compare the manifestation of extrinsic skin ageing signs in German, Japanese and Chinese women by specifically elucidating the age and anatomical site dependence of any potential ethnic difference. In the present study, we assessed skin ageing in N=902 German, N=165 Japanese and N=1260 Chinese women ranging from 30 to 90 years by means of SCINEXA™. Linear regression analysis was used to test for ethnic differences and their age and site dependence adjusted for educational level, sun exposure, smoking and sun protection behaviours. Pigment spots and wrinkles on the face were present among all three ethnic groups and differences were influenced by age and anatomical sites independently of further influencing factors. Pigment spots on the forehead were most pronounced over the whole age range in Chinese and German women and least developed in Japanese. Pigment spots on cheeks were a typical extrinsic skin an ageing sign in the two East Asian populations in all age groups. However, in older German women they reach the same level as observed in the two East Asian populations. In contrast, pigment spots on arms and hands were significantly more pronounced in German women ≥45years of age. Wrinkles were not exclusively a skin an ageing sign of German women, but were also very pronounced in Chinese women on forehead, between the eyebrows and in the crow's feet area. These results corroborate the previous notion that the occurrence of pigments spots and wrinkles is different between Caucasians and East Asians. In addition, this study shows

  6. R179H mutation in ACTA2 expanding the phenotype to include prune-belly sequence and skin manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richer, J; Milewicz, D M; Gow, R; de Nanassy, J; Maharajh, G; Miller, E; Oppenheimer, L; Weiler, G; O'Connor, M

    2012-03-01

    Mutations in ACTA2 (smooth muscle cell-specific isoform of α-actin) lead to a predisposition to thoracic aortic aneurysms and other vascular diseases. More recently, the ACTA2 R179H mutation has been described in individuals with global smooth muscle dysfunction. We report a patient heterozygous for the mutation in ACTA2 R179H who presented with megacystis at 13 weeks gestational age and, at birth, with prune-belly sequence. He also had deep skin dimples and creases on his palms and soles, a finding not previously described but possibly related to ACTA2. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the R179H mutation in ACTA2 in a child with prune-belly sequence. We think the R179H mutation in ACTA2 should be included in the differential diagnosis of individuals presenting with the sequence without an identified mechanical obstruction. Furthermore, as ACTA2 R179H has been reported in patients with severe vasculomyopathy and premature death, we recommend that molecular testing for this mutation be considered in fetuses presenting with fetal megacystis with a normal karyotype, particularly if the bladder diameter is 15 mm or more, to allow expectant parents to make an informed decision. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Malignant disease involving the skin represents a significant work load to the general radiotherapist and can involve interesting diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. Primary skin cancer is also relatively common and there is a need to provide an efficient service in which the first treatment is successful in the majority of patients. The reward for careful attention to technique is very considerable both in terms of clinical cancer control and functional results. Squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and intra-epidermal carcinoma constitute the majority of the lesions dealt with clinically, but metastatic disease, lymphomas, and malignant melanomas are also referred regularly for opinions and may require radiotherapy. The general principle of the techniques of assessment and radiotherapeutic management to be described are equally applicable to any malignant skin tumour once the decision has been made to accept it for radiotherapy. Dosage and fractionation may have to be adjusted to allow for the nature of the disease process and the intent of the treatment

  8. Cutaneous manifestations of primary immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safa Abdelhakim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs are a group of rare, chronic disorders with deficient or malfunctioning immune system. It commonly affects the hematopoietic system, with skin the second most affected organ. Skin involvement is observed in half of pediatric PID cases and often precedes the final diagnosis. Skin infections and eczemas are the two most common manifestations in PID.[1] Skin manifestations associated with PIDs can be of infectious and noninfectious causes. Common noninfectious causes are eczema, erythroderma, cutaneous granulomas, dysplasia, vasculitis, and telangiectasia. It is important to be aware of skin manifestations in pediatric patients as early detection of PID may aid in the management of serious immunologic conditions and prevent associated morbidity and mortality.

  9. Skin tightening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolery-Lloyd, Heather; Kammer, Jenna N

    2011-01-01

    Skin tightening describes the treatment of skin laxity via radiofrequency (RF), ultrasound, or light-based devices. Skin laxity on the face is manifested by progressive loss of skin elasticity, loosening of the connective tissue framework, and deepening of skin folds. This results in prominence of submandibular and submental tissues. Genetic factors (chronological aging) and extrinsic factors (ultraviolet radiation) both contribute to skin laxity. There are many RF, ultrasound, and light-based devices directed at treating skin laxity. All of these devices target and heat the dermis to induce collagen contraction. Heating of the dermis causes collagen denaturation and immediate collagen contraction in addition to long-term collagen remodeling. Via RF, light, or ultrasound, these skin tightening devices deliver heat to the dermis to create new collagen and induce skin tightening. This chapter will provide an overview of the various skin tightening devices. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Pattern of cutaneous manifestations in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal Abhishek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus affects individuals of all ages and socioeconomic status. Skin is affected by the acute metabolic derangements as well as by chronic degenerative complications of diabetes. Aims: To evaluate the prevalence of skin manifestations in patients with diabetes mellitus. To analyze the prevalence and pattern of skin disorders among diabetic patients from this region of Western Himalayas. Materials and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and having skin lesions, either attending the diabetic clinic or admitted in medical wards were included in this study. Results: The common skin disorders were: x0 erosis (44%, diabetic dermopathy (36%, skin tags (32%, cutaneous infections (31%, and seborrheic keratosis (30%. Conclusion: Skin is involved in diabetes quite often and the manifestations are numerous. High prevalence of xerosis in our diabetic population is perhaps due to cold and dry climatic conditions in the region for most of the time in the year.

  11. Unusual Cutaneous Manifestation of Tuberous Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Shah

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations are found in 60 to 70% cases of tuberous sclerosis and consist of adenoma sebaceum, periungual fibromatas, cafe au lait spots, shagreen patches and white macules. Our patient showed unusual skin manifestations like spotty pigmentation on the chest, back and abdomen and hyperkeratosis palmaris et plantaris.

  12. [Pulmonary Manifestations of Vasculitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Vietinghoff, S

    2016-11-01

    The variable symptoms and signs of pulmonary vasculitis are a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Vasculitis should be considered in rapidly progressing, severe and unusual manifestations of pulmonary disease. Clinical examination of other organ systems typically affected by vasculitis such as skin and kidney and autoantibody measurements are complementary approaches to manage this situation. Pulmonary involvement is common in small vessel vasculitis including anti-GBM disease (Goodpasture syndrome) and the ANCA-associated vasculitides. Life threatening pulmonary hemorrhage and irreversible damage of other organs, frequently the kidney, are important complications necessitating rapid diagnosis of these conditions.Vasculitides are rare diseases of multiple organs and therapies including biologics are evolving rapidly, requiring cooperation of specialities and with specialized centres to achieve best patient care. All involved physicians should be aware of typical complications of immunosuppressive therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Prevalence of cutaneous manifestations of diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, K.; Muhammad, Z.; Qayum, I.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a clinical syndrome characterized by hyperglycaemia due to absolute or relative insulin deficiency. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of skin manifestations in patients with diabetes mellitus of this area. This descriptive study was conducted in medical out patient door of District Headquarter Hospital Battgram from January 2008 to July 2008. A total of 350 diabetic (types 1 and 2) patients over 15 years of age attending the medical OPD of DHQ Hospital were examined in detail for skin manifestations of the disease. Three hundred and fifty diabetic (type-1 and type-2) patients (193 females and 157 males) enrolled in this study. Mean age of the patients was 54+-8.53 years. Duration of diabetes was between 1-12 years; 320 patients had type-2 and 30 patients had type-1 diabetes mellitus. Patients with uncontrolled disease were 327 and 23 patients showed adequate glycaemic control. Seventy-six percent of patients had cutaneous manifestations. The skin manifestations observed were: skin infections 30.9%, foot gangrene and ulcers 12.9%, pruritus 7.1%, vitiligo 5.7%, yellow skin 4.2%, diabetic dermopathy 4.2%, skin tags 3.7%, acanthosis nigricans 2.9%, eruptive xanthomas 2.6%, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum 1.4%, diabetic bullae 0.6%, and pigmented purpuras in 0.3% patients. Cutaneous manifestations were quite Common in the diabetics of this area. (author)

  14. An Update on Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Not Just Café-au-Lait Spots and Freckling. Part II. Other Skin Manifestations Characteristic of NF1. NF1 and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Martín, A; Duat-Rodríguez, A

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is the most common neurocutaneous syndrome and probably the one best known to dermatologists. Although the genetic locus of NF1 was identified on chromosome 17 in 1987, diagnosis of the disease is still based primarily on clinical observations. The 7 diagnostic criteria of the National Institutes of Health, which were established in 1988, include 3 skin manifestations (café-au-lait spots, freckling on flexural areas, and cutaneous neurofibromas). The age at which these diagnostic lesions appear is variable: onset can be late in some patients while others never develop certain symptoms. Definitive diagnosis may therefore be delayed by years. Although the appearance of the characteristic café-au-lait spots and freckling in the early years of childhood are very suggestive of the disease, these signs are not pathognomonic and, in isolation, do not constitute sufficient evidence to establish a definitive diagnosis. Thus, other diagnoses should be considered in patients whose only symptoms are café-au-lait spots and freckling. By contrast, the presence of multiple cutaneous neurofibromas or at least 1 plexiform neurofibroma is a very specific indication of NF1. Identification of the different types of neurofibroma allows us to confirm the diagnosis and initiate appropriate management. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Manifestation of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Petronic-Rosic V. Dermatitis herpetiformis: part II. Diagnosis, management, and prognosis. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 2011;64( ... 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. eastern time, M-F Follow Us NIH… Turning Discovery Into ... Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  16. Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uva, Luís; Miguel, Diana; Pinheiro, Catarina; Freitas, João Pedro; Marques Gomes, Manuel; Filipe, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. The skin is one of the target organs most variably affected by the disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) established 11 criteria as a classificatory instrument to operationalise the definition of SLE in clinical trials. They were not intended to be used to diagnose individuals and do not do well in that capacity. Cutaneous lesions account for four of these 11 revised criteria of SLE. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific or nonspecific. This paper covers the SLE-specific cutaneous changes: malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, and oral mucosal lesions as well as SLE nonspecific skin manifestations, their pathophysiology, and management. A deeper thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and efficient management. Thus, dermatologists should cooperate with other specialties to provide optimal care of SLE patient. PMID:22888407

  17. The bleaching syndrome: manifestation of a post-colonial pathology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The post-colonial root of African problems is directly related to skin color. Under the cloak of personal preference, light skin among African women has replaced dark skin as the native ideal. The aftermath is manifestation of the Bleaching Syndrome. Social Work professionals have overlooked the Bleaching Syndrome as ...

  18. Are the cutaneous manifestations in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome a marker for predicting lung manifestations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontic, Milica; Stojanovich, Ljudmila; Mijailović-Ivković, Milena; Velinović, Mladen; Srnka, Jasminka; Zdravkovic, Marija

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate association between pulmonary and skin manifestations in a large group of patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS) as well as their connection with antiphospholipid antibodies. Our prospective study comprises of 390 patients with primary APS. Antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) analysis included detection of aCL (IgG/IgM), ß2GPI (IgG/IgM) and LA. Distinct pulmonary and skin associations were determined, as well as their associations with aPL. In PAPS patients the presence of LA was more common in PTE (p=0.005) and in pulmonary microthrombosis (p=0.003). We revealed statistical significance considering the presence of aCL IgM and pulmonary microthrombosis (p=0.05). Skin ulcerations correlated with positive titres aCL IgM and ß2 GPI IgM (p=0.03 and 0.04, respectively), while pseudovasculitis correlated with positive titres ß2 GPI IgM (p=0.02). PAPS patients were more more likely to develop pulmonary thromboembolisam if they had livedo reticularis (p=0.005), skin ulcerations (p=0.007), pseudovasculitic lesions (p=0.01), superficial cutaneous necrosis (p=0.005), and digital gangrene (p=0.02). Patients were also more prone to pulmonary microthrombosis if they already had livedo reticularis (p=0.03), skin ulcerations (p=0.007), pseudovasculitic lesions (p=0.05), superficial cutaneous necrosis (p=0.006), and digital gangrene (p=0.02). There is strong link between some pulmonary and skin manifestations in PAPS patients, suggesting complexity and evolutionary nature of APS. The presence of skin manifestations may be a high risk factor for several types of serious pulmonary manifestations in PAPS. Certain aPL types are associated with distinct pulmonary and skin manifestation, suggesting their predictive role.

  19. Skin graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin transplant; Skin autografting; FTSG; STSG; Split thickness skin graft; Full thickness skin graft ... donor site. Most people who are having a skin graft have a split-thickness skin graft. This takes ...

  20. Oral manifestations of lamellar ichthyosis: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerthi K Nair

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ichthyoses are a heterogeneous group of disorders with both inherited and acquired forms. Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI is a heterogeneous group of disorders that present at birth with the generalized involvement of skin without other systemic manifestations. Lamellar itchthyosis (LI is a nonsyndromic itchthyosis, which comes under the umbrella of ARCI. Little is only known about the oral manifestations of this disorder. We report a case of LI with oral manifestations.

  1. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings.

  2. e-Manifest

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the primary hub for those seeking information about the e-Manifest system, its advisory board, and its development. Once the system is complete this area will serve as the portal into the e-Manifest system from EPA webpages.

  3. Surgical manifestations of filariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrahmanyam M

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical manifestations of filariasis as seen in 150 cases over a period of three years in the department of Surgery, Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram, Wardha are reviewed. The genital manifestations are more common than the elephantiasis in this endemic zone.

  4. Atypical Cutaneous Manifestations in Syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivars Lleó, M; Clavo Escribano, P; Menéndez Prieto, B

    2016-05-01

    Although the diversity of the clinical manifestations of syphilis is well-known, atypical presentations can also occur. Such atypical presentations are associated with a high risk of transmission as a result of diagnostic confusion and treatment delays owing to the disease's ability to mimic other common skin diseases, deviate from classic clinical presentations, and adopt unique forms. Cases of atypical syphilis have been described most frequently in patients with concomitant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Because the incidence of syphilis has been growing over recent years -particularly in patients with HIV co-infection- dermatologists need to be familiar with the less well-known clinical presentations of this venereal disease. Copyright © 2015 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  6. Quantum manifestations of chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borondo, F.; Benito, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    The correspondence between classical and quantum mechanics is considered both in the regular and chaotic regimes, and the main results regarding the quantum manifestations of chaos are reviewed. (Author) 16 refs

  7. Extrahepatic manifestations of cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasova, Helena; Beuers, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Pruritus, fatigue and metabolic bone disease represent three major extrahepatic manifestations of chronic cholestatic liver disease that considerably affect the patient's quality of life. The present article reviews pathogenetic aspects of and current therapeutic approaches to extrahepatic

  8. Radiographic manifestations of hypochondroplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heselson, N G; Cremin, B J [Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Beighton, P

    1979-01-01

    Hypochrondroplasia is an inherited skeletal dysplasia that resembles achondroplasia in mild degree. Radiographic manifestations encountered in 12 affected individuals in South Africa include slight shortening of all segments of the tubular bones, moderate caudal diminution of the lumbar interpedicular distances, increased lumbar lordosis with cacral tilt and distal prolongation of the fibular. Hypochondroplasia can be distinguished from other osteochondrodystrophies such as achondroplasia, pseudo-achondroplasia and metaphyseal chondroplasia by the recognition of it clinical and radiographic manifestations.

  9. The extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Saeeda; Alamgir, Mohiuddin

    2008-07-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) leads to a number of hepatic complications, from acute to chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, is a well-established fact. Upcoming clinical research, over the years, associates numerous extrahepatic manifestations during the acute and chronic episodes of hepatitis B with significant morbidity and mortality. A causal relationship between HBV and serious autoimmune disorders has also been observed among certain susceptible vaccine recipients in a defined temporal period following immunization. The cause of these extrahepatic manifestations is generally believed to be immune mediated. The most commonly described include skin rash, arthritis, arthralgia, glomerulonephritis, polyarteritis nodosa, and papular acrodermatitis etc. The serum-sickness like "arthritis-dermatitis" prodrome has also been observed in approximately one-third of patients acquiring HBV infections. Skin manifestations of HBV infection typically present as palpable purpura reported to be caused by chronic HBV, although this association remains controversial. To consider the relationship between HBV and other clinically significant disorders as well as serious autoimmune disorders among certain vaccine recipients is the topic of this review. Variable factors that influence extrahepatic manifestation are discussed, including possible synergy between hepatitis B virus and the immune system.

  10. Haematological manifestations of lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyaz, Anum; Igoe, Ann; Kurien, Biji T; Danda, Debashish; James, Judith A; Stafford, Haraldine A; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compile information on the haematological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), namely leucopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and myelofibrosis. During our search of the English-language MEDLINE sources, we did not place a date-of-publication constraint. Hence, we have reviewed previous as well as most recent studies with the subject heading SLE in combination with each manifestation. Neutropenia can lead to morbidity and mortality from increased susceptibility to infection. Severe neutropenia can be successfully treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. While related to disease activity, there is no specific therapy for lymphopenia. Severe lymphopenia may require the use of prophylactic therapy to prevent select opportunistic infections. Isolated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura maybe the first manifestation of SLE by months or even years. Some manifestations of lupus occur more frequently in association with low platelet count in these patients, for example, neuropsychiatric manifestation, haemolytic anaemia, the antiphospholipid syndrome and renal disease. Thrombocytopenia can be regarded as an important prognostic indicator of survival in patients with SLE. Medical, surgical and biological treatment modalities are reviewed for this manifestation. First-line therapy remains glucocorticoids. Through our review, we conclude glucocorticoids do produce a response in majority of patients initially, but sustained response to therapy is unlikely. Glucocorticoids are used as first-line therapy in patients with SLE with AIHA, but there is no conclusive evidence to guide second-line therapy. Rituximab is promising in refractory and non-responding AIHA. TTP is not recognised as a criteria for classification of SLE, but there is a considerable overlap between the presenting features of TTP and SLE, and a few patients with SLE have concurrent

  11. Extrathoracic manifestations of tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzl-Palma, D.; Prosch, H.

    2016-01-01

    Besides the lungs, tuberculosis (TB) can affect any organ system. In most cases, extrathoracic TB occurs in immunosuppressed patients as part of a severe illness via hematogenous spread. Extrathoracic involvement most commonly involves abdominal organs, especially the urogenital tract and less commonly the central nervous system (CNS) and the musculoskeletal system. Most frequently, computed tomography (CT) is used for detecting extrathoracic TB manifestations, except for CNS and musculoskeletal manifestations, where contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the gold standard. Extrathoracic manifestations of TB may be indistinguishable from inflammatory or malignant causes. Due to unspecific symptoms the diagnosis is often delayed. This article summarizes and discusses the various radiological manifestations of extrathoracic manifestation of TB. Radiological modalities for screening extrathoracic TB are CT and MRI. Conventional X-radiographs do not play a role in the diagnosis of extrathoracic TB. The possibility of extrathoracic TB should be considered particularly in immunosuppressed patients, such as the homeless, alcoholics or drug addicts or in patients with an immigrant background from the endemic areas of TB. The most likely site of extrathoracic TB is the abdomen; however, infections of the CNS or musculoskeletal systems and multisystem infections can also occur. In patients with suspected extrathoracic TB, radiological modalities for screening are CT, especially for abdominal infections and lymphadenopathy and MRI with contrast media for the musculoskeletal system and the CNS. (orig.) [de

  12. Sclerodermatomyositis, ocular manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroza-Seres, M; Serna-Ojeda, J C; Flores-Suárez, L F

    2017-07-01

    Sclerodermatomyositis is an overlap syndrome of myositis and scleroderma, with dermatological, muscular and joint involvement, but may also present with ocular manifestations. A 57 year-old woman presented with ophthalmological manifestations, including scleral thinning 360°, and the presence of cells in the anterior and posterior chamber. Oriented physical examination and laboratory studies led to the diagnosis, with the need for systemic treatment. Sclerodermatomyositis is a rare disease. Its diagnosis needs thorough clinical and laboratory studies, and its management should be multidisciplinary when inflammatory ocular manifestations may be present. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Gulati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis has a spectrum of presentation which ranges from mild disease to a severe form comprising of jaundice and renal failure. Involvement of the lung can vary from subtle clinical features to deadly pulmonary hemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Of late, it has been identified that leptospirosis can present atypically with predominant pulmonary manifestations. This can delay diagnosis making and hence optimum treatment. The purpose of this review is to bring together all the reported pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis and the recent trends in the management.

  14. Thermodynamics in 'Manifest Reality'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankey, Alex

    2010-01-01

    D'Espagnat's proof that the universe is not a 'strongly objective reality' demands that all physical processes are reconsidered in that light. D'Espagnat suggests a 'Veiled Reality' as a suitable alternative. The most economical way to achieve that is to demand that 'information production' at a quantum level creates the basis for self-consistent perception of a world of macroscopic, 'manifest' entities, as opposed to self-existent objects. Such a 'manifest reality' fulfils both Wheeler's attempt at an 'IT-from-BIT' programme, and Zeilinger's suggestion that 'information is primary'.

  15. Your Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Your Skin KidsHealth / For Kids / Your Skin What's in this ... body) are really dead skin cells. Bye-Bye Skin Cells These old cells are tough and strong, ...

  16. A clinical study of the cutaneous manifestations of hyperthyroidism in Kashmir valley – India

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad Abid Keen; Mohamad Hayat Bhat; Iffat Hassan; Parvaiz Ahmad Shah; Yasmeen Jabeen Bhat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Thyroid hormones are instrumental in regulating the health and appearance of skin and when the thyroid gland becomes underactive or overactive, a variety of skin problems result. These dermatologic manifestations may occur secondary to the abnormal thyroid hormone levels or due to the presence of thyroid autoantibodies that interact with skin components. Aims: The present study was designed to ascertain the varied cutaneous manifestations of hyperthyroidism. Methods: Thi...

  17. Pulmonary manifestations of malaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauber, K.; Enkerlin, H.L.; Riemann, H.; Schoeppe, W.; Frankfurt Univ.

    1987-01-01

    We report on the two different types of pulmonary manifestations in acute plasmodium falciparum malaria. The more severe variant shows long standing interstitial pulmonary infiltrates, whereas in the more benign courses only short-term pulmonary edemas are visible. (orig.) [de

  18. Hazardous Waste Manifest System

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s hazardous waste manifest system is designed to track hazardous waste from the time it leaves the generator facility where it was produced, until it reaches the off-site waste management facility that will store, treat, or dispose of the waste.

  19. Neurocysticercosis, unusual manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David López-Valencia

    2016-07-01

    The case of a patient with an atypical location of the parasite at the medulla oblongata, between parenchymal and spinal areas, is presented. The initial symptoms were common but its subsequent manifestations were similar to those of Bruns syndrome. Furthermore, the epidemiological profile of neurocysticercosis in Colombia, its control measures and prevention strategies were reviewed in this study.

  20. CUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE AND RENAL TRANSPLANTATION

    OpenAIRE

    R. Suganya Gnanadeepam; S. Kayalvizhi Money

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND The kidney and the skin are the two large networks of the body with abundant blood supply associated with various cutaneous manifestations. This study aims to detect the various cutaneous manifestations and its incidence in patients with chronic renal failure and renal transplantation. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was done for a period of 1 year from January 2016 to December 2016 at Nephrology OPD ward and Medicine wards, Government KAPV Medical College Hos...

  1. Manifestações cutâneo-mucosas da coccidioidomicose: estudo de trinta casos procedentes dos estados do Piauí e Maranhão Skin and mucous membrane manifestations of coccidioidomycosis: a study of thirty cases in the Brazilian states of Piauí and Maranhão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio de Deus Filho

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: A coccidioidomicose é micose sistêmica usualmente manifesta como infecção benigna de resolução espontânea; porém, uma pequena proporção dos infectados desenvolve quadros progressivos potencialmente fatais, podendo atingir a pele com lesões pleomórficas disseminadas. OBJETIVOS: Identificar e descrever as manifestações cutâneo-mucosas da coccidioidomicose, as ocupações de risco relacionadas à doença e o quadro clínico associado. MÉTODOS: Estudo realizado entre os anos 2003 e 2006 em 30 pacientes portadores de coccidioidomicose provenientes dos estados do Piauí e Maranhão e diagnosticados por exame microscópico direto, cultivo do escarro ou sorologia de triagem de imunodifusão dupla em gel de ágar, aliados à anamnese e exame físico. RESULTADOS: Identificaram-se lesões extrapulmonares em 13 casos (43,3%, com predomínio de manifestações dermatológicas de hipersensibilidade: eritema nodoso (26,6%, exantema com lesões eritemato-escamosas (26,6% e eritema multiforme (23,3%, além de úlceras de língua (13,3% e lábio (6,6% e abscesso subcutâneo (3,3%. Tais manifestações foram observadas na fase aguda da doença. CONCLUSÕES: As manifestações cutâneas associadas à infecção respiratória aguda fortalecem a hipótese diagnóstica desta doença, especialmente, em caçadores de tatus ou pessoas expostas à escavação do solo.BACKGROUND: Coccidioidomycosis is a systemic mycosis that usually presents as a benign infection. Patients generally recover spontaneously; however, a small proportion of infected individuals develop progressive complications that may affect the skin in the form of disseminated pleomorphic lesions and may become fatal. OBJECTIVES: To identify and describe skin and mucous membrane manifestations of coccidioidomycosis, to identify occupational hazards associated with the disease and to determine its associated clinical presentation. METHODS: A study conducted between 2003 and 2006

  2. Immunologic manifestations of autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deretic, Vojo; Kimura, Tomonori; Timmins, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The broad immunologic roles of autophagy span innate and adaptive immunity and are often manifested in inflammatory diseases. The immune effects of autophagy partially overlap with its roles in metabolism and cytoplasmic quality control but typically expand further afield to encompass unique...... immunologic adaptations. One of the best-appreciated manifestations of autophagy is protection against microbial invasion, but this is by no means limited to direct elimination of intracellular pathogens and includes a stratified array of nearly all principal immunologic processes. This Review summarizes...... the broad immunologic roles of autophagy. Furthermore, it uses the autophagic control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a paradigm to illustrate the breadth and complexity of the immune effects of autophagy....

  3. Ocular manifestations of leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathinam S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospiral uveitis is a common entity in tropical countries. Ocular manifestations are noted in the second phase of illness, but these remain under-diagnosed mainly because of the prolonged symptom-free period that separates the systemic manifestations from detection of ocular manifestations.Varying ophthalmic presentations and the intrinsic nature of different types of uveitis to mimic one another also challenge the accuracy of the diagnosis. Of the individual ocular signs, the combination of acute, non-granulomatous, panuveitis, hypopyon, vasculitis, optic disc edema, membranous vitreous opacities and absence of choroiditis or retinitis have high predictive value for the clinical diagnosis of leptospiral uveitis. Geographic location of the patient, occupation, socio-economic status, risk factors related to exposure, past history of fever or jaundice also aid in diagnosis.Steroids are the mainstay of treatment for leptospiral uveitis. Depending upon the severity and anatomical location of inflammatory lesion, topical, peri-ocular and/or systemic steroids are given. The prognosis is generally good, even when the inflammation is severe.

  4. Extraintestinal manifestations in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isene, Rune; Bernklev, Tomm; Høie, Ole

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (Crohn's disease [CD] and ulcerative colitis [UC]), symptoms from outside the gastrointestinal tract are frequently seen, and the joints, skin, eyes, and hepatobiliary area are the most usually affected sites (called extraintestinal......, skin, and liver) manifestations: 20.1% versus 10.4% (p colitis compared to proctitis in UC increased the risk of EIM. CONCLUSION: In a European inception cohort, EIMs in IBD...

  5. Atypical Manifestations of Hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxall, E. A.; Lauener, R. W.; McIntosh, H. W.

    1964-01-01

    Patients with hyperthyroidism usually present with symptoms of hypermetabolism with or without goitre and/or eye signs. Occasionally, however, the chief complaints are not immediately suggestive of hyperthyroidism. Patients with hyperthyroidism are described who presented with such atypical manifestations as periodic muscular paralysis, myasthenia, myopathy, encephalopathy, psychosis, angina pectoris, atrial fibrillation, heart failure without underlying heart disease, skeletal demineralization, pretibial myxedema, unilateral eye signs, and pitting edema of the ankles. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:14178405

  6. Skin Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration Keeps harmful ... it Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, ...

  7. Radiological manifestations of melioidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, K.S.; Chong, V.H.

    2010-01-01

    Melioidosis is a serious infection that is associated with high mortality. It is due to a Gram-negative bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei which is an environmental saprophyte found in wet soils. Melioidosis is endemic to northern Australia and the Southeast Asia. However, there is now increasing number of reports of imported cases to regions where this infection has not been previously encountered. Almost any organ can be affected. Like many other conditions, radiological imaging is an integral part of the diagnostic workup of melioidosis. Awareness of the various radiological manifestations can help direct appropriate investigations to achieve early diagnosis and the initiation of appropriate treatment. Generally, there are no known characteristic features on imaging that can specifically differentiate melioidosis from other infections. However, the 'honeycomb' appearance has been described to be characteristic for large melioidosis liver abscesses. Simultaneous involvement of various organs is also characteristics. To date, there are few data available on the radiological manifestations of melioidosis. The present pictorial essay describes melioidosis affecting the various organs.

  8. [Cutaneous manifestations of male breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hali, Fouzia; Khadir, Khadija; Idhammou, Wassima; Bensardi, Fatima-Zahra; Lefriyekh, Mohamed-Rachid; Benider, Abdelatif; Zamiati, Soumia; Benchikhi, Hakima

    2011-11-01

    The appearance of skin symptoms in male breast is the main reason for consultation in our context. The aim of this study is to describe the various cutaneous manifestations of male breast cancer through a series of cases collected in a dermatology department. A retrospective study was conducted in the dermatology department at the CHU Ibn Rochd January 1988 to December 2009. All cases of male breast cancer initially diagnosed in dermatology were included. The various epidemiological, clinical, histological and therapeutic data were collected from medical records. Twenty cases were collected. The mean age was 61.25 years. Skin invasion by tumor was found in all patients, and it was the reason for consultation. It was a cutaneous involvement at the nipple and areola (17 cases) and at the periareolar skin (three cases). The clinical appearance of skin involvement was vegetative type in 12 cases, infiltrating with nipple retraction in five cases and nodule with skin change in three cases. The average period of consultation was 25 months. The axillary lymph nodes were noted in 11 patients and distant metastases in eight patients. The cutaneous metastases outside breast were noted in six patients. The histological types were: infiltrating ductal carcinoma in 15 cases (75%), papillary carcinoma in two cases (10%) and non-specific carcinoma in three cases (15%). The treatment was surgery in 14 patients and consisted of radical mastectomy with complete axillary nodal dissection according to Patey. Complementary therapies, chemotherapy or radiotherapy, were indicated in 14 patients. Our single-center study with dermatological recruitment illustrates the frequency and variety of skin disease in male breast cancer and demonstrates that they are still the main reason for consultation in our context. Better information for public and practitioners would allow earlier diagnosis and a more favourable prognosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Cutaneous Manifestations of Diabetes Mellitus: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Ana Luiza; Illing, Tanja; Schliemann, Sibylle; Elsner, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a widespread endocrine disease with severe impact on health systems worldwide. Increased serum glucose causes damage to a wide range of cell types, including endothelial cells, neurons, and renal cells, but also keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Skin disorders can be found in about one third of all people with diabetes and frequently occur before the diagnosis, thus playing an important role in the initial recognition of underlying disease. Noninfectious as well as infectious diseases have been described as dermatologic manifestations of diabetes mellitus. Moreover, diabetic neuropathy and angiopathy may also affect the skin. Pruritus, necrobiosis lipoidica, scleredema adultorum of Buschke, and granuloma annulare are examples of frequent noninfectious skin diseases. Bacterial and fungal skin infections are more frequent in people with diabetes. Diabetic neuropathy and angiopathy are responsible for diabetic foot syndrome and diabetic dermopathy. Furthermore, antidiabetic therapies may provoke dermatologic adverse events. Treatment with insulin may evoke local reactions like lipohypertrophy, lipoatrophy and both instant and delayed type allergy. Erythema multiforme, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, drug eruptions, and photosensitivity have been described as adverse reactions to oral antidiabetics. The identification of lesions may be crucial for the first diagnosis and for proper therapy of diabetes.

  10. Skin abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abscess - skin; Cutaneous abscess; Subcutaneous abscess; MRSA - abscess; Staph infection - abscess ... Skin abscesses are common and affect people of all ages. They occur when an infection causes pus ...

  11. dermatology cutaneous manifestations of hiv/aids: part i

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    2004-11-01

    Nov 1, 2004 ... Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection can lead to a variety of clinical cutaneous manifestations. These cutaneous disorders ... 1. Correlation between mean CD4 cell count and incidences of specific skin disorders in patients with HIV infection. Fig. 2. Morbilliform rash of acute seroconversion illness.

  12. Respiratory manifestations of hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Jesper Roed; Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypothyroidism has been associated with increased pulmonary morbidity and overall mortality. We conducted a systematic review to identify the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of respiratory problems among patients with thyroid insufficiency. METHODS: PubMed and EMBASE databases were...... searched for relevant literature from January 1950 through January 2015 with study eligibility criteria: English-language publications; Adult subclinical or overt hypothyroid patients; Intervention, observational or retrospective studies; and respiratory manifestations. We followed the PRISMA statement...... and used the Cochrane's risk of bias tool. RESULTS: A total of 1699 papers were screened by two independent authors for relevant titles. Of 109 relevant abstracts, 28 papers underwent full text analyses, of which 22 were included in the review. We identified possible mechanisms explaining respiratory...

  13. Cardiovascular manifestations of Alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Stephen J; Fisher, Michael; Gallagher, James A; Ranganath, Lakshminarayan R

    2011-12-01

    The cardiovascular manifestations of alkaptonuria relate to deposition of ochronotic pigment within heart valves, endocardium, aortic intima and coronary arteries. We assessed 16 individuals with alkaptonuria for cardiovascular disease, including full electrocardiographic and echocardiographic assessment. The self reported prevalence of valvular heart disease and coronary artery disease was low. There was a significant burden of previously undiagnosed aortic valve disease, reaching a prevalence of over 40% by the fifth decade of life. The aortic valve disease was found to increase in both prevalence and severity with advancing age. In contrast to previous reports, we did not find a significant burden of mitral valve disease or coronary artery disease. These findings are important for the clinical follow-up of patients with alkaptonuria and suggest a role for echocardiographic surveillance of patients above 40 years old.

  14. Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Miguel A; Zakaria, Alan; Nizran, Parminder

    2015-12-01

    Skin cancer accounts for most malignancies across the globe. They are primarily divided into melanoma and nonmelanoma skin malignancies. Nonmelanoma skin cancer includes basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Fair skin and chronic ultraviolet B exposure are the most important risk factors. Primary prevention is achieved by avoiding sun exposure and tanning beds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Thyroid and skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogra Alka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The association of thyroid disorders with skin manifestations is complex. Both hypothryoidism and hyperthyroidism are known to cause these changes. In order to study this association of skin changes in relation to hypothyroidism, a study was carried out in the outpatients department of Dermatology of Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana, over a period of 3 months from Jan-March 2005. Thirty two patients were enrolled in the study and parameters were noted regarding history, general symptoms, cutaneous signs and associated diseases. We found gain in weight (71.85% and lethargy (65.62% to be the most common complaints. On cutaneous examination, dry, coarse texture of the skin (56%, pigmentary disorders (37.5% and telogen effluvium (40.62% were the most common findings. Other associated disorders were vitiligo, melasma, pemphigus, alopecia areata, xanthelasma palpebrarum, etc.

  16. Refining the ideas of "ethnic" skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Vicente; Herane, Maria Isabel; Costa, Adilson; Martin, Jaime Piquero; Troielli, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Skin disease occur worldwide, affecting people of all nationalities and all skin types. These diseases may have a genetic component and may manifest differently in specific population groups; however, there has been little study on this aspect. If population-based differences exist, it is reasonable to assume that understanding these differences may optimize treatment. While there is a relative paucity of information about similarities and differences in skin diseases around the world, the knowledge-base is expanding. One challenge in understanding population-based variations is posed by terminology used in the literature: including ethnic skin, Hispanic skin, Asian skin, and skin of color. As will be discussed in this article, we recommend that the first three descriptors are no longer used in dermatology because they refer to nonspecific groups of people. In contrast, "skin of color" may be used - perhaps with further refinements in the future - as a term that relates to skin biology and provides relevant information to dermatologists.

  17. The choice of sensitive skin layer responsible for aftereffects of daily irradiation of the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keirim-Markus, I.B.

    1992-01-01

    The choice of sensitive human skin layer manifesting in delayed period after daily irradiation of the human skin (stochastic and determined effects) was evaluated. It was established that delayed aftereffects of daily radiation of the skin manifested as epidem damages. This layer of papilla derma of 10-15 mg/cm 2 thick situated at the great part of body surface, 15 mg/cm 2 on dorsal side of hands and 40 mg/cm 2 on palms and pillows of the fingers. Sensitive layer of skin dosimeter for a control of daily irradiation of people must have the same geometry

  18. Skin changes in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna M. Przepiórka-Kosińska; Katarzyna M. Chyl-Surdacka; Joanna Bartosińska; Dorota Krasowska; Grażyna Chodorowska

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease causes skin changes which may sometimes be the first sign of kidney failure. Specific skin changes include acquired perforating dermatosis, porphyria cutanea tarda, pseudoporphyria, calcinosis and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The majority of patients present with cutaneous manifestations which are classified as non-specific, including xerosis, pruritus, pigmentation disturbances, nail plate abnormalities, uraemic frost and gynaecomastia. Treatment improving kidney fun...

  19. CT manifestation of hepatic toxoplasmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Qing; Yang Yaying; Bao Yanming; He Bo; Wang Kechao; Song Guangyi; Lu Lin; Wang Xiaoli

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT manifestation of hepatic toxoplasmosis, and to provide image basis for its clinical diagnosis. Methods: Three patients with hepatic toxoplasmosis were examined by abdomen MSCT (pre- and post-contrast), and were confirmed by laboratory exams. The images were analyzed with information of clinical manifestation. Results: The positive appearances included the enlargement of liver, patches of multiple scattered low densities. Post-contrast lesions appearances: (1) No significant enhancement. (2) No significant occupying effection, and normal vessels inserting lesion occasionally. Conclusion: CT manifestation of hepar toxoplasmosis are some characteristic. But the diagnosis was made by a combination both clinical manifestation and laboratory exams. (authors)

  20. Changes in Bacteria Induce Inflammatory Skin Diseases | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that manifests as dry skin with a relentless itch and eczema. AD is considered an allergic disease in which the skin inflammation manifests in response to chronic exposure to contact allergens. However, identification of a responsible allergen is uncommon. Meanwhile, analyses have demonstrated that the surface of

  1. Refining the ideas of "ethnic" skin*

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Vicente; Herane, Maria Isabel; Costa, Adilson; Martin, Jaime Piquero; Troielli, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Skin disease occur worldwide, affecting people of all nationalities and all skin types. These diseases may have a genetic component and may manifest differently in specific population groups; however, there has been little study on this aspect. If population-based differences exist, it is reasonable to assume that understanding these differences may optimize treatment. While there is a relative paucity of information about similarities and differences in skin diseases around the wor...

  2. Skin changes in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna M. Przepiórka-Kosińska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease causes skin changes which may sometimes be the first sign of kidney failure. Specific skin changes include acquired perforating dermatosis, porphyria cutanea tarda, pseudoporphyria, calcinosis and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The majority of patients present with cutaneous manifestations which are classified as non-specific, including xerosis, pruritus, pigmentation disturbances, nail plate abnormalities, uraemic frost and gynaecomastia. Treatment improving kidney function (dialysis therapy or kidney transplantation also leads to the resolution of skin lesions.

  3. Skin Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Skin Complications Diabetes can affect every part of the ... lipoidica diabeticorum, diabetic blisters, and eruptive xanthomatosis. General Skin Conditions Bacterial Infections Several kinds of bacterial infections ...

  4. Cryotherapy - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryosurgery - skin; Warts - freezing; Warts - cryotherapy; Actinic keratosis - cryotherapy; Solar keratosis - cryotherapy ... may be used to: Remove warts Destroy precancerous skin lesions (actinic keratoses or solar keratoses) In rare ...

  5. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types ... face, neck, hands, and arms. Another type of skin cancer, melanoma, is more dangerous but less common. Anyone ...

  6. Sagging Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turkey neck,” this occurs as skin loses its elasticity and in cases where individuals have lost a ... technique or procedure is appropriate for my skin type? Did the doctor show me before-and-after ...

  7. Skin Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... like these: skin rashes or conditions, such as eczema or psoriasis skin infections, such as staph diseases, ...

  8. Skin Graft

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Ruka; Kishi, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Skin graft is one of the most indispensable techniques in plastic surgery and dermatology. Skin grafts are used in a variety of clinical situations, such as traumatic wounds, defects after oncologic resection, burn reconstruction, scar contracture release, congenital skin deficiencies, hair restoration, vitiligo, and nipple-areola reconstruction. Skin grafts are generally avoided in the management of more complex wounds. Conditions with deep spaces and exposed bones normally require the use o...

  9. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay K Mahajan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi characterized by focal or disseminated vasculitis and perivasculitis which may involve the lungs, heart, liver, spleen and central nervous system. It was thought to have been eradicated from India. Recently it is being reported from many areas of India. The clinical picture and severity of the symptoms varies widely. The neurological manifestations of scrub typhus are not uncommon but are diverse. Meningoencephalitis is classical manifestation of scrub typhus but cerebellitis, cranial nerve palsies, plexopathy, transverse myelitis, neuroleptic malignant syndrome and Guillan-Barré syndrome are other manifestations reported in literature. The availability of literature on the neurological manifestations of scrub typhus is limited to case reports mainly. This article reviews various neurological manifestations of scrub typhus reported in literature.

  10. Skin Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your skin changes as you age. You might notice wrinkles, age spots and dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it ... heal, too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out ...

  11. Neurological manifestations of Chikungunya and Zika infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talys J. Pinheiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The epidemics of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV and Zika virus (ZIKV infections have been considered the most important epidemiological occurrences in the Americas. The clinical picture of CHIKV infection is characterized by high fever, exanthema, myalgia, headaches, and arthralgia. Besides the typical clinical picture of CHIKV, atypical manifestations of neurological complications have been reported: meningo-encephalitis, meningoencephalo-myeloradiculitis, myeloradiculitis, myelitis, myeloneuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome and others. The diagnosis is based on clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory criteria. The most common symptoms of ZIKV infection are skin rash (mostly maculopapular, fever, arthralgia, myalgia, headache, and conjunctivitis. Some epidemics that have recently occurred in French Polynesia and Brazil, reported the most severe conditions, with involvement of the nervous system (Guillain-Barré syndrome, transverse myelitis, microcephaly and meningitis. The treatment for ZIKV and CHIKV infections are symptomatic and the management for neurological complications depends on the type of affliction. Intravenous immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis, and corticosteroid pulse therapy are options.

  12. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  13. [Skin and chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Raffaella; Mancini, Elena; Santoro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Kidneys and skin are seldom considered associated, but their relationship is more closer than generally believed. In some immunological diseases (SLE...) and genetic syndromes (tuberous sclerosis, Fabrys disease...) the cutaneous manifestations are integral parts of the clinical picture. In advanced uremia, besides the well-known itching skin lesions, calciphylaxis may appear, a typical example of cutaneous involvement secondary to the metabolic complications (calcium-phosphate imbalance) of the renal disease. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis appears only in patients with renal failure and it has a very severe prognosis due to the systemic organ involvement. Moreover, there is a heterogeneous group of metabolic diseases, with renal involvement, that may be accompanied by skin lesions, either related to the disease itself or to its complications (diabetes mellitus, porphyrias). In systemic amyloidosis, fibrils may deposit even in dermis leading to different skin lesions. In some heroin abusers, in the presence of suppurative lesions in the sites of needle insertion, renal amyloidosis should be suspected, secondary to the chronic inflammation. Atheroembolic disease is nowadays frequently observed, as a consequence of the increasing number of invasive intravascular manoeuvres. Skin manifestations like livedo reticularis or the blue toe syndrome are the most typical signs, but often renal dysfunction is also present. In all these conditions, the skin lesion may be a first sign, a warning, that should arouse the suspicion of a more complex pathology, even with renal involvement. Being aware of this relationship is fundamental to accelerate the diagnostic process.

  14. [Otorhinolaryngological manifestations in patients with Behçet disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Angulo, Carmelo; Vergara Pastrana, Sandra; Obeso-Agüera, Sergio; Acle, Leticia; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Behçet disease (BD) is a systemic immune-mediated vasculitis of unknown origin characterised by recurrent orogenital ulceration, ocular inflammation and skin lesions. The aim of our study was to identify ear, nose and throat (ENT) manifestations associated with BD. Retrospective review of the medical records of all patients diagnosed with BD who attended a tertiary public hospital in Cantabria (Spain) over a period of 22 years. Clinical manifestations, in particular those concerning ENT, were retrieved from medical records. A medical literature review of ENT manifestations was conducted. Thirty-three patients (age range: 17-64 years) were included in the study. Most of them presented oral ulcers (97%). Eight patients (24%) presented oropharyngeal ulcers and 5 patients (15%) experienced audiovestibular symptoms (high frequency sensorineural hearing loss, vertigo and bilateral vestibular hypofunction). One patient had symptoms compatible with vestibular neuronitis as the presentation manifestation of Neuro-Behçet. In 4 patients (12%) the presence of odynophagia secondary to the presence of oropharyngeal lesions, initially interpreted as acute or recurrent tonsillitis, was the first manifestation of the disease, alone or associated with cutaneous or ocular lesions. In addition to the characteristic oral ulcers present in most patients with BD, ulcers in the oropharynx, occasionally interpreted as acute pharyngitis, are also common in these patients. Audiovestibular manifestations frequently appear during the course of the disease and may be the first symptom of central nervous system involvement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. The radiographic manifestations of hypochondroplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heselson, N.G.; Cremin, B.J.; Beighton, P.

    1979-01-01

    Hypochrondroplasia is an inherited skeletal dysplasia that resembles achondroplasia in mild degree. Radiographic manifestations encountered in 12 affected individuals in South Africa include slight shortening of all segments of the tubular bones, moderate caudal diminution of the lumbar interpedicular distances, increased lumbar lordosis with cacral tilt and distal prolongation of the fibular. Hypochondroplasia can be distinguished from other osteochondrodystrophies such as achondroplasia, pseudo-achondroplasia and metaphyseal chondroplasia by the recognition of it clinical and radiographic manifestations. (author)

  16. Cutaneous manifestations of Churg-Strauss syndrome: key to diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Camila Carneiro; Fernandes, Elizabeth Leocadia; Miquelin, Gabriela Momente; Colferai, Mariana Morais Tavares

    2017-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a rare systemic vasculitis characterized by asthma and other allergy symptoms as well as eosinophilia and necrotizing vasculitis involving small and medium-sized vessels. Its prevalence in the general population ranges from 1-3 cases per million a year, varying according to the population studied. The authors describe a case of a female patient affected by the disease with important systemic manifestations and not very florid skin lesions.

  17. Cutaneous manifestations of Churg-Strauss syndrome: key to diagnosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Camila Carneiro; Fernandes, Elizabeth Leocadia; Miquelin, Gabriela Momente; Colferai, Mariana Morais Tavares

    2017-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a rare systemic vasculitis characterized by asthma and other allergy symptoms as well as eosinophilia and necrotizing vasculitis involving small and medium-sized vessels. Its prevalence in the general population ranges from 1-3 cases per million a year, varying according to the population studied. The authors describe a case of a female patient affected by the disease with important systemic manifestations and not very florid skin lesions. PMID:29267447

  18. Cutaneous Manifestations of Human and Murine Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breanna M. Scorza

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The leishmaniases are diseases caused by pathogenic protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. Infections are initiated when a sand fly vector inoculates Leishmania parasites into the skin of a mammalian host. Leishmania causes a spectrum of inflammatory cutaneous disease manifestations. The type of cutaneous pathology is determined in part by the infecting Leishmania species, but also by a combination of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory host immune response factors resulting in different clinical outcomes. This review discusses the distinct cutaneous syndromes described in humans, and current knowledge of the inflammatory responses associated with divergent cutaneous pathologic responses to different Leishmania species. The contribution of key hematopoietic cells in experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis in mouse models are also reviewed and compared with those observed during human infection. We hypothesize that local skin events influence the ensuing adaptive immune response to Leishmania spp. infections, and that the balance between inflammatory and regulatory factors induced by infection are critical for determining cutaneous pathology and outcome of infection.

  19. Imaging findings in systemic childhood diseases presenting with dermatologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Adam Z; Gittler, Julia K; Nakrani, Radhika N; Alis, Jonathan; Blumfield, Einat; Levin, Terry L

    Many childhood diseases often present with skin abnormalities with which radiologists are largely unfamiliar. Knowledge of associated dermatologic manifestations may aid the radiologist in confirming the diagnosis and recommending targeted imaging of affected organs. We review the imaging findings in childhood diseases associated with dermatologic manifestations. Diseases include dermatologic findings which herald underlying malignancy (Neuroblastoma, leukemia/lymphoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis),are associated with risk of malignancy (Epidermolysis Bullosa, basal cell nevus syndrome, Cowden's syndrome, Tuberous Sclerosis),or indicate a systemic inflammatory/immune disorder (Kawasaki's disease, Henoch Schonlein Purpura, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, sarcoidosis, dermatomyositis and immune thrombocytopenic purpura). Familiarity with pertinent findings in childhood diseases presenting with dermatologic manifestations in childhood diseases aids the radiologist in confirming the diagnosis and guiding imaging workup. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dry Skin Relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on a budget Skin care products Skin care secrets Skin lighteners Skin of color Summer skin problems ... condition, such as eczema. Additional related information Dermatologists' top tips for relieving dry skin FIND A DERMATOLOGIST ...

  1. Clinical manifestations of scrub typhus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Weeratunga, Praveen; Sivayoganathan, Sriharan; Fernando, Sumadhya Deepika

    2017-02-01

    The mite-borne rickettsial zoonosis scrub typhus is widely prevalent in parts of Southeast and Far East Asia, and northern Australia. The disease is an acute febrile illness, associated with rash and often an eschar, which responds dramatically to treatment with antibiotics. In some cases it results in a serious illness leading to multiple organ involvement and death. The disease manifestations are thought to result from a systemic vasculitis, caused by both direct effects of the organisms as well as an exaggerated immune response, although little is understood about its pathogenesis. A wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, affecting nearly every organ system, have been described with scrub typhus. Some of these manifestations are serious and life threatening. In this systematic review, we summarise the typical and atypical manifestations of scrub typhus reported in the literature. Awareness of these unusual manifestations will hopefully guide clinicians towards diagnosing the condition early, and initiating early appropriate antibiotics and other supportive measures. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Michiko

    1992-01-01

    This chapter reviews the development of skin cancer associated with radiation, focusing on the knowledge of A-bomb radiation-induced skin cancer. Since the discovery of X radiation in 1895, acute and chronic radiation dermatitis has been the first matter of concern. Then, in 1902, skin cancer found among radiological personnel has posed a social problem. In earlier study determining the relationship between skin cancer and A-bomb radiation, there is no increase in the incidence of either skin cancer or precancerous condition during the first 20 years after A-bombing. More recent studies have showed that there is a significant correlation between the incidence of skin cancer and distance from the hypocenter; and the incidence of skin cancer is found to be remarkably increased since 1975 in the group exposed at ≤2,000 m. Excess relative risk is 2.2 at one Gy dose. The incidence of skin cancer is also found to be extremely increased with aging. Relative risk is high in younger A-bomb survivors at the time of exposure. Histologically, basal cell carcinoma is more senstitive to ionizing radiation than squamous cell carcinoma. (N.K.)

  3. Pulmonary cystic disease associated with integumentary and renal manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayetano, Katherine S.; Albertson, Timothy E.; Chan, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    A 69-year-old man with multiple skin lesions on his face, neck and upper torso, which first appeared in the 3rd decade of his life, was admitted to our hospital. He had cystic changes in his lungs noted on chest computed tomography (CT) scanning, as well as a left kidney mass. This patient exhibited a rare complex of renal, cutaneous and pulmonary manifestations, eponymously named Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome, with characteristic skin features (fibrofolliculomas, trichodiscomas and acrochordons). This syndrome is due to an autosomal dominant germ-line mutation of the folliculin (FLCN) gene located at chromosome 17p11.2. Diagnosis and differentiation from other disease complexes including the skin, kidneys and lungs are important in prognostication and management of potentially life-threatening complications such as renal cell carcinoma and pneumothoraces. PMID:24285950

  4. Quantum manifestations of Nekhoroshev stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanari, Daniele, E-mail: fontanari@purple.univ-littoral.fr [Département de physique, Université du Littoral – Côte d' Opale, 59140 Dunkerque (France); Fassò, Francesco, E-mail: fasso@math.unipd.it [Università di Padova, Dipartimento di Matematica, Via Trieste 63, Padova 35121 (Italy); Sadovskií, Dmitrií A., E-mail: sadovski@univ-littoral.fr [Département de physique, Université du Littoral – Côte d' Opale, 59140 Dunkerque (France)

    2016-09-16

    We uncover quantum manifestations of classical Nekhoroshev theory of resonant dynamics using a simple quantum system of two coupled angular momenta with conserved equal magnitudes which corresponds to a perturbed classical integrable anisochronous Hamiltonian system. - Highlights: • Basic quantum manifestations of classical Nekhoroshev theory are studied. • A simple anisochronous convex system with two degrees of freedom is proposed. • Zones are uncovered in the joint expectation value spectrum of quantized actions. • The width of the zones is given by the Nekhoroshev resonant normal forms.

  5. Mucocutaneous manifestations of Cowden's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundoor Vinay Kumar Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowden's syndrome is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis with variable orofacial and systemic manifestations. Here we present one such classical case of Cowden's syndrome in a 45-year-old female patient with features such as multiple cutaneous papillomatosis, oral fibromas, and fibromas involving multiple organs such as gastrointestinal tract (multiple polyps, thyroid disorders, and breast cancer.

  6. OCULAR MANIFESTATIONS OF HEAD INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanukollu Venkata Madusudana Rao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This prospective study aimed to evaluate the incidence of ocular manifestations in head injury and their correlation with the intracranial lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 108 consecutive cases of closed head injury admitted in the neurosurgical ward of a tertiary teaching hospital underwent a thorough ophthalmic assessment. Clinical examination, radiological imaging and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS were applied to grade the severity of injury. RESULTS Total number of 108 patients of head injury were examined of which 38 patients had ocular manifestations (35.18%. Of these, 85.18% were males, 84% of injuries were due to road traffic accidents and 16% were due to fall from a height. The ocular manifestations were as follows- Orbital complications were seen in 6 patients (15.8%. Anterior segment manifestations included black eyes seen in 10 patients (26.3%, subconjunctival haemorrhage in 10.5% of patients (4 patients, corneal involvement in 21% of patients (8 patients and pupillary involvement in 50% of patients (19 patients. Posterior segment manifestations were seen in 26.3% of patients (10 patients and were as follows- Purtscher’s retinopathy in 2 patients and optic atrophy in 5 patients. Cranial nerve palsies were seen in 15 patients (39.47% and supranuclear movement disorders were seen in 3 patients (8%. CONCLUSION Even though, neurosurgeons perform comprehensive clinical examination including eye examination, the main purpose is limited to aid topical diagnosis of neurological lesions. This study emphasises the importance of a detailed eye examination by an ophthalmologist to prevent irreversible visual loss in addition to aiding in the neurological diagnosis. Pupillary involvement, papilloedema and ocular motor paresis pointed to a more severe head injury. This observational prospective study helped us to correlate the severity of head injuries in association with ocular findings in patients admitted in neurosurgical ward

  7. Cutaneous manifestations in patients with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udayakumar P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic renal failure (CRF presents with an array of cutaneous manifestations. Newer changes are being described since the advent of hemodialysis, which prolongs the life expectancy, giving time for these changes to manifest. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of dermatologic problems among patients with chronic renal failure (CRF undergoing hemodialysis. Methods: One hundred patients with CRF on hemodialysis were examined for cutaneous changes. Results: Eighty-two per cent patients complained of some skin problem. However, on examination, all patients had at least one skin lesion attributable to CRF. The most prevalent finding was xerosis (79%, followed by pallor (60%, pruritus (53% and cutaneous pigmentation (43%. Other cutaneous manifestations included Kyrle′s disease (21%; fungal (30%, bacterial (13% and viral (12% infections; uremic frost (3%; purpura (9%; gynecomastia (1%; and dermatitis (2%. The nail changes included half and half nail (21%, koilonychia (18%, onychomycosis (19%, subungual hyperkeratosis (12%, onycholysis (10%, splinter hemorrhages (5%, Mees′ lines (7%, Muehrcke′s lines (5% and Beau′s lines (2%. Hair changes included sparse body hair (30%, sparse scalp hair (11% and brittle and lusterless hair (16%. Oral changes included macroglossia with teeth markings (35%, xerostomia (31%, ulcerative stomatitis (29%, angular cheilitis (12% and uremic breath (8%. Some rare manifestations of CRF like uremic frost, gynecomastia and pseudo-Kaposi′s sarcoma were also observed. Conclusions: CRF is associated with a complex array of cutaneous manifestations caused either by the disease or by treatment. The commonest are xerosis and pruritus and the early recognition of cutaneous signs can relieve suffering and decrease morbidity.

  8. Skin Dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Registration General information Housing & travel Education Exhibit hall Mobile app 2019 Annual Meeting Derm Exam Prep Course ... SkinPAC State societies Scope of practice Truth in advertising NP/PA laws Action center Public and patients ...

  9. Hyperelastic skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is most often seen in people who have Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. People with this disorder have very elastic skin. ... any member of your family been diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome? What other symptoms are present? Genetic counseling may ...

  10. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sunlamps. There are 2 types of UV rays: UVA rays (long-wave) – UVA rays penetrate clouds and glass. They penetrate the ... to cancer. But studies have shown that both UVA and UVB damage the skin and can cause ...

  11. Cutaneous Manifestations in HIV Infected Libyan Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aljehawi Nabil A.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV disease may result from HIV infection itself, or from opportunistic disorders secondary to the declined immunocompetence due to the disease. A total of 220 HIV positive patients, treated in the Benghazi Center of Infectious Diseases and Immunology over a period of 14 years (January 2003 to November 2016, were included in a retrospective study. The patients' age ranged from 7 to 46 years. The study was conducted by reviewing the patients' records using the management information system (MIS. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out by the t-test and Chi square test. Among the studied patients, 119 (54.1% were males and 101 (45.9% were females, and most of them (78.6% were 10 – 19 years of age. The predominant mode of transmission was parenteral transmission, in 95% of patients, and positive family history was observed in 12% of patients. Among the total number of visits to dermatologists, 93% of patients had a single disease. Of the total number of skin diseases diagnosed during the visits, parasitic infestations were seen in 92 patients (21.0%, eczematous and related disorders in 78 patients (17.8%, viral infections in 71 patients (16.2%, bacterial infections in 41 patients (9.3%, and fungal infections in 35 patients (7.9%. Dermatophyte infections were the most common fungal infections recorded in 19 patients (4.3%, followed by Candida infection in 11 patients (2.5%. Warts were found in 5.9% of viral infections, followed by herpes zoster (4.1%. HIV positive patients should be examined for skin disorders, because early diagnosis and management of such problems improves the quality of life in these patients.

  12. [Streptococcus suis infection--clinical manifestations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragojlović, Julijana; Milosević, Branko; Sasić, Neda; Pelemis, Mijomir; Sasić, Milan

    2005-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a bacterium causing a disease in pigs and rarely in humans. This zoonosis is mostly found as a sporadic disease in individuals that were in contact with the affected or infected pigs: farmers, veterinarians and workers engaged in fresh pork processing. It is assumed that the bacterium enters the body through a cut abrasion in the skin. Initially, the condition resembles a flu, followed by signs of bacteriemia and sepsis. The most frequent clinical manifestation of Streptococcus suis infection is meningitis, leading to hearing loss in over 75% of patients, and subsequent arthritis, endophtalmitis, endocarditis and pneumonia. Toxic shock syndrome with hemorhagic manifestations rarely develops. This study included five male patients aged 22 to 63 years treated in the Intensive Care Unit of the Institute of Infectious and Tropical Diseases in Belgrade, due to Streptococcus suis infection. The aim of this study was to point to the existence of this bacteria in our environment, to describe clinical manifestations of the disease and to point out the importance of its prevention. All patients had epidemiological evidence of being in contact with pork meat. There were no data about diseased pigs. The estimated incubation period was 4 to 8 days. All patients had meningeal signs. Clinical symptoms included shivering, fever, vomiting, headache, malaise, vertigo and tinitus. Three patients presented with alerterd level of awarrness. Four patients developed very severe bilateral hearing impairment, whereas one endophtalmtis and one developed endocarditis. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was opalescent in four patients, and only one patient presented with clear CSF. CSF examination showed typical changes characteristic for bacterial meningitis. Streptoccocus suis was isolated in CSF in all patients, and in one patient the bacteria was isolated in blood as well. All patients underwent treatement with II and III generation cephalosporins and one with one

  13. Cutaneous manifestation in children with HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Naser Emadi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The most recent studies have explained almost 2.3 million children are affected with HIV up to the end of 2009. Sub-Saharan Africa is the main region affected by AIDS compare to other parts of the world. Despite providing competent healthcare services to prevent mother-to-child transmission as a main way of infection to a newborn, an estimated 370,000 children were newly infected to HIV in 2009. Skin disorders are common and may even be the first manifestation of HIV in children.The most common skin illnesses are classified in four categories; infectious, inflammatory, neoplastic, and drug related (Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy. In addition, unusual anatomical sites, disseminated skin lesions, increased frequency and severity, unexplained clinical presentation, rapid onset, and finally treatment failure may be the other specified skin conditions in HIV/AIDS children. CD4 count and viral load are two basic factors playing an important role in terms of type and severity of skin illness. The aim of this review was to show the common and crucial cutaneous findings among HIV/AIDS children via published articles with the same subject.

  14. Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Skin Cancer Key Points Skin cancer is a disease ...

  15. MANIFESTATIONS OF AGGRESSIVE ATYPICAL KAPOSI'S ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... weight loss (86.8%), skin nodules (86.4%) and diarrhoea (55.3%). Virtually, all occupational groups were affected, with students, civil servants and businessmen topping the list. Key Words: Atypical Aggressive Kaposi's sarcoma, HIV infection. African Journal Of Clinical And Experimental Microbiology Jan 2004 Vol.5 No.1 ...

  16. Breast manifestations of systemic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilaveri CA

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Christina A Dilaveri, Maire Brid Mac Bride, Nicole P Sandhu, Lonzetta Neal, Karthik Ghosh, Dietlind L Wahner-RoedlerDivision of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Although much emphasis has been placed on the primary presentations of breast cancer, little focus has been placed on how systemic illnesses may affect the breast. In this article, we discuss systemic illnesses that can manifest in the breast. We summarize the clinical features, imaging, histopathology, and treatment recommendations for endocrine, vascular, systemic inflammatory, infectious, and hematologic diseases, as well as for the extramammary malignancies that can present in the breast. Despite the rarity of these manifestations of systemic disease, knowledge of these conditions is critical to the appropriate evaluation and treatment of patients presenting with breast symptoms.Keywords: breast, endocrine, hematologic, infectious, vascular

  17. Unusual clinical manifestations of leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis has protean clinical manifestations. The classical presentation of the disease is an acute biphasic febrile illness with or without jaundice. Unusual clinical manifestations may result from involvement of pulmonary, cardiovascular, neural, gastrointestinal, ocular and other systems. Immunological phenomena secondary to antigenic mimicry may also be an important component of many clinical features and may be responsible for reactive arthritis. Leptospirosis in early pregnancy may lead to fetal loss. There are a few reports of leptospirosis in HIV- infected individuals but no generalisation can be made due to paucity of data. It is important to bear in mind that leptospiral illness may be a significant component in cases of dual infections or in simultaneous infections with more than two pathogens.

  18. Otolaryngic manifestations of Cushing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Edward C; Peng, Kevin A; Suh, Jeffrey D; Bergsneider, Marvin; Wang, Marilene B

    2017-08-01

    Cushing disease is a relatively rare cause of Cushing syndrome secondary to a hyperfunctioning pituitary adenoma. In addition to signs and symptoms of hypercortisolism, Cushing disease may present with diverse otolaryngic manifestations, which may guide diagnosis and management. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients who were found to have Cushing disease and who underwent transnasal transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas between January 1, 2007, and July 1, 2014, at a tertiary academic medical center. There were 37 consecutive patients in this series with Cushing disease caused by a pituitary adenoma. Fifteen (41%) patients complained of visual changes. Five (14%) patients suffered from obstructive sleep apnea. Four (11%) patients had thyroid disease. Other symptoms included hearing loss, vertigo, tinnitus, epistaxis, dysphagia, and salivary gland swelling. Although Cushing disease traditionally presents with classic "Cushingoid" systemic features, it also may present with various otolaryngic manifestations. A thorough workup by otolaryngologists is critical in the comprehensive management of these patients.

  19. Respiratory manifestations in endocrine diseases

    OpenAIRE

    LENCU, CODRU?A; ALEXESCU, TEODORA; PETRULEA, MIRELA; LENCU, MONICA

    2016-01-01

    The control mechanisms of respiration as a vital function are complex: voluntary ? cortical, and involuntary ? metabolic, neural, emotional and endocrine. Hormones and hypothalamic neuropeptides (that act as neurotrasmitters and neuromodulators in the central nervous system) play a role in the regulation of respiration and in bronchopulmonary morphology. This article presents respiratory manifestations in adult endocrine diseases that evolve with hormone deficit or hypersecretion. In hyperthy...

  20. Thoracic manifestation of tuberculosis; Thorakale Manifestation der Tuberkulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienzl-Palma, D.; Prosch, H. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer Allgemeine Radiologie und Kinderradiologie, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2016-10-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a granulomatous disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and transmission is via an airborne route by droplet infection. In the majority of cases patients have thoracic TB, which most frequently presents with hilar lymphadenopathy and pulmonary manifestation. Due to the rise in incidence of TB in central Europe to be expected over the coming years, it is essential to be acquainted with the radiological manifestations of pulmonary TB, particularly to be able to discriminate active from inactive TB. Due to the use of molecular techniques entailing DNA fingerprinting, the traditional classification of TB in primary and postprimary TB is being challenged. These genetic studies have revealed that variations in the clinical and radiographic appearance of TB are mainly affected by the immune status of the patients. Due to the low prevalence of TB in central Europe and the wide variation of radiological presentations, the diagnosis and therapy of TB is often delayed. In this article, the radiographic manifestations of thoracic TB are summarized and discussed. Together with the medical history and bacteriological tests, chest X-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) play a major role not only in the detection of TB but also in the follow-up during and after therapy. Chest X-radiographs should be the primary diagnostic method in patients with suspected TB in screening as well as for diagnosis and therapy monitoring. The use of CT is more sensitive than chest radiographs and is frequently performed after chest radiographs to obtain detailed information about subtle parenchymal changes or lymph node manifestation. When active TB is suspected CT should be performed. Tree in bud, lobular consolidations, centrilobular nodules, cavities and ground-glass opacification are typical changes in active TB. (orig.) [German] Tuberkulose (Tbc) ist eine durch Troepfchen uebertragene granulomatoese Infektionserkrankung, die durch das Mycobacterium tuberculosis

  1. Skin decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehrle, G.

    1975-01-01

    A general survey of skin decontamination is given. The success of every decontamination treatments depends mainly on the speed, but also on the care, with which the action is taken. The best way to remove the skin contaminants is thorough washing under lukewarm running water with mild soap and a soft brush. This washing is to be repeated several times for a period of several minutes. If results are not satisfactory, light duty detergents and wetting agents available commercially may also be used. Some solutions which have proved useful are mentioned. The decontamination solutions are best used in the order given. When one has no satisfactory decontamination effect, the next one is to be used. If necessary, these agents must be used several times in the stated order as long as this does not involve too much strain for the skin. All the decontamination measures mentioned refer, of course, to intact healthy skin. After decontamination has been completed, the skin should be treated with a protective cream

  2. Imaging Manifestations in Systemic Cat Scratch Disease: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forero M, Julian F; Perez A, Maria C; Cerquera C, Fredy M

    2011-01-01

    Cat scratch disease is a zoonosis caused by Bartonella henselae, which is transmitted by scratches, bites or exposition to cats saliva (1). The disease typically manifests with local lymphadenitis after bacterial inoculation in the skin, however, there is an atypical systemic presentation in 5 to 10% of patients, which causes unspecific symptoms. There are several imaging findings that lead the radiologist to consider this diagnosis, in order to prevent an invasive procedure, especially if we consider that the majority of cases occur in the pediatric population (2,3). Although in the majority of cases the symptoms and imaging findings resolve spontaneously, there are specific indications like the systemic form of the disease,which requires antibiotic treatment. In the present article we are exposing a case report from Fundacion Cardioinfantil; we will review some epidemiologic aspects, clinical manifestations, diagnostic methods as well as imaging findings in Ultrasonography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance and Nuclear Medicine.

  3. Imaging Manifestations in Systemic Cat Scratch Disease: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forero Melo, Julian Francisco; Perez Alvarado, Maria Carolina; Cerquera Cabrera, Fredy Martin

    2011-01-01

    Cat scratch disease is a zoonosis caused by Bartonella henselae, which is transmitted by scratches, bites or exposition to cats saliva (1). The disease typically manifests with local lymphadenitis after bacterial inoculation in the skin, however, there is an atypical systemic presentation in 5 to 10% of patients, which causes unspecific symptoms. There are several imaging findings that lead the radiologist to consider this diagnosis, in order to prevent an invasive procedure, especially if we consider that the majority of cases occur in the pediatric population (2,3). Although in the majority of cases the symptoms and imaging findings resolve spontaneously, there are specific indications like the systemic form of the disease, which requires antibiotic treatment. In the present article we are exposing a case report from Fundacion Cardio infantil; we will review some epidemiologic aspects, clinical manifestations, diagnostic methods as well as imaging findings in Ultrasonography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance and Nuclear Medicine.

  4. Oral Manifestations and Dental Management of Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidt, Lisa; Sanabe, Mariane Emi; Diniz, Michele Baffi

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of hereditary chronic disorders, characterized by fragility of the skin and mucous membranes in response to minor mechanical trauma. The objective of this study was to report the case of a young girl diagnosed with epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS), transmitted by an autosomal dominant gene. Cutaneous findings included blisters and dystrophy following minimal friction. Recurrent blisters and vesicle formation on the hard palate were the main oral findings. In conclusion, publications concerning the oral and clinical manifestations of EBS are important for providing knowledge and an early multidisciplinary approach that prevents blister formation and improves these patients' quality of life, with the dentist playing an important role in oral health management. How to cite this article: Scheidt L, Sanabe ME, Diniz MB. Oral Manifestations and Dental Management of Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):239-241.

  5. Ocular manifestations in the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivcharan L Chandravanshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGP syndrome is an extremely rare genetic condition characterized by an appearance of accelerated aging in children. The word progeria is derived from the Greek word progeros meaning ′prematurely old′. It is caused by de novo dominant mutation in the LMNA gene (gene map locus 1q21.2 and characterized by growth retardation and accelerated degenerative changes of the skin, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. The most common ocular manifestations are prominent eyes, loss of eyebrows and eyelashes, and lagophthalmos. In the present case some additional ocular features such as horizontal narrowing of palpebral fissure, superior sulcus deformity, upper lid retraction, upper lid lag in down gaze, poor pupillary dilatation, were noted. In this case report, a 15-year-old Indian boy with some additional ocular manifestations of the HGP syndrome is described.

  6. A clinical study of the cutaneous manifestations of hyperthyroidism in Kashmir valley – India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Abid Keen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Thyroid hormones are instrumental in regulating the health and appearance of skin and when the thyroid gland becomes underactive or overactive, a variety of skin problems result. These dermatologic manifestations may occur secondary to the abnormal thyroid hormone levels or due to the presence of thyroid autoantibodies that interact with skin components. Aims: The present study was designed to ascertain the varied cutaneous manifestations of hyperthyroidism. Methods: This was a hospital based cross sectional study conducted over a period of one year. A total of forty diagnosed cases of hyperthyroidism constituted the subject material for the study and were evaluated for the presence of any cutaneous manifestation. Results: In our study group of 40 patients, the predominant cutaneous symptom was increased sweating (80%, followed by heat intolerance (42.5%. The predominant cutaneous sign in hyperthyroid patients was increased skin temperature, noticed in 47.5% of patients. This was followed by soft, smooth and velvety skin (37.5%, palmar erythema (35%, fine thin hair (22.5% and hyperpigmentation (10%. Conclusions: The interaction between thyroid gland and skin is very complex. So, dermatologists need to be cognizant of the ways in which these two organs interact.

  7. Pulmonary manifestations in anaphylactoid purpura (Henoch-Schoenlein syndrome)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiegler, W.; Siemoneit, K.D.

    1981-01-01

    Pulmonary manifestations in anaphylactoid purpura (Henoch-Schoenlein-syndrome). Radiological observations are reported on 2 female adults with Henoch-Schoenlein-syndrome accompanied by reversible pulmonary disease. This form of anaphylaktoid purpura has rarely been reported until now. The pulmonary opacities are regarded as intraalveolar bleeding probably with edem and interstitial perivascular infiltrations. They developed at the same time as the skin lesions and are probably part of the disease. These pulmonary changes are characterized by the following radiological criteria: 1. parahilar, butterfly-shaped opacities, 2. air-bronchograms, 3. reticulo-nodular pattern, 4. rapid change. (orig.) [de

  8. Zeolitization at uranium ore manifestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrosyan, R.V.; Buntikova, A.F.

    1981-01-01

    The process of zeolitization at uranium ore manifestation is studied. A specific type of low-temperature wall endogenous alteration of rocks due to the effect of primary acid solution with low content of carbonic acid is established. Leaching of calcium from enclosing rocks and its deposition in ore-accompanying calcium zeolites is a characteristic feature of wall-metasomatosis. Formation of desmin- calcite-laumontite and quartz-fluoroapatite of vein associations, including ore minerals (uranophane and metaotenite), is genetically connected with calcium metasomatosis. On the basis of the connection of ore minerals with endogeneous process of zeolitization a conclusion can be made on endogenous origin of uranophane and metaotenite [ru

  9. [Corneal manifestations in systemic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarranz Ventura, J; De Nova, E; Moreno-Montañés, J

    2008-01-01

    Systemic diseases affecting the cornea have a wide range of manifestations. The detailed study of all pathologies that cause corneal alteration is unapproachable, so we have centered our interest in the most prevalent or characteristic of them. In this paper we have divided these pathologies in sections to facilitate their study. Pulmonar and conective tissue (like colagen, rheumatologic and idiopathic inflamatory diseases), dermatologic, cardiovascular, hematologic, digestive and hepatopancreatic diseases with corneal alteration are described. Endocrine and metabolic diseases, malnutrition and carential states are also studied, as well as some otorhinolaryngologic and genetic diseases that affect the cornea. Finally, a brief report of ocular toxicity induced by drugs is referred.

  10. Liver manifestations of cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akata, Deniz; Akhan, Okan

    2007-01-01

    Chronic liver disease is one of the major complications of cystic fibrosis (CF). Significant liver disease is seen in 13-25% of children with CF. Improved life expectancy and prolonged follow-up have favored better characterization of the hepatic manifestations of CF and allowed direct observation of an increasing number of liver-related events. Liver disease typically develops in the first decade of life, with the incidence dropping rapidly after the age of 10 years. The wide spectrum of liver disease ranging from asymptomatic gallbladder abnormalities to biliary cirrhosis will be reviewed in this article

  11. Neurological Manifestations of Dengue Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Hong Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue counts among the most commonly encountered arboviral diseases, representing the fastest spreading tropical illness in the world. It is prevalent in 128 countries, and each year >2.5 billion people are at risk of dengue virus infection worldwide. Neurological signs of dengue infection are increasingly reported. In this review, the main neurological complications of dengue virus infection, such as central nervous system (CNS, peripheral nervous system, and ophthalmic complications were discussed according to clinical features, treatment and possible pathogenesis. In addition, neurological complications in children were assessed due to their atypical clinical features. Finally, dengue infection and Japanese encephalitis were compared for pathogenesis and main clinical manifestations.

  12. Neurological manifestation of colonic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzair Chaudhary

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders are extremely rare in cancer patients and are most commonly associated with certain tumors, such as ovarian cancer, small cell lung cancer, and breast cancer. We report here a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome in a 53-year-old man with colonic adenocarcinoma with a solitary liver metastasis. His paraneoplastic syndrome was successfully treated by methylprednisolone and primary oncologic therapies including neoadjuvant chemotherapy and definitive surgery. This is also the first documented case of simultaneous manifestation of a sensory neuropathy and limbic encephalitis with colon cancer.

  13. The SAPHO syndrome revisited with an emphasis on spinal manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Antonio; Casale, Roberto; Magarelli, Nicola; Semprini, Alessia; Colosimo, Cesare [Catholic University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N. [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Shropshire, England (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    The synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome includes a group of chronic, relapsing, inflammatory musculoskeletal disorders with similar manifestations, in particular synovitis, hyperostosis, and osteitis, which may or may not be associated with neutrophilic skin eruptions such as palmoplantar pustulosis and acne conglobata. The syndrome occurs at any age, can involve any skeletal site, and its imaging appearances are variable, depending on the stage/age of the lesion and imaging method. The diagnosis is difficult if there is no skin disease. Awareness of the imaging appearances, especially in the spine, may help the radiologist in avoiding misdiagnosis (e.g., infection, tumor) and unnecessary invasive procedures, while facilitating early diagnosis and selection of an effective treatment. In this article, we provide an overview of the radiological appearances of SAPHO syndrome, focusing on the magnetic resonance imaging findings of vertebral involvement, and present relevant clinical and pathological features that assist early diagnosis. (orig.)

  14. The SAPHO syndrome revisited with an emphasis on spinal manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leone, Antonio; Casale, Roberto; Magarelli, Nicola; Semprini, Alessia; Colosimo, Cesare; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N.

    2015-01-01

    The synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome includes a group of chronic, relapsing, inflammatory musculoskeletal disorders with similar manifestations, in particular synovitis, hyperostosis, and osteitis, which may or may not be associated with neutrophilic skin eruptions such as palmoplantar pustulosis and acne conglobata. The syndrome occurs at any age, can involve any skeletal site, and its imaging appearances are variable, depending on the stage/age of the lesion and imaging method. The diagnosis is difficult if there is no skin disease. Awareness of the imaging appearances, especially in the spine, may help the radiologist in avoiding misdiagnosis (e.g., infection, tumor) and unnecessary invasive procedures, while facilitating early diagnosis and selection of an effective treatment. In this article, we provide an overview of the radiological appearances of SAPHO syndrome, focusing on the magnetic resonance imaging findings of vertebral involvement, and present relevant clinical and pathological features that assist early diagnosis. (orig.)

  15. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that reflect light more, such as water, sand, concrete, and areas that are painted white. The higher ... - skin - squamous cell; Skin cancer - squamous cell; Nonmelanoma skin cancer - squamous ...

  16. Ultrasound manifestation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, M S; Yoo, H S; Park, C Y; Choi, H J; Moon, Y M; Lee, S I [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1982-06-15

    With the advent of gray scale ultrasonographic equipment, the parenchymal disease of liver is more easily evaluated. Ultrasonography is a non-invasive technique, different from angiography, and performed without discomfort to patient. And also ultrasonography can be used in assessing the liver in cases showing equivocal scintigraphy and in differentiation of solid and cystic masses, first detected on scintigrams. Therefore, the complementary use of ultrasonography, Tc-99m-sulfur colloid scan and angiography provides better diagnostic accuracy for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma, and moreover, sequential ultrasonographic studies in the same patient are valuable of following the course of hepatocellular carcinoma and monitoring the effectiveness of therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma. In thirty patients with histologically proven hepatocellular carcinoma, an analysis of ultrasound manifestation is made and the results are as follows; 1. Ultrasound manifestation of hepatocellular carcinoma by gray scale showed four different sonographic patterns including discrete echo free, discrete echogenic, ill defined echogenic and mixed patterns. 2. The size of hepatocellular carcinoma by ultrasonographic measurement was larger than 5 cm in diameter in 28 cases. 3. In 7 cases performed with angiography, all echogenicities of hepatocellualr carcinoma were correlated with the findings of vascularity of angiography. 4. In cases combined with liver cirrhosis, the sonographic pattern of hepatocellular carcinoma appeared to be discrete or ill defined echogenic patterns.

  17. Ultrasound manifestation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, M. S.; Yoo, H. S.; Park, C. Y.; Choi, H. J.; Moon, Y. M.; Lee, S. I.

    1982-01-01

    With the advent of gray scale ultrasonographic equipment, the parenchymal disease of liver is more easily evaluated. Ultrasonography is a non-invasive technique, different from angiography, and performed without discomfort to patient. And also ultrasonography can be used in assessing the liver in cases showing equivocal scintigraphy and in differentiation of solid and cystic masses, first detected on scintigrams. Therefore, the complementary use of ultrasonography, Tc-99m-sulfur colloid scan and angiography provides better diagnostic accuracy for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma, and moreover, sequential ultrasonographic studies in the same patient are valuable of following the course of hepatocellular carcinoma and monitoring the effectiveness of therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma. In thirty patients with histologically proven hepatocellular carcinoma, an analysis of ultrasound manifestation is made and the results are as follows; 1. Ultrasound manifestation of hepatocellular carcinoma by gray scale showed four different sonographic patterns including discrete echo free, discrete echogenic, ill defined echogenic and mixed patterns. 2. The size of hepatocellular carcinoma by ultrasonographic measurement was larger than 5 cm in diameter in 28 cases. 3. In 7 cases performed with angiography, all echogenicities of hepatocellualr carcinoma were correlated with the findings of vascularity of angiography. 4. In cases combined with liver cirrhosis, the sonographic pattern of hepatocellular carcinoma appeared to be discrete or ill defined echogenic patterns

  18. Atypical Manifestation of Vestibular Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster, Guilherme

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor whose cells are derived from Schwann sheaths, which commonly occurs from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve. Furthermore, vestibular schwannomas account for ∼8% of intracranial tumors in adults and 80 to 90% of tumors of the cerebellopontine angle. Its symptoms are varied, but what stands out most is a unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with a low index of speech recognition. Objective: Describe an atypical manifestation of vestibular schwannoma. Case Report: The 46-year-old woman had vertigo and binaural hearing loss and fullness, with ear, nose, and throat examination suggestive of cochlear injury. After 6 months, the patient developed worsening of symptoms and onset of right unilateral tinnitus. In further exams the signs of cochlear damage remained, except for the vestibular test (hyporeflexia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an expansive lesion in the right cerebellopontine angle. Discussion: This report warns about the atypical manifestations of vestibular schwannoma, which must always be remembered in investigating and diagnosing hearing loss.

  19. Biological Rhythms in the Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary S. Matsui

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms, ≈24 h oscillations in behavior and physiology, are reflected in all cells of the body and function to optimize cellular functions and meet environmental challenges associated with the solar day. This multi-oscillatory network is entrained by the master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the hypothalamus, which directs an organism’s rhythmic expression of physiological functions and behavior via a hierarchical system. This system has been highly conserved throughout evolution and uses transcriptional–translational autoregulatory loops. This master clock, following environmental cues, regulates an organism’s sleep pattern, body temperature, cardiac activity and blood pressure, hormone secretion, oxygen consumption and metabolic rate. Mammalian peripheral clocks and clock gene expression have recently been discovered and are present in all nucleated cells in our body. Like other essential organ of the body, the skin also has cycles that are informed by this master regulator. In addition, skin cells have peripheral clocks that can function autonomously. First described in 2000 for skin, this review summarizes some important aspects of a rapidly growing body of research in circadian and ultradian (an oscillation that repeats multiple times during a 24 h period cutaneous rhythms, including clock mechanisms, functional manifestations, and stimuli that entrain or disrupt normal cycling. Some specific relationships between disrupted clock signaling and consequences to skin health are discussed in more depth in the other invited articles in this IJMS issue on Sleep, Circadian Rhythm and Skin.

  20. Cutaneous manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus in a tertiary referral center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kole Alakes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease with multiorgan involvement. The skin is the second most commonly affected organ. SLE with skin lesions can produce considerable morbidity resulting from painful skin lesions, alopecia, disfigurement, etc. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific (LE specific or may be non specific (LE non specific. Acute cutaneous LE (Lupus specific has a strong association with systemic disease and non-specific skin lesions always indicate disease activity for which patients present to rheumatologists and internists. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for most efficient management. Aims: The aims of this study were to evaluate the patterns and prevalence of skin lesions in patients with SLE and to assess the relationship between skin lesions and other systemic involvement. Materials and Methods: At the Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, IPGME&R in Kolkata, 150 patients with SLE fulfilling the clinical and laboratory criteria of the American Rheumatology Association (updated 1982 were examined and followed-up for cutaneous manifestations between January 2002 and January 2007. Results: Skin lesions were important clinical features. About 45 patients (30% presented with skin lesions although all patients had skin lesions during the follow-up period. Skin changes noted were as follows: Lupus specific lesions: malar rash in 120 patients (80%, photosensitive dermatitis in 75 patients (50%, generalized maculopapular rash in 40 patients (26.67%, discoid rash in 30 patients (20%, subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE in 5 patients (3.34%, lupus profundus in 5 patients (3.34%. The lupus non-specific lesions were non-scarring alopecia in 130 patients (86.67%, oral ulcers in 85 patients (56.67%, vasculitic lesions in 50 patients (33.34%, bullous lesions in 15 patients (10%, Raynaud′s phenomenon in 10 patients (6

  1. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or ...

  2. Skin Cancer Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Host a Fundraising Event | About Us | Store The Skin Cancer Foundation The Skin Cancer Foundation is the ... Handbook A "Sunscreen Gene"? Skin Cancer Facts & Statistics Skin Cancer Treatment Glossary Information on medications and procedures ...

  3. Skin Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase ... is based on the type of nonmelanoma skin cancer or other skin condition diagnosed: Basal cell carcinoma Enlarge Basal cell ...

  4. Stages of Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase ... is based on the type of nonmelanoma skin cancer or other skin condition diagnosed: Basal cell carcinoma Enlarge Basal cell ...

  5. Musculoskeletal manifestations of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merashli, M; Chowdhury, T A; Jawad, A S M

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are increasing significantly worldwide. Whilst vascular complications of diabetes are well recognized, and account for principle mortality and morbidity from the condition, musculoskeletal manifestations of diabetes are common and whilst not life threatening, are an important cause of morbidity, pain and disability. Joints affected by diabetes include peripheral joints and the axial skeleton. Charcot neuroarthropathy is an important cause of deformity and amputation associated with peripheral neuropathy. A number of fibrosing conditions of the hands and shoulder are recognized, including carpal tunnel syndrome, adhesive capsulitis, tenosynovitis and limited joint mobility. People with diabetes are more prone to gout and osteoporosis. Management of these conditions requires early recognition and close liaison between diabetes and rheumatology specialists. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Radiological manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapp, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis preferrably becomes manifest at the synovial joints of the limbs, especially at the small joints of the hands and feet, at bursae and synovial sheathes. The pathologic lesions are less frequently found at cartilaginous joints or entheses. The lesions very often are symmetrically distributed and are characterized by the following: 1. A periarticular, spindle-shaped opacity with a density similar to soft-tissue, induced by an inflammatory hypertrophy of the synovia, a serosynovitis, or an edematous impregnation of the periarticular tissue. 2. A juxta-articular osteoporosis, most probably caused by a neighbouring synovialitis accompanied by hyperemia. 3. A diffuse joint cavity narrowing due to a destruction of the articular cartilage by the pannus, a fibrovascular resorptive tissue. 4. Central as well as marginal erosions, caused by destruction of ossous material by the pannus. 5. Subchondral signal cysts, likewise unduced by the pannus. (Orig./AJ) [de

  7. Musculoskeletal manifestations of bacterial endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika Bevilaqua Rangel

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The incidence of staphylococcal infection has been increasing during the last 20 years. OBJECTIVE: Report a case of staphylococcal endocarditis preceded by musculoskeletal manifestations, which is a rare form of clinical presentation. DESIGN: Case report. CASE REPORT: A 45-year-old-man, without addictions and without known previous cardiopathy, was diagnosed as having definitive acute bacterial endocarditis due to Staphylococcus aureus. Its etiology was community-acquired, arising from a non-apparent primary focus. In addition, the musculoskeletal symptoms preceded the infective endocarditis (IE by about 1 month, which occurred together with other symptoms, e.g. mycotic aneurysms and petechiae. Later, the patient showed perforation of the mitral valve and moderate mitral insufficiency with clinical control.

  8. Pulmonary manifestations from systemic vasculitides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, M.; Both, M.; Schnabel, A.

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary vasculitides predominantly involve the small arterioles, capillaries and venules and include Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis and the Churg-Strauss syndrome. Takayasu's arteriitis is a large vessel disease and may affect the main pulmonary arteries causing stenoses and occlusions. Knowledge of the natural course of disease and of clinical manifestations of pulmonary disease is helpful for an understanding of imaging findings. For this reason this article gives an overview not only of radiologic findings in chest X-ray and high resolution CT of the lungs but as well of clinical aspects of pulmonary vasculitides. Next to determination of disease extension the determination of disease activity is in the foreground of diagnostic imaging in vasculitides. Within this context principals of immunosuppressive therapy will be recognized. (orig.)

  9. CT manifestations of liver abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Jianfeng; Peng Yongjun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study CT findings of hepatic abscess. Methods: CT findings and clinical materials of 38 patients with liver abscess verified by aspiration were retrospectively viewed. All patients were examined by non-enhanced and contrast enhanced CT. Results: In 25 cases, inhomogeneous hypodense lesions with unclear demarcation were found on non-enhanced CT. On contrast enhanced CT scan, target or cluster enhancement was found Additionally, air was found within some lesions. In the rest 13 cases with early stage liver abscess, no typical sign was found on non-enhanced CT, while rosette sign and continued enhancement sign were demonstrated after the contrast agent was given. Conclusion: Various CT findings are found in different stages of liver abscess. The diagnosis and differential diagnosis should be based on CT manifestations and clinical history as well. (authors)

  10. Atypical manifestations of early syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R V Koranne

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of 36 untreated patients with early syphilis revealed atypical variations namely; long incubation period of 101 days in I patient, more than 3 chancres in 1, undermined margin of the chancre along with tenderness in 1 and moderate to severe tenderness of the ulcers in 2 cases. In 3 patients there was no indurations of the ulcers. Three patients with primary syphilis had unilateral lymphadenitis, and in I case the lymph nodes were not only tender but showed tendency towardsmatingawell. Insecondarysyphilis, 11 out of 16 patients having condylomata lata had no other muco-cutaneous lesions. Concomitant presence of other venereal disease to account for the atypical manifestations was discounted- by appropriate laboratory tests, response to therapeutic agents and follow up.

  11. CT manifestation of peritoneal metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Soon Joo; Kang, Eun Young; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1989-01-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is frequent mode of dissemination of intraabdominal malignancies. Radiologic diagnosis of peritoneal metastasis has relied on indirect evidence on a barium UGI series and small bowel examination. With the advent of CT scanning, CT is capable of direct imaging of peritoneum. The sensitivity of CT in detecting peritoneal metastasis and CT manifestation of peritoneal metastatic lesions had reported occasionally, but rarely in Korea. So, authors illustrated the CT manifestation of peritoneal metastatic lesions in 32 cases of macroscopically proven cases in laparoscopy or laparotomy in Korea University Hae Wha Hospital during recent 4 years. The results are as follows. 1. Of total 32 cases, 18 cases were male and 14 cases were female. Age incidence was the most common in 6th decade. 2. The most common type of malignancy that cause peritoneal metastasis was the stomach cancer and next common type of malignancies were pancreas cancer in men and ovarian cancer in women. 3. Of total 32 cases of peritoneal metastasis which was confirmed by laparoscopy or laparotomy macroscopically, 23 cases (72%) were detected peritoneal thickening and/or omental pathology by CT, and the remaining 9 cases (28%) were not detected by CT. 4. Ascites was present in 19 cases (59%). 5. Parietal peritoneal thickening was present in 16 cases (50%) by CT and sheetlike pattern was the most common findings. The patterns of peritoneal thickening was relatively nonspecific and was not correlated with primary tumor type. 6. Tumor involvement of greater omentum by CT was present in 19 cases (59%). There were 7 cases of smudged appearance pattern, 6 cases of nodular pattern, 6 cases of omental cake pattern and no cystic mass pattern. The patterns of omental pathology was relatively nonspecific and was nor correlated with primary tumor type

  12. Dermatitis herpetiformis: a cutaneous manifestation of coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Pekka; Salmi, Teea T; Hervonen, Kaisa; Kaukinen, Katri; Reunala, Timo

    2017-02-01

    Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is an itchy blistering skin disease with predilection sites on elbows, knees, and buttocks. Diagnosis is confirmed by showing granular immunoglobulin A deposits in perilesional skin. DH is one manifestation of coeliac disease; the skin symptoms heal with gluten free diet (GFD) and relapse on gluten challenge. Of the first-degree relatives, 5% may be affected by either condition. Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is the autoantigen in coeliac disease and epidermal transglutaminase (TG3) in DH. Both diseases conditions exhibit TG2-specific autoantibodies in serum and small bowel mucosa; patients with DH have IgA-TG3 in the skin. There are some divergencies between these two phenotypes. One-fourth of DH patients do not have small bowel mucosal villous atrophy, but virtually all have coeliac-type inflammatory changes. The skin symptoms respond slowly to GFD. The incidence of coeliac disease is increasing, whereas the opposite is true for DH. A female predominance is evident in coeliac disease, while DH may be more common in males. Coeliac disease carries the risk of small intestinal T-cell lymphoma; in DH B-cell lymphomas at any site may prevail. Adult coeliac disease carries a slightly increased elevated mortality risk, whereas in DH, the relative mortality rate is significantly decreased. Key messages Dermatitis herpetiformis is a cutaneous manifestation of coeliac disease; both conditions are genetically determined and gluten-dependent. Gastrointestinal symptoms and the degree of villous atrophy are less obvious in dermatitis herpetiformis than in coeliac disease. Both show tissue transglutaminase (TG2) specific autoantibodies in serum and small bowel mucosa. In addition, TG3-targeted IgA antibodies are found in the skin of DH patients Both conditions carry an increased elevated risk of lymphoma, in coeliac disease small intestinal T-cell lymphoma, in dermatitis herpetiformis mainly B-cell lymphoma at various sites. Coeliac disease is

  13. Clinical manifestations and outcome of tuberculous sclerokeratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoughy, Samir S; Jaroudi, Mahmoud O; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2016-09-01

    To study the clinical manifestations and outcome of patients with tuberculous sclerokeratitis treated with antituberculous therapy without concomitant use of systemic steroids. We reviewed retrospectively the medical records of eight consecutive patients with tuberculous sclerokeratitis. Patients were treated unsuccessfully with topical and/or systemic steroids. They underwent complete ophthalmic examination, systemic evaluation, laboratory investigations and imaging. Tuberculin skin test was done with purified protein derivative (PPD) on all patients. The diagnosis of tuberculous sclerokeratitis was made based on clinical findings of scleritis with adjacent peripheral corneal stromal keratitis, positive PPD test of 15 mm of induration or more, response to antituberculous treatment (ATT) within 4 weeks and exclusion of other causes of sclerokeratitis. Antituberculous drugs were given for a minimum of 6 months without concomitant use of corticosteroids. The outcome measure was resolution of the ocular surface inflammation of the sclera and cornea. Eight consecutive patients with a diagnosis of tuberculous sclerokeratitis were included. There were one male and seven female patients. The mean age was 29 years with an age range of 7-43 years. The involvement of the sclera was nodular in six patients and diffuse in two. The involvement of the cornea consisted of peripheral corneal stromal inflammation adjacent to the area of scleritis. Patients responded to antituberculous medications with complete resolution of the sclerokeratitis without topical or systemic anti-inflammatory agents. Antituberculous medications can lead to complete resolution of the sclerokeratitis without concomitant use of steroids, or other anti-inflammatory agents. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Crohn’s Disease Ocular Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koev Kr.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel disease which causes inflammation of the digestive tract. Crohn’s disease most frequently affects the ileum and the colon. In the active stage of the disease signs and symptoms may include diarrhea, abdominal pain and cramping, blood in the stools, reduced appetite and weight loss. In patients with severe Crohn’s disease the following signs and symptoms may be observed: fever, fatigue, arthritis, eye inflammation, oral ulcers, skin disorders, inflammation of the liver or bile ducts or delayed growth. Heredity and dysfunctions of the immune system are considered to cause the development of Crohn’s disease. About 10% of people with inflammatory bowel disease have also ocular problems. The most common ocular manifestations of Crohn’s disease are uveitis, iritis, episcleritis, keratopathy, keratoconjunctivitis and retinal vasculitis. Untreated uveitis may cause glaucoma and vision loss. Uveitis and iritis are four times more common in women than in men. In patients in the active stage of the disease, episcleritis also flares. Symptoms of episcleritis include inflammation, bright red spots on the sclera and localized pain. Keratoconjunctivitis in Crohn’s disease is caused by decreased tear production or increased tear film evaporation. Dry eyes can cause itching, burning or infection. Keratopathy usually causes no pain or vision loss, therefore in most cases no treatment is needed. In retinal vasculitis tortuosity of retinal veins, retinal edema at the posterior pole and intraretinal blood near blood vessels are observed. Intravenous fluorescein angiography shows intraretinal neovascularisation and haemorrhage in the posterior pole.

  15. Cutaneous skin tag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin tag; Acrochordon; Fibroepithelial polyp ... have diabetes. They are thought to occur from skin rubbing against skin. ... The tag sticks out of the skin and may have a short, narrow stalk connecting it to the surface of the skin. Some skin tags are as long as ...

  16. Cervical tuberculous adenitis: CT manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reede, D L; Bergeron, R T

    1985-03-01

    Cervical tuberculous adenitis is being seen with increasing frequency in the United States; in the appropriate clinical setting it should be included in the differential diagnosis of an asymptomatic neck mass. Patients are typically young adults who are recent arrivals from Southeast Asia. A history of tuberculosis is not always elicited nor is the chest radiograph always abnormal. All of these patients have positive purified protein derivative tests unless they are anergic. The CT findings may lead to the diagnosis. Several CT patterns of nodal disease can be seen in tuberculous adenitis; some may mimic benign and neoplastic disease. The presence of a multiloculated or multichambered (conglomerate nodal) mass with central lucency and thick rims of enhancement and minimally effaced fascial planes is highly suggestive of tuberculous adenitis, especially if the patient has a strongly positive tuberculosis skin test.

  17. Cervical tuberculous adenitis: CT manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reede, D.L.; Bergeron, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    Cervical tuberculous adenitis is being seen with increasing frequency in the United States; in the appropriate clinical setting it should be included in the differential diagnosis of an asymptomatic neck mass. Patients are typically young adults who are recent arrivals from Southeast Asia. A history of tuberculosis is not always elicited nor is the chest radiograph always abnormal. All of these patients have positive purified protein derivative tests unless they are anergic. The CT findings may lead to the diagnosis. Several CT patterns of nodal disease can be seen in tuberculous adenitis; some may mimic benign and neoplastic disease. The presence of a multiloculated or multichambered (conglomerate nodal) mass with central lucency and thick rims of enhancement and minimally effaced fascial planes is highly suggestive of tuberculous adenitis, especially if the patient has a strongly positive tuberculosis skin test

  18. Gastrointestinal symptomatology as first manifestation of systemic erythematous lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systemic lupus erithematodes (SLE is chronic, often febrile, multisystemic disease unknown origin and relapsing course which affects connective tissue of the skin, joints, kidney and serous membranes. Gastrointestinal manifestations are rarely the first sign of systemic lupus erythematosus. Case report. We presented a female patient, 35 years old, whose first symptoms of SLE were paralitic ileus (chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and polyserositis (pleural effusion and ascites. Except for high parameters of inflammation, leucopenia and thrombocytopenia, all immunological and laboratory tests for SLE were negative in the onset of the disease. During next six months the patient had clinical signs of paralitic ileus several times and was twice operated with progressive malabsorptive syndrome. The full picture of SLE was manifested seven months later associated with lupus nephritis. Treatment with cyclophosphamide, corticosteroids and total parenteral nutrition (30 days induced stable remission of the disease. Conclusion. The SLE can be initially manifested with gastroenterological symptoms without any other clinical and immunologic parameters of the disease. If in patients with SLE and gastrointestinal tract involvement malabsorption syndrom is developed, a treatment success depends on both immunosupressive therapy and total parenteral nutrition.

  19. THE BLEACHING SYNDROME: MANIFESTATION OF A POST ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    universal and extends to the Americas and elsewhere impacted by colonial influences. Without exception .... "They say we should stop bleaching because of skin cancer and skin disease. ... Kenya, activists moved to have a ban put on the sale of skin bleaching creams. In agreement .... socioeconomic standing. Furthermore ...

  20. Extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease: epidemiology, diagnosis, and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Signe; Bendtzen, Klaus; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2010-01-01

    ', 'bronchiectasis', 'bronchitis', 'cutaneous manifestations', 'erythema nodosum', 'extraintestinal manifestations', 'hyperhomocysteinemia', 'infliximab', 'iridocyclitis', 'lung disease', 'ocular manifestations', 'osteomalacia', 'pancreatitis', 'primary sclerosing cholangitis', 'renal stones', 'sulfasalazine...

  1. Radiological manifestations of intestinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Jae Hoon

    1974-01-01

    Radiological findings of 87 cases of intestinal tuberculosis are analyzed and presented. The diagnosis was based on histopathology in 29 cases, and on clinical ground and radiological findings in 58 cases. The radio of male and female patients was 4:6, and peak incidence is between 10 and 30. Abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, fever and general weakness are frequent symptoms, and tenderness of abdomen, ascites with abdominal distension, malnutrition and emaciation are frequent signs of the patients. Laboratory investigation reveal anemia, raised ESR, hypoalbuminaemia and positive occult blood reaction in the stool in most of the patients. Chest film show activity pulmonary tuberculosis in only 1/3 patients. There is no pathognomonic radiological findings in intestinal tuberculosis and their manifestations are protean, and differentiation from other inflammatory diseases and malignant tumors in gastrointestinal tract is very difficult on radiological ground alone. However, in patients with complaining vague abdominal symptoms and signs, the radiological diagnosis is most certain means in the decision of existence of organic lesion and suggestion of tuberculosis in the gastrointestinal tract and its extent as yet. Multiplicity of the lesion, involvement of adjacent organ such as peritoneum or mesenteric lymph nodes, typical nodularity or irregularity of mesenteric border and existence of active pulmonary tuberculosis are the suggestive findings of intestinal tuberculosis. In the diagnosis of inflammatory disease or malignant tumor of gastrointestinal tract, the possibility of tuberculosis should be borne in mind, and vice versa

  2. CT manifestations of pancreatic tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Risheng; Zheng Ji'ai; Li Rongfen

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the CT manifestations and diagnostic value in the pancreatic tuberculosis(PTB)with review of the literatures. Methods: All cases of PTB proved by surgery or biopsy were examined with plain and enhanced CT scans. Results: The CT findings in one case with multiple-nodular type of PTB were diffuse enlargement of the pancreas with multiple, nodular, and low-density lesions; The nodular lesions had peripheral enhancement. 7 cases of local type of PTB encroached on pancreatic head. 4 cases showed local soft tissue masses with multiple flecked calcifications in 2 cases and mild enhancement in one case; Cystic masses was found in 2 cases, with mural calcification in 1 case and multi-loculated cystic mass in 1 case, respectively; Massive pancreatic head calcification was demonstrated in one case. In these 8 cases of PTB, the lesion extended out of pancreas in 4 cases, including abdominal tuberculous lymph nodes, tuberculous peritonitis, and hepatosplenic tuberculosis. Conclusion: CT findings of PTB were various but had some characteristics. Pancreatic masses with multiple flecked calcification or mild enhancement could suggest the diagnosis. Abdominal tuberculosis accompanied with the pancreatic lesion, especially tuberculous lymph nodes, was highly suggestive of the diagnosis of PTB

  3. Radiological manifestations of intestinal tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Jae Hoon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-10-15

    Radiological findings of 87 cases of intestinal tuberculosis are analyzed and presented. The diagnosis was based on histopathology in 29 cases, and on clinical ground and radiological findings in 58 cases. The radio of male and female patients was 4:6, and peak incidence is between 10 and 30. Abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, fever and general weakness are frequent symptoms, and tenderness of abdomen, ascites with abdominal distension, malnutrition and emaciation are frequent signs of the patients. Laboratory investigation reveal anemia, raised ESR, hypoalbuminaemia and positive occult blood reaction in the stool in most of the patients. Chest film show activity pulmonary tuberculosis in only 1/3 patients. There is no pathognomonic radiological findings in intestinal tuberculosis and their manifestations are protean, and differentiation from other inflammatory diseases and malignant tumors in gastrointestinal tract is very difficult on radiological ground alone. However, in patients with complaining vague abdominal symptoms and signs, the radiological diagnosis is most certain means in the decision of existence of organic lesion and suggestion of tuberculosis in the gastrointestinal tract and its extent as yet. Multiplicity of the lesion, involvement of adjacent organ such as peritoneum or mesenteric lymph nodes, typical nodularity or irregularity of mesenteric border and existence of active pulmonary tuberculosis are the suggestive findings of intestinal tuberculosis. In the diagnosis of inflammatory disease or malignant tumor of gastrointestinal tract, the possibility of tuberculosis should be borne in mind, and vice versa.

  4. Cystic thymic diseases: CT manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Soon Young; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Eui Yong; Jeon, Seok Chol; Seo, Heung Suk; Hahm, Chang Kok

    1995-01-01

    To describe CT findings and differential points of cystic thymic lesions. We evaluated retrospectively total 19 masses with well marginated cystic lesions at thymic area on CT scans. They were 10 teratomas, 3 congenital thymic cysts, 2 multilocular thymic cysts(associated with thymoma and myasthenia gravis in each), 2 cysts Assciated with thymic Hodgkin's lymphomas an ectopic parathyroid cyst, and an infected thymic cyst. The radiological abnormalities evaluated were thickness of the wall, presence or abscene of septa, mural nodule, solid component, calcification and fat component. All three cases of congenital thymic cysts and an ectopic parathyroid cyst appeared as thin-walled unilocular cyst with homogeneous internal density and without identifiable solid component. In multilocular thymic cyst, there were thick wall and solid components(n =2), thick internal septa and calcifications(n = 1). The cysts of teratomas manifested thick walls(n = 9), internal septa(n = 4), calcifications(n = 6), fat components(n = 4), and solid components(n = 4). Cysts in Hodgkin's diseases appeared as multilocular or unilocular and had thick wall and septa without calcification. Infected thymic cyst presented with multilocular cystic mass with identifiable wall and septa, calcification, and solid components. The thymic diseases with cystic lesion include teratomas, congenital thymic cysts, multilocular thymic cysts, parathyroid cyst, and Hodgkin's disease. Congenital thymic cyst and ectopic parathyroid cyst are thin-walled unilocular cystic lesions. Cystic lesions associated with teratoma, Hodgkin's disease, and multilocular thymic cyst are thick-walled cystic lesions with or without solid component

  5. Mucocutaneous manifestations of HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobhana A

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is associated with various mucocutaneous features, which may be the first pointer towards the existence of HIV infection. This study was done to note the different mucocutaneous lesions present in the HIV population in eastern India. METHODS: Four hundred and ten HIV seropositive patients attending the outpatient and inpatient departments were included in the study. RESULTS: Out of 410 HIV positives, 40% had mucocutaneous involvement at presentation. The mean age of the study population was 29 years and male to female ratio was 2.5:1. The common mucocutaneous morbidities included oral candidiasis (36%, dermatophytosis and gingivitis (13% each, herpes zoster (6%, herpes simplex and scabies (5% each. A striking feature, noted in 36% males, was straightening of hairs. Genital herpes was the commonest genital ulcer disease. Lesions associated with declining immunity included oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia and herpes zoster with median CD4 counts of 98, 62 and 198/ L respectively. CONCLUSION: Early recognition of mucocutaneous manifestations and associated STDs help in better management of HIV/AIDS.

  6. Esophageal manifestations of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucendo, A J

    2011-09-01

    Celiac disease (CD) may often be associated with various motor disorders affecting the different segments of the digestive tract, including the esophagus. Although it has not been universally reported, some available evidences indicate that pediatric and adult celiac patients could manifest a higher frequency of esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease-related symptoms compared to nonceliac patients. In addition, several published studies have consistently shown the efficacy of a gluten-free diet in rapidly controlling esophageal symptoms and in preventing their recurrence. Since the participation of gluten in the esophageal symptoms of CD seems clear, its intimate mechanisms have yet to be elucidated, and several hypothesis have been proposed, including the specific immune alterations characterizing CD, the reduction in nutrient absorption determining the arrival of intact gluten to distal gastrointestinal segments, and various dysregulations in the function of gastrointestinal hormones and peptides. Recent studies have suggested the existence of a possible relationship between CD and eosinophilic esophagitis, which should be more deeply investigated. © 2011 Copyright the Author. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  7. Ocular Manifestations of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Shin; Sun, Hae Jung; Kim, Tae Hyong; Kang, Kui Dong; Lee, Sung Jin

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the patterns and risk factors of the ocular manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and their correlation with CD4+ count in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). This retrospective study examined 127 AIDS patients who presented to Soonchunhyang University Hospital. Data were collected from patient interviews, clinical examinations, and laboratory investigations. Ophthalmologic examinations included the best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, anterior segment and adnexal examination, and dilated fundus examination. Of the 127 patients with AIDS, 118 were on HAART and 9 were not. The mean CD4+ count was 266.7 ± 209.1 cells/µL. There were ocular manifestations in 61 patients (48.0%). The incidence of anterior segment manifestations was higher than posterior segment manifestations at 28.3% and 19.7%, respectively. The mean CD4+ count was significantly (p AIDS. In this study, anterior segment and external ocular manifestations occurred more frequently than posterior segment manifestations. Also, the mean CD4+ count was significantly lower in patients with posterior segment ocular manifestations versus anterior segment ocular manifestations. We found that CD4+ count and age >35 years were independent risk factors for developing ocular manifestations.

  8. Endocrine manifestations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Philip

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease can have extra gastrointestinal tract (GIT presentations, most of which are endocrine. The aim of this study was to present patients diagnosed to have celiac disease from an endocrine department and to study the prevalence of endocrinopathies in celiac disease. Materials and Methods: A total of 36 patients from the endocrinology department (LLRM Medical College, Meerut between January 2011 and July 2012 and who were diagnosed to have celiac disease were included in the study. Results: Short stature was the commonest presentation (25%, other presentations included short stature and delayed puberty (20%, delayed puberty (11%, screening for celiac disease in type-1 DM patients (17%, rickets (6%, anemia not responding to oral therapy (6%, type-1 DM with recurrent hypoglycaemia (6%, and osteomalacia (3%. The endocrine manifestations include (after complete evaluation short stature (58%, delayed puberty (31%, elevated alkaline phospahatase (67%, low calcium (22%, X-rays suggestive of osteomalacia or rickets (8%, capopedal spasm (6%, and night blindness (6%. Anti-TPO antibody positivity was found in 53%, hypothyroidism in 28%, subclinical hypothyroidism in 17%, and type-1 DM in 25% of the patients. A total of 14% patients had no GI symptoms. Conclusion: Celiac disease is an endocrine disrupter as well as the great masquerader having varied presentations including short stature, delayed puberty, and rickets. Some patients who have celiac disease may not have any GI symptoms, making the diagnosis all the more difficult. Also, there is significant incidence of celiac disease with hypothyroidism and type-1 DM, making screening for it important in these diseases.

  9. Electrocardiographic Manifestations of Benzodiazepine Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Kazemzadeh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the clinical and electrocardiographic (ECG manifestations of benzodiazepines (BZs. Methods: In this retrospective study, all BZ-poisoned patients hospitalized at Loghman Hakim Hospital between September 2010 and March 2011 were evaluated. Patients’ information including age, sex, time elapsed between the ingestion and presentation, and type of the BZ used were extracted from the patients' charts and recorded. ECGs on presentation to the emergency department (ED were evaluated and parameters such as PR interval, QRS duration, corrected QT, amplitude of S wave in lead I, height of R wave and R/S ratio in the lead aVR were also measured and recorded. Results: Oxazepam, chlordiazepoxide, lorazepam, alprazolam, diazepam, and clonazepam were ingested by 9 (3%, 13 (4.4%, 29 (9.9%, 105 (35.8%, 65 (22.2%, and 72 (24.6% patients, respectively. Mean PR interval was reported to be 0.16 ± 0.03 sec and PR interval of greater than 200 msec was detected in 12 (4.5% patients. Mean QRS duration was 0.07 ± 0.01sec and QRS≥120 msec was observed in 7 (2.6% cases. Conclusion: Diazepam is the only BZ that does not cause QRS widening and oxazepam is the only one not causing PR prolongation. It can be concluded that if a patient refers with a decreased level of consciousness and accompanying signs of BZ toxicity, QRS widening in ECG rules out diazepam, whereas PR prolongation rules out oxazepam toxicity.

  10. Cystic thymic diseases: CT manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Soon Young; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Eui Yong; Jeon, Seok Chol; Seo, Heung Suk; Hahm, Chang Kok [School of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    To describe CT findings and differential points of cystic thymic lesions. We evaluated retrospectively total 19 masses with well marginated cystic lesions at thymic area on CT scans. They were 10 teratomas, 3 congenital thymic cysts, 2 multilocular thymic cysts(associated with thymoma and myasthenia gravis in each), 2 cysts Assciated with thymic Hodgkin's lymphomas an ectopic parathyroid cyst, and an infected thymic cyst. The radiological abnormalities evaluated were thickness of the wall, presence or abscene of septa, mural nodule, solid component, calcification and fat component. All three cases of congenital thymic cysts and an ectopic parathyroid cyst appeared as thin-walled unilocular cyst with homogeneous internal density and without identifiable solid component. In multilocular thymic cyst, there were thick wall and solid components(n =2), thick internal septa and calcifications(n = 1). The cysts of teratomas manifested thick walls(n = 9), internal septa(n = 4), calcifications(n = 6), fat components(n = 4), and solid components(n = 4). Cysts in Hodgkin's diseases appeared as multilocular or unilocular and had thick wall and septa without calcification. Infected thymic cyst presented with multilocular cystic mass with identifiable wall and septa, calcification, and solid components. The thymic diseases with cystic lesion include teratomas, congenital thymic cysts, multilocular thymic cysts, parathyroid cyst, and Hodgkin's disease. Congenital thymic cyst and ectopic parathyroid cyst are thin-walled unilocular cystic lesions. Cystic lesions associated with teratoma, Hodgkin's disease, and multilocular thymic cyst are thick-walled cystic lesions with or without solid component.

  11. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer Order the free Anyone Can ... rarely, younger children can develop skin cancer. How can people with dark skin get skin cancer? Although ...

  12. Cutaneous manifestations in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hediger, C; Rost, B; Itin, P

    2000-04-22

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder among adolescent girls and young women which, though common, often goes undetected and untreated. Anorexia nervosa is a response for young people with psychological conflicts who try to win love by having a body corresponding to the present-day image, symbolising strength, beauty, attraction, power and success. Anorexia nervosa involves inadequate calorie intake leading to marked cachexia with metabolic and endocrinological disturbances. We investigated dermatological changes in 21 young female anorectics aged 19-24 in an attempt to find dermatological markers which mirror the dynamics of the disease and thus obtain helpful signs for early diagnosis with its important bearing on the outcome. Extensive histories were taken and whole-body examinations performed. Seven sex- and age-matched persons served as a control group. The most common dermatological findings were xerosis (71%, controls 29%), cheilitis (76%), bodily hypertrichosis (62%), alopecia (24%), dry scalp hair (48%), acral coldness (38%), acrocyanosis (33%), periungual erythema (48%), gingival changes (37%), nail changes (29%) and calluses on dorsum of hand due to self-induced vomiting (67%). Our study documented for the first time that a body mass index of anorexia nervosa and in HIV infection. Patients with anorexia nervosa develop early stereotype skin changes which are cardinal diagnostic symptoms and pointers to the diagnosis of eating disorders. During training at the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Solothurn one of us (C. H.) was once more able to observe most of the above-described cutaneous and mucocutaneous changes in anorexic adolescents. This paper is intended to stimulate further basic research on this topic. We hope our study will facilitate early diagnosis of anorexia nervosa by the family physician and enable him or her to institute immediate treatment for the eating disorder and thereby improve the prognosis.

  13. A clinical study of the cutaneous manifestations of hypothyroidism in kashmir valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abid Keen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thyroid disorders are known to involve all the organ systems of the body, the skin being no exception. The association of thyroid disorders with cutaneous manifestations is complex. Both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism are known to cause these changes. Aims: The present study was designed to ascertain the varied cutaneous manifestations of hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods: This study was a hospital based clinical study conducted in collaboration with the Endocrinology Division (Department of Medicine of SMHS Hospital (associated teaching hospital of Government Medical College Srinagar, over a period of one year, from May 2010 to May 2011. Four hundred and sixty consecutive diagnosed cases of hypothyroidism constituted the subject material for the study and were evaluated for the presence of any cutaneous manifestation. Results: In our study group of 460 patients, there were 416 females and 44 male patients. The predominant cutaneous symptom in our hypothyroid patients was dry coarse skin (65.22%, followed by hair loss (42.6% and puffy edema (38.48%. The most common cutaneous sign observed in hypothyroid patients was xerosis (57.17%, followed by diffuse hair loss (46.09%, altered skin texture (31.74%, coarse scalp hair (29.35% and puffy face (28.69%. Conclusions: The interaction between thyroid gland and skin is of profound clinical importance in dermatological practice. So, dermatologists need to be cognizant of the ways in which these two organs interact.

  14. Abnormally dark or light skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperpigmentation; Hypopigmentation; Skin - abnormally light or dark ... Normal skin contains cells called melanocytes. These cells produce melanin , the substance that gives skin its color. Skin with ...

  15. Abdominal manifestations of autoimmune disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triantopoulou, C.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Immunoglobulin G4-related disease was recognized as a systemic disease since various extrapancreatic lesions were observed in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). The real etiology and pathogenesis of IgG4-RD is still not clearly understood. Moreover the exact role of IgG4 or IgG4-positive plasma cells in this disease has not yet been elucidated. only some inconsistent biological features such as hypergammaglobulinemia or hypocomplementemia support the autoimmune nature of the disease process. various names have been ascribed to this clinicopathological entity including IgG4-related sclerosing disease, IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease, IgG4-related disease, IgG4-related autoimmune disease, hyper-IgG4 disease and IgG4-related systemic disease. The extrapancreatic lesions of IgG4-RD also exhibit the same characteristic histologic features including dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, massive storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis as seen in IgG4-related pancreatitis. Abdominal manifestations include the following organs/systems: Bile ducts: Sclerosing cholangitis; Gallbladder and liver: Acalculous sclerosis cholecytitis with diffuse wall thickening; hepatic inflammatory pseudotumorts; Kidneys: round or wedge-shaped renal cortical nodules, peripheral cortical; lesions, mass like lesions or renal pelvic involvement; Prostate, urethra, seminal vesicle, vas deferens, uterine cervix; Autoimmune prostatitis; Retroperitoneum: Retroperitoneal fibrosis. thin or mildly thick homogeneous soft tissue lesion surrounding the abdominal aorta and its branches but also bulky masses causing hydronephroureterosis; Mesentery: Sclerosing mesenteritis usually involving the root of the mesentery; Bowel: Inflammatory bowel diseases mimicking Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. various types of sclerosing nodular lesions of the bowel wall; Stomach: Gastritis, gastric ulcers and focal masses mimicking submucosal tumor; omentum: Infiltration mimicking

  16. 21 CFR 11.50 - Signature manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signature manifestations. 11.50 Section 11.50 Food... RECORDS; ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES Electronic Records § 11.50 Signature manifestations. (a) Signed electronic...: (1) The printed name of the signer; (2) The date and time when the signature was executed; and (3...

  17. Learn about the Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System (e-Manifest)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This webpage provides information on EPA's work toward developing a hazardous waste electronic manifest system. Information on the Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest Establishment Act, progress on the project and frequent questions are available.

  18. Skin color - patchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003224.htm Skin color - patchy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Patchy skin color is areas where the skin color is irregular. ...

  19. Histoplasma skin test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histoplasmosis skin test ... health care provider cleans an area of your skin, usually the forearm. An allergen is injected just below the cleaned skin surface. An allergen is a substance that causes ...

  20. Skin Condition Finder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SKIN CONDITIONS HEALTH TOPICS FOR PROFESSIONALS Rash and Skin Condition Finder 1 Select Age Group Infant Child ... Toe Toe Webspace Toe Nail CLOSE About the Skin Condition Finder Have a health question or concern? ...

  1. Skin Complications of IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Resources > Skin Complications of IBD Go Back Skin Complications of IBD Email Print + Share After arthritis, ... about 5% of people with inflammatory bowel disease. SKIN DISORDERS COMMONLY SEEN IN IBD ERHTHEMA NODOSUM The ...

  2. Skin Peeling Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rajeev

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Peeling of the skin is an uncommonly encountered disorder. Occurrence of vesicles and bullae in peeling skin syndrome is very rare. We report a case of idiopathic peeling skin syndrome with vesicular lesions.

  3. Koebner phenomenon of the ear canal skin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Young, O

    2012-02-01

    The Koebner phenomenon originally described the appearance of psoriatic lesions in the uninvolved skin of patients with psoriasis as a consequence of trauma. We describe a case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the auditory canal, which represents an unusual manifestation of the Koebner phenomenon. This is the first case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the head and neck region and highlights the need for biopsy to allow accurate histopathological diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Koebner phenomenon of the ear canal skin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Young, O

    2009-02-01

    The Koebner phenomenon originally described the appearance of psoriatic lesions in the uninvolved skin of patients with psoriasis as a consequence of trauma. We describe a case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the auditory canal, which represents an unusual manifestation of the Koebner phenomenon. This is the first case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the head and neck region and highlights the need for biopsy to allow accurate histopathological diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Dandruff: The most commercially exploited skin disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganathan S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discuss in detail about the prevalence, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations of dandruff including the etio-pathology. The article also discusses in detail about various treatment methods available for dandruff. The status of dandruff being amphibious - a disease/disorder, and relatively less medical intervention is sought after for the treatment, dandruff is the most commercially exploited skin and scalp disorder/disease by personal care industries.

  6. Cow&s milk protein allergy with gastrointestinal manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Ferreira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cow’s milk protein allergy (CMPA is the leading cause of food allergy in children under three years of age, although its gastrointestinal manifestations may occur in all age groups. In the suspicion of CMPA based on the anamnesis and physical examination, an elimination diet should be initiated for a variable length of time according to the clinical picture, followed by an oral food challenge (OFC confi rming or excluding the diagnosis. Complementary exams such as skin prick tests and specifi c IgE may be necessary. Treatment is based on an elimination diet and demands nutritional counselling and growth monitoring. Usually an OFC is repeated after three to 12 months of elimination diet. Tolerance is achieved at three years of age in more than 80% of the children. The aim of this work is to make a brief review and update on CMPA in pediatric age, proposing a management approach based on recent international recommendations.

  7. Ocular and non-ocular manifestations of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Pallavi; Tyagi, Vipin; Hashim, Adnan A

    2011-01-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is a group of rare multisystemic genetic syndromes that affects ectodermal structures such as skin, hair, nails, teeth and sweat glands. The authors present a case of a child with ocular and dermatological signs of HED along with severe involvement of other multiple organ systems. The family history could be traced to four generations and there was an observed trend of increase in severity of signs and symptoms occurring at younger age. The purpose of this case report is to create awareness in ophthalmic community of its diagnosis and clinical manifestations. This case highlights the role of multidisciplinary approach for management of systemic disease, genetic evaluation of affected individuals and carriers and genetic counselling. PMID:22700604

  8. Nail lesions as a main manifestation of lichen nitidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Sobjanek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Lichen nitidus (LN is a rare, chronic, inflammatory dermatosis usually affecting children and young adults. Nails involvement is very rare. Until now, 7 cases of LN with nail involvement have been described. Objective. To present a rare case of childhood lichen nitidus where trachyonychia was the main manifestation of the disease. Case report. A 7-year-old, Caucasian, previously healthy boy presented thumbnail longitudinal ridges, distal splitting and subungual hyperkeratosis for 7 months. Numerous mycological and bacteriological examinations were negative. Dermatological examination also revealed erythematous lesions on the proximal nail fold as well as small skin-pigmented papules on the thumb. Similar papules grouped into patches were also observed on the upper limbs, trunk and forehead. Treatment was not recommended. Conclusions . Lichen nitidus may rarely affect nails and should be considered as a possible cause of nail lesions in childhood.

  9. Clinical manifestations of primary syphilis in homosexual men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Bjekić

    Full Text Available At the beginning of a new millennium, syphilis incidence has been increasing worldwide, occurring primarily among men who have sex with men (MSM. The clinical features of primary syphilis among MSM is described, a case-note review of the primary syphilis (PS patients who attended the Institute of Skin and Venereal Diseases. The diagnosis was assessed based upon the clinical features and positive syphilis serology tests. Among 25 patients with early syphilis referred during 2010, PS was diagnosed in a total of 13 cases. In all patients, unprotected oral sex was the only possible route of transmission, and two out of 13 patients had HIV co-infection. Overall, 77% of men presented with atypical penile manifestation. The VDRL test was positive with low titers. The numerous atypical clinical presentations of PS emphasize the importance of continuing education of non-experienced physicians, especially in countries with lower reported incidence of syphilis.

  10. A study on the cutaneous manifestations of diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Puri

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The cutaneous manifestations of diabetes mellitus are varied. We conducted a study of fifty patients having diabetes mellitus coming from the department of dermatology and medicine. The commonest cutaneous feature of diabetes were pyodermas seen in 40% patients, dermatophytosis seen in 36% patients, pruritis diabetic thick skin seen in 20 % patients, diabetic dermopathy seen in 16% patients, diabetic bulla and rubeosis seen in 8% patients each and meralgia paraesthetica and diabetic foot seen in 4% patients each. About the associations of diabetes mellitus, achrchordons were seen in 8% patients, vitiligo and perforating dermatoses were seen in 6% patients each, granuloma annulare, eruptive xanthomas, acanthosis nigricans, necrobiosis lipoidica and oral lichen planus were seen in 4 % patients each and xanthelasma was seen in 2% patients.

  11. Neurological Manifestations In Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    youssef HNACH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe purpose of this retrospective study was to report neurological manifestations noted in patients who were monitored for inflammatory bowel disease, in order to document the pathophysiological, clinical, progressive, and therapeutic characteristics of this entity.Material and methodsWe conducted a retrospective study on patients monitored -in the gastroenterology service in Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat, Morocco- for inflammatory bowel disease from 1992 till 2013 and who developed neurological manifestations during its course. Patients with iatrogenic complications were excluded, as well as patients with cerebrovascular risk factors.ResultsThere were 6 patients, 4 of whom have developed peripheral manifestations. Electromyography enabled the diagnosis to be made and the outcome was favorable with disappearance of clinical manifestations and normalization of the electromyography.The other 2 patients, monitored for Crohn’s disease, developed ischemic stroke. Cerebral computed tomography angiography provided positive and topographic diagnosis. Two patients were admitted to specialized facilities.ConclusionNeurological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are rarely reported.  Peripheral neuropathies and stroke remain the most common manifestations. The mechanisms of these manifestations are not clearly defined yet. Currently, we hypothesize the interaction of immune mediators.

  12. Intrathoracic manifestations of Rosai-Dorfman disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartin-Ceba, Rodrigo; Golbin, Jason M; Yi, Eunhee S; Prakash, Udaya B S; Vassallo, Robert

    2010-09-01

    Rosai-Dorfman Disease (RDD), also known as Sinus Histiocytosis with Massive Lymphadenopathy (SHML), is a rare monocyte/macrophage proliferative disorder of varied biological behavior. Although cutaneous and lymph node involvement are relatively well-described, intrathoracic manifestations of RDD have only occasionally been reported. We conducted a retrospective computer-assisted search of the Mayo Clinic record from 1976 to 2005 for patients with histopathologic evidence of RDD on organ biopsy. Clinical characteristics were abstracted from charts and thoracic manifestations recorded. Survival was estimated using the national social security database. A total of 21 patients were diagnosed with RDD over a period of 30 years; 9 had intrathoracic manifestations (43%). Main pulmonary symptoms included dyspnea and cough. Age at the time of diagnosis, gender, race, smoking history, mortality and time of survival after diagnosis were no different between RDD patients with and without intrathoracic manifestations. The most common radiographic thoracic manifestation was mediastinal lymphadenopathy (6 patients). Cystic change, interstitial lung disease, and airway disease were radiographically evident in 4 patients. Seven patients were treated at some point in the course of their disease, most commonly with oral corticosteroids. At the time of last follow-up 87% were alive, with a median (IQR) time interval since diagnosis of 8 years (4-9.7). Intrathoracic manifestations of RDD are relatively common and include mediastinal lymphadenopathy, airway disease, pleural effusion, cystic and interstitial lung disease. Although limited in size, this series suggests the prognosis of patients with RDD and intrathoracic manifestations is relatively good.

  13. PASI (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index in the evaluation of the clinical manifestations of psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kubanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is one of the most prevalent chronic inflammatory skin diseases. The severity of its clinical manifestations can vary greatly. Objective assessment of psoriasis severity is required to select an adequate therapy. One of the simplest and most consistent methods used to determine psoriasis severity is to calculate the PASI (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index. This index is based on the doctor’s determination of the sum of indices showing the intensity of the main symptoms of psoriasis: erythema, infiltration and peeling in view of the affected skin area. The PASI can also be used to assess the efficacy of treatment for psoriasis patients.

  14. Genetic alterations in syndromes with oral manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamurthy Anuthama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since Gregor Johan Mendel proposed the law of inheritance, genetics has transcended the field of health and has entered all walks of life in its application. Thus, the gene is the pivoting factor for all happenings revolving around it. Knowledge of gene mapping in various diseases would be a valuable tool in prenatally diagnosing the condition and averting the future disability and stigma for the posterity. This article includes an array of genetically determined conditions in patients seen at our college out-patient department with complete manifestation, partial manifestation and array of manifestations not fitting into a particular syndrome.

  15. Ulcerative colitis presenting as leukocytoclastic vasculitis of skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Sabiye; Ozaslan, Ersan; Topal, Firdevs; Albayrak, Levent; Kayhan, Burcak; Efe, Cumali

    2008-04-21

    A number of cutaneous changes are known to occur in the course of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including pyoderma gangrenosum, erythema nodosum, perianal disease, erythematous eruptions, urticaria, and purpura. However, occurrence of skin manifestations prior to the development of ulcerative colitis is a rare occasion. Here, we report a case of ulcerative colitis associated with leukocytoclastic vasculitis in which the intestinal symptoms became overt 8 mo after the development of skin lesions.

  16. Ulcerative colitis presenting as leukocytoclastic vasculitis of skin

    OpenAIRE

    Akbulut, Sabiye; Ozaslan, Ersan; Topal, Firdevs; Albayrak, Levent; Kayhan, Burcak; Efe, Cumali

    2008-01-01

    A number of cutaneous changes are known to occur in the course of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including pyoderma gangrenosum, erythema nodosum, perianal disease, erythematous eruptions, urticaria, and purpura. However, occurrence of skin manifestations prior to the development of ulcerative colitis is a rare occasion. Here, we report a case of ulcerative colitis associated with leukocytoclastic vasculitis in which the intestinal symptoms became overt 8 mo after the development of skin ...

  17. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia manifestating as exfoliative dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhir R

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old patient reported with a history of redness and peeling of the skin, and sensations of chills and tightness of the skin of three months duration. Clinical examination revealed exfoliative dermatitis, generalised lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegely. A peripheral smear showed features of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

  18. Cutaneous manifestations of polycystic ovary syndrome: A cross-sectional clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abid Keen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women, affecting 5–10% of reproductive-aged women. The dermatologic manifestations of hyperandrogenism, chiefly hirsutism, acne vulgaris, androgenic alopecia, and acanthosis nigricans, are among the cardinal manifestations of PCOS. Aim: To study the incidence and prevalence of various cutaneous manifestations in patients with PCOS and to correlate these skin manifestations with hormonal changes. Settings and Design: This study was conducted at a dermatology centre over a period of 1 year from November 2012 to 2013. Materials and Methods: The present study included 100 women diagnosed to have PCOS. Hormonal analysis as well as radiological assessment was done in all the cases. Cutaneous manifestations were ascertained and inferences were drawn. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was carried out by the Chi-square test and independent samples t-test. Statistical significance was determined at a level of P < 0.05. Results: In our study, the prevalence of hirsutism, acne, female pattern hair loss, acanthosis nigricans, seborrhea, striae and acrochordons was 78%, 48%, 31%, 30%, 29%, 13%, and 9%, respectively. Conclusion: Dermatologic manifestations of PCOS play a significant role in making the diagnosis and constitute a substantial portion of the symptoms experienced by women with this syndrome.

  19. Hydrophysical manifestations of the Indian ocean tsunami

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Murthy, T.V.R.; Rao, B.P.

    described in detail by several authors. This chapter summarises the results of our investigations on the hydrophysical manifestations (salinity and temperature, coastal currents, internal waves, etc.) of the tsunami on the coastal environments in India...

  20. Gastrointestinal manifestations in children with primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    with autoimmune manifestations, and increased risk of malignancy in ... cell dysfunction as well as hepatic abscess in phagocytic defect. .... Pulmonary infections are the most common ... colony-stimulating factor may be indicated to treat.

  1. Musculoskeletal manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureldine, M H A; Khamashta, M A; Merashli, M; Sabbouh, T; Hughes, G R V; Uthman, I

    2016-04-01

    The scope of clinical and laboratory manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) has increased dramatically since its discovery in 1983, where any organ system can be involved. Musculoskeletal complications are consistently reported in APS patients, not only causing morbidity and mortality, but also affecting their quality of life. We reviewed all English papers on APS involvement in the musculoskeletal system using Google Scholar and Pubmed; all reports are summarized in a table in this review. The spectrum of manifestations includes arthralgia/arthritis, avascular necrosis of bone, bone marrow necrosis, complex regional pain syndrome type-1, muscle infarction, non-traumatic fractures, and osteoporosis. Some of these manifestations were reported in good quality studies, some of which showed an association between aPL-positivity and the occurrence of these manifestations, while others were merely described in case reports. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Manifest toob klassika taas kinoekraanile / Andri Maimets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Maimets, Andri, 1979-

    2007-01-01

    2.-9. veebr. on kinos "Sõprus" ja 11.-15. veebr. Tartu Sadamateatris 5. kultusfilmide festival Manifest, seekord USA filmid ja teemaks sõnavabadus. Esilinastub ka Urmas E. Liivi dokumentaalfilm "Tervitusi Nõukogude Eestist!"

  3. Skin, Hair, and Nails

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Skin, Hair, and Nails KidsHealth / For Parents / Skin, Hair, and ... piel, el cabello y las uñas About Skin, Hair and Nails Skin is our largest organ. If ...

  4. Estrogens and aging skin

    OpenAIRE

    Thornton, M. Julie

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity...

  5. Urostomy - stoma and skin care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it well before you attach the pouch. Avoid skin care products that contain alcohol. These can make your skin ... the pouch to your skin. Use fewer special skin care products. This will make problems with your skin less ...

  6. Risks of Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors increase or decrease the risk of skin cancer. Skin cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) ... following PDQ summaries for more information about skin cancer: Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Genetics ...

  7. Neurological manifestations of excessive alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas-Ballvé, Anna; Grau-López, Laia; Morillas, Rosa María; Planas, Ramón

    2017-12-01

    This article reviews the different acute and chronic neurological manifestations of excessive alcohol consumption that affect the central or peripheral nervous system. Several mechanisms can be implicated depending on the disorder, ranging from nutritional factors, alcohol-related toxicity, metabolic changes and immune-mediated mechanisms. Recognition and early treatment of these manifestations is essential given their association with high morbidity and significantly increased mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical Manifestations and Diagnosis of Acromegaly

    OpenAIRE

    Lugo, Gloria; Pena, Lara; Cordido, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Ac...

  9. Bilingualism delays clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Woumans, Evy; Santens, Patrick; Sieben, Anne; Versijpt, Jan; Stevens, Michaël; Duyck, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of bilingualism on the clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in a European sample of patients. We assessed all incoming AD patients in two university hospitals within a specified timeframe. Sixty-nine monolinguals and 65 bilinguals diagnosed with probable AD were compared for time of clinical AD manifestation and diagnosis. The influence of other potentially interacting variables was also examined. Results indicated a significant delay f...

  10. Neuropsychiatric Manifestations of Parkinson`s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Peixinho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease affects about 1% of the world population older than 65 years. It’s most frequently considered a movement disorder, but the neuropsychiatric manifestations associated with the disease and/or its treatment may be of equal or greater significance in some patients. We will discuss briefly the epidemiology, physiopathology and diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, highlighting the neuropsychiatric manifestations: depression, anxiety, psychosis, dementia, sleep disorders, dopamine dysregulation syndrome.

  11. Metabolic and hormonal signatures in pre-manifest and manifest Huntington’s disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui eWang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder typified by involuntary body movements, and psychiatric and cognitive abnormalities. Many HD patients also exhibit metabolic changes including progressive weight loss and appetite dysfunction. Here we have investigated metabolic function in pre-manifest and manifest HD subjects to establish an HD subject metabolic hormonal plasma signature. Individuals at risk for HD who have had predictive genetic testing showing the cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG expansion causative of HD, but who do not yet present signs and symptoms sufficient for the diagnosis of manifest HD are said to be pre-manifest. Pre-manifest and manifest HD patients, as well as both familial and non-familial controls, were evaluated for multiple peripheral metabolism signals including circulating levels of hormones, growth factors, lipids and cytokines. Both pre-manifest and manifest HD subjects exhibited significantly reduced levels of circulating growth factors, including growth hormone and prolactin. HD-related changes in the levels of metabolic hormones such as ghrelin, glucagon and amylin were also observed. Total cholesterol, HDL-C and LDL-C were significantly decreased in HD subjects. C-reactive protein was significantly elevated in pre-manifest HD subjects. The observation of metabolic alterations, even in subjects considered to be in the pre-manifest stage of HD, suggests that in addition, and prior, to overt neuronal damage, HD affects metabolic hormone secretion and energy regulation, which may shed light on pathogenesis, and provide opportunities for biomarker development.

  12. Morphologic Features of Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaibin M. Ko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma are the prototypic complications of chronic hepatitis C virus infection in the liver. However, hepatitis C virus also affects a variety of other organs that may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C infection include a multitude of disease processes affecting the small vessels, skin, kidneys, salivary gland, eyes, thyroid, and immunologic system. The majority of these conditions are thought to be immune mediated. The most documented of these entities is mixed cryoglobulinemia. Morphologically, immune complex depositions can be identified in small vessels and glomerular capillary walls, leading to leukoclastic vasculitis in the skin and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in the kidney. Other HCV-associated entities include porphyria cutanea tarda, lichen planus, necrolytic acral erythema, membranous glomerulonephritis, diabetic nephropathy, B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, insulin resistance, sialadenitis, sicca syndrome, and autoimmune thyroiditis. This paper highlights the histomorphologic features of these processes, which are typically characterized by chronic inflammation, immune complex deposition, and immunoproliferative disease in the affected organ.

  13. A practical approach to ichthyoses with systemic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saral, S; Vural, A; Wollenberg, A; Ruzicka, T

    2017-06-01

    Inherited ichthyoses are rare disorders in terms of patient numbers, but abundant in terms of clinical-genetic subtypes. These disorders are often associated with severe systemic manifestations, in addition to significant medical, cosmetic and social problems. There are 17 subtypes of syndromic ichthyosis identified so far and most patients with these syndromes are living in countries with high consanguinity rates. Frequently, clinicians cannot make a definitive diagnosis and patients are not managed properly owing to the rarity and complexity of these disorders. These difficulties make this group of ichthyosis and the patients living with them 'orphan'. After skin and skin appendages, nervous system is the most frequently involved system in ichthyosis syndromes. Thus, association of ichthyosis with neurological symptoms provides an important clue for diagnosis. In this article, we aim to increase clinicians' comprehension of ichthyosis syndromes by providing a symptomatology-based approach based on this observation. Additionally, we provide a review of ichthyosis syndromes, with special emphasis on neurological symptoms, hoping to attract interest to this complicated field. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Pyoderma gangrenosum as a initial manifestation of ulcerative proctocolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Bortolin Fonseca

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available pyoderma gangrenosum is a rare inflammatory skin condition characterized by progressive and recurrent skin ulceration of destructive course. It is usually associated with rheumatoid arthritis, paraproteinemia, myeloproliferative diseases and inflammatory bowel diseases, especially non-specific ulcerative proctocolitis. In these situations, skin lesions are described as concurrent with the intestinal condition. However, reports on pyoderma gangrenosum preceding intestinal findings are less frequent. The authors describe a case of a woman with febrile condition associated with skin lesions diagnosed by biopsy as pyoderma gangrenosum. Two weeks later, she developed diarrhea, arthralgia and sepsis, being diagnosed as ulcerative proctocolitis. After the administration of the treatment for ulcerative proctocolitis, she showed improvements in sepsis care, remission of diarrhea and regression of skin lesions. This case highlights the importance of considering pyoderma gangrenosum as a manifestation associated with inflammatory bowel disease, regardless of its timing in relation to intestinal symptoms.Pioderma gangrenoso é uma forma de inflamação cutânea, caracterizada por ulceração progressiva e recorrente da pele, com curso destrutivo. Geralmente é associada à artrite reumatoide, paraproteinemia, doenças mieloproliferativas e doença inflamatória intestinal, em especial retocolite ulcerativa inespecífica. Em tais casos, as lesões cutâneas são descritas concomitantes ao quadro intestinal, porém, relatos com descrição de pioderma gangrenoso precedendo achados intestinais são menos frequentes. Os autores relatam caso de mulher com quadro febril associado a lesões cutâneas diagnosticadas por biópsia como pioderma gangrenoso. Duas semanas depois, apresentou diarreia, artralgia e sepse sendo diagnosticada retocolite ulcerativa. Com o tratamento para retocolite ulcerativa apresentou melhora do quadro séptico, remissão da diarreia e

  15. Cutaneous Manifestations of Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity: Clinical Histological and Immunopathological Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Bonciolini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The dermatological manifestations associated with intestinal diseases are becoming more frequent, especially now when new clinical entities, such as Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS, are identified. The existence of this new entity is still debated. However, many patients with diagnosed NCGS that present intestinal manifestations have skin lesions that need appropriate characterization. Methods: We involved 17 patients affected by NCGS with non-specific cutaneous manifestations who got much better after a gluten free diet. For a histopathological and immunopathological evaluation, two skin samples from each patient and their clinical data were collected. Results: The median age of the 17 enrolled patients affected by NCGS was 36 years and 76% of them were females. On the extensor surfaces of upper and lower limbs in particular, they all presented very itchy dermatological manifestations morphologically similar to eczema, psoriasis or dermatitis herpetiformis. This similarity was also confirmed histologically, but the immunopathological analysis showed the prevalence of deposits of C3 along the dermo-epidermal junction with a microgranular/granular pattern (82%. Conclusions: The exact characterization of new clinical entities such as Cutaneous Gluten Sensitivity and NCGS is an important objective both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, since these are patients who actually benefit from a GFD (Gluten Free Diet and who do not adopt it only for fashion.

  16. Articular manifestations in patients with Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-López, María Esther; Díez-Morrondo, Carolina; Sánchez-Andrade, Amalia; Pego-Reigosa, Robustiano; Díaz, Pablo; Castro-Gago, Manuel

    To determine the percentage of Lyme patients with articular manifestations in NW Spain and to know their evolution and response to treatment. A retrospective study (2006-2013) was performed using medical histories of confirmed cases of Lyme disease showing articular manifestations. Clinical and laboratory characteristics, together with the treatment and evolution of the patients, were analysed. Seventeen out of 108 LD confirmed patients (15.7%) showed articular manifestations. Regarding those 17 patients, 64.7%, 29.4% and 5.9% presented arthritis, arthralgia and bursitis, respectively. The knee was the most affected joint. Articular manifestations were often associated to neurological, dermatological and cardiac pathologies. Otherwise, most patients were in Stage III. The 11.8% of the cases progressed to a recurrent chronic arthritis despite the administration of an appropriate treatment. Lyme disease patients showing articular manifestations should be included in the diagnosis of articular affections in areas of high risk of hard tick bite, in order to establish a suitable and early treatment and to avoid sequels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  17. Oily skin: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Thais H; Maibach, Howard I

    2012-01-01

    Oily skin (seborrhea) is a common cosmetic problem that occurs when oversized sebaceous glands produce excessive amounts of sebum giving the appearance of shiny and greasy skin. This paper overviews the main concepts of sebaceous gland anatomy and physiology, including the biosynthesis, storage and release of sebum, as well as its relationship to skin hydration and water barrier function. We also address how skin oiliness may vary according to diet, age, gender, ethnicity and hot humid climates. The deeper understanding of this skin type provides the opportunity to better guide patients regarding skin care and also assist in the development of sebosuppressive agents. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Peeling skin syndrome associated with novel variant in FLG2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfares, Ahmed; Al-Khenaizan, Sultan; Al Mutairi, Fuad

    2017-12-01

    Peeling skin syndrome is a rare genodermatosis characterized by variably pruritic superficial generalized peeling of the skin with several genes involved until now little is known about the association between FLG2 and peeling skin syndrome. We describe multiple family members from a consanguineous Saudi family with peeling skin syndrome. Next Generation Sequencing identifies a cosegregating novel variant in FLG2 c.632C>G (p.Ser211*) as a likely etiology in this family. Here, we reported on the clinical manifestation of homozygous loss of function variant in FLG2 as a disease-causing gene for peeling skin syndrome and expand the dermatology findings. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Vertigo as a Predominant Manifestation of Neurosarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasnim F. Imran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown etiology that affects multiple organ systems. Neurological manifestations of sarcoidosis are less common and can include cranial neuropathies and intracranial lesions. We report the case of a 21-year-old man who presented with vertigo and uveitis. Extensive workup including brain imaging revealed enhancing focal lesions. A lacrimal gland biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. The patient was initially treated with prednisone, which did not adequately control his symptoms, and then was switched to methotrexate with moderate symptomatic improvement. Our patient had an atypical presentation with vertigo as the predominant manifestation of sarcoidosis. Patients with neurosarcoidosis typically present with systemic involvement of sarcoidosis followed by neurologic involvement. Vertigo is rarely reported as an initial manifestation. This case highlights the importance of consideration of neurosarcoidosis as an entity even in patients that may not have a typical presentation or systemic involvement of disease.

  20. Leukemic Oral Manifestations and their Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisconi, Carolina Favaro; Caldas, Rogerio Jardim; Oliveira Martins, Lazara Joyce; Fischer Rubira, Cassia Maria; da Silva Santos, Paulo Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common neoplastic disease of the white blood cells which is important as a pediatric malignancy. Oral manifestations occur frequently in leukemic patients and may present as initial evidence of the disease or its relapse. The symptoms include gingival enlargement and bleeding, oral ulceration, petechia, mucosal pallor, noma, trismus and oral infections. Oral lesions arise in both acute and chronic forms of all types of leukemia. These oral manifestations either may be the result of direct infiltration of leukemic cells (primary) or secondary to underlying thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, or impaired granulocyte function. Despite the fact that leukemia has long been known to be associated with oral lesions, the available literature on this topic consists mostly of case reports, without data summarizing the main oral changes for each type of leukemia. Therefore, the present review aimed at describing oral manifestations of all leukemia types and their dental management. This might be useful in early diagnosis, improving patient outcomes.

  1. Otorhinolaryngologic manifestations of cystic fibrosis: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho, Carolina Pimenta

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cystic Fibrosis is the most common recessive autosomic genetic disease among Caucasians. It's caused by mutations in the gene that decodes regulatory protein for transmembrane conductance, resulting in defective transport of chlorine. Objective: Review the literature about Cystic Fibrosis, with emphasis on otorhinolaryngologic manifestations. Method: The online Pub Med databases were researched and we applied the following search terms Fibrosis Cystic and Sinusitis, and Mucoviscidosis and Sinusitis. Conclusions: Although it is not the main cause of death, the otorhinolaryngologic manifestations of the Cystic Fibrosis bring important morbidity to these patients.

  2. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Diagnosis and Clinical Manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yutaro; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a parenchymal lung disease characterized by progressive interstitial fibrosis. The clinical course of IPF can be unpredictable and may be punctuated by acute exacerbations. Although much progress is being made in unraveling the mechanisms underlying IPF, effective therapy for improving survival remains elusive. Longitudinal disease profiling, especially in terms of clinical manifestations in a large cohort of patients, should lead to proper management of the patients and development of new treatments for IPF. Appropriate multidisciplinary assessment in ongoing registries is required to achieve this. This review summarizes the current status of the diagnosis and clinical manifestations of IPF. PMID:27625576

  3. Skeletal manifestations of granulocytic sarcoma (chloroma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, G.; Abdelwahab, I.F. (Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology); Feldman, F. (Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)); Klein, M.J. (Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Pathology)

    1991-10-01

    Skeletal manifestations of chloroma were reviewed in five patients. In four cases, a chloroma was the initial manifestation of a systemic disease. In the fifth, an elderly patient developed a bone lesion during a blastic crisis while under treatment for chronic myelogeneous leukemia. Two patients presented with lytic lesions of the ribs, two with lytic lesions of the femur, and one with a predominantly sclerotic lesion of the scapula. The laboratory findings in two patients were within normal limits. All lesions were confirmed by bone biopsy. (orig.).

  4. Congenital rubella syndrome and delayed manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Several hypotheses of different medical and psychological delayed manifestations among people who have congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) have been discussed. This study tests some of these hypotheses of delayed manifestations. Methods: Gathering information about 35 individuals who hav...... which people with CRS face must primarily be understood in relation to congenital deafblindness and dual sensory and communicative deprivation....... CRS and who are congenitally deafblind. Results: None of the hypotheses could be confirmed when individuals with CRS were compared to a control group of individuals who were congenital deafblind with different aetiology than CRS. Conclusions: This study concludes that those health related problems...

  5. Skin pathology in Hawaiian goldring surgeonfish, Ctenochaetus strigosus (Bennett)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Aeby, Greta S.

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-eight goldring surgeonfish, Ctenochaetus strigosus (Bennett), manifesting skin lesions and originating from the north-western and main Hawaiian Islands were examined. Skin lesions were amorphous and ranged from simple dark or light discolouration to multicoloured tan to white sessile masses with an undulant surface. Skin lesions covered 2–66% of the fish surface, and there was no predilection for lesions affecting a particular part of the fish. Males appeared over-represented. Microscopy revealed the skin lesions to be hyperplasia, melanophoromas or iridophoromas. The presence of skin tumours in a relatively unspoiled area of Hawaii is intriguing. Explaining their distribution, cause and impact on survivorship of fish all merit further study because C. strigosus is an economically important fish in the region.

  6. Pathologies of the skin and its appendages in endocrine diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Arasiewicz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from endocrine disorders often present a wide profile of skin lesions. In hyperthyroidism we observe hair loss, lower leg myxedema and onycholysis or, in the case of hormone deficiency, generalized swelling of the skin, which becomes cold and pale. Primary hyperparathyroidism is revealed by pruritus, presence of chronic urticaria or deposition of amorphous calcium salts. In hypoparathyroidism, the skin is dry while the nails become very brittle. Skin lesions in diabetes include necrobiosis lipoidica, granuloma annulare, scleroderma-like diabetic edema and acanthosis nigricans. Overactive pituitary gland is often manifested as acromegaly with hypertrophy of soft tissue thickening and hypertrichosis. The skin in the early stages of hypopituitarism feels swollen, is pale yellow and oily, and finally becomes alabaster and dry. The characteristic features of Cushing syndrome are central obesity, lunar face, buffalo hump, and striae. In Addison’s disease we observe hyperpigmentation. Hyperandrogenism in women leads to acne, hirsutism and virilization.

  7. Skin Stem Cells in Skin Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollapour Sisakht

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Preclinical and clinical research has shown that stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many diseases. This article describes skin stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications. Evidence Acquisition Compared with conventional methods, cell therapy reduces the surgical burden for patients because it is simple and less time-consuming. Skin cell therapy has been developed for variety of diseases. By isolation of the skin stem cell from the niche, in vitro expansion and transplantation of cells offers a surprising healing capacity profile. Results Stem cells located in skin cells have shown interesting properties such as plasticity, transdifferentiation, and specificity. Mesenchymal cells of the dermis, hypodermis, and other sources are currently being investigated to promote regeneration. Conclusions Because skin stem cells are highly accessible from autologous sources and their immunological profile is unique, they are ideal for therapeutic approaches. Optimization of administrative routes requires more investigation own to the lack of a standard protocol.

  8. Menopausal manifestations and quality of life in afro-colombians. Valuation whit Cervantes scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monterrosa-Castro, Álvaro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the menopausal manifestations should be studied by ethnic considerations. Objective: to identify the most prevalent menopausal manifestations and to evaluate quality of life according to menstrual states. Methods: this study is a part of CAVIMEC [Quality of Life in Menopause and Colombian Ethnic Groups], performed with Cervantes Scale, which evaluates CV in menopause, in 646 Afro-Colombians, aged 40-59 years, living in populations of the Caribbean and Pacific. Results: mean age 48.7±5.7 years, 69.1% with obesity/overweight, 22.7% with university/technological studies and 40.5% postmenopausal. The most prevalent manifestations: hot flashes 76.4%; suffocation 73.1%; Muscle/joint pain 71.3%; they couldn’t sleep 61.8%; easy sweating episode 55.8%; dry skin 50.4% and headache that increased during the day 44.2%. The third part could not be good by the nerves, things like boring, lost the ability to relax or noticed that everyone was spinning 24.4% had less interest in sex and 14.4% had not significant sexuality. Postmenopausal women had worse scores in most of the manifestations and in the domains of health, psychic, sexuality, relationship, vasomotor, health, aging and global. Conclusion: hot flashes, suffocations and muscle/joint pain were the manifestations most prevalent, in seven out of ten. Postmenopausal women had worse quality of life.

  9. Examine Your Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support Donate Share Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video below and in only two minutes, you can learn to examine your skin. A special thanks to Dr. Martin Weinstock, MD, ...

  10. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Support Donate Share Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video below and in only two minutes, you can learn to examine your skin. A special thanks to Dr. Martin Weinstock, MD, ...

  11. Bleeding into the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003235.htm Bleeding into the skin To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bleeding into the skin can occur from broken blood ...

  12. Mantoux Tuberculin Skin Test

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Learn how to evaluate people for latent TB infection with the Mantoux tuberculin skin test. This podcast includes sections on administering and reading the Mantoux tuberculin skin test, the standard method for detecting latent TB infection since the 1930s.

  13. Skin graft - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100100.htm Skin graft - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... entire body, and acts as a protective barrier. Skin grafts may be recommended for: Extensive wounds Burns Specific ...

  14. Laser surgery - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bleeding Problem not going away Infection Pain Scarring Skin color changes Some laser surgery is done when you are asleep and ... TG, Elston DM, eds. Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical ... lasers, lights, and tissue interactions. In: Hruza GJ, Avram ...

  15. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ...

  16. Сlinical consideration of «small signs» of the disease: necessity and art in the primary care physician activity in diagnostics of lifethreatining conditions (on the example of dermatological manifestations of HIV-infection)

    OpenAIRE

    Рудіченко, В. М.; Яновська, А. О.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents literature data and clinical case concerning dermatological manifestations in HIV infection. Paradoxical situation is possible, when big scale of obvious skin disorders can be visible. But in case of the lack of other symptoms and disability, such disorders (eventually «small signs») are not considered as the signals of the danger. Primary and secondary manifestations of skin pathology connected to HIV-1 are given. In HIV-positive patients a lot of different types of papi...

  17. Skin self-exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer - self-exam; Melanoma - self-exam; Basal cell cancer - self-exam; Squamous cell - self-exam; Skin mole - self-exam ... Checking your skin regularly can help you notice any unusual changes. Follow your health care provider's recommendations on how often to ...

  18. Skin Conditions during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... during pregnancy. For most skin changes, however, health care providers are not sure of the exact cause. Why do dark spots and patches appear on the skin during pregnancy? Dark spots and patches are caused by an increase in the body’s melanin—a natural substance that gives color to the skin and ...

  19. Psychoneuroimmunology and the Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeyman, Juan F

    2016-08-23

    The nervous, immune, endocrine and integumentary systems are closely related and interact in a number of normal and pathological conditions. Nervous system mediators may bring about direct changes to the skin or may induce the release of immunological or hormonal mediators that cause pathological changes to the skin. This article reviews the psychological mechanisms involved in the development of skin diseases.

  20. Skin layer mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerligs, M.

    2010-01-01

    The human skin is composed of several layers, each with an unique structure and function. Knowledge about the mechanical behavior of these skin layers is important for clinical and cosmetic research, such as the development of personal care products and the understanding of skin diseases. Until

  1. Diverse Neurological Manifestations of Lead Encephalopathy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three patients with lead encephalopathy due to industrial poisoning are presented. They all showed a wide spectrum of neurological manifestations, which mimic other neurological presentations. It is emphasised that lead poisoning still occurs in industry, despite efforts at prevention. S. Afr. Med. J., 48, 1721 (1974) ...

  2. Imaging the Abdominal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Gillespie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a multisystem disease with a range of abdominal manifestations including those involving the liver, pancreas, and kidneys. Recent advances in management of the respiratory complications of the disease has led to a greater life expectancy in patients with CF. Subsequently, there is increasing focus on the impact of abdominal disease on quality of life and survival. Liver cirrhosis is the most important extrapulmonary cause of death in CF, yet significant challenges remain in the diagnosis of CF related liver disease. The capacity to predict those patients at risk of developing cirrhosis remains a significant challenge. We review representative abdominal imaging findings in patients with CF selected from the records of two academic health centres, with a view to increasing familiarity with the abdominal manifestations of the disease. We review their presentation and expected imaging findings, with a focus on the challenges facing diagnosis of the hepatic manifestations of the disease. An increased familiarity with these abdominal manifestations will facilitate timely diagnosis and management, which is paramount to further improving outcomes for patients with cystic fibrosis.

  3. Hepatic angiosarcoma manifested as recurrent hemoperitoneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Song, Chun-Young; Gi, Young-Hwa; Kang, Sang-Beom; Kim, Yon-Soo; Nam, Soon-Woo; Lee, Dong-Soo; Kim, Jong-Ok

    2008-01-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare tumor that account for less than 1% of all sarcomas. Although hepatic angiosarcoma usually presents with unspecific symptoms, it rapidly progresses and has a high mortality. We report a rare case of primary hepatic angiosarcoma manifested as recurrent hemoperitoneum. PMID:18473427

  4. Neurological and neurosurgical manifestations of human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neurological and neurosurgical manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Mrica. Adelola Adeloye MS FRCS FRCP. Professor. Department of Surgery, College of Medicine. Blantyre, Malawi. Introduction. AIDS was first recognised in the United States of . America in the late 1970s among homosexual ...

  5. Caracterisation des dechets solides des grandes manifestations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This situation aggravates the structural inadequacy of the city managers and leads to unsanitary. The content of a pilgrim's trash behaves like a mirror reflecting his consumption habits, his attitude towards a manifestation of piety in the public space considered as private area as well as a no man's land. Keywords: Dassa ...

  6. Radiological pulmonary manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchiori, Edson; Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de; Ossa, Alfonso Jaramillo

    1999-01-01

    In this article are reviewed the principal radiologic manifestations of inflammatory and tumoral diseases the compromise the lungs of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In the group of inflammatory diseases the radiologic aspects of pneumocystosis, cytomegalovirus disease, cryptococcosis, tuberculosis and bacterial pneumonias are emphasized. In the neoplasic diseases' group the aspects of lymphoma and Kaposi's sarcoma are specially presented. (author)

  7. Propylthiouracil induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis: A rare manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Ayturk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Propylthiouracil (PTU is a common drug used in patients with hyperthyroidism. It may cause perinuclearantineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (p-ANCA in few patients with Graves′ disease. This antibody has been associated with different forms of vasculitis. We report a patient who presented with cutaneous manifestations of leukocytoclasticvasculitis with simultaneous development of p-ANCAs during PTU therapy for Graves′ disease.

  8. CT manifestations of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang Jun; Yu Wei; Gao Wanqin; Song Haiqiao; Ma Yingjian

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyzes the CT manifestations of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH). Methods: CT features of 11 patients with PLCH proved pathologically were analyzed retrospectively. Results: The main findings in 11 PLCHs were cysts and nodules. Two cases only had cysts, and 1 only had nodules, which most had cavitations. The other 8 cases showed cysts and nodules with 4 cases mainly manifested with cysts and nine mainly manifested with nodules. Two cases had pulmonary interstitial changes. One case only had cysts in the left upper lung field and 10 cases had lesions not only in the upper and middle but in the lower lung field, which 2 cases had more lesions in the lower and costo-phrenic angle field and 8 cases had less lesions in the costo-phrenic angle field. Three of these 8 cases had more lesions in the superior lobe and apical segment of lower lobe. Conclusion: CT manifestations of PLCH are helpful for the early diagnosis. (authors)

  9. Effects of Onchocerciasis Manifestations on Academic Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in order to reduce the parasite reservoir in man, and also breaking the man-fly contact either by use of repellents or through proper covering of the body during outdoor activities. Key Words: Onchocerciasis, manifestation, academic performance, weighted average, visual impairment. Bio-Research Vol.1(2) 2003: 77-85 ...

  10. Mechanisms And Variegated Manifestations Of Inteference In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian bilinguals' use of English as a second language is fraught with interference from L1 to L2, a phenomenon that is commonplace world-wide as a linguistic enterprise. But the extent of this trend in bilinguals varies from one language to another based on sociolinguistic and cultural variables. In Nigeria, manifestations ...

  11. Taking Care of Your Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español Taking Care of Your Skin KidsHealth / For Kids / Taking Care of Your Skin ... you're in. Why Be Nice to Your Skin? Like the heart, stomach, and brain, your skin ...

  12. Sesame seed allergy: Clinical manifestations and laboratory investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazlollahi MR.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plant-origin foods are among the most important sources of food allergic reactions. An increase in the incidence of sesame seed allergy among children and adults has been reported in recent years. The aim of this preliminary study was to investigate the prevalence, importance and clinical manifestations of sesame allergy among Iranian patients.Methods: In a cross-sectional survey, 250 patients with suspected IgE-mediated food allergies completed a questionnaire and underwent skin prick tests with sesame extract as well as cross-reacting foods (walnut, soya and peanut. Total IgE and sesame-specific IgE levels were measured. Patients with positive skin test reactions and/or IgE specific for sesame without clinical symptoms were considered sensitive to sesame. The patients who also had clinical symptoms with sesame consumption were diagnosed as allergic to sesame.Results: Of the 250 patients enrolled in this study, 129 were male and 121 female, with a mean age of 11.7 years. The most common food allergens were cow's milk, egg, curry, tomato and sesame. Sesame sensitivity was found in 35 patients (14.1%. Only five patients (2% had sesame allergy. Sesame-sensitive patients had a significantly higher frequency of positive prick test to cross-reacting foods when compared to non-sensitized patients (p=0.00. The type of symptom was independent of gender and age of the patients, but urticaria and dermatitis-eczema were significantly more frequent in sensitized patients (p=0.008.Conclusions: This is the first study addressing the prevalence of sesame seed allergy in Iranian population. We found sesame to be a common and important cause of food allergy. The panel of foods recommended for use in diagnostic allergy tests should be adjusted.

  13. SKIN CARE IN INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Zakharova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human skin is a complex organ in its structure. Numerous functions of the skin may be impaired in its pathology. Anatomical and physiological characteristics of the skin in children predispose to common diseases of the skin. Diaper dermatitis is one of the most common skin diseases during infancy and childhood. Diapered skin is exposed to friction and excessive hydration, has a higher pH than nondiapered skin, and is repeatedly soiled with feces that contains enzymes with high irritation potential for the skin. Diaper dermatitis may vary in clinical severity and course. Therapeutically, frequent diaper changes and adequate skin care are most important. Appropriate skin care can help to prevent the occurrence of diaper dermatitis and to speed up the healing of affected skin. This includes frequent diaper changes and aeration, gentle cleansing, and the use of a barrier cream. For the treatment of diaper dermatitis agents selected depending on the presence and severity of complications. For prevention and treatment of uncomplicated diaper dermatitis effective means of containing dexpantenol.

  14. Nutrition and skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Apostolos; Liakou, Aikaterini; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2016-09-01

    Nutrition has long been associated with skin health, including all of its possible aspects from beauty to its integrity and even the aging process. Multiple pathways within skin biology are associated with the onset and clinical course of various common skin diseases, such as acne, atopic dermatitis, aging, or even photoprotection. These conditions have been shown to be critically affected by nutritional patterns and dietary interventions where well-documented studies have demonstrated beneficial effects of essential nutrients on impaired skin structural and functional integrity and have restored skin appearance and health. Although the subject could be vast, the intention of this review is to provide the most relevant and the most well-documented information on the role of nutrition in common skin conditions and its impact on skin biology.

  15. [Manifestation of first branchial anomaly:56 cases reportrhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B; Chen, L S; Huang, S L; Liang, L; Wu, P N; Zhang, S Y; L, Z M; Liang, L

    2016-09-05

    Objective: To sum up and conclude manifestation of congenital first branchial anomaly(CFBCA). Method: The clinical data of 56 patients from 2005 to 2015 in our hospital were retrospective reviewed. Result: Manifestation:mass without pain(26.8%),repeated sore and discharge(71.4%),otological symptom(external auditory discharge、hearing loss,28.6%).Eleven cases bacterial sample showed positive result,and most of them show pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococcus aureus.Auricular endoscopy typically performed stricture of external auditory canal,cholesteatoma samples accumulated in ear canal,fistula at the conjunction of the bone and cartilage and tympanic membranous attachment.Typical performance of CT(MRI)was that there were cystic,lobulated or tubular abnormal shadow related with ear canal in Pochet's triangle area whose cyst wall or pipe wall could been enhanced in enhanced CT(MRI) scans,and part of that could be connected with skin.The statistical difference between type Oslen and Work and clinical characteristics( P <0.01),and the relationship between type Oslen and Work( P <0.01).Most of Work Ⅰ were cyst type,and these two type often had no infected symptom.Most of them were young patients.Most of Work Ⅱ were sinus and fistula type ,and these two type often had infected symptom.Most of them were teenagers.Part of patients of type Work Ⅱ showed tympanic membranous attachment. Conclusion: CFBCA was rare,and it is more common in young patients and often in left part.It always performed as mass without pain、repeated sore and discharge、external auditory discharge.Most of Work Ⅰ were cyst type,and these two type often had no infected symptom and most of them were young patients .Most of Work Ⅱ were sinus and fistula type,and these two type often had infected symptom and most of them were teenagers.Auricular endoscopy,CT,MRI could help make diagnose.Doctors clinical need to differentiate it with related diseases according to different manifestations

  16. Skin absorption through atopic dermatitis skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Overgaard, A-S; Kezic, S; Jakasa, I

    2017-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis have skin barrier impairment in both lesional and non-lesional skin. They are typically exposed to emollients daily and topical anti-inflammatory medicaments intermittently, hereby increasing the risk of developing contact allergy and systemic exposed to chemicals...... ingredients found in these topical preparations. We systematically searched for studies that investigated skin absorption of various penetrants, including medicaments, in atopic dermatitis patients, but also animals with experimentally induced dermatitis. We identified 40 articles, i.e. 11 human studies...... examining model penetrants, 26 human studies examining atopic dermatitis drugs and 3 animal studies. We conclude that atopic dermatitis patients have nearly two-fold increased skin absorption when compared to healthy controls. There is a need for well-designed epidemiological and dermato...

  17. 78 FR 11877 - Announcement of Requirements Gathering Meetings for the Electronic Manifest (e-Manifest) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... either electronically through www.regulations.gov or in hard copy at the Resource Conservation and... of proposed rulemaking that, among other things, proposed revisions to the Federal manifest program...

  18. THE INDIVIDUAL SOVEREIGNTY: CONCEPTUALIZATION AND MANIFESTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Lj. Ilievski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is qualitative and theoretical research of the concept of sovereignty and the libertarian theory, particularly the concept of individual liberty. It represents a concept developing study, with a specific accent laid on the individual liberty, and the theoretically established concept of sovereignty. The research focus could be identified with the conceptualization and manifestation of the individual sovereignty, as a theoretical phenomenon that is not fully conceptualized and strictly defined. In the scope of this paper, content analysis method and comparative method are used. The analysis, comparison and synthesis refer to the theories of sovereignty and the theory of libertarianism, resulting in developing the concept of individual sovereignty and its socio-political manifestation.

  19. Clinical Manifestations of the Opiate Withdrawal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faniya Shigakova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, substance abuse is one of the most serious problems facing our society. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical manifestations of the opiate withdrawal syndrome (OWS. The study included 112 patients (57 women and 55 men aged from 18 to 64 years with opium addiction according to the DSM-IV. To study the clinical manifestation of OWS, the special 25-score scale with four sections to assess severity of sleep disorders, pain syndrome, autonomic disorders, and affective symptoms was used. Given the diversity of the OWS symptoms, attention was focused on three clinical variants, affective, algic and mixed. The OWS affective variant was registered more frequently in women, while the mixed type of OWS was more typical of men.

  20. Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Gloria; Pena, Lara; Cordido, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Acromegaly is a disabling disease that is associated with increased morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The diagnosis is based primarily on clinical features and confirmed by measuring GH levels after oral glucose loading and the estimation of IGF-I. It has been suggested that the rate of mortality in patients with acromegaly is correlated with the degree of control of GH. Adequately treated, the relative mortality risk can be markedly reduced towards normal.

  1. Manifestations of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; Mikkelsen, Dorthe; Hertz, Jens Michael

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an uncommon hereditary condition caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene causing a wide range of developmental abnormalities. Multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits and jaw cysts are cardinal features. Many clinicians are unfamiliar with the different...... manifestations and the fact that patients are especially sensitive to ionizing radiation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of patients with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome seen at the Department of Dermatology and Allergy Centre or at Department of Plastic Surgery, Odense University Hospital...... families and none of these mutations had previously been described. CONCLUSION: The patient cohort illustrates classic and rare disease manifestations. It is necessary to remind clinicians that radiation therapy in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is relatively contraindicated. Today, mutation analysis can be used...

  2. Acute dacryocystitis: another clinical manifestation of sporotrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Dayvison Francis Saraiva; Lima, Iluska Augusta Rocha; Curi, Carolina Lemos; Jordão, Livia; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria; Valle, Antonio Carlos Francesconi do; Galhardo, Maria Clara Gutierrez; Curi, Andre Luiz Land

    2014-04-01

    Sporotrichosis associated with exposure to domestic cats is hyperendemic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A review of the clinical records at our institute revealed four patients with clinical signs of dacryocystitis and a positive conjunctival culture for Sporothrix who were diagnosed with Sporothrix dacryocystitis. Three patients were children (sporotrichosis. Dacryocystitis was associated with nodular, ulcerated lesions on the face of one patient and with granulomatous conjunctivitis in two patients; however, this condition manifested as an isolated disease in another patient. All of the patients were cured of the fungal infections, but three patients had chronic dacryocystitis and one patient developed a cutaneous fistula. Sporotrichosis is usually a benign disease, but may cause severe complications when the eye and the adnexa are affected. Physicians, especially ophthalmologists in endemic areas, should be aware of the ophthalmological manifestations and complications of sporotrichosis.

  3. Acute dacryocystitis: another clinical manifestation of sporotrichosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayvison Francis Saraiva Freitas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis associated with exposure to domestic cats is hyperendemic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A review of the clinical records at our institute revealed four patients with clinical signs of dacryocystitis and a positive conjunctival culture for Sporothrix who were diagnosed with Sporothrix dacryocystitis. Three patients were children (< 13 years of age and one patient was an adult. Two patients reported contact with a cat that had sporotrichosis. Dacryocystitis was associated with nodular, ulcerated lesions on the face of one patient and with granulomatous conjunctivitis in two patients; however, this condition manifested as an isolated disease in another patient. All of the patients were cured of the fungal infections, but three patients had chronic dacryocystitis and one patient developed a cutaneous fistula. Sporotrichosis is usually a benign disease, but may cause severe complications when the eye and the adnexa are affected. Physicians, especially ophthalmologists in endemic areas, should be aware of the ophthalmological manifestations and complications of sporotrichosis.

  4. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  5. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilce Mitiko Matsuda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is an infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The disease mainly affects the nervous system, digestive system and heart. The objective of this review is to revise the literature and summarize the main chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease are mainly a result of enteric nervous system impairment caused by T. cruzi infection. The anatomical locations most commonly described to be affected by Chagas disease are salivary glands, esophagus, lower esophageal sphincter, stomach, small intestine, colon, gallbladder and biliary tree. Chagas disease has also been studied in association with Helicobacter pylori infection, interstitial cells of Cajal and the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer.

  6. Violent and criminal manifestations in dementia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Gabriele; Lucetti, Claudio; Danti, Sabrina; Carlesi, Cecilia; Nuti, Angelo

    2016-05-01

    Although the older adults have been studied as victims of violence, geriatric patients can display violent behavior. The purpose of the present review was to explore the phenomenon of criminal violations and violent acts in people with dementia. The authors used PubMed to search the MEDLINE database and other sources for original research and review articles on criminal and violent manifestation in demented patients combining the terms "criminal manifestation," "violence, aggressive behavior," "homicide," "suicide" and "homicide-suicide" together with "dementia". Possible biomarkers of violence are considered. The present review highlights the risk factors for violence in patients suffering from dementia, and reviews the literature about criminal violations and homicidal/suicidal behavior in this patient group. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 541-549. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  7. ORAL MANIFESTATIONS AMONG ROMANIAN HIV PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela ARBUNE

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to evaluate the oral health problems on HIV youth patients from Galati. Materials and method. A cross-sectional study assessed 102 patients with mean age 22. The most frequent oral manifestations on HIV infected youth under ART are erythema marginatum, periodontitis, candidosis and hypertrophia gingivalis. Results and discussion. Dental decay-missing-filled index on HIV patients is high. Viral HIV replication, long time pediatric exposure on HIV, male sex, smoking, and oral inflamation are related to dental poor condition. Exodontic therapy is comon among HIV youth. However, persistence of some associated oral infections is related to individual or behavioral risk factors, but also to some newly found mechanisms, such as disfunctional immune reconstruction. Seeing to antiretroviral treatment, the severity and frequency of oral manifestations decreased among HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment. Conclusions. Developing medical, social and educational programs is imperative for improving the oral health of HIV youth of Galati.

  8. Clinical Manifestations and Diagnosis of Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Lugo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Acromegaly is a disabling disease that is associated with increased morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The diagnosis is based primarily on clinical features and confirmed by measuring GH levels after oral glucose loading and the estimation of IGF-I. It has been suggested that the rate of mortality in patients with acromegaly is correlated with the degree of control of GH. Adequately treated, the relative mortality risk can be markedly reduced towards normal.

  9. Radiographic manifestations of reperfusion edema after transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Se Young; Kim, Tae Hoon; Ryu, Young Hoon; Moon, Sung Wook; Kim, Hyung Joong; Ahn, Chul Min; Paik, Hyo Chae; Lee, Doo Yun; Kim, Sang Jin

    2003-01-01

    To elucidate the sequential radiologic manifestations of reperfusion edema after lung transplantation. The study group comprised five consecutive lung transplant recipients (M:F=3:2;mean age; 47.5 years) who between July 1996 and April 2002 underwent lung transplantation procedures (four, unilateral; one, bilateral) at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed the serial postoperative radiographs obtained and characterized the lung infiltrates. Lung infiltrates compatible with reperfusion edema were present in all patients (5/5). Reperfusion edema appeared on day 1 in four, and by day 2 in the other. In all transplanted lungs, infiltrates were found in the perihilar and basilar regions, and were scored as maximal on day 1 in one, day 3 in two, day 4 in one and day 5 in the other. The recognition of sequential radiological manifestations helps identify recognition of reperfusion edema after lung transplantation

  10. Thoracic manifestations of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, M.F.; Hutton, L.C.; Kaplan, B.R. [University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)

    1995-02-01

    In order to determine the thoracic manifestations of severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, the medical records and available images of 771 patients who had received gonadotropins to induce superovulation, were reviewed. In 22 patients (3%) severe hyperstimulation syndrome was diagnosed clinically and confirmed with ultrasonography (US). Pleural effusion occurred in five of these (23%), one of whom required thoracentesis. Atelectasis and internal jugular vein thrombosis developed in one patient, and ventilation-perfusion mismatch occurred in another. The study concluded that respiratory distress in patients with ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome was most likely due to lung restriction. Pulmonary manifestations formed an important part of this syndrome, and radiologic input were considered necessary for assessment, monitoring and management. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The radiological manifestations of sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madani, G.; Papadopoulou, A.M.; Holloway, B.; Robins, A.; Davis, J.; Murray, D.

    2007-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited abnormality of the ss-globin chain, which causes a spectrum of haemolytic anaemias. Clinical manifestations in SCD include anaemia, jaundice, recurrent vaso-occlusive crises, and infections (particularly by encapsulated bacteria) due to functional asplenia and cerebrovascular accidents. Radiological investigations play a critical role both in the diagnosis and in the primary prevention of the complications of SCD

  12. Unusual roentgenologic manifestations of Meckel's diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, K.B.; Naimark, A.; O'Connor, J.F.; Bouras, L.

    1981-01-01

    Five cases illustrating rare roentgenographic manifestations of Meckel's diverticulum are presented. Small bowel studies in 2 patients demonstrated a mucosal pattern identifiable as heterotopic gastric rugae, and in 2 other cases peptic ulcers were seen within the diverticulum. In 1 patient the diverticulum located in the right upper quadrant contained calcified enteroliths, and in another patient the diverticulum had fistulous communication with the appendix. (orig.)

  13. Musculoskeletal manifestations in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Deepti P. Deshmukh; Asmita G. Akarte

    2017-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal complications of diabetes have been generally ignored and poorly treated as compared to other complications. Hence we carried out this study to find the prevalence of musculoskeletal manifestations in type II diabetes mellitus and its correlation with age, BMI, duration of diabetes, and control of diabetes. Methods: 100 consecutive patients of type II diabetes were studied. Duration of diabetes, control of diabetes, and any musculoskeletal complaints were noted....

  14. Nasal manifestations in chromium industry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyer, R G; Kumar, Gaurav

    2003-04-01

    People working in mines, plating factories, cement industries are mainly exposed to chrome substances, IIexavalent chromium has been implicated for its toxic effect on the nasal mucosa. Hereby we present a rare study of 28 patients who attended out patient department of Otorhinolaryngology at SSG Hospital, Baroda from a nearby chromium industry. This study aims to present various nasal manifestations of toxic effects of prolonged chromium exposure.

  15. The radiological manifestations of sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madani, G. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: gittamadani@yahoo.com; Papadopoulou, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Holloway, B. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Robins, A. [Department of Paediatrics, Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Davis, J. [Department of Radiology, Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Murray, D. [Department of Radiology, Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited abnormality of the ss-globin chain, which causes a spectrum of haemolytic anaemias. Clinical manifestations in SCD include anaemia, jaundice, recurrent vaso-occlusive crises, and infections (particularly by encapsulated bacteria) due to functional asplenia and cerebrovascular accidents. Radiological investigations play a critical role both in the diagnosis and in the primary prevention of the complications of SCD.

  16. ORAL MANIFESTATIONS AMONG ROMANIAN HIV PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Manuela ARBUNE; Oana-Mirela POTÂRNICHIE; Silvia MARTU

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the oral health problems on HIV youth patients from Galati. Materials and method. A cross-sectional study assessed 102 patients with mean age 22. The most frequent oral manifestations on HIV infected youth under ART are erythema marginatum, periodontitis, candidosis and hypertrophia gingivalis. Results and discussion. Dental decay-missing-filled index on HIV patients is high. Viral HIV replication, long time pediatric exposu...

  17. Les manifestations cardiovasculaires chez les hemodialyses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Le but de l'étude est d'analyser sur une période de 12 mois chez 75 patients en hémodialyse chronique, âgés de 38ans en moyenne, le les aspects cliniques, thérapeutiques et évolutifs des manifestations cardiovasculaires. La prévalence est de 87,20% chez les patients. Les signes fonctionnels les plus fréquents sont la ...

  18. Tardive Dystonia: Clinical Spectrum and Novel Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jeffrey Davis

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Tardive dystonia was identified in 25 patients: involvement of the face and neck was most common; truncal and limb dystonia were also observed. There were 3 cases of laryngospasm and 2 of spasmodic dysphonia. The latter has not been previously reported as a manifestation of tardive dystonia. In all cases, movements typical of classic tardive dyskinesia could be demonstrated. This group illustrates the variety of dystonic disorders that may occur in conjunction with tardive dyskinesia.

  19. Palmse viinaköögi manifest

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1996-01-01

    Manifest. Tõlkijate seminari puhul 17. mail 1996 Palmse viinaköögis Juta Bedia, Eric Dickens, Gyözö Fehérvári, Guntars Godinsh, Maima Grinberga, Irja Grönholm, Leif Hannibal, Cornelius Hasselblatt, Pirkko Huurto, Ivo Iliste, Nora Javorskaja, Gisbert Jänicke, Kaisu Lahikainen, Enel Melberg, Vera Ruber, Arnold Tamm, Leili Tamm, Jonatan Tomesh, Lilia Velic'kova, Marianne Vogel. Inglise k.: Estonian Literary Magazine, autumn 1996, nr. 3

  20. Cardiac manifestations of Familial Mediterranean fever

    OpenAIRE

    Alsarah, Ahmad; Alsara, Osama; Laird-Fick, Heather S.

    2017-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is autoinflammatory disorder characterized by sporadic attacks of fever, peritonitis, pleuritis, and arthritis. It is mainly seen in patients from Mediterranean origins, but it is now reported more frequently in Europe and North America due to immigration. To analyze the data on the cardiovascular manifestations in FMF patients, we searched PubMed using the terms “Familial Mediterranean Fever” or “FMF” in combination with other key words including “cardiovas...

  1. Factors affecting dermatological manifestations in patients with end stage renal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anees, M.; Gull, S.; Nazeer, A.

    2018-01-01

    To determine skin changes in patients of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) and factors affecting these changes. Study Design:Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study:Nephrology Department, Mayo Hospital, Lahore in collaboration with Dermatology Department, King Edward Medical University, Lahore, from October 2015 to January 2016. Methodology:Two hundred patients who were undergoing MHD for more than three months were included in the study. Patients' demographic data, laboratory reports and dialysis records were noted in a predesigned questionnaire. Skin examination was carried out by consultant dermatologist after patient's permission. Results:Among 200 patients included in study, 105 were males and rest of them were females. Major causes of ESRD were Diabetes Mellitus (n=83, 41.5%, followed by Hypertension (n=80, 40%), Nephrolithiasis (n=15, 7.5%) and Chronic glomerulonephritis (n=5, 2.5%). At least one cutaneous finding was present in every patient. Common skin findings observed were pigmentation (86%), xerosis (83%), pallor (79%), pruritus (69%), acquired ichthyosis (50.5%), and bacterial skin infections (18.5%). Among them, nail manifestations were half-and-half nails (52%), nychomycosis (30.5%), onycholysis (20.5%), subungual hyperkeratosis (23.5%), and Mee's lines (7.5). Among hair changes were sparse scalp hair (38.5%), brittle and lustreless hair (28%). The factors contributing to skin changes were patient's age, cause of ESRD, anti HCV positivity, high urea and creatinine levels, duration and frequency of hemodialysis, hemoglobin levels, calcium phosphate product and socioeconomic status. Some skin manifestations were interrelated with each other like xerosis with pruritus (p<0.001), pruritus with bacterial infection (p<0.022), acquired Ichthyosis (p=0.008) and hair changes (p=0.035). Conclusion:ESRD patients on hemodialysis develop various skin changes during the course of disease

  2. Mandibular and Dental Manifestations of Gaucher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranjam, Hamid R.; Sidransky, Ellen; Levine, William Z.; Zimran, Ari; Elstein, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a systemic lysosomal storage disorder with a high prevalence among Ashkenazi Jews. It is caused by an inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Common signs and symptoms include hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and skeletal involvement. Oral and dental manifestations are less commonly seen. These manifestations are often asymptomatic, although they may be detected by routine dental x-rays. There are several case reports and a few larger series published describing patients with Gaucher disease who have mandibulo-maxillofacial involvement. This review aims to examine the oral manifestations observed in Gaucher disease and to suggest practical guidelines for dealing with these often worrisome signs. Among the critical issues are the benign nature of Gaucher cell infiltration of the mandible and the critical importance of being prepared for post-procedure bleeding and/or infections. Therefore, it is essential that dental practitioners be aware of the possible oral and dental complications of Gaucher disease, as well as the available treatment modalities. PMID:22251146

  3. Chronic polyarthritis as isolated manifestation of toxocariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Gabriela R; Giacomin, Maria Fernanda A; França, Camila M P; Sallum, Adriana M E; Jacob, Cristina M A; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-01-01

    Human toxocariasis is a parasitic zoonosis mainly caused by Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati and is acquired by ingestion of the parasite's embryonated eggs. Arthralgia and/or arthritis were reported in up to 17% of the cases, generally with acute duration (less than 6 weeks). However, to our knowledge, chronic polyarthritis, as the isolated presentation of Toxocara infection, was not reported. One of the 5809 patients that was followed up at our service (0.017%) had chronic polyarthritis as the single manifestation of toxocariasis and was described herein. A 3-year-old girl was referred to our service with severe painful chronic polyarthritis for a period longer than 10 weeks and morning stiffness of 30min. Dog contact exposure history in the recreational areas of neighborhood was reported. Her exams showed high levels of eosinophils in peripheral blood (29%), bone marrow aspirate revealed marked eosinophilia (32%) and Toxocara enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Elisa) was positive (1:1280). She was treated with paracetamol (40mg/kg/day) and thiabendazole (25mg/kg/day) for 10 days, and all manifestations reduced. After eight months of follow-up, she was on clinical and laboratorial remission. In conclusion, we described a case of chronic polyarthritis, as isolated manifestation of toxocariasis, mimicking juvenile idiopathic arthritis and leukemia. Importantly, this zoonosis should be considered in patients with arthritis and eosinophilia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Manifestations or seven acts and one folly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Guilherme Bandeira de Araújo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The theme that inspired the writing of this article was the set of street manifestations that took place in Brazil in July 2013. The manifestations were initially articulated by the problems of urban mobility, but later will acquire immense complexity. The plurality of voices and crossings and the impossibility of a single language to give existence to the complexity of the manifestations is what constitutes the raw material of this text, which causes thinking about generalizations and constraints that are imposed by existing languages to talk space. The text was produced collectively or brokered by members of the Grupo de Pesquisa Modernidade e Cultura of the Instituto de Pesquisa e Planejamento Urbano e Regional, of the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro and was presented as a performance in the panel discussion “In the borders of the major Geography: imagination, strangeness and performance, in the III Colóquio Internacional “A Educação pelas imagens e suas geografias”.

  5. Abdominal manifestations of cystic fibrosis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz; Navarro, Oscar M.; Levine, Daniel S.; Oudjhane, Kamaldine

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary complications remain the main cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis, but the presenting symptoms in children are often related to gastrointestinal or pancreaticobiliary disease. Furthermore, abdominal manifestations are now seen throughout childhood, from infancy to adolescence. The child might present in the neonatal period with meconium ileus or its attendant complications. The older child might present with distal intestinal obstruction syndrome or colonic stricture secondary to high doses of pancreatic enzyme replacement. Less-common gastrointestinal manifestations include intussusception, duodenitis and fecal impaction of the appendix. Most children also show evidence of exocrine pancreatic deficiency. Radiologically, the combination of fat deposition and pancreatic fibrosis leads to varying CT and MR appearances. A higher than normal incidence of pancreatic cysts and calcification is also seen. Decreased transport of water and chloride also increases the viscosity of bile, with subsequent obstruction of the biliary ductules. If extensive, this can progress to obstructive cirrhosis, portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Diffuse fatty infiltration, hypersplenism and gallstones are also commonly seen in these patients. We present a pictorial review of the radiological appearance of these abdominal manifestations. The conditions are dealt with individually, together with typical appearances in various imaging modalities. (orig.)

  6. Chronic polyarthritis as isolated manifestation of toxocariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela R. Viola

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Human toxocariasis is a parasitic zoonosis mainly caused by Toxocara canis or Toxocara catiand is acquired by ingestion of the parasite’s embryonated eggs. Arthralgia and/or arthri-tis were reported in up to 17% of the cases, generally with acute duration (less than 6weeks. However, to our knowledge, chronic polyarthritis, as the isolated presentation ofToxocara infection, was not reported. One of the 5809 patients that was followed up at ourservice (0.017% had chronic polyarthritis as the single manifestation of toxocariasis and wasdescribed herein. A 3-year-old girl was referred to our service with severe painful chronicpolyarthritis for a period longer than 10 weeks and morning stiffness of 30 min. Dog contactexposure history in the recreational areas of neighborhood was reported. Her exams showedhigh levels of eosinophils in peripheral blood (29%, bone marrow aspirate revealed markedeosinophilia (32% and Toxocara enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Elisa was positive(1:1280. She was treated with paracetamol (40 mg/kg/day and thiabendazole (25 mg/kg/dayfor 10 days, and all manifestations reduced. After eight months of follow-up, she was onclinical and laboratorial remission. In conclusion, we described a case of chronic polyarthri-tis, as isolated manifestation of toxocariasis, mimicking juvenile idiopathic arthritis andleukemia. Importantly, this zoonosis should be considered in patients with arthritis andeosinophilia.

  7. Abdominal manifestations of cystic fibrosis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz; Navarro, Oscar M.; Levine, Daniel S.; Oudjhane, Kamaldine [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-03-15

    Pulmonary complications remain the main cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis, but the presenting symptoms in children are often related to gastrointestinal or pancreaticobiliary disease. Furthermore, abdominal manifestations are now seen throughout childhood, from infancy to adolescence. The child might present in the neonatal period with meconium ileus or its attendant complications. The older child might present with distal intestinal obstruction syndrome or colonic stricture secondary to high doses of pancreatic enzyme replacement. Less-common gastrointestinal manifestations include intussusception, duodenitis and fecal impaction of the appendix. Most children also show evidence of exocrine pancreatic deficiency. Radiologically, the combination of fat deposition and pancreatic fibrosis leads to varying CT and MR appearances. A higher than normal incidence of pancreatic cysts and calcification is also seen. Decreased transport of water and chloride also increases the viscosity of bile, with subsequent obstruction of the biliary ductules. If extensive, this can progress to obstructive cirrhosis, portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Diffuse fatty infiltration, hypersplenism and gallstones are also commonly seen in these patients. We present a pictorial review of the radiological appearance of these abdominal manifestations. The conditions are dealt with individually, together with typical appearances in various imaging modalities. (orig.)

  8. Skin: an interactive hyperstereoscopic electro installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostis, Helen-Nicole; Kooima, Robert; Kannenberg, John

    2007-02-01

    It is the uniqueness of Virtual Reality as a medium that calls for the creation of hybrid realities which blur the finite boundaries between physical and digital existence. Virtual Reality's distinguishing features as an artistic medium embody a distinct form of aesthetics: it is a stereoscopic, immersive, interactive, performative, dynamic, and experiential medium. A Virtual Reality art piece manifests in multiple ways. It can present itself as an interactive virtual archetype, exploring concepts rendered from different perspectives, and as an impetus to challenge the platform's capabilities, not only theoretically as an artistic practice, but also by calling for the instantiation of authoring tools for the development of virtual reality experiences. The paradigm presented in this paper is a Virtual Reality art piece, called skin, 2006, developed on Electro, which is an open-source cross-platform development environment. skin, 2006, is an interactive hypersteroscopic high-definition audiovisual installation that explores a dialogue between physical and digital senses of "touch".

  9. Ophthalmic manifestations of methylmalonic aciduria accompanied with homocystinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Jing Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Methylmalonicaciduia(MMAaccompanied with homocystinuria is a rare autosomal-recessive with congenital metabolic disorder of Vitamin B12. There are three subtypes, cblC, cblD, cblF, in which cblC is the most common one. The diagnostic tests are tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Tests for activity of enzyme in fibroblasts from skin, complementary assay and genetic analysis can be used to make the subtype clear. Early-onset patients, defined by onset of symptoms before the age of 1 year, may have severe ocular involvement, including visual loss, nystagmus, strabismus, retinopathy, maculopathy, optic atrophy, abnormal electroretinography. Late-onset patients, defined by onset of symptoms after the age of 4 year, rarely have ocular manifestations. The pathogenesis of the ophthalmic symptoms may be related to the high level of homocystine, oxidative stress and the abnormal development of nervous systems. The treatment for MMA accompanied with homocystinuria is mostly symptomatic based. Ophthalmic treatment is limited. Early supplement of methionine,GSH or other antioxidants may be helpful for retinopathy. There is no standard ophthalmological examination for those patients in China. It is critical to set up inter-departmental cooperation and early stage examination for the treatments and outcomes of the patients.

  10. Brain Metastasis as Initial Manifestation of Melanoma (A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitorino Modesto Santos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Melanoma is a malignancy derived from the neural crest, constituted of melanocytes found in the basal layer of epidermis, with the main function of melanin production. Case: A 64-year-old woman was admitted with headache and dyslalia and reported some episodes of vertigo and falls in the last six months. A superficial red and dark skin discoloration in the scalp and a node in the right parotid gland were observed. Computed tomography of the brain showed nodular lesions in the left parietal and right temporal and occipital lobes with hemorrhagic features, in addition to mass effect. Furthermore, PET-CT images were suggestive of brain, lung, and adrenal metastasis. The patient evolved with intracranial hypertension and a neurosurgery was performed. Histopathological and immunohistochemistry studies revealed metastatic melanoma. Conclusions: She underwent schedules of radiation therapy and chemotherapy, but developed uncontrolled sepsis and died in spite of clinical management and intensive care support. Cutaneous primary site of this malignancy in the scalp was previously neglected; therefore, neurological disturbances were the initial manifestations of melanoma. Immunohistochemistry findings allowed ruling out the main differential hypotheses.

  11. Multisystem Radiologic Manifestations of Erdheim-Chester Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umairullah Lodhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Erdheim-Chester Disease is a rare form of multiorgan non-Langerhans’ cell histiocytosis that affects individuals between the ages of 50 and 70 with an equal distribution among males and females. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality that is mostly due to infiltration of critical organs. Some of the sites that Erdheim-Chester Disease affects include the skeletal system, central nervous system, cardiovascular system, lungs, kidneys (retroperitoneum, and skin. The most common presenting symptom of Erdheim-Chester Disease is bone pain although a large majority of patients are diagnosed incidentally during a workup for a different disease process. Diagnosing Erdheim-Chester Disease is challenging due its rarity and mimicry to other infiltrative processes. Therefore, a multimodality diagnostic approach is employed with imaging being at the forefront. As of date, a comprehensive radiologic review of the manifestations of Erdheim-Chester Disease has rarely been reported. Here we present radiologic findings of an individual suffering from Erdheim-Chester Disease.

  12. [Clinical extraintestinal manifestations in patients with ulcerative colitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toader, Elena

    2007-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic disease clinically manifest either by bowel symptoms alone or extraintestinal symptoms. Our prospective study included 635 patients with ulcerative colitis (334 males and 301 females, mean age 37.54 +/- 13.84, range 20-70 years). The presence of the common extraintestinal symptoms (ES) was analyzed. Of the 635 investigated patients, these symptoms were found in 83 (13%, 49 males and 34 females, mean age 41.6 +/- 13.95 range 21-70). Patients with ES suffered longer from UC on the average, that is 60.6 years. Most commonly ES involved the joints, 38 (45.8%) patients, hepatobiliary, 28 patients (33.7%), skin, 10 patients (12%) and eyes, 7 patients (8.4%). In 18% of the patients two or more ES were present. ES were clinically detectable after the intestinal symptoms in 81% patients. An increased tendency of ES to occur in patients with a more extensive disease was noticed. The prevalence of ES in the UC patients from NE Romania is in agreement with data from other countries. The number of ES supports the need for complex follow-up in these patients.

  13. Marine algae as attractive source to skin care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthon, Jean-Yves; Nachat-Kappes, Rachida; Bey, Mathieu; Cadoret, Jean-Paul; Renimel, Isabelle; Filaire, Edith

    2017-06-01

    As the largest organ in the human body, the skin has multiple functions of which one of the most important is the protection against various harmful stressors. The keratinised stratified epidermis and an underlying thick layer of collagen-rich dermal connective tissues are important components of the skin. The environmental stressors such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and pollution increase the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), contributing to clinical manifestations such as wrinkle formation and skin aging. Skin aging is related to the reduction of collagen production and decrease of several enzymatic activities including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which degrade collagen structure in the dermis; and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), which inhibit the action of MMPs. In addition to alterations of DNA, signal transduction pathways, immunology, UVR, and pollution activate cell surface receptors of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the skin. This action leads to a breakdown of collagen in the extracellular matrix and a shutdown of new collagen synthesis. Therefore, an efficient antioxidants strategy is of major importance in dermis and epidermis layers. Marine resources have been recognised for their biologically active substances. Among these, marine algae are rich-sources of metabolites, which can be used to fight against oxidative stress and hence skin aging. These metabolites include, among others, mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), polysaccharides, sulphated polysaccharides, glucosyl glycerols, pigments, and polyphenols. This paper reviews the role of oxidative processes in skin damage and the action of the compounds from algae on the physiological processes to maintain skin health.

  14. Chronologic and actinically induced aging in human facial skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilchrest, B.A.; Szabo, G.; Flynn, E.; Goldwyn, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    Clinical and histologic stigmata of aging are much more prominent in habitually sun-exposed skin than in sun-protected skin, but other possible manifestations of actinically induced aging are almost unexplored. We have examined the interrelation of chronologic and actinic aging using paired preauricular (sun-exposed) and postauricular (sun-protected) skin specimens. Keratinocyte cultures derived from sun-exposed skin consistently had a shorter in vitro lifespan but increased plating efficiency compared with cultures derived from adjacent sun-protected skin of the same individual, confirming a previous study of different paired body sites. Electron microscopic histologic sections revealed focal abnormalities of keratinocyte proliferation and alignment in vitro especially in those cultures derived from sun-exposed skin and decreased intercellular contact in stratified colonies at late passage, regardless of donor site. One-micron histologic sections of the original biopsy specimens revealed no striking site-related keratinocyte alterations, but sun-exposed specimens had fewer epidermal Langerhans cells (p less than 0.001), averaging approximately 50 percent the number in sun-protected skin, a possible exaggeration of the previously reported age-associated decrease in this cell population. These data suggest that sun exposure indeed accelerates aging by several criteria and that, regardless of mechanism, environmental factors may adversely affect the appearance and function of aging skin in ways amenable to experimental quantitation

  15. Skin barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Renowned experts present the latest knowledge Although a very fragile structure, the skin barrier is probably one of the most important organs of the body. Inward/out it is responsible for body integrity and outward/in for keeping microbes, chemicals, and allergens from penetrating the skin. Since...... the role of barrier integrity in atopic dermatitis and the relationship to filaggrin mutations was discovered a decade ago, research focus has been on the skin barrier, and numerous new publications have become available. This book is an interdisciplinary update offering a wide range of information...... on the subject. It covers new basic research on skin markers, including results on filaggrin and on methods for the assessment of the barrier function. Biological variation and aspects of skin barrier function restoration are discussed as well. Further sections are dedicated to clinical implications of skin...

  16. Recommendations for skin decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Further to the reecommendations for determining the surface contamination of the skin and estimating the radiation exposure of the skin after contamination (SAAS-Mitt--89-16), measures for skin decontamination are recommended. They are necessary if (1) after simple decontamination by means of water, soap and brush without damaging the skin the surface contamination limits are exceeded and the radiation exposure to be expected for the undamaged healthy skin is estimated as to high, and if (2) a wound is contaminated. To remove skin contaminations, in general universally applicable, non-aggressive decontamination means and methods are sufficient. In special cases, nuclide-specific decontamination is required taking into account the properties of the radioactive substance

  17. An investigation into the management of acute skin reactions from tangential breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meegan, M.A.; Haycocks, T.R.

    1997-01-01

    This research examined the acute skin reaction of two consecutive groups receiving tangetial breast irradiation for carcinoma of the breast. The first group used the traditional skin care advice of using warm water only within the treatment area, while the second group continued with their normal skin care regime. Data was collected on the physical manifestations of the acute reaction, medical history, the use of concurrent cytotoxic agents, treatment parameters and skin care products used. Statistical analysis using the T-test method showed no difference in the skin reaction between the two groups. The investigation has lead to a change of policy in the management of acute breast reactions. Patients receiving radiation therapy to the breast or chest wall can now use their routine skin care products with no adverse effect on skin reactions. (author)

  18. Generalized subcutaneous edema as a rare manifestation of dermatomyositis: clinical lesson from a rare feature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2011-04-01

    Generalized subcutaneous edema is a very rare manifestation of inflammatory myopathies. A 61-year-old woman presented with classic signs and symptoms of dermatomyositis. She was also noted to have generalized edema that was so florid that an alternative diagnosis was considered. Her disease was resistant to corticosteroids, azathioprine, and mycophenolate mofetil. Intravenous administration of immunoglobulins was started because of marked worsening of her disease-muscle weakness, generalized anasarca, and involvement of her bulbar muscles. This led to dramatic resolution of her subcutaneous edema and significant improvement of her skin and muscle disease. As the initial screen for malignancy was negative, a positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was requested, which interestingly showed a metabolically active cervical tumor. Anasarca is an unusual manifestation of dermatomyositis. In treatment-refractory cases, it seems reasonable to consider positron emission tomography scan in excluding underlying malignant disease.

  19. Oral Manifestations of Crohn’s Disease: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L. Woo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Crohn’s disease (CD is an inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that is likely caused by an inappropriate mucosal inflammatory response to intestinal bacteria in a genetically predisposed host. The lesions of CD can involve any region of the GI tract as well as extraintestinal sites such as the skin, joints, and eyes. The most common presenting symptoms are abdominal pain and prolonged diarrhea associated with fevers, fatigue, and malaise. Delayed growth and failure to thrive may also be observed in pediatric patients. Oral manifestations of CD are known as oral CD and may precede GI involvement, thus serving as early markers of this condition. We describe a 6-year-old male who presented with oral lesions as his initial manifestation of disease and review the current literature pertaining to oral CD.

  20. Cryoglobulinemia and its correlation with clinical extrahepatic manifestations in chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Jabłońska

    2017-12-01

    Results: Cryoglobulins were found in 93 persons (37.8%. Type II cryoglobulinemia was detected in 28 persons. Patients with cryoglobulinemia were elder (p<0.0004. 54 patients (21.95% manifested clinical extrahepatic symptoms. Arthralgia was found in 27 cases (10.98%. Skin changes were found in 22 patients (8.94%. 12 persons had glomerulonephritis (4.88%. 11 patients (4.47% had sicca syndrome. 6 patients developed peripheral polyneuropathy (2.4%. 4 persons developed B cell lymphoma (1.63%. There was no correlation between presence of symptoms and grading, staging, age, HCV genotype, and the presence of autoantibodies. Extrahepatic manifestations were present more frequently in women (p<0.0008.

  1. Skin-effect in a dense ionizing plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanenkov, G.V.; Taranenko, S.B.

    1989-01-01

    Effect of multiple ionization and radiation (bremmstrahlung and photorecombination) on skin effect in a dense plasma is investigated. Limiting cases are considered: 1) fast skin-effect, when plasma movement and any types of losses (radiation, electron thermal conductivity) have no time to manifest themselves during short heating times; 2) deceleration of skinning under effect of radiation achieving equilibrium with Joule heating. Self-simulating solutions of the problem for half-space are investigated. The results are applied to analysing experiments with exploding wires. It is shown that under conditions, typical of heavy-current decelerators tubular structures are produced as a result of heat and current skinning under free dispersion of plasma produced during the explosion. Their dimensions are of the order of dozens of microns, and the temperature exceeds 50 eV. The linear power and complete ''tube'' radiation yield at this stage are able to make a substantial contribution to the energy balance in the group

  2. Secondary Syphilis: Uncommon Manifestations a Common Disease

    OpenAIRE

    McPhee, Stephen J.

    1984-01-01

    Reports of cases of primary and secondary syphilis are increasing in the United States, particularly in urban areas and among homosexual men. While primary syphilis poses little diagnostic difficulty, many physicians are unfamiliar with the multisystem nature of secondary lues. Patients who have secondary syphilis commonly present with systemic signs, skin rash, mucous membrane lesions and generalized adenopathy. Less commonly, secondary syphilis may occur as acute meningitis, sensorineural h...

  3. Otorhinolaryngology manifestations secondary to oral sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-López, Claudia; Morales-Angulo, Carmelo

    Over the last few years, oral and pharyngeal signs and symptoms due to oral sex have increased significantly. However, no review articles related to this subject have been found in the medical literature. The objective of our study was to identify otorhinolaryngological manifestations associated with orogenital/oroanal contact, both in adults and children, in the context of consensual sex or sexual abuse. We performed a review of the medical literature on otorhinolaryngological pathology associated with oral sex published in the last 20 years in the PubMed database. Otorhinolaryngological manifestations secondary to oral sex practice in adults can be infectious, tumoral or secondary to trauma. The more common signs and symptoms found in the literature were human papillomavirus infection (above all, condyloma acuminata and papilloma/condyloma), oral or pharyngeal syphilis, gonococcal pharyngitis, herpes simplex virus infection and pharyngitis from Chlamydia trachomatis. The incidence of human papillomavirus -induced oropharyngeal carcinoma has dramatically increased. In children past the neonatal period, the presence of condyloma acuminatus, syphilis, gonorrhoea or palatal ecchymosis (the last one, unless justified by other causes) should make us suspect sexual abuse. Sexual habits have changed in the last decades, resulting in the appearance of otorhinolaryngological pathology that was rarely seen previously. For this reason, it is important for primary care physicians to have knowledge about the subject to perform correct diagnosis and posterior treatment. Some sexual abuse cases in children may also be suspected based on the knowledge of the characteristic oropharyngeal manifestations secondary to them. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  4. Urological manifestations of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askeland, Eric J; Arlen, Angela M; Erickson, Bradley A; Mathews, Katherine D; Cooper, Christopher S

    2013-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a dystrophinopathy affecting males that is associated with multiple organ system complications. To our knowledge urological complications of Duchenne muscular dystrophy have been described only anecdotally to date. We reviewed the medical charts of 135 patients with Duchenne or Duchenne-Becker muscular dystrophy for demographics and disease progression, urological diagnoses, intervention and followup. Of 135 patients 67 (50%) had at least 1 documented urological diagnosis and 38 (28%) had multiple manifestations. Lower urinary tract symptoms were the most common urological diagnosis (32% of patients). Survival analysis revealed a median age at onset of lower urinary tract symptoms of 23 years (95% CI 17.7-23.9). Intervention was required in 12 patients (9%), most commonly due to nephrolithiasis. Urological morbidity increased with Duchenne muscular dystrophy progression when stratified by clinical progression. Lower urinary tract symptoms were more common in nonambulatory patients (40.7% vs 19%, p = 0.007), those with a diagnosis of scoliosis (44% vs 19.7%, p = 0.003) and/or scoliosis spine surgery (60% vs 22%, p <0.001), and those on invasive respiratory support (53% vs 29%, p = 0.046). Likewise, nephrolithiasis was more common in nonambulatory patients (10% vs 0%, p = 0.017), those with scoliosis (12% vs 0%, p = 0.004) and/or scoliosis spine surgery (20% vs 1%, p <0.001), and those on invasive respiratory support (29% vs 3%, p <0.001). Only 28% of patients with a urological manifestation were referred to urology. As these patients transition into adolescence and adulthood, the increased prevalence of urological manifestations warrants increased awareness and referral to urologists. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Manifestation of Corruption in Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viacheslav Hladky

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to identify the main manifestations of corruption in the states of Eastern Europe, and, first of all, in Ukraine, which since 2014 has been actively carrying out multiple anti-corruption transformations, although the state is becoming increasingly corrupt every year. The author defines the main groups of manifestations of corruption and analyzes their constituent elements, in the light of which, delineates such categories as "gratitude", bribe, and corruption "gratitude". Particular attention is paid to the study of corruption intercession, which unites nepotism, cronyism and corruption lobbying. It is noted that to date nepotism is essentially supplanted by the rabble, which is the advantage of "privatization" of the state in the light of the clan capitalism. It is concluded that bribery and deviant intercession (corruption protection, as the main manifestations of corruption, the facts that corruption behavior is life-affirming security and protective actions of people, to which they resort, on the one hand, because of the insolvency of the state and society, but, on the other hand, to optimize the achievement of the good that is provided by the state and society, however, in an improper way. Meanwhile, if the discrepancy measures and methods of granting the benefits of state benefits (i.e., on average, the measure and method is applicable, then ignoring the state provision of certain goods as such (i.e., they can be provided only in the corruption plane - this phenomenon is completely objective. On this basis, it is argued that the policy of counteracting corrupt practices in the state should focus, first of all, on the solution of such problems and objective problems, the refusal to account, which will lead to further criminalization of the society, which is observed, in particular, in modern Ukraine.

  6. Unusual manifestations of ectodermal dysplasia-syndactyly syndrome type I in two Yemeni siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Alshami

    2015-01-15

    Ectodermal dysplasias (EDs) are a group of genodermatoses characterized by malformations of tissues derived from the ectoderm, including the skin, its appendages (hair, nails, sweat glands), teeth, and the breasts. Ectodermal dysplasia syndactyly syndrome (EDSS) is a rare, newly described type of ED involving syndactyly. We report 2 Yemeni siblings with typical EDSS manifestations, including bilateral, partial cutaneous syndactyly of the fingers and toes; sparse, coarse, brittle scalp hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes; and conical, widely spaced teeth with enamel notches. In addition, the siblings presented with other features hitherto not described for this syndrome, such as adermatoglyphia, onychogryphosis, hypoplastic widely spaced nipples, hypoplastic thumbs, and red scalp hair.

  7. Pulmonary manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kee Hyuk; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Joo, Kyung Bin; Hahm, Chang Kok; Lee, Seung Ro [College of Medicine, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    Pulmonary involvement is more common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) than in any other connective tissue disease, and more than half of patients with SLE suffer from respiratory dysfunction during the course of their illness. Although sepsis and renal disease are the most common causes of death in SLE, lung disease is the predominant manifestation and is an indicator of overall prognosis. Respiratory disease may be due to direct involvement of the lung or as a secondary consequence of the effect of the disease on other organ systems.

  8. Sarcoidosis: Oral and extra-oral manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease, which is usually associated with the formation of noncaseating granulomas in affected tissues and organs. It is mostly present with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, pulmonary infiltration, ocular, and cutaneous lesions. Oral manifestations of this disease are relatively rare. The present case report shows a 40-year-old male with lesions in the soft tissue of oral cavity (buccal mucosa, gingiva, and palate and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was established following hematological, biochemical and pulmonary function tests, chest radiograph, and histopathological investigation.

  9. Research Misconduct—Definitions, Manifestations and Extent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Bornmann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the international scientific community has been rocked by a number of serious cases of research misconduct. In one of these, Woo Suk Hwang, a Korean stem cell researcher published two articles on research with ground-breaking results in Science in 2004 and 2005. Both articles were later revealed to be fakes. This paper provides an overview of what research misconduct is generally understood to be, its manifestations and the extent to which they are thought to exist.

  10. Cutaneous manifestations in patients with mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Karin; Escribano, Luis; Grattan, Clive

    2016-01-01

    with mastocytosis. To address this unmet need, an international task force involving experts from different organizations (including the European Competence Network on Mastocytosis; the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; and the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology) met several...... times between 2010 and 2014 to discuss the classification and criteria for diagnosis of cutaneous manifestations in patients with mastocytosis. This article provides the major outcomes of these meetings and a proposal for a revised definition and criteria. In particular, we recommend that the typical...

  11. Pulmonary manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kee Hyuk; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Joo, Kyung Bin; Hahm, Chang Kok; Lee, Seung Ro

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement is more common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) than in any other connective tissue disease, and more than half of patients with SLE suffer from respiratory dysfunction during the course of their illness. Although sepsis and renal disease are the most common causes of death in SLE, lung disease is the predominant manifestation and is an indicator of overall prognosis. Respiratory disease may be due to direct involvement of the lung or as a secondary consequence of the effect of the disease on other organ systems

  12. Imaging manifestations of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, R.; Bag, A.K.; Chapman, P.R.; Cure, J.K.

    2010-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease caused by reactivation of JC virus in immunosuppressed patients. The diagnosis is usually suggested on imaging and confirmed by cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for JC virus DNA. In this article, we review the imaging manifestations of PML on computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), MR spectroscopy, single photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission tomography (PET), and outline the role of imaging in follow-up and prognostication.

  13. Various musculoskeletal manifestations of chronic renal insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C.Y.; Ong, K.O.

    2013-01-01

    Musculoskeletal manifestations in chronic renal insufficiency are caused by complex bone metabolism alterations, now described under the umbrella term of chronic kidney disease mineral- and bone-related disorder (CKD-MBD), as well as iatrogenic processes related to renal replacement treatment. Radiological imaging remains the mainstay of disease assessment. This review aims to illustrate the radiological features of CKD-MBD, such as secondary hyperparathyroidism, osteomalacia, adynamic bone disease, soft-tissue calcifications; as well as features associated with renal replacement therapy, such as aluminium toxicity, secondary amyloidosis, destructive spondyloarthropathy, haemodialysis-related erosive arthropathy, tendon rupture, osteonecrosis, and infection

  14. Manifestações cutâneas das trombofilias Cutaneous manifestations of thrombophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Ricardo Criado

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O escopo deste artigo é revisar os estados de hipercoagulabilidade sangüínea (trombofilias mais provavelmente encontrados por dermatologista. Seus sinais cutâneos incluem o livedo reticular, necrose cutânea, ulcerações e isquemia digital, púrpura retiforme, além de úlceras nas pernas. Revisamos seu tratamento adequado, bem como ressaltamos as manifestações cutâneas que impõem pesquisa laboratorial de trombofilias e os exames indicados nessas situações.The aim of this article is to review the hypercoagulable states (thrombophilia most probably found by dermatologists; their cutaneous signs including livedo racemosa, skin necrosis, digital ischemia and ulcerations, retiform purpura and leg ulcers; their appropriate treatment; to describe the skin manifestations that require laboratory tests for thrombophilias and the tests indicated in these clinical conditions.

  15. Skin Diseases: Skin and Sun—Not a good mix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin and Sun —Not a good mix Past Issues / ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Good skin care begins with sun safety. Whether it is ...

  16. Skin tribology: Science friction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, Emile; Zeng, Xiangqiong; Masen, Marc Arthur

    2013-01-01

    The application of tribological knowledge is not just restricted to optimizing mechanical and chemical engineering problems. In fact, effective solutions to friction and wear related questions can be found in our everyday life. An important part is related to skin tribology, as the human skin is

  17. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video below and in only two minutes, you can learn to examine your skin. A special thanks to Dr. Martin Weinstock, MD, PhD, Professor of Dermatology, Brown University, for permission to use this video. UPDATED: ... Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention ...

  18. Imaging manifestations and its clinical significance in patients with synovitis acne pustulosis hyperostosis osteomyelitis syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Wei; Lin Qiang; Yao Jinpeng; Chang Yinjuan; Zhou Xiaohong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical and imaging manifestations of patients with synovitis acne pustulosis hyperostosis osteomyelitis (SAPHO) syndrome, and to analyze the diagnostic importance of different clinical and imaging manifestations for SAPHO syndrome. Methods: Seventeen patients (7 males and 10 females) with SAPHO syndrome were recruited in this study. Age ranged from 36 to 67 years with a mean age of (48 ± 8) years. All patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of Benhamou. Serum HLA B27 antigen records were reviewed for all patients. Imaging data of the abnormal bone sites were collected by conventional radiograph in all patients, CT in 13 patients as well as MR in 3 patients. Average time to take for a definite diagnosis of the syndrome was 3.7 years (ranged from O.5 to 13 years). Results: Serum HLA B27 antigen was positive in all patients. Both skin and bone abnormalities were found in all patients. Ten patients had skin palmoplantar pustulosis and two patients had acne. Involving sites of bone and joints include sacroiliac joints, anterior chest and limbs. Sacroiliac joints were asymmetrically involved with imaging features in all patients. Eight patients exhibited anterior chest wall involvement. Five patients had osteomyelitis at limbs. For all images of 17 patients, CT was superior to conventional radiography in detecting abnormal changes of bone erosion and soft tissue swelling. MR imaging was able to depict edema changes that was not detectable by CT and radiography. Conclusion: SAPHO syndrome is a rare disease, but for patients with skin and bone-joint abnormalities, especially with skin palmoplantar pustulosis, acne as well as with imaging features at the sacroiliac joint and anterior chest wall, SAPHO syndrome should be taken into a diagnostic consideration. (authors)

  19. Neurotic manifestations in adolescents with thalassemia major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorjani, J D; Issac, Chithira

    2006-07-01

    To study the neurotic manifestations in thalassemic adolescents as a consequence of long-term illness. From July 2003, thirty six thalassemic adolescents and forty normal adolescents were selected with age ranging from 13 to 18 and with same socio economic status and family background. Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire by Crown and Crisp [1966] was administered and Mann Whiteny 'U' test was employed to measure free-floating anxiety, phobia, somatic anxiety, obsession, depression, hysteria and total neuroticism score. An interview was conducted along with the questionnaire to detect the problems in depth. Parents of thalassemic adolescents were interviewed subsequently to realize the behavioral problems existing along with neuroticism. Thirty-six of thalassemic and all forty normal adolescents returned the questionnaires. The responses suggest a marked difference in total neuroticism score and all other variables except that of hysteria. The interview on parents of thalassemic adolescents exposed various behavioral problems in these adolescents. Thalassemic adolescents were having higher scores in neuroticism. Some behavioral problems are also found to exist along with neurotic manifestations. There remains a need to improve the management of thalassemia in terms of psychological aspects in order to improve the mental health of this group.

  20. Manifestations of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; Mikkelsen, Dorthe Bisgaard; Hertz, Jens Michael; Bygum, Anette

    2014-05-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an uncommon hereditary condition caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene causing a wide range of developmental abnormalities. Multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits and jaw cysts are cardinal features. Many clinicians are unfamiliar with the different manifestations and the fact that patients are especially sensitive to ionizing radiation. This was a retrospective analysis of patients with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome seen at the Department of Dermatology and Allergy Centre or at Department of Plastic Surgery, Odense University Hospital, Denmark, in the period from 1994 to 2013. A total of 17 patients from eight families fulfilled the diagnostic criteria. In all, 14 patients had basal cell carcinomas, 12 patients had jaw cysts and ten patients had calcification of the falx cerebri. Other clinical features were frontal bossing, kyphoscoliosis, rib anomalies, coalitio, cleft lip/palate, eye anomalies, milia and syndactyly. In one family, medulloblastoma and astrocytoma occurred. Traditional treatment principles of basal cell carcinomas were used including radiotherapy performed in six patients. PTCH1 mutations were identified in five families and none of these mutations had previously been described. The patient cohort illustrates classic and rare disease manifestations. It is necessary to remind clinicians that radiation therapy in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is relatively contraindicated. Today, mutation analysis can be used for confirmation of the diagnosis and for predictive genetic testing. Patients should be offered genetic counselling and life-long surveillance. not relevant. not relevant.

  1. Non-cardiac manifestations of Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Because of the widespread distribution of fibrillin 1 in the body, Marfan syndrome (MFS) affects virtually every system. The expression of this single dominantly inherited gene is variable within a family, and between families. There is some genotype-phenotype correlation which is helpful in guiding long-term prognosis, and management. In general gene mutations have been reported in clusters, with those having mainly ocular manifestations occurring in exons 1 to 15 of this 65-exon gene; those causing cardiac problems often involving cysteine replacement in a calcium binding EGF-like sequence; the most severe mutations occurring in exons 25–32, causing neonatal MFS diagnosed at birth, and severe enough to cause death frequently before the age of 2. Other correlations will certainly be found in future. This condition is progressive, and the manifestations unfold according to age. For example, if the lens is going to dislocate this usually occurs by age 10; scoliosis usually presents itself between the ages of 8 and 15; height should be monitored carefully between the onset of puberty and cessation of growth approximately age 17 or 18. Holistic care should be offered by one doctor who oversees the patient’s welfare. This should be a paediatrician, paediatric cardiologist, or general practitioner in the case of an affected child. Thereafter, the physician in charge of the most seriously affected system should be aware that other systems need to be managed through a referral network. PMID:29270372

  2. Cutaneous manifestations of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S S; Kuruvilla, M; Pai, G S; Dinesh, M

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-two confirmed cases of non -Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) were examined for cutaneous manifestations for a period of 2 years from November 1998 in KMC Hospital Attavar, Mangalore. Cutaneous manifestations in the study group were compared to a control group of 32 patients. Specific infiltrates were present in all (5/5) CTCL patients and one out of twenty-seven patients with low grade NHL. Morphologically they presented as papules, plaques, nodules and erythroderma. Infective conditions seen in the study group were superficial fungal (7/32) and viral infections (2/ 32). Non-infective conditions were acquired ichthyosis (10/32), generalised pruritus (5/32), insect bite reaction (1/32) and drug eruption (1/32). When compared to control patients only acquired ichthyosis and generalised pruritus were found to be statistically significant. The study group also showed changes due to chemotherapy like diffuse alopecia (24/29), bluish pigmentation of proximal part of nail (4/29), localised pigmentation of palms and soles (1 /29), diffuse pigmentation at injection site (1 /29), pigmentation at scar site (1 /29) and stomatitis (4/29).

  3. Neurological manifestations of Batch s disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Ashjazadeh, Nahid; Nikseresht, Alireza; Shariat, Abdolhamid; Yousefipour, Gholamali; Samangooie, Shahdokht; Safari, Anahid

    2006-01-01

    To determine the prevalence, clinical manifestations, and laboratory features of Neuro-Behcets disease. This prospective study was carried out in the Behcets Research Clinic in Shiraz (south-west Iran) and included the patients referred from 1990-1999. The patients' clinical records, images, CSF analyses, and electrodiagnostic studies were reviewed. Eighteen (15 males and 3 females) out of 690 Behcet s patients (2.6%, 95% CI = 1.4-3.8%) were found to have neurological involvement. The mean +/- standard deviation age of these patients was 34.7 +/- 8.6 years. All fulfilled the criteria of the International Study Group of Behcet s Disease. Central nervous system involvement was more common than peripheral nervous system manifestations. Headache, weakness, tingling, and numbness were the most common symptoms. Hyperreflexia, upward plantar reflex, and somatosensory findings were the most frequent signs. Hemispheral and brainstem stroke-like syndromes and cerebral venous thrombosis were the major neurologic presentations. There were also cases of myelitic, pure meningoencephalitic, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-like, multiple sclerosis-like, and Guillain Barre syndromes. Neuro-Behcets disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of stroke in young adults, chronic meningitis, intracranial hypertension, multiple sclerosis, myelopathies, and peripheral neuropathies. (author)

  4. [Buccal manifestations in patients submitted to chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hespanhol, Fernando Luiz; Tinoco, Eduardo Muniz Barretto; Teixeira, Henrique Guilherme de Castro; Falabella, Márcio Eduardo Vieira; Assis, Neuza Maria de Souza Picorelli

    2010-06-01

    Several changes in the oral cavity due to chemotherapy can be observed and can lead to important systemic complications, increasing the time of the patient in hospital and the costs of the treatment as well as affect the quality of life of the patients. The aim of this study was to assess the oral manifestation in patients treated with chemotherapy according to sex, age and tumor type. Data was collected in an oncology hospital in Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais State, from patients' records that were submitted to oncologic treatment. It was possible to verify that mucositis, associated or not to other type of lesions, was the most common lesion in both sex of all ages (15.5%). Xerostomia and other lesions, such as Candida infection and aphthous lesions, were also present. It is possible to improve the quality of life of the patient during and after anti-neoplastic therapies through a protocol of odontological assistance that includes changes of the oral environment previous to chemotherapy such as profilaxis, caries removal, treatment of periodontal and periapical lesions, oral hygiene instructions, diet orientation and laser therapy. It is very important the insertion of the dentist in the oncologic medical team for the early diagnosis of the oral manifestation and follow-up during treatment time.

  5. Dermatologic manifestations of tularemia: a study of 151 cases in the mid-Anatolian region of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şenel, Engin; Satılmış, Özgür; Acar, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    Tularemia is a serious and potentially life-threatening zoonosis caused by Francisella tularensis, a highly infective, gram-negative coccobacillus. Although there are plenty of case reports and studies of tularemia outbreaks, the literature is lacking in reports on dermatologic manifestations of the disease. This study aimed to identify skin manifestations in clinical forms of tularemia. A total of 151 patients diagnosed with tularemia at Çankırı State Hospital, Çankırı, Turkey, were retrospectively examined. Dermatologic data for these patients were assessed. The most frequent clinical manifestation of tularemia was the glandular form (49.7%), followed by the oropharyngeal, ulceroglandular, and oculoglandular forms (39.1, 6.0, and 5.3%, respectively). Physical manifestations were observed in 64.5% of females and 56.9% of males. Lymphadenopathy and tonsillitis were the most frequent physical findings and were noted in 57.6 and 25.2% of patients, respectively. Erythema multiforme was found in 17 patients (11.3%), most of whom presented with the oropharyngeal and glandular forms, and was followed by ulcer (6.0%), urticaria (3.3%), erythema nodosum (2.6%), and cellulitis (0.7%). However, it should be noted that this study was retrospective and that its patient sample demonstrated four of the six clinical forms of tularemia. Patients with the oropharyngeal form of tularemia had statistically significantly more physical findings than those with other clinical forms of the disease (P < 0.001). There were statistically more skin findings in the ulceroglandular form (P < 0.001). There was no statistical correlation between serum antibody titers and cutaneous findings (P = 0.585). Although the literature reports that skin lesions are observed more frequently in women than in men, we did not find any statistically significant difference between the sexes in any type of skin lesion. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  6. Bionanomaterials for skin regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Leonida, Mihaela D

    2016-01-01

    This book gives a concise overview of bionanomaterials with applications for skin regeneration. The advantages and challenges of nanoscale materials are covered in detail, giving a basic view of the skin structure and conditions that require transdermal or topical applications. Medical applications, such as wound healing, care for burns, skin disease, and cosmetic care, such as aging of the skin and photodamage, and how they benefit from bionanomaterials, are described in detail. A final chapter is devoted to the ethical and social issues related to the use of bionanomaterials for skin regeneration. This is an ideal book for researchers in materials science, medical scientists specialized in dermatology, and cosmetic chemists working in formulations. It can also serve as a reference for nanotechnologists, dermatologists, microbiologists, engineers, and polymer chemists, as well as students studying in these fields.

  7. The gentilionic theory for quarks: Manifestly confining for quarks and manifestly non-coalescent for hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattani, M.S.D.

    1987-01-01

    It's shown that the gentilionic theory for quarks is manifestly confining for quarks and manifestly non-coalescent for hadrons, and that these properties are rigorously deduced only from first principles. To prove them no arguments involving the intrinsic nature of gentileons or dynamical hypothesis are necessary to be adopted. It's also shown that, in the context of the quantum field theory, gentileous can be taken approximately as fermions and that the usual quantum chromodynamics can be used to calculate the properties of gentilionic hadrons. (Author) [pt

  8. Ophthalmic manifestations and histopathology of xeroderma pigmentosum: two clinicopathological cases and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, Hema L; Brooks, Brian P; Cao, Xiaoguang; Tamura, Deborah; Digiovanna, John J; Kraemer, Kenneth H; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2011-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum is a rare, autosomal recessive disease caused by a defect in DNA repair. Patients with xeroderma pigmentosum often have cutaneous and ocular sun sensitivity, freckle-like skin pigmentation, multiple skin and eye cancers, and, in some patients, progressive neurodegeneration. Xeroderma pigmentosum predominantly affects the ultraviolet (UV) exposed ocular surface, resulting in eyelid atrophy and cancers, corneal dryness, exposure keratopathy, and conjunctival tumors. We report the clinical history and ocular pathology of two white women who had xeroderma pigmentosum with neurological degeneration: Case 1 (died at age 44 years) and Case 2 (died at age 45 years). Case 1, with mutations in the XPA gene, had more than 180 basal cell carcinomas of her skin and eyelids and died from complications of neurodegeneration. Case 2, with mutations in the XPD gene, was sun-protected and had three skin cancers. She died from complications of neurodegeneration and pneumonia. Both patients had bilateral pinguecula, corneal pannus, and exposure keratopathy. Case 1 had bilateral optic atrophy, and Case 2 had bilateral peripheral retinal pigmentary degeneration. Both patients developed retinal gliosis. The ophthalmic manifestations and pathology of xeroderma pigmentosum are discussed and reviewed with respect to this report and other cases in the literature. These cases illustrate the role of DNA repair in protection of the eyes from UV damage and neurodegeneration of the retina. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Skin signs of primary immunodeficiencies: how to find the genes to check.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, M; Schreml, J; Wirsching, K; Berneburg, M; Schreml, S

    2018-02-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are a heterogeneous group of rare diseases that result from defects in immune system development and/or function. The clinical manifestations of PIDs are highly variable, but most disorders involve at least an increased susceptibility to infection. Furthermore, cutaneous manifestations are very common in PIDs. As an easily accessible organ, the skin can be crucial for early diagnosis and treatment. This is relevant for preventing significant disease-associated morbidity and mortality. We provide a table that enables the reader to find the possible diseases and corresponding gene defects based on the skin manifestations of the suspected PIDs. To our knowledge, this is the first review that allows the reader to find relevant PIDs and the respective gene defects through solitary or combined skin signs. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  10. The Relative Utility of Skin Resistance and Skin Conductance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barland, Gordon

    1990-01-01

    The effectiveness of two circuits (constant current = skin resistance; constant voltage = skin conductance) used for measuring electrodermal activity during a psychophysiological detection of deception...

  11. 77 FR 54818 - Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs): Revisions to Manifesting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... Transportation of PCB waste. Waste Management and 562 Facilities that manage Remediation Services. PCB waste... as noted in the manifest discrepancy space. 264.72(a)(2) Definition of rejected wastes as manifest... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Uniform Hazardous Waste Manifest, under the Toxic Substances Control Act...

  12. 40 CFR 265.71 - Use of manifest system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the manifest; (iv) Within 30 days of delivery, send a copy of the manifest to the generator; and (v... Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20460. (b) If a facility receives, from a rail or water (bulk shipment... on the manifest (excluding the EPA identification numbers, generator's certification, and signatures...

  13. Dry skin - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pat skin dry then apply your moisturizer. Avoid skin care products and soaps that contain alcohol, fragrances, dyes, or other chemicals. Take short, warm baths or showers. Limit your ... gentle skin cleansers or soap with added moisturizers. Only use ...

  14. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... AP Photo/Herald-Mail, Kevin G. Gilbert Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer ...

  15. Cryogen therapy of skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zikiryakhodjaev, D.Z.; Sanginov, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    In this chapter authors studied the cure of skin cancer in particular cryogen therapy of skin cancer. They noted that cryogen therapy of skin cancer carried new possibilities and improved results of neoplasms treatment

  16. Skin and antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljsak, Borut; Dahmane, Raja; Godic, Aleksandar

    2013-04-01

    It is estimated that total sun exposure occurs non-intentionally in three quarters of our lifetimes. Our skin is exposed to majority of UV radiation during outdoor activities, e.g. walking, practicing sports, running, hiking, etc. and not when we are intentionally exposed to the sun on the beach. We rarely use sunscreens during those activities, or at least not as much and as regular as we should and are commonly prone to acute and chronic sun damage of the skin. The only protection of our skin is endogenous (synthesis of melanin and enzymatic antioxidants) and exogenous (antioxidants, which we consume from the food, like vitamins A, C, E, etc.). UV-induced photoaging of the skin becomes clinically evident with age, when endogenous antioxidative mechanisms and repair processes are not effective any more and actinic damage to the skin prevails. At this point it would be reasonable to ingest additional antioxidants and/or to apply them on the skin in topical preparations. We review endogenous and exogenous skin protection with antioxidants.

  17. Occupational skin cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gawkrodger, D.J. [Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Dermatology

    2004-10-01

    Skin cancer due to occupation is more common than is generally recognized, although it is difficult to obtain an accurate estimate of its prevalence. Over the past two centuries, occupational skin cancers have particularly been due to industrial exposure of men (it seems more so than women) to chemical carcinogens such as polycyclic hydrocarbons (e.g. from coal tar products) or to arsenic. Industrial processes have improved in most Western countries to limit this type of exposure, but those with outdoor occupations are still exposed to solar ultraviolet irradiation without this being widely recognized as an industrial hazard. Ionizing radiation such as X-rays can also cause skin cancer. Occupational skin cancers often resemble skin tumours found in non-occupational subjects, e.g. basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, but some pre-malignant lesions can be more specific and point to an occupational origin, e.g. tar keratoses or arsenical keratoses. An uncommon but well-recognized cause of occupational skin cancer is that which results from scar formation following an industrial burn. In the future it will be necessary to focus on preventative measures, e.g. for outdoor workers, the need to cover up in the sun and use sun protective creams and a campaign for earlier recognition of skin cancers, which are usually curable if treated in their early stages.

  18. Skin Picking Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Cetinay Aydin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Skin picking disorder is not a dermatological disorder and it is a table characterized with picking skin excessively and repetitively, leading to damage in skin tissue. Unlike normal picking behaviour, psychogenic skin picking is repetitive and it can lead to severe damage in the skin and even complications which constitute vital danger. While some patients define frequent but short lasting picking attacks, others define rarer attacks which last a few hours. Skin picking disorder, which is not included in the classification systems up to DSM-5 as a separate diagnosis category, is included as an independent diagnosis in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Associated Disorders category in DSM-5. In case reports, open label studies and double blind studies selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are shown to be effective in the treatment of skin picking disorder. Mostly, cognitive-behaviourial techniques are used and have been proven to be useful in psychotherapy. Habit reversal is one of the behaviourial techniques which are frequently applied, give positive results in which well-being state can be maintained. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(4.000: 401-428

  19. Ocular Manifestations of Mosquito-Transmitted Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karesh, James W; Mazzoli, Robert A; Heintz, Shannon K

    2018-03-01

    Of the 3,548 known mosquito species, about 100 transmit human diseases. Mosquitoes are distributed globally throughout tropical and temperate regions where standing water sources are available for egg laying and the maturation of larva. Female mosquitoes require blood meals for egg production. This is the main pathway for disease transmission. Mosquitoes carry several pathogenic organisms responsible for significant ocular pathology and vision loss including West Nile, Rift Valley, chikungunya, dengue viruses, various encephalitis viruses, malarial parasites, Francisella tularensis, microfilarial parasites, including Dirofilaria, Wuchereria, and Brugia spp., and human botfly larvae. Health care providers may not be familiar with many of these mosquito-transmitted diseases or their associated ocular findings delaying diagnosis, treatment, and recovery of visual function. This article aims to provide an overview of the ocular manifestations associated with mosquito-transmitted diseases.

  20. Quantum manifestations of classical resonance zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Leon, N.; Davis, M.J.; Heller, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    We examine the concept of nodal breakup of wave functions as a criterion for quantum mechanical ergodicity. We find that complex nodal structure of wave functions is not sufficient to determine quantum mechanical ergodicity. The influence of classical resonances [which manifest themselves as classical resonance zones (CRZ)] may also be responsible for the seeming complexity of nodal structure. We quantify this by reexamining one of the two systems studied by Stratt, Handy, and Miller [J. Chem. Phys. 71, 3311 (1974)] from both a quantum mechanical and classical point of view. We conclude that quasiperiodic classical motion can account for highly distorted quantum eigenstates. One should always keep this in mind when addressing questions regarding quantum mechanical ergodicity

  1. Natural curvature for manifest T-duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poláček, Martin; Siegel, Warren

    2014-01-01

    We reformulate the manifestly T-dual description of the massless sector of the closed bosonic string, directly from the geometry associated with the (left and right) affine Lie algebra of the coset space Poincaré/Lorentz. This construction initially doubles not only the (spacetime) coordinates for translations but also those for Lorentz transformations (and their “dual”). As a result, the Lorentz connection couples directly to the string (as does the vielbein), rather than being introduced ad hoc to the covariant derivative as previously. This not only reproduces the old definition of T-dual torsion, but automatically gives a general, covariant definition of T-dual curvature (but still with some undetermined connections)

  2. Variable manifestations of dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azouz, E.M.; Slomic, A.M.; Marton, D.; Rigault, P.; Finidori, G.

    1985-01-01

    Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica (DEH) is an osteocartilaginous overgrowth involving one or multiple epiphyses or ossification centers, usually in a lower extremity on one side of the body. Characteristically the involvement is hemimelic, i.e., either the medial or lateral part of the ossification center is involved. The authors have studied 24 patients with DEH and are adding 15 new cases to the literature. Because of the variable manifestations of the dysplasia and its different degrees of involvement in the affected children, they have subdivided it into localized, classical and generalized. In the generalized form, there is involvement of a whole lower extremity from the pelvis to the foot, and some of these patients show megaepiphyses with enlargement of a whole epiphyseal center, not only its medial or lateral part. The authors have also described and illustrated other special features of the dysplasia especially the advanced bone age and the metaphyseal and growth plate involvement.

  3. Spiral CT manifestations of spherical pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaohong; Yang Hongwei; Xu Chunmin; Qin Xiu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the Spiral CT manifestations and differential diagnosis of spherical pneumonia. Methods: 18 cases of spherical pneumonia and 20 cases of peripheral pulmonary carcinoma were selected, both of them were confirmed by clinic and/or pathology. The SCT findings of both groups were compared retrospectively. Results: Main spiral CT findings of spherical pneumonia were showed as followings: square or triangular lesions adjacent to pleura; with irregular shape, blurry, slightly lobulated margin, sometimes with halo sign. Small inflammatory patches and intensified vascular markings around the lesions were seen. Lesions became smaller or vanished after short-term anti-inflammatory treatment. Conclusion: Spherical pneumonia showed some characteristics on Spiral CT scan, which are helpful in diagnosis and differential diagnosis of this disease. (authors)

  4. Musculoskeletal manifestations in sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Ravikanth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia is an inherited hemoglobin disorder characterized by substitution of glutamic acid by valine at the sixth position of the beta globin chain. The sequence of events leads to pain crisis. Ischemia of the tissues resulting from decreased blood flow is believed to occur in pain crisis. Repeated or prolonged sickling causes red cell death in the form of hemolytic anemia. The majority of hospital admissions are due to painful crisis. These patients are at increased risk for both osteomyelitis and infarction of the long bones. Magnetic resonance imaging has been shown to be helpful in the diagnosis of early osteomyelitis and its differentiation from infarction in sickle cell disease patients with acute bone crisis. Others findings include dactylitis, medullary infarcts, diploic space widening, fish mouth vertebrae, and avascular necrosis. We present a case series on the various musculoskeletal manifestations of sickle cell disease.

  5. Renal manifestations in children with Alagille syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pinto, Diana; Adragna, Marta

    2018-04-01

    Alagille syndrome (AS) is a cholestatic disease secondary to scarcity of interlobular bile ducts. It is associated with extrahepatic manifestations, and renal involvement is frequent. To describe the prevalence, type and outcome of renal pathology in children with AS. The presence and outcome of renal pathology was retrospectively studied in 21 children who met AS criteria. Renal pathology was observed in 18 patients (85.7%): (1) ultrasound variations in 7 patients (6 cases of bilateral renal dysplasia and 1 case of renal agenesis); (2) distal renal tubular acidosis in 2 patients; (3) a drop in glomerular filtration and/or proteinuria in 16 patients. The frequency of a drop in glomerular filtration was similar between patients with and without pathological kidney ultrasound findings. Our study confirms a high prevalence of renal involvement, which enhances the importance of diagnosis and renal function follow-up in children with AS. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  6. Multiple Erythema Lesions Obscured As Fungal Skin Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Koçinaj, Allma; Gërçari, Antigona; Ferizi, Mybera; Lashi, Edlira; Gjunkshi, Lorela; Fida, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Erythema migrans is a ring like erythema, with a few centimeters in diameter. Usually it occur solitary, days to weeks after an infected tick bite. According to skin changes it can be manifested acutely such as erythema migrans in Lyme Borreliosis, borrelial lymphocytoma (subacute), or as a late Lyme disease with acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. All stages of this disease can be treatable with antimicrobial agents. As a first case in our department with multiple lesions, we describe a 14-...

  7. Ultrasound skin tightening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkis, Kira; Alam, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound skin tightening is a noninvasive, nonablative method that allows for energy deposition into the deep dermal and subcutaneous tissue while avoiding epidermal heating. Ultrasound coagulation is confined to arrays of 1-mm(3) zones that include the superficial musculoaponeurotic system and connective tissue. This technology gained approval from the Food and Drug Administration as the first energy-based skin "lifting" device, specifically for lifting lax tissue on the neck, submentum, and eyebrows. Ultrasound has the unique advantage of direct visualization of treated structures during treatment. Ultrasound is a safe and efficacious treatment for mild skin tightening and lifting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cutaneous manifestations of spotted fever rickettsial infections in the Central Province of Sri Lanka: a descriptive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosala Weerakoon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Characteristic skin lesions play a key role in clinical diagnosis of spotted fever group rickettsioses and this study describes these cutaneous manifestations along with basic histological features.Study was conducted at Medical Unit, Teaching Hospital, Peradeniya, from November 2009 to October 2011, where a prospective data base of all rickettsial infections is maintained. Confirmation of diagnosis was made when IgM and IgG immunofluorescent antibody titre of 1/32 and >1/256 respectively. Of the 210 clinical cases, 134 had cutoff antibody titers for Rickettsia conorii antigen for confirmation. All these 134 patients had fever and skin rash, and of them 132(98% had discrete maculopapular rash while eight (6% had fern leaf type skin necrosis. Eight patients (6% had healed tick bite marks. Average size of a skin lesion was 5 mm and rash involved 52% of body surface, distributed mainly in limbs and back of the chest. Generally the facial and leg skin was slightly oedematous particularly in old aged patients. Sixteen patients (12% had pain and swelling of ankle joints where swelling extended to feet and leg. Biopsies from skin rash of six patients showed evidence of cutaneous vasculitis and of them, 247 bp region of the 17-kDa spotted fever group specific protein antigen was amplified using PCR.A discrete maculopapular rash and occasional variations such as fern leaf shape necrosis and arthritis are found in spotted fever group. Histology found vasculitis as the pathology of these lesions.

  9. Spiritual and religious aspects of skin and skin disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenefelt PD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Philip D Shenefelt,1 Debrah A Shenefelt2 1Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of South Florida, Tampa, 2Congregation Or Ahavah, Lutz, FL, USA Abstract: Skin and skin disorders have had spiritual aspects since ancient times. Skin, hair, and nails are visible to self and others, and touchable by self and others. The skin is a major sensory organ. Skin also expresses emotions detectable by others through pallor, coldness, "goose bumps", redness, warmth, or sweating. Spiritual and religious significances of skin are revealed through how much of the skin has been and continues to be covered with what types of coverings, scalp and beard hair cutting, shaving and styling, skin, nail, and hair coloring and decorating, tattooing, and intentional scarring of skin. Persons with visible skin disorders have often been stigmatized or even treated as outcasts. Shamans and other spiritual and religious healers have brought about healing of skin disorders through spiritual means. Spiritual and religious interactions with various skin disorders such as psoriasis, leprosy, and vitiligo are discussed. Religious aspects of skin and skin diseases are evaluated for several major religions, with a special focus on Judaism, both conventional and kabbalistic. Keywords: skin, skin disorders, spiritual, religious

  10. Skin Diseases: Cross-section of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Cross-section of human skin Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Logical Images, Inc. I n the areas of skin health and skin diseases, the NIH's National Institute ...

  11. Cure of skin cancer. Surgical cure of skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zikiryakhodjaev, D.Z.; Sanginov, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    In this chapter authors studied the cure of skin cancer in particular the surgical cure of skin cancer. They noted that surgical cure of skin cancer is remain one of the primary and most important methods in treatment of skin cancer

  12. Artificial skin and patient simulator comprising the artificial skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    The invention relates to an artificial skin (10, 12, 14), and relates to a patient simulator (100) comprising the artificial skin. The artificial skin is a layered structure comprising a translucent cover layer (20) configured for imitating human or animal skin, and comprising a light emitting layer

  13. Mucocutaneous manifestations in patients with chronic kidney disease: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattan S Rashpa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD-associated mucocutaneous manifestations significantly impair the quality of life but often remain understudied. They may also vary across regions, socioeconomic and nutritional status, and racial differences. Objectives: To study the patterns of mucocutaneous disorders and their prevalence in CKD patients irrespective of clinical stage or dialysis status. Materials and Methods: 122 (M:F = 77:45 patients aged 21‒85 (Mean ± SD = 57.5 ± 14.0 years having CKD for 3 month to 5 years were studied for mucocutaneous manifestations. Fifty (41% patients were on hemodialysis for 1‒42 months. Detailed medical history, clinical and mucocutaneous examination, and lab investigations were performed. KOH mounts, skin biopsy, Gram's and Giemsa staining, bacterial or fungal cultures were performed as required. Results: Xerosis in 93 (76.2%, skin pallor in 61 (50%, pruritus in 57 (46.7%, pigmentation in 47 (38.5%, and purpura in 18 (14.8% patients were the major dermatoses. Bullous lesions and perforating folliculitis occurred in 3 (2.5% patients each. Major nail abnormalities were pallor (in 35.2%, absent lunula (in 23.8%, nail discoloration (in 18%, and “half-and-half nails” in 16.4% patients, respectively. Hair abnormalities included sparse scalp and body hairs (in 35.2% and 13.1%, respectively and lusterless hair in 12.3% patients. Coated tongue (in 14.8%, xerostomia (in 12.3%, and macroglossia with teeth indention (in 7.4% patients were the mucosal manifestations. Conclusions: Xerosis, pruritus, skin pallor/pigmentary changes, nail pallor, absent lunula, nail discoloration, sparse hairs, coated tongue, xerostomia, macroglossia, and infections were the most common mucocutaneous manifestations in the studied patients irrespective of hemodialysis status. Cold and dry climates might be additional aggravators for xerosis/pruritus. Lifelong follow-up may be needed to reduce the morbidity associated with CKD

  14. Allergy Skin Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and symptoms. Medications can interfere with results Before scheduling a skin test, bring your doctor a list ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  15. Caring for Tattooed Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Registration General information Housing & travel Education Exhibit hall Mobile app 2019 Annual Meeting Derm Exam Prep Course ... SkinPAC State societies Scope of practice Truth in advertising NP/PA laws Action center Public and patients ...

  16. Dry Skin (Xerosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Registration General information Housing & travel Education Exhibit hall Mobile app 2019 Annual Meeting Derm Exam Prep Course ... SkinPAC State societies Scope of practice Truth in advertising NP/PA laws Action center Public and patients ...

  17. Impairments in Skin Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphree, Rose W

    2017-09-01

    Altered skin integrity increases the chance of infection, impaired mobility, and decreased function and may result in the loss of limb or, sometimes, life. Skin is affected by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Intrinsic factors can include altered nutritional status, vascular disease issues, and diabetes. Extrinsic factors include falls, accidents, pressure, immobility, and surgical procedures. Ensuring skin integrity in the elderly requires a team approach and includes the individual, caregivers, and clinicians. The twenty-first century clinician has several online, evidence-based tools to assist with optimal treatment plans. Understanding best practices in addressing skin integrity issues can promote positive outcomes with the elderly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Allergy testing - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patch tests - allergy; Scratch tests - allergy; Skin tests - allergy; RAST test; Allergic rhinitis - allergy testing; Asthma - allergy testing; Eczema - allergy testing; Hayfever - allergy testing; Dermatitis - allergy testing; Allergy testing; ...

  19. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Store In Memory Melanoma Info Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ... Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma Treatment: Stages I & II Melanoma Treatment: Stage III Melanoma ...

  20. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... We Are Be On Our PAGE MIF Staff Programs & Services Scientific Advisory Board Advisory Board Patrons & Sponsors ... us for One-on-One Support Donate Share Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video ...

  1. Occupational skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahler, V; Aalto-Korte, K; Alfonso, J H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Work-related skin diseases (WSD) are caused or worsened by a professional activity. Occupational skin diseases (OSD) need to fulfil additional legal criteria which differ from country to country. OSD range amongst the five most frequently notified occupational diseases (musculoskeletal...... diseases, neurologic diseases, lung diseases, diseases of the sensory organs, skin diseases) in Europe. OBJECTIVE: To retrieve information and compare the current state of national frameworks and pathways to manage patients with occupational skin disease with regard to prevention, diagnosis, treatment...... in Science and Technology (COST) Action TD 1206 (StanDerm) (www.standerm.eu). RESULTS: Besides a national health service or a statutory health insurance, most European member states implemented a second insurance scheme specifically geared at occupational diseases [insurance against occupational risks...

  2. Skin care and incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin care; Incontinence - pressure sore; Incontinence - pressure ulcer Patient Instructions Preventing pressure ulcers Images Male urinary system References Holroyd S. Incontinence-associated dermatitis: identification, prevention and care. Br J Nurs . 2015;24( ...

  3. Healthy Skin Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin. If you’re helping out in the kitchen, make sure you use hot pads or wear ... in humans, plants, and animals, while others are essential for a healthy life. Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) ( ...

  4. Tuberculin Skin Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Appendix 1 Appendix 2 Appendix 3 Interim Laboratory Biosafety Guidance for XDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains Data & Statistics ... The Mantoux tuberculin skin test (TST) is the standard method of determining whether a person is infected ...

  5. [Currently available skin substitutes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravcová, Darina; Koller, Ján

    2014-01-01

    The current trend of burn wound care has shifted to more holistic approach of improvement in the long-term form and function of the healed burn wounds and quality of life. Autologous split or full-thickness skin graft are the best definitive burn wound coverage, but it is constrained by the limited available sources, especially in major burns. Donor site morbidities in term of additional wounds and scarring are also of concern of the autograft application. This has demanded the emergence of various skin substitutes in the management of acute burn injury as well as post burn reconstructions. This paper reviews currently available skin substitutes, produced in not for-profit skin banks as well as commercially available. They are divided according to type of material included, as biological, biosynthetic and synthetic and named respectively.

  6. Parasites and the skin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-06-11

    Jun 11, 2009 ... those conditions that are encountered in daily practice and to remind you of those ... care conditions. Parasitic infections can be solely confined to the skin, as seen ..... endemic areas or may become chronic and disseminate.

  7. Skin or nail culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucosal culture; Culture - skin; Culture - mucosal; Nail culture; Culture - fingernail; Fingernail culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria, ...

  8. Fungal Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abbreviations Weights & Measures ENGLISH View Professional English Deutsch Japanese Espaniol Find information on medical topics, symptoms, drugs, ... touching the infected area. Diagnosis Skin scrapings or cultures Doctors may suspect a fungal infection when they ...

  9. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Download a Skin Self-Exam Card Download a Patient Navigation Card Events, Webinars & Videos Events, Webinars & Videos Melanoma Patient Video Events Host an Event Past Webinars Upcoming ...

  10. Allergic Skin Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most common types are atopic dermatitis (often called eczema) and contact dermatitis. Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema) Eczema is a chronic ... contact with your skin, they may cause a rash called contact dermatitis. There are two kinds of contact dermatitis: ...

  11. Neuromodulators for Aging Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Light treatment to the skin and Restylane to tear troughs and outer eyebrow. Photo courtesy of Rebecca Fitzagerald, MD - Los Angeles, California Possible risks Soreness Mild bruising Temporary weakness of surrounding muscles Headache Drooping eyelid Why choose neuromodulators for aging ...

  12. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Doctor Glossary of Terms Resources Resources Global Resources Cancer Centers Online Resources The Melanoma Book Clinical Trials Download a Skin Self-Exam Card Download a Patient Navigation Card ...

  13. Manifestations of radiation syndrome in pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljajic, R.; Masic, Z.; Petrovic, B.; Ciganovic, P.

    1996-01-01

    Clinical and hematological changes in pigs after one-time acute radiation by high-energy-X-rays were described. The of animals was performed by using the linear accelerator of industrial type, with X-rays of 4 MeV, with semi-lethal dose (LD 50/30 = 3.20 Gy) bilaterally (50% of the dose from each side). The radiation syndrome in pigs developed through 4 stages of the disease: the prodromal stadium (1-3 days), the latent stadium (3-7 days), the stadium of expressed clinical symptoms (7-18 days) and the stadium of recovery (after 25 days). The basic characteristic of the disease was a strong haemorrhagic diathesis with expressed blood spots on the skin and bleedings from the nose and the anus as well as a rush decrease of blood dementia (leukocytes and thrombocytes) already 24 hours after radiation. (author)

  14. Unusual manifestations of secondary urothelial carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaohui Lisa Zhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma regularly invades the bladder wall, adjacent prostate, seminal vesicles, ureters, vagina, rectum, retroperitoneum, and regional lymph nodes. In advanced stages, it may disseminate to the liver, lungs, and bone marrow. On rare occasions, unusual metastatic foci like skin have been reported. The incidence of urothelial carcinoma has increased with associated rise in variants of urothelial carcinoma and unusual metastatic foci. It is imperative that urologists and pathologists are aware of the unusual variants and unusual metastatic locations to expedite the diagnostic process. Hereby we report an unusual case of secondary involvement of spinal nerve by conventional urothelial carcinoma. Also a second case of rhabdoid variant of urothelial carcinoma showing synchronous involvement of bladder and subcutaneous tissue of upper extremity is presented.

  15. Next generation human skin constructs as advanced tools for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaci, H E; Guo, Zongyou; Doucet, Yanne; Jacków, Joanna; Christiano, Angela

    2017-11-01

    Many diseases, as well as side effects of drugs, manifest themselves through skin symptoms. Skin is a complex tissue that hosts various specialized cell types and performs many roles including physical barrier, immune and sensory functions. Therefore, modeling skin in vitro presents technical challenges for tissue engineering. Since the first attempts at engineering human epidermis in 1970s, there has been a growing interest in generating full-thickness skin constructs mimicking physiological functions by incorporating various skin components, such as vasculature and melanocytes for pigmentation. Development of biomimetic in vitro human skin models with these physiological functions provides a new tool for drug discovery, disease modeling, regenerative medicine and basic research for skin biology. This goal, however, has long been delayed by the limited availability of different cell types, the challenges in establishing co-culture conditions, and the ability to recapitulate the 3D anatomy of the skin. Recent breakthroughs in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and microfabrication techniques such as 3D-printing have allowed for building more reliable and complex in vitro skin models for pharmaceutical screening. In this review, we focus on the current developments and prevailing challenges in generating skin constructs with vasculature, skin appendages such as hair follicles, pigmentation, immune response, innervation, and hypodermis. Furthermore, we discuss the promising advances that iPSC technology offers in order to generate in vitro models of genetic skin diseases, such as epidermolysis bullosa and psoriasis. We also discuss how future integration of the next generation human skin constructs onto microfluidic platforms along with other tissues could revolutionize the early stages of drug development by creating reliable evaluation of patient-specific effects of pharmaceutical agents. Impact statement Skin is a complex tissue that hosts various

  16. ReciPlySkin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic Larsen, Olga; Andersen, Mikkel; Munk-Andersen, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    The report presents process that enbabled the production of the ReciPlySkin structure exhibited at the Circular Economy Exhibition at KADK during the Autumn 2017. The concept, design, detailed design and production are presented in this report.......The report presents process that enbabled the production of the ReciPlySkin structure exhibited at the Circular Economy Exhibition at KADK during the Autumn 2017. The concept, design, detailed design and production are presented in this report....

  17. Adnexal Tumours Of Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parate Sanjay N

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A total 120 cases of epidermal appendage tumours of skin were analysed and classified according to the classification provided by WHO’. Epidermal appendage tumours accounted for 12.87% of all skin tumours, of which 29.17% were benign and 70.83% were malignant. Most of the tumours (75.83% were in the head and face region. The most common tumour was basal cell epithelioma (55%.

  18. Mantoux Tuberculin Skin Test

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2006-11-22

    Learn how to evaluate people for latent TB infection with the Mantoux tuberculin skin test. This podcast includes sections on administering and reading the Mantoux tuberculin skin test, the standard method for detecting latent TB infection since the 1930s.  Created: 11/22/2006 by National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 12/12/2006.

  19. Stressed skin panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2001-07-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of stressed skin panels, also known as structural insulated panels (SIPs), are discussed as material and labour-saving alternatives to traditional stick framing. Stressed skin panels are manufactured 'sandwich' assemblies with a rigid insulating polystyrene foam core, whose interior and exterior surfaces are bonded into panels. The skins distribute and carry the structural loading while the bonded foam core provides insulation and keeps the two skins aligned. Since there are fewer framing members, there is little thermal bridging and the R-value remains high. SIPs are usually manufactured in four feet by eight feet panels, although some manufacturers can produce panels up to eight feet by forty feet. SIPs are resource efficient as they use less wood than conventional framing (about 25 per cent less); can structurally cover large spans, requiring less supplementary framing. Use of SIPs eliminate the need for headers over small openings; provide the ability to nail anywhere; create less scrap and waste; lessen vulnerability to unfavourable weather and other job-site hazards, can reduce delays, and often can produce significant savings in material and labour costs. Limitations include the more complex approaches to plumbing and electrical systems, although this can be minimized by designers by incorporating much of the plumbing and electrical work on interior (non-panel) walls. Most stressed skin panels require one-half inch interior gypsum drywall. If become wet, stressed skin panels take a long time to dry out and may harbour mold growth. Larger stressed-skin panels used in floors and roofs, may require cranes or other machinery for handling because of their weight. Although not without some environmental impact, overall, stressed skin panels are judged to be a resource-efficient building technology with significant energy-efficiency benefits and distinct advantages over stick framing. 3 photos.

  20. [Anorectal manifestations of sexually transmitted infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2013-07-01

    The incidence of sexually transmitted infections is rising in Europe and in Switzerland since the beginning of the third millenium. Many organisms may affect the perianal skin and the anorectum. While some of these infections are a result of contigous spread from genital infection, most result from receptive anal intercourse affecting males who have sex with males but is seen increasingly in females as well since there is evidence of the increasing popularity of anal sex among heterosexuals. The symptoms of specific infections are largely dependent on the route and site of inoculation. Organisms that cause typical genital symptoms - such as syphilis, chancroid, herpes simplex or HPV-infection - result in similar symptoms when the perianal skin, the anoderm or the distal anal canal are the site of infection. Patients with proctitis may have unspecific signs in various degrees including mucous discharge, rectal bleeding, anorectal pain, superficial ulcers and sometimes generalized lymphadenopathy and fever. It is of utmost importance to include STIs (e. g. lymphogranuloma venereum, gonorrhea, non-LGV-chlamydia and herpes simplex) in the differential diagnosis in these patients. Unfortunately rectal infection with chlamydia and gonorrhea is asymptomatic in the majority of cases of men having sex with men and in high-risk females. A careful history and physical examination is essential in establishing a correct diagnosis, usually supported by proctoscopy, culture, PCR, serology and histology. Certain organisms, more commonly thought of as food- or water-borne disease may be sexually transmitted by direct or indirect fecal-oral contact from various sexual practices.

  1. Cutaneous Hypersensitivity Dermatoses in the Feline Patient: A Review of Allergic Skin Disease in Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Alison Diesel

    2017-01-01

    Feline allergic skin disease presents a unique set of challenges to the veterinary practitioner. Although there is some similarity to what is seen in the allergic canine patient, cutaneous hypersensitivity dermatoses in cats can manifest with strikingly different clinical signs, treatment options and outcomes, and secondary complications/disease entities. Additionally, less is known about the pathogenesis of feline allergic skin diseases, particularly “feline atopic syndrome” when compared to...

  2. Skin metastasis from conventional giant cell tumor of bone: conceptual significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler, W.; Barrett, T.; Frassica, F.; McCarthy, E.

    2002-01-01

    A conventional giant cell tumor of the proximal femur recurred twice locally and developed pulmonary nodules. The lung lesions were felt to be an example of ''benign'' metastases. Eight months after the initial presentation, the patient developed a single skin nodule on the contralateral leg. Histologic features of the skin nodule showed conventional giant cell tumor identical to the bone lesion. This nodule is a manifestation of arterial metastasis typical of any malignant tumor and seemingly contradicts the concept of ''benign '' metastasis. (orig.)

  3. Dermatological manifestations in onchocerciasis: A retrospective study of 400 imported cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, Sabino; Ramirez-Olivencia, German; Lago, Mar; Subirats, Mercedes; Perez-Blazquez, Eugenio; Bru, Fernando; Garate, Teresa; Vicente, Belén; Belhassen-Garcia, Moncef; Muro, Antonio

    2017-12-20

    Onchocerciasis is caused by Onchocerca volvulus and mainly leads to pruritus and skin and visual disorders, including blindness. Seventeen million people are infected in 38 countries; 31 of these are in sub-Saharan Africa, six in Latin America and one on the Arabian Peninsula. More than 99% of cases occur in sub-Saharan Africa where 120 million people are at risk of infection. Eye disorders have been well-documented; however, skin disorders have not been described accurately. The objective of our study was to describe the epidemiology, main skin manifestations and treatment of imported onchocerciasis. A retrospective study was thus conducted by analysing the main demographic, clinical and treatment data regarding a cohort of 400 patients attending a reference clinical unit over a 17-year period. Most patients were female (55%) with mean age 37.5±16.7 years. All the migrants came from sub-Saharan countries. The most frequently occurring dermatological symptom was pruritus. Ivermectin had been used as first-line therapy and adverse reactions had been described in 11 patients (3.2%). The results indicate the fact that there should be a clinical suspicion of onchocerciasis regarding immigrants from endemic areas having skin lesions compatible with the disease's profile or asymptomatic patients having eosinophilia or unexplained high IgE. Moreover, skin snips from the buttocks region were very fruitful and treatment with ivermectin was seen to be safe. This is the largest case series regarding imported onchocerciasis described up to the present time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  4. Autonomic neuropathy-in its many guises-as the initial manifestation of the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Jill R

    2017-04-01

    Autonomic disorders have previously been described in association with the antiphospholipid syndrome. The present study aimed to determine the clinical phenotype of patients in whom autonomic dysfunction was the initial manifestation of the antiphospholipid syndrome and to evaluate for autonomic neuropathy in these patients. This was a retrospective study of 22 patients evaluated at the University of Colorado who were found to have a disorder of the autonomic nervous system as the initial manifestation of antiphospholipid syndrome. All patients had persistent antiphospholipid antibody positivity and all patients who underwent skin biopsy were found to have reduced sweat gland nerve fiber density suggestive of an autonomic neuropathy. All patients underwent an extensive evaluation to rule out other causes for their autonomic dysfunction. Patients presented with multiple different autonomic disorders, including postural tachycardia syndrome, gastrointestinal dysmotility, and complex regional pain syndrome. Despite most having low-titer IgM antiphospholipid antibodies, 13 of the 22 patients (59%) suffered one or more thrombotic event, but pregnancy morbidity was minimal. Prothrombin-associated antibodies were helpful in confirming the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome. We conclude that autonomic neuropathy may occur in association with antiphospholipid antibodies and may be the initial manifestation of the syndrome. Increased awareness of this association is important, because it is associated with a significant thrombotic risk and a high degree of disability. In addition, anecdotal experience has suggested that antithrombotic therapy and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy may result in significant clinical improvement in these patients.

  5. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type: An Underdiagnosed Hereditary Connective Tissue Disorder with Mucocutaneous, Articular, and Systemic Manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type, constituting a phenotypic continuum with or, perhaps, corresponding to the joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT), is likely the most common, though the least recognized, heritable connective tissue disorder. Known for decades as a hereditary condition with predominant rheumatologic manifestations, it is now emerging as a multisystemic disorder with widespread manifestations. Nevertheless, the practitioners' awareness of this condition is generally poor and most patients await years or, perhaps, decades before reaching the correct diagnosis. Among the various sites of disease manifestations, skin and mucosae represent a neglected organ where the dermatologist can easily spot diagnostic clues, which consistently integrate joint hypermobility and other orthopedic/neurologic manifestations at physical examination. In this paper, actual knowledge on JHS/EDS-HT is summarized in various sections. Particular attention has been posed on overlooked manifestations, including cutaneous, mucosal, and oropharyngeal features, and early diagnosis techniques, as a major point of interest for the practicing dermatologist. Actual research progresses on JH/EDS-HT envisage an unexpected link between heritable dysfunctions of the connective tissue and a wide range of functional somatic syndromes, most of them commonly diagnosed in the office of various specialists, comprising dermatologists. PMID:23227356

  6. Presentation of an infant with nutritional deficiency dermatitis as the initial manifestation of cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojković Anđelka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cystic fibrosis (CF is a multisystemic autosomal recessive disease most frequently recognized by characteristic respiratory and/or digestive manifestations. Exceptionally rare, as is the case with the infant we are presenting, the initial sign of the disease can be nutritional deficiency dermatitis (NDD. Case Outline. A three-month-old male infant of young and healthy non-consanguineous parents, born at term after the first uneventful pregnancy, was hospitalized due to atopic dermatitis (AD-like skin changes, failure to thrive and normochromic anemia (Hb 60 g/L. As exclusively breast-fed, failure to thrive was attributed to hypogalactia and skin changes to nutritional allergy, so that, besides exclusion of cow’s milk protein and other highly allergenic foods in mother’s diet, hypoallergenic milk formula was added to the child’s diet. However, dietetic measures were without effect, and the child was re-hospitalized at age 4.5 months, this time in the condition of severe malnutrition with hypoproteinemic edemas, extensive dermatitis, moderate hepatosplenomegaly and recurrent normochromic anemia (Hb 57 g/L. After plasma-free erythrocyte transfusion, correction of hypoalbuminemia and two-week parenteral and semi-elementary nutrition resulted in gradual recovery of the child, also including the resolution of skin changes. Having in mind the clinical course of the disease, as well as the response to applied therapeutic measures, CF was suspected as the cause of the child’s problems, which was also confirmed by a high level of sweat chlorine (92 mmol/L and DNA analysis (∆F508/∆F508. Conclusion. Our experience indicates that NDD, as the initial manifestation of CF, should be also kept in mind in differential diagnosis of the infant’s AD-like changes.

  7. Differences in manifestations of Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meester, Josephina A N; Verstraeten, Aline; Schepers, Dorien; Alaerts, Maaike; Van Laer, Lut; Loeys, Bart L

    2017-11-01

    Many different heritable connective tissue disorders (HCTD) have been described over the past decades. These syndromes often affect the connective tissue of various organ systems, including heart, blood vessels, skin, joints, bone, eyes, and lungs. The discovery of these HCTD was followed by the identification of mutations in a wide range of genes encoding structural proteins, modifying enzymes, or components of the TGFβ-signaling pathway. Three typical examples of HCTD are Marfan syndrome (MFS), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). These syndromes show some degree of phenotypical overlap of cardiovascular, skeletal, and cutaneous features. MFS is typically characterized by cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal manifestations and is caused by heterozygous mutations in FBN1 , coding for the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibrillin-1. The most common cardiovascular phenotype involves aortic aneurysm and dissection at the sinuses of Valsalva. LDS is caused by mutations in TGBR1/2 , SMAD2/3 , or TGFB2/3 , all coding for components of the TGFβ-signaling pathway. LDS can be distinguished from MFS by the unique presence of hypertelorism, bifid uvula or cleft palate, and widespread aortic and arterial aneurysm and tortuosity. Compared to MFS, LDS cardiovascular manifestations tend to be more severe. In contrast, no association is reported between LDS and the presence of ectopia lentis, a key distinguishing feature of MFS. Overlapping features between MFS and LDS include scoliosis, pes planus, anterior chest deformity, spontaneous pneumothorax, and dural ectasia. EDS refers to a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous connective tissue disorders and all subtypes are characterized by variable abnormalities of skin, ligaments and joints, blood vessels, and internal organs. Typical presenting features include joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue fragility. Up to one quarter of the EDS patients show aortic aneurysmal

  8. Differences in manifestations of Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meester, Josephina A. N.; Verstraeten, Aline; Schepers, Dorien; Alaerts, Maaike; Van Laer, Lut

    2017-01-01

    Many different heritable connective tissue disorders (HCTD) have been described over the past decades. These syndromes often affect the connective tissue of various organ systems, including heart, blood vessels, skin, joints, bone, eyes, and lungs. The discovery of these HCTD was followed by the identification of mutations in a wide range of genes encoding structural proteins, modifying enzymes, or components of the TGFβ-signaling pathway. Three typical examples of HCTD are Marfan syndrome (MFS), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). These syndromes show some degree of phenotypical overlap of cardiovascular, skeletal, and cutaneous features. MFS is typically characterized by cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal manifestations and is caused by heterozygous mutations in FBN1, coding for the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibrillin-1. The most common cardiovascular phenotype involves aortic aneurysm and dissection at the sinuses of Valsalva. LDS is caused by mutations in TGBR1/2, SMAD2/3, or TGFB2/3, all coding for components of the TGFβ-signaling pathway. LDS can be distinguished from MFS by the unique presence of hypertelorism, bifid uvula or cleft palate, and widespread aortic and arterial aneurysm and tortuosity. Compared to MFS, LDS cardiovascular manifestations tend to be more severe. In contrast, no association is reported between LDS and the presence of ectopia lentis, a key distinguishing feature of MFS. Overlapping features between MFS and LDS include scoliosis, pes planus, anterior chest deformity, spontaneous pneumothorax, and dural ectasia. EDS refers to a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous connective tissue disorders and all subtypes are characterized by variable abnormalities of skin, ligaments and joints, blood vessels, and internal organs. Typical presenting features include joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue fragility. Up to one quarter of the EDS patients show aortic aneurysmal

  9. Cutaneous Manifestations of Scleroderma and Scleroderma-Like Disorders: a Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreli, Caterina; Gasparini, Giulia; Parodi, Aurora; Cozzani, Emanuele; Rongioletti, Franco; Atzori, Laura

    2017-12-01

    Scleroderma refers to an autoimmune connective tissue fibrosing disease, including three different subsets: localized scleroderma, limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis, and diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis with divergent patterns of organ involvement, autoantibody profiles, management, and prognostic implications. Although systemic sclerosis is considered the disease prototype that causes cutaneous sclerosis, there are many other conditions that can mimic and be confused with SSc. They can be classified into immune-mediated/inflammatory, immune-mediated/inflammatory with abnormal deposit (mucinoses), genetic, drug-induced and toxic, metabolic, panniculitis/vascular, and (para)neoplastic disorders according to clinico-pathological and pathogenetic correlations. This article reviews the clinical presentation with emphasis on cutaneous disease, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment options available for the different forms of scleroderma firstly and for scleroderma-like disorders, including scleromyxedema, scleredema, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, eosinophilic fasciitis, chronic graft-versus-host disease, porphyria cutanea tarda, diabetic stiff-hand syndrome (diabetic cheiroartropathy), and other minor forms. This latter group of conditions, termed also scleroderma mimics, sclerodermiform diseases, or pseudosclerodermas, shares the common thread of skin thickening but presents with distinct cutaneous manifestations, skin histology, and systemic implications or disease associations, differentiating each entity from the others and from scleroderma. The lack of Raynaud's phenomenon, capillaroscopic abnormalities, or scleroderma-specific autoantibodies is also important diagnostic clues. As cutaneous involvement is the earliest, most frequent and characteristic manifestation of scleroderma and sclerodermoid disorders, dermatologists are often the first-line doctors who must be able to promptly recognize skin symptoms to provide the affected patient a correct

  10. Gynecomastia as the initial manifestation of hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, D L; Brown, J L; Emanuele, N V; Hall, L

    1997-01-01

    To present two new cases of gynecomastia as the initial manifestation of hyperthyroidism. We describe detailed case reports of two men with breast enlargement who were found to have hyperthyroidism, and we review the related literature. Two men sought medical assistance because of unilateral tender gynecomastia. In one of these patients, thyroid, gonadal, and prostate examinations showed normal findings at the time of initial assessment, and symptoms of hyperthyroidism developed later. In our other patient with gynecomastia, other symptoms of hyperthyroidism--for example, nervousness, irritability, palpitations, and fatigue--had been present for a prolonged period but had been considered "normal" by the patient. In both patients, the hyperthyroidism was treated with radioiodine. Breast pain disappeared in both patients, and breast enlargement disappeared in one patient and was decreased in the other patient after euthyroidism was achieved. Review of the literature disclosed only two similar cases. Because of the rarity of gynecomastia as the initial symptom of hyperthyroidism, we believe that thyroid function tests are not indicated in the workup of patients whose major complaint is gynecomastia.

  11. Neuro-ophthalmic manifestations of prematurity

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    Preeti Patil Chhablani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing rates of preterm births coupled with better survival of these infants have resulted in higher prevalence of systemic and ocular complications associated with prematurity. In addition to retinopathy of prematurity, infants who are born preterm may suffer from severe visual impairment as a result of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, hypoglycemia, and other metabolic imbalances. The effect of these processes on the anterior visual pathway may result in optic atrophy, optic nerve hypoplasia or optic disc cupping and affection of the posterior visual pathway leads to cortical visual impairment (CVI. Other ocular associations include strabismus, nystagmus, and ocular motor abnormalities such as tonic down gaze and defective saccades and pursuits. Cortical and subcortical involvement also manifests as defects in functional vision and these have not yet been completely understood. Children with CVI may have visual field defects, photophobia, defective visual processing, and deficient color vision. Since most of these children also suffer from additional systemic disabilities, evaluation, and management remains a challenge. However, early diagnosis and initiation of rehabilitation therapy can prove to be of significant benefit in these children.

  12. Neuropsychiatric Manifestations in a Patient with Panhypopituitarism

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    Oluwole Jegede

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of an incidental diagnosis of panhypopituitarism in a 68-year-old African American man admitted to our psychiatric inpatient unit with symptoms suggestive of schizophrenia. The case was unusual as a first-episode psychosis given the patient’s age. In the course of his admission, the patient’s clinical condition deteriorated culminating in a sudden altered mental status which prompted a transfer to the medical floors and further investigations. A head CT scan and a pituitary MRI revealed a near total resection of the pituitary while laboratory investigations revealed hyponatremia and a grossly low hormone profile. The progression of these events casts doubts on our admitting diagnosis as the primary cause of the patient’s symptoms. The patient’s clinical condition improved only when his endocrinopathy was treated with hormone replacement, fluids, and electrolyte correction in addition to antipsychotics. An inability to verify the patient’s psychiatric history and a remote history of pituitary resection several decades earlier, unknown to the treating team, added to the diagnostic conundrum. We revised the diagnosis to neuropsychiatric manifestations secondary to an organic brain syndrome due to a partial pituitary resection. The patient was discharged with no symptoms of psychosis, good insight, judgment, and good reality testing.

  13. Neuropsychiatric Manifestations in a Patient with Panhypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegede, Oluwole; Jeyakumar, Ajouka; Balakumar, Thyarapan; Raghu, Alyssa; Chang, Katherine I; Soewono, Katarina; Gustave, Mario; Jolayemi, Ayodeji

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of an incidental diagnosis of panhypopituitarism in a 68-year-old African American man admitted to our psychiatric inpatient unit with symptoms suggestive of schizophrenia. The case was unusual as a first-episode psychosis given the patient's age. In the course of his admission, the patient's clinical condition deteriorated culminating in a sudden altered mental status which prompted a transfer to the medical floors and further investigations. A head CT scan and a pituitary MRI revealed a near total resection of the pituitary while laboratory investigations revealed hyponatremia and a grossly low hormone profile. The progression of these events casts doubts on our admitting diagnosis as the primary cause of the patient's symptoms. The patient's clinical condition improved only when his endocrinopathy was treated with hormone replacement, fluids, and electrolyte correction in addition to antipsychotics. An inability to verify the patient's psychiatric history and a remote history of pituitary resection several decades earlier, unknown to the treating team, added to the diagnostic conundrum. We revised the diagnosis to neuropsychiatric manifestations secondary to an organic brain syndrome due to a partial pituitary resection. The patient was discharged with no symptoms of psychosis, good insight, judgment, and good reality testing.

  14. Q fever: a new ocular manifestation

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    Udaondo P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available P Udaondo1,3, S Garcia-Delpech1,2, D Salom1,2, M Garcia-Pous1, M Diaz-Llopis1,21Department of Ophthalmology, Nuevo Hospital Universitario y Politecnico La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 2Faculty of Medicine, Universitat de València, Valencia, Spain; 3Universidad Cardenal Herrera CEU, Valencia, SpainAbstract: Q Fever is a zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. Ocular manifestations are rare in this infection. We describe the case of a man complaining of an intense retro-orbital headache, fever, arthralgia, and bilateral loss of vision, who showed an anterior uveitis accompanied by exudative bilateral inferior retinal detachment and optic disk edema. At the beginning, a Vogt–Koyanagi–Harada (VKH syndrome was suspected, but the patient was diagnosed with Q fever and treatment with doxycycline was initiated, with complete resolution after 2 weeks. We wondered if Q fever could unleash VKH syndrome or simulate a VKH syndrome by a similar immunological process.Keywords: Q fever, Vogt–Koyanagi–Harada syndrome, panuveitis, exudative retinal detachment

  15. Hemoglobinopathies: clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohne, Elisabeth

    2011-08-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are among the most common inherited diseases around the world. They have become much more common recently in northern and central Europe, including Germany, due to immigration. Selective review of the literature with consideration of national guidelines. The hemoglobinopathies encompass all genetic diseases of hemoglobin. They fall into two main groups: thalassemia syndromes and structural hemoglobin variants (abnormal hemoglobins). α- and β-thalassemia are the main types of thalassemia; the main structural hemoglobin variants are HbS, HbE and HbC. There are many subtypes and combined types in each group. The highly variable clinical manifestations of the hemoglobinopathies range from mild hypochromic anemia to moderate hematological disease to severe, lifelong, transfusion-dependent anemia with multiorgan involvement. Stem-cell transplantation is the preferred treatment for the severe forms of thalassemia. Supportive, rather than curative, treatment consists of periodic blood transfusions for life, combined with iron chelation. Drugs to treat the symptoms of sickle-cell disease include analgesics, antibiotics, ACE inhibitors and hydroxyurea. Blood transfusions should be given only when strictly indicated. More than 90% of patients currently survive into adulthood. Optimally treated patients have a projected life span of 50 to 60 years. Hemoglobinopathies are a public health issue in today's multiethnic German population. Adequate care of the affected patients requires a wide variety of diagnostic and therapeutic measures.

  16. Clinical manifestations and management of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linari, Silvia; Castaman, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a rare multi-systemic metabolic disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase, which leads to the accumulation of its normal substrate, glucocerebroside, in tissue macrophages with damage to haematological, visceral and bone systems. Anaemia, thrombocytopenia, enlargement of liver and/or spleen, skeletal abnormalities (osteopenia, lytic lesions, pathological fractures, chronic bone pain, bone crisis, bone infarcts, osteonecrosis and skeletal deformities) are typical manifestations of the most prevalent form of the disease, the so-called non-neuronopathic type 1. However, severity and coexistence of different symptoms are highly variable. The determination of deficient β-glucocerebrosidase activity in leukocytes or fibroblasts by enzymatic assay is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Gaucher disease. Comprehensive and reproducible evaluation and monitoring of all clinically relevant aspects are fundamental for the effective management of Gaucher disease patients. Enzyme replacement therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing glucocerebroside storage burden and diminishing the deleterious effects caused by its accumulation. Tailored treatment plan for each patient should be directed to symptom relief, general improvement of quality of life, and prevention of irreversible damage.

  17. Neurological manifestations of dengue viral infection

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    Carod-Artal FJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Francisco Javier Carod-Artal1,21Neurology Department, Raigmore hospital, Inverness, UK; 2Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Dengue is the most common mosquito-borne viral infection worldwide. There is increased evidence for dengue virus neurotropism, and neurological manifestations could make part of the clinical picture of dengue virus infection in at least 0.5%–7.4% of symptomatic cases. Neurological complications have been classified into dengue virus encephalopathy, dengue virus encephalitis, immune-mediated syndromes (acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, myelitis, Guillain–Barré syndrome, neuritis brachialis, acute cerebellitis, and others, neuromuscular complications (hypokalemic paralysis, transient benign muscle dysfunction and myositis, and dengue-associated stroke. Common neuro-ophthalmic complications are maculopathy and retinal vasculopathy. Pathogenic mechanisms include systemic complications and metabolic disturbances resulting in encephalopathy, direct effect of the virus provoking encephalitis, and postinfectious immune mechanisms causing immune-mediated syndromes. Dengue viruses should be considered as a cause of neurological disorders in endemic regions. Standardized case definitions for specific neurological complications are still needed. Keywords: encephalitis, encephalopathy, dengue fever, neurological complications

  18. The chest radiological manifestation in psittacosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jun; Fu Jiazhen; Wang Shulan; Zhang Shuxin; Sun Guochang; Tang Guangjian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the clinical characteristics and imaging features of psittacosis. Methods: The clinical features and imaging appearances of 3 cases with acute psittacosis were retrospectively analyzed. The related literature was reviewed. Results: The clinical manifestation of psittacosis was high fever in the patients. Physical findings included pulse-temperature dissociation, localized lung crackles, hepatomegaly, and splenomegaly. Laboratory findings showed elevation of ESR in all cases, and liver dysfunction was present in 2 cases. The counts of white blood cells were normal, but the percent of neutrophils might be increased. The chest X-ray and CT scan showed air-space consolidation and ground-glass attenuation in the lung, and miliary, nodular, or consolidated shadows were found in pathological areas. Pleural effusions were also present in 2 cases. Psittacosis was diagnosed from the history of exposure to infected parrots and elevation of the IgG and IgM titer for Chlamydia psittaci. Erythromycin was effective in all 3 patients. Conclusion: Although the appearance of psittacosis on clinical findings and chest X-ray and CT scan is not characteristic, psittacosis can be diagnosed with the combination of the history of exposure to infected parrots and laboratory findings. CT scan can reveal the focus earlier and accurately, and catching the imaging features of psittacosis is helpful in differential diagnosis. (authors)

  19. Form of the manifestly covariant Lagrangian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Oliver Davis

    1985-10-01

    The preferred form for the manifestly covariant Lagrangian function of a single, charged particle in a given electromagnetic field is the subject of some disagreement in the textbooks. Some authors use a ``homogeneous'' Lagrangian and others use a ``modified'' form in which the covariant Hamiltonian function is made to be nonzero. We argue in favor of the ``homogeneous'' form. We show that the covariant Lagrangian theories can be understood only if one is careful to distinguish quantities evaluated on the varied (in the sense of the calculus of variations) world lines from quantities evaluated on the unvaried world lines. By making this distinction, we are able to derive the Hamilton-Jacobi and Klein-Gordon equations from the ``homogeneous'' Lagrangian, even though the covariant Hamiltonian function is identically zero on all world lines. The derivation of the Klein-Gordon equation in particular gives Lagrangian theoretical support to the derivations found in standard quantum texts, and is also shown to be consistent with the Feynman path-integral method. We conclude that the ``homogeneous'' Lagrangian is a completely adequate basis for covariant Lagrangian theory both in classical and quantum mechanics. The article also explores the analogy with the Fermat theorem of optics, and illustrates a simple invariant notation for the Lagrangian and other four-vector equations.

  20. Biochemical Manifestation of HIV Lipodystrophy Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihenetu, Kenneth; Mason, Darius

    2012-01-01

    Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), including protease inhibitors (PI) have led to dramatic improvements in the quality and quantity of life in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, a significant number of AIDS patients on HAART develop characteristic changes in body fat redistribution referred to as lipodystrophy syndrome (LDS). Features of LDS include hypertrophy in the neck fat pad (buffalo hump), increased fat in the abdominal region (protease paunch), gynecomastia and loss of fat in the mid-face and extremities. The aim of this paper is to review the current knowledge regarding this syndrome. This article reviews the published investigations on biochemical manifestation of HIV lipodystrophy syndrome. It is estimated that approximately 64% of patients treated with PI will experience this syndrome. Biochemically, these patients have increased triglycerides (Trig), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and extremely low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C). It is hoped that awareness of this syndrome would aid in early diagnosis and better patient management, possibly leading to a lower incidence of cardiovascular complications among these patients.

  1. Oroal manifestations in patients with multiple sclerosis

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    Grajales González Hilda María

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, characterized by the presence of acute focal inflammatory demyelination, axonal loss and gliosis. It affects predominantly in young adults between 20 and 40 years of age; it is infrequent in the pediatric age. A observational, retrospective and descriptive cohort research was conducted between May 1999 and January 2012 to assess demographic characteristics, and pathological manifestations in the oral cav- ity of children with this condition. Records of 17 patients, under 18 years of age, of either sex were included, who had been evaluated in the Department of Stomatology. Data recorded were age, sex, State of origin, oral and facial pathological features, focal cavity infections and ceod index. There were no patients with trigeminal neuralgia or facial paralysis; a 5.7% ceod index was identified. Most of the patients were under immunopressive treatment. A protocol for stomatological follow-up in patients with multiple sclerosis does not exist. The medical profession must be sensibilized to establish strategies for an integral follow-up in patients with this condition.

  2. CT manifestation of schistosoma haematobium cystitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yujun; Hu Lirong; Cheng Yougen; Mao Guoqun; Yang Guangzhao; Modya Camara; Mohamed Traore

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze CT manifestation of Schistosoma haematobium cystitis. Methods: Retrospective analysis 32 patients, who were tested for Schistosoma haematobium cystitis using the urine filtration method. CT scan was performed for each patient with contrast enhancement. Results: The vast majority of urinary tract schistomiasis lesions were in the urinary bladder. Calcification of the bladder wall was observed in all patients and mild enhancement in non calcified zone was found after intravenous contrast. Except for 5 patients of bladder cancer, the rest were no abnormality in size of bladder when bladder was filling or emptying. Ureteral wall annular calcification could also be identified in 25 patients. Twenty two patients were companied with ureteric hydronephrosis. Seminal vesicle calcification was seen in 4 patients among 11 male patients, while both uterine and ovarian in female and prostate in men had non calcification. Serious illness can be combined with bladder cancer. In 5 patients of patients with bladder cancer, bladder showed irregular soft tissue mass which was enhanced moderately after post-contrast scan, with vesical calcification in mass medially. Conclusion: Bladder calcification is the most prominent CT feature of Schistosoma haematobium cystitis, which is useful in diagnosis the disease. (authors)

  3. INNOVATION – CREATIVE MANIFESTATION WITH ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS

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    VALENTINA MUNTEANU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims at a correct perception of innovation, regarded as a present phenomenon, for which it is necessary to resorts to a series of notions and definitions, as well as to multiple perspectives. Thus, the definition of this phenomenon - in all that it captures in it - suggests dynamism and ease of communication. The complexity of the phenomenon of innovation is the creative capacity, around which there revolve all other matters concerning innovation. The present paper also illustrates the relationship between technology and economy, meaning that technical progress makes the economic system that created it. This, in turn, provides a more consistent support for changing technology. Economic factors play a major role in the development of technology, because they are interested in reducing costs, increasing productivity, sales volume, as well as goals that can be achieved through innovation. Successful entrepreneurs in an increasingly more competitive environment try to assert through value creation rewardingly new and different outputs, a fact which represents a change from what was known at the beginning of the business. In general, innovation and to the same extent technical and technological innovation has always accompanied the development of human society. Innovation has manifesting itself throughout history with different levels of intensity. Technical-scientific revolution, present in all spheres of human activity through the accelerated mutations that produce them, fundamentally influence the way in which orientation and innovation evolve.

  4. Manifestations and management of lymphogranuloma venereum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, John A

    2009-02-01

    This review was prompted by a sustained outbreak of lymphogranuloma venereum that has been observed among men who have sex with men (MSM) worldwide since 2004. Recent developments in the epidemiology, diagnosis and management of the infection are summarized. Between the early 1980s and 2003, lymphogranuloma venereum was rarely seen in the developed world. In 2003, a cluster of cases was seen in the Netherlands occurring mostly in HIV-positive MSM with high levels of sexual risk. With the assistance of novel molecular diagnostic techniques, more than a thousand cases of Chlamydia trachomatis L2 serovar disease have now been reported in MSM worldwide. Almost all have presented with rectal infection, usually manifesting as severe proctitis, with ulcer adenopathy syndrome seldom seen. Oral doxycycline remains the recommended treatment and has proven effective in the recent outbreak. Conflicting data exist regarding the prevalence of asymptomatic infection, and our understanding of the exact modes of transmission remains incomplete. Lymphogranuloma venereum appears to have reestablished endemicity among MSM populations in many industrialized nations. In the relative absence of recent publications from its traditional endemic regions it can be assumed that these populations remain afflicted by the infection as well.

  5. Periodontal and oral manifestations of marijuana use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, Swati Y; Tatakis, Dimitris N; Tipton, David A

    2012-01-01

    Marijuana, prepared from the plant Cannabis sativa, is the most widely used illicit drug in the United States. Marijuana use has been associated with adverse psychosocial and health effects, including effects on oral tissues. Periodontal literature has limited references to the periodontal effects of cannabis use. In this report, we present two cases of marijuana-associated gingival enlargement and review the literature on oral complications of marijuana use. Two asymptomatic males, aged 23 and 42 years, presented independently for oral prophylaxis. Both had an unremarkable medical history and related a history of significant marijuana use of 2-16 years duration. Common findings following oral and periodontal examination were nicotinic stomatitis-like lesions, uvulitis and gingival enlargement. Marginal and papillary gingiva of the anterior dentition were the areas primarily affected by gingival enlargement, while some of these areas exhibited a nodular or "pebbly" appearance. Marijuana-associated gingival enlargement was diagnosed in the reported cases. A review of the literature revealed two other reports of marijuana-associated gingival enlargement, all in young adult males with chronic (2 or more years) cannabis use. These authors reported a resemblance to phenytoin-induced enlargement. Biochemical similarities between phenytoin and cannabis active compounds suggest possible common pathogenetic mechanisms. Uvulitis and nicotinic stomatitis appear to be the two most common of the several oral manifestations of marijuana use. Chronic marijuana use may result in gingival enlargement with clinical characteristics similar to phenytoin-induced enlargement.

  6. Clinical manifestations and pathophysiology of lissencephaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Shizuo; Sasaki, Koji; Yamada, Hiroshi; Ando, Shoko; Tamura, Yasunori; Fukuda, Kuniaki; Furukawa, Seikyo; Matsumoto, Satoshi.

    1985-01-01

    Four cases of lissencephaly were analyzed in light of clinical manifestations, CT findings and the state of hydrocephalus. Lissencephaly had been diagnosed mainly by autopsy until CT scan was introduced in the early 1970's. Since then, diagnosis of lissencephaly early in life is possible. Presently the major interest in this congenital CNS anomaly, which is caused by a neuronal migration disorder in the relatively late stages of fetal development, is to learn the dynamic pathophysiological state and management. The purpose of this paper is to analyze those points of lissencephaly in diagnosis during life and possible treatment in the hydrocephalic state. The common findings in CT in all four cases are as follows: No. 1. smooth cortical surface (agyria--pachygyria), No. 2. wide sylvian fissure (complete or incomplete lack of opercularization, No. 3. ventricular dilatation (remarkable bilateral enlargement of lateral ventricle and third ventricle--colpocephaly), No. 4. wide subdural or subarachnoid space in supratentorial region, No. 5. periventricular low density, No. 6. midline cavum, No. 7. normal CT findings in posterior fossa structure. Three out of four patients demonstrated full or bulged and tense anterior fontanella. Because of this suggestion of increased intracranial pressure and enlarged ventricles with periventricular lucency in CT findings, one patient underwent CT cisternography for dynamic analysis of the CSF circulation and continuous ICP monitoring for dynamic evaluation of the ICP pattern. The results revealed very much delayed CSF circulation and intermittently increased. ICP, with pressure waves appearing in 35.7 % of all recordings. (J.P.N.)

  7. Oral manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrozzo, Marco; Scally, Kara

    2014-01-01

    Extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can affect a variety of organ systems with significant morbidity and mortality. Some of the most frequently reported EHM of HCV infection, involve the oral region predominantly or exclusively. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory condition that is potentially malignant and represents cell-mediated reaction to a variety of extrinsic antigens, altered self-antigens, or super antigens. Robust epidemiological evidence support the link between OLP and HCV. As the virus may replicate in the oral mucosa and attract HCV-specific T lymphocytes, HCV may be implicated in OLP pathogenesis. Sjögren syndrome (SjS) is an autoimmune exocrinopathy, characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes and a multitude of other systemic signs and symptoms. SjS patients have also an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients with chronic hepatitis C do frequently have histological signs of Sjögren-like sialadenitis with mild or even absent clinical symptoms. However, it is still unclear if HCV may cause a disease mimicking SjS or it is directly responsible for the development of SjS in a specific subset of patients. Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common oral malignant tumour and at least in some part of the world could be linked to HCV. PMID:24976694

  8. Skin Examination: An Important Diagnostic Tool in Renal Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde-Kossmann, Karen M

    2018-01-01

    Renal failure is common in the United States with an estimated prevalence of 660,000 treated end-stage renal disease patients in 2015 [1]. Causes of renal failure are many, and complications from renal failure, underlying disease, and treatment are not infrequent. Examples of common skin manifestations include xerosis, pigmentary change, and nail dystrophies. Frequent disease-specific skin changes may be helpful in the diagnosis of primary disorders leading to renal disease or severity of disease including bullosis diabeticorum, sclerodactyly, or leukoctoclastic vasculitis. Some cutaneous changes, such as the multiple angiokeratomas of Fabry disease or the plexiform neurofibromas of neurofibromatosis, are pathognomonic of genetic disorders, which often lead to renal failure. Careful examination of the skin can provide crucial clues to diagnosis of renal failure causation and aid in monitoring complications. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Skin hyperpigmentation in Indian population: Insights and best practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Nouveau

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin pigmentation is one of the most strikingly variable phenotypes in humans, therefore making cutaneous pigmentation disorders frequent symptoms manifesting in a multitude of forms. The most common among them include lentigines, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, dark eye circles, and melasma. Variability of skin tones throughout the world is well-documented, some skin tones being reported as more susceptible to pigmentation disorders than others, especially in Asia and India. Furthermore, exposure to ultraviolet radiation is known to trigger or exacerbate pigmentation disorders. Preventive strategies for photoprotection and treatment modalities including topical and other medical approaches have been adopted by dermatologists to mitigate these disorders. This review article outlines the current knowledge on pigmentation disorders including pathophysiology, molecular profiling, and therapeutic options with a special focus on the Indian population.

  10. A Clinico- Epidemiological Study Of Filarial Related Orthopaedic Manifestations

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    Patond K.R

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available An epidemiological study was undertaken to study the incidence and distribution of orthopaedic manifestations of filariasis in an endemic area. A total of 207 cases were clinically examined and investigated. Patients were divided into three groups , viz., Group A: Orthopaedic manifestations with no history of filariasis . Group B: Orthopaedic manifestations with history of filariasis such as microfilaraemia or filarial fevers etc., Group C: Orthopaedic manifestations with chronic manifestations such as elephantiasis, hydrocele etc. To confirm filarial etiology, all the cases were examined for the presence of filarial antibody by indirect ELISA using wuchereda bancrofti microfilarial excretory- secretary antigen (wd Mf ESAg . A total of 61 of 102 patients of Group A, 14 of 21 patients of group B, and 73 of 84 patients of Group C were positive for filarial antibody. This study showed the prevalence of filarial antibody in about 71.4% of various orthopaedic manifestations.

  11. Dermatological manifestations in HIV-infected patients at a tertiary care hospital in a tribal (Bastar region of Chhattisgarh, India

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    Singh Harminder

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cutaneous disorders during HIV infection are numerous and skin is often the first and only organ affected during most of the course of HIV disease. Some Cutaneous disorders reflect the progression of HIV disease; though the relation is still controversial. Aims : The objective of this study, conducted at a tertiary care centre in Bastar, Jagdalpur, is to estimate the status of cutaneous manifestation in HIV-infected patients and its relationship with CD4 cell counts. Methods: We enrolled 137 HIV positive subjects. Demographic information such as age, gender, weight, height, socioeconomic status, and educational status were recorded. Laboratory parameter (CD4 counts and treatment regimen were noted. Patients were examined for skin disorders by a dermatologist. Data were analyzed using chi-square test for categorical variables. Results: Majority of the patients were from rural area (65.69% and belonged to a low socioeconomic and educational status. 30.65% of the patients were housewives, 23.35% drivers, and 16.78% labourers. Predominant mode of transmission was heterosexual contact (94.16%. Most common HIV-related dermatological manifestations were seborrheic dermatitis (74.16%, xerosis (52.5%, generalized skin hyperpigmentation 56 (46.67%, onychomycosis 53 (44.16%, pruritic papular eruption 27 (22.5%, oral candidiasis 21 (17.5%, photo dermatitis 21 (17.5%, and scabies 4 (3.33%. Significant correlation with low CD4+ cell counts was found for oral candidiasis (P < 0.0001 and Kaposi′s sarcoma ( P = 0.03, while other disorders such as seborrheic dermatitis ( P = 0.22, xerosis ( P = 0.25, and onychomycosis (P = 0.08 were not statistically significant. Conclusion : This study showed high prevalence of dermatological manifestations in HIV-infected subjects, and they occur more frequently with progression of HIV and decline in immune functions. Therefore, early diagnosis and management of skin disorders can improve the quality of life of

  12. Skin therapies: dermatologic perspective on the rheumatology-dermatology interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Jodie L; Koo, John Y

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory skin condition in which up to 42% of patients may develop psoriatic arthritis. Consequently, dermatologists and rheumatologists frequently manage the same patient for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, respectively. Hence, it is important for the two specialties to understand one another and work together to optimise care of patients with psoriatic disease. This article discusses several areas of clinical concern in which coordination of care is especially critical. First, when selecting a therapeutic modality, it is best to use treatments that improve both the joints and the skin, and exercise caution while using options that can rarely worsen the skin, such as systemic steroids. Second, a close working relationship between the two specialties is critical in making prompt and early diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. Dermatologists often are on the frontlines for detecting early signs of joint involvement, and the prevalence of undiagnosed PsA among patients with psoriasis is estimated to be 15.5%. Third, in the rare instance of anti-TNF induced paradoxical worsening of the skin disease, it is highly recommended that these patients be referred to dermatologists as soon as possible for optimal management of the skin manifestations. Lastly, dermatologists in the US have a long history of undertreating generalised psoriasis, especially with regards to the use of systemic agents. Therefore, the consideration of systemic agents by the rheumatologist may greatly benefit the patient by treating both the joint and skin manifestations. In summary, this article highlights the importance of interdisciplinary coordination between rheumatologists and dermatologists for which both specialties offer unique and complementary expertise to the care of patients with psoriatic disease.

  13. Screening for skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfand, M; Mahon, S M; Eden, K B; Frame, P S; Orleans, C T

    2001-04-01

    Malignant melanoma is often lethal, and its incidence in the United States has increased rapidly over the past 2 decades. Nonmelanoma skin cancer is seldom lethal, but, if advanced, can cause severe disfigurement and morbidity. Early detection and treatment of melanoma might reduce mortality, while early detection and treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer might prevent major disfigurement and to a lesser extent prevent mortality. Current recommendations from professional societies regarding screening for skin cancer vary. To examine published data on the effectiveness of routine screening for skin cancer by a primary care provider, as part of an assessment for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. We searched the MEDLINE database for papers published between 1994 and June 1999, using search terms for screening, physical examination, morbidity, and skin neoplasms. For information on accuracy of screening tests, we used the search terms sensitivity and specificity. We identified the most important studies from before 1994 from the Guide to Clinical Preventive Services, second edition, and from high-quality reviews. We used reference lists and expert recommendations to locate additional articles. Two reviewers independently reviewed a subset of 500 abstracts. Once consistency was established, the remainder were reviewed by one reviewer. We included studies if they contained data on yield of screening, screening tests, risk factors, risk assessment, effectiveness of early detection, or cost effectiveness. We abstracted the following descriptive information from full-text published studies of screening and recorded it in an electronic database: type of screening study, study design, setting, population, patient recruitment, screening test description, examiner, advertising targeted at high-risk groups or not targeted, reported risk factors of participants, and procedure for referrals. We also abstracted the yield of screening data including probabilities and numbers

  14. Cutaneous manifestations of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogiparthi, S N; Muralidhar, K; Seshadri, K G; Rangarajan, S

    2017-01-01

    There is a rise in number of people diagnosed with Diabetes Mellitus. The incidence is rising in modern Indian society because of Industrial development and drastically changing lifestyles. Diabetic neuropathies are microvascular disorders that are usually associated with the duration of Diabetes. Among the various forms, the most common is Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy. The disease if neglected leads to chronic ulcer formation leading to amputations frequently. Hence the aim of this study is to document the early cutaneous changes and create an early awareness in the importance of controlling Diabetes. The study consisted of 205 patients with Type 2 DM. Participant's neuropathy status was determined based on Neuropathy Disability Score and Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom Score. Among the Skin changes documented, the common changes seen were: Peripheral hair loss in 185 (90.2%), Xerosis in 168 (82%), Anhydrosis in 162 (79%), Plantar Fissures in 136 (66.3%), Plantar Ulcer in 80 (39%), common nail changes documented were Onychomycosis in 165 (80.5%) and Onychauxis in 53 (25.8%) patients in relation to the occupation and duration of Diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, it is important to control glycemic levels in the all stages of Diabetes and institute foot care measures to prevent the complications of neuropathy.

  15. Black Skin White Guns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrer, Sabine; Pichlmair, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This paper talks about the manifestation of colonial thinking in the Japanese video game Resident Evil 5. Through three gameplay vignettes the balance between an enjoyable video game and the traces of colonial logic is described. This is possible by contrasting the gameoplay with Frantz Fanon's f...

  16. Coprolalia as a manifestation of epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot-Tarrús, Andreu; Mousavi, Seyed Reza; Dove, Carin; Hayman-Abello S, Susan; Hayman-Abello, Brent; Derry, Paul A; Diosy, David C; McLachlan, Richard S; Burneo, Jorge G; Steven, David A; Mirsattari, Seyed M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the lateralizing and localizing value of ictal coprolalia and brain areas involved in its production. A retrospective search for patients manifesting ictal coprolalia was conducted in our EMU database. Continuous video-EEG recordings were reviewed, and EEG activity before and during coprolalia was analyzed using independent component analysis (ICA) technique and was compared to the seizures without coprolalia among the same patients. Nine patients were evaluated (five women), eight with intracranial video-EEG recordings (icVEEG). Four had frontal or temporal lesions, and five had normal MRIs. Six patients showed impairment in the language functions and five in the frontal executive tasks. Two hundred six seizures were reviewed (60.7% from icVEEG). Ictal coprolalia occurred in 46.6% of them, always associated with limbic auras or automatisms. They arose from the nondominant hemisphere in five patients, dominant hemisphere in three, and independently from the right and left hippocampus-parahippocampus in one. Electroencephalographic activity always involved orbitofrontal and/or mesial temporal regions of the nondominant hemisphere when coprolalia occurred. Independent component analysis of 31 seizures in seven patients showed a higher number of independent components in the nondominant hippocampus-parahippocampus before and during coprolalia and in the dominant lateral temporal region in those seizures without coprolalia (p=0.009). Five patients underwent surgery, and all five had an ILAE class 1 outcome. Ictal coprolalia occurs in both males and females with temporal or orbitofrontal epilepsy and has a limited lateralizing value to the nondominant hemisphere but can be triggered by seizures from either hemisphere. It involves activation of the paralimbic temporal-orbitofrontal network. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Respiratory Manifestations of Hypothyroidism: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Jesper Roed; Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop; Godballe, Christian; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2016-11-01

    Hypothyroidism has been associated with increased pulmonary morbidity and overall mortality. A systematic review was conducted to identify the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of respiratory problems among patients with thyroid insufficiency. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched for relevant literature from January 1950 through January 2015 with the following study eligibility criteria: English-language publications; adult subclinical or overt hypothyroid patients; intervention, observational, or retrospective studies; and respiratory manifestations. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement was followed, and Cochrane's risk of bias tool was used. A total of 1699 papers were screened by two independent authors for relevant titles. Of 109 relevant abstracts, 28 papers underwent full-text analyses, of which 22 were included in the review. Possible mechanisms explaining respiratory problems at multiple physiological levels were identified, such as the ventilator control system, diaphragmatic muscle function, pulmonary gas exchange, goiter caused upper airway obstruction, decreased capacity for energy transduction, and reduced glycolytic activity. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome was found among 30% of newly diagnosed patients with overt hypothyroidism, and demonstrated reversibility following treatment. The evidence for or against a direct effect on pulmonary function was ambiguous. However, each of the above-mentioned areas was only dealt with in a limited number of studies. Therefore, it is not possible to draw any strong conclusions on any of these themes. Moreover, most studies were hampered by considerable risk of bias due for example to small numbers of patients, lack of control groups, randomization and blinding, and differences in body mass index, sex, and age between subjects and controls. Mechanistic data linking hypothyroidism and respiratory function are at best limited. This area of research is therefore

  18. Neuromuscular Manifestations of West Nile Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arturo eLeis

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common neuromuscular manifestation of West Nile virus (WNV infection is a poliomyelitis syndrome with asymmetric paralysis variably involving one (monoparesis to four limbs (quadriparesis, with or without brainstem involvement and respiratory failure. This syndrome of acute flaccid paralysis may occur without overt fever or meningoencephalitis. Although involvement of anterior horn cells in the spinal cord and motor neurons in the brainstem are the major sites of pathology responsible for neuromuscular signs, inflammation also may involve skeletal or cardiac muscle (myositis, myocarditis, motor axons (polyradiculitis, peripheral nerve (Guillain-Barré syndrome, brachial plexopathy. In addition, involvement of spinal sympathetic neurons and ganglia provides a plausible explanation for autonomic instability seen in some patients. Many patients also experience prolonged subjective generalized weakness and disabling fatigue. Despite recent evidence that WNV may persist long term in the central nervous system or periphery in animals, the evidence in humans is controversial. WNV persistence would be of great concern in immunosuppressed patients or in those with prolonged or recurrent symptoms. Support for the contention that WNV can lead to autoimmune disease arises from reports of patients presenting with various neuromuscular diseases that presumably involve autoimmune mechanisms (GBS, other demyelinating neu¬ropathies, myasthenia gravis, brachial plexopathies, stiff-person syndrome, and delayed or recurrent symptoms. Although there is no specific treatment or vaccine currently approved in humans, and the standard remains supportive care, drugs that can alter the cascade of immunobiochemical events leading to neuronal death may be potentially useful (high-dose corticosteroids, interferon preparations, and intravenous immune globulin containing WNV-specific antibodies. Human experience with these agents seems promising based on anecdotal

  19. [A case of skin autograft for skin ulcers in ichthyosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiwei; Yang, Xiaodong; Liu, Lijun; Tang, Xueyang

    2017-10-28

    Ichthyosis refers to a group of skin diseases characterized by abnormal keratinization of the epidermis, resulting in dryness, roughness and scale of the skin. A girl with ichthyosis, who presented with skin ulcers and infection of the right dorsal foot, was admitted to our department. An autologous razor-thin skin grafting procedure was performed to repair the skin ulcers after debridement and vacuum sealing drain. After 8 months of follow-up, both the donor and recipient site healed well and there were no newly formed ulcers or infections. Although the skin quality of ichthyosis is poor, the lesion area can still be used as donor or recipient cite.

  20. Assessment of extent of skin involvement in scleroderma using shear wave elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Wakhlu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis [SSc] is a rare autoimmune disease which manifests as fibrosis in the skin and other internal organs. Conventionally, the modified Rodnan skin score (MRSS has been used to quantify the extent of skin fibrosis (resulting in skin tightness in SSc. This technique, although widely validated, is limited by the requirement of a trained, experienced assessor. Recent literature suggests that utilization of the objective ultrasound-based assessment of skin fibrosis utilizing shear wave elastography (SWE may be a more robust technique to detect early skin tightness in SSc. Methods: We evaluated the use of SWE (assessed by an experienced radiologist in 24 patients with SSc compared with 16 healthy controls. Results: Our patients were predominantly females, with median disease duration of 1.5 years and median MRSS of 17. There was minimal intraobserver variation in the assessment of SWE. Patients with SSc had higher SWE values (mean elasticity [Emean] compared to healthy controls at most assessed sites for the MRSS. The Emeancorrelated significantly at all sites with the MRSS scores. At the sites where MRSS was scored as 0 (normal, the Emeanin patients with SSc was higher when compared with similarly clinical normal skin in patients with SSc, suggesting potential early involvement of these areas of the skin with fibrosis. Conclusion: SWE is a promising tool to objectively assess skin fibrosis in SSc and may be useful in detecting early, subclinical skin involvement in this disease.

  1. Multifactorial skin barrier deficiency and atopic dermatitis: Essential topics to prevent the atopic march.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Gyohei; Kabashima, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common inflammatory skin disease in the industrialized world and has multiple causes. Over the past decade, data from both experimental models and patients have highlighted the primary pathogenic role of skin barrier deficiency in patients with AD. Increased access of environmental agents into the skin results in chronic inflammation and contributes to the systemic "atopic (allergic) march." In addition, persistent skin inflammation further attenuates skin barrier function, resulting in a positive feedback loop between the skin epithelium and the immune system that drives pathology. Understanding the mechanisms of skin barrier maintenance is essential for improving management of AD and limiting downstream atopic manifestations. In this article we review the latest developments in our understanding of the pathomechanisms of skin barrier deficiency, with a particular focus on the formation of the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin, which contributes significantly to skin barrier function. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Smoking and skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S F; Sørensen, L T

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a serious and preventable health hazard that can cause or exacerbate a number of diseases and shorten life expectancy, but the role of smoking as an etiologic factor in the development of skin disease is largely unknown. Although epidemiological evidence is sparse, findings...... suggest that tobacco smoking is a contributing factor in systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, palmoplantar pustulosis, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, hidradenitis suppurativa, and genital warts. In contrast, smoking may confer some protective effects and mitigate other skin diseases, notably...... pemphigus vulgaris, pyoderma gangrenosum, aphthous ulcers, and Behçet's disease. Various degenerative dermatologic conditions are also impacted by smoking, such as skin wrinkling and dysregulated wound healing, which can result in post-surgical complications and delayed or even arrested healing of chronic...

  3. Sprayed skin turbine component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David B

    2013-06-04

    Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

  4. Environment and the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suskind, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    The skin is an important organ of defense adaptation and a portal of entry for xenobiotics. It is vulnerable to physical, chemical, and biologic agents and capable of expressing responses to these agents in a variety of pathologic patterns. These patterns are characterized by morphologic and functional features which are elicited by careful examination and test procedures. Cutaneous cancer may result from exposure to nonionizing as well as ionizing radiation, to specific identifiable chemical hazards, and may be enhanced by trauma. Cutaneous hazards of chemical sources are largely found in the workplace and among consumer products, including drugs and toilet goods. Environmental skin diseases and injuries are preventable. Prior to use assessment for safety and for possible risks from exposure to an agent, product, or process is of primary importance in the prevention and control of environmental skin disease and injury

  5. Modern Electronic Devices: An Increasingly Common Cause of Skin Disorders in Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, Monica; Minghetti, Sara; Bertoldi, Alberto Maria; Martina, Emanuela; Virgili, Annarosa; Borghi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    : The modern conveniences and enjoyment brought about by electronic devices bring with them some health concerns. In particular, personal electronic devices are responsible for rising cases of several skin disorders, including pressure, friction, contact dermatitis, and other physical dermatitis. The universal use of such devices, either for work or recreational purposes, will probably increase the occurrence of polymorphous skin manifestations over time. It is important for clinicians to consider electronics as potential sources of dermatological ailments, for proper patient management. We performed a literature review on skin disorders associated with the personal use of modern technology, including personal computers and laptops, personal computer accessories, mobile phones, tablets, video games, and consoles.

  6. Cutaneous Hypersensitivity Dermatoses in the Feline Patient: A Review of Allergic Skin Disease in Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Diesel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Feline allergic skin disease presents a unique set of challenges to the veterinary practitioner. Although there is some similarity to what is seen in the allergic canine patient, cutaneous hypersensitivity dermatoses in cats can manifest with strikingly different clinical signs, treatment options and outcomes, and secondary complications/disease entities. Additionally, less is known about the pathogenesis of feline allergic skin diseases, particularly “feline atopic syndrome” when compared to dogs or people. This article aims to review what is currently known in regards to allergic skin disease in the feline patient, with focus on non-flea, non-food hypersensitivity dermatitis.

  7. Cutaneous Hypersensitivity Dermatoses in the Feline Patient: A Review of Allergic Skin Disease in Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesel, Alison

    2017-05-09

    Feline allergic skin disease presents a unique set of challenges to the veterinary practitioner. Although there is some similarity to what is seen in the allergic canine patient, cutaneous hypersensitivity dermatoses in cats can manifest with strikingly different clinical signs, treatment options and outcomes, and secondary complications/disease entities. Additionally, less is known about the pathogenesis of feline allergic skin diseases, particularly "feline atopic syndrome" when compared to dogs or people. This article aims to review what is currently known in regards to allergic skin disease in the feline patient, with focus on non-flea, non-food hypersensitivity dermatitis.

  8. Precancerous Skin Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrándiz, C; Malvehy, J; Guillén, C; Ferrándiz-Pulido, C; Fernández-Figueras, M

    Certain clinically and histologically recognizable skin lesions with a degree of risk of progression to squamous cell carcinoma have been traditionally grouped as precancerous skin conditions but now tend to be classified as in situ carcinomas. This consensus statement discusses various aspects of these lesions: their evaluation by means of clinical and histopathologic features, the initial evaluation of the patient, the identification of risk factors for progression, and the diagnostic and treatment strategies available today. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Skin graft viability test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahner, H.W.; Robertson, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    With respect to skin pedicles (tubular pedicle or direct flap), an estimation of the blood supply is of great importance in making a decision as to when to perform the separation from the original blood supply. This decision is based on empiric observation of the normal time of healing and varies greatly with the site and the concepts of the individual surgery. A number of methods have been proposed for testing the circulation of pedicle skin flaps or tubes, and these methods all seem more complicated and less accurate than the isotope method that is described in this chapter

  10. Skin innate immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Aksoy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available All multicellular organisms protect themselves from external universe and microorganisms by innate immune sytem that is constitutively present. Skin innate immune system has several different components composed of epithelial barriers, humoral factors and cellular part. In this review information about skin innate immune system and its components are presented to the reader. Innate immunity, which wasn’t adequately interested in previously, is proven to provide a powerfull early protection system, control many infections before the acquired immunity starts and directs acquired immunity to develop optimally

  11. Nail tic disorders: Manifestations, pathogenesis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Archana; Daulatabad, Deepashree

    2017-01-01

    Nail tic disorders are classic examples of overlap between the domains of dermatology and psychiatry. They are examples of body-focused repetitive behaviors in which there is an irresistible urge or impulse to perform a certain behavior. The behavior is reinforced as it results in some degree of relief and pleasure. Nail tic disorders are common, yet poorly studied and understood. The literature on nail tic disorders is relatively scarce. Common nail tics include nail biting or onychophagia, onychotillomania and the habit tic deformity. Some uncommon and rare nail tic disorders are onychoteiromania, onychotemnomania, onychodaknomania and bidet nails. Onychophagia is chronic nail biting behavior which usually starts during childhood. It is often regarded as a tension reducing measure. Onychotillomania is recurrent picking and manicuring of the fingernails and/or toenails. In severe cases, it may lead to onychoatrophy due to irreversible scarring of the nail matrix. Very often, they occur in psychologically normal children but may sometimes be associated with anxiety. In severe cases, onychotillomania may be an expression of obsessive-compulsive disorders. Management of nail tic disorders is challenging. Frequent applications of distasteful topical preparations on the nail and periungual skin can discourage patients from biting and chewing their fingernails. Habit-tic deformity can be helped by bandaging the digit daily with permeable adhesive tape. Fluoxetine in high doses can be helpful in interrupting these compulsive disorders in adults. For a complete diagnosis and accurate management, it is imperative to assess the patient's mental health and simultaneously treat the underlying psychiatric comorbidity, if any.

  12. Findings of skin and bones in mastocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohner, H.G.; Bartl, R.; Koischwitz, D.; Rodermund, O.E.

    1982-01-01

    The syndrome of mastocytosis can include isolated urticaria pigmentosa, systemic mastocytosis, or the extremely rare form of mast cell leucemia. Our investigations of many patients have shown more frequently than earlier suspected, that the mastocytosis is a systemic disease. The frequency of attacked bone marrow is noteworthy. Because of the inflammatorygranulomatous manifestation in bone marrow, considerations of the pathogenesis of an immune and reactive event are taken into account. The mast cell granulomas are mostly found in the endosteal region, which is the reason for frequenctly occurring bone lesions (half on all patients show bone lesions). The bone changes can develop generalized (osteoporosis-osteosclerosis) or localized (osteolytic-osteosclerotic foci). In clinical work bone biopsies and skeletal radiology are supplementing each other: bone biopsy and skin biopsy give the first diagnosis of mastocytosis and reveal the systemic disease; X-ray pictures give information of shape and dimension of the induced osteopathy. (orig.)

  13. Study of Laser Reflectivity on Skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oidor-Garcia, J. J. J.; Trevino-Palacios, C. G.

    2008-01-01

    The response to the light on the skin can be manifested as temperature increase or creation of biochemical byproducts, in which further studies are required to asset the light effect. This response changes the average response over time and can produce discrepancies between similar studies. In this work we present a Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) study with feedback. We study the time response reflectivity of a 980 nm laser diode of 25 mW modulated at frequencies close to 40 kHz and detect the reflected light on a silicon photodiode, finding no direct correlation between different test points or individuals, while finding reproducible responses within the same individual and test point

  14. Findings of skin and bones in mastocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohner, H.G.; Bartl, R.; Koischwitz, D.; Rodermund, O.E.

    1982-12-01

    The syndrome of mastocytosis can include isolated urticaria pigmentosa, systemic mastocytosis, or the extremely rare form of mast cell leucemia. Our investigations of many patients have shown more frequently than earlier suspected, that the mastocytosis is a systemic disease. The frequency of attacked bone marrow is noteworthy. Because of the inflammatory granulomatous manifestation in bone marrow, considerations of the pathogenesis of an immune and reactive event are taken into account. The mast cell granulomas are mostly found in the endosteal region, which is the reason for frequently occurring bone lesions (half of all patients show bone lesions). The bone changes can develop generalized (osteoporosis-osteosclerosis) or localized (osteolytic-osteosclerotic foci). In clinical work bone biopsies and skeletal radiology are supplementing each other: bone biopsy and skin biopsy give the first diagnosis of mastocytosis and reveal the systemic disease; X-ray pictures give information of shape and dimension of the induced osteopathy.

  15. Skin, a mirror reflecting diabetes mellitus: A longitudinal study in a tertiary care hospital in Gujarat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahora, Roshni; Thakkar, Sejal; Marfatia, Yogesh

    2013-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common of the endocrine disorders. Mucocutaneous manifestations of diabetes mellitus are many and vary from trivial to life-threatening. Sometimes, mucocutaneous disorders may herald the onset of diabetes. To study the pattern of mucocutaneous manifestations in diabetics and role of it in diagnosing diabetes mellitus and its complications. It was a longitudinal observational study of patients having diabetes with skin complaints attending skin outdoor department or admitted in wards for any reason in a tertiary care hospital. Total 300 patients were included in the study. Detailed history, clinical examination, and relevant investigations were done to diagnose the mucocutaneous disorders, diabetes, and diabetic complications. The data was analyzed by using Epi info software. Demographic profile shown majority of cases (78.66%) in more than 40 years of age with almost equal male and female preponderance. Mucocutaneous manifestations as presenting feature of diabetes were observed in 21.67% cases. Infections were most common in 119 (39.66%) cases, followed by acanthosis nigricans in 46 (15.33%) cases. Various associated complications like hypertension, retinopathy, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, neuropathy, nephropathy, and diabetic ketoacidosis were observed in 160 (53.3%). Skin is the mirror, which reflects internal diseases; this aptly applies to skin and diabetes mellitus. Through awareness about cutaneous manifestations of DM, dermatologist can not only take credit for detecting DM but also facilitate early diagnosis of systemic complications of DM. This is immensely beneficial to patients in long run.

  16. Four Cases of Atopic Dermatitis Complicated by Sjogren's Syndrome: Link between Dry Skin and Autoimmune Anhidrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Kitaba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report four adult cases of atopic dermatitis (AD complicated by Sjogren's syndrome (SS. The patients fulfilled diagnostic criteria for AD and SS. All cases showed persistent itchy dry skin and eczematous lesions complicated by sicca symptoms including dry eyes and dry mouth with moderate joint pain. One case manifested annular erythema and another manifested widespread discoid erythema. To investigate the underlying cause of dry skin in these cases, sweating function was evaluated using a quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test (QSART in which the axon reflex is stimulated by acetylcholine iontophoresis. The sweating latency time was significantly prolonged in eczematous skin of AD and AD/SS compared to normal controls. Axon reflex (AXR sweat volume was also significantly reduced in AD (normal and eczematous skin and AD/SS (normal and eczema compared to normal control. In contrast, the direct sweat volume of lesional or non-lesional AD skin induced by direct stimulation with acetylcholine was only slightly reduced compared to that in normal controls, but not in SS and lesional skin of AD/SS patients. These results suggest that the impaired sweat response in AD is attributable to an abnormal sudomotor axon reflex, which is accelerated and modulated when complicated by SS resulting in dry skin in the present cases.

  17. Prevalence and characteristics of articular manifestations in human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and characteristics of articular manifestations in human immune virus infection. ... Objectives: To determine the prevalence, types and characteristics of articular manifestations in the anti-retroviral treatment naive HIV infected patients. Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Setting: Comprehensive care clinic ...

  18. Orofacial manifestations of hematological disorders: Anemia and hemostatic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titilope A Adeyemo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to review the literature and identify orofacial manifestations of hematological diseases, with particular reference to anemias and disorders of hemostasis. A computerized literature search using MEDLINE was conducted for published articles on orofacial manifestations of hematological diseases, with emphasis on anemia. Mesh phrases used in the search were: oral diseases AND anaemia; orofacial diseases AND anaemia; orofacial lesions AND anaemia; orofacial manifestations AND disorders of haemostasis. The Boolean operator "AND" was used to combine and narrow the searches. Anemic disorders associated with orofacial signs and symptoms include iron deficiency anemia, Plummer-Vinson syndrome, megaloblastic anemia, sickle cell anemia, thalassaemia and aplastic anemia. The manifestations include conjunctiva and facial pallor, atrophic glossitis, angular stomatitis, dysphagia, magenta tongue, midfacial overgrowth, osteoclerosis, osteomyelitis and paraesthesia/anesthesia of the mental nerve. Orofacial petechiae, conjunctivae hemorrhage, nose-bleeding, spontaneous and post-traumatic gingival hemorrhage and prolonged post-extraction bleeding are common orofacial manifestations of inherited hemostatic disorders such as von Willebrand′s disease and hemophilia. A wide array of anemic and hemostatic disorders encountered in internal medicine has manifestations in the oral cavity and the facial region. Most of these manifestations are non-specific, but should alert the hematologist and the dental surgeon to the possibilities of a concurrent disease of hemopoiesis or hemostasis or a latent one that may subsequently manifest itself.

  19. Corneal manifestations of selected systemic diseases: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne D.H. Gillan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The corneal manifestations of several selected systemic diseases are reviewed. Metabolic, immunologic and inflammatory and infectious diseases are included. A brief overview of each disease and how it manifests in the cornea is discussed. The importance of conducting a slit-lamp examination on every patient is emphasised.

  20. Achondroplasia: Craniofacial manifestations and considerations in dental management

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Saleem, Afnan; Al-Jobair, Asma

    2010-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia dwarfism that manifests with stunted stature and disproportionate limb shortening. Achondroplasia is of dental interest because of its characteristic craniofacial features which include relative macrocephaly, depressed nasal bridge and maxillary hypoplasia. Presence of large head, implanted shunt, airway obstruction and difficulty in head control require special precautions during dental management. Craniofacial manifestations and c...

  1. Respiratory manifestations of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cottin, Vincent; Bel, Elisabeth; Bottero, Paolo; Dalhoff, Klaus; Humbert, Marc; Lazor, Romain; Sinico, Renato A.; Sivasothy, Pasupathy; Wechsler, Michael E.; Groh, Matthieu; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Khouatra, Chahéra; Wallaert, Benoit; Taillé, Camille; Delaval, Philippe; Cadranel, Jacques; Bonniaud, Philippe; Prévot, Grégoire; Hirschi, Sandrine; Gondouin, Anne; Dunogué, Bertrand; Chatté, Gérard; Briault, Amandine; Jayne, David; Guillevin, Loïc; Cordier, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory manifestations of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) have not been studied in detail.In this retrospective multicentre study, EGPA was defined by asthma, eosinophilia and at least one new onset extra-bronchopulmonary organ manifestation of disease.The study

  2. 40 CFR 264.71 - Use of manifest system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Within 30 days of delivery, send a copy of the manifest to the generator; and (v) Retain at the facility..., NW., Washington, DC 20460. (b) If a facility receives, from a rail or water (bulk shipment... on the manifest (excluding the EPA identification numbers, generator's certification, and signatures...

  3. Cardio-pulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease, characterized by polyarthritis and extraarticular manifestations. The cardiopulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis were studied retrospectively in a cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Methods: This was a retrospective study of all ...

  4. 8 CFR 251.1 - Arrival manifests and lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... List, in accordance with the instructions contained thereon. (2) Longshore work notations. The master... master, captain, or agent shall prepare as a part of the manifest, when one is required for presentation... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arrival manifests and lists. 251.1 Section...

  5. A Review of the Latent and Manifest Benefits (LAMB) Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Juanita; Waters, Lea

    2012-01-01

    The latent and manifest benefits (LAMB) scale (Muller, Creed, Waters & Machin, 2005) was designed to measure the latent and manifest benefits of employment and provide a single scale to test Jahoda's (1981) and Fryer's (1986) theories of unemployment. Since its publication in 2005 there have been 13 studies that have used the scale with 5692…

  6. Cardiac tamponade as an initial manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Diego M; Carrion, Andres F

    2012-06-12

    Clinical manifestations of pericardial disease may precede other signs and symptoms associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Although pericardial effusion is one of the most common cardiac problems in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, haemodynamically significant effusions manifesting as cardiac tamponade are rare and require prompt diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Pulmonary arterial hypertension as a manifestation of lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, P; Sargent, E N; Boylen, T; Jaramillo, D

    1987-08-01

    We present five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who developed pulmonary arterial hypertension and cor pulmonale in the course of their disease. The clinical features, as well as, the radiological manifestations of this rare manifestation of SLE are discussed. A vasculitic process is the most likely cause of this complication. Therapy is ineffective and the prognosis is poor.

  8. Understanding Climate Change and Manifestation of its Driven ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the nature and manifestation of climate change driven impacts on the agrarian districts of Kongwa and Bahi in the semi arid areas of Dodoma region in Tanzania. A Survey of 398 households in the study area was undertaken to elicit information on the nature and manifestation of climate change driven ...

  9. Cutaneous manifestations of HIV/AIDS: Part I | Dlova | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection can lead to a variety of clinical cutaneous manifestations. These cutaneous disorders occur universally during the course of HIV infection. Cutaneous manifestations of HIV are very diverse. The course and clinical presentation of HIV in individuals who have access to highly ...

  10. Pulmonary arterial hypertension as a manifestation of lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, P.; Jaramillo, D.

    1987-01-01

    We present five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who developed pulmonary arterial hypertension and cor pulmonale in the course of their disease. The clinical features, as well as, the radiological manifestations of this rare manifestation of SLE are discussed. A vasculitic process is the most likely cause of this complication. Therapy is ineffective and the prognosis is poor. (orig.) [de

  11. Skin dosimetry - radiological protection aspects of skin dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Following a Workshop in Skin Dosimetry, a summary of the radiological protection aspects is given. Aspects discussed include routine skin monitoring and dose limits, the need for careful skin dosimetry in high accidental exposures, techniques for assessing skin dose at all relevant depths and the specification of dose quantities to be measured by personal dosemeters and the appropriate methods to be used in their calibration. (UK)

  12. Frog skin function revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid Larsen, Erik; Ramløv, Hans

    2013-01-01

    of the epidermis. These mechanisms have evolved pari passu with life alternating between aquatic and terrestrial habitats associated with permeabilities of the skin controlled by external ion- and osmotic concentrations (loc. cit.). This allows for fast switching of the cutaneous uptake of chloride between active...

  13. Skin Cut Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    of the exhibition is to create a connection between the artistic and technological development through Danish rms and researchers who represent the newest technology in concrete treatment. The rst part exhibition (skin) will focus on the surface treatment of concrete (’graphical concrete’), the second (cut...

  14. Mechanical modeling of skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, C.W.J.; Peters, G.W.M.; Kassab, G.S.; Sacks, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter describes the work that was performed in the soft tissue biomechanics laboratory at Eindhoven University of Technology on the biomechanics of skin. A rationale is given for the changes from standard testing methods to inverse methods, from in vitro to in vivo and back to in vitro testing

  15. Preventing Skin Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-05-18

    A man and a woman talk about how they’ve learned to protect their skin from the sun over the years. .  Created: 5/18/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/18/2016.

  16. Skin Cancer Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children from the Sun? Are There Benefits to Spending Time Outdoors? The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer Related Resources Sun Safety Tips for Men Tips for Families Tips for Schools Tips for Employers Tips for ...

  17. Immunity and skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.B.; Brysk, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    Observations in humans and animal studies support the theory that immunologic surveillance plays an important role in limiting the development of skin malignancies. These immune responses undergo progressive diminution with age. In addition, other factors, such as bereavement, poor nutrition, and acute and chronic exposure to ultraviolet light, can further diminish immune mechanisms

  18. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... us for One-on-One Support Donate Share Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video ... 29498 © 2013 Melanoma International Foundation. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Use Toll-free: 866-463- ...

  19. Skin lesion removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... likely to be done when there is a concern about a skin cancer. Most often, an area the shape of an ellipse is removed, as this makes it easier to close with stitches. The entire lesion is removed, going as deep as the fat, if needed, to ...

  20. Skin painting studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witschi, H.P.; Smith, L.H.; Goad, M.E.; Anthony, W.B.; Gipson, L.C.; Stephens, T.J.; Whitaker, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    In order to estimate eventual risks to human health as a consequence of incidental and prolonged skin contact, it is necessary to obtain some information on the potential of coal-derived liquids to elicit skin cancer. In addition, it also must be established whether prolonged dermal exposure will produce signs of toxicity not only on the skin but to internal organs. During the past 2 years, they completed a life-long skin painting study with mice designed to answer some of these questions. The following materials were tested: Raw H-coal blend, containing 5700 ppm N; H-coal blend after low hydrotreatment (2650 ppm N); H-coal blend after high hydrotreatment (0.2 ppm N); H-coal home heating oil, a devolatilized version of the high-hydrotreatment H-coal blend; and an H-coal reformed naphtha. Two petroleum-derived references samples were used: Petroleum No. 2 fuel oil and high catalytically cracked naphtha. Benzo(a)pyrene was used as reference substance. Experimental animals were male and female C3H mice

  1. Light and skin disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, R.

    1991-01-01

    Because of the depletion of ozone in the stratosphere due to chlorofluorocarbons, the screening effect of this ozone layer on ultraviolet radiation (especially the so-called UV-B component) is reduced. This paper describes the impact of increased UV radiation on the human skin. Because of the 'ozone-hole', a distinct increase in the rate of skin cancer is to be expected which will affect all living beings but most of all man - an indirect consequence of the climate development. What makes the increased intensity of UV-B radiation so harmful is the fact that light-induced skin damage accumulates for the period of the life-time of the individual and cannot be reversed. A further thinning of stratospheric ozone would let through, in addition, the more short-waved ('harder') UV-C radiation. The latter, though clinically not significant currently, would then account for a further increase in the rate of malignant skin disease world-wide. (orig.) [de

  2. Skin peeling syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gharpuray Mohan

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a case of skin peeling syndrome, a rare disorder in which sudden generalized exfoliation of the stratum corneum occurs. Histopathologically, there was well formed subcorneal pustule filled with polymorphs and nuclear dust, considering this to be a varient of subcorneal pustular dermatosis, we have put the patient on Dapsone.

  3. Skin color independent assessment of aging using skin autofluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetsier, M.; Nur, Erfan; Chunmao, Han; Lutgers, Helen L.; Links, Thera P.; Smit, Andries J.; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Graaff, Reindert

    2010-01-01

    Skin autofluorescence (AF) for the non-invasive assessment of the amount of accumulated tissue Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) increases with aging. In subjects with darker skin colors, measurements typically result in lower AF values than in subjects with fair skin colors, e.g. due to

  4. Skin color independent assessment of aging using skin autofluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetsier, M.; Nur, E.; Chunmao, H.; Lutgers, H.L.; Links, T.P.; Smit, A.J.; Rakhorst, G.; de Graaff, R.

    2010-01-01

    Skin autofluorescence (AF) for the non-invasive assessment of the amount of accumulated tissue Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) increases with aging. In subjects with darker skin colors, measurements typically result in lower AF values than in subjects with fair skin colors, e. g. due to

  5. Adult-onset acral peeling skin syndrome in a non-identical twin: a case report in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Reshmi; Omole, Olufemi B; Rigby, Jonathan; Grayson, Wayne

    2014-12-31

    Acral peeling skin syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in which skin exfoliation is limited to the hands and feet. While it typically manifests from early childhood, in this first reported case from South Africa, the patient did not manifest clinically until the fourth decade of life. A 44-year-old woman of African descent, 1 of a set of non-identical twins, presented with recurrent episodes of skin peeling of the upper and lower limbs. The first episode occurred 4 years prior, followed by perennial skin peeling during the spring seasons. She was not on treatment for any chronic disease and reported no exposure to chemicals or other irritants. The family, including the non-identical twin sister, has no history of skin disorders and the patient's HIV antibody test was negative. At presentation, physical examination revealed ongoing exfoliation with new skin formation on the palms and soles. The mucous membranes and nails were spared. Other systems were normal. Skin biopsy taken from the palms confirmed peeling skin syndrome. The patient was managed with topical aqueous cream and analgesics. She was briefly counseled on the nature and prognosis of the disease, and referred for genetic testing and counseling. On follow-up, she continues to have skin peeling once or twice a year. This first reported case of this rare disease in South Africa contributes to the growing body of literature on the disease and highlights the need for clinicians to be aware of its variable clinical onset.

  6. A new method for skin color enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huanzhao; Luo, Ronnier

    2012-01-01

    Skin tone is the most important color category in memory colors. Reproducing it pleasingly is an important factor in photographic color reproduction. Moving skin colors toward their preferred skin color center improves the skin color preference on photographic color reproduction. Two key factors to successfully enhance skin colors are: a method to detect original skin colors effectively even if they are shifted far away from the regular skin color region, and a method to morph skin colors toward a preferred skin color region properly without introducing artifacts. A method for skin color enhancement presented by the authors in the same conference last year applies a static skin color model for skin color detection, which may miss to detect skin colors that are far away from regular skin tones. In this paper, a new method using the combination of face detection and statistical skin color modeling is proposed to effectively detect skin pixels and to enhance skin colors more effectively.

  7. Candida infection of the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000880.htm Candida infection of the skin To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Candida infection of the skin is a yeast infection ...

  8. Radiotherapy for extramedullary leukaemic manifestation (Chloroma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oertel, Michael; Elsayad, Khaled; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Stelljes, Matthias [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Internal Medicine, Muenster (Germany)

    2018-02-15

    Extramedullary leukaemic disease (EMD, synonym chloroma) is a rare solid manifestation of myeloid leukaemia for which the value of radiotherapy (RT) as a treatment strategy remains controversial. The aim of this study is to analyse the effectiveness of various RT doses for EMD in the modern treatment era. Between January 2000 and June 2016, 20 patients with total of 45 lesions underwent RT for EMD at our institution. With a median radiation dose of 26 Gy (range 4-42 Gy), local remission could be achieved in 91% of patients (complete remission rate: 71%). The median duration of local control (DOLC) was 17 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.5-33) and the median overall survival (OS) after chloroma onset was 24 months (95% CI 11-38). No noticeable difference between high- and low-dose regimens has been observed (74% versus 68%; P = 0.5). In the multivariate analysis, only Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score and bone marrow state during RT have proven to be determinant for durable local control and OS. Low-dose RT (≤26 Gy) achieves good local control compared to high-dose regimes. Bone marrow state during RT and ECOG score during RT may play a crucial role, influencing both DOLC and OS. (orig.) [German] Extramedullaere leukaemische Infiltrate (EMD) sind seltene Manifestationen myeloischer Leukaemien, in deren Behandlungskonzepten der Stellenwert der Radiotherapie (RT) unklar ist. Das Ziel der vorgelegten Studie ist es, die Wirksamkeit verschiedener Strahlentherapiedosen fuer EMD in der modernen Behandlungsaera zu untersuchen. Zwischen Januar 2000 und Juni 2016 durchliefen 20 Patienten mit insgesamt 45 Laesionen eine RT fuer EMD in unserer Klinik. Mit einer mittleren RT-Dosis von 26 Gy (Spanne 4-42 Gy) konnte eine lokale Remission bei 91 % der Patienten erzielt werden (komplette Remissionsrate, CRR: 71 %). Die mittlere Dauer der Lokalkontrolle (DOLC) betrug 17 Monate (95 %-KI 0,5-33) und das mediane Gesamtueberleben (OS) nach Chloromadiagnose war 24

  9. Folate in Skin Cancer Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, J.D.; Jacobson, Elaine L.; Kim, H.; Kim, M.; Jacobson, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    Skin, the largest, most exposed organ of the body, provides a protective interface between humans and the environment. One of its primary roles is protection against exposure to sunlight, a major source of skin damage where the UV radiation (UVR) component functions as a complete carcinogen. Melanin pigmentation and the evolution of dark skin is an adaptive protective mechanism against high levels of UVR exposure. Recently, the hypothesis that skin pigmentation balances folate preservation an...

  10. Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus Presenting as Acute Orbital Myositis Preceding a Skin Rash: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Ha Yeun; Cho, Seong Whi [Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun [Dept. of Neurology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Herpes zoster ophthalmicus, in which orbital symptoms and signs appear before the onset of a skin rash, is very rare. We experienced such a case and therefore report on it via magnetic resonance imaging. A 48-year-old man with pain and swelling of left eye and headache presented 2 days before onset of a zoster skin rash. On orbit-al MRI, edematous thickening of the left lateral rectus muscle with high signal intensity was revealed. After contrast injection, the lateral rectus muscle demonstrated heterogenous enhancement. Also, diffuse contrast enhancement was noted at left preseptal space, lacrimal gland and periorbital soft tissue. The man was treated with antiviral agents and prednisolone. Two weeks later, he recovered from the skin manifestations and most of the orbital manifestations except for the diplopia and restricted lateral movement.

  11. Skin Pedagogies and Abject Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenway, Jane; Bullen, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    How does the beauty industry "narrate the skin"? What does it teach women from different cultural groups about the female body? How does skin function as a site where female subjection and abjection are produced and reproduced? In this paper we examine the skin industry pointing to its extreme commodification of the female body and to the…

  12. Maintaining Healthy Skin -- Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and SCI • Depression and SCI • Taking Care of Pressure Sores • Maintaining Healthy Skin (Part I) • Maintaining Healthy Skin ( ... For information on establishing skin tolerance, see our “Pressure Sores” pamphlet.) Pressure releases in a wheelchair can be ...

  13. Maintaining Healthy Skin -- Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with no breaks in the surface. It is warm (not hot or red) and neither dry and flaky nor moist and wrinkled. Healthy skin is a mirror of a healthy body. How to take care of your skin NUTRITION: To keep your skin healthy, eat a well- ...

  14. Skin Cancers of the Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foot Health Awareness Month Diabetes Awareness What Are Skin Cancers of the Feet? Skin cancer can develop anywhere on the body, including ... cell carcinoma is the most common form of cancer on the skin of the feet. Most types of early squamous ...

  15. ICRP-26 and skin contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnigan, T.; Huda, W.; Newbery, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The experience of dealing with skin contamination incidents at The Radiochemical Centre over a 3-year period is presented. Data are given for the primary isotopes involved, the duration of skin contamination, and the skin doses that arise from these incidents. The methods employed in performing dosimetry for skin contamination are discussed and examples involving the isotopes carbon-14 and indium-111 are described. For skin contamination incidents, the mode of penetration of the activity into skin is normally not known and this can be of major significance for the final skin dose estimate. The operational health physics difficulties encountered in complying with both ICRP-26 and UK legislation for skin contamination are considered. In the event of multiple exposure (i.e. skin doses calculated from whole body film badges, extremity TLD dose meters and skin contamination) there is ambiguity in the precise meaning of the skin dose. The usefulness of Derived Working Levels is also discussed. Experience at The Radiochemical Centre has shown that good plant design, proper training and prompt action in dealing with contamination incidents ensures that overexposures to skin from accidental contamination are rare occurrences. (author)

  16. Portal hypertension as the initial manifestation of POEMS syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lina; Li, Yue; Yao, Fang; Lu, Chongmei; Li, Jian; Zhou, Weixun; Qian, Jiaming

    2017-01-01

    Portal hypertension has a broad differential diagnosis. POEMS syndrome is an uncommon cause of it. POEMS syndrome is a rare disease involving multiple organs. In differential diagnosis of portal hypertension, POEMS syndrome should be considered especially when other symptoms such as numbness, organomegaly, endocrine alteration and skin changes also present, as it is highlighted by our case. We report a 46-year-old Chinese male, a teacher, presenting with portal hypertension. Electromyography revealed peripheral neuropathy. Immunofixation showed monoclonal immunoglobulin A lambda protein. The diagnosis of POEMS syndrome was established. After treatment of lenalidomide combined with dexamethasone over 2 years, the patient achieved a considerable improvement. This case highlights the manifestation of portal hypertension in POEMS syndrome. Lenalidomide with or without dexamethasone is effective for portal hypertension due to POEMS syndrome, though esophageal and gastric varices seems not reversible so easily.

  17. Isolated Tenosynovitis as a Sole Manifestation: The Great Mimicker Still Continues to Surprise Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Abhishek; Surana, Trupti V; Biswas, Saugato; Reja, Abu Hena Hasanoor; Chatterjee, Gobinda

    2015-01-01

    A middle aged male presented with non-tender cystic swelling over left distal forearm since 1 year. No other cutaneous abnormality could be found except mild paresthesia of the overlying skin and equivocal thickening of the ipsilateral ulnar nerve. Routine investigation was within normal limits. Detailed workup of the patient including MRI of the lesion suggested the diagnosis as tenosynovitis with a soft tissue mass. Fine needle aspiration cytology from the cyst showed foamy macrophages and acid fast bacilli; while PCR of the aspirate confirmed the etiological agent as M. leprae. We, thus, report a unique case of isolated tenosynovitis as a sole manifestation of pure neural leprosy which is extremely rare in world literature. PMID:25814736

  18. Shining Light on Skin Pigmentation: The Darker and the Brighter Side of Effects of UV Radiation†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddodi, Nityanand; Jayanthy, Ashika; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi

    2012-01-01

    The term barrier function as applied to human skin often connotes the physical properties of this organ that provide protection from its surrounding environment. This term does not generally include skin pigmentation. However, skin pigmentation, which is the result of melanin produced in melanocytes residing the basal layer of the skin and exported to the keratinocytes in the upper layers, serves equally important protective function. Indeed, changes in skin pigmentation are often the most readily recognized indicators of exposure of skin to damaging agents, especially to natural and artificial radiation in the environment. Several recent studies have shed new light on a) the mechanisms of involved in selective effects of subcomponents of UV radiation on human skin pigmentation and b) the interactive influences between keratinocytes and melanocytes, acting as ‘epidermal melanin unit’, that manifest as changes in skin pigmentation in response to exposure to various forms of radiation. This article provides a concise review of our current understanding of the effects of the non-ionizing solar radiation, at cellular and molecular levels, on human skin pigmentation. PMID:22404235

  19. Shining light on skin pigmentation: the darker and the brighter side of effects of UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddodi, Nityanand; Jayanthy, Ashika; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi

    2012-01-01

    The term barrier function as applied to human skin often connotes the physical properties of this organ that provides protection from its surrounding environment. This term does not generally include skin pigmentation. However, skin pigmentation, which is the result of melanin produced in melanocytes residing in the basal layer of the skin and exported to the keratinocytes in the upper layers, serves equally important protective function. Indeed, changes in skin pigmentation are often the most readily recognized indicators of exposure of skin to damaging agents, especially to natural and artificial radiation in the environment. Several recent studies have shed new light on (1) the mechanisms involved in selective effects of subcomponents of UV radiation on human skin pigmentation and (2) the interactive influences between keratinocytes and melanocytes, acting as "epidermal melanin unit," that manifest as changes in skin pigmentation in response to exposure to various forms of radiation. This article provides a concise review of our current understanding of the effects of the nonionizing solar radiation, at cellular and molecular levels, on human skin pigmentation. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  20. [VISIBLE LIGHT AND HUMAN SKIN (REVIEW)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibadze, A; Chikvaidze, E; Katsitadze, A; Kvachadze, I; Tskhvediani, N; Chikviladze, A

    2015-09-01

    Biological effect of a visible light depends on extend of its property to penetrate into the tissues: the greater is a wavelength the more is an effect of a radiation. An impact of a visible light on the skin is evident by wave and quantum effects. Quanta of a visible radiation carry more energy than infrared radiation, although an influence of such radiation on the skin is produced by the light spectrum on the boarder of the ultraviolet and the infrared rays and is manifested by thermal and chemical effects. It is determined that large doses of a visible light (405-436 nm) can cause skin erythema. At this time, the ratio of generation of free radicals in the skin during an exposure to the ultraviolet and the visible light range from 67-33% respectively. Visible rays of 400-500 nm length of wave cause an increase of the concentration of oxygen's active form and mutation of DNA and proteins in the skin. The urticaria in 4-18% of young people induced by photodermatosis is described. As a result of a direct exposure to sunlight photosensitive eczema is more common in elderly. Special place holds a hereditary disease - porphyria, caused by a visible light. In recent years, dermatologists widely use phototherapy. The method uses polychromatic, non-coherent (wavelength of 515-1200 nm) pulsating beam. During phototherapy/light treatment a patient is being exposed to sunlight or bright artificial light. Sources of visible light are lasers, LEDs and fluorescent lamps which have the full range of a visible light. Phototherapy is used in the treatment of acne vulgaris, seasonal affective disorders, depression, psoriasis, eczema and neurodermities. LED of the red and near infrared range also is characterized by the therapeutic effect. They have an ability to influence cromatophores and enhance ATP synthesis in mitochondria. To speed up the healing of wounds and stimulate hair growth light sources of a weak intensity are used. The light of blue-green spectrum is widely used for

  1. Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma ...

  2. Behavioral Counseling to Prevent Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it might mean for you. What is skin cancer? Skin cancer is cancer that occurs in different kinds ... squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Facts About Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: acral peeling skin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Acral peeling skin syndrome Acral peeling skin syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Acral peeling skin syndrome is a skin disorder characterized by ...

  4. Unilateral pitting edema of the leg as a manifestation of Graves’ disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volke Vallo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Graves’ hyperthyroidism has a number of well-recognized but relatively rare extrathyroid manifestations such as thyroid acropachy, pretibial myxedema, and congestive heart failure. Case presentation A 38-year-old Caucasian woman presented to the out-patient clinic with symptoms of hyperthyroidism lasting for approximately five months. Remarkably, she had developed pitting edema of her left leg four months before. She had gone through a conventional assessment, but the reason for the edema was not revealed. At presentation to the endocrinology clinic, the skin of both legs was of normal color and pitting edema on her left leg was of a diffuse nature and spread from her toes to two thirds of her leg. The skin surface of her left leg was smooth and had no elevations or discoloration, whereas her right leg appeared normal. Based on signs and symptoms of thyrotoxicosis and suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone level (less than 0.001mIU/L, local reference of 0.4 to 4, treatment of 10mg of thiamazole three times a day was started. Additional blood tests revealed marked Graves’ hyperthyroidism with elevated free T4 and anti-thyroid receptor antibodies. Within a month, the free T4 level was normalized and the edema was completely cleared and never reappeared during the treatment course of 12 months. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of unilateral treatment-responsive leg edema as a manifestation of Graves’ hyperthyroidism. However, the pathophysiological mechanism underlying this case of edema remains unclear.

  5. Cardiac manifestation's history in the systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Rondon, Federico; Restrepo, Jose Felix

    2001-01-01

    In this paper it is broadly and in depth reviewed the cardiac manifestation's history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), since an historical analysis of clinical manifestations both in pre and post corticosteroids period. The way how the heart and the cardiovascular system's functions have been studied by clinical and semiological views are showed, through clinical manifestations such as myocarditis pericarditis, endocarditis, rhythm alterations, etc, and the evolution of laboratory methods used to its study as well as immunologic prognostic markers and risk factors for coronary disease in SLE

  6. Organising pneumonia - the first manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinova, Desislava; Kolarov, Zlatimir; Rashkov, Rasho

    2017-01-01

    Organising pneumonia (OP) is a distinct type of interstitial lung disease, because it can also be seen in association with several conditions such as infections, drugs, and connective tissue diseases. An association of OP with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has also been described. Joint manifestations of RA usually precede lung involvements by several years; however, in less than 10% of cases of RA, interstitial lung disease may be the initial feature of RA. Organising pneumonia as the initial manifestation or developed simultaneously of RA is extremely rare, and its clinical features remain unknown. We present a 56-year-old woman with OP as the first manifestation of RA.

  7. Morphological and clinical characteristics of the head epidermal skin carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijović M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common skin malignant tumor of the epidermoid origin are basal cell (BCC and squamous cell (SCC carcinoma. They occur at the photoexposed parts of the body in 90% of cases and are directly associated with skin damage caused by long term exposure to UV rays, usually in older persons and light skin. Almost 65,000 people die annually in the world from their consequences. The most important link in preventing the occurrence of these tumors is prevention, but their early identification allows adequate surgical treatment with sparing surrounding tissue. The main objective of this paper is to examine the histopathological and clinical-morphological characteristics of BCC and SCC of the skin of the head. The analysis included 439 cancer (297 (67.7% BCC, 126 (28.7% SCK and 16 (3.6% BCK + SCK, among which over 60% were diagnosed in men, usually in the seventh and eighth decade of life, with the highest incidence of BCC on the nose or on the skin of the upper half of the face and SCK on the lips or the skin of the lower half of face. All skin cancers of the head were more common on the right side. Clinical and morphological, most of the BCC were manifested by ulcerative form of average size 1.2cm and mixed histological type, and SCK by vegetative form of average size 1.55cm and histological grade I. The highest number of BCC and SCC was completly removed, in contrast to the combination of these two tumors among them in most cases the subsequent surgical intervention was necessary.

  8. Granular Corneal Dystrophy Manifesting after Radial Keratotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepehr Feizi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To report manifestation of granular corneal dystrophy after radial keratotomy (RK. CASE REPORT: A 32-year-old man presented with white radial lines in both corneas. He had undergone uncomplicated RK in both eyes 8 years ago. Preoperative refraction had been OD: -3.5 -0.75@180 and OS: -3.0 -0.5@175. Uncorrected visual acuity was OD: 8/10 and OS: 7/10; best corrected visual acuity was 9/10 in both eyes with OD: -0.5 -0.5@60 and OS: -0.75 -0.5@80. Slit lamp examination revealed discrete well-demarcated whitish lesions with clear intervening stroma in the central anterior cornea consistent with granular dystrophy. Similar opacities were present within the RK incisions. CONCLUSION: Granular dystrophy deposits may appear within RK incisions besides other previously reported locations.