WorldWideScience

Sample records for situ stabilization technique

  1. Shining a light on Jarosite: formation, alteration and stability studies using in situ experimental synchrotron and neutron techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, H. E. A.; Scarlett, N. V. Y.; Wilson, S. A.; Frierdich, A. J.; Grey, I. E.

    2016-12-01

    Jarosites and related minerals are critical to a range of mineral processing and research applications. They are used in the removal of iron species from smelting processes; they occur in metal bioleaching systems, and they are present in acid mine drainage environments. There has been a recent resurgence in interest in jarosites since their detection on Mars. In this context, the presence of jarosite has been recognised as a likely indicator of liquid water at the surface of Mars in the past & it is thought that their study will provide insight into the environmental history of Mars. Acid sulfate soils cover large areas of the Australian coastline and are likely to be a major constituent of the Martian environment. The oxidation of acid sulfate soils, coupled with potential release of heavy metals and acidic groundwaters, can have serious consequences for fragile ecosystems. Understanding these sediments will provide insight into the biogeochemical processes that affect the lifetimes of transient mineral species on Earth, and may be used to better understand soil acidification, contaminant mobility at sites affected by acid and metalliferous drainage, and even constrain past weathering and putative biosignatures on Mars. Knowledge of the behaviour of jarosite minerals under the actual conditions that they are found in is crucial to understanding their potential environmental impacts on both Earth and Mars. To this end, we are engaged in a program to study the formation, stability and alteration of natural and synthetic jarosite minerals using a complementary suite of in situ synchrotron and neutron techniques. There are 3 sections to this work that will introduce the experimental techniques and sample environments that make these measurements possible: Studying the nucleation and growth of jarosites under laboratory conditions. The experimentation consisted of time-resolved synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction. Studying the stability of

  2. Implementation of an ex situ stabilization technique at the Sand Springs superfund site to solidify and stabilize acid tar sludges involving a quick-lime based stabilization process and innovative equipment design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McManus, R.W.; Grajczak, P.; Wilcoxson, J.C.; Webster, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    An old refinery site was safely remediated a year before schedule and for 25% less than final engineering estimates for the stabilization remedy thanks to energetic project management and innovative design involving ex situ stabilization/solidification of acid tar sludges. A quicklime based process, Dispersion by Chemical Reaction (DCR trademark), was employed to solidify and stabilize (SS) over 103,000 cubic meters (135,000 cubic yards) of petroleum waste, mostly acidic tarry sludge. The SS process was selected over competing methods because it afforded minimal volume increase, could readily achieve Record of Decision (ROD) specified physical and chemical treatment goals, could be implemented with treatment equipment that minimized emissions, and could be performed with low reagent usage and at low cost. To ensure treatment goals were achieved and an accelerated schedule met, a custom designed and fabricated transportable treatment unit (TTU) was employed to implement the process. The treated material was visually soil-like in character, it was left in stockpiles for periods of time, and it was placed and compacted in the on site landfill using standard earth-moving equipment

  3. Cross-check of ex-situ and in-situ metrology of a bendable temperature stabilized KB mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Sheng; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Celestre, Richard; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory; Macdougall, James; Mochi, Iacopo; Warwick, Tony

    2011-01-01

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in-situ, at-wavelength wavefront slope measurement techniques for Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror nano-focusing. In this paper, we report an initial cross-check of ex-situ and in-situ metrology of a bendable temperature stabilized KB mirror. This cross-check provides a validation of the in-situ shearing interferometry, currently under development at the ALS.

  4. In situ solution mining technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Learmont, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    A method of in situ solution mining is disclosed in which a primary leaching process employing an array of 5-spot leaching patterns of production and injection wells is converted to a different pattern by converting to injection wells all the production wells in alternate rows

  5. Validation of an in situ solidification/stabilization technique for hazardous barium and cyanide waste for safe disposal into a secured landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Rucha; Kodam, Kisan; Ghole, Vikram; Surya Mohan Rao, K

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to devise and validate an appropriate treatment process for disposal of hazardous barium and cyanide waste into a landfill at a Common Hazardous Waste Treatment Storage Disposal Facility (CHWTSDF). The waste was generated during the process of hardening of steel components and contains cyanide (reactive) and barium (toxic) as major contaminants. In the present study chemical fixation of the contaminants was carried out. The cyanide was treated by alkali chlorination with calcium hypochlorite and barium by precipitation with sodium sulfate as barium sulfate. The pretreated mixture was then solidified and stabilized by binding with a combination of slag cement, ordinary Portland cement and fly ash, molded into blocks (5 x 5 x 5 cm) and cured for a period of 3, 7 and 28 days. The final experiments were conducted with 18 recipe mixtures of waste + additive:binder (W:B) ratios. The W:B ratios were taken as 80:20, 70:30 and 50:50. The optimum proportions of additives and binders were finalized on the basis of the criteria of unconfined compressive strength and leachability. The leachability studies were conducted using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. The blocks were analyzed for various physical and leachable chemical parameters at the end of each curing period. Based on the results of the analysis, two recipe mixtures, with compositions - 50% of [waste + (120 g Ca(OCl)(2) + 290 g Na(2)SO(4)) kg(-1) of waste] + 50% of binders, were validated for in situ stabilization into a secured landfill of CHWTSDF. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Laboratory-performance criteria for in situ waste-stabilization materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, P.; Weidner, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is investigating a variety of in situ placement methods, grout materials, and characterization techniques for the stabilization of buried low-level transuranic-contaminated waste at Department of Energy sites. In situ stabilization involves underground injection or placement of substances to isolate, treat, or contain buried contaminants. Performance criteria were developed to evaluate various candidate stabilization materials for both long-term stabilization and interim stabilization or retrieval. The criteria are go/no-go, ready, and preliminary. The criterion go/no-go eliminates technologies that are not applicable for in situ treatment of buried waste. The criterion ready indicates that the technology is sufficiently developed and proven to be field demonstrated full-scale. The criterion preliminary indicates the prospective technologies to be potentially applicable to in situ buried waste stabilization, but further development is needed before the technology is ready for field-scale demonstration

  7. In situ vitrification: application analysis for stabilization of transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oma, K.H.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    The in situ vitrification process builds upon the electric melter technology previously developed for high-level waste immobilization. In situ vitrification converts buried wastes and contaminated soil to an extremely durable glass and crystalline waste form by melting the materials, in place, using joule heating. Once the waste materials have been solidified, the high integrity waste form should not cause future ground subsidence. Environmental transport of the waste due to water or wind erosion, and plant or animal intrusion, is minimized. Environmental studies are currently being conducted to determine whether additional stabilization is required for certain in-ground transuranic waste sites. An applications analysis has been performed to identify several in situ vitrification process limitations which may exist at transuranic waste sites. Based on the process limit analysis, in situ vitrification is well suited for solidification of most in-ground transuranic wastes. The process is best suited for liquid disposal sites. A site-specific performance analysis, based on safety, health, environmental, and economic assessments, will be required to determine for which sites in situ vitrification is an acceptable disposal technique. Process economics of in situ vitrification compare favorably with other in-situ solidification processes and are an order of magnitude less than the costs for exhumation and disposal in a repository. Leachability of the vitrified product compares closely with that of Pyrex glass and is significantly better than granite, marble, or bottle glass. Total release to the environment from a vitrified waste site is estimated to be less than 10 -5 parts per year. 32 figures, 30 tables

  8. Remediation of SRS Basins by In Situ Stabilization/Solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the late summer of 1998, the Savannah River Site began remediation of two radiologically contaminated basins using in situ stabilization. These two high-risk, unlined basins contain radiological contaminants, which potentially pose significant risks to human health and the environment. The selected remedy involves in situ stabilization/solidification of the contaminated wastes (basin and pipeline soils, pipelines, vegetation, and other debris) followed by installation of a low permeability soil cover

  9. Latex-modified grouts for in-situ stabilization of buried transuranic/mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, M.L.

    1996-06-01

    The Department of Applied Science at Brookhaven national Laboratory was requested to investigate latex-modified grouts for in-situ stabilization of buried TRU/mixed waste for INEL. The waste exists in shallow trenches that were backfilled with soil. The objective was to formulate latex-modified grouts for use with the jet grouting technique to enable in-situ stabilization of buried waste. The stabilized waste was either to be left in place or retrieved for further processing. Grouting prior to retrieval reduces the potential release of contaminants. Rheological properties of latex-modified grouts were investigated and compared with those of conventional neat cement grouts used for jet grouting

  10. Optical metrology techniques for dimensional stability measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, Jonathan David

    2010-01-01

    This thesis work is optical metrology techniques to determine material stability. In addition to displacement interferometry, topics such as periodic nonlinearity, Fabry-Perot interferometry, refractometry, and laser stabilization are covered.

  11. In situ uranium stabilization by microbial metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turick, Charles E.; Knox, Anna S.; Leverette, Chad L.; Kritzas, Yianne G.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial melanin production by autochthonous bacteria was explored in this study as a means to increase U immobilization in U contaminated soil. This article demonstrates the application of bacterial physiology and soil ecology for enhanced U immobilization in order to develop an in situ, U bio-immobilization technology. We have demonstrated microbial production of a metal chelating biopolymer, pyomelanin, in U contaminated soil from the Tims Branch area of the Department of Energy (DOE), Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina, as a result of tyrosine amendments. Bacterial densities of pyomelanin producers were >10 6 cells per g wet soil. Pyomelanin demonstrated U complexing and mineral binding capacities at pH 4 and 7. In laboratory studies, in the presence of goethite or illite, pyomelanin enhanced U sequestration by these minerals. Tyrosine amended soils in a field test demonstrated increased U sequestration capacity following pyomelanin production up to 13 months after tyrosine treatments

  12. IN SITU URANIUM STABILIZATION BY MICROBIAL METABOLITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C; Anna Knox, A; Chad L Leverette,C; Yianne Kritzas, Y

    2006-11-29

    Soil contaminated with U was the focus of this study in order to develop in-situ, U bio-immobilization technology. We have demonstrated microbial production of a metal chelating biopolymer, pyomelanin, in U contaminated soil from the Tims Branch area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) as a result of tyrosine amendments. Bacterial densities of pyomelanin producers were >106 cells/g wet soil. Pyomelanin demonstrated U chelating and mineral binding capacities at pH 4 and 7. In laboratory studies, in the presence of goethite or illite, pyomelanin enhanced U sequestration by these minerals. Tyrosine amended soils in field tests demonstrated increased U sequestration capacity following pyomelanin production up to 13 months after tyrosine treatments.

  13. In-situ thermoelectric stabilization of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouns, R.A.; Timmerman, C.L.

    1982-02-01

    A new process for stabilizing buried radioactive wastes without exhumation is being developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The process, known as in situ vitrification, converts waste and contaminated soil to a durable glass and crystalline material by passing an electric current between electrodes placed in the ground. Joule heating created by the flowing current has generated temperatures over 1700 0 C which cause the soil to melt and dissolve or encapsulate the wastes. Engineering-scale tests conducted in the laboratory have melted approximately 45 kgs (30 liters) of soil at a time by this technique. Encouraging results from these engineering-scale tests led to the design and construction of a pilot-scale field test unit which has solidified approximately 9000 kg of simulated contaminated soil per test. Test results and evaluations to date have been very promising. No detectable migration of hazardous species into uncontaminated soil has been found, and volatilization during melting has been very low. Leach studies have found the vitrified soil to be a highly durable waste form similar to pyrex glass. Electrical power costs to solidify a disposal site have been calculated at less than $70 per cubic meter ($2/ft 3 ) of waste. Future activities include both radioactive and nonradioactive pilot and large-scale tests

  14. In situ stabilization wall for containment and hot spot retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G.G.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a full scale field demonstration of a in situ stabilization technology applicable to buried transuranic waste. The technology involves creating a jet grouted wall around selected regions or hot spots within a buried waste site. The resulting wall provides a barrier against further horizontal migration of the contaminants and allows vertical digging of material inside the wall, thus minimizing waste during a hot spot removal action. The demonstration involved creating a open-quotes Uclose quotes shaped wall in the interior of a full sized, simulated waste pit. The wall simulated the main features of a four sided wall. The demonstration also involved a destructive examination and a stability test for a hot spot retrieval scenario

  15. In-situ stabilization of mixed waste contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegrist, R.L.; Cline, S.R.; Gilliam, T.M.; Conner, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    A full-scale field demonstration was conducted to evaluate in for stabilizing an inactive RCRA land treatment site at a DOE facility in Ohio. Subsurface silt and clay deposits were contaminated principally with up to 500 mg/kg of trichloroethylene and other halocarbons, but also trace to low levels of Pb, Cr, 235 U, and 99 Tc. In situ solidification was studied in three, 3.1 m diameter by 4.6 m deep columns. During mixing, a cement-based grout was injected and any missions from the mixed region were captured in a shroud and treated by filtration and carbon adsorption. During in situ processing, operation and performance parameters were measured, and soil cores were obtained from a solidified column 15 months later. Despite previous site-specific treatability experience, there were difficulties in selecting a grout with the requisite treatment agents amenable to subsurface injection and at a volume adequate for distribution throughout the mixed region while minimizing volume expansion. observations during the demonstration revealed that in situ solidification was rapidly accomplished (e.g., >90 m 3 /d) with limited emissions of volatile organics (i.e., -6 cm/s vs. 10 -8 cm/s). Leaching tests performed on the treated samples revealed non-detectable to acceptably low concentrations of all target contaminants

  16. Novel in-situ lamella fabrication technique for in-situ TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavan, Megan; Daly, Dermot; Rummel, Andreas; McCarthy, Eoin K; McAuley, Cathal; Nicolosi, Valeria

    2018-03-29

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy is rapidly emerging as the premier technique for characterising materials in a dynamic state on the atomic scale. The most important aspect of in-situ studies is specimen preparation. Specimens must be electron transparent and representative of the material in its operational state, amongst others. Here, a novel fabrication technique for the facile preparation of lamellae for in-situ transmission electron microscopy experimentation using focused ion beam milling is developed. This method involves the use of rotating microgrippers during the lift-out procedure, as opposed to the traditional micromanipulator needle and platinum weld. Using rotating grippers, and a unique adhesive substance, lamellae are mounted onto a MEMS device for in-situ TEM annealing experiments. We demonstrate how this technique can be used to avoid platinum deposition as well as minimising damage to the MEMS device during the thinning process. Our technique is both a cost effective and readily implementable alternative to the current generation of preparation methods for in-situ liquid, electrical, mechanical and thermal experimentation within the TEM as well as traditional cross-sectional lamella preparation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Review of subsidence and stabilization techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernando, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    In Britain the damage caused by underground coal mining operations approximates to about 100 million pounds Sterling per annum, most of the damage resulting from longwall mining operations. Causes of subsidence can be attributed to the following factors: (1) roof failure (2) pillar failure (3) floor movements. Currently, in Britain, the mining industry is undergoing a state of decline for economic reasons. Consequently, the number of old coal sites available for development schemes has increased. Therefore, the problems associated with subsidence can be segregated into two parts. The first being the mitigation of the effects of subsidence on structures on actively mined areas. The second being the stabilization and rehabilitation of ground over and around old mine sites for new development schemes. In the former case the stabilization techniques employed may be local or global, depending on the problems encountered in any particular area. In the latter case, generally, grouting techniques are employed. This paper aims to review the causes of subsidence and the techniques used to minimize its effect on structures. Also, more economic alternative methods of ground stabilization techniques are described and proposed, to be used in this area of ground engineering

  18. Stabilization of contaminated soils by in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmerman, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    In Situ Vitrification is an emerging technology developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for potential in-place immobilization of radioactive wastes. The contaminated soil is stabilized and converted to an inert glass form. This conversion is accomplished by inserting electrodes in the soil and establishing an electric current between the electrodes. The electrical energy causes a joule heating effect that melts the soil during processing. Any contaminants released from the melt are collected and routed to an off-gas treatment system. A stable and durable glass block is produced which chemically and physically encapsulates any residual waste components. In situ vitrification has been developed for the potential application to radioactive wastes, specifically, contaminated soil sites; however, it could possibly be applied to hazardous chemical and buried munitions waste sites. The technology has been developed and demonstrated to date through a series of 21 engineering-scale tests [producing 50 to 1000 kg (100 to 2000 lb) blocks] and seven pilot-scale tests [producing 9000 kg (20,000 lb) blocks], the most recent of which illustrated treatment of actual radioactively contaminated soil. Testing with some organic materials has shown relatively complete thermal destruction and incineration. Further experiments have documented the insensitivity of in situ vitrification to soil characteristics such as fusion temperature, specific heat, thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, and moisture content. Soil inclusions such as metals, cements, ceramics, and combustibles normally present only minor process limitations. Costs for hazardous waste applications are estimated to be less than $175/m 3 ($5.00/ft 3 ) of material vitrified. For many applications, in situ vitrification can provide a cost-effective alternative to other disposal options. 13 references, 4 figures, 1 table

  19. In-situ containment and stabilization of buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, M.L.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1993-10-01

    In FY 1993 research continued on development and testing of grout materials for in-situ containment and stabilization of buried waste. Specifically, the work was aimed at remediation of the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico as part of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). The work on grouting materials was initiated in FY 1992 and the accomplishments for that year are documented in the previous annual report (Allan, Kukacka and Heiser, 1992). The remediation plan involves stabilization of the chromium plume, placement of impermeable vertical and horizontal barriers to isolate the landfill and installation of a surface cap. The required depth of subsurface barriers is approximately 33 m (100 ft). The work concentrated on optimization of grout formulations for use as grout and soil cement barriers and caps. The durability of such materials was investigated, in addition to shrinkage cracking resistance, compressive and flexural strength and permeability. The potential for using fibers in grouts to control cracking was studied. Small scale field trials were conducted to test the practicality of using the identified formulations and to measure the long term performance. Large scale trials were conducted at Sandia as part of the Subsurface Barrier Emplacement Technology Program. Since it was already determined in FY 1992 that cementitious grouts could effectively stabilize the chromium plume at the CWL after pre-treatment is performed, the majority of the work was devoted to the containment aspect

  20. In situ observation techniques of protective oxide layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Takashi; Adachi, Takeharu; Usuki, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    In situ analyzing techniques for investigating a surface and interface change during corrosion and oxidation of metals by using Raman scattering spectroscopy (Raman), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) are present. The Raman spectra revealed that a crystal structure and distribution of corrosion products varied during corrosion progress at elevated temperature and high pressure electrolyte. Time dependent XRD measurements made clear the behavior of the electrochemical reduction of a rust and the iso thermal transformation of a scale on a steel. It was demonstrated that XPS was capable of the in-situ measurements for initial stage of high temperature oxidation. (author)

  1. In situ analytical techniques for battery interface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Alok M; Su, Wei-Nien; Hwang, Bing Joe

    2018-02-05

    Lithium-ion batteries, simply known as lithium batteries, are distinct among high energy density charge-storage devices. The power delivery of batteries depends upon the electrochemical performances and the stability of the electrode, electrolytes and their interface. Interfacial phenomena of the electrode/electrolyte involve lithium dendrite formation, electrolyte degradation and gas evolution, and a semi-solid protective layer formation at the electrode-electrolyte interface, also known as the solid-electrolyte interface (SEI). The SEI protects electrodes from further exfoliation or corrosion and suppresses lithium dendrite formation, which are crucial needs for enhancing the cell performance. This review covers the compositional, structural and morphological aspects of SEI, both artificially and naturally formed, and metallic dendrites using in situ/in operando cells and various in situ analytical tools. Critical challenges and the historical legacy in the development of in situ/in operando electrochemical cells with some reports on state-of-the-art progress are particularly highlighted. The present compilation pinpoints the emerging research opportunities in advancing this field and concludes on the future directions and strategies for in situ/in operando analysis.

  2. A novel natural analog in situ stabilization agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, P.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the laboratory-scale test results on a synthetic analog of natural hematite cement for potential as an in situ treatment and stabilization agent for buried hazardous and radioactive waste. The concept is based on the principle that the ideal waste isolation materials are synthetic analogs of those natural encapsulating materials (cements), which are in equilibrium with the environment in which they occur. If equilibrium is achieved, then such materials will remain intact as long as the natural environment remains unchanged. The specific waste application is long-term stabilization of transuranic-contaminated waste pits and trenches at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Six properties of the natural analog agent and resulting wasteforms are discussed to access the agent's effectiveness and implementability: hydraulic conductivity; compressive strength; mineralogy and microstructure; compatibility with possible waste materials, nitrates, machine cutting oil, and metallic iron; leachability of hazardous metals; and field application parameters. Data indicated that the iron waste encapsulation materials tested are appropriate choices for buried waste mixed with INEL soil. Iron oxide/gypsum INEL soil wasteforms have hydraulic conductivity values close to the regulatory limit. Wasteforms with soil and wastes have compressive strength greater than the regulatory minimum. Gypsum/iron oxide removes hazardous metals from solution by adsorption and would pass Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure limits for most toxic metals. It appears to be chemically and physically inert with respect to the bulk of the waste materials likely to be found at INEL, and has properties conducive to jet grouting

  3. Evaluation of stabilization-solidification techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goubier, R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports that among the techniques applied to treat polluting residue in France for the past ten years has been the mixing of pollutants with reactive agents in order to fix the contaminants and to give them a solid consistency. The first applications of these stabilization/solidification processes occurred in 1978 in the treatment of oil residues from the AMOCO CADIZ spill. They have also been used for the treatment of a mayor dump site for petroleum residues, for the disposal of mineral sludges of a detoxication plant, and for the rehabilitation of sites contaminated by various industrial residues, specially acid tars generated by oil refining plants. Although from the beginning these techniques appeared to be able to transform filthy lagoons into solid and apparently safe areas, it was necessary to evaluate their efficiency and to determine the conditions and limits of application

  4. Aquifer restoration techniques for in-situ leach uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, W.J.; Bell, N.E.; Mercer, B.W.; Serne, R.J.; Shade, J.W.; Tweeton, D.R.

    1984-02-01

    In-situ leach uranium mines and pilot-scale test facilities are currently operating in the states of Wyoming, Texas, New Mexico and Colorado. This report summarizes the technical considerations involved in restoring a leached ore zone and its aquifer to the required level. Background information is provided on the geology and geochemistry of mineralized roll-front deposits and on the leaching techniques used to extract the uranium. 13 references, 13 figures, 4 tables

  5. Assessment of the availability of As and Pb in soils after in situ stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanying; Yang, Jie; Li, Zhongyuan; Zhou, Dongmei; Dang, Fei

    2017-10-01

    The in situ stabilization has been widely used to remediate metal-contaminated soil. However, the long-term retaining performance of heavy metals and the associated risk after in situ stabilization remains unclear and has evoked amounting concerns. Here, Pb- or As-contaminated soil was stabilized by a commercial amendment. The availability of Pb and As after in situ stabilization were estimated by ten different in vitro chemical extractions and DGT technique. After amendment application, a significant decline in extractable Pb or As was observed in treatments of Milli-Q water, 0.01 M CaCl 2 , 0.1 M NaNO 3 , 0.05 M (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 , and 0.43 M HOAc. Potential available metal(loid)s determined by DGT also showed remarkable reduction. Meanwhile, the results of in vivo uptake assays demonstrated that Pb concentrations in shoots of ryegrass Lolium perenne L. declined to 12% of the control samples, comparable to the extraction ratio of 0.1 M NaNO 3 (15.8%) and 0.05 M (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 (17.3%). For As-contaminated soil, 0.43 M HOAC provided a better estimation of relative phytoavailability (64.6 vs. 65.4% in ryegrass) compared to other extraction methods. We propose that 0.1 M NaNO 3 or 0.05 M (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 for Pb and 0.43 M HOAc for As may serve as surrogate measures to estimate the lability of metal(loid)s after soil remediation of the tested contaminated soils. Further studies over a wider range of soil types and amendments are necessary to validate extraction methods.

  6. Technique for in situ leach simulation of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, D.C.; Seidel, D.C.; Nichols, I.L.

    1985-01-01

    In situ uranium mining offers the advantages of minimal environmental disturbance, low capital and operating costs, and reduced mining development time. It is becoming an increasingly attractive mining method for the recovery of uranium from secondary ore deposits. In order to better understand the process, a laboratory technique was developed and used to study and simulate both the chemical and physical phenomena occurring in ore bodies during in situ leaching. The laboratory simulation technique has been used to determine effects of leaching variables on permeability, uranium recovery, and post-leach aquifer restoration. This report describes the simulation system and testing procedure in sufficient detail to allow the construction of the system, and to perform the desired leaching tests. With construction of such a system, in situ leaching of a given ore using various leach conditions can be evaluated relatively rapidly in the laboratory. Not only could optimum leach conditions be selected for existing ore bodies, but also exploitation of new ore bodies could be accelerated. 8 references, 8 figures, 2 tables

  7. Experimental Investigation of Centrifugal Compressor Stabilization Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2003-01-01

    Results from a series of experiments to investigate techniques for extending the stable flow range of a centrifugal compressor are reported. The research was conducted in a high-speed centrifugal compressor at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The stabilizing effect of steadily flowing air-streams injected into the vaneless region of a vane-island diffuser through the shroud surface is described. Parametric variations of injection angle, injection flow rate, number of injectors, injector spacing, and injection versus bleed were investigated for a range of impeller speeds and tip clearances. Both the compressor discharge and an external source were used for the injection air supply. The stabilizing effect of flow obstructions created by tubes that were inserted into the diffuser vaneless space through the shroud was also investigated. Tube immersion into the vaneless space was varied in the flow obstruction experiments. Results from testing done at impeller design speed and tip clearance are presented. Surge margin improved by 1.7 points using injection air that was supplied from within the compressor. Externally supplied injection air was used to return the compressor to stable operation after being throttled into surge. The tubes, which were capped to prevent mass flux, provided 9.3 points of additional surge margin over the baseline surge margin of 11.7 points.

  8. Engineering feasibility analysis for in-situ stabilization of Canonsburg residues. [UMTRA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is considering several methods for carrying out remedial actions in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, at the site of an inactive uranium-processing mill. The main objective of this study is to determine the feasibility of in-situ stabilization as the remedial action. In-situ stabilization is an alternative to site decontamination and offsite disposal. The problems associated with offsite hauling of large quantities of contaminated material and with the location and development of a new disposal site could be avoided by the implementation of an in-situ stabilization concept. In addition, the in-situ approach would be more cost-effective than offsite disposal. This study will establish that a technically feasible and implementable in-situ stabilization concept can be developed that meets regulatory requirements and is cost effective. This study in no way commits the DOE to implement any specific actions described herein. 11 refs., 30 figs., 24 tabs.

  9. Engineering feasibility analysis for in-situ stabilization of Canonsburg residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is considering several methods for carrying out remedial actions in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, at the site of an inactive uranium-processing mill. The main objective of this study is to determine the feasibility of in-situ stabilization as the remedial action. In-situ stabilization is an alternative to site decontamination and offsite disposal. The problems associated with offsite hauling of large quantities of contaminated material and with the location and development of a new disposal site could be avoided by the implementation of an in-situ stabilization concept. In addition, the in-situ approach would be more cost-effective than offsite disposal. This study will establish that a technically feasible and implementable in-situ stabilization concept can be developed that meets regulatory requirements and is cost effective. This study in no way commits the DOE to implement any specific actions described herein. 11 refs., 30 figs., 24 tabs

  10. Review of in situ derivatization techniques for enhanced bioanalysis using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdady, Yehia Z; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and specific analysis of target molecules in complex biological matrices remains a significant challenge, especially when ultra-trace detection limits are required. Liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry is often the method of choice for bioanalysis. Conventional sample preparation and clean-up methods prior to the analysis of biological fluids such as liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction, or protein precipitation are time-consuming, tedious, and can negatively affect target recovery and detection sensitivity. An alternative or complementary strategy is the use of an off-line or on-line in situ derivatization technique. In situ derivatization can be incorporated to directly derivatize target analytes in their native biological matrices, without any prior sample clean-up methods, to substitute or even enhance the extraction and preconcentration efficiency of these traditional sample preparation methods. Designed appropriately, it can reduce the number of sample preparation steps necessary prior to analysis. Moreover, in situ derivatization can be used to enhance the performance of the developed liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry-based bioanalysis methods regarding stability, chromatographic separation, selectivity, and ionization efficiency. This review presents an overview of the commonly used in situ derivatization techniques coupled to liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry-based bioanalysis to guide and to stimulate future research. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. In Situ Techniques for Life Detection on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, L.; Brinckerhoff, W.; Cotter, R.

    2006-12-01

    The search for organic matter on Mars is rapidly emerging as a result of technological advancements and the study of early "life" on our own planet. As we learned from the Viking missions and the examination of martian meteorites, the criteria for establishing life require the appropriate strategy. One such approach would require careful mapping of the surface from orbit for the selection of the appropriate landing sites, robotic space missions equipped with several life detection in situ techniques for selection of samples, and sample return missions for additional verification of in situ results and laboratory measurements. It may, however, be possible to obtain critical information about the organic matter and associated mineral assemblages present on Mars, in situ, in a single measurement that is both capable of flight and is nondestructive to the sample. We discuss a new multi-source mass spectrometer, `MOMA' (Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer) that incorporates multiple methods of volatilizing and ionizing chemical compounds from intact samples without further processing or manipulation. Moreover, MOMA is capable of detecting a broad range of organics enabling the evaluation of the origin of the organics and the presence of terrestrial contaminants.

  12. In situ evidence of mineral physical protection and carbon stabilization revealed by nanoscale 3-D tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yi-Tse; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chiang, Cheng-Cheng; Tsai, Heng; Song, Yen-Fang; Huang, Shiuh-Tsuen; Liang, Biqing

    2018-05-01

    An approach for nanoscale 3-D tomography of organic carbon (OC) and associated mineral nanoparticles was developed to illustrate their spatial distribution and boundary interplay, using synchrotron-based transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM). The proposed 3-D tomography technique was first applied to in situ observation of a laboratory-made consortium of black carbon (BC) and nanomineral (TiO2, 15 nm), and its performance was evaluated using dual-scan (absorption contrast and phase contrast) modes. This novel tool was then successfully applied to a natural OC-mineral consortium from mountain soil at a spatial resolution of 60 nm, showing the fine structure and boundary of OC, the distribution of abundant nano-sized minerals, and the 3-D organo-mineral association in situ. The stabilization of 3500-year-old natural OC was mainly attributed to the physical protection of nano-sized iron (Fe)-containing minerals (Fe oxyhydroxides including ferrihydrite, goethite, and lepidocrocite), and the strong organo-mineral complexation. In situ evidence revealed an abundance of mineral nanoparticles, in dense thin layers or nano-aggregates/clusters, instead of crystalline clay-sized minerals on or near OC surfaces. The key working minerals for C stabilization were reactive short-range-order (SRO) mineral nanoparticles and poorly crystalline submicron-sized clay minerals. Spectroscopic analyses demonstrated that the studied OC was not merely in crisscross co-localization with reactive SRO minerals; there could be a significant degree of binding between OC and the minerals. The ubiquity and abundance of mineral nanoparticles on the OC surface, and their heterogeneity in the natural environment may have been severely underestimated by traditional research approaches. Our in situ description of organo-mineral interplay at the nanoscale provides direct evidence to substantiate the importance of mineral physical protection for the long-term stabilization of OC. This high-resolution 3-D

  13. Soil surface stabilization using an in situ plutonium coating techniuqe at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lew, J.; Snipes, R.; Tamura, T.

    1996-01-01

    The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), in collaboration with the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR), has developed and is investigating an in situ plutonium treatment for soils at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The concept, conceived by Dr. T. Tamura and refined at HAZWRAP, was developed during the Nevada Applied Ecology Program investigation. In analyzing for plutonium in soils, it was noted that the alpha emanation of plutonium was greatly attenuated if traces of iron or manganese oxides were present in the final electroplating stage. The technique would reduce resuspension of alpha particles into the air by coating the contaminants in soils in situ with an environmentally compatible, durable, and nontoxic material. The coating materials (calcium hydroxide, ferrous sulfate) reduce resuspension by providing a cementitious barrier against radiation penetration while retaining soil porosity. This technique not only stabilizes plutonium-contaminated soils, but also provides an additional protection from worker exposure to radiation during remediation activities. Additionally, the coating would decrease the water solubility of the contaminant and, thus, reduce its migration through soil and uptake by plants

  14. Alternative technique to neutron probe calibration in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encarnacao, F.; Carneiro, C.; Dall'Olio, A.

    1990-01-01

    An alternative technique of neutron probe calibration in situ was applied for Podzolic soil. Under field condition, the neutron probe calibration was performed using a special arrangement that prevented the lateral movement of water around the access tube of the neutron probe. During the experiments, successive amounts of water were uniformly infiltrated through the soil profile. Two plots were set to study the effect of the plot dimension on the slope of the calibration curve. The results obtained shown that the amounts of water transferred to the soil profile were significantly correlated to the integrals of count ratio along the soil profile on both plots. In consequence, the slope of calibration curve in field condition was determined. (author)

  15. In-situ thermeolectric stabilization of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouns, R.A.; Timmerman, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    Current analysis indicates that in situ vitrification is applicable to many wastes and soil types at a cost an order of magnitude less than exhumation, processing, and transportation to a deep geological disposal site. Once the waste materials have been solidified, future ground subsidence, wind erosion and plant or animal intrusion are virtually eliminated. Furthermore, the waste form is extremely durable

  16. Comparative study of resist stabilization techniques for metal etch processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Gerry; Ross, Matthew F.; Wong, Selmer S.; Minter, Jason P.; Marlowe, Trey; Livesay, William R.

    1999-06-01

    This study investigates resist stabilization techniques as they are applied to a metal etch application. The techniques that are compared are conventional deep-UV/thermal stabilization, or UV bake, and electron beam stabilization. The electron beam tool use din this study, an ElectronCure system from AlliedSignal Inc., ELectron Vision Group, utilizes a flood electron source and a non-thermal process. These stabilization techniques are compared with respect to a metal etch process. In this study, two types of resist are considered for stabilization and etch: a g/i-line resist, Shipley SPR-3012, and an advanced i-line, Shipley SPR 955- Cm. For each of these resist the effects of stabilization on resist features are evaluated by post-stabilization SEM analysis. Etch selectivity in all cases is evaluated by using a timed metal etch, and measuring resists remaining relative to total metal thickness etched. Etch selectivity is presented as a function of stabilization condition. Analyses of the effects of the type of stabilization on this method of selectivity measurement are also presented. SEM analysis was also performed on the features after a compete etch process, and is detailed as a function of stabilization condition. Post-etch cleaning is also an important factor impacted by pre-etch resist stabilization. Results of post- etch cleaning are presented for both stabilization methods. SEM inspection is also detailed for the metal features after resist removal processing.

  17. In situ solidification/stabilization pilot study for the treatment of coal tar contaminated soils and river sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, M.A.; Venn, J.G.; Pugh, L.B.; Vallis, T.

    1996-01-01

    Coal tar contamination was encountered at a former coal gasification site in soils below the groundwater table, and in the sediments of the adjacent river. Ex situ remediation techniques at this site would be costly because of the need to dewater the impacted media. In situ solidification/stabilization was tested to evaluate its effectiveness. Treatability testing was performed to evaluate a Portland cement/fly ash binder system with added stabilizing agents. Results were sufficiently promising to warrant pilot testing. Grout containing Portland cement, fly ash, organically modified clay, and granular activated carbon was pilot tested at the site. Test specimens were collected and tested to evaluate durability, compressive strength, and permeability. The samples were extracted by several methods and analyzed to measure the leachable concentrations of organic compounds and metals. Results indicated acceptable physical characteristics. Leachable concentrations of most polynuclear aromatic compounds were decreased

  18. Evaluation of stabilization techniques for ion implant processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Matthew F.; Wong, Selmer S.; Minter, Jason P.; Marlowe, Trey; Narcy, Mark E.; Livesay, William R.

    1999-06-01

    With the integration of high current ion implant processing into volume CMOS manufacturing, the need for photoresist stabilization to achieve a stable ion implant process is critical. This study compares electron beam stabilization, a non-thermal process, with more traditional thermal stabilization techniques such as hot plate baking and vacuum oven processing. The electron beam processing is carried out in a flood exposure system with no active heating of the wafer. These stabilization techniques are applied to typical ion implant processes that might be found in a CMOS production process flow. The stabilization processes are applied to a 1.1 micrometers thick PFI-38A i-line photoresist film prior to ion implant processing. Post stabilization CD variation is detailed with respect to wall slope and feature integrity. SEM photographs detail the effects of the stabilization technique on photoresist features. The thermal stability of the photoresist is shown for different levels of stabilization and post stabilization thermal cycling. Thermal flow stability of the photoresist is detailed via SEM photographs. A significant improvement in thermal stability is achieved with the electron beam process, such that photoresist features are stable to temperatures in excess of 200 degrees C. Ion implant processing parameters are evaluated and compared for the different stabilization methods. Ion implant system end-station chamber pressure is detailed as a function of ion implant process and stabilization condition. The ion implant process conditions are detailed for varying factors such as ion current, energy, and total dose. A reduction in the ion implant systems end-station chamber pressure is achieved with the electron beam stabilization process over the other techniques considered. This reduction in end-station chamber pressure is shown to provide a reduction in total process time for a given ion implant dose. Improvements in the ion implant process are detailed across

  19. Contributions to fuzzy polynomial techniques for stability analysis and control

    OpenAIRE

    Pitarch Pérez, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    The present thesis employs fuzzy-polynomial control techniques in order to improve the stability analysis and control of nonlinear systems. Initially, it reviews the more extended techniques in the field of Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems, such as the more relevant results about polynomial and fuzzy polynomial systems. The basic framework uses fuzzy polynomial models by Taylor series and sum-of-squares techniques (semidefinite programming) in order to obtain stability guarantees...

  20. In-situ anatase phase stabilization of titania photocatalyst by sintering in presence of Zr{sup 4+} organic salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strini, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.strini@itc.cnr.it [Istituto per le Tecnologie della Costruzione (ITC-CNR), via Lombardia, 49, I-20098 San Giuliano Milanese (MI) (Italy); Sanson, Alessandra; Mercadelli, Elisa [Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali Ceramici (ISTEC-CNR), via Granarolo, 64, I-48018 Faenza (RA) (Italy); Bendoni, Riccardo [Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali Ceramici (ISTEC-CNR), via Granarolo, 64, I-48018 Faenza (RA) (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche e Centro NAST - Università di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Marelli, Marcello; Dal Santo, Vladimiro [CNR–Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, via Golgi, 19, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Schiavi, Luca [Istituto per le Tecnologie della Costruzione (ITC-CNR), via Lombardia, 49, I-20098 San Giuliano Milanese (MI) (Italy)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Existing commercial (P25) anatase was stabilized in-situ with Zr(IV) doping. • Highly active catalytic layers were obtained by screen-printing. • Increased thermal stability was demonstrated up to 200 °C without activity loss. • Enhanced activity was obtained because of the Zr(IV) doping. • Zirconium diffusion was assessed by STEM-EDS analysis. - Abstract: The direct in-situ stabilization of an anatase-based nanocrystalline photocatalyst (Degussa P25) was obtained by sintering the catalyst powder in presence of Zr{sup 4+} organic salts. This approach allows the doping of an already-formed nanocrystalline photocatalyst instead of introducing the dopant in the crystal lattice during the catalyst synthesis. The procedure was demonstrated by the production of thick ceramic layers using the screen printing technique. This new method allows to easily stabilize the anatase phase 200 °C higher than the undoped P25 maintaining the same photocatalytic activity. The process was studied using specifically formulated screen-printing inks added with Zr{sup 4+} organic salt at 1% and 2% Zr/Ti molar ratio. The anatase phase stability was investigated in the 500–900 °C temperature range analysing the resulting catalysts with XRD, TEM and (S)TEM-EDS. The catalytic activity of the screen-printed layers was assessed by measuring the degradation of toluene in air at ambient concentration (500 nmol m{sup −3}) and low UV-A irradiance (180 μW cm{sup −2}). The described in-situ stabilization method could be potentially applied to any deposition process involving already formed anatase photocatalyst, allowing higher sintering temperature and then an improved mechanical stability of the active layers without photocatalytic activity degradation.

  1. In-situ anatase phase stabilization of titania photocatalyst by sintering in presence of Zr4+ organic salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strini, Alberto; Sanson, Alessandra; Mercadelli, Elisa; Bendoni, Riccardo; Marelli, Marcello; Dal Santo, Vladimiro; Schiavi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Existing commercial (P25) anatase was stabilized in-situ with Zr(IV) doping. • Highly active catalytic layers were obtained by screen-printing. • Increased thermal stability was demonstrated up to 200 °C without activity loss. • Enhanced activity was obtained because of the Zr(IV) doping. • Zirconium diffusion was assessed by STEM-EDS analysis. - Abstract: The direct in-situ stabilization of an anatase-based nanocrystalline photocatalyst (Degussa P25) was obtained by sintering the catalyst powder in presence of Zr 4+ organic salts. This approach allows the doping of an already-formed nanocrystalline photocatalyst instead of introducing the dopant in the crystal lattice during the catalyst synthesis. The procedure was demonstrated by the production of thick ceramic layers using the screen printing technique. This new method allows to easily stabilize the anatase phase 200 °C higher than the undoped P25 maintaining the same photocatalytic activity. The process was studied using specifically formulated screen-printing inks added with Zr 4+ organic salt at 1% and 2% Zr/Ti molar ratio. The anatase phase stability was investigated in the 500–900 °C temperature range analysing the resulting catalysts with XRD, TEM and (S)TEM-EDS. The catalytic activity of the screen-printed layers was assessed by measuring the degradation of toluene in air at ambient concentration (500 nmol m −3 ) and low UV-A irradiance (180 μW cm −2 ). The described in-situ stabilization method could be potentially applied to any deposition process involving already formed anatase photocatalyst, allowing higher sintering temperature and then an improved mechanical stability of the active layers without photocatalytic activity degradation

  2. Localized in situ polymerization on graphene surfaces for stabilized graphene dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sriya; Wajid, Ahmed S; Shelburne, John L; Liao, Yen-Chih; Green, Micah J

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate a novel in situ polymerization technique to develop localized polymer coatings on the surface of dispersed pristine graphene sheets. Graphene sheets show great promise as strong, conductive fillers in polymer nanocomposites; however, difficulties in dispersion quality and interfacial strength between filler and matrix have been a persistent problem for graphene-based nanocomposites, particularly for pristine graphene. With this in mind, a physisorbed polymer layer is used to stabilize graphene sheets in solution. To create this protective layer, we formed an organic microenvironment around dispersed graphene sheets in surfactant solutions, and created a nylon 6, 10 or nylon 6, 6 coating via interfacial polymerization. Technique lies at the intersection of emulsion and admicellar polymerization; a similar technique was originally developed to protect luminescent properties of carbon nanotubes in solution. These coated graphene dispersions are aggregation-resistant and may be reversibly redispersed in water even after freeze-drying. The coated graphene holds promise for a number of applications, including multifunctional graphene-polymer nanocomposites. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. In Situ Study of Thermal Stability of Copper Oxide Nanowires at Anaerobic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many metal oxides with promising electrochemical properties were developed recently. Before those metal oxides realize the use as an anode in lithium ion batteries, their thermal stability at anaerobic environment inside batteries should be clearly understood for safety. In this study, copper oxide nanowires were investigated as an example. Several kinds of in situ experiment methods including in situ optical microscopy, in situ Raman spectrum, and in situ transmission electron microscopy were adopted to fully investigate their thermal stability at anaerobic environment. Copper oxide nanowires begin to transform as copper(I oxide at about 250°C and finish at about 400°C. The phase transformation proceeds with a homogeneous nucleation.

  4. Materials testing for in situ stabilization treatability study of INEEL mixed wastes soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, J.; Fuhrmann, M.

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the contaminant-specific materials testing phase of the In Situ Stabilization Comprehensive Environment Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Treatability Study (TS). The purpose of materials testing is to measure the effectiveness of grouting agents to stabilize Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Acid Pit soils and select a grout material for use in the Cold Test Demonstration and Acid Pit Stabilization Treatability Study within the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Test results will assist the selecting a grout material for the follow-on demonstrations described in Test Plan for the Cold Test Demonstration and Acid Pit Stabilization Phases of the In Situ Stabilization Treatability Study at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex

  5. Fast axisymmetric stability calculations using variational techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haney, S.W., Pearlstein, L.D.; Bulmer, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for treating the axisymmetric (n = 0) stability of diverted plasmas in the presence of arbitrary, but toroidally symmetric, structures and active feedback circuits has been developed and implemented as a module in the TEQ free-boundary equilibrium code. This procedure is based on a variational solution of the ideal MHD normal mode equations. Inertia is ordered small but provides a constraint to allow the calculation of the poloidal and toroidal components of the plasma displacement. Feedback based on flux loop measurements is handled by introducing an adjoint system into the variational principle. Approximately 200 trial functions for the radial component of the plasma displacement and 200 magnetic surfaces are employed to obtain highly accurate estimates of the passive growth rate and the non-rigid eigenfunction. Nevertheless, the method is extremely fast: typically 10-20 sec of Cray 2 CPU time are required to analyze a realistic tokamak configuration. This speed, along with the direct coupling to the MHD equilibrium solver, allows interactive investigations of tokamak axisymmetric stability. Benchmarks with TSC and GATO are presented along with parameter scans for ITER and BPX. The results emphasize the importance of considering non-rigid mode effects which for ITER, yield higher nominal growth rates (non-rigid: 45 Hz, rigid: 25 Hz) and atypical internal inductance dependence (smaller l i more unstable)

  6. Comparison of in situ polymerization and solution-dispersion techniques in the preparation of Polyimide/Montmorillonite (MMT) Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Gharayebi, Yadollah; Salit, Mohd Sapuan; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Shameli, Kamyar

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, Polyimide/Montmorillonite Nanocomposites (PI/MMT NCs), based on aromatic diamine (4-Aminophenyl sulfone) (APS) and aromatic dianhydride (3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride) (BTDA) were prepared using in situ polymerization and solution-dispersion techniques. The prepared PI/MMT NCs films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The XRD results showed that at the content of 1.0 wt % Organo Montmorillonite (OMMT) for two techniques and 3.0 wt % OMMT for the in situ polymerization technique, the OMMT was well-intercalated, exfoliated and dispersed into polyimide matrix. The OMMT agglomerated when its amount exceeded 10 wt % and 3.0 wt % for solution-dispersion and in situ polymerization techniques respectively. These results were confirmed by the TEM images of the prepared PI/MMT NCs. The TGA thermograms indicated that thermal stability of prepared PI/MMT NCs were increased with the increase of loading that, the effect is higher for the samples prepared by in situ polymerization technique.

  7. In-situ anatase phase stabilization of titania photocatalyst by sintering in presence of Zr4+ organic salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strini, Alberto; Sanson, Alessandra; Mercadelli, Elisa; Bendoni, Riccardo; Marelli, Marcello; Dal Santo, Vladimiro; Schiavi, Luca

    2015-08-01

    The direct in-situ stabilization of an anatase-based nanocrystalline photocatalyst (Degussa P25) was obtained by sintering the catalyst powder in presence of Zr4+ organic salts. This approach allows the doping of an already-formed nanocrystalline photocatalyst instead of introducing the dopant in the crystal lattice during the catalyst synthesis. The procedure was demonstrated by the production of thick ceramic layers using the screen printing technique. This new method allows to easily stabilize the anatase phase 200 °C higher than the undoped P25 maintaining the same photocatalytic activity. The process was studied using specifically formulated screen-printing inks added with Zr4+ organic salt at 1% and 2% Zr/Ti molar ratio. The anatase phase stability was investigated in the 500-900 °C temperature range analysing the resulting catalysts with XRD, TEM and (S)TEM-EDS. The catalytic activity of the screen-printed layers was assessed by measuring the degradation of toluene in air at ambient concentration (500 nmol m-3) and low UV-A irradiance (180 μW cm-2). The described in-situ stabilization method could be potentially applied to any deposition process involving already formed anatase photocatalyst, allowing higher sintering temperature and then an improved mechanical stability of the active layers without photocatalytic activity degradation.

  8. In-situ stabilization of the Geiger (C and M Oil) Superfund Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andromalos, K.B.; Ameel, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Geiger (C and M Oil) Superfund Site is the first US Army Corps of Engineers managed soil remediation project which utilized the in-situ stabilization/solidification technique to remediate the soil. This project involved the remediation of approximately 23,000 cubic yards of contaminated soil. Contaminants of concern included chromium, lead, PCB'S, toluene, benzene, and other organic compounds. Clean-up criteria for the stabilized material was equal to the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations, when tested using the TCLP leachate extraction method. Chromium, lead, and toluene were the main contaminants of concern, with TCLP clean-up goals of 150, 15 and 1,000 parts per billion (ppb), respectively. This National Priorities List (NPL) site is located near Charleston, SC and was an abandoned old waste oil facility that utilized unlined shallow trenches for the storage of waste oil. This paper summarizes the initial testing programs and the final production work at the site. Extensive testing was performed throughout all phases of the project. This testing was performed for the purpose of mix optimization, quality assurance, and verification testing. Specific parameters tested included: TCLP testing of organics, metals and PCBs, permeability testing, and unconfirmed compression strength

  9. Power system stabilizers based on modern control techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, O P; Chen, G P; Zhang, Y; El-Metwally, K [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1994-12-31

    Developments in digital technology have made it feasible to develop and implement improved controllers based on sophisticated control techniques. Power system stabilizers based on adaptive control, fuzzy logic and artificial networks are being developed. Each of these control techniques possesses unique features and strengths. In this paper, the relative performance of power systems stabilizers based on adaptive control, fuzzy logic and neural network, both in simulation studies and real time tests on a physical model of a power system, is presented and compared to that of a fixed parameter conventional power system stabilizer. (author) 16 refs., 45 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. In-situ stabilization of radioactive zirconium swarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Clay C.

    1999-01-01

    The method for treating ignitable cutting swarf in accordance with the present invention involves collecting cutting swarf in a casting mold underwater and injecting a binder mixture comprising vinyl ester styrene into the vessel to fill void volume; and form a mixture comprising swarf and vinyl ester styrene; and curing the mixture. The method is especially useful for stabilizing the ignitable characteristics of radioactive zirconium cutting swarf, and can be used to solidify zirconium swarf, or other ignitable finely divided material, underwater. The process could also be performed out of water with other particulate wastes.

  11. Stabilization of microorganisms for in situ degradation of toxic chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, R.L.; Ralston, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Methods for large-scale microencapsulation of bacteria and nutrients into microbeads with small enough diameters to travel through aquifers have been developed at the University of Idaho. Both free and immobilized cells of Flavobacterium ATCC 39723, a gram-negative aerobe that degrades various chlorinated phenols, into aquifer microcosms, through which pentachlorophenol (PCP)-contaminated groundwater flowed at in situ flow rates. Aquifer samples were collected with an auger from three wells at the University of Idaho Ground Water Research Site, and packed into 24 columns. Some sterile columns were also prepared, by irradiation at the Washington State University Radiation Center. In some of the columns the free Flavobacterium cells were mixed with the aquifer material before packing the columns. In others, agarose-microimmobilized Flavobacterium were mixed into the aquifer material. The effluent from each column was collected daily for 170 days and analyzed by UV spectroscopy or HPLC for remaining PCP. There were no statistically significant differences between the degradation rates of free or encapsulated Flavobacterium in sterile or native aquifer material as tested in these experiments. This work has shown at the lab scale that encapsulated PCP-degrading Flavobacterium were able to survive under conditions of starvation, predation, and lack of water

  12. Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation - Demonstration Bulletin: In-Situ Soil Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    In-situ stabilization technology immobilizes organics and inorganic compounds in wet or dry soils by using reagents (additives) to polymerize with the soils and sludges producing a cement-like mass. Two basic components of this technology are the Geo-Con/DSM Deep Soil Mixing Sy...

  13. In Situ Local Measurement of Austenite Mechanical Stability and Transformation Behavior in Third-Generation Advanced High-Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Farha, Fadi; Hu, Xiaohua; Sun, Xin; Ren, Yang; Hector, Louis G.; Thomas, Grant; Brown, Tyson W.

    2018-05-01

    Austenite mechanical stability, i.e., retained austenite volume fraction (RAVF) variation with strain, and transformation behavior were investigated for two third-generation advanced high-strength steels (3GAHSS) under quasi-static uniaxial tension: a 1200 grade, two-phase medium Mn (10 wt pct) TRIP steel, and a 980 grade, three-phase TRIP steel produced with a quenching and partitioning heat treatment. The medium Mn (10 wt pct) TRIP steel deforms inhomogeneously via propagative instabilities (Lüders and Portevin Le Châtelier-like bands), while the 980 grade TRIP steel deforms homogenously up to necking. The dramatically different deformation behaviors of these steels required the development of a new in situ experimental technique that couples volumetric synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurement of RAVF with surface strain measurement using stereo digital image correlation over the beam impingement area. Measurement results with the new technique are compared to those from a more conventional approach wherein strains are measured over the entire gage region, while RAVF measurement is the same as that in the new technique. A determination is made as to the appropriateness of the different measurement techniques in measuring the transformation behaviors for steels with homogeneous and inhomogeneous deformation behaviors. Extension of the new in situ technique to the measurement of austenite transformation under different deformation modes and to higher strain rates is discussed.

  14. Bioengineering Techniques for Soil Erosion Protection and Slope Stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Georgi; Ioannis Stathakopoulos

    2006-01-01

    The use of bio-engineering methods for soil erosion protection and slope stabilization has a long tradition. Old methods with rocks and plants, structures of timber have been used over the past centuries. Recently these old soil conservation and stabilization techniques have been rediscovered and improved. Biotechnical engineering methods have become part of geotechnical and hydraulic engineering and have helped bridge the gap between classical engineering disciplines, land use management, la...

  15. Voltage Stabilizer Based on SPWM technique Using Microcontroller

    OpenAIRE

    K. N. Tarchanidis; J. N. Lygouras; P. Botsaris

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an application of the well known SPWM technique on a voltage stabilizer, using a microcontroller. The stabilizer is AC/DC/AC type. So, the system rectifies the input AC voltage to a suitable DC level and the intelligent control of an embedded microcontroller regulates the pulse width of the output voltage in order to produce through a filter a perfect sinusoidal AC voltage. The control program on the microcontroller has the ability to change the FET transistor ...

  16. Introduction to in situ leaching technique and facility at Smith Ranch uranium project in USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lechang; Wang Delin; Sun Xianrong; Gao Shangxiong

    2005-01-01

    The history of in situ leaching of uranium in USA is reviewed. Some techniques and parameters of alkaline in situ leach at Smith Ranch uranium project are introduced, including well field, sorption, elution, precipitation, filter and drying, automatic control, radiation protection, safety and environmental protection. (authors)

  17. In-situ containment and stabilization of buried waste: Annual report FY 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, M.L.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1994-10-01

    The two landfills of specific interest are the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) and the Mixed Waste Landfill (MWL), both located at Sandia National Laboratory. The work is comprised of two subtasks: (1) In-Situ Barriers and (2) In-Situ Stabilization of Contaminated Soils. The main environmental concern at the CWL is a chromium plume resulting from disposal of chromic acid and chromic sulfuric acid into unlined pits. This program has investigated means of in-situ stabilization of chromium contaminated soils and placement of containment barriers around the CWL. The MWL contains a plume of tritiated water. In-situ immobilization of tritiated water with cementitious grouts was not considered to be a method with a high probability of success and was not pursued. This is discussed further in Section 5.0. Containment barriers for the tritium plume were investigated. FY 94 work focused on stabilization of chromium contaminated soil with blast furnace slag modified grouts to bypass the stage of pre-reduction of Cr(6), barriers for tritiated water containment at the MWL, continued study of barriers for the CWL, and jet grouting field trials for CWL barriers at an uncontaminated site at SNL. Cores from the FY 93 permeation grouting field trails were also tested in FY 94

  18. Ignition technique for an in situ oil shale retort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1983-01-01

    A generally flat combustion zone is formed across the entire horizontal cross-section of a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles formed in an in situ oil shale retort. The flat combustion zone is formed by either sequentially igniting regions of the surface of the fragmented permeable mass at successively lower elevations or by igniting the entire surface of the fragmented permeable mass and controlling the rate of advance of various portions of the combustion zone.

  19. Effects of Preservative Techniques on the Storage Stability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of different preservative techniques on the storage stability of sorghum stem sheath beverage was studied. A portion of the beverage samples were pasteurized at 75oC for 15 mins, another pasteurized and refrigerated and the other pasteurized and preserved with 0.1% sodium benzoate and they were studied at ...

  20. Initial tests on in situ vitrification using electrode feeding techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Oma, K.H.; Bigelow, C.E.

    1990-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of an engineering-scale in situ vitrification (ISV) test conducted to demonstrate the potential for electrode feeding in soils with a high concentration of metals. The engineering-scale test was part of a Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) program to assist Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in conducting treatability studies of the potential for applying ISV to the mixed transuranic waste buried at the INEL subsurface disposal area. The purpose of this test was to evaluate the effectiveness of both gravity fed and operator-controlled electrode feeding in reducing or eliminating many of the potential problems associated with fixed-electrode processing of soils with high concentrations of metal. Actual site soils from INEL were mixed with representative concentrations of carbon steel and stainless steel for this engineering-scale test. 18 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Comparison of non-invasive tear film stability measurement techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael Tm; Murphy, Paul J; Blades, Kenneth J; Craig, Jennifer P

    2018-01-01

    Measurement of tear film stability is commonly used to give an indication of tear film quality but a number of non-invasive techniques exists within the clinical setting. This study sought to compare three non-invasive tear film stability measurement techniques: instrument-mounted wide-field white light clinical interferometry, instrument-mounted keratoscopy and hand-held keratoscopy. Twenty-two subjects were recruited in a prospective, randomised, masked, cross-over study. Tear film break-up or thinning time was measured non-invasively by independent experienced examiners, with each of the three devices, in a randomised order, within an hour. Significant correlation was observed between instrument-mounted interferometric and keratoscopic measurements (p 0.05). Tear film stability values obtained from the hand-held device were significantly shorter and demonstrated narrower spread than the other two instruments (all p 0.05). Good clinical agreement exists between the instrument-mounted interferometric and keratoscopic measurements but not between the hand-held device and either of the instrument-mounted techniques. The results highlight the importance of specifying the instrument employed to record non-invasive tear film stability. © 2017 Optometry Australia.

  2. Caudal Septal Stabilization Suturing Technique to Treat Crooked Noses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykal, Bahadir; Erdim, Ibrahim; Guvey, Ali; Oghan, Fatih; Kayhan, Fatma Tulin

    2016-10-01

    To rotate the nasal axis and septum to the midline using an L-strut graft and a novel caudal septal stabilization suturing technique to treat crooked noses. Thirty-six patients were included in the study. First, an L-strut graft was prepared by excising the deviated cartilage site in all patients. Second, multiple stabilization suturing, which we describe as a caudal septal stabilization suturing technique with a "fishing net"-like appearance, was applied between the anterior nasal spine and caudal septum in all patients. This new surgical technique, used to rotate the caudal septum, was applied to 22 I-type and 14 C-type crooked noses. Correction rates for the crooked noses were compared between the 2 inclination types with angular estimations. Deviation angles were measured using the AutoCAD 2012 software package and frontal (anterior) views, with the Frankfurt horizontal line parallel to the ground. Nasal axis angles showing angle improvement graded 4 categories as excellent, good, acceptable, and unsuccessful for evaluations at 6 months after surgery in the study. The success rate in the C-type nasal inclination was 86.7% (±21.9) and 88% (±16.7) in the I-type. The overall success rate of L-strut grafting and caudal septal stabilization suturing in crooked nose surgeries was 87.5% (±18.6). "Unsuccessful" results were not reported in any of the patients. L-strut grafting and caudal septal stabilization suturing techniques are efficacious in crooked noses according to objective measurement analysis results. However, a longer follow-up duration in a larger patient population is needed.

  3. Agar agar-stabilized milled zerovalent iron particles for in situ groundwater remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velimirovic, Milica; Schmid, Doris; Wagner, Stephan; Micić, Vesna; Kammer, Frank von der; Hofmann, Thilo, E-mail: thilo.hofmann@univie.ac.at

    2016-09-01

    Submicron-scale milled zerovalent iron (milled ZVI) particles produced by grinding macroscopic raw materials could provide a cost-effective alternative to nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles for in situ degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in groundwater. However, the aggregation and settling of bare milled ZVI particles from suspension presents a significant obstacle to their in situ application for groundwater remediation. In our investigations we reduced the rapid aggregation and settling rate of bare milled ZVI particles from suspension by stabilization with a “green” agar agar polymer. The transport potential of stabilized milled ZVI particle suspensions in a diverse array of natural heterogeneous porous media was evaluated in a series of well-controlled laboratory column experiments. The impact of agar agar on trichloroethene (TCE) removal by milled ZVI particles was assessed in laboratory-scale batch reactors. The use of agar agar significantly enhanced the transport of milled ZVI particles in all of the investigated porous media. Reactivity tests showed that the agar agar-stabilized milled ZVI particles were reactive towards TCE, but that their reactivity was an order of magnitude less than that of bare, non-stabilized milled ZVI particles. Our results suggest that milled ZVI particles could be used as an alternative to nZVI particles as their potential for emplacement into contaminated zone, their reactivity, and expected longevity are beneficial for in situ groundwater remediation. - Highlights: • Rapid aggregation and sedimentation were observed in bare milled ZVI particles. • Agar agar improved the stability of milled ZVI particle suspensions. • Agar agar enhanced the transport of milled ZVI particles in heterogeneous sands. • Agar agar reduced the reactivity of milled ZVI particles towards TCE.

  4. Agar agar-stabilized milled zerovalent iron particles for in situ groundwater remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velimirovic, Milica; Schmid, Doris; Wagner, Stephan; Micić, Vesna; Kammer, Frank von der; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    Submicron-scale milled zerovalent iron (milled ZVI) particles produced by grinding macroscopic raw materials could provide a cost-effective alternative to nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles for in situ degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in groundwater. However, the aggregation and settling of bare milled ZVI particles from suspension presents a significant obstacle to their in situ application for groundwater remediation. In our investigations we reduced the rapid aggregation and settling rate of bare milled ZVI particles from suspension by stabilization with a “green” agar agar polymer. The transport potential of stabilized milled ZVI particle suspensions in a diverse array of natural heterogeneous porous media was evaluated in a series of well-controlled laboratory column experiments. The impact of agar agar on trichloroethene (TCE) removal by milled ZVI particles was assessed in laboratory-scale batch reactors. The use of agar agar significantly enhanced the transport of milled ZVI particles in all of the investigated porous media. Reactivity tests showed that the agar agar-stabilized milled ZVI particles were reactive towards TCE, but that their reactivity was an order of magnitude less than that of bare, non-stabilized milled ZVI particles. Our results suggest that milled ZVI particles could be used as an alternative to nZVI particles as their potential for emplacement into contaminated zone, their reactivity, and expected longevity are beneficial for in situ groundwater remediation. - Highlights: • Rapid aggregation and sedimentation were observed in bare milled ZVI particles. • Agar agar improved the stability of milled ZVI particle suspensions. • Agar agar enhanced the transport of milled ZVI particles in heterogeneous sands. • Agar agar reduced the reactivity of milled ZVI particles towards TCE.

  5. Sampling hydrometeors in clouds in-situ - the replicator technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wex, Heike; Löffler, Mareike; Griesche, Hannes; Bühl, Johannes; Stratmann, Frank; Schmitt, Carl; Dirksen, Ruud; Reichardt, Jens; Wolf, Veronika; Kuhn, Thomas; Prager, Lutz; Seifert, Patric

    2017-04-01

    For the examination of ice crystals in clouds, concerning their number concentrations, sizes and shapes, often instruments mounted on fast flying aircraft are used. One related disadvantage is possible shattering of the ice crystals on inlets, which has been improved with the introduction of the "Korolev-tip" and by accounting for inter-arrival times (Korolev et al., 2013, 2015), but additionally, the typically fast flying aircraft allow only for a low spatial resolution. Alternative sampling methods have been introduced as e.g., a replicator by Miloshevich & Heymsfield (1997) and an in-situ imager by by Kuhn & Heymsfield (2016). They both sample ice crystals onto an advancing stripe while ascending on a balloon, conserving the ice crystals either in formvar for later off-line analysis under a microscope (Miloshevich & Heymsfield, 1997) or imaging them upon their impaction on silicone oil (Kuhn & Heymsfield, 2016), both yielding vertical profiles for different ice crystal properties. A measurement campaign was performed at the Lindenberg Meteorological Observatory of the German Meteorological Service (DWD) in Germany in October 2016, during which both types of instruments were used during balloon ascents, while ground-based Lidar and cloud-radar measurements were performed simultaneously. The two ice particle sondes were operated by people from the Lulea University of Technology and from TROPOS, where the latter one was made operational only recently. Here, we will show first results of the TROPOS replicator on ice crystals sampled during one ascent, for which the collected ice crystals were analyzed off-line using a microscope. Literature: Korolev, A., E. Emery, and K. Creelman (2013), Modification and tests of particle probe tips to mitigate effects of ice shattering, J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech., 30, 690-708, 2013. Korolev, A., and P. R. Field (2015), Assessment of the performance of the inter-arrival time algorithm to identify ice shattering artifacts in cloud

  6. Theoretical stability assessment of uranyl phosphates and apatites: Selection of amendments for in situ remediation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raicevic, S.; Wright, J.V.; Veljkovic, V.; Conca, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Addition of an amendment or reagent to soil/sediment is a technique that can decrease mobility and reduce bioavailability of uranium (U) and other heavy metals in the contaminated site. According to data from literature and results obtained in field studies, the general mineral class of apatites was selected as a most promising amendment for in situ immobilization/remediation of U. In this work we presented theoretical assessment of stability of U(VI) in four apatite systems (hydroxyapatite (HAP), North Carolina Apatite (NCA), Lisina Apatite (LA), and Apatite II) in order to determine an optimal apatite soil amendment which could be used for in situ remediation of uranium. In this analysis we used a theoretical criterion which is based on calculation of the ion-ion interaction potential, representing the main term of the cohesive energy of the matrix/pollutant system. The presented results of this analysis indicate (i) that the mechanism of immobilization of U by natural apatites depends on their chemical composition and (ii) that all analyzed apatites represent, from the point of view of stability, promising materials which could be used in field remediation of U-contaminated sites

  7. Development of in-situ trap characterisation techniques for EMCCDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, N.; Hall, D.; Holland, A.; Burgon, R.; Jordan, D.; Morrissey, P.; Demers, R.; Harding, L. K.; Nemati, B.; Effinger, R.; Bottom, M.

    2018-02-01

    The "trap pumping" technique has seen considerable use over recent years as a means to probe the intrinsic properties of silicon defects that can impact charge transfer performance within CCD-based technologies. While the theory behind the technique is reasonably well understood, it has to date only been applied to relatively simple pixel designs where the motion of charge between pixel phases is fairly easy to predict. For some devices, the intrinsic pixel architecture is more complex and can consist of unequal phase sizes and additional implants that deform the electronic potential. Here, we present the implementation of the trap pumping technique for the CCD201-20, a 2-phase Teledyne e2v EMCCD. Clocking schemes are presented that can provide the location of silicon defects to sub-micron resolution. Experimental techniques that allow determination of trap energy levels and emission cross sections are presented. These are then implemented on an irradiated CCD201-20 to determine the energy level and emission cross section for defects thought to be the double acceptor state of the silicon divacancy (VV--) and carbon-phosphorus (CiPs) pairs. An improvement in charge transfer performance through optimised parallel clock delay is demonstrated and found to correlate with the properties of defects found using the trap pumping technique.

  8. On the stability of a variety of organic photovoltaic devices by IPCE and in situ IPCE analyses - the ISOS-3 inter-laboratory collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Terán-Escobar, Gerardo; Krebs, Frederik C.; Lira-Cantú, Mónica

    2012-01-01

    This work is part of the inter-laboratory collaboration to study the stability of seven distinct sets of state-of-the-art organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices prepared by leading research laboratories. All devices have been shipped to and degraded at RISempty set-DTU up to 1830 hours in accordance with established ISOS-3 protocols under defined illumination conditions. In this work, we apply the Incident Photon-to-Electron Conversion Efficiency (IPCE) and the in situ IPCE techniques to determin...

  9. In situ stabilization of mixed radioactive waste storage tanks and contaminated soil areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthern, G.E.; Meservey, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    Within the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex, there are a number of small (<50,000 gallons) underground Storage tanks containing mixed waste materials. The radioactive content of wastes eliminates the feasibility for hazardous waste treatment in accordance with previously prescribed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) technologies. As a result, DOE is funding in situ stabilization technology development for these tanks, Some of this development work has been done at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the initial efforts there were concentrated on the stabilization of the contents of the Test Area North (TAN) V-9 Tank. This is a 400 gallon underground tank filled with about 320 gallons of liquids and silty sediments. Sampling data indicates that approximately 50 wt% of the tank contents is aqueous-phase liquids. The vertically oriented cylindrical tank has a conical bottom and a chordal baffle that separates the tank inlet from its outlet. Access to the tank is through a six inch diameter access pipe on top of the tank. Because of the high volume, and the high concentration of aqueous-phase materials, Tank V-9 stabilization efforts have focussed on applying in situ agitation with dry feed addition to stabilize its contents. Materials selected for dry feed addition to this tank include a mixture of Aquaset IIH, and Type I/II Portland cement. This paper describes the results of proof-of-concept tests performed on full scale mockups of the Tank V-9. This proof-of-concept test were used to set operating parameters for in situ mixing, as well as evaluate how variations in Aquaset IIH/Portland cement ratio and sediment to liquid volume affected mixing of the tank

  10. In-situ stabilization of TRU/mixed waste project at the INEEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milian, L.W.; Heiser, J.H.; Adams, J.W.; Rutenkroeger, S.P.

    1997-08-01

    Throughout the DOE complex, buried waste poses a threat to the environment by means of contaminant transport. Many of the sites contain buried waste that is untreated, prior to disposal, or insufficiently treated, by today's standards. One option to remedy these disposal problems is to stabilize the waste in situ. This project was in support of the Transuranic/Mixed Buried Waste - Arid Soils product line of the Landfill Focus Area, which is managed currently by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (BNL) provided the analytical laboratory and technical support for the various stabilization activities that will be performed as part of the In Situ Stabilization of TRU/Mixed Waste project at the INEL. More specifically, BNL was involved in laboratory testing that included the evaluation of several grouting materials and their compatibility, interaction, and long-term durability/performance, following the encapsulation of various waste materials. The four grouting materials chosen by INEL were: TECT 1, a two component, high density cementious grout, WAXFIX, a two component, molten wax product, Carbray 100, a two component elastomeric epoxy, and phosphate cement, a two component ceramic. A simulated waste stream comprised of sodium nitrate, Canola oil, and INEL soil was used in this study. Seven performance and durability tests were conducted on grout/waste specimens: compressive strength, wet-dry cycling, thermal analysis, base immersion, solvent immersion, hydraulic conductivity, and accelerated leach testing

  11. Reliable cost effective technique for in situ ground stress measurements in deep gold mines.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stacey, TR

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available on these requirements, an in situ stress measurement technique which will be practically applicable in the deep gold mines, has been developed conceptually. Referring to the figure on the following page, this method involves: • a borehole-based system, using... level mines have not been developed. 2 This is some of the background to the present SIMRAC research project, the title ofwhich is “Reliable cost effective technique for in-situ ground stress measurements in deep gold mines”. A copy of the research...

  12. Development of an in situ calibration technique for combustible gas detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumar, J. W.; Wynveen, R. A.; Lance, N., Jr.; Lantz, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an in situ calibration procedure for combustible gas detectors (CGD). The CGD will be a necessary device for future space vehicles as many subsystems in the Environmental Control/Life Support System utilize or produce hydrogen (H2) gas. Existing calibration techniques are time-consuming and require support equipment such as an environmental chamber and calibration gas supply. The in situ calibration procedure involves utilization of a water vapor electrolysis cell for the automatic in situ generation of a H2/air calibration mixture within the flame arrestor of the CGD. The development effort concluded with the successful demonstration of in situ span calibrations of a CGD.

  13. Two-dimensional in situ metrology of X-ray mirrors using the speckle scanning technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongchang, E-mail: hongchang.wang@diamond.ac.uk; Kashyap, Yogesh; Laundy, David; Sawhney, Kawal [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-06

    The two-dimensional slope error of an X-ray mirror has been retrieved by employing the speckle scanning technique, which will be valuable at synchrotron radiation facilities and in astronomical telescopes. In situ metrology overcomes many of the limitations of existing metrology techniques and is capable of exceeding the performance of present-day optics. A novel technique for precisely characterizing an X-ray bimorph mirror and deducing its two-dimensional (2D) slope error map is presented. This technique has also been used to perform fast optimization of a bimorph mirror using the derived 2D piezo response functions. The measured focused beam size was significantly reduced after the optimization, and the slope error map was then verified by using geometrical optics to simulate the focused beam profile. This proposed technique is expected to be valuable for in situ metrology of X-ray mirrors at synchrotron radiation facilities and in astronomical telescopes.

  14. In situ optoacoustic measurement of the pointing stability of femtosecond laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushkarev, D.; Mitina, E.; Uryupina, D.; Volkov, R.; Karabytov, A.; Savel'ev, A.

    2018-02-01

    A new method for the in situ acoustic measurement of the beam pointing stability (BPS) of powerful pulsed lasers is tested. A broadband (~6 MHz) piezoelectric transducer placed a few millimeters from the laser spark produces an electric pulse. We show that variation in time of the position of this pulse can be used to assess the BPS down to 1 µrad in a few hundred laser shots. The estimated value coincides well with the BPS estimated using standard measurement in the far field.

  15. Implementation of the Fluorescent in Situ Hybridization technique in the Faculty of Medicine, UdelaR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Cairus

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Cytogenetic Laboratory of the Faculty of Medicine processes, on average, 300 annual samples of public and private healthcare centers by conventional cytogenetics. It is essential to implement new techniques to improve the quality of the service offered. The purpose of this work was to implement the Fluorescent in situ Hybridization technique (FISH. An observational, cross-sectional, analytical study was performed. Peripheral blood samples from patients with sex chromosomopathies diagnosed by conventional cytogenetics were analyzed. Fluorescent in situ hybridization technique was applied, comparing results with FISH and with conventional cytogenetics. The percentage of mosaicism detected by conventional cytogenetics and Fluorescent in situ Hybridization was studied: 24 samples were analyzed; 19 presented numerical alterations, 3 structural and 2 both. Numerical alterations were Turner syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, XXX syndrome and XYY syndrome. Concordance in diagnoses was found for both techniques. For Turner syndrome, 8 of 12 samples corresponded to mosaicism, and there were no significant differences between conventional cytogenetics and the technique studied (p0.05. Klinefelter syndrome and XYY were both presented in a non-mosaic karyotype. For XXX syndrome, a normal line (46, XX was observed in three of the samples, in a percentage close to the cut off. From this research, it will be possible to implement Fluorescent in situ Hybridization in this service, to extend it to other pathologies and to enable the training of human resources; consolidating this laboratory as a national academic reference center.

  16. Using geophysical techniques to control in situ thermal remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, S.; Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Wilt, M.; Goldman, R.; Kayes, D.; Kenneally, K.; Udell, K.; Hunter, R.

    1994-01-01

    Monitoring the thermal and hydrologic processes that occur during thermal environmental remediation programs in near real-time provides essential information for controlling the process. Geophysical techniques played a crucial role in process control as well as for characterization during the recent Dynamic Underground Stripping Project demonstration in which several thousand gallons of gasoline were removed from heterogeneous soils both above and below the water table. Dynamic Underground Stripping combines steam injection and electrical heating for thermal enhancement with ground water pumping and vacuum extraction for contaminant removal. These processes produce rapid changes in the subsurface properties including changes in temperature fluid saturation, pressure and chemistry. Subsurface imaging methods are used to map the heated zones and control the thermal process. Temperature measurements made in wells throughout the field reveal details of the complex heating phenomena. Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) provides near real-time detailed images of the heated zones between boreholes both during electrical heating and steam injection. Borehole induction logs show close correlation with lithostratigraphy and, by identifying the more permeable gravel zones, can be used to predict steam movement. They are also useful in understanding the physical changes in the field and in interpreting the ERT images. Tiltmeters provide additional information regarding the shape of the steamed zones in plan view. They were used to track the growth of the steam front from individual injectors

  17. Evaluation of the tear film stability after laser in situ keratomileusis using the tear film stability analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tomoko; Zheng, Xiaodong; Klyce, Stephen D; Kataoka, Hisashi; Uno, Toshihiko; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Karon, Mike; Hirano, Sumie; Okamoto, Shigeki; Ohashi, Yuichi

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the tear film stability of patients before and after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) using the tear film stability analysis system (TSAS). Prospective observational case series. New videokeratography software for a topographic modeling system (TMS-2N) was developed that can automatically capture consecutive corneal surface images every second for 10 seconds. Thirty-four subjects (64 eyes) who underwent myopia LASIK were enrolled in this study. All subjects were examined with the new system before LASIK and at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after the surgery. Corneal topographs were analyzed for tear breakup time (TMS breakup time) and breakup area (TMS breakup area). Based on pre-LASIK TSAS analysis, subjects were separated into normal and abnormal TSAS value groups. The criteria for the normal group were either TMS breakup time more than 5 seconds or TMS breakup area less than 0.2. The percentage of the occurrence of superficial punctuate keratitis was compared between the two groups with regard to subject's dry eye signs and symptoms. Tear film stability decreased significantly during the early period after LASIK, as indexed by decreased TMS breakup time and increased TMS breakup area. Tear film instability resolved at 6 months after surgery. Before LASIK, 22 subjects (43 eyes) had normal TSAS evaluation and 12 subjects (21 eyes) were abnormal. After LASIK, among normal TSAS value eyes, 8 of 43 (18.6%) eyes developed superficial punctuate keratitis. In sharp contrast, 14 of 21 (66.7%) eyes in the abnormal group displayed superficial punctuate keratitis, correlating well with the patients' dry eye symptoms. The difference in the presence of superficial punctuate keratitis after LASIK between normal and abnormal TSAS value groups was statistically significant (P <.001). Subjects with abnormal TSAS evaluation also displayed resistance to dry eye treatment and had extended period of recovery. Tear film stability analysis can be a useful

  18. A New Technique for Deep in situ Measurements of the Soil Water Retention Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocchi, Irene; Gragnano, Carmine Gerardo; Govoni, Laura

    2018-01-01

    In situ measurements of soil suction and water content in deep soil layers still represent an experimental challenge. Mostly developed within agriculture related disciplines, field techniques for the identification of soil retention behaviour have been so far employed in the geotechnical context ...

  19. Stability investigations of zinc and cobalt precipitates immobilized by in situ bioprecipitation (ISBP) process

    KAUST Repository

    Satyawali, Yamini; Schols, Edo; Van Roy, Sandra; Dejonghe, Winnie; Diels, Ludo; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien

    2010-01-01

    In situ bioprecipitation (ISBP), which involves immobilizing the metals as precipitates (mainly sulphides) in the solid phase, is an effective method of metal removal from contaminated groundwater. This study investigated the stability of metal precipitates formed after ISBP in two different solid-liquid matrices (artificial and natural). The artificial matrix consisted of sand, Zn (200mgL-1), artificial groundwater and a carbon source (electron donor). Here the stability of the Zn precipitates was evaluated by manipulation of redox and pH. The natural system matrices included aquifer material and groundwater samples collected from three different metal (Zn and Co) contaminated sites and different carbon sources were provided as electron donors. In the natural matrices, metal precipitates stability was assessed by changing aquifer redox conditions, sequential extraction, and BIOMET® assay. The results indicated that, in the artificial matrix, redox manipulation did not impact the Zn precipitates. However the sequential pH change proved detrimental, releasing 58% of the precipitated Zn back into liquid phase. In natural matrices, the applied carbon source largely affected the stability of metal precipitates. Elemental analysis performed on the precipitates formed in natural matrix showed that the main elements of the precipitates were sulphur with Zn and Co. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Ultra-Small Fatty Acid-Stabilized Magnetite Nanocolloids Synthesized by In Situ Hydrolytic Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheireddine El-Boubbou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple, fast, large-scale, and cost-effective preparation of uniform controlled magnetic nanoparticles remains a major hurdle on the way towards magnetically targeted applications at realistic technical conditions. Herein, we present a unique one-pot approach that relies on simple basic hydrolytic in situ coprecipitation of inexpensive metal salts (Fe2+ and Fe3+ compartmentalized by stabilizing fatty acids and aided by the presence of alkylamines. The synthesis was performed at relatively low temperatures (~80°C without the use of high-boiling point solvents and elevated temperatures. This method allowed for the production of ultra-small, colloidal, and hydrophobically stabilized magnetite metal oxide nanoparticles readily dispersed in organic solvents. The results reveal that the obtained magnetite nanoparticles exhibit narrow size distributions, good monodispersities, high saturation magnetizations, and excellent colloidal stabilities. When the [fatty acid] : [Fe] ratio was varied, control over nanoparticle diameters within the range of 2–10 nm was achieved. The amount of fatty acid and alkylamine used during the reaction proved critical in governing morphology, dispersity, uniformity, and colloidal stability. Upon exchange with water-soluble polymers, the ultra-small sized particles become biologically relevant, with great promise for theranostic applications as imaging and magnetically targeted delivery vehicles.

  1. Stability investigations of zinc and cobalt precipitates immobilized by in situ bioprecipitation (ISBP) process

    KAUST Repository

    Satyawali, Yamini

    2010-09-01

    In situ bioprecipitation (ISBP), which involves immobilizing the metals as precipitates (mainly sulphides) in the solid phase, is an effective method of metal removal from contaminated groundwater. This study investigated the stability of metal precipitates formed after ISBP in two different solid-liquid matrices (artificial and natural). The artificial matrix consisted of sand, Zn (200mgL-1), artificial groundwater and a carbon source (electron donor). Here the stability of the Zn precipitates was evaluated by manipulation of redox and pH. The natural system matrices included aquifer material and groundwater samples collected from three different metal (Zn and Co) contaminated sites and different carbon sources were provided as electron donors. In the natural matrices, metal precipitates stability was assessed by changing aquifer redox conditions, sequential extraction, and BIOMET® assay. The results indicated that, in the artificial matrix, redox manipulation did not impact the Zn precipitates. However the sequential pH change proved detrimental, releasing 58% of the precipitated Zn back into liquid phase. In natural matrices, the applied carbon source largely affected the stability of metal precipitates. Elemental analysis performed on the precipitates formed in natural matrix showed that the main elements of the precipitates were sulphur with Zn and Co. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  2. In-situ measurement of mechanical properties of structural components using cyclic ball indentation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Madhusoodanan, K.; Panwar, Sanjay; Rupani, B.B.

    2007-01-01

    Material properties of components change during service due to environmental conditions. Measurement of mechanical properties of the components is important for assessing their fitness for service. In many instances, it is not possible to remove sizable samples from the component for doing the measurement in laboratory. In-situ technique for measurement of mechanical properties has great significance in such cases. One of the nondestructive methods that can be adopted for in-situ application is based on cyclic ball indentation technique. It involves multiple indentation cycles (at the same penetration location) on a metallic surface by a spherical indenter. Each cycle consists of indentation, partial unload and reload sequences. Presently, commercial systems are available for doing indentation test on structural component for limited applications. But, there is a genuine need of remotely operable compact in-situ property measurement system. Considering the importance of such applications Reactor Engineering Division of BARC has developed an In-situ Property Measurement System (IProMS), which can be used for in-situ measurement of mechanical properties of a flat or tubular component. This paper highlights the basic theory of measurement, qualification tests on IProMS and results from tests done on flat specimens and tubular component. (author)

  3. Outside-out "sniffer-patch" clamp technique for in situ measures of neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller-Chrétien, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism underlying neurotransmitter release is a critical research domain for the understanding of neuronal network function; however, few techniques are available for the direct detection and measurement of neurotransmitter release. To date, the sniffer-patch clamp technique is mainly used to investigate these mechanisms from individual cultured cells. In this study, we propose to adapt the sniffer-patch clamp technique to in situ detection of neurosecretion. Using outside-out patches from donor cells as specific biosensors plunged in acute cerebral slices, this technique allows for proper detection and quantification of neurotransmitter release at the level of the neuronal network.

  4. Application of in situ x-ray diffraction techniques in heterogenous catalytic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifah Bee Abd Hamid

    2002-01-01

    A broad range of techniques is available today for the characterisation of catalysts and the investigation of catalyst reaction mechanisms. However, only a limited number of those are suitable for in situ studies, i.e experiments performed in conditions mimicking or close as possible to real operating conditions. Various commercially and in-house developed in situ X-Ray diffraction (XRD) cells have been used to obtain information on the phase and structure of materials at the initial formation stage, activation methodology, calcination, reduction and carburization. A major advantage of the in situ X-ray cells is that it allows direct observations on the decomposition of precursors leading to various phases in a controlled environment, i.e. controlled temperature and pressure under specified gases. The cells can be operated both at high temperatures and high pressures, equipped with Position Sensitive Detector (PSD), feature which was used to study phase transformation occurring during the activation of various solids. In MoO 3 , XRD results provide detailed information on the hydrogen insertion into its lattice, followed by carburization providing good understanding on the mechanism in the solid transformation leading to the metastable MoC 1 -x phase. For the Bi-SnO x systems, the environmental cell coupled with XRD and PSD allow the design of activation procedure to obtain the active Bi 2 Sn 2 O 7 . The in situ XRD technique reveals crucial information on the initial stage of oxides formations prior to condensation reaction shown in MCM-41 and titania systems. In this presentation, discussions on general achievements and problems relating to the use of in situ XRD techniques as well as of specific examples selected to illustrate the use and potential of in situ XRD are made. It is not intended to be a review of the art but a highlight of the challenges which the catalytic and material scientists face when entering the avenue. (Author)

  5. Evaluating Acoustic Emission Signals as an in situ process monitoring technique for Selective Laser Melting (SLM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Karl A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Candy, Jim V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Guss, Gabe [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mathews, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-14

    In situ real-time monitoring of the Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process has significant implications for the AM community. The ability to adjust the SLM process parameters during a build (in real-time) can save time, money and eliminate expensive material waste. Having a feedback loop in the process would allow the system to potentially ‘fix’ problem regions before a next powder layer is added. In this study we have investigated acoustic emission (AE) phenomena generated during the SLM process, and evaluated the results in terms of a single process parameter, of an in situ process monitoring technique.

  6. Lithographically fabricated silicon microreactor for in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts—Enabling correlative characterization techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baier, S.; Rochet, A.; Hofmann, G. [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kraut, M. [Institute for Micro Process Engineering, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Grunwaldt, J.-D., E-mail: grunwaldt@kit.edu [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Catalysis Research and Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    We report on a new modular setup on a silicon-based microreactor designed for correlative spectroscopic, scattering, and analytic on-line gas investigations for in situ studies of heterogeneous catalysts. The silicon microreactor allows a combination of synchrotron radiation based techniques (e.g., X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy) as well as infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy. Catalytic performance can be determined simultaneously by on-line product analysis using mass spectrometry. We present the design of the reactor, the experimental setup, and as a first example for an in situ study, the catalytic partial oxidation of methane showing the applicability of this reactor for in situ studies.

  7. Laser Based In Situ Techniques: Novel Methods for Generating Extreme Conditions in TEM Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, M; Lagrange, T; Reed, B; Armstrong, M; Campbell, G; DeHope, W; Kim, J; King, W; Masiel, D; Browning, N

    2008-02-25

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) is introduced as a novel tool for in situ processing of materials. Examples of various types of dynamic studies outline the advantages and differences of laser-based heating in the DTEM in comparison to conventional (resistive) heating in situ TEM methods. We demonstrate various unique capabilities of the drive laser, namely, in situ processing of nanoscale materials, rapid and high temperature phase transformations, and controlled thermal activation of materials. These experiments would otherwise be impossible without the use of the DTEM drive laser. Thus, the potential of the DTEM to as a new technique to process and characterize the growth of a myriad of micro and nanostructures is demonstrated.

  8. The development of an electrochemical technique for in situ calibrating of combustible gas detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumar, J. W.; Lantz, J. B.; Schubert, F. H.

    1976-01-01

    A program to determine the feasibility of performing in situ calibration of combustible gas detectors was successfully completed. Several possible techniques for performing the in situ calibration were proposed. The approach that showed the most promise involved the use of a miniature water vapor electrolysis cell for the generation of hydrogen within the flame arrestor of a combustible gas detector to be used for the purpose of calibrating the combustible gas detectors. A preliminary breadboard of the in situ calibration hardware was designed, fabricated and assembled. The breadboard equipment consisted of a commercially available combustible gas detector, modified to incorporate a water vapor electrolysis cell, and the instrumentation required for controlling the water vapor electrolysis and controlling and calibrating the combustible gas detector. The results showed that operation of the water vapor electrolysis at a given current density for a specific time period resulted in the attainment of a hydrogen concentration plateau within the flame arrestor of the combustible gas detector.

  9. Grout performance in support of in situ stabilization/solidification of the GAAT tank sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, R.D.; Kauschinger, J.L.

    1997-05-01

    The Gunite trademark and associated tanks (GAATs) were constructed at ORNL between 1943 and 1951 and were used for many years to collect radioactive and chemical wastes. These tanks are currently inactive. Varying amounts of the sludge were removed and disposed of through the Hydrofracture Program. Thus, some tanks are virtually empty, while others still contain significant amounts of sludge and supernatant. In situ grouting of the sludges in the tanks using multi-point injection (MPI trademark), a patented, proprietary technique, is being investigated as a low-cost alternative to (1) moving the sludges to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) for later solidification and disposal, (2) ex situ grouting of the sludges followed by either disposal back in the tanks or containerizing and disposal elsewhere, and (3) vitrification of the sludges. The paper discusses the chemical characteristics of the GAATs and the type of chemical surrogate that was used during the leachability tests. This is followed by the experimental work, which, consisted of scope testing and sensitivity testing. The scope testing explored the rheology of the proposed jetting slurries and the settling properties of the proposed grouts using sand-water mixes for the wet sludge. After establishing a jetting slurry and grout with an acceptable rheology and settling properties, the proposed in situ grout formulation was subjected to sensitivity testing for variations in the formulation

  10. In situ vitrification - A potential remedial action technique for hazardous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, V.F.; Buelt, J.L.; Oma, K.H.; Timmerman, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is an innovative technology being developed as a potential method for stabilizing transuranic (TRU) contaminated wastes in place. Although the process is being developed for TRU contaminated wastes, it is envisioned that the process could also be applied to hazardous chemical wastes. In situ vitrification (ISV) is the conversion of contaminated soil into a durable glass and crystalline wastes form through melting by joule heating. The technology for in situ vitrification is based upon electric melter technology developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste. In situ vitrification was initially tested by researchers at PNL in August, 1980 (U.S. Patent 4,376,598). Since then, ISV has grown from a concept to an emerging technology through a series of 21 engineering-scale (laboratory) tests and 7 pilot-scale (field) tests. A large-scale system is currently being fabricated for testing. The program has been sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office for potential application to Hanford TRU contaminated soil sites. A more detailed description outlining the power system design and the off-gas treatment system follows

  11. Fragrance composition of Dendrophylax lindenii (Orchidaceae using a novel technique applied in situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Sadler

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The ghost orchid, Dendrophylax lindenii (Lindley Bentham ex Rolfe (Orchidaceae, is one of North America’s rarest and well-known orchids. Native to Cuba and SW Florida where it frequents shaded swamps as an epiphyte, the species has experienced steady decline. Little information exists on D. lindenii’s biology in situ, raising conservation concerns. During the summer of 2009 at an undisclosed population in Collier County, FL, a substantial number (ca. 13 of plants initiated anthesis offering a unique opportunity to study this species in situ. We report a new technique aimed at capturing floral headspace of D. lindenii in situ, and identified volatile compounds using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS. All components of the floral scent were identified as terpenoids with the exception of methyl salicylate. The most abundant compound was the sesquiterpene (E,E-α-farnesene (71% followed by (E-β-ocimene (9% and methyl salicylate (8%. Other compounds were: linalool (5%, sabinene (4%, (E-α-bergamotene (2%, α-pinene (1%, and 3-carene (1%. Interestingly, (E,E-α-farnesene has previously been associated with pestiferous insects (e.g., Hemiptera. The other compounds are common floral scent constituents in other angiosperms suggesting that our in situ technique was effective. Volatile capture was, therefore, possible without imposing physical harm (e.g., inflorescence detachment to this rare orchid.

  12. Stability of silver nanoparticle monolayers determined by in situ streaming potential measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morga, Maria; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Oćwieja, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    A silver particle suspension obtained by a chemical reduction was used in this work. Monolayers of these particles (average size 28 nm) on mica modified by poly(allylamine hydrochloride) were produced under diffusion-controlled transport. Monolayer coverages, quantitatively determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and SEM, was regulated by adjusting the nanoparticle deposition time and the suspension concentration. The zeta potential of the monolayers was determined by streaming potential measurements carried out under in situ (wet) conditions. These measurements performed for various ionic strengths and pH were interpreted in terms of the three-dimensional (3D) electrokinetic model. The stability of silver monolayers was also investigated using streaming potential and the AFM methods. The decrease in the surface coverage of particles as a function of time and ionic strength varied between 10 −1 and 10 −4  M was investigated. This allowed one to determine the equilibrium adsorption constant K a and the binding energy of silver particles (energy minima depth). Energy minima depth were calculated that varied between −18 kT for I = 10 −1  M and −19 kT for I = 10 −4 for pH 5.5 and T = 298 K. Our investigations suggest that the interactions between surface and nanoparticles are controlled by the electrostatic interactions among ion pairs. It was also shown that the in situ electrokinetic measurements are in accordance with those obtained by more tedious ex situ AFM measurements. This confirmed the utility of the streaming potential method for direct kinetic studies of nanoparticle deposition/release processes.Graphical Abstract

  13. Stability of added and in situ-produced vitamin B12 in breadmaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Minnamari; Chamlagain, Bhawani; Santin, Marco; Kariluoto, Susanna; Piironen, Vieno

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin B12 exists naturally in foods of animal origin and is synthesised only by certain bacteria. New food sources are needed to ensure vitamin B12 intake in risk groups. This study aimed to investigate the stability of added cyanocobalamin (CNCbl, chemically modified form) and hydroxocobalamin (OHCbl, natural form) and in situ-synthesised vitamin B12 in breadmaking. Samples were analysed both with a microbiological (MBA) and a liquid chromatographic (UHPLC) method to test applicability of these two methods. Proofing did not affect CNCbl and OHCbl levels. By contrast, 21% and 31% of OHCbl was lost in oven-baking steps in straight- and sponge-dough processes, respectively, whereas CNCbl remained almost stable. In sourdough baking, 23% of CNCbl and 44% of OHCbl were lost. In situ-produced vitamin B12 was almost as stable as added CNCbl and more stable than OHCbl. The UHPLC method showed its superiority to the MBA in determining the active vitamin B12. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Shape-and size-controlled Ag nanoparticles stabilized by in situ generated secondary amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez-Meneses, E., E-mail: esther.ramirez@ibero.mx [Departamento de Ingeniería y Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prolongación Paseo de la Reforma 880, Lomas de Santa Fe, Distrito Federal C.P. 01219 (Mexico); Montiel-Palma, V. [Centro de Investigaciones Químicas, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001 Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Morelos C.P. 62209 (Mexico); Domínguez-Crespo, M.A.; Izaguirre-López, M.G. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada-IPN, Unidad Altamira. Km 14.5 Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial, 89600 Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Palacios-Gonzalez, E. [Laboratorio de Microscopia de Ultra alta Resolución, Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje Central Lázaro Cárdenas No. 152, C.P. 07730 México D.F. (Mexico); Dorantes-Rosales, H. [Departamento de Metalurgia, E.S.I.Q.I.E.-I.P.N., Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos, Zacatenco, Delegación. Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07738 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ag nanoparticles were generated from Ag amido complexes AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. • Ag nanoparticles were stabilized by in situ generated HN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} or HN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. • 1 or 5 equiv. of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent decreases the average size of the particles. • Ethylenediamine favor the formation of spherical particles. - Abstract: Silver amides such as AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2} have been employed successfully as precursors for the yield synthesis of silver nanoparticles under mild conditions of dihydrogen gas reduction (2 atm) in organic media. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of silver nanoparticles with FCC structure, variously sized from 26 to 35 nm for AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and from 14 to 86 nm for AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, the synthesis could take place in absence of added stabilizers due to the in situ formation of secondary amines from the reaction of dihydrogen gas with the amide ligands of the silver precursor. Indeed, the presence of HNR{sub 2} (R = iPr{sub 2}, N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}) on the surface of the nanoparticle was confirmed by spectroscopic means. Finally, the addition of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent allowed not only the control of the structural characteristics of the resulting Ag nanoparticles (well-dispersed with spherical shape), but that regarding the nanoparticle size as it inhibited overgrowth, limiting it to ca. 25 nm.

  15. In situ crosslinking of surface-initiated ring opening metathesis polymerization of polynorbornene for improved stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fursule, Ishan A; Abtahi, Ashkan; Watkins, Charles B; Graham, Kenneth R; Berron, Brad J

    2018-01-15

    In situ crosslinking is expected to increase the solvent stability of coatings formed by surface-initiated ring opening metathesis polymerization (SI ROMP). Solvent-associated degradation limits the utility of SI ROMP coatings. SI ROMP coatings have a unique capacity for post-functionalization through reaction of the unsaturated site on the polymer backbone. Any post-reaction scheme which requires a liquid solvent has the potential to degrade the coating and lower the thickness of the resulting film. We designed a macromolecular crosslinking group based on PEG dinorbornene. The PEG length is tailored to the expected mean chain to chain distance during surface-initiated polymerization. This crosslinking macromer is randomly copolymerized with norbornene through SI ROMP on a gold coated substrate. The solvent stability of polynorbornene coatings with and without PEG dinorbornene is quantitatively determined, and the mechanism of degradation is further supported through XPS and AFM analyses. The addition of the 0.25mol% PEG dinorbornene significantly increases the solvent stability of the SI ROMP coatings. The crosslinker presence in the more stable films is supported with observable PEG absorbances by FTIR and an increase in contact angle hysteresis when compared to non-crosslinked coatings. The oxidation of the SI ROMP coatings is supported by the observation of carbonyl oxygen in the polynorbornene coatings. The rapid loss of the non-crosslinked SI ROMP coating corresponds to nanoscale pitting across the surface and micron-scale regions of widespread film loss. The crosslinked coatings have uniform nanoscale pitting, but the crosslinked films show no evidence of micron-scale film damage. In all, the incorporation of minimal crosslinking content is a simple strategy for improving the solvent stability of SI ROMP coatings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative review of techniques used for in situ remediation of contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escusol Tomey, M.; Rodriguez Abad, R.

    2014-01-01

    Soil pollution may influence the geotechnical parameters of the soil itself, properties such as solid particle density or water within its pores. It may also vary its friction angle, modify its structure and texture, or change the properties of its constitutive minerals due to the inclusion of polluting components. For these reasons, soil decontamination is an important factor to consider in geotechnics. This work focuses on those soil decontamination techniques carried out in situ, since they allow to eliminate soil pollutants in a less invasive way than confinement, containment or ex situ remediation techniques, causing a minor soil alteration and, therefore, affecting less to its mechanical properties. These factors should be taken into account when carrying out a geotechnical performance on a previously decontaminated soil. (Author)

  17. Stabilized amorphous glibenclamide nanoparticles by high-gravity technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Lei; Li Caixia; Le Yuan; Chen Jianfeng; Zou Haikui

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: · Amorphous glibenclamide nanoparticles of 220 nm are obtained using the high-gravity technique. · The dissolution rate of these nanoparticles achieves 85% in 5 min, while those of the raw glibenclamide and the commercial glibenclamide tablet only reach 35% and 55% respectively during the same period. · The morphology, particle size, crystalline form and dissolution rate of these nanoparticles almost remain constant after keeping more than 70 days. - Abstract: The stable amorphous glibenclamide nanoparticles was obtained via anti-solvent precipitation using the high-gravity technique in this study. The effects of operating variables on the particle size were investigated. The properties of glibenclamide nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dissolution test. The prepared glibenclamide nanoparticles had a mean size of 220 nm within a narrow distribution. The dissolution rate of glibenclamide nanoparticles was obviously faster than that of the raw glibenclamide or the commercial glibenclamide tablet. It achieved 85% in 5 min, while those of the raw glibenclamide and the commercial glibenclamide tablet achieved 35% and 55% respectively during the same period. The physical stability of the nanoparticles was tested after storing for more than 70 days at room conditions. Their morphology, particle size, crystalline form and dissolution rate almost remained constant during storage.

  18. Nuclear techniques for in situ evaluation of coal and mineral deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsaru, M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews developments in in situ analysis of minerals and coal by nuclear borehole logging. Developments in the oil, gas and uranium industries are not discussed in the present paper unless they have direct applications in the mineral industry (e.g. multi-element analysis and development of spectral litho-density tools). The review covers techniques developed mostly in the last decade and is based on work published in North America, Europe and Australia. (author)

  19. Powder metallurgical nanostructured medium carbon bainitic steel: Kinetics, structure, and in situ thermal stability studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lonardelli, I., E-mail: il244@cam.ac.uk [University of Cambridge, Materials Science and Metallurgy, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); University of Trento, Materials Engineering and Industrial Technologies, via Mesiano 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Bortolotti, M. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, via Sommarive 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Beek, W. van [Swiss-Norwegian Beamlines, ESRF, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Girardini, L.; Zadra, M. [K4-Sint, via Dante 300, 38057 Pergine Valsugana (Italy); Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H. [University of Cambridge, Materials Science and Metallurgy, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    It has been possible to produce incredibly fine plates of bainitic ferrite separated by a percolating network of retained austenite in a medium carbon steel produced by mechanical alloying followed by spark plasma sintering and isothermal heat treatment. This is because the sintering process limits the growth of the austenite grains to such an extent that the martensite-start temperature is suppressed in spite of the medium carbon concentration. Furthermore, the fine austenite grain size accelerates the bainite transformation, which can therefore be suppressed to low temperatures to obtain a nanostructure. Microscopy and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the morphology and the thermal stability of the retained austenite during continuous heating. These latter experiments revealed a gradient of carbon concentration in the retained austenite and a reduced thermal stability in high carbon film-austenite. It was also possible to correlate the evolution of defect density and carbon depletion in both retained austenite and bainitic ferrite during tempering.

  20. On the stability of a variety of organic photovoltaic devices by IPCE and in situ IPCE analyses--the ISOS-3 inter-laboratory collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teran-Escobar, Gerardo; Tanenbaum, David M; Voroshazi, Eszter; Hermenau, Martin; Norrman, Kion; Lloyd, Matthew T; Galagan, Yulia; Zimmermann, Birger; Hösel, Markus; Dam, Henrik F; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Gevorgyan, Suren; Kudret, Suleyman; Maes, Wouter; Lutsen, Laurence; Vanderzande, Dirk; Würfel, Uli; Andriessen, Ronn; Rösch, Roland; Hoppe, Harald; Rivaton, Agnès; Uzunoğlu, Gülşah Y; Germack, David; Andreasen, Birgitta; Madsen, Morten V; Bundgaard, Eva; Krebs, Frederik C; Lira-Cantu, Monica

    2012-09-07

    This work is part of the inter-laboratory collaboration to study the stability of seven distinct sets of state-of-the-art organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices prepared by leading research laboratories. All devices have been shipped to and degraded at RISØ-DTU up to 1830 hours in accordance with established ISOS-3 protocols under defined illumination conditions. In this work, we apply the Incident Photon-to-Electron Conversion Efficiency (IPCE) and the in situ IPCE techniques to determine the relation between solar cell performance and solar cell stability. Different ageing conditions were considered: accelerated full sun simulation, low level indoor fluorescent lighting and dark storage. The devices were also monitored under conditions of ambient and inert (N(2)) atmospheres, which allows for the identification of the solar cell materials more susceptible to degradation by ambient air (oxygen and moisture). The different OPVs configurations permitted the study of the intrinsic stability of the devices depending on: two different ITO-replacement alternatives, two different hole extraction layers (PEDOT:PSS and MoO(3)), and two different P3HT-based polymers. The response of un-encapsulated devices to ambient atmosphere offered insight into the importance of moisture in solar cell performance. Our results demonstrate that the IPCE and the in situ IPCE techniques are valuable analytical methods to understand device degradation and solar cell lifetime.

  1. Performance of the In Situ Microcosm Technique for Measuring the Degradation of Organic Chemicals in Aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per H.; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    chemicals in polluted and pristine aquifers representing different redox environments. The ISM technique has great potential for providing field-relevant degradation potentials and rate constants, but care must be taken in using the equipment and interpreting the results. This paper provides details......An in situ microcosm (ISM) consists of a stainless steel cylinder isolating about 2 L of the aquifer and is equipped with valves allowing for loading and sampling from the ground surface. During the last five years, this technique has been used frequently to study the degradation of organic...

  2. Deformation processes in functional materials studied by in situ neutron diffraction and ultrasonic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sittner, P.; Novak, V.; Landa, M.; Lukas, P.

    2007-01-01

    The unique thermomechanical functions of shape memory alloys (hysteretic stress-strain-temperature responses) not their structural properties (as strength, fatigue, corrosion resistance, etc.) are primarily utilized in engineering applications. In order to better understand and predict the functional behavior, we have recently employed two dedicated non-invasive in situ experimental methods capable to follow the deformation/transformation processes in thermomechanically loaded polycrystalline samples. The in situ neutron diffraction method takes advantage of the ability of thermal neutrons to penetrate bulk samples. As a diffraction technique sensitive to interplanar spacings in crystalline solids, it provides in situ information on the changes in crystal structure, phase composition, phase stress and texture in the transforming samples. The combined in situ ultrasonic and electric resistance method follows variations of the electric resistance as well as speed and attenuation of acoustic waves propagating through the transforming sample. The acoustic waves are mainly sensitive to changes of elastic properties accompanying the deformation/transformation processes. The latter method thus follows the changes in interatomic bonds rather than changes in the interplanar lattice spacings focused in the neutron diffraction method. The methods are thus complementary. They are briefly described and selected experimental results obtained recently on NiTi alloys are presented and discussed

  3. Concrete - Opalinus clay interaction: in-situ experiment and technique for coring undisturbed interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeder, U.; Dolder, F.; Jenni, A.; Schwyn, B.; Frieg, B.; Eul, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Designs for deep geologic disposal of radioactive waste foresee cementitious materials as structural elements, backfill or waste matrix. Interactions near interfaces are driven by chemical gradients in pore water and resultant diffusive transport, and are predicted to lead to mineralogical alterations in the barrier system, which in turn influences properties like swelling pressure, permeability, or specific retention in case of clay materials. Reactive transport modelling predictions and laboratory and in situ studies revealed significant alteration in both cement and clay-stone. An increase in porosity in the cement close to the interface, and clogging in the clay-stone adjacent to the interface is commonly predicted and observed. The Cement-Clay Interaction (CI) Experiment at the Mont Terri Underground Laboratory (St. Ursanne, Switzerland) aims at demonstrating some of the processes at interfaces to be expected at a realistic spatial scale and under saturated conditions. A duration of 20 years is foreseen during which reaction progress should become measurable and thus comparable to laboratory experiments and modelling predictions. Companion studies address cement hydration, and develop new high-resolution techniques for phase identification using μ-X-ray diffraction at the Paul Scherrer Institut. The field experiment at Mont Terri comprises two vertical boreholes (384 mm diameter, up to 9 m length) in Opalinus Clay (OPA) filled with layers of three different concretes and bentonite. The concrete formulations are based on three different binders: Portland cement (OPC), ESDRED cement designed for repository applications (40% of cement substituted by silica fume), and low alkali cement (LAC, containing slag and nano-silica). The characterisation of the three concrete-OPA interfaces after 2 years of alteration are presented in a companion contribution (Jenni et al.). A key issue is the repeat recovery of

  4. In situ measurement of the effect of LiOH on the stability of zircaloy-2 surface film in PWR water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saario, T.; Taehtinen, S.

    1997-01-01

    Surface films on the metals play a major role in corrosion assisted cracking. A new method called Contact Electric Resistance (CER) method has been recently developed for in situ measurement of the electric resistance of surface films in high temperature and high pressure environments. The technique has been used to determine in situ the electric resistance of films on metals when in contact with water and dissolved anions, during formation and destruction of oxides and hydrides and during electroplating of metals. Electric resistance data can be measured with a frequency of the order of one hertz, which makes it possible to investigate in situ the kinetics of surface film related processes which are dependent on the environment, temperature, pH and electrochemical potential. This paper presents the results of the CER investigation on the effects of LiOH on the stability of Zircaloy-2 surface film in water with 2000 ppm H 3 BO 3 . At 300 deg. C the LiOH concentrations higher than 10 -2 M (roughly 70 ppm of Li + ) were found to markedly reduce the electric resistance of the Zircaloy-2 surface film during a test period of less than two hours. The decrease of the film resistance is very abrupt, possibly indicating a phase transformation. Moreover, the advantages of the CER technique over the other competing techniques which rely on the measurement of current are discussed. (author)

  5. In situ measurement of the effect of LiOH on the stability of zircaloy-2 surface film in PWR water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saario, T; Taehtinen, S [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-02-01

    Surface films on the metals play a major role in corrosion assisted cracking. A new method called Contact Electric Resistance (CER) method has been recently developed for in situ measurement of the electric resistance of surface films in high temperature and high pressure environments. The technique has been used to determine in situ the electric resistance of films on metals when in contact with water and dissolved anions, during formation and destruction of oxides and hydrides and during electroplating of metals. Electric resistance data can be measured with a frequency of the order of one hertz, which makes it possible to investigate in situ the kinetics of surface film related processes which are dependent on the environment, temperature, pH and electrochemical potential. This paper presents the results of the CER investigation on the effects of LiOH on the stability of Zircaloy-2 surface film in water with 2000 ppm H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}. At 300 deg. C the LiOH concentrations higher than 10{sup -2} M (roughly 70 ppm of Li{sup +}) were found to markedly reduce the electric resistance of the Zircaloy-2 surface film during a test period of less than two hours. The decrease of the film resistance is very abrupt, possibly indicating a phase transformation. Moreover, the advantages of the CER technique over the other competing techniques which rely on the measurement of current are discussed. (author).

  6. The Development of an In-Situ TEM Technique for Studying Corrosion Behavior as Applied to Zirconium-Based Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Wayne

    Zirconium-based alloys are a commonly used material for nuclear fuel rod cladding, due to its low neutron cross section and good corrosion properties. However, corrosion is still a limiting factor in fuel rod lifespan, which restricts burn up levels, and thus efficiency, that can be achieved. While long-term corrosion behavior has been studied through both reactor and autoclave samples, the oxide nucleation and growth behavior has not been extensively studied. This work develops a new technique to study the initial stages of corrosion in zirconium-based alloys and the microstructural effects on this process by developing an environmental cell system for the TEM. Nanoscale oxidation parameters are developed, as is a new FIB technique to support this method. Precession diffraction is used in conjunction with in-situ TEM to observe the initial stages of corrosion in these alloys, and oxide thickness is estimated using low-loss EELS. In addition, the stress stabilization of tetragonal ZrO 2 is explored in the context of sample preparation for TEM. It was found that in-situ environmental TEM using an environmental cell replicates the oxidation behavior observed in autoclaved samples in both oxide structure and phases. Utilizing this technique, it was shown that cracking of the oxide layer in zirconium-based alloys is related to oxide relaxation, and not thermal changes. The effect of secondary phase particles on oxidation behavior did not present significant results, however a new method for studying initial oxidation rates using low-loss EELS was developed.

  7. Clinical application for the preservation of phospho-proteins through in-situ tissue stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Wei

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein biomarkers will play a pivotal role in the future of personalized medicine for both diagnosis and treatment decision-making. While the results of several pre-clinical and small-scale clinical studies have demonstrated the value of protein biomarkers, there have been significant challenges to translating these findings into routine clinical care. Challenges to the use of protein biomarkers include inter-sample variability introduced by differences in post-collection handling and ex vivo degradation of proteins and protein modifications. Results In this report, we re-create laboratory and clinical scenarios for sample collection and test the utility of a new tissue stabilization technique in preserving proteins and protein modifications. In the laboratory setting, tissue stabilization with the Denator Stabilizor T1 resulted in a significantly higher yield of phospho-protein when compared to standard snap freeze preservation. Furthermore, in a clinical scenario, tissue stabilization at collection resulted in a higher yield of total phospho-protein, total phospho-tyrosine, pErkT202/Y204 and pAktS473 when compared to standard methods. Tissue stabilization did not have a significant effect on other post-translational modifications such as acetylation and glycosylation, which are more stable ex-vivo. Tissue stabilization did decrease total RNA quantity and quality. Conclusion Stabilization at the time of collection offers the potential to better preserve tissue protein and protein modification levels, as well as reduce the variability related to tissue processing delays that are often associated with clinical samples.

  8. Development of in situ two-coil mutual inductance technique in a multifunctional scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ming-Chao; Liu, Zhi-Long; Ge, Jian-Feng; Tang, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Guan-Yong; Wang, Zi-Xin; Guan, Dandan; Li, Yao-Yi; Qian, Dong; Liu, Canhua; Jia, Jin-Feng

    2017-07-01

    Superconducting thin films have been a focal point for intensive research efforts since their reduced dimension allows for a wide variety of quantum phenomena. Many of these films, fabricated in UHV chambers, are highly vulnerable to air exposure, making it difficult to measure intrinsic superconducting properties such as zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism with ex situ experimental techniques. Previously, we developed a multifunctional scanning tunneling microscope (MSTM) containing in situ four-point probe (4PP) electrical transport measurement capability in addition to the usual STM capabilities [Ge et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 053903 (2015)]. Here we improve this MSTM via development of both transmission and reflection two-coil mutual inductance techniques for in situ measurement of the diamagnetic response of a superconductor. This addition does not alter the original STM and 4PP functions of the MSTM. We demonstrate the performance of the two-coil mutual inductance setup on a 10-nm-thick NbN thin film grown on a Nb-doped SrTiO 3 (111) substrate.

  9. In situ formation of magnetite reactive barriers in soil for waste stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    Reactive barriers containing magnetite and methods for making magnetite reactive barriers in situ in soil for sequestering soil contaminants including actinides and heavy metals, organic materials, iodine and technetium are disclosed. According to one embodiment, a two-step reagent introduction into soil takes place. In the first step, free oxygen is removed from the soil by separately injecting into the soil aqueous solutions of iron (II) salt, for example FeCl.sub.2, and base, for example NaOH or NH.sub.3 in about a 1:1 volume ratio. Then, in the second step, similar reagents are injected a second time (however, according to about a 1:2 volume ratio, iron to salt) to form magnetite. The magnetite formation is facilitated, in part, due to slow intrusion of oxygen into the soil from the surface. The invention techniques are suited to injection of reagents into soil in proximity to a contamination plume or source allowing in situ formation of the reactive barrier at the location of waste or hazardous material. Mixing of reagents to form. precipitate is mediated and enhanced through movement of reagents in soil as a result of phenomena including capillary action, movement of groundwater, soil washing and reagent injection pressure.

  10. Lab scale testing of novel natural analog in situ stabilization agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, P.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the laboratory-scale test results on several novel in situ treatment and stabilization agents for buried hazardous and radioactive waste. Paraffin, hematite and phosphate materials were examined when combined with soil and other wastes representative of what might be present at buried waste DOE sites. Hematite was made from the reaction of agricultural iron and lime slurries to form gypsum and iron oxide/hydroxide. Common household paraffin was melted, both with and without a zeolitic additive, waste added and then cooled. Magnesium phosphate was made from the reaction of magnesium oxide and phosphoric acid or potassium biphosphate to form, magnesium phosphate. All were tested with soil and some with additional waste sumulants such as ash, machine oil and nitrate salts. The following laboratory-generated data indicate that all waste encapsulation materials tested are appropriate materials, for field in situ testing. Compressive strengths of treated Idaho National Engineering and Environment Laboratory (INEEL) soil and the waste encapsulation material were sufficient to prevent collapse of the void space in waste, i.e., greater than the NRC 60 psi minimum. The mineralogy and microstructure of hematite was amorphous but should progress to an interlocking crystalline solid. Phosphate was crystalline with characteristics of higher temperature ceramics. Paraffin is non crystalline but encapsulates even very fine grained INEEL soils. Each agent appears to be chemically and physically inert to possible waste materials such as, nitrates and machine cutting oil. Two of the agents hematite and phosphate react favorably with ash increasing the metals retention at higher waste loadings than Portland cement. Hematite, phosphate and zeolite decrease leaching of most hazardous metals from waste when compared to untreated waste and soil. Solution pH, time for reaction initiation, and viscosity values are conducive to jet-grouting application

  11. Sintering process optimization for multi-layer CGO membranes by in situ techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Prasad, A.S.; Foghmoes, Søren Preben Vagn

    2013-01-01

    The sintering of asymmetric CGO bi-layers (thin dense membrane on a porous support; Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95-delta = CGO) with Co3O4 as sintering additive has been optimized by combination of two in situ techniques. Optical dilatometry revealed that bi-layer shape and microstructure are dramatically...... changing in a narrow temperature range of less than 100 degrees C. Below 1030 degrees C, a higher densification rate in the dense membrane layer than in the porous support leads to concave shape, whereas the densification rate of the support is dominant above 1030 degrees C, leading to convex shape. A fiat...... bi-layer could be prepared at 1030 degrees C, when shrinkage rates were similar. In situ van der Pauw measurements on tape cast layers during sintering allowed following the conductivity during sintering. A strong increase in conductivity and in activation energy E-a for conduction was observed...

  12. In Situ Analytical Characterization of Contaminated Sites Using Nuclear Spectrometry Techniques. Review of Methodologies and Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Past and current human activities can result in the contamination of sites by radionuclides and heavy metals. The sources of contamination are various. The most important sources for radionuclide release include global fallout from nuclear testing, nuclear and radiological accidents, waste production from nuclear facilities, and activities involving naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Contamination of the environment by heavy metals mainly originates from industrial applications and mineralogical background concentration. Contamination of sites by radionuclides and heavy metals can present a risk to people and the environment. Therefore, the estimation of the contamination level and the identification of the source constitute important information for the national authorities with the responsibility to protect people and the environment from adverse health effects. In situ analytical techniques based on nuclear spectrometry are important tools for the characterization of contaminated sites. Much progress has been made in the design and implementation of portable systems for efficient and effective monitoring of radioactivity and heavy metals in the environment directly on-site. Accordingly, the IAEA organized a Technical Meeting to review the current status and trends of various applications of in situ nuclear spectrometry techniques for analytical characterization of contaminated sites and to support Member States in their national environmental monitoring programmes applying portable instrumentation. This publication represents a comprehensive review of the in situ gamma ray spectrometry and field portable X ray fluorescence analysis techniques for the characterization of contaminated sites. It includes papers on the use of these techniques, which provide useful background information for conducting similar studies, in the following Member States: Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Czech Republic, Egypt, France, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania

  13. Thermo-stabilized, porous polyimide microspheres prepared from nanosized SiO2 templating via in situ polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Q. Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we addressed a feasible and versatile method of the fabrication of porous polyimide microspheres presenting excellent heat resistance. The preparation process consisted of two steps. Firstly, a novel polyimide/nano-silica composite microsphere was prepared via the self-assembly structures of poly(amic acid (PAA, precursor of PI/nanosized SiO2 blends after in situ polymerization, following the two-steps imidization. Subsequently, the encapsulated nanoparticles were etched away by hydrofluoric acid treatment, giving rise to the pores. It is found the composite structure of PI/SiO2 is a precondition of the formation of nanoporous structures, furthermore, the morphology of the resultant pore could be relatively tuned by changing the content and initial morphology of silica nano-particles trapped into PI matrix. The thermal properties of the synthesized PI porous spheres were studied, indicating that the introduction of nanopores could not effectively influence the thermal stabilities of PI microspheres. Moreover, the fabrication technique described here may be extended to other porous polymer systems.

  14. Burn Control in Fusion Reactors via Nonlinear Stabilization Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, Eugenio; Krstic, Miroslav; Tynan, George

    2003-01-01

    Control of plasma density and temperature magnitudes, as well as their profiles, are among the most fundamental problems in fusion reactors. Existing efforts on model-based control use control techniques for linear models. In this work, a zero-dimensional nonlinear model involving approximate conservation equations for the energy and the densities of the species was used to synthesize a nonlinear feedback controller for stabilizing the burn condition of a fusion reactor. The subignition case, where the modulation of auxiliary power and fueling rate are considered as control forces, and the ignition case, where the controlled injection of impurities is considered as an additional actuator, are treated separately.The model addresses the issue of the lag due to the finite time for the fresh fuel to diffuse into the plasma center. In this way we make our control system independent of the fueling system and the reactor can be fed either by pellet injection or by puffing. This imposed lag is treated using nonlinear backstepping.The nonlinear controller proposed guarantees a much larger region of attraction than the previous linear controllers. In addition, it is capable of rejecting perturbations in initial conditions leading to both thermal excursion and quenching, and its effectiveness does not depend on whether the operating point is an ignition or a subignition point.The controller designed ensures setpoint regulation for the energy and plasma parameter β with robustness against uncertainties in the confinement times for different species. Hence, the controller can increase or decrease β, modify the power, the temperature or the density, and go from a subignition to an ignition point and vice versa

  15. The ultrasonic technique for in situ investigations on stones: suggestions for uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellopede, R.; Marini, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Ultrasound Pulse Velocity (UPV) is one of the main non destructive techniques to detect both in laboratory and in situ the stone decay and many international papers of the recent years deal with its application. This technique is often executed in laboratory, where the possibility to keep constant the environmental and test conditions are a guarantee of the reliability of the results. It is known in fact the UPV are mainly conditioned by the following factors: - the characteristics of the stone tested (not only petrographic properties such as texture and structure, but even specimen dimension and water content); - the transducers features such as frequency, divergence angle , near field and wavelength; - external climate factors such as environmental temperature, humidity. In spite of the many factors affecting the measurements, UPV performed in laboratory is well correlated with mechanical strength of the stone , with its porosity and, as consequence, it is a reliable technique to detect the durability of a stone. On the other side, for in situ UPV test it is important to take into account that the measurement uncertainty is affected by the unknown water content in the stone. From tests performed on different rocks (marble, limestones, travertines, granites, gneiss, schists , sandstones) , the ratios between UPV tested in dry and saturated conditions can be > 1 or stone in order to choose the suitable measurement frequency; the correct choice of transducers frequencies; the use of a reference slab, with a known UPV in dry conditions, to be exposed in the investigated site some days before the in situ tests, in order to appreciate the UPV variation due to climate factors.

  16. Measurement techniques for in situ stresses around underground constructions in a deep clay formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li X.L.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Disposal in deep underground geological formations is internationally recognized as the most viable option for the long-term management of high-level radioactive waste. In Belgium, the Boom clay formation is extensively studied in this context, in particular at the 225 m deep HADES Underground Research Facility in Mol. A cost-effective design of deep underground structures requires an accurate assessment of the in situ stresses; a good estimation of these stresses is also essential when interpreting in situ experiments regarding the hydro-mechanical behaviour of the host formation. Different measurement techniques are available to provide data on the stress evolution and other mechanical properties of the geological formation. The measurement can be direct (measurement of total pressure, or it can be an indirect technique, deriving the stress from related quantities such as strain (changes in structural members. Most total stress measurements are performed through permanently installed sensors; also once-only measurements are performed through specific methods (e.g. pressuremeter. Direct measurement of the stress state is challenging due to the complex mechanical behaviour of the clay, and the fact that the sensor installation inevitably disturbs the original stress field. This paper describes ways to deal with these problems and presents the results obtained using different techniques at HADES.

  17. Field application of innovative grouting agents for in situ stabilization of buried waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G.G.; Farnsworth, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents field applications for two innovative grouting agents that were used to in situ stabilize buried waste sites, via jet grouting. The two grouting agents include paraffin and a proprietary iron oxide based cement grout called TECT. These materials were tested in specially designed cold test pits that simulate buried transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The field demonstrations were performed at the INEL in an area referred to as the Cold Test Pit, which is adjacent to the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). At the RWMC, 56,000 m 3 of transuranic (TRU) waste is co-mingled with over 170,000 m 3 of soil in shallow land burial. Improving the confinement of this waste is one of the options for final disposition of this waste. Using jet-grouting technology to inject these materials into the pore spaces of buried waste sites results in the creation of buried monolithic waste forms that simultaneously protect the waste from subsidence, while eliminating the migratory potential of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in the waste

  18. In situ stabilization of cadmium-, lead-, and zinc-contaminated soil using various amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Jin-Soo; Choi, Youn Jeong; Kim, Jeong-Gyu

    2009-11-01

    Chemical stabilization is an in situ remediation method that uses inexpensive amendments to reduce contaminant availability in polluted soil. We tested the effects of several amendments (limestone, red-mud, and furnace slag) on the extractability of heavy metals, microbial activities, phytoavailability of soil metals (assessed using lettuce, Lactuca sativa L.), and availability of heavy metals in ingested soil to the human gastrointestinal system (assessed using the physiologically based extraction test). The application of soil amendments significantly decreased the amount of soluble and extractable heavy metals in the soil (p<0.05). The decreased extractable metal content of soil was accompanied by increased microbial activity and decreased plant uptake of heavy metals. Soil microbial activities (soil respiration, urease, and dehydrogenase activity) significantly increased in limestone and red-mud-amended soils. Red-mud was the most effective treatment in decreasing heavy-metal concentrations in lettuce. Compared to non-amended control soil, lettuce uptake of Cd, Pb, and Zn was reduced 86%, 58%, and 73%, respectively, by the addition of red-mud.

  19. Nanocapsule of cationic liposomes obtained using "in situ" acrylic acid polymerization: stability, surface charge and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarioti, Giovana Danieli; Lubambo, Adriana; Feitosa, Judith P A; Sierakowski, Maria Rita; Bresolin, Tania M B; de Freitas, Rilton Alves

    2011-10-15

    In this work, didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) (2.5:1) were used to prepare liposomes coated with polyacrylic acid (PAA) using "in situ" polymerization with 2.5, 5 and 25 mM of acrylic acid (AA). The PAA concentrations were chosen to achieve partially to fully covered capsules, and the polymerization reaction was observed with real-time monitoring using dynamic light scattering (NanoDLS). The DDAB:DOPE liposomes showed stability in the tested temperature range (25-70°C), whereas the results confirmed the success of the polymerization according to superficial charge (zeta potential of +66.7±1.2 mV) results and AFM images. For the liposomes that were fully coated with PAA (zeta potential of +0.3±3.9 mV), cytotoxicity was independent of the concentration of albumin. Cationic liposomes and nanocapsules of the stable liposomes coated with PAA were obtained by controlling the surface charge, which was the most important factor related to cytotoxicity. Thus, a potential, safe drug nanocarrier was successfully developed in this work. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. In situ vitrification demonstration for the stabilization of buried wastes at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, G.K.; Spalding, B.P.; Carter, J.G.; Koegler, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    A demonstration of In Situ Vitrification (ISV) technology for the stabilization of radioactively contaminated soil sites at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was successfully completed during July 1987. This demonstration is the first application of the ISV process not performed at the Hanford Site, where the technology was developed and patented by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The joint ORNL-PNL pilot-scale demonstration was performed on a 3/8-scale trench (2 m deep x 1 m wide x 10 m long) that was constructed to simulate a typical seepage trench used for liquid low-level radioactive waste disposal at ORNL from 1951 to 1966. In the ISV process, electrodes are inserted around a volume of contaminated soil, power is applied to the electrodes, and the entire mass is melted from the surface of the soil down through the contaminated zone, thus making a glassy-to-microcrystalline waste form that incorporates the contaminants. Gases produced during the melting are collected, treated, monitored, and released through an off-gas process trailer. In the ORNL demonstration, a 25-t mass of melted rock approximately 1.2 m thick x 2.1 m wide x 4.9 m long was formed during 110 h of operation that consumed approximately 29 MWh of power. Data obtained on the operational performance of the test and waste-form durability will be used to assess the feasibility of applying the ISV technology to an actual waste trench

  1. In situ nonlinear ultrasonic technique for monitoring microcracking in concrete subjected to creep and cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gun; Loreto, Giovanni; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Kurtis, Kimberly E; Wall, James J; Jacobs, Laurence J

    2018-08-01

    This research conducts in situ nonlinear ultrasonic (NLU) measurements for real time monitoring of load-induced damage in concrete. For the in situ measurements on a cylindrical specimen under sustained load, a previously developed second harmonic generation (SHG) technique with non-contact detection is adapted to a cylindrical specimen geometry. This new setup is validated by demonstrating that the measured nonlinear Rayleigh wave signals are equivalent to those in a flat half space, and thus the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, β can be defined and interpreted in the same way. Both the acoustic nonlinearity parameter and strain are measured to quantitatively assess the early-age damage in a set of concrete specimens subjected to either 25 days of creep, or 11 cycles of cyclic loading at room temperature. The experimental results show that the acoustic nonlinearity parameter is sensitive to early-stage microcrack formation under both loading conditions - the measured β can be directly linked to the accumulated microscale damage. This paper demonstrates the potential of NLU for the in situ monitoring of mechanical load-induced microscale damage in concrete components. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. In Situ Techniques for the Investigation of the Kinetics of Austenitization of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nießen, Frank; Villa, Matteo; Apel, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The austenitization and inter-critical annealing of X4CrNiMo16-5-1 (1.4418) supermartensitic stainless steel were investigated in-situ with synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), dilatometry and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) under isochronal heating conditions. Austenitization occurred...... of surface martensite formation on the XRD measurement. The applicable temperature range for DSC as well as the close proximity of the Ac1- and the Curietemperature limited the usage of the technique in the present case....

  3. All-inside, anatomical lateral ankle stabilization for revision and complex primary lateral ankle stabilization: a technique guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prissel, Mark A; Roukis, Thomas S

    2014-12-01

    Lateral ankle instability is a common mechanical problem that often requires surgical management when conservative efforts fail. Historically, myriad open surgical approaches have been proposed. Recently, consideration for arthroscopic management of lateral ankle instability has become popular, with promising results. Unfortunately, recurrent inversion ankle injury following lateral ankle stabilization can occur and require revision surgery. To date, arthroscopic management for revision lateral ankle stabilization has not been described. We present a novel arthroscopic technique combining an arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization kit with a suture anchor ligament augmentation system for revision as well as complex primary lateral ankle stabilization. © 2014 The Author(s).

  4. In situ tagging technique for fishes provides insight into growth and movement of invasive lionfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akins, John L; Morris, James A; Green, Stephanie J

    2014-10-01

    Information on fish movement and growth is primarily obtained through the marking and tracking of individuals with external tags, which are usually affixed to anesthetized individuals at the surface. However, the quantity and quality of data obtained by this method is often limited by small sample sizes owing to the time associated with the tagging process, high rates of tagging-related mortality, and displacement of tagged individuals from the initial capture location. To address these issues, we describe a technique for applying external streamer and dart tags in situ, which uses SCUBA divers to capture and tag individual fish on the sea floor without the use of anesthetic. We demonstrate this method for Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans/P. miles), species which are particularly vulnerable to barotrauma when transported to and handled at the surface. To test our method, we tagged 161 individuals inhabiting 26 coral reef locations in the Bahamas over a period of 3 years. Our method resulted in no instances of barotrauma, reduced handling and recovery time, and minimal post-tagging release displacement compared with conventional ex situ tag application. Opportunistic resighting and recapture of tagged individuals reveals that lionfish exhibit highly variable site fidelity, movement patterns, and growth rates on invaded coral reef habitats. In total, 24% of lionfish were resighted between 29 and 188 days after tagging. Of these, 90% were located at the site of capture, while the remaining individuals were resighted between 200 m and 1.1 km from initial site of capture over 29 days later. In situ growth rates ranged between 0.1 and 0.6 mm/day. While individuals tagged with streamer tags posted slower growth rates with increasing size, as expected, there was no relationship between growth rate and fish size for individuals marked with dart tags, potentially because of large effects of tag presence on the activities of small bodied lionfish (i.e., lionfish

  5. Development of Advanced In-Situ Techniques for Chemistry Monitoring and Corrosion Mitigation in SCWO Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D. D.; Lvov, S. N.

    2000-01-01

    This project is developing sensing technologies and corrosion monitoring techniques for use in super critical water oxidation (SCWO) systems to reduce the volume of mixed low-level nuclear waste by oxidizing organic components in a closed cycle system where CO2 and other gaseous oxides are produced, leaving the radioactive elements concentrated in ash. The technique uses water at supercritical temperatures under highly oxidized conditions by maintaining a high fugacity of molecular oxygen in the system, which causes high corrosion rates of even the most corrosive resistant reactor materials. This project significantly addresses the high corrosion shortcoming through development of (a) advanced electrodes and sensors for in situ potentiometric monitoring of pH in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous solutions, (b) an approach for evaluating the association constants for 1-1 aqueous electrolytes using a flow-through electrochemical thermocell; (c) an electrochemical noise sensor for the in situ measurement of corrosion rate in subcritical and supercritical aqueous systems; (d) a model for estimating the effect of pressure on reaction rates, including corrosion reactions, in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous systems. The project achieved all objectives, except for installing some of the sensors into a fully operating SCWO system

  6. New application technology for 'in situ' pipeline protection using pigging techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretorius, Louis Charles [Corrocoat SA (PTY) Ltd., Durban (South Africa)

    2005-07-01

    Pigging of long pipelines is a technique for in situ (field) coating, creating seamless internal structural linings. Originally developed for cleaning pipes, the system was adapted to apply internal anti-corrosion protection to pipes using a thin epoxy layer, which had some problems in weld coverage, stress cracking, poor cold weather curing and the inability to fill pitting corrosion metal loss. New coating materials, revised application methods and modified pigging equipment have made it possible to apply in situ liquid film coatings up to 1 mm thick, as an internal corrosion barrier to pipes, in a single application (similar to continuous screeding) resulting in a bonded 'GRP pipe within a steel pipe'. The method can be used for new projects on fully welded pipe lines avoiding coating problems associated with flange joints and/or couplings, or for refurbishment of old pipelines, varying from 150-900 mm diameter, up to 12 km long. Pipes can be buried, submerged, continuously welded or flanged. Many different pipes, such as oil platform to shore based pipelines, can all be treated using this method. Thick film polymer pigging techniques create new possibilities for Engineers to extend the life of pipeline systems, with significant cost savings compared to replacement pipe. (author)

  7. Development of Advanced In-Situ Techniques for Chemistry Monitoring and Corrosion Mitigation in SCWO Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, D. D.; Lvov, S. N.

    2000-03-31

    This project is developing sensing technologies and corrosion monitoring techniques for use in super critical water oxidation (SCWO) systems to reduce the volume of mixed low-level nuclear waste by oxidizing organic components in a closed cycle system where CO2 and other gaseous oxides are produced, leaving the radioactive elements concentrated in ash. The technique uses water at supercritical temperatures under highly oxidized conditions by maintaining a high fugacity of molecular oxygen in the system, which causes high corrosion rates of even the most corrosive resistant reactor materials. This project significantly addresses the high corrosion shortcoming through development of (a) advanced electrodes and sensors for in situ potentiometric monitoring of pH in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous solutions, (b) an approach for evaluating the association constants for 1-1 aqueous electrolytes using a flow-through electrochemical thermocell; (c) an electrochemical noise sensor for the in situ measurement of corrosion rate in subcritical and supercritical aqueous systems; (d) a model for estimating the effect of pressure on reaction rates, including corrosion reactions, in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous systems. The project achieved all objectives, except for installing some of the sensors into a fully operating SCWO system.

  8. A Novel FCC Catalyst Based on a Porous Composite Material Synthesized via an In Situ Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Qin Zheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To overcome diffusion limitations and improve transport in microporous zeolite, the materials with a wide-pore structure have been developed. In this paper, composite microspheres with hierarchical porous structure were synthesized by an in situ technique using sepiolite, kaolin and pseudoboehmite as raw material. A novel fluid catalytic cracking (FCC catalyst for maximizing light oil yield was prepared based on the composite materials. The catalyst was characterized by XRD, FT-IR, SEM, nitrogen adsorption-desorption techniques and tested in a bench FCC unit. The results indicated that the catalyst had more meso- and macropores and more acid sites than the reference catalyst, and thus can increase light oil yield by 1.31 %, while exhibiting better gasoline and coke selectivity.

  9. Diagnosis of In Situ Metabolic State and Rates of Microbial Metabolism During In Situ Uranium Bioremediation with Molecular Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovley, Derek R. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    2012-11-28

    The goal of these projects was to develop molecule tools to tract the metabolic activity and physiological status of microorganisms during in situ uranium bioremediation. Such information is important in able to design improved bioremediation strategies. As summarized below, the research was highly successful with new strategies developed for estimating in situ rates of metabolism and diagnosing the physiological status of the predominant subsurface microorganisms. This is a first not only for groundwater bioremediation studies, but also for subsurface microbiology in general. The tools and approaches developed in these studies should be applicable to the study of microbial communities in a diversity of soils and sediments.

  10. Using the in situ lift-out technique to prepare TEM specimens on a single-beam FIB instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lekstrom, M; McLachlan, M A; Husain, S; McComb, D W; Shollock, B A

    2008-01-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) specimens are today routinely prepared using focussed ion beam (FIB) instruments. Specifically, the lift-out method has become an increasingly popular technique and involves removing thin cross-sections from site-specific locations and transferring them to a TEM grid. This lift-out process can either be performed ex situ or in situ. The latter is mainly carried out on combined dual-beam FIB and scanning electron microscope (SEM) systems whereas conventional single-beam instruments often are limited to the traditional ex situ method. It is nevertheless desirable to enhance the capabilities of existing single-beam instruments to allow for in situ lift-out preparation to be performed since this technique offers a number of advantages over the older ex situ method. A single-beam FIB instrument was therefore modified to incorporate an in situ micromanipulator fitted with a tungsten needle, which can be attached to a cut-out FIB section using ion beam induced platinum deposition. This article addresses the issues of using an ion beam to monitor the in situ manipulation process as well as approaches that can be used to create stronger platinum welds between two objects, and finally, views on how to limit the extent of ion beam damage to the specimen surface.

  11. Techniques for sampling nuclear waste tank contents and in situ measurement of activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, R.C.

    1978-04-01

    A study was conducted to develop suitable sampling equipment and techniques for characterizing the mechanical properties of nuclear wastes; identifying effective means of measuring radiation levels, temperatures, and neutron fluxes in situ in wastes; and developing a waste core sampler. A portable, stainless steel probe was developed which is placed in the tank through a riser. This probe is built for the insertion of instrumentation that can measure the contents of the tank at any level and take temperature, radiation, and neutron activation readings with reliable accuracy. A simple and reliable instrument for the in situ extraction of waste materials ranging from liquid to concrete-like substances was also developed. This portable, stainless steel waste core sampler can remove up to one liter of radioactive waste from tanks for transportation to hot cell laboratories for analysis of hardness, chemical form, and isotopic content. A cask for transporting the waste samples from the tanks to the laboratory under radiation-protected conditions was also fabricated. This cask was designed with a ''boot'' or inner-seal liner to contain any radioactive wastes that might remain on the outside of the waste core sampling device

  12. Robust design of decentralized power system stabilizers using meta-heuristic optimization techniques for multimachine systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeevanandham Arumugam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a classical lead-lag power system stabilizer is used for demonstration. The stabilizer parameters are selected in such a manner to damp the rotor oscillations. The problem of selecting the stabilizer parameters is converted to a simple optimization problem with an eigen value based objective function and it is proposed to employ simulated annealing and particle swarm optimization for solving the optimization problem. The objective function allows the selection of the stabilizer parameters to optimally place the closed-loop eigen values in the left hand side of the complex s-plane. The single machine connected to infinite bus system and 10-machine 39-bus system are considered for this study. The effectiveness of the stabilizer tuned using the best technique, in enhancing the stability of power system. Stability is confirmed through eigen value analysis and simulation results and suitable heuristic technique will be selected for the best performance of the system.

  13. In situ characterization of natural pyrite bioleaching using electrochemical noise technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-bao; Yang, Hong-ying; Li, Hai-jun

    2016-02-01

    An in situ characterization technique called electrochemical noise (ECN) was used to investigate the bioleaching of natural pyrite. ECN experiments were conducted in four active systems (sulfuric acid, ferric-ion, 9k culture medium, and bioleaching solutions). The ECN data were analyzed in both the time and frequency domains. Spectral noise impedance spectra obtained from power spectral density (PSD) plots for different systems were compared. A reaction mechanism was also proposed on the basis of the experimental data analysis. The bioleaching system exhibits the lowest noise resistance of 0.101 MΩ. The bioleaching of natural pyrite is considered to be a bio-battery reaction, which distinguishes it from chemical oxidation reactions in ferric-ion and culture-medium (9k) solutions. The corrosion of pyrite becomes more severe over time after the long-term testing of bioleaching.

  14. Combustion synthesis of advanced materials. [using in-situ infiltration technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. J.; Feng, H. J.; Perkins, N.; Readey, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The combustion synthesis of ceramic-metal composites using an in-situ liquid infiltration technique is described. The effect of varying the reactants and their stoichiometry to provide a range of reactant and product species i.e. solids, liquids and gases, with varying physical properties e.g. thermal conductivity, on the microstructure and morphology of synthesized products is also described. Alternatively, conducting the combustion synthesis reaction in a reactive gas environment is also discussed, in which advantages can be gained from the synergistic effects of combustion synthesis and vapor phase transport. In each case, the effect of the presence or absence of gravity (density) driven fluid flow and vapor transport is discussed as is the potential for producing new and perhaps unique materials by conducting these SHS reactions under microgravity conditions.

  15. Direct push driven in situ color logging tool (CLT): technique, analysis routines, and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werban, U.; Hausmann, J.; Dietrich, P.; Vienken, T.

    2014-12-01

    Direct push technologies have recently seen a broad development providing several tools for in situ parameterization of unconsolidated sediments. One of these techniques is the measurement of soil colors - a proxy information that reveals to soil/sediment properties. We introduce the direct push driven color logging tool (CLT) for real-time and depth-resolved investigation of soil colors within the visible spectrum. Until now, no routines exist on how to handle high-resolved (mm-scale) soil color data. To develop such a routine, we transform raw data (CIEXYZ) into soil color surrogates of selected color spaces (CIExyY, CIEL*a*b*, CIEL*c*h*, sRGB) and denoise small-scale natural variability by Haar and Daublet4 wavelet transformation, gathering interpretable color logs over depth. However, interpreting color log data as a single application remains challenging. Additional information, such as site-specific knowledge of the geological setting, is required to correlate soil color data to specific layers properties. Hence, we exemplary provide results from a joint interpretation of in situ-obtained soil color data and 'state-of-the-art' direct push based profiling tool data and discuss the benefit of additional data. The developed routine is capable of transferring the provided information obtained as colorimetric data into interpretable color surrogates. Soil color data proved to correlate with small-scale lithological/chemical changes (e.g., grain size, oxidative and reductive conditions), especially when combined with additional direct push vertical high resolution data (e.g., cone penetration testing and soil sampling). Thus, the technique allows enhanced profiling by means of providing another reproducible high-resolution parameter for analysis subsurface conditions. This opens potential new areas of application and new outputs for such data in site investigation. It is our intention to improve color measurements by means method of application and data

  16. Assessment of phytoremediation as an in-situ technique for cleaning oil-contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, C. M.; Farrell, R. E.; Germida, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    Literature on examples of phytoremediation techniques used in the in-situ remediation of soils contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons is reviewed. The review includes discussion of the key mechanisms involved in each case, benefits, limitations and costs compared to alternative approaches, including natural attenuation, engineering and bioremediation. Review of the literature led to the conclusion that phytoremediation is an effective method for degrading and containing petroleum hydrocarbons in soil, and confirmed the ability of plants to transfer volatile petroleum hydrocarbons, such as napthalene, from the soil to the atmosphere via transpiration. The primary loss mechanism for the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons appears to be microorganisms in the rhizosphere of plants. The available information also suggests that plants may degrade petroleum hydrocarbons directly, although the indirect role played by plants is far more common. These roles include supplying root exudates for microbial use, releasing root-associated enzymes that degrade contaminants in the soil, and altering soil to promote phytoremediation. BTEX compounds are most easily amenable to phytoremediation; large and lipophilic compounds such as four or five-ring polyaromatic hydrocarbons are more difficult to remediate. The limited information available suggests that phytoremediation is slightly less expensive than bioremediation, and several order of magnitude less than engineering techniques. In general, phytoremediation is faster than natural attenuation, but typically slower than engineering and bioremediation. On the other hand, it is less disruptive to the site than ex-situ engineering and bioremediation that involve excavation efforts. Phytoremediation is most effective with shallow contamination. Preliminary screenings indicate that there are several plant species, native and introduced, that may be used with some success for phytoremediation in the Prairie and Boreal Plains ecozones

  17. Techniques for Liquid Rocket Combustion Spontaneous Stability and Rough Combustion Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, R. J.; Giacomoni, C.; Casiano, M. J.; Fischbach, S. R.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents techniques for liquid rocket engine combustion stability assessments with respect to spontaneous stability and rough combustion. Techniques covering empirical parameter extraction, which were established in prior works, are applied for three additional programs: the F-1 Gas Generator (F1GG) component test program, the RS-84 preburner component test program, and the Marshall Integrated Test Rig (MITR) program. Stability assessment parameters from these programs are compared against prior established spontaneous stability metrics and updates are identified. Also, a procedure for comparing measured with predicted mode shapes is presented, based on an extension of the Modal Assurance Criterion (MAC).

  18. Comparative review of techniques used for in situ remediation of contaminated soils; Revision comparativa de tecnicas empleadas para la descontaminacion in situ de suelos contaminados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escusol Tomey, M.; Rodriguez Abad, R.

    2014-07-01

    Soil pollution may influence the geotechnical parameters of the soil itself, properties such as solid particle density or water within its pores. It may also vary its friction angle, modify its structure and texture, or change the properties of its constitutive minerals due to the inclusion of polluting components. For these reasons, soil decontamination is an important factor to consider in geotechnics. This work focuses on those soil decontamination techniques carried out in situ, since they allow to eliminate soil pollutants in a less invasive way than confinement, containment or ex situ remediation techniques, causing a minor soil alteration and, therefore, affecting less to its mechanical properties. These factors should be taken into account when carrying out a geotechnical performance on a previously decontaminated soil. (Author)

  19. The role of capital realignment versus in situ stabilization for the treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souder, Christopher D; Bomar, James D; Wenger, Dennis R

    2014-12-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) can be treated by a variety of methods with the traditional method of in situ pin fixation being most commonly used. More recently, the Modified Dunn (Mod. Dunn) procedure consisting of capital realignment has been popularized as a treatment method for SCFE, particularly for more severe cases. Over the last 5 years, our institution has selectively used this method for more complex cases. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the differences between these 2 treatment methods in terms of avascular necrosis (AVN) rate, reoperation rate, and complication rate. Eighty-eight hips that were surgically treated for SCFE between July 2004 and June 2012 met our inclusion criteria. The in situ fixation group included 71 hips, whereas 17 hips were anatomically reduced with the Mod. Dunn procedure. Loder classification, severity, acuity, complication rate, and reoperation rate were determined for the 2 cohorts. The χ analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between the treatment method and outcome. As expected, stable slips did well with in situ pinning with no cases of AVN, even in more severe slips. Ten stable slips were treated with the Mod. Dunn approach and 2 (20%) developed AVN. Unstable slips were more difficult to treat with 3 of the 7 hips stabilized in situ developing AVN (43%). Two of the 7 unstable slips treated by the Mod. Dunn procedure developed AVN (29%). The other outcomes studied (reoperation rate and complication rate) were not significantly related to the surgical treatment method (P = 0.732 and 0.261, respectively). In situ pinning remains a safe and predictable method for treatment of stable SCFE with no AVN noted, even in severe slips. Attempts to anatomically reduce stable slips led to severe AVN in 20% of cases, thus this treatment approach should be considered with caution. Treatment of unstable slips remains problematic with high AVN rates noted whether treated by in situ fixation or capital

  20. Development of In Situ Infrared Spectroelectrochemical Techniques: Application to Lithium Intercalation Reactions in Electrode Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frech, Roger

    2007-01-01

    .... The transition between LiFePO4 and FePO4 could easily be followed in the in situ spectra. An industrially available coin cell was modified to facilitate routine in situ Raman measurements of lithium batteries...

  1. Evaluating the Long-Term Stability of Metals Precipitated In-Situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because metals (including metals and metalloids) cannot be destroyed, unlike organic contaminants, in-situ approaches for their removal from groundwater necessarily involves fixation/immobilization in the solid aquifer matrix. Consequently, the success of precipitation based in...

  2. A double labeling technique for performing immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization in virus infected cell cultures and tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendelman, H.E.; Moench, T.R.; Narayan, O.; Griffin, D.E.; Clements, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes a combined immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization procedure which allows visualization of cellular or viral antigens and viral RNA in the same cell. Cultures infected with visna or measles virus were fixed in periodate-lysine-paraformaldehyde-glutaraldehyde, stained by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase technique using antibodies to viral or cellular proteins and then incubated with radiolabeled specific DNA probes (in situ hybridization). This technique provides a new approach to the study of viral pathogenesis by: (1) identifying the types of cells which are infected in the host and (2) identifying points of blockade in the virus life cycle during persistent infections. (Auth.)

  3. Novel stability criteria for fuzzy Hopfield neural networks based on an improved homogeneous matrix polynomials technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yi-Fu; Zhang Qing-Ling; Feng De-Zhi

    2012-01-01

    The global stability problem of Takagi—Sugeno (T—S) fuzzy Hopfield neural networks (FHNNs) with time delays is investigated. Novel LMI-based stability criteria are obtained by using Lyapunov functional theory to guarantee the asymptotic stability of the FHNNs with less conservatism. Firstly, using both Finsler's lemma and an improved homogeneous matrix polynomial technique, and applying an affine parameter-dependent Lyapunov—Krasovskii functional, we obtain the convergent LMI-based stability criteria. Algebraic properties of the fuzzy membership functions in the unit simplex are considered in the process of stability analysis via the homogeneous matrix polynomials technique. Secondly, to further reduce the conservatism, a new right-hand-side slack variables introducing technique is also proposed in terms of LMIs, which is suitable to the homogeneous matrix polynomials setting. Finally, two illustrative examples are given to show the efficiency of the proposed approaches

  4. Stability assessment for underground excavations and key construction techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Hanhua; Zhao, Yu; Niu, Fusheng

    2017-01-01

    This book examines how the state of underground structures can be determined with the assistance of force, deformation and energy. It then analyzes mechanized shield methods, the New Austrian tunneling method (NATM) and conventional methods from this new perspective. The book gathers a wealth of cases reflecting the experiences of practitioners and administrators alike. Based on statistical and engineering studies of these cases, as well as lab and field experiments, it develops a stability assessment approach incorporating a stable equilibrium, which enables engineers to keep the structure and surrounding rocks safe as long as the stable equilibrium and deformation compliance are maintained. The book illustrates the implementation of the method in various tunneling contexts, including soil-rock mixed strata, tunneling beneath operating roads, underwater tunnels, and tunnel pit excavation. It offers a valuable guide for researchers, designers and engineers, especially those who are seeking to understand the u...

  5. [Molecular classification of breast cancer patients obtained through the technique of chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Angel; Reigosa, Aldo

    2013-12-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease composed of a growing number of biological subtypes, with substantial variability of the disease progression within each category. The aim of this research was to classify the samples object of study according to the molecular classes of breast cancer: luminal A, luminal B, HER2 and triple negative, as a result of the state of HER2 amplification obtained by the technique of chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH). The sample consisted of 200 biopsies fixed in 10% formalin, processed by standard techniques up to paraffin embedding, corresponding to patients diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. These biopsies were obtained from patients from private practice and the Institute of Oncology "Dr. Miguel Pérez Carreño", for immunohistochemistry (IHC) of hormone receptors and HER2 made in the Hospital Metropolitano del Norte, Valencia, Venezuela. The molecular classification of the patient's tumors considering the expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors by IHC and HER2 amplification by CISH, allowed those cases originally classified as unknown, since they had an indeterminate (2+) outcome for HER2 expression by IHC, to be grouped into the different molecular classes. Also, this classification permitted that some cases, initially considered as belonging to a molecular class, were assigned to another class, after the revaluation of the HER2 status by CISH.

  6. Measurement of in-situ stress in salt and rock using NQR techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schempp, E.; Hirschfeld, T.; Klainer, S.

    1980-01-01

    A discussion of how stress and strain affect the quantities which can be measured in an NQR experiment shows that, for stresses of the magnitude to be expected at depths up to about 10,000 feet, quadrupole coupling constants will fall in the range of 1 to 10 kHz for both the sodium and chloride ions in NaCl. The most promising system involves pulsed nuclear double resonance detection; and alterative is to observe the quadrupolar splitting of the NMR signal. Choices to be made in the measurement and mapping techniques are discussed. The well-known perturbation of the homogenous stress field in the neighborhood of a borehole is shown to be advantageous from the point of view of obtaining directional information on the stress. Construction and operation of a borehole stress sensor are considered. The NQR technique seems feasible for measuring the magnitude and direction of underground stress with a resolution of about 25 psi, or 2.5% at 1000 psi. Downhole instrumentation suitable for in-situ determinations of stress appears within the state of the art. Additional tasks required on the project are identified

  7. N-isopropylacrylamide-based fine-dispersed thermosensitive ferrogels obtained via in-situ technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotych, O; Samchenko, Yu; Boldeskul, I; Ulberg, Z; Zholobak, N; Sukhodub, L

    2013-03-01

    Thermosensitive hydrogels with magnetic properties (ferrogels) are very promising for medical application, first of all, for the design of targeted delivery systems with controlled release of drugs and for magnetic hyperthermia and chemotherapy treatment of cancer. These magnetic hydrogels could be obtained using diverse techniques: ex- and in-situ syntheses. The present work is devoted to the study of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) formation inside the nanoreactors of (co)polymeric hydrogels. Polymeric templates (hydrogel films and fine-dispersed hydrogels) used for obtaining ferrogels were based on acrylic monomers: thermosensitive N-isopropylacrylamide, and hydrophilic acrylamide. Covalent cross-linking was accomplished using bifunctional monomer N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide. Influence of hydrophilic-lipophilic balance of polymeric templates and concentration of iron cations on the magnetite formation were investigated along with the development of ferrogel preparation technique. Cytotoxicity, physical and chemical properties of obtained magnetic hydrogels have been studied in this work. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Towards a more realistic picture of in situ biocide actions: Combining physiological and microscopy techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speranza, M., E-mail: speranzamariela@gmail.com [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, MNCN-CSIC, Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Wierzchos, J.; De Los Rios, A.; Perez-Ortega, S. [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, MNCN-CSIC, Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Souza-Egipsy, V. [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, ICA-CSIC, Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ascaso, C., E-mail: ascaso@mncn.csic.es [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, MNCN-CSIC, Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    In this study, we combined chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlaF) measurements, using pulse-amplitude-modulate (PAM) equipment, with scanning electron microscopy in backscattered electron mode (SEM-BSE) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images to evaluate the actions of Koretrel at lower concentrations on Verrucaria nigrescens colonising a dolostone. ChlaF measurements are good indicators of the damaging effects of biocides. However, these indicators only provide an incomplete view of the mechanism of biocides used to control biodeterioration agents. The death of the V. nigrescens photobiont at two biocide concentrations was revealed by PAM, SEM-BSE and TEM. Once Koretrel was applied, the Fv/Fm ratios markedly fell in the first few hours after the 1.5% treatment, and ratios for the 3% dilution remained close to zero throughout the study. The algal zone shows the plasmolysed appearance of the photobiont cells, and important aspects related to the action of the biocide on free and lichenised fungi were also detected using SEM-BSE. Many of the mycobiont cells had only their cell walls preserved; although, some fungal hyphae in lichen thalli and some microorganisms in endolithic clusters maintained lipid storage in their cytoplasm. These results indicated that the combination of physiological and microscopy techniques improves the assessment of biocide action in situ and this will help to optimize protocols in order to reduce the emission of these compounds to the environment. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We combined ChlaF measurements with EM images to analyses the biocides action on stone biodeterioration agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At lower biocide concentrations damage to photobiont and mycobiont cells integrity, ultrastructure and vitality were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The limited action of biocides on fungi and algae were detected using SEM-BSE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The combination of physiological and microscopy

  9. Stabilizing operation point technique based on the tunable distributed feedback laser for interferometric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuefeng; Zhou, Xinlei; Yu, Qingxu

    2016-02-01

    We describe a stabilizing operation point technique based on the tunable Distributed Feedback (DFB) laser for quadrature demodulation of interferometric sensors. By introducing automatic lock quadrature point and wavelength periodically tuning compensation into an interferometric system, the operation point of interferometric system is stabilized when the system suffers various environmental perturbations. To demonstrate the feasibility of this stabilizing operation point technique, experiments have been performed using a tunable-DFB-laser as light source to interrogate an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric vibration sensor and a diaphragm-based acoustic sensor. Experimental results show that good tracing of Q-point was effectively realized.

  10. Application of Arma Technique For Operation Stability of RSG-Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djudjuratisbela, Udju

    2000-01-01

    Application Of Arma Technique For Operation Stability Of RSG-Gas. Application of Fast Fourier Transport (FFT) method in the noise experiments data had been conducted to reactor kinetic parameter determination of RSG-Gas. Reactor stability that has closed relation to operation safety has not been measured yet. Noise analysis method and ARMA (Auto Regressive Moving Average) technique that has capability to identify mathematical model of the noise experimental data can be used for determination of kinetic/dynamic characteristic equation and its roots. From the roots of reactor characteristic equation, magnitude of natural frequency (fn), damping ratio (xi), damping frequency (fd), decay ratio (delta) and then reactor stability can be calculated

  11. Rumen escape nitrogen from forages in sheep: comparison of in situ and in vitro techniques using in vivo data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselink, J.M.J.; Dulphy, J.P.; Poncet, C.; Aufrère, J.; Tamminga, S.; Cone, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to relate in vivo data of rumen escape N (REN) of forages with REN estimated from models and with determinations of rumen undegradable N. For these determinations and models measurements from in situ and in vitro techniques were used. Eleven forages were investigated

  12. Developing new understanding of photoelectrochemical water splitting via in-situ techniques: A review on recent progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajie Cen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Photoelectrochemical (PEC water splitting is a promising technology for solar hydrogen production to build a sustainable, renewable and clean energy economy. Given the complexity of the PEC water splitting processes, it is important to note that developing in-situ techniques for studying PEC water splitting presents a formidable challenge. This review is aimed at highlighting advantages and disadvantages of each technique, while offering a pathway of potentially combining several techniques to address different aspects of interfacial processes in PEC water splitting. We reviewed recent progress in various techniques and approaches utilized to study PEC water splitting, focusing on spectroscopic and scanning-probe methods. Keywords: In-situ, Water splitting, IMPS, TAS, SPM

  13. In situ preparation of CuS cathode with unique stability and high rate performance for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yourong; Zhang Xianwang; Chen Peng; Liao Hantao; Cheng Siqing

    2012-01-01

    A simple approach, for the first time, was presented for in situ preparation of the CuS cathode. The obtained CuS cathodes were investigated by the measurements of X-ray diffraction pattern, scanning electronic microscopy, and electrochemical performance. The results indicate the CuS cathodes are composed of plenty of nano flakes, which construct a large 3-D net structure. Moreover, the CuS cathodes exhibit reversible capacity of 447.4, 414.1, 389.9 and 376.0 mAh g −1 at 0.2 C, 0.5 C, 1 C and 2 C respectively and excellent cycle stability for more than 100 cycles. The possible mechanism of the unique stability of the CuS cathode was discussed.

  14. Thermal stability and in situ SiN passivation of InAlN/GaN high electron mobility heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugani, L.; Carlin, J.-F.; Py, M. A.; Grandjean, N. [ICMP, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    We investigate the thermal stability of nearly lattice-matched InAlN layers under metal organic vapor phase epitaxy conditions for temperatures >800 °C and show that they are not fully stable. In particular, InAlN top layers undergo degradation during high temperature annealing due to a surface related process, which causes the loss of crystal quality. This strongly impacts the transport properties of InAlN/GaN HEMT heterostructures; in particular, the mobility is significantly reduced. However, we demonstrate that high thermal stability can be achieved by capping with a GaN layer as thin as 0.5 nm. Those findings enabled us to realize in situ passivated HEMT heterostructures with state of the art transport properties.

  15. Application of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) Technique for the Detection of Genetic Aberration in Medical Science

    OpenAIRE

    Ratan, Zubair Ahmed; Zaman, Sojib Bin; Mehta, Varshil; Haidere, Mohammad Faisal; Runa, Nusrat Jahan; Akter, Nasrin

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a macromolecule recognition technique, which is considered as a new advent in the field of cytology.?Initially, it was developed as a physical mapping tool to delineate genes within chromosomes. The accuracy and versatility of FISH were subsequently capitalized upon in biological and medical research. This visually appealing technique provides an intermediate degree of resolution between DNA analysis and chromosomal investigations. FISH consists of...

  16. Advanced electron holography techniques for in situ observation of solid-state lithium ion conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirayama, Tsukasa, E-mail: t-hirayama@jfcc.or.jp [Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramics Center, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 456-8587 (Japan); Aizawa, Yuka; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Sato, Takeshi [Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramics Center, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 456-8587 (Japan); Murata, Hidekazu [Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 468-8502 (Japan); Yoshida, Ryuji; Fisher, Craig A.J. [Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramics Center, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 456-8587 (Japan); Kato, Takehisa; Iriyama, Yasutoshi [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    Advanced techniques for overcoming problems encountered during in situ electron holography experiments in which a voltage is applied to an ionic conductor are reported. The three major problems encountered were 1) electric-field leakage from the specimen and its effect on phase images, 2) high electron conductivity of damage layers formed by the focused ion beam method, and 3) chemical reaction of the specimen with air. The first problem was overcome by comparing experimental phase distributions with simulated images in which three-dimensional leakage fields were taken into account, the second by removing the damage layers using a low-energy narrow Ar ion beam, and the third by developing an air-tight biasing specimen holder. - Highlights: • Phase distributions derived by comparing experimental and simulated measurements. • Simulations take into account leakage electric fields. • Electric potential distributions inside Li-ion conductors are obtained. • FIB damage layers are removed using a low-energy narrow Ar ion beam. • An air-tight biasing TEM holder for protecting air-sensitive specimens is reported.

  17. Assessment of phytoremediation as an in-situ technique for cleaning oil-contaminated sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frick, C M; Germida, J J; Farrell, R E [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Dept. of Soil Science

    1999-01-01

    The effectiveness of phytoremediation as a tool for cleaning up hydrocarbon contaminated soil and groundwater was evaluated by reviewing relative literature. Phytoremediation is an emerging technology which consists of the use of plants for in situ treatment of contaminated soils. Grasses, herbs, shrubs and deciduous trees were the main types of plants considered in this study. A database is presently under construction to act as an inventory of plant species that tolerate or phytoremediate petroleum hydrocarbons. This paper focused on the main mechanisms and special considerations involved in the phytoremediation alkanes, aromatics, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and creosote. While phytoremediation does not require intensive engineering techniques, it does involve human intervention to establish appropriate plants and microorganisms to enhance natural degradation processes. Plants such as canola, oats barley have been shown to tolerate and accumulate metals such as selenium, copper, cadmium and zinc. Hybrid poplar trees reduce the concentration of nitrate in surficial groundwater and degrade the herbicide atrazine. Forage grasses inoculated with bacteria can degrade chlorinated benzoic acids. Various grasses and leguminous plants can increase the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons from contaminated soils. 66 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  18. Assessment of phytoremediation as an in-situ technique for cleaning oil-contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, C.M.; Germida, J.J.; Farrell, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    The effectiveness of phytoremediation as a tool for cleaning up hydrocarbon contaminated soil and groundwater was evaluated by reviewing relative literature. Phytoremediation is an emerging technology which consists of the use of plants for in situ treatment of contaminated soils. Grasses, herbs, shrubs and deciduous trees were the main types of plants considered in this study. A database is presently under construction to act as an inventory of plant species that tolerate or phytoremediate petroleum hydrocarbons. This paper focused on the main mechanisms and special considerations involved in the phytoremediation alkanes, aromatics, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and creosote. While phytoremediation does not require intensive engineering techniques, it does involve human intervention to establish appropriate plants and microorganisms to enhance natural degradation processes. Plants such as canola, oats barley have been shown to tolerate and accumulate metals such as selenium, copper, cadmium and zinc. Hybrid poplar trees reduce the concentration of nitrate in surficial groundwater and degrade the herbicide atrazine. Forage grasses inoculated with bacteria can degrade chlorinated benzoic acids. Various grasses and leguminous plants can increase the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons from contaminated soils. 66 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  19. Prompt gamma-ray activation technique for in-situ analysis of mercury pollution in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khouri, M.C.; Jayanthi, K.A.; Pascholati, P.R.

    1995-01-01

    Industrial and mining pollutants discharged into water are in general distributed homogeneously and we investigated a prompt neutron activation technique for the in-situ analysis, to start with of Hg content in water. The laboratory test employed a 252 Cf neutron source (of ∼ 3 x 10 6 n/s fluence) submerged in a test tank of water of ∼ 500 litres, and to monitor the gamma-ray emission a 4 x 4 NaI (Tl) detector system was employed. In 3000 is time interval trials, for a 46 ppm contamination level of Hg, we observed an excess of counts of ∼ 9.2 σ significance in the energy range of 4000-6500 keV, which can be attributed to the presence of mercury. This test system for a 10 hour monitoring can provide a minimum detectable sensitivity at 4.78 ppm. In the future experiments, we propose to replace the NaI(Tl) detector by a HPGe detector to facilitate simultaneous analyses of pollutants such as cadmium, chlorine, chromium etc for detection at few tenths to tens of ppm levels or better. (author). 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Identification of bacteria used for microbial enhanced oil recovery process by fluorescence in situ hybridization technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, K.; Tanaka, S.; Otsuka, M. [Kansai Research Institute, Kyoto (Japan). Lifescience Lab.; Yonebayashi, H. [Japan National Oil Corp., Chiba (Japan). Tech. Research Center; Enomoto, H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Geoscience and Tech.

    2000-01-01

    A fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique using 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes was developed for rapid detection of microorganisms for use in the microbial enhancement of oil recovery (MEOR) process. Two microorganisms, Enterobacter cloacae TRC-322 and Bacillus licheniformis TRC-18-2-a, were selected from a collection of Enterobacter sp. and Bacillus sp. which were screened in previous studies as candidate microorganisms for injection, and were used for this experiment. Oligonucleotide probes, design based on specific sequences in the 16S rRNA gene were labeled with either fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), or 6-car-boxy-X-rhodamine (ROX), and were allowed to hybridize with fixed cells of the two microorganisms noted above. The fluorescence signal emitted from each microorganism cells could clearly be detected by an epifluorescence microscope. Moreover, E. cloacae TRC-322 and B, licheniformis TRC-18-2-a, suspended in actual reservoir brine, including inorganic salts, oil and aboriginal cells of the reservoir brine, could be detected directly by this hybridization method, without the need for cultivation and isolation. (author)

  1. Kinetics of chloride ion adsorption on stainless alloys by in situ contact electric resistance technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marichev, V.A.

    2008-01-01

    As the primary reason for pitting of stainless alloys, chloride adsorption is not adequately studied, e.g. kinetic investigations of chloride adsorption are actually absent. We discuss and partly reconsider some well-known facts (e.g. halides order: Cl - > Br - > I - ), disputed points (chloride penetration in passive film), and still unknown aspects of chloride adsorption. For the first time, we report kinetic studies of chloride adsorption on stainless alloys by in situ contact electric resistance technique. The peak-like character of kinetic curves has been found for all studied stainless alloys, but not for pure iron and nickel. This has been considered as a sequence of the substantial charge transfer during chloride adsorption. Opposite to typical d metals, stainless materials are alloys of early and late transition metals having unfilled d-bands with increased number of d-electron vacancies. Such electronic structure is favorable for adsorption of electron donating adsorbates like halide ions. Experimental data of this work are more compatible with possibility of chloride penetration into the passive films on stainless alloys that also might involve a transformation of primary oxy-hydroxide films into oxy-chloride films

  2. In-situ performance evaluation of radon measurement techniques in Uranium mine exhausts of Jaduguda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patnaik, R.L.; Jha, V.N.; Singh, M.K.; Meena, J.S.; Rajesh Kumar; Srivastava, V.S.; Sethy, N.K.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Several techniques are used for the measurement of the activity concentration of radon in the work place and the environment. Devices like Scintillation cell, Alpha guard and Low Level Radon Detection System (LLRDS) are widely used for the estimation of radon. Some of the devices like scintillation cell is normally used in high activity concentration, whereas, device like LLRDS is used in low activity concentration range. All these above devices are used in ambient mode in which air sample is either collected in a cell or in a chamber and the alpha counts are recorded after a definite delay. In some device, air is allowed to be diffused through a filter and alpha activity is estimated using proper detection system. Passive radon dosimeters can effectively be used both in low and high activity concentration range. The cumulative radon exposure can be assessed using passive radon dosimeters. For in situ performance evaluation an area is required where both high and low level activity concentration of radon is anticipated. Uranium mines exhaust area is presumed to be an area where both these conditions can be found by mere variation in the placement of the device. Inter comparison exercise can also be done effectively at this location using various devices of radon estimation

  3. Combining soundscape analysis with in situ observations and oceanographic data for future ecosystem evaluation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, S. E.; Freeman, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    Coral reef ecosystems face many anthropogenic threats. There are urgent requirements for improved monitoring and management. Conventional assessment methods using SCUBA are costly and prone to bias and under-sampling. Here, three approaches to understanding coral reef ecology are combined to aid the goal of enhanced passive monitoring in the future: statistical analysis of oceanographic habitats, remote cameras for nocturnal surveys of benthic fauna, and soundscape analysis in the context of oceanographic setting and ecological metrics collected in-situ. Hawaiian reefs from Kure Atoll to the island of Hawaii, an area spanning two oceanographic habitats, are assessed. Multivariate analysis of acoustic, remote camera, and in-situ observational data showed significant differences in more than 20 percent of ecological and acoustic variables when grouped by oceanic regime, suggesting that large-scale oceanography substantially influences local ecological states and associated soundscapes. Acoustic variables further delineated sites by island, suggesting local conditions influence the soundscape to a greater degree. While the number of invertebrates (with an emphasis on crustaceans and echinoderms) imaged using remote cameras correlated with a number of acoustic metrics, an increasingly higher correlation between invertebrate density and spectral level was observed as acoustic bands increased in frequency from 2 to 20 kHz. In turn, correlation was also observed between the number of predatory fish and sound levels above 2 kHz, suggesting a connection between the number of invertebrates, sound levels at higher frequencies, and the presence of their predators. Comparisons between sound recordings and diversity indices calculated from observational and remote camera data indicate that greater diversity in fishes and benthic invertebrates is associated with a larger change in sound levels between day and night. Interdisciplinary analyses provide a novel view to underwater

  4. Automated quantitative analysis of in-situ NaI measured spectra in the marine environment using a wavelet-based smoothing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsabaris, Christos; Prospathopoulos, Aristides

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm for automated analysis of in-situ NaI γ-ray spectra in the marine environment is presented. A standard wavelet denoising technique is implemented for obtaining a smoothed spectrum, while the stability of the energy spectrum is achieved by taking advantage of the permanent presence of two energy lines in the marine environment. The automated analysis provides peak detection, net area calculation, energy autocalibration, radionuclide identification and activity calculation. The results of the algorithm performance, presented for two different cases, show that analysis of short-term spectra with poor statistical information is considerably improved and that incorporation of further advancements could allow the use of the algorithm in early-warning marine radioactivity systems. - Highlights: → Algorithm for automated analysis of in-situ NaI γ-ray marine spectra. → Wavelet denoising technique provides smoothed spectra even at parts of the energy spectrum that exhibits strong statistical fluctuations. → Automated analysis provides peak detection, net area calculation, energy autocalibration, radionuclide identification and activity calculation. → Analysis of short-term spectra with poor statistical information is considerably improved.

  5. USE OF THE MOBILE NYLON BAG TECHNIQUE FOR MEASURING IN SITU DIGESTIBILITY OF SOME SUPPLIES FOOD AND AVOCADO IN PIGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Ly Carmenatti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The mobile nylon bag technique was used for measuring in situ digestibility of conventional feeds and avocado (Persea americana Mills products in three 70 kg pigs fitted with a simple cannula in duodenum. One 3x3 Latin square was used for determining in situ digestibility of soybean, maize and sorghum meal and another 3x3 Latin square for measuring in situ digestibility of seed, peel plus seed meal and the entire Nayaritean avocado fruit of Hass type, as well as of the commercial diet given ad libitum to animals. In a preliminary test conducted with only bags containing a commercial feedstuff, it was found that in situ digestibility of DM was on average 73.01%. In conventional feeds, soybean meal samples showed higher (P0.05 for N digestibility among avocado products, which was generally low (between 28.02 and 34.58%. In situ organic matter digestibility was linked to that of MS (r = 0.915; P<0.001, both in percent, in 42 examined samples, by the following found equation: y = 2.076 + 0.926 x. The herein described studies concerning the utilization of the mobile bag showed that it is possible to obtain a fast response in connection to the nutritive value of non conventional, tropical alimentary resources for pigs. On the other hand, the continuation of studies relative to the nutritive value of avocado products for pigs is highly recommended.

  6. Innovative electrical technique for in-place stabilization of contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.; FitzPatrick, V.F.; Timmerman, C.L.

    1984-05-01

    This paper discusses an emerging thermoelectric process known as in situ vitrification as a potential method for stabilizing buried waste inplace. The paper describes the Scott-Tee power system for the large-scale testing unit and how its design was developed. A brief synopsis of the performance assessments that have been conducted with regard to waste form quality, effect of soil conditions on processing, physical constraints of the process, and vitrification of soils containing organic and hazardous components is presented. A summary of an economic analysis is also provided

  7. Use of an extracapsular stabilization technique to repair cruciate ligament ruptures in two avian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Spodnick, Gary; Degernes, Laurel; DeVoe, Ryan S; Marcellin-Little, Denis J

    2009-12-01

    An extracapsular stabilization technique was used to repair cruciate ligament ruptures in a trumpeter hornbill (Bycanistes bucinator) and an African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus). The hornbill demonstrated cranial drawer motion and severe rotational instability of the stifle from ruptures of the cranial and caudal cruciate ligaments and stifle joint capsule. The luxation was reduced, and the fibula was cranially transposed, in relation to the tibiotarsus, and anchored with 2 positive profile threaded acrylic pins. A lateral extracapsular stabilization was then performed. The African grey parrot had a traumatic stifle luxation, and an open reduction and a lateral extracapsular stabilization were performed. Both birds regained function of the affected leg by 1 month after surgery. Extracapsular stabilization allows motion of the stifle joint to be maintained during the postoperative recovery period, an advantage over rigid stabilization. Maintaining motion in the stifle joint facilitates physical therapy and can aid in full recovery after avian stifle injuries.

  8. Stability of gas atomized reactive powders through multiple step in-situ passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iver E.; Steinmetz, Andrew D.; Byrd, David J.

    2017-05-16

    A method for gas atomization of oxygen-reactive reactive metals and alloys wherein the atomized particles are exposed as they solidify and cool in a very short time to multiple gaseous reactive agents for the in-situ formation of a protective reaction film on the atomized particles. The present invention is especially useful for making highly pyrophoric reactive metal or alloy atomized powders, such as atomized magnesium and magnesium alloy powders. The gaseous reactive species (agents) are introduced into the atomization spray chamber at locations downstream of a gas atomizing nozzle as determined by the desired powder or particle temperature for the reactions and the desired thickness of the reaction film.

  9. Stability of Porous Platinum Nanoparticles: Combined In Situ TEM and Theoretical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Shery L. Y.; Barnard, Amanda S.; Dwyer, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Porous platinum nanoparticles provide a route for the development of catalysts that use less platinum without sacrificing catalytic performance. Here, we examine porous platinum nanoparticles using a combination of in situ transmission electron microscopy and calculations based on a first-principles......-parametrized thermodynamic model. Our experimental observations show that the initially irregular morphologies of the as-sythesized porous nanoparticles undergo changes at high temperatures to morphologies having faceted external surfaces with voids present in the interior of the particles. The increasing size of stable...

  10. Polluted soils with heavy metals. Stabilization by magnesium oxide. Ex-situ and in-situ testings; Suelos contaminados con metales pesados. Estabilizacion con oxido de magnesio. Ensayos ex situ-in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cenoz, S.; Hernandez, J.; Gangutia, N.

    2004-07-01

    This work describes the use of Low-Grade MgO as a stabiliser agent for polluted soil reclaim. Low-Grade MgO may be an economically feasible alternative in the stabilisation of heavy metals from heavily contaminated soils. The effectiveness of Low-Grade MgO has been studied in three ex-situ stabilisation of heavily polluted soils contaminated by the flue-dust of pyrite roasting. LG-MgO provides an alkali reservoir guaranteeing long-term stabilisation without varying the pH conditions. The success of the ex-situ stabilisation was corroborated with the analysis of heavy metals in the leachates collected from the landfill o ver a long period of time. The study also includes the results obtained in an in-situ pilot scale stabilisation of contaminated soil. (Author) 17 refs.

  11. Reliable practical technique for in-situ rock stress measurements in deep gold mines.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stacey, TR

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The proposed primary output of this research project is the development of a set of equipment and method of in situ stress measurements in a high stress environment typical of the deep level gold mines....

  12. Investigation of Lobular Carcinoma In Situ, Using Molecular Genetic Techniques, for the Involvement of Novel Genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mastracci, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    Atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), i.e. lobular neoplasia, are lesions of significance in terms of implication of risk to the patient in the development of invasive carcinorna...

  13. The development of sensors and techniques for in situ water quality monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. C.

    1976-01-01

    Enzyme electrodes and chloride ion electrodes were investigated for in situ monitoring of water quality. Preliminary results show that miniature chloride ion electrodes and a phenol sensor are most promising in determining trace contaminants in water.

  14. A novel fluorescent in situ hybridization technique for detection of Rickettsia spp. in archival samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Claus Bo; Boye, Mette; Struve, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    A novel, sensitive and specific method for detecting Rickettsia spp. in archival samples is described. The method involves the use of fluorescently marked oligonucleotide probes for in situ hybridization. Specific hybridization of Ricekttsia was found without problems of cross-reactions with bact......A novel, sensitive and specific method for detecting Rickettsia spp. in archival samples is described. The method involves the use of fluorescently marked oligonucleotide probes for in situ hybridization. Specific hybridization of Ricekttsia was found without problems of cross...

  15. Styrene grafted natural rubber reinforced by in situ silica generated via sol–gel technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sittiphan, Torpong [Program of Petrochemistry and Polymer Sciences, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Prasassarakich, Pattarapan [Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Poompradub, Sirilux, E-mail: sirilux.p@chula.ac.th [Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Sol–gel reaction by NR latex was the absence of use of organic solvent and base catalyst. • Well dispersed in situ formed silica particles in the rubber matrix were obtained. • In situ silica was better to improve mechanical properties of rubber vulcanizates. -- Abstract: The filling of styrene graft natural rubber (ST-GNR) with in situ formed silica was performed using the sol–gel reaction via the latex solution method. The mechanical properties of ST-GNR/NR vulcanizate were improved when using the in situ formed silica to levels higher than those obtained with the commercial ex situ formed silica filled ST-GNR/NR vulcanizates at a comparable silica content of 12 parts by weight per hundred parts of rubber. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that the in situ silica particles were small (∼40 nm diameter) and well dispersed, while the commercial silica particles were larger (∼60 nm diameter) and markedly agglomerated in the rubbery matrix. The mechanical properties of the composites prepared via both the solid rubber and latex solution methods were comparable.

  16. Stabilization and in situ management of radioactive contaminated sediments of Port Hope harbor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolinar, G.M.; Killey, R.W.D.; Philipase, K.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of laboratory and field studies undertaken to assess the feasibility of in situ management of contaminated sediments in Port Hope harbor. The contaminated sediments stem from historic releases from an adjacent radium and uranium refinery, and uranium, arsenic, and radium are the most abundant contaminants. With improved emission controls, currently accumulating sediments have much lower levels of contamination, and the harbor waters currently meet water quality limits for the contaminants of concern. Within a few years, however, the continuing sedimentation will render the harbor unusable. Field tests have confirmed the dredging will result in incomplete removal of the contaminated sediments and that sediment suspension and the release of pores waters during dredging will produce harbor water contaminant concentrations that would require the treatment of large volumes of water. In addition, no remedial work can start until a site for the dredged material can be found. The local community inquired whether in situ burial of the sediments and abandonment of the harbor would provide safe disposal

  17. In Situ Stability of Substrate-Associated Cellulases Studied by DSC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Kim; Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Badino, Silke Flindt

    2014-01-01

    This work shows that differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) can be used to monitor the stability of substrate-adsorbed cellulases during long-term hydrolysis of insoluble cellulose. Thermal transitions of adsorbed enzyme were measured regularly in subsets of a progressing hydrolysis, and the size...

  18. In situ stabilizer formation from methacrylic acid macromonomers in emulsion polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreur-Piet, Ingeborg; Heuts, Johan P.A.

    2017-01-01

    Oligomers of methacrylic acid containing a propenyl ω-endgroup (i.e. MAA-macromonomers) were synthesized by cobalt-mediated catalytic chain transfer polymerization and used as precursors to stabilizers in emulsion polymerization. It was found that only in those polymerizations in which these

  19. Kinetically controlled fabrication of gold nanorods and investigation of their thermal stability via in-situ TEM heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chankhunthod, N.; Aslam, Z.; Critchley, K.; Evans, S. D.; Brydson, R.

    2017-09-01

    Size controlled CTAB-capped AuNRs with various aspect ratios (ARs) ranging from 1.63±0.13 to 4.12±0.25 were synthesized following a modified seed-mediated method. Their thermal stability was examined by in-situ TEM heating. The results revealed a structural change from rods to spheres with increasing temperature. At lower temperatures 600ºC, particles became increasingly spherical. This behaviour occurred at temperatures lower than the melting point of bulk gold supporting a surface diffusion mechanism with material diffusing from the tips and redepositing at the middle of the rods. The rate of change in AR appeared to increase for thinner AuNRs.

  20. Assessing phase stability and element distribution in Co-base superalloys at elevated temperatures by in situ TEM heating experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggeler, Yolita; Mueller, Julian; Spiecker, Erdmann [Lehrstuhl fuer Mikro- und Nanostrukturforschung and Center for Nanoanalysis and Electron Microscopy (CENEM), Department Werkstoffwissenschaften, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Co-based alloys, of a composition of Co-12Al-9W, form a stable two phase γ/γ{sup '} microstructure at 900 C. γ{sup '} cubes, consisting of the L12 crystal structure are coherently embedded in a solid solution fcc (A1) γ matrix. To ensure precipitate hardening at temperatures, which are relevant to practical applications, 700-1100 C, as experienced in gas turbine applications, the stability of the γ/γ{sup '} phases is of fundamental importance. In this analysis in situ TEM studies with chip-based heating systems (by DENS solution) are applied on new Co-based superalloys. After in situ heating at apr. 900 C and controlled quenching with different quenching rates the elemental distribution at the γ/γ{sup '} interface is measured using ChemiSTEM EDX. Exploiting the driving force for interface movement resulting from temperature-dependent volume fraction of γ and γ{sup '} insight into the diffusion of individual alloying elements and the relationship between local chemistry and ordering can be gained from transient phenomena. The experimental results will be compared with theoretical calculations. This work has been carried out within the framework of the SFB-TR 103 ''Single Crystal Superalloys''.

  1. In-Situ Measurements of the Radiation Stability of Amino Acids at 15-140 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.; Bell, Jan-Luca

    2012-01-01

    We present new kinetics data on the radiolytic destruction of amino acids measured in situ with infrared spectroscopy. Samples were irradiated at 15, 100, and 140 K with D.8-MeV protons, and amino-acid decay was followed at each temperature with and without H2O present. Observed radiation products included CO2 and amines, consistent with amino-acid decarboxylation. The half-lives of glycine, alanine, and phenylalanine were estimated for various extraterrestrial environments. Infrared spectral changes demonstrated the conversion from the non-zwitterion structure NH2-CH2(R)-COOH at 15 K to the zwitterion structure +NH3-CH2(R)-COO- at 140 K for each amino acid studied.

  2. Engineering feasibility analysis for in-situ stabilization of Burrell Township site residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    The Burrell Township site, located in western Pennsylvania, received approximately 11,600 tons of radioactively-contaminated material in late 1956 and early 1957 from the Vitro Manufacturing Company's operations in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. WESTON was requested to conduct an engineering study to determine the feasibility of stabilizing the site in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) interim and proposed standards (45 FR 27366--27368, April 22, 1980, and 46 FR 2556--2563, January 9, 1981). The scope of this study is limited to those alternatives that can be implemented on the site and will not require removal and offsite disposal of radioactively-contaminated material. Four alternatives for control of the radioactive material at the Burrell site were considered and evaluated, as follows: 1. Site stabilization and closure. 2. Site control and containment. 3. Waste excavation and encapsulation. 4. Waste excavation, incineration, and encapsulation. 2 refs., 32 figs., 12 tabs

  3. Development of the DGT technique for in-situ Pu speciation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusnir, R.; Bochud, F.; Froidevaux, P. [Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne University Hospital, Rue du Grand-Pre 1, CH-1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Steinmann, P. [Federal Office of Public Health, Swarzenburgstrasse 165, CH-3003 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    Toxic effects of artificial radionuclides are strongly dependent on the surrounding chemical environment which determines the bioavailability of contaminant species. Speciation of plutonium in the environment is of particular interest since it is a long-life actinide contributing to the dose exposure via ingestion with water and food in case of radioactive discharge. Furthermore, natural colloids present in waters, as main carriers of dissolved trace metals, can transport plutonium over significant distances from contaminated sites. The diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique is an efficient instrument for passive sampling of trace metals. It allows for in-situ monitoring of mean concentrations of bioavailable contaminant species (1). A DGT sampler consists of two gel layers: a polyacrylamide hydrogel diffusion layer allowing to diffuse labile metal species to the second, binding layer, impregnated with ion-exchange resin. Resin elution and further analysis allow determining the amount of the bioavailable fraction of trace metals in the bulk solution, which can be calculated from the relationship: C{sub bulk}= (M x Δg)/(D x t x A) where M is the measured metal species inventory in the resin, Δg the thickness of the diffusion layer, D the diffusion coefficient of the species in the gel, t the time of deployment, A the diffusion area. To our knowledge, the DGT has not yet been applied for Pu speciation measurements and the D value is unknown. Here we propose the use of DGT to monitor the dissolved phase and labile complexes of plutonium in the aquatic environment. We have first measured the diffusion coefficient of plutonium in the hydrogel. Experiments were carried out in a diffusion cell (2) and with commercially available DGT samplers exposed in standardized solutions containing {sup 239}Pu at pico-molar concentrations. Both approaches give comparable D values in the range of 2.30 x 10{sup -6} - 2.45 x 10{sup -6} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. We then studied

  4. DC Microgrids–Part I: A Review of Control Strategies and Stabilization Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragicevic, Tomislav; Lu, Xiaonan; Vasquez, Juan; Guerrero, Josep

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a review of control strategies, stability analysis, and stabilization techniques for dc microgrids (MGs). Overall control is systematically classified into local and coordinated control levels according to respective functionalities in each level. As opposed to local control, which relies only on local measurements, some line of communication between units needs to be made available in order to achieve the coordinated control. Depending on the communication method, three basic coordinated control strategies can be distinguished, i.e., decentralized, centralized, and distributed control. Decentralized control can be regarded as an extension of the local control since it is also based exclusively on local measurements. In contrast, centralized and distributed control strategies rely on digital communication technologies. A number of approaches using these three coordinated control strategies to achieve various control objectives are reviewed in this paper. Moreover, properties of dc MG dynamics and stability are discussed. This paper illustrates that tightly regulated point-of-load converters tend to reduce the stability margins of the system since they introduce negative impedances, which can potentially oscillate with lightly damped power supply input filters. It is also demonstrated that how the stability of the whole system is defined by the relationship of the source and load impedances, referred to as the minor loop gain. Several prominent specifications for the minor loop gain are reviewed. Finally, a number of active stabilization techniques are presented.

  5. Straightforward and accurate technique for post-coupler stabilization in drift tube linac structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Khalvati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The axial electric field of Alvarez drift tube linacs (DTLs is known to be susceptible to variations due to static and dynamic effects like manufacturing tolerances and beam loading. Post-couplers are used to stabilize the accelerating fields of DTLs against tuning errors. Tilt sensitivity and its slope have been introduced as measures for the stability right from the invention of post-couplers but since then the actual stabilization has mostly been done by tedious iteration. In the present article, the local tilt-sensitivity slope TS_{n}^{′} is established as the principal measure for stabilization instead of tilt sensitivity or some visual slope, and its significance is developed on the basis of an equivalent-circuit diagram of the DTL. Experimental and 3D simulation results are used to analyze its behavior and to define a technique for stabilization that allows finding the best post-coupler settings with just four tilt-sensitivity measurements. CERN’s Linac4 DTL Tank 2 and Tank 3 have been stabilized successfully using this technique. The final tilt-sensitivity error has been reduced from ±100%/MHz down to ±3%/MHz for Tank 2 and down to ±1%/MHz for Tank 3. Finally, an accurate procedure for tuning the structure using slug tuners is discussed.

  6. Straightforward and accurate technique for post-coupler stabilization in drift tube linac structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalvati, Mohammad Reza; Ramberger, Suitbert

    2016-04-01

    The axial electric field of Alvarez drift tube linacs (DTLs) is known to be susceptible to variations due to static and dynamic effects like manufacturing tolerances and beam loading. Post-couplers are used to stabilize the accelerating fields of DTLs against tuning errors. Tilt sensitivity and its slope have been introduced as measures for the stability right from the invention of post-couplers but since then the actual stabilization has mostly been done by tedious iteration. In the present article, the local tilt-sensitivity slope TSn' is established as the principal measure for stabilization instead of tilt sensitivity or some visual slope, and its significance is developed on the basis of an equivalent-circuit diagram of the DTL. Experimental and 3D simulation results are used to analyze its behavior and to define a technique for stabilization that allows finding the best post-coupler settings with just four tilt-sensitivity measurements. CERN's Linac4 DTL Tank 2 and Tank 3 have been stabilized successfully using this technique. The final tilt-sensitivity error has been reduced from ±100 %/MHz down to ±3 %/MHz for Tank 2 and down to ±1 %/MHz for Tank 3. Finally, an accurate procedure for tuning the structure using slug tuners is discussed.

  7. Electrochemical and spectroscopic in situ techniques for the investigation of the phosphating of zinc coated steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomandl, A.

    2003-05-01

    In this work spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques were developed for the investigation of surface treatments used in steel industry. ICP-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), Raman spectroscopy and the Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) were applied to the investigation of the kinetics of phosphating as well as the properties of phosphate layers. Phosphating of zinc coated steel leads to the formation of a crystalline layer consisting of zinc phosphate and is employed to enhance paint adhesion and corrosion protection. For the high reaction rates necessary in industrial production lines, oxidation agents are added to the phosphating bathes to accelerate the reaction. The oxidation agents provide an additional reduction reaction beside the hydrogen formation and therefore decrease the number of gas bubbles, which would block the zinc surface and reduce the rate of phosphating. With addition of H2O2 or nitrates the rate of layer formation is distinctly increased. In a combined experiment of ICP-AES with QCM and potential transients, it was shown that the presence of these accelerators in the phosphating bath increases the rate of zinc dissolution and hence leads to a faster formation of the phosphate layer. In under paint corrosion of painted, zinc coated steel phosphate layers are exposed to a highly alkaline environment. The stability of a phosphate layer against alkaline attack is therefore essential for its performance in corrosion protection. To enhance the alkaline stability Mn and Ni are added to modern phosphating bathes. The incorporation of these elements reduces the dissolution rate in 0.1 M NaOH proportional to their concentration in the phosphate layer. The dissolution of Zn, P, Mn and Ni was determined quantitatively with ICP-AES. Raman spectroscopy showed the formation of a Mn-hydroxide layer during alkaline attack, which protects the phosphate layer and reduces further dissolution. On basis of these results the reaction of phosphate layers

  8. Field application of activated carbon amendment for in-situ stabilization of polychlorinated biphenyls in marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yeo-Myoung; Ghosh, Upal; Kennedy, Alan J; Grossman, Adam; Ray, Gary; Tomaszewski, Jeanne E; Smithenry, Dennis W; Bridges, Todd S; Luthy, Richard G

    2009-05-15

    We report results on the first field-scale application of activated carbon (AC) amendment to contaminated sediment for in-situ stabilization of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The test was performed on a tidal mud flat at South Basin, adjacent to the former Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco Bay, CA. The major goals of the field study were to (1) assess scale up of the AC mixing technology using two available, large-scale devices, (2) validate the effectiveness of the AC amendment at the field scale, and (3) identify possible adverse effects of the remediation technology. Also, the test allowed comparison among monitoring tools, evaluation of longer-term effectiveness of AC amendment, and identification of field-related factors that confound the performance of in-situ biological assessments. Following background pretreatment measurements, we successfully incorporated AC into sediment to a nominal 30 cm depth during a single mixing event, as confirmed by total organic carbon and black carbon contents in the designated test plots. The measured AC dose averaged 2.0-3.2 wt% and varied depending on sampling locations and mixing equipment. AC amendment did not impact sediment resuspension or PCB release into the water column over the treatment plots, nor adversely impactthe existing macro benthic community composition, richness, or diversity. The PCB bioaccumulation in marine clams was reduced when exposed to sediment treated with 2% AC in comparison to the control plot Field-deployed semi permeable membrane devices and polyethylene devices showed about 50% reduction in PCB uptake in AC-treated sediment and similar reduction in estimated pore-water PCB concentration. This reduction was evident even after 13-month post-treatment with then 7 months of continuous exposure, indicating AC treatment efficacy was retained for an extended period. Aqueous equilibrium PCB concentrations and PCB desorption showed an AC-dose response. Field-exposed AC after 18 months

  9. Techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides in contaminated subsurface environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, P.M.; Watson, D.B.; Blake, D.A.; Beard, L.P.; Brooks, S.C.; Carley, J.M.; Criddle, C.S.; Doll, W.E.; Fields, M.W.; Fendorf, S.E.; Geesey, G.G.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Hubbard, S.S.; Istok, J.D.; Kelly, S.; Kemner, K.M.; Peacock, A.D.; Spalding, B.P.; White, D.C.; Wolf, A.; Wu, W.; Zhou, J.

    2004-11-14

    monitoring of coupled hydrological, geochemical/geophysical, and microbial processes. In the following manuscript we will (1) discuss contaminant fate and transport problems in humid regimes, (2) efforts to immobilize metals and radionuclides in situ via bioremediation, and (3) state-of-the-art techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides. These included (a) in situ solution and solid phase monitoring, (b) in situ and laboratory microbial community analysis, (c) noninvasive geophysical methods, and (d) solid phase speciation via high resolution spectroscopy.

  10. Spacecraft navigation at Mars using earth-based and in situ radio tracking techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, S. W.; Edwards, C. D.; Kahn, R. D.; Vijayaraghavan, A.; Hastrup, R. C.; Cesarone, R. J.

    1992-08-01

    A survey of earth-based and in situ radiometric data types and results from a number of studies investigating potential radio navigation performance for spacecraft approaching/orbiting Mars and for landed spacecraft and rovers on the surface of Mars are presented. The performance of Doppler, ranging and interferometry earth-based data types involving single or multiple spacecraft is addressed. This evaluation is conducted with that of in situ data types, such as Doppler and ranging measurements between two spacecraft near Mars, or between a spacecraft and one or more surface radio beacons.

  11. Evaluation of primary and secondary stability of titanium implants using different surgical techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabassum, A.; Meijer, G.J.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of different surgical techniques on the primary and secondary implant stability using trabecular bone of goats as an implantation model. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the iliac crest of eight goats, 48 cylindrical-screw-type implants with a diameter of 4.2 mm

  12. An offset tone based gain stabilization technique for mixed-signal RF measurement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Gopal, E-mail: gjos@barc.gov.in [BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Motiwala, Paresh D.; Randale, G.D.; Singh, Pitamber [BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Agarwal, Vivek; Kumar, Girish [IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2015-09-21

    This paper describes a gain stabilization technique for a RF signal measurement system. A sinusoidal signal of known amplitude, phase and close enough in frequency is added to the main, to be measured RF signal at the input of the analog section. The system stabilizes this offset tone in the digital domain, as it is sampled at the output of the analog section. This process generates a correction factor needed to stabilize the magnitude of the gain of the analog section for the main RF signal. With the help of a simple calibration procedure, the absolute amplitude of the main RF signal can be measured. The technique is especially suited for a system that processes signals around a single frequency, employs direct signal conversion into the digital domain, and processes subsequent steps in an FPGA. The inherent parallel signal processing in an FPGA-based implementation allows a real time stabilization of the gain. The effectiveness of the technique is derived from the fact, that the gain stabilization stamped to the main RF signal measurement branch requires only a few components in the system to be inherently stable. A test setup, along with experimental results is presented from the field of RF instrumentation for particle accelerators. Due to the availability of a phase synchronized RF reference signal in these systems, the measured phase difference between the main RF and the RF reference is also stabilized using this technique. A scheme of the signal processing is presented, where a moving average filter has been used to filter out not only the unwanted frequencies, but also to separate the main RF signal from the offset tone signal. This is achieved by a suitable choice of sampling and offset tone frequencies. The presented signal processing scheme is suitable to a variety of RF measurement applications.

  13. Field Deployment for In-situ Metal and Radionuclide Stabilization by Microbial Metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C. E.; Knox, A. S.; Dixon, K. L.; Roseberry, R. J.; Kritzas, Y. G

    2005-09-26

    A novel biotechnology is reported here that was demonstrated at SRS that facilitates metal and actinide immobilization by incorporating the physiology and ecology of indigenous bacteria. This technology is based on our previous work with pyomelanin-producing bacteria isolated from SRS soils. Through tyrosine supplementation, overproduction of pyomelanin was achieved, which lead ultimately to metal and actinide immobilization, both in-vitro and in-situ. Pyomelanin is a recalcitrant microbial pigment and a humic type compound in the class of melanin pigments. Pyomelanin has electron shuttling and metal chelation capabilities and thus accelerates the bacterial reduction and/or immobilization of metals. Pyomelanin is produced outside the cell and either diffuses away or attaches to the cell surface. In either case, the reduced pyomelanin is capable of transferring electrons to metals as well as chelating metals. Because of its recalcitrance and redox cycling properties, pyomelanin molecules can be used over and over again for metal transformation. When produced in excess, pyomelanin produced by one bacterial species can be used by other species for metal reduction, thereby extending the utility of pyomelanin and further accelerating metal immobilization rates. Soils contaminated with Ni and U were the focus of this study in order to develop in-situ, metal bioimmobilization technologies. We have demonstrated pyomelanin production in soil from the Tims Branch area of SRS as a result of tyrosine amendments. These results were documented in laboratory soil column studies and field deployment studies. The amended soils demonstrated increased redox behavior and sequestration capacity of U and transition metals following pyomelanin production. Treatments incorporating tyrosine and lactate demonstrated the highest levels of pyomelanin production. In order to determine the potential use of this technology at other areas of SRS, pyomelanin producing bacteria were also quantified

  14. A novel strategy for high-stability lithium sulfur batteries by in situ formation of polysulfide adsorptive-blocking layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Liming; Li, Gaoran; Liu, Binhong; Li, Zhoupeng; Zheng, Junsheng; Zheng, Jim P.

    2017-07-01

    Lithium sulfur (Lisbnd S) batteries are one of the most promising energy storage devices owing to their high energy and power density. However, the shuttle effect as a key barrier hinders its practical application by resulting in low coulombic efficiency and poor cycling performance. Herein, a novel design of in situ formed polysulfide adsorptive-blocking layer (PAL) on the cathode surface was developed to tame the polysulfide shuttling and promote the cycling stability for Lisbnd S batteries. The PAL is consisted of La2S3, which is capable to chemically adsorb polysulfide via the strong interaction of Lasbnd S bond and Ssbnd S bond, and build an effective barrier against sulfur escaping. Moreover, the La2S3 is capable to suppress the crystallization of Li2S and promote the ion transfer, which contributes to the reduced internal resistance of batteries. Furthermore, the by-product LiNO3 simultaneously forms a stable anode solid and electrolyte interface to further inhibit the polysulfide shuttle. By this simple and convenient method, the resultant Lisbnd S batteries achieved exceptional cycling stability with an ultralow decay rate of 0.055% since the 10th cycle.

  15. Development of cellulase-nanoconjugates with enhanced ionic liquid and thermal stability for in situ lignocellulose saccharification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Jasneet; Ahmad, Razi; Khare, S K

    2017-10-01

    The present work aimed to improve catalytic efficiency of Trichoderma reesei cellulase for enhanced saccharification. The cellulase was immobilized on two nanomatrices i.e. magnetic and silica nanoparticles with immobilization efficiency of 85% and 76% respectively. The nanobioconjugates exhibited increase in V max , temperature optimum, pH and thermal stability as compared with free enzyme. These could be efficiently reused for five repeated cycles and were stable in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazoliumacetate [EMIM][Ac], an ionic liquid. Ionic liquids (IL) are used as green solvents to dissolve lignocellulosic biomass and facilitate better saccharification. The cellulase immobilized on magnetic nanoparticles was used for in situ saccharification of [EMIM][Ac] pretreated sugarcane bagasse and wheat straw for two cycles. The structural deconstruction and decrease in biomass crystallinity was confirmed by SEM, XRD and FTIR. The high hydrolysis yields (∼89%) obtained in this one-pot process coupled with IL stability and recycled use of immobilized cellulase, potentiates its usefulness in biorefineries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Non-Aqueous Sol-Gel Synthesis of FePt Nanoparticles in the Absence of In Situ Stabilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Preller

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of FePt nanocrystals is typically performed in an organic solvent at rather high temperatures, demanding the addition of the in situ stabilizers oleic acid and oleylamine to produce monomodal particles with well-defined morphologies. Replacing frequently-used solvents with organic media bearing functional moieties, the use of the stabilizers can be completely circumvented. In addition, various morphologies and sizes of the nanocrystals can be achieved by the choice of organic solvent. The kinetics of particle growth and the change in the magnetic behavior of the superparamagnetic FePt nanocrystals during the synthesis with a set of different solvents, as well as the resulting morphologies and stoichiometries of the nanoparticles were determined by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES/mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID measurements. Furthermore, annealing of the as-prepared FePt nanoparticles led to the ordered L10 phase and, thus, to hard magnetic materials with varying saturation magnetizations and magnetic coercivities.

  17. Model predictions of metal speciation in freshwaters compared to measurements by in situ techniques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unsworth, Emily R; Warnken, Kent W; Zhang, Hao; Davison, William; Black, Frank; Buffle, Jacques; Cao, Jun; Cleven, Rob; Galceran, Josep; Gunkel, Peggy; Kalis, Erwin; Kistler, David; Leeuwen, Herman P van; Martin, Michel; Noël, Stéphane; Nur, Yusuf; Odzak, Niksa; Puy, Jaume; Riemsdijk, Willem van; Sigg, Laura; Temminghoff, Erwin; Tercier-Waeber, Mary-Lou; Toepperwien, Stefanie; Town, Raewyn M; Weng, Liping; Xue, Hanbin

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of trace metal species in situ in a softwater river, a hardwater lake, and a hardwater stream were compared to the equilibrium distribution of species calculated using two models, WHAM 6, incorporating humic ion binding model VI and visual MINTEQ incorporating NICA-Donnan. Diffusive

  18. Slipped upper femoral epiphysis: Outcome after in situ fixation and capital realignment technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Arora

    2013-01-01

    Results: Clinical outcome as assessed by Merle d′ Aubigne score was excellent in 6, good in 10, fair in 6 and poor in 1. Half of the in situ fixation patients underwent osteoplasty procedure for femoroacetabular impingement and 5 more were symptomatic. The head neck offset and α angle after in situ pinning were -1.12 ± 3 mm and 66.05 ± 9.7°, respectively and this improved to 8.7 mm and 49°, respectively, after osteoplasty. One child in the pinning group had chondrolysis. Eight patients with severe slip underwent capital realignment. Mean followup was 20.15 months. The anterior head neck offset and α angle were corrected to 6.8 ± 1.72 mm and 44.6 ± 7.0° mm, respectively. Two children with unstable slip in the capital realignment group had avascular necrosis which was diagnosed at presentation by bone scan. Conclusion: High BMI, vitamin D deficiency and endocrine disorders are associated with SUFE in India and should be evaluated as some of these are amenable to prevention and treatment. Most patients treated with in situ pinning developed femoroacetabular impingement. The early results after capital realignment procedure are encouraging and help to avoid a second procedure which is needed in a majority of patients who underwent in situ pinning.

  19. Optical and structural properties of radiolytically in situ synthesized silver nanoparticles stabilized by chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol) blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstić, Jelena; Spasojević, Jelena; Radosavljević, Aleksandra; Šiljegovć, Milorad; Kačarević-Popović, Zorica

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the potential of chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol) (CS/PVA) blends as capping agent for stabilization of Ag-nanoparticles (Ag NPs) during their in situ gamma irradiation induced synthesis was investigated. The UV–vis absorption spectra show the surface plasmon absorption band around 410 nm, which confirms the formation of Ag-nanoparticles. It was found that the composition of CS/PVA blend affected the size of the obtained Ag-nanoparticles, as well as the parameters such as density, molar concentration and effective surface area, calculated from the experimentally obtained UV–vis absorption spectra and spectra obtained by simulation according to the Mie theory. SEM micrograph and XRD measurement indicated a spherical morphology and face centered cubic crystal structure of Ag-nanoparticles, with diameter around 12 nm. The values of optical band gap energy between valence and conduction bands (E g ), calculated from the UV–vis absorption spectra, also show dependence on the blend composition for Ag–CS/PVA colloids as well as for Ag–CS/PVA nanocomposites. - Highlights: • Ag NPs were synthesized by γ-irradiation and stabilized by CS/PVA blends. • Composition of CS/PVA blends has influence on the size of spherical Ag NPs. • simulation based on Mie theory was used to calculate the parameters of Ag NPs. • Ag NPs are stabilized through interactions with -OH and -NH 2 groups of polymers. • Optical band gap energy was calculated from UV–vis spectra by Tauc's expression

  20. Structural changes and thermal stability of charged LiNixMnyCozO₂ cathode materials studied by combined in situ time-resolved XRD and mass spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Seong-Min; Hu, Enyuan; Zhou, Yongning; Yu, Xiqian; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Cho, Sung-Jin; Kim, Kwang-Bum; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Nam, Kyung-Wan

    2014-12-24

    Thermal stability of charged LiNixMnyCozO2 (NMC, with x + y + z = 1, x:y:z = 4:3:3 (NMC433), 5:3:2 (NMC532), 6:2:2 (NMC622), and 8:1:1 (NMC811)) cathode materials is systematically studied using combined in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy (TR-XRD/MS) techniques upon heating up to 600 °C. The TR-XRD/MS results indicate that the content of Ni, Co, and Mn significantly affects both the structural changes and the oxygen release features during heating: the more Ni and less Co and Mn, the lower the onset temperature of the phase transition (i.e., thermal decomposition) and the larger amount of oxygen release. Interestingly, the NMC532 seems to be the optimized composition to maintain a reasonably good thermal stability, comparable to the low-nickel-content materials (e.g., NMC333 and NMC433), while having a high capacity close to the high-nickel-content materials (e.g., NMC811 and NMC622). The origin of the thermal decomposition of NMC cathode materials was elucidated by the changes in the oxidation states of each transition metal (TM) cations (i.e., Ni, Co, and Mn) and their site preferences during thermal decomposition. It is revealed that Mn ions mainly occupy the 3a octahedral sites of a layered structure (R3̅m) but Co ions prefer to migrate to the 8a tetrahedral sites of a spinel structure (Fd3̅m) during the thermal decomposition. Such element-dependent cation migration plays a very important role in the thermal stability of NMC cathode materials. The reasonably good thermal stability and high capacity characteristics of the NMC532 composition is originated from the well-balanced ratio of nickel content to manganese and cobalt contents. This systematic study provides insight into the rational design of NMC-based cathode materials with a desired balance between thermal stability and high energy density.

  1. In Situ Microbial Community Control of the Stability of Bio-reduced Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, Brett R.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Resch, Charles T.; Arntzen, Evan; Smithgall, Amanda N.; Pfiffner, Susan; Gan, M.; McKinley, James P.; Long, Philip E.; White, David C.

    2008-01-01

    In aerobic aquifers typical of many Department of Energy (DOE) legacy waste sites, uranium is present in the oxidized U(VI) form which is more soluble and thus more mobile. Field experiments at the Old Rifle UMTRA site have demonstrated that biostimulation by electron donor addition (acetate) promotes biological U(VI) reduction (2). However, U(VI) reduction is reversible and oxidative dissolution of precipitated U(IV) after the cessation of electron donor addition remains a critical issue for the application of biostimulation as a treatment technology. Despite the potential for oxidative dissolution, field experiments at the Old Rifle site have shown that rapid reoxidation of bio-reduced uranium does not occur and U(VI) concentrations can remain at approximately 20% of background levels for more than one year. The extent of post-amendment U(VI) removal and the maintenance of bioreduced uranium may result from many factors including U(VI) sorption to iron-containing mineral phases, generation of H2S or FeS0.9, or the preferential sorption of U(VI) by microbial cells or biopolymers, but the processes controlling the reduction and in situ reoxidation rates are not known. To investigate the role of microbial community composition in the maintenance of bioreduced uranium, in-well sediment incubators (ISIs) were developed allowing field deployment of amended and native sediments during on-going experiments at the site. Field deployment of the ISIs allows expedient interrogation of microbial community response to field environmental perturbations and varying geochemical conditions.

  2. In Situ Microbial Community Control of the Stability of Bio-reduced Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, Brett, R.; Peacock, Aaron, D.; Resch, Charles, T.; Arntzen, Evan; Smithgall, Amanda, N.; Pfiffner, Susan; Gan, M.; McKinley, James, P.; Long, Philip, E.; White, David, C.

    2008-03-28

    In aerobic aquifers typical of many Department of Energy (DOE) legacy waste sites, uranium is present in the oxidized U(VI) form which is more soluble and thus more mobile. Field experiments at the Old Rifle UMTRA site have demonstrated that biostimulation by electron donor addition (acetate) promotes biological U(VI) reduction (2). However, U(VI) reduction is reversible and oxidative dissolution of precipitated U(IV) after the cessation of electron donor addition remains a critical issue for the application of biostimulation as a treatment technology. Despite the potential for oxidative dissolution, field experiments at the Old Rifle site have shown that rapid reoxidation of bio-reduced uranium does not occur and U(VI) concentrations can remain at approximately 20% of background levels for more than one year. The extent of post-amendment U(VI) removal and the maintenance of bioreduced uranium may result from many factors including U(VI) sorption to iron-containing mineral phases, generation of H2S or FeS0.9, or the preferential sorption of U(VI) by microbial cells or biopolymers, but the processes controlling the reduction and in situ reoxidation rates are not known. To investigate the role of microbial community composition in the maintenance of bioreduced uranium, in-well sediment incubators (ISIs) were developed allowing field deployment of amended and native sediments during on-going experiments at the site. Field deployment of the ISIs allows expedient interrogation of microbial community response to field environmental perturbations and varying geochemical conditions.

  3. A new in situ technique for studying deformation and fracture in thin film ductile/brittle laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackney, S.A.; Milligan, W.W.

    1991-01-01

    A new technique for studying deformation and fracture of thin film ductile/brittle laminates is described. The laminates are prepared by sputtering a brittle coating on top of an electropolished TEM thin foil. The composites are then strained in situ in the TEM. In this preliminary investigation, the composites consisted of a ductile aluminum substrate and a brittle silicon coating. Cracks in the brittle film grew discontinuously in bursts several micrometers in length. The crack opening displacement initiated plastic deformation in the ductile film, thus dissipating energy and allowing crack arrest. The interface was well bonded, and delamination was not observed. Due to the good interfacial bond and the crack opening behind the crack tip, it was possible to study very large plastic deformations and ductile fracture in the aluminum in situ, without buckling of the foil. The possibility of micromechanical modeling of the fracture behavior is briefly discussed. (orig.)

  4. Stabilized Sulfonated Aromatic Polymers by in situ Solvothermal Cross-Linking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Vona, Maria Luisa, E-mail: divona@uniroma2.it; Sgreccia, Emanuela [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Narducci, Riccardo; Pasquini, Luca [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); MAtériaux Divisés, Interfaces, Réactivité, ELectrochimie (MADIREL – UMR 7246), Aix Marseille Université, Marseille (France); Hou, Hongying [Faculty of Material and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming (China); Knauth, Philippe [MAtériaux Divisés, Interfaces, Réactivité, ELectrochimie (MADIREL – UMR 7246), Aix Marseille Université, Marseille (France)

    2014-10-10

    The cross-link reaction via sulfone bridges of sulfonated polyether ether ketone (SPEEK) by thermal treatment at 180°C in presence of dimethylsulfoxide is discussed. The modifications of properties subsequent to the cross-linking are presented. The mechanical strength as well as the hydrolytic stability increased with the thermal treatment time, i.e., with the degree of cross-linking. The proton conductivity was determined as function of temperature, IEC, degree of cross-linking, and hydration number. The memory effect, which is the membrane ability to “remember” the water uptake reached at high temperature also at lower temperature, is exploited in order to achieve high values of conductivity. Membranes swelled at 110°C can reach a conductivity of 0.14 S/cm at 80°C with a hydration number (λ) of 73.

  5. Stabilized sulfonated aromatic polymers by in situ solvothermal cross-linking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa eDi Vona

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The cross-link reaction via sulfone bridges of sulfonated polyetheretherketone (SPEEK by thermal treatment at 180 °C in presence of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO is discussed. The modifications of properties subsequent to the cross-linking are presented. The mechanical strength as well as the hydrolytic stability increased with the thermal treatment time, i.e., with the degree of cross-linking. The proton conductivity was determined as function of temperature, IEC, degree of cross-linking and hydration number. The memory effect, which is the membrane ability to remember the water uptake reached at high temperature also at lower temperature, is exploited in order to achieve high values of conductivity. Membranes swelled at 110 °C can reach a conductivity of 0.14 S/cm at 80°C with a hydration number ( of 73.

  6. In-situ, real-time, studies of film growth processes using ion scattering and direct recoil spectroscopy techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smentkowski, V. S.

    1999-04-22

    Time-of-flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy (TOF-ISARS) enables the characterization of the composition and structure of surfaces with 1-2 monolayer specificity. It will be shown that surface analysis is possible at ambient pressures greater than 3 mTorr using TOF-ISARS techniques; allowing for real-time, in situ studies of film growth processes. TOF-ISARS comprises three analytical techniques: ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), which detects the backscattered primary ion beam; direct recoil spectroscopy (DRS), which detects the surface species recoiled into the forward scattering direction; and mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions (MSRI), which is 3 variant of DRS capable of isotopic resolution for all surface species--including H and He. The advantages and limitations of each of these techniques will be discussed. The use of the three TOF-ISARS methods for real-time, in situ film growth studies at high ambient pressures will be illustrated. It will be shown that MSRI analysis is possible during sputter deposition. It will be also be demonstrated that the analyzer used for MSRI can also be used for time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) under high vacuum conditions. The use of a single analyzer to perform the complimentary surface analytical techniques of MSRI and SIMS is unique. The dwd functionality of the MSRI analyzer provides surface information not obtained when either MSRI or SIMS is used independently.

  7. Performance Comparison of Adaptive Estimation Techniques for Power System Small-Signal Stability Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Feilat

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the assessment of the small-signal stability of a single-machine infinite- bus power system under widely varying loading conditions using the concept of synchronizing and damping torques coefficients. The coefficients are calculated from the time responses of the rotor angle, speed, and torque of the synchronous generator. Three adaptive computation algorithms including Kalman filtering, Adaline, and recursive least squares have been compared to estimate the synchronizing and damping torque coefficients. The steady-state performance of the three adaptive techniques is compared with the conventional static least squares technique by conducting computer simulations at different loading conditions. The algorithms are compared to each other in terms of speed of convergence and accuracy. The recursive least squares estimation offers several advantages including significant reduction in computing time and computational complexity. The tendency of an unsupplemented static exciter to degrade the system damping for medium and heavy loading is verified. Consequently, a power system stabilizer whose parameters are adjusted to compensate for variations in the system loading is designed using phase compensation method. The effectiveness of the stabilizer in enhancing the dynamic stability over wide range of operating conditions is verified through the calculation of the synchronizing and damping torque coefficients using recursive least square technique.

  8. Real-time stability in power systems techniques for early detection of the risk of blackout

    CERN Document Server

    Savulescu, Savu

    2014-01-01

    This pioneering volume has been updated and enriched to reflect the state-of-the-art in blackout prediction and prevention. It documents and explains background and algorithmic aspects of the most successful steady-state, transient and voltage stability solutions available today in real-time. It also describes new, cutting-edge stability applications of synchrophasor technology, and captures industry acceptance of metrics and visualization tools that quantify and monitor the distance to instability. Expert contributors review a broad spectrum of additionally available techniques, such as traje

  9. Chemical stability of fluorine-containing coatings of cold drying for radiation - protection technique articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigorina, I.I.; Zvyagintseva, N.V.; Egorov, B.N.

    1977-01-01

    The chemical stability of fluorolon coatings, which are not subjected to heat treatment or hot drying during application, has been studied. The test for layer life-time has been performed by submerging specimens in agressive medium. The time for one upper removable layer to fail under steady action of agressive liquid is found to be: > 12 months at 20 deg C, 6-9 months at 40 deg C; at 60 deg C the time of layer stability depends upon medium: 1 month for nitric, 2 months for acetic, 2-3 months for sulphuric and hydrochloric acid. The coatings are recommended for practical application in radiation-protective technique

  10. In situ high-frequency UV-Vis spectrometer probes for investigating runoff processes and end member stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Michael; Weiler, Markus; Pfister, Laurent; Klaus, Julian

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, several limitations as to the application of end member mixing analysis with isotope and geochemical tracers have been revealed: unstable end member solutions, inputs varying in space and time, and unrealistic mixing assumptions. In addition, the necessary high-frequency sampling using conventional methods is time and resources consuming, and hence most sampling rates are not suitable for capturing the response times of the majority of observed headwater catchments. However, high-frequency observations are considered fundamental for gaining new insights into hydrological systems. In our study, we have used two portable, in situ, high-frequency UV-Vis spectrometers (spectro::lyser; scan Messtechnik GmbH) to investigate the variability of several signatures in streamflow and end member stability. The spectro::lyser measures TOC, DOC, nitrate and the light absorption spectrum from 220 to 720 nm with 2.5 nm increment. The Weierbach catchment (0.45 km2) in the Attert basin (297 km2) in Luxemburg is a small headwater research catchment (operated by the CRP Gabriel Lippmann), which is completely forested and underlain by schist bedrock. The catchment is equipped with a dense network of hydrological instruments and for this study, the outlet of the Weierbach catchment was equipped with one spectro::lyser, permanently sensing stream water at a 15 minutes time step over several months. Hydrometric and meteorologic data was compared with the high-frequency spectro::lyser time series of TOC, DOC, nitrate and the light absorption spectrum, to get a first insight into the behaviour of the catchment under different environmental conditions. As a preliminary step for a successful end member mixing analysis, the stability of rainfall, soil water, and groundwater was tested with one spectro::lyser, both temporally and spatially. Thereby, we focused on the investigation of changes and patterns of the light absorption spectrum of the different end members and the

  11. Straightforward and accurate technique for post-coupler stabilization in drift tube linac structures

    CERN Document Server

    Khalvati, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    The axial electric field of Alvarez drift tube linacs (DTLs) is known to be susceptible to variations due to static and dynamic effects like manufacturing tolerances and beam loading. Post-couplers are used to stabilize the accelerating fields of DTLs against tuning errors. Tilt sensitivity and its slope have been introduced as measures for the stability right from the invention of post-couplers but since then the actual stabilization has mostly been done by tedious iteration. In the present article, the local tilt-sensitivity slope TS 0 n is established as the principal measure for stabilization instead of tilt sensitivity or some visual slope, and its significance is developed on the basis of an equivalent-circuit diagram of the DTL. Experimental and 3D simulation results are used to analyze its behavior and to define a technique for stabilization that allows finding the best post-coupler settings with just four tilt-sensitivity measurements. CERN ’ s Linac4 DTL Tank 2 and Tank 3 have been stabilized succ...

  12. [Research on the application of in-situ biological stabilization solidification technology in chromium contaminated site management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-rong; Li, Juan; Xu, Wei

    2013-09-01

    In-situ biological stabilization solidification (SS) technology is an effective ground water risk control method for chromium contaminated sites. Through on-site engineering test, this paper has preliminarily validated the remediation effect of in-situ SS method on a southern chromium contaminated site. The engineering test site has an area of approximately 600 m2, and is located at the upstream of the contaminated area. Due to the severe contamination of chromium, the total chromium concentration reached up to 11,850 mg x kg(-1), while the hexavalent chromium concentration reached up to 349 mg x kg(-1), and the most severely contaminated soil had a depth of -0.5 - -2 m. Variations in hexavalent chromium and total chromium concentration in groundwater were observed through the injection of reducing agents and microbial regulators into the injection wells in the test site, and through the monitoring analysis at different time and different depth under the action of the injection agents. Results of the engineering test showed that the on-site SS technology significantly changed the chromium speciation in soil and then reduced the migration of chromium, thus the groundwater risk was reduced. The injected agents had a good effect of hexavalent chromium remediation in groundwater within the effective range of the injection wells, and the SS rate of hexavalent chromium into trivalent chromium reached 94%-99.9%, the SS rate of total chromium fixation reached 83.9%-99.8%. The test results are of significant reference value for the remediation of contaminated sites with features of shallow groundwater depth and soil mainly consisting of silty clay and sandy clay.

  13. Design of top covers supporting aerobic in situ stabilization of old landfills - An experimental simulation in lysimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrad, Marlies [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Huber-Humer, Marion, E-mail: marion.huber-humer@boku.ac.at [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Wimmer, Bernhard; Reichenauer, Thomas G. [Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tested engineered covers as surrogate to gas extraction during and after in situ aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examined how covers influence gas emissions, water balance and leachate generation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigated effect of top covers on air-distribution in waste mass during aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We suggest criteria and cover design to meet the demands during and after aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Such cover systems may offer greenhouse gas emission reduction also after active aeration. - Abstract: Landfill aeration by means of low pressure air injection is a promising tool to reduce long term emissions from organic waste fractions through accelerated biological stabilization. Top covers that enhance methane oxidation could provide a simple and economic way to mitigate residual greenhouse gas emissions from in situ aerated landfills, and may replace off-gas extraction and treatment, particularly at smaller and older sites. In this respect the installation of a landfill cover system adjusted to the forced-aerated landfill body is of great significance. Investigations into large scale lysimeters (2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Multiplication-Sign 3 m) under field conditions have been carried out using different top covers including compost materials and natural soils as a surrogate to gas extraction during active low pressure aeration. In the present study, the emission behaviour as well as the water balance performance of the lysimeters has been investigated, both prior to and during the first months of in situ aeration. Results reveal that mature sewage sludge compost (SSC) placed in one lysimeter exhibits in principle optimal ambient conditions for methanotrophic bacteria to enhance methane oxidation. Under laboratory conditions the mature compost mitigated CH{sub 4} loadings up to 300 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} d. In addition, the compost material provided high air permeability

  14. In Situ TEM Multi-Beam Ion Irradiation as a Technique for Elucidating Synergistic Radiation Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Caitlin; Bufford, Daniel; Muntifering, Brittany; Senor, David; Steckbeck, Mackenzie; Davis, Justin; Doyle, Barney; Buller, Daniel; Hattar, Khalid

    2017-09-29

    Materials designed for nuclear reactors undergo microstructural changes resulting from a combination of several environmental factors, including neutron irradiation damage, gas accumulation and elevated temperatures. Typical ion beam irradiation experiments designed for simulating a neutron irradiation environment involve irradiating the sample with a single ion beam and subsequent characterization of the resulting microstructure, often by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This method does not allow for examination of microstructural effects due to simultaneous gas accumulation and displacement cascade damage, which occurs in a reactor. Sandia’s in situ ion irradiation TEM (I3TEM) offers the unique ability to observe microstructural changes due to irradiation damage caused by concurrent multi-beam ion irradiation in real time. This allows for time-dependent microstructure analysis. A plethora of additional in situ stages can be coupled with these experiments, e.g., for more accurately simulating defect kinetics at elevated reactor temperatures. This work outlines experiments showing synergistic effects in Au using in situ ion irradiation with various combinations of helium, deuterium and Au ions, as well as some initial work on materials utilized in tritium-producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs): zirconium alloys and LiAlO2.

  15. In Situ TEM Multi-Beam Ion Irradiation as a Technique for Elucidating Synergistic Radiation Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin Anne Taylor

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Materials designed for nuclear reactors undergo microstructural changes resulting from a combination of several environmental factors, including neutron irradiation damage, gas accumulation and elevated temperatures. Typical ion beam irradiation experiments designed for simulating a neutron irradiation environment involve irradiating the sample with a single ion beam and subsequent characterization of the resulting microstructure, often by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. This method does not allow for examination of microstructural effects due to simultaneous gas accumulation and displacement cascade damage, which occurs in a reactor. Sandia’s in situ ion irradiation TEM (I3TEM offers the unique ability to observe microstructural changes due to irradiation damage caused by concurrent multi-beam ion irradiation in real time. This allows for time-dependent microstructure analysis. A plethora of additional in situ stages can be coupled with these experiments, e.g., for more accurately simulating defect kinetics at elevated reactor temperatures. This work outlines experiments showing synergistic effects in Au using in situ ion irradiation with various combinations of helium, deuterium and Au ions, as well as some initial work on materials utilized in tritium-producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs: zirconium alloys and LiAlO2.

  16. Development of new ultrafiltration techniques maintaining in-situ hydrochemical conditions for colloidal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aosai, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Mizuno, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Chemical state of elements in groundwater is one of the most important information for understanding behavior of elements in underground environment. Chemical state of elements controlled mainly by groundwater physico-chemical parameters. Because the change of physico-chemical parameters of groundwater, due to pressure release and oxidation during sampling, causes changes in chemical state of elements, systematic methodologies for understanding in situ chemical state is required. In this study, in order to understand chemical state of elements in groundwater, an ultrafiltration instrument for maintaining in-situ pressure and anaerobic conditions was developed. The instrument developed in this study for ultrafiltration made of passivated Stainless Used Steel (SUS) materials, was designed to keep groundwater samples maintaining in-situ pressure/anaerobic conditions. Ultrafiltration of groundwater was conducted at a borehole drilled from the 200 mbGL (meters below ground level) Sub-stage at a depth of 200 m at the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory. Chemical analyses of groundwater were also conducted using samples filtered under both pressurized/anaerobic and atmospheric conditions and passivated SUS materials with different elapsed times after passivation. The results indicate that our ultrafiltration method is suitable for collection of filtered groundwater and passivation is an essential treatment before ultrafiltration. (author)

  17. Environmental gamma-ray measurements using in situ and core sampling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, H.W.; Kerr, G.D.; Perdue, P.T.; Abdullah, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    Dose rates from natural radionuclides and 137 Cs in soils of the Oak Ridge area have been determined from in situ and core sample measurements. In situ γ-ray measurements were made with a transportable spectrometer. A tape of spectral data and a soil core sample from each site were returned to ORNL for further analysis. Information on soil composition, density and moisture content and on the distribution of cesium in the soil was obtained from the core samples. In situ spectra were analyzed by a computer program which identified and assigned energies to peaks, integrated the areas under the peaks, and calculated radionuclide concentrations based on a uniform distribution in the soil. The assumption of a uniform distribution was adequate only for natural radionuclides, but simple corrections can be made to the computer calculations for man-made radionuclides distributed on the surface or exponentially in the soil. For 137 Cs a correction was used based on an exponential function fitted to the distribution measured in core samples. At typical sites in Oak Ridge, the dose rate determined from these measurements was about 5 μrad/hr. (author)

  18. Patch-augmented rotator cuff repair: influence of the patch fixation technique on primary biomechanical stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Christian; Spreiter, Gregor; Audigé, Laurent; Ferguson, Stephen J; Flury, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the potential of patch augmentation to improve biomechanical stability and healing associated with rotator cuff repair. The biomechanical properties of three different patch-augmented rotator cuff repair techniques were assessed in vitro and compared with a standard repair. Dermal collagen patch augmentation may increase the primary stability and strength of the repaired tendon in vitro, depending on the technique used for patch application. Forty cadaveric sheep shoulders with dissected infraspinatus tendons were randomized into four groups (n = 10/group) for tendon repair using a knotless double-row suture anchor technique. A xenologous dermal extracellular matrix patch was used for augmentation in the three test groups using an "integrated", "cover", or "hybrid" technique. Tendons were preconditioned, cyclically loaded from 10 to 30 N at 1 Hz, and then loaded monotonically to failure. Biomechanical properties and the mode of failure were evaluated. Patch augmentation significantly increased the maximum load at failure by 61 % in the "cover" technique test group (225.8 N) and 51 % in the "hybrid" technique test group (211.4 N) compared with the non-augmented control group (140.2 N) (P ≤ 0.015). For the test group with "integrated" patch augmentation, the load at failure was 28 % lower (101.6 N) compared with the control group (P = 0.043). There was no significant difference in initial and linear stiffness among the four experimental groups. The most common mode of failure was tendon pullout. No anchor dislocation, patch disruption or knot breakage was observed. Additional patch augmentation with a collagen patch influences the biomechanical properties of a rotator cuff repair in a cadaveric sheep model. Primary repair stability can be significantly improved depending on the augmentation technique.

  19. A comparison of the energy use of in situ product recovery techniques for the Acetone Butanol Ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outram, Victoria; Lalander, Carl-Axel; Lee, Jonathan G M; Davis, E Timothy; Harvey, Adam P

    2016-11-01

    The productivity of the Acetone Butanol Ethanol (ABE) fermentation can be significantly increased by application of various in situ product recovery (ISPR) techniques. There are numerous technically viable processes, but it is not clear which is the most economically viable in practice. There is little available information about the energy requirements and economics of ISPR for the ABE fermentation. This work compares various ISPR techniques based on UniSim process simulations of the ABE fermentation. The simulations provide information on the process energy and separation efficiency, which is fed into an economic assessment. Perstraction was the only technique to reduce the energy demand below that of a batch process, by approximately 5%. Perstraction also had the highest profit increase over a batch process, by 175%. However, perstraction is an immature technology, so would need significant development before being integrated to an industrial process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of processing techniques on oxidative stability of Prunus pedunculatus seed oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the effects of Prunus pedunculatus (P. pedunculatus seed pre-treatment, including microwaving (M, roasting (R, steaming (S and roasting plus steaming (RS on crude oil quality in terms of yield, color change, fatty acid composition, and oxidative stability. The results showed an increase in monounsaturated fatty acid content and oxidative stability of the oils obtained from different processing treatments compared to the oil obtained from raw seeds (RW without processing. The oils, obtained from pretreated seeds, had higher conjugated diene (CD and 2-thiobarbituric acid (2-TBA values, compared to that obtained from RW when stored in a Schaal oven at 65 °C for 168 h. However, polyphenol and tocopherol contents decreased in all oil samples, processed or unprocessed. The effect of pre-treating the seeds was more prominent in the oil sample obtained through the RS technique, and showed higher oxidative stability than the other processed oils and the oil from RW.

  1. Vane coupling rings: a simple technique for stabilizing a four-vane radiofrequency quadrupole structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.; Lancaster, H.

    1983-01-01

    The benefits of stabilized accelerating structures, with regard to the manufacture and operation, have been well documented. The four-vane radiofrequency quadrupoles (RFQ) presently being designed and constructed in many laboratories are not stabilized because of the weak electromagnetic coupling between the quadrant resonators. This paper presents a simple technique developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory using vane coupling rings (VCR's) which azimuthally stabilize the RFQ structure and greatly enhance its use as a practical accelerator. In particular, the VCR's: Completely eliminate the dipole modes in the frequency range of interest; Provide adequate quadrant balance with an initial precision mechanical alignment of the vanes; Enhance axial balance and simplify end tuners. Experimental verification tests on a scale model will be discussed

  2. Vane coupling rings: a simple technique for stabilizing a four-vane radiofrequency quadrupole structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.; Lancaster, H.

    1982-11-01

    The benefits of stabilized accelerating structures, with regard to the manufacture and operation, have been well documented. The four-vane radiofrequency quadrupoles (RFQ) presently being designed and constructed in many laboratories are not stabilized because of the weak electromagnetic coupling between the quadrant resonators. This paper presents a simple technique developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory using vane coupling rings (VCR's) which azimuthally stabilize the RFQ structure and greatly enhance its use as a practical accelerator. In particular, the VCR's: completely eliminate the dipole modes in the frequency range of interest; provide adequate quadrant balance with an initial precision mechanical alignment of the vanes; and enhance axial balance and simplify end tuners. Experimental verification tests on a scale model are discussed

  3. Robust Coordinated Design of PSS and TCSC using PSO Technique for Power System Stability Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Panda

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Power system stability improvement by coordinated design of a Power System Stabilizer (PSS and a Thyristor Controlled Series Compensator (TCSC controller is addressed in this paper. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO technique is employed for optimization of the parameterconstrained nonlinear optimization problem implemented in a simulation environment. The proposed controllers are tested on a weakly connected power system. The non-linear simulation results are presented for wide range of loading conditions with various fault disturbances and fault clearing sequences as well as for various small disturbances. The eigenvalue analysis and simulation results show the effectiveness and robustness of proposed controllers to improve the stability performance of power system by efficient damping of low frequency oscillations under various disturbances.

  4. IN-SITU CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF METALS AND RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH ENHANCED ANAEROBIC REDUCTIVE PRECIPITATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher C. Lutes; Angela Frizzell, PG; Todd A. Thornton; James M. Harrington

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this NETL sponsored bench-scale study was to demonstrate the efficacy of enhanced anaerobic reductive precipitation (EARP) technology for precipitating uranium using samples from contaminated groundwater at the Fernald Closure Project (FCP) in Cincinnati, Ohio. EARP enhances the natural biological reactions in the groundwater through addition of food grade substrates (typically molasses) to drive the oxidative-reductive potential of the groundwater to a lower, more reduced state, thereby precipitating uranium from solution. In order for this in-situ technology to be successful in the long term, the precipitated uranium must not be re-dissolved at an unacceptable rate once groundwater geochemical conditions return to their pretreatment, aerobic state. The approach for this study is based on the premise that redissolution of precipitated uranium will be slowed by several mechanisms including the presence of iron sulfide precipitates and coatings, and sorption onto fresh iron oxides. A bench-scale study of the technology was performed using columns packed with site soil and subjected to a continuous flow of uranium-contaminated site groundwater (476 {micro}g/L). The ''treated'' column received a steady stream of dilute food grade molasses injected into the contaminated influent. Upon attainment of a consistently reducing environment and demonstrated removal of uranium, an iron sulfate amendment was added along with the molasses in the influent solution. After a month long period of iron addition, the treatments were halted, and uncontaminated, aerobic, unamended water was introduced to the treated column to assess rebound of uranium concentrations. In the first two months of treatment, the uranium concentration in the treated column decreased to the clean-up level (30 {micro}g/L) or below, and remained there for the remainder of the treatment period. A brief period of resolubilization of uranium was observed as the treated column

  5. Texture evolution and microstructural changes during solid-state dewetting: A correlative study by complementary in situ TEM techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niekiel, Florian; Kraschewski, Simon M.; Schweizer, Peter; Butz, Benjamin; Spiecker, Erdmann

    2016-01-01

    The transition of a thin film into an energetically favorable set of particles at temperatures below the melting point of the bulk material is known as solid-state dewetting. In this work the dewetting behavior of 16 nm thick discontinuous Au thin films on amorphous silicon nitride membranes is quantitatively studied by complementary in situ transmission electron microscopy techniques taking advantage of the unique capabilities of a chip-based heating system. The combination of dedicated imaging and diffraction techniques is used to investigate the interplay of grain growth and texture evolution with the process of dewetting. The results show an initial coarsening of the microstructure preceding the other processes. Texture evolution is highly correlated to material retraction and agglomeration during the following dewetting process. In-plane grain rotation has been observed, acting as an additional mechanism for orientation changes. From a methodological perspective this work demonstrates the capabilities of today’s transmission electron microscopy in combination with state-of-the-art in situ instrumentation. In particular the combination of complementary information from different dedicated techniques in one and the same setup is demonstrated to be highly beneficial.

  6. Determination of stability constants of lanthanide nitrate complex formation using a solvent extraction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, S.; Ekberg, C.; Liljenzin, J.O.; Nilsson, M.; Skarnemark, G.; Eberhardt, K.

    2006-01-01

    For lanthanides and actinides, nitrate complex formation is an important factor with respect to the reprocessing of nuclear fuels and in studies that treat partitioning and transmutation/conditioning. Different techniques, including microcalorimetry, various kinds of spectroscopy, ion-exchange and solvent extraction, can be used to determine stability constants of nitrate complex formation. However, it is uncommon that all lanthanides are studied at the same time, using the same experimental conditions and technique. The strengths of the complexes are different for lanthanides and actinides, a feature that may assist in the separation of the two groups. This paper deals with nitrate complex formation of lanthanides using a solvent extraction technique. Trace amounts of radioactive isotopes of lanthanides were produced at the TRIGA Mainz research reactor and at the Institutt for Energiteknikk in Kjeller, Norway (JEEP II reactor). The extraction of lanthanide ions into an organic phase consisting of 2, 6-bis-(benzoxazolyl)-4-dodecyloxylpyridine, 2-bromodecanoic acid and tert-butyl benzene as a function of nitrate ion concentration in the aqueous phase was studied in order to estimate the stability constants of nitrate complex formation. When the nitrate ion concentration is increased in the aqueous phase, the nitrate complex formation starts to compete with the extraction of metal ions. Thus the stability constants of nitrate complex formation can be estimated by measuring the decrease in extraction and successive fitting of an appropriate model. Extraction curves for La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho and Er were obtained and stability constants for their nitrate complex formation were estimated. Tb, Tm, Yb and Lu were also investigated, but no stability constants could be determined. The distribution ratios for the metal ions at low nitrate ion concentration were obtained at the same time, showing the effect of lanthanide contraction resulting in decreasing

  7. Development of in-situ laser based cutting technique for shock absorber rear nut in pressurized heavy water reactors. CP-2.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishwakarma, S.C.; Jain, R.K.; Upadhyaya, B.N.; Choubey, Ambar; Agrawal, D.K.; Oak, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a laser based cutting technique for shock absorber rear nuts in pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). This technique has been successfully used for in-situ laser cutting at RAPS-3 reactor. The technique consists of a motorized compact fixture, which holds a fiber optic beam delivery cutting nozzle and can be operated remotely

  8. A simple stir casting technique for the preparation of in situ Fe-aluminides reinforced Al-matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta K. Pradhan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a simple stir casting technique for the development of Fe-aluminides particulate reinforced Al-matrix composites. It has been demonstrated that stirring of super-heated Al-melt by a mild steel plate followed by conventional casting and hot rolled results in uniform dispersion of in situ Al13Fe4 particles in the Al matrix; the amount of reinforcement is found to increase with increasing melt temperature. With reference to base alloy, the developed composite exhibits higher hardness and improved tensile strength without much loss of ductility; since, composite like base alloy undergoes ductile mode of fracture.

  9. Actively stabilized optical fiber interferometry technique for online/in-process surface measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kaiwei; Martin, Haydn; Jiang Xiangqian

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we report the recent progress in optical-beam scanning fiber interferometry for potential online nanoscale surface measurement based on the previous research. It attempts to generate a robust and miniature measurement device for future development into a multiprobe array measurement system. In this research, both fiber-optic-interferometry and the wavelength-division-multiplexing techniques have been used, so that the optical probe and the optical interferometer are well spaced and fast surface scanning can be carried out, allowing flexibility for online measurement. In addition, this system provides a self-reference signal to stabilize the optical detection with high common-mode noise suppression by adopting an active phase tracking and stabilization technique. Low-frequency noise was significantly reduced compared with unstabilized result. The measurement of a sample surface shows an attained repeatability of 3.3 nm

  10. On the thermal stability of ultrafine-grained Al stabilized by in-situ amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balog, Martin, E-mail: martin.balog@savba.sk [Institute of Materials and Machine Mechanics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Racianska 75, 83102 Bratislava (Slovakia); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Hu, Tao [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Krizik, Peter [Institute of Materials and Machine Mechanics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Racianska 75, 83102 Bratislava (Slovakia); Castro Riglos, Maria Victoria [Centro Atómico Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9.500 (8400) Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Saller, Brandon D.; Yang, Hanry; Schoenung, Julie M.; Lavernia, Enrique J. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2015-11-11

    Bulk Al materials with average grain sizes of 0.47 and 2.4 µm, were fabricated by quasi-isostatic forging consolidation of two types of Al powders with average particle sizes of 1.3 and 8.9 μm, respectively. By utilizing the native amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (am-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) film on the Al powders surfaces, a continuous, ∼7 nm thick, am-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} network was formed in situ in the Al specimens. Systematic investigation of the changes to the am-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} network embedded in the Al matrix upon heating and annealing up to 600 °C was performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). At the same time, the stability of the Al grain structure was studied by transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD), electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD), and TEM. The am-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} network remained stable after annealing at 400 °C for 24 h. In-situ TEM studies revealed that at temperatures ≥450 °C, phase transformation of the am-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} network to crystalline γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles occurred. After annealing at 600 °C for 24 h the transformation was completed, whereby only nanometric γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles with an average size of 28 nm resided on the high angle grain boundaries of Al. Due to the pinning effect of γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the Al grain and subgrain structures remained unchanged during annealing up to 600 °C for 24 h. The effect of the am-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}→γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} transformation on the mechanical properties of ultrafine- and fine-grained Al is discussed from the standpoint of the underlying mechanisms.

  11. A numerical technique for enhanced efficiency and stability for the solution of the nuclear reactor equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khotylev, V.A.; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents new techniques for the solution of the nuclear reactor equation in diffusion approximation, that has enhanced efficiency and stability. The code system based on the new technique solves a number of steady-state and/or transient problems with coupled thermal hydraulics in one-, two-, or three dimensional geometry with reduced CPU time as compared to similar code systems of previous generations if well-posed neutronics problems are considered. Automated detection of ill-posed problem and selection of the appropriate numerical method makes the new code system capable of yielding a correct solution for wider range of problems without user intervention. (author)

  12. A numerical technique for enhanced efficiency and stability for the solution of the nuclear reactor equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khotylev, V.A.; Hoogenboom, J.E. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Interfaculty Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)

    1996-07-01

    The paper presents new techniques for the solution of the nuclear reactor equation in diffusion approximation, that has enhanced efficiency and stability. The code system based on the new technique solves a number of steady-state and/or transient problems with coupled thermal hydraulics in one-, two-, or three dimensional geometry with reduced CPU time as compared to similar code systems of previous generations if well-posed neutronics problems are considered. Automated detection of ill-posed problem and selection of the appropriate numerical method makes the new code system capable of yielding a correct solution for wider range of problems without user intervention. (author)

  13. Accuracy Enhanced Stability and Structure Preserving Model Reduction Technique for Dynamical Systems with Second Order Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahavori, Maryamsadat; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    A method for model reduction of dynamical systems with the second order structure is proposed in this paper. The proposed technique preserves the second order structure of the system, and also preserves the stability of the original systems. The method uses the controllability and observability...... gramians within the time interval to build the appropriate Petrov-Galerkin projection for dynamical systems within the time interval of interest. The bound on approximation error is also derived. The numerical results are compared with the counterparts from other techniques. The results confirm...

  14. Stability analysis of nonlinear Roesser-type two-dimensional systems via a homogenous polynomial technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tie-Yan; Zhao, Yan; Xie, Xiang-Peng

    2012-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of stability analysis of nonlinear Roesser-type two-dimensional (2D) systems. Firstly, the fuzzy modeling method for the usual one-dimensional (1D) systems is extended to the 2D case so that the underlying nonlinear 2D system can be represented by the 2D Takagi—Sugeno (TS) fuzzy model, which is convenient for implementing the stability analysis. Secondly, a new kind of fuzzy Lyapunov function, which is a homogeneous polynomially parameter dependent on fuzzy membership functions, is developed to conceive less conservative stability conditions for the TS Roesser-type 2D system. In the process of stability analysis, the obtained stability conditions approach exactness in the sense of convergence by applying some novel relaxed techniques. Moreover, the obtained result is formulated in the form of linear matrix inequalities, which can be easily solved via standard numerical software. Finally, a numerical example is also given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  15. Stability analysis of nonlinear Roesser-type two-dimensional systems via a homogenous polynomial technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tie-Yan; Zhao Yan; Xie Xiang-Peng

    2012-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of stability analysis of nonlinear Roesser-type two-dimensional (2D) systems. Firstly, the fuzzy modeling method for the usual one-dimensional (1D) systems is extended to the 2D case so that the underlying nonlinear 2D system can be represented by the 2D Takagi—Sugeno (TS) fuzzy model, which is convenient for implementing the stability analysis. Secondly, a new kind of fuzzy Lyapunov function, which is a homogeneous polynomially parameter dependent on fuzzy membership functions, is developed to conceive less conservative stability conditions for the TS Roesser-type 2D system. In the process of stability analysis, the obtained stability conditions approach exactness in the sense of convergence by applying some novel relaxed techniques. Moreover, the obtained result is formulated in the form of linear matrix inequalities, which can be easily solved via standard numerical software. Finally, a numerical example is also given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. (general)

  16. Effect of Graphene Oxide on the Reaction Kinetics of Methyl Methacrylate In Situ Radical Polymerization via the Bulk or Solution Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis S. Tsagkalias

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of nanocomposite materials based on poly(methyl methacrylate and graphene oxide (GO is presented using the in situ polymerization technique, starting from methyl methacrylate, graphite oxide, and an initiator, and carried out either with (solution or without (bulk in the presence of a suitable solvent. Reaction kinetics was followed gravimetrically and the appropriate characterization of the products took place using several experimental techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD data showed that graphite oxide had been transformed to graphene oxide during polymerization, whereas FTIR spectra revealed no significant interactions between the polymer matrix and GO. It appears that during polymerization, the initiator efficiency was reduced by the presence of GO, resulting in a reduction of the reaction rate and a slight increase in the average molecular weight of the polymer formed, measured by gel permeation chromatography (GPC, along with an increase in the glass transition temperature obtained from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The presence of the solvent results in the suppression of the gel-effect in the reaction rate curves, the synthesis of polymers with lower average molecular weights and polydispersities of the Molecular Weight Distribution, and lower glass transition temperatures. Finally, from thermogravimetric analysis (TG, it was verified that the presence of GO slightly enhances the thermal stability of the nano-hybrids formed.

  17. Residual stress evaluation in brittle coatings using indentation technique combined with in-situ bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Steinbrech, R.W.; Tanabe, Yuji; Hara, Toshiaki

    2000-01-01

    The indentation crack length approach was adopted and further elaborated to evaluate residual stress and toughness of the brittle coatings: two kinds of glass coatings on steel. The influence of the residual stress on indentation cracking was examined in as-received coating condition and by in-situ superimposing a counteracting tensile stress. For purpose of providing reference toughness values stress-free pieces of separated coating material have also been examined. Thus results of the two complementary sets of experiments were assumed to prove self-consistently toughness and residual stress data of the coating. In particular, the in-situ bending of specimen in combination with the indentation test allowed us to vary deliberately the residual stress situation in glass coating. Thus experiments which utilized the combination of bending test and micro-indentation were introduced as a method to provide unambiguous information about residual compressive stress. Toughness and residual compressive stress of glass coatings used in this study were 0.46-0.50 MPa·m 1/2 and 94-111 MPa, respectively. Furthermore, a thermoelastic calculation of the residual compressive stress was performed and it is found that the value of residual compressive stress at coating surface of specimen was 90-102 MPa. (author)

  18. Cu-Ti Formation in Nb-Ti/Cu Superconducting Strand Monitored by in situ Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Pong, I; Pong, Ian; Gerardin, Alexandre; Scheuerlein, Christian; Bottura, Luca

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the high temperature exposure effect on Nb-Ti/Cu superconducting strands, as might be encountered in joining by soldering and in cabling annealing, X-ray diffraction and resistometry measurements were performed in situ during heat treatment, and complemented by conventional metallography, mechanical tests and superconducting properties measurements. Changes of the Nb-Ti nanostructure at temperatures above 300 degrees C are manifested in the degradation of critical current in an applied external magnetic field, although degradation at self field was insignificant up to 400 degrees C for several minutes. Above 500 degrees C, the formation of various Cu-Ti intermetallic compounds, due to Ti diffusion from Nb-Ti into Cu, is detected by in situ XRD albeit not resolvable by SEM-EDS. There is a ductile to brittle transition near 600 degrees C, and liquid formation is observed below 900 degrees C. The formation of Cu-Ti causes a delayed reduction of the residual resistivity ratio (RRR) and adv...

  19. High temperature in-situ observations of multi-segmented metal nanowires encapsulated within carbon nanotubes by in-situ filling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Iijima, Toru; Iwata, Takuya; Kalita, Golap; Tanemura, Masaki; Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Kuroda, Kotaro

    2012-08-08

    Multi-segmented one-dimensional metal nanowires were encapsulated within carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through in-situ filling technique during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and environmental TEM were employed to characterize the as-prepared sample at room temperature and high temperature. The selected area electron diffractions revealed that the Pd4Si nanowire and face-centered-cubic Co nanowire on top of the Pd nanowire were encapsulated within the bottom and tip parts of the multiwall CNT, respectively. Although the strain-induced deformation of graphite walls was observed, the solid-state phases of Pd4Si and Co-Pd remain even at above their expected melting temperatures and up to 1,550 ± 50°C. Finally, the encapsulated metals were melted and flowed out from the tip of the CNT after 2 h at the same temperature due to the increase of internal pressure of the CNT.

  20. Studies on In-situ Chelation/Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Lanthanides and Actinides Using a Radiotracer Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yuehe; Wu, Hong; Smart, Neil G.; Wai, Chien M.

    2001-01-01

    Radioisotope tracer techniques were used to study the process of in-situ chelation/supercritical fluid extraction(SFE) of La3+ and Lu3+ from solid matrix using mixed ligand hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA) and tributylphosphate (TBP) as chelating agents. A lab-built SFE extactor was used in this study and the extractor design was optimized based on the experimental results. Quantitative recovery of La and Lu was achieved when the extrator design was optimized. Extraction of uranium from real world samples was also investigated to demonstrate the capability of this chelation/SFE technology for environmental remediation applications. A novel on-line back extraction technique for the recovery of metal ions and regeneration of ligands is also reported.

  1. Establishment of 60Co dose calibration curve using fluorescent in situ hybridization assay technique: Result of preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimah Abdul Rahim; Noriah Jamal; Noraisyah Mohd Yusof; Juliana Mahamad Napiah; Nelly Bo Nai Lee

    2010-01-01

    This study aims at establishing an in-vitro 60 Co dose calibration curve using Fluorescent In-Situ Hybridization assay technique for the Malaysian National Bio dosimetry Laboratory. Blood samples collected from a female healthy donor were irradiated with several doses of 60 Co radiation. Following culturing of lymphocytes, microscopic slides are prepared, denatured and hybridized. The frequencies of translocation are estimated in the metaphases. A calibration curve was then generated using a regression technique. It shows a good fit to a linear-quadratic model. The results of this study might be useful in estimating absorbed dose for the individual exposed to ionizing radiation retrospectively. This information may be useful as a guide for medical treatment for the assessment of possible health consequences. (author)

  2. Amplatzer Vascular Plug Anchoring Technique to Stabilize the Delivery System for Microcoil Embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozawa, Shiro; Murata, Satoru; Mine, Takahiko; Sugihara, Fumie; Yasui, Daisuke; Kumita, Shin-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the feasibility of a novel embolization technique, the Amplatzer vascular plug (AVP) anchoring technique, to stabilize the delivery system for microcoil embolization.Materials and methodsThree patients were enrolled in this study, including two cases of internal iliac artery aneurysms and one case of internal iliac arterial occlusion prior to endovascular aortic repair. An AVP was used in each case for embolization of one target artery, and the AVP was left in place. The AVP detachment wire was then used as an anchor to stabilize the delivery system for microcoil embolization to embolize the second target artery adjacent to the first target artery. The microcatheter for the microcoils was inserted parallel to the AVP detachment wire in the guiding sheath or catheter used for the AVP.ResultsThe AVP anchoring technique was achieved and the microcatheter was easily advanced to the second target artery in all three cases.ConclusionThe AVP anchoring technique was found to be feasible to advance the microcatheter into the neighboring artery of an AVP-embolized artery.

  3. An optical technique to measure distortion in heat-treated parts in-situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Federico; Nash, Phillip

    2005-05-01

    Improvements in the properties of aluminum alloys have made them more popular for structural applications. Using the different heat treatments that are available, aluminum alloys can have a wide variation in properties for different types of applications. The appropriate heat treatments of these alloys are vital in providing the properties needed for their particular applications. Moreover, understanding the effects of heat treatments that may cause distortion to a part is critical. Most of the work carried out in this field is in the form of pre- and post-treatment analysis of a part. In this study, in-situ measurements of the distortions that a heat-treated part undergoes when subjected to rapid heating to temperatures near melting followed by slow cooling were carried out. A numerical model was built to simulate the experiment and the results are compared. This study will provide much-needed insight into the complex occurrences that aluminum parts undergo during heat treatment.

  4. Ultrasonic techniques for the in situ characterisation of 'legacy' Waste sludges and dispersions - 59111

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, Timothy; Biggs, Simon; Young, James; Fairweather, Michael; Peakall, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Research being undertaken at the University of Leeds, as part of the DIAMOND university consortium, is exploring the effectiveness of various ultrasonic technologies as in situ probes to characterize and monitor nuclear waste slurries, such as the 'Legacy' Magnesium hydroxide sludges found in Sellafield, U.K. Through use of a commercial Acoustic Backscatter Sensor (ABS) with 1 - 5 MHz transducers, various properties of free-settling oxide simulant sludges were determined. Work was focused upon characterizing essentially 'static' sludges (to give prospective use as tools for the wastes in current deposits); although, the sensors also have potential as dispersion monitors during any future processing and storage of the Legacy wastes, as well as many other storage, clarifier or thickener systems across a wide range of industrial processing operations. ABS data of mixed glass powder dispersions was analysed and compared to scattering theory, to understand the correlations between acoustic attenuation and particulate concentration. The ABS was also calibrated to measure changes in average particulate concentration within a settling suspension over time, and showed the depth-wise segregation of the dispersion through the settling column at different particular time intervals. It was found that observed hindered settling also led to an increase in particulate concentration over the sludge zone and significant segregation occurred at moderate time intervals, due to the broad size distribution of the aggregates measured. It is hoped in future that these sensors may be able to be fitted to robotic handlers that have been installed onsite (and previously used for sampling), allowing fully automatic in situ sludge analysis. (authors)

  5. Stabilization of flail chest injuries: minimized approach techniques to treat the core of instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Drost, S; Grupp, S; Pachowsky, M; Oppel, P; Krinner, S; Mauerer, A; Hennig, F F; Langenbach, A

    2017-04-01

    Stabilizing techniques of flail chest injuries usually need wide approaches to the chest wall. Three main regions need to be considered when stabilizing the rib cage: median-anterior with dissection of pectoral muscle; lateral-axillary with dissection of musculi (mm) serratus, externus abdominis; posterior inter spinoscapular with division of mm rhomboidei, trapezius and latissimus dorsi. Severe morbidity due to these invasive approaches needs to be considered. This study discusses possibilities for minimized approaches to the shown regions. Fifteen patients were stabilized by locked plate osteosynthesis (MatrixRib ® ) between May 2012 and April 2014 and prospectively followed up. Flail chest injuries were managed through limited incisions to the anterior, the lateral, and the posterior parts of the chest wall or their combinations. Each approach was 4-10 cm using Alexis ® retractor. One minimized approach offered sufficient access at least to four ribs posterior and laterally, four pairs of ribs anterior in all cases. There was no need to divide latissimus dorsi muscle. Trapezius und rhomboid muscles were only limited divided, whereas a subcutaneous dissection of serratus and abdominis muscles was necessary. A follow-up showed sufficient consolidation. pneumothorax (2) and seroma (2). Minimized approaches allow sufficient stabilization of severe dislocated rib fractures without extensive dissection or division of the important muscles. Keeping the arm and, thus, the scapula mobile is very important for providing the largest reachable surface of the rib cage through each approach.

  6. Development of Technique for Testing the Long-Term Stability of Silicon Microstrip Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosinov, A.V.; Maslov, N.I.; Naumov, S.V.; Ovchinnik, V.D.; Starodubtsev, A.F.; Vasiliev, G.P.; Yalovenko, V.I.; Bosisio, L.

    2006-01-01

    An automatic multi-channel set-up prototype for simultaneous testing of the Long-Term Stability (LTS) of more than ten detectors is described. The Inner Tracking System of the ALICE experiment will include about two thousand Double-sided Microstrip Detectors (DSMD). Efficient automatic measurement techniques are crucial for the LTS test, because the corresponding test procedure should be performed on each detector and requires long time, at least two days. By using special adapters for supporting and connecting the bare DSMDs, failing detectors can be screened out before module assembly, thus minimizing the cost. Automated probe stations developed for a special purpose or for microelectronics industry are used for measuring physical static DSMD characteristics and check good-to-bad elements ratio for DSMD. However, automated (or semi-automatic)test benches for studying LTS or testing DSMD long-term stability before developing a detecting module are absent

  7. An improved direct feedback linearization technique for transient stability enhancement and voltage regulation of power generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenne, Godpromesse [Laboratoire d' Automatique et d' Informatique Appliquee (LAIA), Departement de Genie Electrique, Universite de Dschang, B.P. 134 Bandjoun, Cameroun; Goma, Raphael; Lamnabhi-Lagarrigue, Francoise [Laboratoire des Signaux et Systemes (L2S), CNRS-SUPELEC, Universite Paris XI, 3 Rue Joliot Curie, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Nkwawo, Homere [Departement GEII, Universite Paris XIII, IUT Villetaneuse, 99 Avenue Jean Baptiste Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Arzande, Amir; Vannier, Jean Claude [Departement Energie, Ecole Superieure d' Electricite-SUPELEC, 3 Rue Joliot Curie, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, a simple improved direct feedback linearization design method for transient stability and voltage regulation of power systems is discussed. Starting with the classical direct feedback linearization technique currently applied to power systems, an adaptive nonlinear excitation control of synchronous generators is proposed, which is new and effective for engineering. The power angle and mechanical power input are not assumed to be available. The proposed method is based on a standard third-order model of a synchronous generator which requires only information about the physical available measurements of angular speed, active electric power and generator terminal voltage. Experimental results of a practical power system show that fast response, robustness, damping, steady-state and transient stability as well as voltage regulation are all achieved satisfactorily. (author)

  8. Phase stability and oxygen non-stoichiometry of SrCo0.8Fe0.2O3-d measured by in-situ neutron diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McIntosh, Steven; McIntosh, S.; Vente, Jaap F.; Haije, Wim G.; Blank, David H.A.; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The phase stability, oxygen stoichiometry and expansion properties of SrCo0.8Fe0.2O3−δ (SCF) were determined by in situ neutron diffraction between 873 and 1173 K and oxygen partial pressures of 5×10−4 to 1 atm. At a pO2 of 1 atm, SCF adopts a cubic perovskite structure, space group Pm3¯m, across

  9. Novel XRD technique and equipment for in-situ monitoring of phase transformations in lithium batteries during cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolov, J.; Howlett, P.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Safe, rechargeable batteries utilising a lithium metal electrode have not been realised due to phenomena, which occur on the lithium surface during the cycling of a battery. Lithium ion conduction inhomogeneities through the surface film give rise to uneven deposition of lithium, which can result in short circuits. The large potential increase in energy density that the use of the lithium electrode represents makes the nature of the surface film of interest to battery researchers. The lithium surface is highly reactive, particularly in the case of electrodes with a rough surface deposit. This presents difficulties to researchers hoping to obtain representative measurements of the lithium surface and requires the use of environmental sample chambers and in-situ techniques. X-ray diffraction techniques have been used to probe changes in cathode materials (typically transition metal oxides) for lithium batteries, but to our knowledge has not been successfully used to study changes taking place on the lithium surface during cycling. We present early results from work we have undertaken to develop a technique for characterising the surface film on lithium battery electrodes. The instrumentation was set-up as follows. An XRD was fitted with an INEL CPS 120 position sensitive detector (PSD), multilayer mirror and environmental chamber. The latter was specially developed in our laboratory for the purpose of these experiments. The lithium cells were sealed in laminated foil. Cycled and uncycled cells were investigated. Different radiation sources were used (Cu, Co and Cr). The in-situ measurements aiming at monitoring the phase transitions of cycled/uncycled cells at different angles (including grazing angles) in time were carried out in both transmission and reflection mode. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  10. In situ characterization of organic matter in two primitive chondrites through correlated microanalytical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wende, A. M.; Nittler, L.; Steele, A.; Herd, C. D.

    2009-12-01

    Primitive meteorites contain up to 2 wt % C, much of it in the form of insoluble organic matter (IOM). Bulk analyses have revealed the IOM to be marked by large D and 15N enrichments relative to terrestrial values. Isotopic imaging studies have revealed the presence of `hotspots’, sub-μm to μm-sized regions of IOM exhibiting extreme isotope enrichments. An interesting subpopulation of organic grains, ’nanoglobules’, which have hollow, spherical morphologies, is known to account for a portion of these hot spots. Previous work has suggested that nanoglobules can be identified in situ by native UV fluorescence. The isotopic enrichments are believed to point to low-T chemical fractionations either in the interstellar medium (ISM) or the outer regions of the early Solar System. As part of a larger study investigating the origin and evolution of IOM in the Solar System, a correlated, in situ, microanalytical approach was employed to characterize local isotopic and morphological heterogeneities in IOM in the highly primitive chondrites QUE 99177 (CR3) and Tagish Lake (C-ung). Previous NanoSIMS ion imaging of a QUE 99177 section revealed the spatial and isotopic distribution of C in the matrix with a spatial resolution of 200 nm. Manual definition of >3300 C-rich regions in the NanoSIMS images indicates that grains smaller than 1 μm across, which account for 80% of the IOM area, have a size distribution that is similar to estimates of the size distribution of carbonaceous dust in the diffuse ISM, supporting an interstellar origin for the IOM. Micro-Raman spectroscopy, which is highly sensitive to the degree of disorder in carbonaceous materials, was attempted on the same regions analyzed by NanoSIMS in QUE 99177. Unfortunately, surface damage due to both the prior SIMS analyses and removal of a prior C coat precluded acquisition of useful Raman spectra. Consequently, future correlated work will entail performing Raman analyses on uncoated samples prior to SIMS

  11. Safety, efficacy, predictability and stability of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) with a 1000-Hz scanning spot excimer laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoramnia, Ramin; Salgado, Josefina P; Wuellner, Christian; Donitzky, Christof; Lohmann, Chris P; Winkler von Mohrenfels, Christoph

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the safety, efficacy, predictability and stability of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) with a 1000-Hz scanning spot excimer laser (Concept System 1000; WaveLight GmbH, Erlangen, Germany). LASIK was performed on twenty eyes with myopia or myopic astigmatism (mean spherical equivalent refraction: -3.97±1.72 dioptres (D); mean cylinder: -0.84±0.77 D) using a microkeratome for flap creation and the Concept System 1000 for photoablation. Patients were examined preoperatively as well as 1, 3 and 6 months after the treatment. Manifest sphere and cylinder, uncorrected (UCDVA) and best corrected (BCDVA) distance visual acuity, corneal topography and pachymetry were analysed. We observed no adverse events that might have been associated with the use of a repetition rate of 1000 Hz. All eyes maintained or had improved BCDVA at 6 months after treatment when compared to preoperative values. Six months after LASIK, UCDVA was 20/20 or better in 85% and 20/25 or better in 100% of the eyes. The spherical equivalent refraction was within ±0.50 D in 95% of the eyes at 6 months after surgery. The refraction stayed stable over time; 95% of the eyes changedLASIK with the prototype 1000-Hz excimer laser was safe, efficient and predictable. The postoperative refraction was stable over time. There were no specific clinical side-effects that might be associated with the use of such a high repetition rate. © 2011 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2011 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  12. Enhanced permanganate in situ chemical oxidation through MnO2 particle stabilization: evaluation in 1-D transport systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimi, Michelle; Quickel, Mark; Ko, Saebom

    2009-02-27

    In situ chemical oxidation using permanganate is an increasingly employed approach to organic contaminant remediation at hazardous waste sites. Manganese dioxide (MnO2) particles form as a by-product of the reaction of permanganate with contaminants and naturally-reduced subsurface materials. These particles are of interest because they have the potential to deposit in the subsurface and impact the flow regime in/around permanganate injection, including the well screen, filter pack, and the surrounding subsurface formation. Control of these particles can allow for improved oxidant injection and transport, and contact between the oxidant and contaminants of concern. Sodium hexametaphosphate (HMP) has previously been identified as a promising aid to stabilize MnO2 in solution when included in the oxidizing solution, increasing the potential to inhibit particle deposition and impact subsurface flow. The goal of the experimental studies described herein was to investigate the ability of HMP to prevent particle deposition in transport studies using four different types of porous media. Permanganate was delivered to a contaminant source zone (trichloroethylene) located within four different media types with variations in sand, clay, organic carbon, and iron oxides (as goethite) content. Deposition of MnO2 within the columns was quantified with distance from the source zone. Experiments were repeated in replicate columns with the inclusion of HMP directly with the oxidant delivery solution, and MnO2 deposition was again quantified. While total MnO2 deposition within the 60 cm columns did not change significantly with the addition of HMP, deposition within the contaminant source zone decreased by 25-85%, depending on the specific media type. The greatest differences in deposition were observed in the goethite-containing and clay-containing columns. Columns containing these two media types experienced completely plugged flow in the oxidant-only delivery systems; however

  13. In situ stabilization of trace metals in a copper-contaminated soil using P-spiked Linz-Donawitz slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negim, Osama; Mench, Michel; Bes, Clémence; Motelica-Heino, Mikael; Amin, Fouad; Huneau, Frédéric; Le Coustumer, Philippe

    2012-03-01

    A former wood exploitation revealing high Cu and As concentration of the soils served as a case study for assisted phytoextraction. P-spiked Linz-Donawitz (LD) slag was used as a soil additive to improve physico-chemical soil properties and in situ stabilize Cu and other trace metals in a sandy Cu-contaminated soil (630 mg kg⁻¹ soil). The LD slag was incorporated into the contaminated soil to consist four treatments: 0% (T1), 1% (T2), 2% (T3), and 4% (T4). A similar uncontaminated soil was used as a control (CTRL). After a 1-month reaction period, potted soils were used for a 2-week growth experiment with dwarf beans. Soil pH increased with the incorporation rate of LD slag. Similarly the soil electrical conductivity (EC, in millisiemens per centimetre) is ameliorated. Bean plants grown on the untreated soil (T1) showed a high phytotoxicity. All incorporation rates of LD slag increased the root and shoot dry weight yields compared to the T1. The foliar Ca concentration of beans was enhanced for all LD slag-amended soil, while the foliar Mg, K, and P concentrations were not increased. Foliar Cu, Zn, and Cr concentrations of beans decreased with the LD slag incorporation rate. P-spiked LD slag incorporation into polluted soil allow the bean growth and foliar Ca concentration, but also to reduce foliar Cu concentration below its upper critical value avoiding an excessive soil EC and Zn deficiency. This dual effect can be of interest for soil remediation at larger scale.

  14. In-situ stabilization of radioactively contaminated low-level solid wastes buried in shallow trenches: an assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, H.S.; Tamura, T.; Boegly, W.J.

    1980-09-01

    The potential effectiveness of materials for in-situ encapsulation of low-level, radioactively contaminated solid waste buried in shallow trenches is enumerated. Cement, clay materials, and miscellaneous sorbents, aqueous and nonaqueous gelling fluids and their combinations are available to solidify contaminated free water in trenches, to fill open voids, and to minimize radionuclide mobility. The success of the grouting technique will depend on the availability of reliable geohydrologic data and laboratory development of a mix with enhanced sorption capacity for dominant radionuclides present in the trenches. A cement-bentonite-based grout mix with low consistency for pumping, several hours controlled rate of hardening, negligible bleeding, and more than 170 kPa (25 psi) compressive strength are a few of the suggested parameters in laboratory mix development. Cost estimates of a cement-bentonite-based grout mix indicate that effective and durable encapsulation can be accomplished at a reasonable cost (about $113 per cubic meter). However, extensive implementation of the method suggests the need for a field demonstration of the method. 53 references

  15. Investigating the Mechanical Behavior and Deformation Mechanisms of Ultrafinegrained Metal Films Using Ex-situ and In-situ TEM Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, Ehsan

    Nanocrystalline (NC) and Ultrafine-grained (UFG) metal films exhibit a wide range of enhanced mechanical properties compared to their coarse-grained counterparts. These properties, such as very high strength, primarily arise from the change in the underlying deformation mechanisms. Experimental and simulation studies have shown that because of the small grain size, conventional dislocation plasticity is curtailed in these materials and grain boundary mediated mechanisms become more important. Although the deformation behavior and the underlying mechanisms in these materials have been investigated in depth, relatively little attention has been focused on the inhomogeneous nature of their microstructure (particularly originating from the texture of the film) and its influence on their macroscopic response. Furthermore, the rate dependency of mechanical response in NC/UFG metal films with different textures has not been systematically investigated. The objectives of this dissertation are two-fold. The first objective is to carry out a systematic investigation of the mechanical behavior of NC/UFG thin films with different textures under different loading rates. This includes a novel approach to study the effect of texture-induced plastic anisotropy on mechanical behavior of the films. Efforts are made to correlate the behavior of UFG metal films and the underlying deformation mechanisms. The second objective is to understand the deformation mechanisms of UFG aluminum films using in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments with Automated Crystal Orientation Mapping. This technique enables us to investigate grain rotations in UFG Al films and to monitor the microstructural changes in these films during deformation, thereby revealing detailed information about the deformation mechanisms prevalent in UFG metal films.

  16. In situ NMR and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance techniques reveal the structure of the electrical double layer in supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, John M.; Forse, Alexander C.; Tsai, Wan-Yu; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P.

    2015-08-01

    Supercapacitors store charge through the electrosorption of ions on microporous electrodes. Despite major efforts to understand this phenomenon, a molecular-level picture of the electrical double layer in working devices is still lacking as few techniques can selectively observe the ionic species at the electrode/electrolyte interface. Here, we use in situ NMR to directly quantify the populations of anionic and cationic species within a working microporous carbon supercapacitor electrode. Our results show that charge storage mechanisms are different for positively and negatively polarized electrodes for the electrolyte tetraethylphosphonium tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile; for positive polarization charging proceeds by exchange of the cations for anions, whereas for negative polarization, cation adsorption dominates. In situ electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance measurements support the NMR results and indicate that adsorbed ions are only partially solvated. These results provide new molecular-level insight, with the methodology offering exciting possibilities for the study of pore/ion size, desolvation and other effects on charge storage in supercapacitors.

  17. In-situ Polymerization of Polyaniline/Polypyrrole Copolymer using Different Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, A. S.; Noby, H.; Elkady, M. F.; El-Shazly, A. H.

    2018-01-01

    The morphology and surface area of the poly(aniline-co-pyrrole) copolymer (PANPY) are important properties which improve the efficiency of the copolymer in various applications. In this investigation, different techniques were employed to produce PANPY in different morphologies. Aniline and pyrrole were used as monomers, and ammonium peroxydisulfate (APS) was used as an oxidizer with uniform molar ratio. Rapid mixing, drop-wise mixing, and supercritical carbon dioxide (ScCO2) polymerization techniques were appointed. The chemical structure, crystallinity, porosity, and morphology of the composite were distinguished by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) analysis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) respectively. The characterization tests indicated that the polyaniline/polypyrrole copolymer was successfully prepared with different morphologies. Based on the obtained TEM, hollow nanospheres were formed using rapid mixing technique with acetic acid that have a diameter of 75 nm and thickness 26 nm approximately. Also, according to the XRD, the produced structures have a semi- crystalline structure. The synthesized copolymer with ScCO2-assisted polymerization technique showed improved surface area (38.1 m2/g) with HCl as dopant.

  18. Evaluation of primary and secondary stability of titanium implants using different surgical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Afsheen; Meijer, Gert J; Walboomers, X Frank; Jansen, John A

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the influence of different surgical techniques on the primary and secondary implant stability using trabecular bone of goats as an implantation model. In the iliac crest of eight goats, 48 cylindrical-screw-type implants with a diameter of 4.2 mm (Dyna(®) ; Bergen op Zoom, the Netherlands) were installed, using three different surgical techniques: (i) 5% undersized, using a final drill diameter of 4 mm; (ii) 15% undersized, using a final drill diameter of 3.6 mm; and (iii) 25% undersized, using a final drill diameter of 3.2 mm. Peak insertion torque values were measured by a Digital(®) (MARK-10 Corporation, New York, NY, USA) torque gauge instrument during placement. At 3 weeks after implantation, removal torque was measured. Histomorphometrically, the peri-implant bone volume was measured in three zones; the inner zone (0-500 μm), the middle zone (500-1000 μm) and the outer zone (1000-1500 μm). Evaluation of the obtained data demonstrated no statistically significant difference between different surgical techniques regarding removal torque values. With respect to the percentage peri-implant bone volume (%BV), also no significant difference could be observed between all three applied surgical techniques for both the inner, middle and outer zone. However, irrespective of the surgical technique, it was noticed that the %BV was significantly higher for the inner zone as compared to middle and outer zone (P < 0.05) around the implant. At 3 weeks after implant installation, independent of the used undersized surgical technique, the %BV in the inner zone (0-500 μm) peri-implant area was improved due to both condensation of the surrounding bone as also the translocation of host bone particles along the implant surface. Surprisingly, no mechanical beneficial effect of the 25% undersized surgical technique could be observed as compared to the 5% or 15% undersized surgical technique to improve primary or secondary implant stability. © 2013

  19. An injection technique for in-situ remediation of abandoned underground coal mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canty, G.A.; Everett, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Remediation of underground mines can prove to be a difficult task, given the physical constraints associated with introducing amendments to a subterranean environment. An acid mine abatement project involving in-situ chemical treatment method was conducted by the University of Oklahoma. The treatment method involved the injection of an alkaline coal combustion by-product (CCB) slurry into a flooded mine void (pH 4.4) to create a buffered zone. Injection of the CCB slurry was possible through the use of equipment developed by the petroleum industry for grouting recovery wells. This technology was selected because the CCB slurry could be injected under significant pressure and at a high rate. With higher pressure and rates of injection, a large quantity of slurry can be introduced into the mine within a limited amount of time. Theoretically, the high pressure and rate would improve dispersal of the slurry within the void. In addition, the high pressure is advantageous in fracturing or breaking-down obstructions to injection. During the injection process, a total of 418 tons of CCB was introduced within 15 hours. The mine did not refuse any of the material, and it is likely that a much larger mass could have been added. One injection well was drilled into a pillar of coal. Normally this would pose a problem when introducing a slurry; however, the coal pillar was easily fractured during the injection process. Currently, the pH of the mine discharge is above 6.5 and the alkalinity is approximately 100 mg/L as CACO 3

  20. Enhancement of the stability of the flow focusing technique for low-viscosity liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acero, A J; Montanero, J M; Ferrera, C; Herrada, M A; Gañán-Calvo, A M

    2012-01-01

    We propose a modified flow focusing configuration to produce low-viscosity microjets at much smaller flow rates than those reached by the standard configuration. In the modified flow focusing device, a sharpened rod blocks the recirculation cell appearing in the tapering liquid meniscus for low flow rates, which considerably improves its stability. We measured the minimum flow rates attainable with the modified configuration and compared the results with the corresponding values for the standard technique. For moderate and large applied pressure drops, the minimum flow rate reached with the modified configuration was about five times smaller than its counterpart in the standard configuration. The Weber numbers of the jets produced with the modified flow focusing configuration were considerably smaller than those with the standard technique. Numerical simulations were conducted to show how the presence of the inner rod substantially changes the flow pattern in the liquid meniscus. (paper)

  1. Impression techniques for the resorbed mandibular arch: A guide to increased stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All clinicians face the common problems in making complete denture prosthesis for patients exhibiting high degree of bone resorption. Though resorption can be prevented to an extent but sooner or later it comes back to haunt the clinician. The result is a dis-satisfied patient with a loose prosthesis ready for a new one. The real problem lies in the capturing the oral tissues and using them for creating retention and stability in the prosthesis. Though ultimate success also depends on many other factors such as the occlusal scheme used and patient adaptability yet the most important step still remains the impression technique employed. A few impression techniques are suggested for increasing the success rates in such patients.

  2. Probing absorption of deuterium into palladium cathodes during D2O electrolysis with an in situ electrochemical microbalance technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Noboru; Yamamoto, Nobushige; Hatozaki, Osamu; Ohsaka, Takeo

    1990-01-01

    The in situ observation of the absorption of deuterium (or hydrogen) into the Pd cathode during D 2 O (or H 2 O) electrolysis was made by an electrochemical microbalance technique which is based on the quartz-crystal electrode. The resonant frequency of the Pd-coated quartz-crystal electrode decreased with increasing amount of charge passed during electrolysis, and the frequency change for the D 2 O electrolysis was about twice that for the H 2 O electrolysis. The atom ratios of H/Pd and D/Pd of the H-Pd and D-Pd compounds resulting from the electrolysis were estimated to be 0.59 and 0.57, respectively. (author)

  3. Application of fluorescence in situ hybridization technique in the diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia with abnormal immunophenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Leilei; Sun Xuemei; Chen Junhao; Zhang Le

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the utilization of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique in the diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia(APL) with abnormal immunophenotype, flow cytometry was used to detect the immunophenotype of mononuclear cells in APL patients and PML/RARα fusion gene was detected by FISH. The mononuclear cells of several APL patients showed abnormal immunophenotype: CD13 + , CD33 + , CD34 - , HLA-DR + and PML/RARα fusion gene was also detected, which was different from the regular result of APL: HLA- DR - , PML/RARα + . Therefore, the detection of immunophenotype in APL patients should not be regarded as the sole accurate target for diagnosing leukemia. FISH ,associated with traditional FAB classification, is a simple, rapid, accurate and direct method. It can be used to help confirm the diagnosis, to guide the formulation of a reasonable chemotherapy scheme and to supervise the efficacy of the treatment in patients with leukemia. (authors)

  4. Chemical composition and the nutritive value of pistachio epicarp (in situ degradation and in vitro gas production techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Bakhshizadeh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The nutritive value of pistachio epicarp (PE was evaluated by in situ and in vitro techniques. Chemical analysis indicated that PE was high in crude protein (11.30% and low in neutral detergent fiber (26.20%. Total phenols, total tannins, condensed tannins and hydrolysable tannins contents in PE were 8.29%, 4.48%, 0.49% and 3.79%, respectively. Ruminal dry matter and crude protein degradation after 48 hr incubation were 75.21% and 82.52%, respectively. The gas production volume at 48 hr for PE was 122.47 mL g-1DM. As a whole, adding polyethylene glycol (PEG to PE increased (p < 0.05 gas production volumes, organic matter digestibility and the metabolizable energy that illustrated inhibitory effect of phenolics on rumen microbial fermentation and the positive influence of PEG on digestion PE. The results showed that PE possessed potentials to being used as feed supplements.

  5. Steel research using neutron beam techniques. In-situ neutron diffraction, small-angle neutron scattering and residual stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueyoshi, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Katsumi; Sato, Kaoru; Nakagaito, Tatsuya; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Arakaki, Yu; Tomota, Yo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the neutron beam techniques have been applied for steel researches and industrial applications. In particular, the neutron diffraction is a powerful non-destructive method that can analyze phase transformation and residual stress inside the steel. The small-angle neutron scattering is also an effective method for the quantitative evaluation of microstructures inside the steel. In this study, in-situ neutron diffraction measurements during tensile test and heat treatment were conducted in order to investigate the deformation and transformation behaviors of TRIP steels. The small-angle neutron scattering measurements of TRIP steels were also conducted. Then, the neutron diffraction analysis was conducted on the high strength steel weld joint in order to investigate the effect of the residual stress distribution on the weld cracking. (author)

  6. Chemical composition and the nutritive value of pistachio epicarp (in situ degradation and in vitro gas production techniques).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshizadeh, Somayeh; Taghizadeh, Akbar; Janmohammadi, Hossein; Alijani, Sadegh

    2014-01-01

    The nutritive value of pistachio epicarp (PE) was evaluated by in situ and in vitro techniques. Chemical analysis indicated that PE was high in crude protein (11.30%) and low in neutral detergent fiber (26.20%). Total phenols, total tannins, condensed tannins and hydrolysable tannins contents in PE were 8.29%, 4.48%, 0.49% and 3.79%, respectively. Ruminal dry matter and crude protein degradation after 48 hr incubation were 75.21% and 82.52%, respectively. The gas production volume at 48 hr for PE was 122.47 mL g(-1)DM. As a whole, adding polyethylene glycol (PEG) to PE increased (p gas production volumes, organic matter digestibility and the metabolizable energy that illustrated inhibitory effect of phenolics on rumen microbial fermentation and the positive influence of PEG on digestion PE. The results showed that PE possessed potentials to being used as feed supplements.

  7. ArthroBroström Lateral Ankle Stabilization Technique: An Anatomic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Jorge I; Ortiz, Cristian; Golano, Pau; Nery, Caio

    2015-10-01

    Arthroscopic ankle lateral ligament repair techniques have recently been developed and biomechanically as well as clinically validated. Although there has been 1 anatomic study relating suture and anchor proximity to anatomic structures, none has evaluated the ArthroBroström procedure. To evaluate the proximity of anatomic structures for the ArthroBroström lateral ankle ligament stabilization technique and to define ideal landmarks and "safe zones" for this repair. Descriptive laboratory study. Ten human cadaveric ankle specimens (5 matched pairs) were screened for the study. All specimens underwent arthroscopic lateral ligament repair according to the previously described ArthroBroström technique with 2 suture anchors in the fibula. Three cadaveric specimens were used to test the protocol, and 7 were dissected to determine the proximity of anatomic structures. Several distances were measured, including those of different anatomic structures to the suture knots, to determine the "safe zones." Measurements were obtained by 2 separate observers, and statistical analysis was performed. None of the specimens revealed entrapment by either of the suture knots of the critical anatomic structures, including the superficial peroneal nerve (SPN), sural nerve, peroneus tertius tendon, peroneus brevis tendon, or peroneus longus tendon. The internervous safe zone between the intermediate branch of the SPN and sural nerve was a mean of 51 mm (range, 39-64 mm). The intertendinous safe zone between the peroneus tertius and peroneus brevis was a mean of 43 mm (range, 37-49 mm). On average, a 20-mm (range, 8-36 mm) safe distance was maintained from the most medial suture to the intermediate branch of the SPN. The amount of inferior extensor retinaculum (IER) grasped by either suture knot varied from 0 to 12 mm, with 86% of repairs including the retinaculum. The results indicate that there is a relatively wide internervous and intertendinous safe zone when performing the Arthro

  8. Absorption kinetics of vitamin E nanoemulsion and green tea microstructures by intestinal in situ single perfusion technique in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saratale, Rijuta Ganesh; Lee, Hee-Seok; Koo, Yong Eui; Saratale, Ganesh Dattatraya; Kim, Young Jun; Imm, Jee Young; Park, Yooheon

    2018-04-01

    The absorption kinetics of food ingredients such as nanoemulsified vitamin E and green tea microstructures were evaluated by the intestinal in situ single perfusion technique. Absorption rate, sub-acute oral toxicity and organ morphology in a rat model were examined. The intestinal in situ single perfusion technique and HPLC analysis were applied to investigate the absorption rate of selected materials by examining time-dependent changes in the serum levels of catechin and dl-α-tocopherol. The acute toxicity test and histopathological evaluation were applied to analyze the safety of microsized green tea and nanosized vitamin E in a rat model. Total serum dl-α-tocopherol levels significantly increased with nanosized vitamin E administration (PE until 90min after administration showed significantly increased absorption rate of serum dl-α-tocopherol levels at each time point (10min interval) (PE and microsized green tea did not show signs of acute toxicity or death after 14days of observation. In addition, macroscopic analysis showed that there were no changes in representative organ sections of rats following the oral administration of food-related nanoscale materials. We successfully demonstrated that using nanosized vitamin E increased absorption rate to a greater extent than normal food-related material, and these results occurs via safety analyses on food-related nanoscale materials for human consumption. These results could be useful for the design and development of novel nanoemulsified vitamin E and microsized green tea formulations that can overcome the problem of their bioavailability and improve their efficacy while still maintaining their essential therapeutic efficacies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A New Technique for Deep in situ Measurements of the Soil Water Retention Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocchi, Irene; Gragnano, Carmine Gerardo; Govoni, Laura

    2018-01-01

    to monitor shallow landslides and seasonal volume changes beneath shallow foundations, within the most superficial ground strata. In this paper, a novel installation technique is presented, discussed and assessed, which allows to extend the use of commercially available low cost and low maintenance...... to the field data. The results of this study offer a convenient starting point to accommodate important geotechnical works such as river and road embankments in the traditional monitoring of unsaturated soil variables....

  10. Effect of meniscus replacement fixation technique on restoration of knee contact mechanics and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Lima, D D; Chen, P C; Kessler, O; Hoenecke, H R; Colwell, C W

    2011-06-01

    The menisci are important biomechanical components of the knee. We developed and validated a finite element model of meniscal replacement to assess the effect of surgical fixation technique on contact behavior and knee stability. The geometry of femoral and tibial articular cartilage and menisci was segmented from magnetic resonance images of a normal cadaver knee using MIMICS (Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). A finite element mesh was generated using HyperWorks (Altair Inc, Santa Ana, CA). A finite element solver (Abaqus v6.9, Simulia, Providence, RI) was used to compute contact area and stresses under axial loading and to assess stability (reaction force generated during anteroposterior translation of the femur). The natural and surgical attachments of the meniscal horns and peripheral rim were simulated using springs. After total meniscectomy, femoral contact area decreased by 26% with a concomitant increase in average contact stresses (36%) and peak contact stresses (33%). Replacing the meniscus without suturing the horns did little to restore femoral contact area. Suturing the horns increased contact area and reduced peak contact stresses. Increasing suture stiffness correlated with increased meniscal contact stresses as a greater proportion of tibiofemoral load was transferred to the meniscus. A small incremental benefit was seen of simulated bone plug fixation over the suture construct with the highest stiffness (50 N/mm). Suturing the rim did little to change contact conditions. The nominal anteroposterior stiffness reduced by 3.1 N/mm after meniscectomy. In contrast to contact area and stress, stiffness of the horn fixation sutures had a smaller effect on anteroposterior stability. On the other hand suturing the rim of the meniscus affected anteroposterior stability to a much larger degree. This model emphasizes the importance of the meniscus in knee biomechanics. Appropriate meniscal replacement fixation techniques are likely to be critical to the clinical

  11. In Situ Determination of Thermal Profiles during Czochralski Silicon Crystal Growth by an Eddy Current Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Kwang Su.

    An eddy current testing method was developed to continuously monitor crystal growth process and determine thermal profiles in situ during Czochralski silicon crystal growth. The work was motivated by the need to improve the quality of the crystal by controlling thermal gradients and annealing history over the growth cycle. The experimental concept is to monitor intrinsic electrical conductivities of the growing crystal and deduce temperature values from them. The experiments were performed in a resistance-heated Czochralski puller with a 203 mm (8 inch) diameter crucible containing 6.5 kg melt. The silicon crystals being grown were about 80 mm in diameter and monitored by an encircling sensor operating at three different test frequencies (86, 53 and 19 kHz). A one-dimensional analytical solution was employed to translate the detected signals into electrical conductivities. In terms of experiments, the effects of changes in growth condition, which is defined by crystal and crucible rotation rates, crucible position, pull rate, and hot-zone configuration, were investigated. Under a given steady-state condition, the thermal profile was usually stable over the entire length of crystal growth. The profile shifted significantly, however, when the crucible rotation rate was kept too high. As a direct evidence to the effects of melt flow on heat transfer process, a thermal gradient minimum was observed about the crystal/crucible rotation combination of 20/-10 rpm cw. The thermal gradient reduction was still most pronounced when the pull rate or the radiant heat loss to the environment was decreased: a nearly flat axial thermal gradient was achieved when either the pull rate was halved or the height of the exposed crucible wall was effectively doubled. Under these conditions, the average axial thermal gradient along the surface of the crystal was about 4-5 ^{rm o}C/mm. Regardless of growth condition, the three-frequency data revealed radial thermal gradients much larger

  12. Ruminally undegradable protein content and digestibility for forages using the mobile bag in situ technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, C D; Klopfenstein, T J; Rolfe, K M; Griffin, W A; Lamothe, M J; Watson, A K; MacDonald, J C; Schacht, W H; Schroeder, P

    2013-06-01

    Four experiments were conducted to evaluate RUP content and digestibility for smooth bromegrass, subirrigated meadow, upland native range, and warm-season grasses. Samples were collected from esophageally cannulated cows or ruminally cannulated steers. Forages were ruminally incubated in in situ bags for durations of time based on 75% of total mean retention time, which was based on IVDMD and rate of passage calculations. One-half of the bags were duodenally incubated and excreted in the feces, and NDIN was analyzed on all bags for RUP calculations. Crude protein was numerically greater early in the growing cycle for grasses compared with later as grasses matured (P ≤ 0.32). The RUP was 13.3%, 13.3%, and 19.7% of CP for smooth bromegrass, subirrigated meadow, and upland native range, respectively. These values tended to be lower early in the growth cycle and increased (linear P ≤ 0.13) as forages matured for warm-season grasses and subirrigated meadows. Because both CP and RUP content change throughout the growing season, expressing RUP as a percentage of DM gives more consistent averages compared with RUP as a percentage of CP. Coefficient of variation values for RUP as a percentage of DM averaged 0.21 over all 4 experiments compared with 0.26 for RUP as a percentage of CP. Average RUP as a percentage of DM was 2.03%, 1.53%, and 1.94% for smooth bromegrass, subirrigated meadow, and upland native range, respectively. Total tract indigestible protein (TTIDP) linearly increased with maturity for subirrigated meadow samples (P RUP varied considerably, ranging from 25% to 60%. Subirrigated meadow, native range, and smooth bromegrass samples tended to have linear decreases (P ≤ 0.11) in RUP digestibility throughout the growing season. The amount of digested RUP was fairly consistent across experiments and averages for smooth bromegrass, subirrigated meadow, and upland native range were 0.92%, 0.64%, and 0.49% of DM, respectively. Warm-season grasses in Exp. 2 had

  13. Comparison of continuous in situ CO2 observations at Jungfraujoch using two different measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibig, M. F.; Steinbacher, M.; Buchmann, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; van der Laan, S.; Ranjan, S.; Leuenberger, M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2004, atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is being measured at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch by the division of Climate and Environmental Physics at the University of Bern (KUP) using a nondispersive infrared gas analyzer (NDIR) in combination with a paramagnetic O2 analyzer. In January 2010, CO2 measurements based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) as part of the Swiss National Air Pollution Monitoring Network were added by the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa). To ensure a smooth transition - a prerequisite when merging two data sets, e.g., for trend determinations - the two measurement systems run in parallel for several years. Such a long-term intercomparison also allows the identification of potential offsets between the two data sets and the collection of information about the compatibility of the two systems on different time scales. A good agreement of the seasonality, short-term variations and, to a lesser extent mainly due to the short common period, trend calculations is observed. However, the comparison reveals some issues related to the stability of the calibration gases of the KUP system and their assigned CO2 mole fraction. It is possible to adapt an improved calibration strategy based on standard gas determinations, which leads to better agreement between the two data sets. By excluding periods with technical problems and bad calibration gas cylinders, the average hourly difference (CRDS - NDIR) of the two systems is -0.03 ppm ± 0.25 ppm. Although the difference of the two data sets is in line with the compatibility goal of ±0.1 ppm of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the standard deviation is still too high. A significant part of this uncertainty originates from the necessity to switch the KUP system frequently (every 12 min) for 6 min from ambient air to a working gas in order to correct short-term variations of the O2 measurement system. Allowing additional time for

  14. Comparison of continuous in-situ CO2 observations at Jungfraujoch using two different measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibig, M. F.; Steinbacher, M.; Buchmann, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; van der Laan, S.; Ranjan, S.; Leuenberger, M. C.

    2014-07-01

    Since 2004, atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is measured at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch by the division of Climate and Environmental Physics at the University of Bern (KUP) using a nondispersive infrared gas analyzer (NDIR) in combination with a paramagnetic O2 analyzer. In January 2010, CO2 measurements based on cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) as part of the Swiss National Air Pollution Monitoring Network have been added by the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa). To ensure a smooth transition - a prerequisite when merging two datasets e.g. for trend determinations - the two measurement systems run in parallel for several years. Such a long-term intercomparison also allows identifying potential offsets between the two datasets and getting information about the compatibility of the two systems on different time scales. A good agreement of the seasonality as well as for the short-term variations was observed and to a lesser extent for trend calculations mainly due to the short common period. However, the comparison revealed some issues related to the stability of the calibration gases of the KUP system and their assigned CO2 mole fraction. It was possible to adapt an improved calibration strategy based on standard gas determinations, which lead to better agreement between the two data sets. By excluding periods with technical problems and bad calibration gas cylinders, the average hourly difference (CRDS - NDIR) of the two systems is -0.03 ppm ± 0.25 ppm. Although the difference of the two datasets is in line with the compatibility goal of ±0.1 ppm of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the standard deviation is still too high. A significant part of this uncertainty originates from the necessity to switch the KUP system frequently (every 12 min) for 6 min from ambient air to a working gas in order to correct short-term variations of the O2 measurement system. Allowing additionally for signal

  15. A study on in-situ measuring method and modeling technique of an unsaturated zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, Hisashi [Hazama Corp., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Technical Research Inst.; Amemiya, Kiyoshi; Nishida, Kaoru; Lin, Weiren; Lei, Xinglin

    1997-03-01

    It is generally considered that an unsaturated zone is generated in the vicinity of a drift after excavation. In such a zone, invasion of air containing oxygen possibly changes geochemical environment (redox condition) of the rock mass. However, no measurement technique for quantitative understanding of this unsaturated zone is currently available. This study has been started to develop the measuring method in the several years. This year, fundamental information has been obtained through analysis, laboratory experiments using homogeneous rock samples and field measurement described below. (1) experiments on the mechanism of undersaturation in rock. (2) experiments on the measuring method of the extend of unsaturated zone. (author)

  16. A novel in-situ sampling and VFA sensor technique for anaerobic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pind, Peter Frode; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2002-01-01

    A key information for understanding and controlling the anaerobic biogas process is the concentration of Volatile Fatty Acids (VFA). However, access to this information has so far been limited to off-line measurements by manual time and labour consuming methods. We have developed a new technique ...... than 1000 samples on both a fullscale biogas plant and lab-scale reactors. The measuring range covers specific measurements of acetate, propionate, iso-/n-butyrate and iso-/n-valerate from 0.1 to 50 mM (6–3,000 mg)....

  17. Impact of In Situ Stress Distribution Characteristics on Jointed Surrounding Rock Mass Stability of an Underground Cavern near a Hillslope Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangxiang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a series of numerical simulations are performed to analyze the in situ stress distribution characteristics of the rock mass near different slope angles hillslope surfaces, which are subjected to the vertical gravity stress and different horizontal lateral stresses and the influence which the in situ stress distribution characteristics of 45° hillslope to the integral stability of surrounding rock mass when an underground cavern is excavated considering three different horizontal distances from the underground cavern to the slope surface. It can be concluded from the numerical results that different slope angles and horizontal lateral stresses have a strong impact on the in situ stress distribution and the integral surrounding rock mass stability of the underground cavern when the horizontal distance from the underground cavern to the slope surface is approximately 100 m to 200 m. The relevant results would provide some important constructive suggestions to the engineering site selection and optimization of large-scale underground caverns in hydropower stations.

  18. Development of Advanced In-Situ Techniques for Chemistry Monitoring and Corrosion Mitigation in SCWO Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.D.

    2000-01-01

    Super Critical Water Oxidation (SCWO) is a promising technology for destroying highly toxic organic waste (including physiological agents) and for reducing the volume of DOE's low-level nuclear waste. The major problem inhibiting the wide implementation of SCWO is the lack of fundamental knowledge about various physico-chemical and corrosion processes that occur in SCW environments. In particular, the lack of experimental techniques for accurately monitoring important parameters, such as pH, corrosion potential and corrosion rate, has severely hampered the development of a quantitative understanding of the degradation of materials in this extraordinarily aggressive environment. Accordingly, the principal objective of the present program has been to develop new, innovative methods for accurately measuring parameters that characterize corrosion processes under super critical conditions

  19. In situ studies of pesticides photodegradation on soils using PD-TOFMS technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J. P.; Bejjani, A.; Nsouli, B.; Gardon, A.; Chovelon, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    As we have demonstrated that plasma desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PD-TOFMS) is well adapted to the direct characterization of pesticides adsorbed on agricultural soils the technique has been applied for the first time to the study of their evolution under sunlight-like irradiation. Two pesticides have been selected: norflurazon which is the most documentated (both from the literature and from our previous experiments) and oxyfluorfen in order to assess the capability of the technique. The photodegradation process has been investigated both for a deposit onto a metallic substrate and for a soil impregnated with the product. For norflurazon degradation parameters have been extracted from the yield variation of ions representative of the molecule and breakdown products and particularly the time required for 50% dissipation of their initial concentration (DT50 values). The comparison between deposits and soils indicates clearly that the degradation is slower in the latter case with an increase of about 3.5 for the DT50 of the molecule, and about 2 for its breakdown products. These values are in agreement with the decays of other ions. As expected, the degradation is faster when the UV of the sunlight is unfiltered, more significantly for the breakdown products. This is also observed for the oxyfluorfen deposited onto aluminium although at a lower level (twice less). The trends are only qualitative for the impregnated soil but definitely there. A discussion is presented for the interpretation of the photodegradation process in both cases together with suggestions of improvement in the data acquisition.

  20. Combining in situ chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to reduce contaminant mass and leachability in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Daniel P; Srivastava, Vipul J; Dombrowski, Frank J; Lingle, James W

    2015-10-30

    Laboratory batch reactors were maintained for 32 weeks to test the potential for an in situ remedy that combines chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to treat soil from a manufactured gas plant, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Portland cement and slaked lime were used to activate the persulfate and to stabilize/encapsulate the contaminants that were not chemically oxidized. Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded residual contaminants using the sulfate left after persulfate activation. The ability of the combined remedy to reduce contaminant mass and leachability was compared with NaOH-activated persulfate, stabilization, and sulfate-reducing bioremediation as stand-alone technologies. The stabilization amendments increased pH and temperature sufficiently to activate the persulfate within 1 week. Activation with both stabilization amendments and NaOH removed between 55% and 70% of PAH and BTEX. However, combined persulfate and stabilization significantly reduced the leachability of residual BTEX and PAH compared with NaOH activation. Sulfide, 2-naphthoic acid, and the abundance of subunit A of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) were used to monitor native sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were negatively impacted by activated persulfate, but recovered completely within weeks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Advanced Techniques for Assessment of Postural and Locomotor Ataxia, Spatial Orientation, and Gaze Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Conrad., III

    1999-01-01

    and quantified. We are improving this situation by applying methodologies such as nonlinear orbital stability to quantify responses and by using multivariate statistical approaches to link together the responses across separate tests. In this way we can exploit the information available and increase the ability to discriminate between normal and pathological responses. Measures of stability and orientation are compared to measures such as dynamic visual acuity and with balance function tests. The responses of normal human subjects and of patients having well documented pathophysiologies are being characterized. When these studies are completed, we should have a clearer idea about normal and abnormal patterns of eye, head, and body movements during locomotion and their stability in a wide range of environments. We plan eventually to use this information to validate the efficacy of candidate neurovestibular and neuromuscular rehabilitative techniques. Some representative studies made during this year are summarized.

  2. Seven-hour fluorescence in situ hybridization technique for enumeration of Enterobacteriaceae in food and environmental water sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ootsubo, M; Shimizu, T; Tanaka, R; Sawabe, T; Tajima, K; Ezura, Y

    2003-01-01

    A fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique using an Enterobacteriaceae-specific probe (probe D) to target 16S rRNA was improved in order to enumerate, within a single working day, Enterobacteriaceae present in food and environmental water samples. In order to minimize the time required for the FISH procedure, each step of FISH with probe D was re-evaluated using cultured Escherichia coli. Five minutes of ethanol treatment for cell fixation and hybridization were sufficient to visualize cultured E. coli, and FISH could be performed within 1 h. Because of the difficulties in detecting low levels of bacterial cells by FISH without cultivation, a FISH technique for detecting microcolonies on membrane filters was investigated to improve the bacterial detection limit. FISH with probe D following 6 h of cultivation to grow microcolonies on a 13 mm diameter membrane filter was performed, and whole Enterobacteriaceae microcolonies on the filter were then detected and enumerated by manual epifluorescence microscopic scanning at magnification of x100 in ca 5 min. The total time for FISH with probe D following cultivation (FISHFC) was reduced to within 7 h. FISHFC can be applied to enumerate cultivable Enterobacteriaceae in food (above 100 cells g-1) and environmental water samples (above 1 cell ml-1). Cultivable Enterobacteriaceae in food and water samples were enumerated accurately within 7 h using the FISHFC method. A FISHFC method capable of evaluating Enterobacteriaceae contamination in food and environmental water within a single working day was developed.

  3. Application of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) Technique for the Detection of Genetic Aberration in Medical Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratan, Zubair Ahmed; Zaman, Sojib Bin; Haidere, Mohammad Faisal; Runa, Nusrat Jahan; Akter, Nasrin

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a macromolecule recognition technique, which is considered as a new advent in the field of cytology. Initially, it was developed as a physical mapping tool to delineate genes within chromosomes. The accuracy and versatility of FISH were subsequently capitalized upon in biological and medical research. This visually appealing technique provides an intermediate degree of resolution between DNA analysis and chromosomal investigations. FISH consists of a hybridizing DNA probe, which can be labeled directly or indirectly. In the case of direct labeling, fluorescent nucleotides are used, while indirect labeling is incorporated with reporter molecules that are subsequently detected by fluorescent antibodies or other affinity molecules. FISH is applied to detect genetic abnormalities that include different characteristic gene fusions or the presence of an abnormal number of chromosomes in a cell or loss of a chromosomal region or a whole chromosome. It is also applied in different research applications, such as gene mapping or the identification of novel oncogenes. This article reviews the concept of FISH, its application, and its advantages in medical science.  PMID:28690958

  4. Determining of Degradation and Digestion Coefficients of Canola meal Using of In situ and Gas production Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younes Tahmazi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to the determination of nutritive value of canola meal using naylon bag and cumulative gas production techniques in Gizel sheep. Tow fistulated Gizel sheep with average BW 45±2 kg used in a complete randomized design. The cumulative gas production was measured at 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 24, 36 and 48 h and ruminal DM and CP disappearance were measured up to 96 h. Coefficients of soluble CP degradation of canola meal (A, canola meal treated with 0.5% urea (B and canola meal treated with micro wave (C were 4.74, 15.81 and 15%, and for fermentable portion were 31.05, 39.62 and 65.55%, respectively. The cumulative gas production of soluble and insoluble portions (a+b were 252.13, 213.57 and 240.88 ml/g DM. Metabolizable protein of treatments A, B and C were 283.11, 329.33 and 284.39 g/kg DM, that were not significantly different. The relationship between dry matter and cumulative gas production values for treatments obtained about 0.958, 0.976 and 0.932 and this parameter for crude protein and cumulative gas production achieved 0.987, 0.994 and 0.989, respectively. High correlation between in situ and cumulative gas production techniques indicated that digestibility values can be predicted from cumulative gas production data.

  5. Influence of in situ synthesized TiC on thermal stability and corrosion behavior of Zr60Cu10Al15Ni15 amorphous composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Jiwei; Teng, Xinying; Zhou, Guorong; Leng, Jinfeng; Zhao, Degang

    2014-01-01

    In situ synthesized TiC particles were prepared by a thermal explosion method. Adding “in situ synthesized” TiC into Zr 60 Cu 10 Al 15 Ni 15 glass matrix to obtain amorphous matrix composites was achieved. The corrosion behavior of Zr 60 Cu 10 Al 15 Ni 15 amorphous composites was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization measurements in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution at room temperature. The results show that the microhardness and thermal stability are improved apparently, while the TiC (≤0.6 wt%) does not significantly affect the supercooled liquid behavior. Moreover, the corrosion resistance is improved apparently because the nanocrystals accelerate the diffusion of passive elements for faster formation of the protective passive film at nanocrystals/amorphous interfaces. However, when the TiC content is more than 0.6 wt%, both glass forming ability and corrosion resistance are reduced significantly

  6. Observation on the stability of the solid phase microparticles separating technique in T3, T4 radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guangliang; Chen Xunmin

    1995-01-01

    The solid phase T 3 ,T 4 RIA is adopted at various laboratories. The data analysis from the effective dose and quality control of samples indicates that the separation technique is of good effect and high stability. It is an effective separation technique for the quality control in RIA

  7. Trace Metals in Groundwater and the Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment and Stabilization of Strontium-90 and Other Divalent Metals and Radionuclides at Arid West DOE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants such as strontium-90 are present beneath U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands in both the groundwater (e.g., 100-N area at Hanford, WA) and vadose zone (e.g., Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants is a cost-effective treatment strategy. However, implementing in situ containment and stabilization approaches requires definition of the mechanisms that control contaminant sequestration. We are investigating the in situ immobilization of radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., strontium-90) by their facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Our facilitated approach, shown schematically in Figure 1, relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity. Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which may be either introduced with the urea or produced in situ by ubiquitous subsurface urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation process tends to be irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the co-precipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from the aqueous phase over the long-term. Another advantage of the ureolysis approach is that the ammonium ions produced by the reaction can exchange with radionuclides sorbed to subsurface minerals, thereby enhancing the availability of the radionuclides for re-capture in a more stable solid phase (co-precipitation rather than adsorption)

  8. Advanced kinetics for calorimetric techniques and thermal stability screening of sulfide minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliyas, Abduljelil; Hawboldt, Kelly; Khan, Faisal

    2010-01-01

    Thermal methods of analysis such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) provide a powerful methodology for the study of solid reactions. This paper proposes an improved thermal analysis methodology for thermal stability investigation of complex solid-state reactions. The proposed methodology is based on differential iso-conversional approach and involves peak separation, individual peak analysis and combination of isothermal/non-isothermal DSC measurements for kinetic analysis and prediction. The proposed thermal analysis, which coupled with Mineral Libration Analyzer (MLA) technique was employed to investigate thermal behavior of sulfide mineral oxidation. The importance of various experimental variables such as particle size, heating rate and atmosphere were investigated and discussed. The information gained from such an advanced thermal analysis method is useful for scale-up processes with potential of significant savings in plant operations, as well as in mitigating adverse environmental and safety issues arising from handling and storage of sulfide minerals.

  9. Synthesis, microstructure and mechanical properties of ceria stabilized tetragonal zirconia prepared by spray drying technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.C.; Gokhale, N.M.; Dayal, Rajiv; Lazl, Ramji

    2002-01-01

    Ceria stabilized zirconia powders with ceria concentration varying from 6 to 16 mol% were synthesized using spray drying technique. Powders were characterized for their particle size distribution and specific surface area. The dense sintered ceramics fabricated using these powders were characterized for their microstructure, crystallite size and phase composition. The flexural strength, fracture toughness and micro-hardness of sintered ceramics were measured. High fracture toughness and flexural strength were obtained for sintered bodies with 12 mol% of CeO 2 . Flexural strength and fracture toughness were dependent on CeO 2 concentration, crystallite size and phase composition of sintered bodies. Correlation of data has indicated that the transformable tetragonal phase is the key factor in controlling the fracture toughness and strength of ceramics. It has been demonstrated that the synthesis method is effective to prepare nanocrystalline tetragonal ceria stabilized zirconia powders with improved mechanical properties. Ce-ZrO 2 with 20 wt% alumina was also prepared with flexural strength, 1200 MPa and fracture toughness 9.2 MPa√m. (author)

  10. On the Decay Ratio Determination in BWR Stability Analysis by Auto-Correlation Function Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behringer, K.; Hennig, D.

    2002-11-01

    A novel auto-correlation function (ACF) method has been investigated for determining the oscillation frequency and the decay ratio in BWR stability analyses. The neutron signals are band-pass filtered to separate the oscillation peak in the power spectral density (PSD) from background. Two linear second-order oscillation models are considered. These models, corrected for signal filtering and including a background term under the peak in the PSD, are then least-squares fitted to the ACF of the previously filtered neutron signal, in order to determine the oscillation frequency and the decay ratio. Our method uses fast Fourier transform techniques with signal segmentation for filtering and ACF estimation. Gliding 'short-term' ACF estimates on a record allow the evaluation of uncertainties. Numerical results are given which have been obtained from neutron data of the recent Forsmark I and Forsmark II NEA benchmark project. Our results are compared with those obtained by other participants in the benchmark project. The present PSI report is an extended version of the publication K. Behringer, D. Hennig 'A novel auto-correlation function method for the determination of the decay ratio in BWR stability studies' (Behringer, Hennig, 2002)

  11. Mechanical and biodegradable properties of porous titanium filled with poly-L-lactic acid by modified in situ polymerization technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Masaaki; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Ishii, Daisuke

    2011-10-01

    Porous titanium (pTi) can possess a low Young's modulus equal to that of human bone, depending on its porosity. However, the mechanical strength of pTi deteriorates greatly with increasing porosity. On the other hand, certain medical polymers exhibit biofunctionalities, which are not possessed intrinsically by metallic materials. Therefore, a biodegradable medical polymer, poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), was used to fill in the pTi pores using a modified in-situ polymerization technique. The mechanical and biodegradable properties of pTi filled with PLLA (pTi/PLLA) as fabricated by this technique and the effects of the PLLA filling were evaluated in this study. The pTi pores are almost completely filled with PLLA by the developed process (i.e., technique). The tensile strength and tensile Young's modulus of pTi barely changes with the PLLA filling. However, the PLLA filling improves the compressive 0.2% proof stress of pTi having any porosity and increases the compressive Young's modulus of pTi having relatively high porosity. This difference between the tensile and compressive properties of pTi/PLLA is considered to be caused by the differing resistances of PLLA in the pores to tensile and compressive deformations. The PLLA filled into the pTi pores degrades during immersion in Hanks' solution at 310 K. The weight loss due to PLLA degradation increases with increasing immersion time. However, the rate of weight loss of pTi/PLLA during immersion decreases with increasing immersion time. Hydroxyapatite formation is observed on the surface of pTi/PLLA after immersion for ≥8 weeks. The decrease in the weight-loss rate may be caused by weight gain due to hydroxyapatite formation and/or the decrease in contact area with Hanks' solution caused by its formation on the surface of pTi/PLLA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Normal and friction stabilization techniques for interactive rigid body constraint-based contact force computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silcowitz-Hansen, Morten; Abel, Sarah Maria Niebe; Erleben, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel, yet simple, method for stabilization of normal forces. A normal stabilization term, carefully designed from hypotheses about interactive usability, is added to the contact force problem. Further, we propose friction stabilization as a completely new stabilization paradigm...

  13. A modified rinsing method for the determination of the S, W-S and D + U fraction of protein and starch in feedstuff within the in situ technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, de L.H.; Laar, van H.; Hendriks, W.H.; Dijkstra, J.

    2013-01-01

    A modified rinsing method for the in situ technique was developed to separate, isolate and characterise the soluble (S), the insoluble washout (W–S) and the non-washout fractions (D1U) within one procedure. For non-incubated bags ( t50 h), this method was compared with the conventional, Combined

  14. Temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of flexible yttria-stabilized zirconia substrate via 3ω technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Shivkant; Yarali, Milad; Mavrokefalos, Anastassios [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Shervin, Shahab [Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Venkateswaran, Venkat; Olenick, Kathy; Olenick, John A. [ENrG Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States); Ryou, Jae-Hyun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston (TcSUH), Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Thermal management in flexible electronic has proven to be challenging thereby limiting the development of flexible devices with high power densities. To truly enable the technological implementation of such devices, it is imperative to develop highly thermally conducting flexible substrates that are fully compatible with large-scale fabrication. Here, we present the thermal conductivity of state-of-the-art flexible yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates measured using the 3ω technique, which is already commercially manufactured via roll-to-roll technique. We observe that increasing the grain size increases the thermal conductivity of the flexible 3 mol.% YSZ, while the flexibility and transparency of the sample are hardly affected by the grain size enlargement. We exhibit thermal conductivity values of up to 4.16 Wm{sup -1}K {sup -1} that is at least 4 times higher than state-of-the-art polymeric flexible substrates. Phonon-hopping model (PHM) for granular material was used to fit the measured thermal conductivity and accurately define the thermal transport mechanism. Our results show that through grain size optimization, YSZ flexible substrates can be realized as flexible substrates, that pave new avenues for future novel application in flexible electronics through the utilization of both their ceramic structural flexibility and high heat dissipating capability. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Neural robust stabilization via event-triggering mechanism and adaptive learning technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ding; Liu, Derong

    2018-06-01

    The robust control synthesis of continuous-time nonlinear systems with uncertain term is investigated via event-triggering mechanism and adaptive critic learning technique. We mainly focus on combining the event-triggering mechanism with adaptive critic designs, so as to solve the nonlinear robust control problem. This can not only make better use of computation and communication resources, but also conduct controller design from the view of intelligent optimization. Through theoretical analysis, the nonlinear robust stabilization can be achieved by obtaining an event-triggered optimal control law of the nominal system with a newly defined cost function and a certain triggering condition. The adaptive critic technique is employed to facilitate the event-triggered control design, where a neural network is introduced as an approximator of the learning phase. The performance of the event-triggered robust control scheme is validated via simulation studies and comparisons. The present method extends the application domain of both event-triggered control and adaptive critic control to nonlinear systems possessing dynamical uncertainties. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Does the Implant Surgical Technique Affect the Primary and/or Secondary Stability of Dental Implants? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadid, Rola Muhammed; Sadaqah, Nasrin Rushdi; Othman, Sahar Abdo

    2014-01-01

    Background. A number of surgical techniques for implant site preparation have been advocated to enhance the implant of primary and secondary stability. However, there is insufficient scientific evidence to support the association between the surgical technique and implant stability. Purpose. This review aimed to investigate the influence of different surgical techniques including the undersized drilling, the osteotome, the piezosurgery, the flapless procedure, and the bone stimulation by low-level laser therapy on the primary and/or secondary stability of dental implants. Materials and methods. A search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and grey literature was performed. The inclusion criteria comprised observational clinical studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in patients who received dental implants for rehabilitation, studies that evaluated the association between the surgical technique and the implant primary and/or secondary stability. The articles selected were carefully read and classified as low, moderate, and high methodological quality and data of interest were tabulated. Results. Eight clinical studies were included then they were classified as moderate or high methodological quality and control of bias. Conclusions. There is a weak evidence suggesting that any of previously mentioned surgical techniques could influence the primary and/or secondary implant stability. PMID:25126094

  17. Does the Implant Surgical Technique Affect the Primary and/or Secondary Stability of Dental Implants? A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rola Muhammed Shadid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A number of surgical techniques for implant site preparation have been advocated to enhance the implant of primary and secondary stability. However, there is insufficient scientific evidence to support the association between the surgical technique and implant stability. Purpose. This review aimed to investigate the influence of different surgical techniques including the undersized drilling, the osteotome, the piezosurgery, the flapless procedure, and the bone stimulation by low-level laser therapy on the primary and/or secondary stability of dental implants. Materials and methods. A search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and grey literature was performed. The inclusion criteria comprised observational clinical studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs conducted in patients who received dental implants for rehabilitation, studies that evaluated the association between the surgical technique and the implant primary and/or secondary stability. The articles selected were carefully read and classified as low, moderate, and high methodological quality and data of interest were tabulated. Results. Eight clinical studies were included then they were classified as moderate or high methodological quality and control of bias. Conclusions. There is a weak evidence suggesting that any of previously mentioned surgical techniques could influence the primary and/or secondary implant stability.

  18. Stability analysis of resistive MHD modes via a new numerical matching technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, M.; Tokuda, S.; Zheng, L.-J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Asymptotic matching technique is one of the principal methods for calculating linear stability of resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) modes such as tearing modes. In applying the asymptotic method, the plasma region is divided into two regions: a thin inner layer around the mode-resonant surface and ideal MHD regions except for the layer. If we try to solve this asymptotic matching problem numerically, we meet practical difficulties. Firstly, the inertia-less ideal MHD equation or the Newcomb equation has a regular singular point at the mode-resonant surface, leading to the so-called big and small solutions. Since the big solution is not square-integrable, it needs sophisticated treatment. Even if such a treatment is applied, the matching data or the ratio of small solution to the big one, has been revealed to be sensitive to local MHD equilibrium accuracy and grid structure at the mode-resonant surface by numerical experiments. Secondly, one of the independent solutions in the inner layer, which should be matched onto the ideal MHD solution, is not square-integrable. The response formalism has been adopted to resolve this problem. In the present paper, we propose a new method for computing the linear stability of resistive MHD modes via matching technique, where the plasma region is divided into ideal MHD regions and an inner region with finite width. The matching technique using an inner region with finite width was recently developed for ideal MHD modes in cylindrical geometry, and good performance was shown. Our method extends this idea to resistive MHD modes. In the inner region, the low-beta reduced MHD equations are solved, and the solution is matched onto the solution of the Newcomb equation by using boundary conditions such that the parallel electric field vanishes properly as approaching the computational boundaries. If we use the inner region with finite width, the practical difficulties raised above can be avoided from the beginning. Figure

  19. Intrinsic stress in ZrN thin films: Evaluation of grain boundary contribution from in situ wafer curvature and ex situ x-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutsokeras, L. E.; Abadias, G.

    2012-01-01

    Low-mobility materials, like transition metal nitrides, usually undergo large residual stress when sputter-deposited as thin films. While the origin of stress development has been an active area of research for high-mobility materials, atomistic processes are less understood for low-mobility systems. In the present work, the contribution of grain boundary to intrinsic stress in reactively magnetron-sputtered ZrN films is evaluated by combining in situ wafer curvature measurements, providing information on the overall biaxial stress, and ex situ x-ray diffraction, giving information on elastic strain (and related stress) inside crystallites. The thermal stress contribution was also determined from the in situ stress evolution during cooling down, after deposition was stopped. The stress data are correlated with variations in film microstructure and growth energetics, in the 0.13-0.42 Pa working pressure range investigated, and discussed based on existing stress models. At low pressure (high energetic bombardment conditions), a large compressive stress is observed due to atomic peening, which induces defects inside crystallites but also promotes incorporation of excess atoms in the grain boundary. Above 0.3-0.4 Pa, the adatom surface mobility is reduced, leading to the build-up of tensile stress resulting from attractive forces between under-dense neighbouring column boundary and possible void formation, while crystallites can still remain under compressive stress.

  20. Tuning of colossal dielectric constant in gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes using in-situ x-ray diffraction techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhisakh Sarma

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In-situ x-ray diffraction technique has been used to study the growth process of gold incorporated polypyrrole nanotubes that exhibit colossal dielectric constant due to existence of quasi-one-dimensional charge density wave state. These composite nanotubes were formed within nanopores of a polycarbonate membrane by flowing pyrrole monomer from one side and mixture of ferric chloride and chloroauric acid from other side in a sample cell that allows collection of x-ray data during the reaction. The size of the gold nanoparticle embedded in the walls of the nanotubes was found to be dependent on chloroauric acid concentration for nanowires having diameter more than 100 nm. For lower diameter nanotubes the nanoparticle size become independent of chloroauric acid concentration and depends on the diameter of nanotubes only. The result of this study also shows that for 50 nm gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes obtained with 5.3 mM chloroauric acid gives colossal dielectric constant of about 107. This value remain almost constant over a frequency range from 1Hz to 106 Hz even at 80 K temperature.

  1. Tuning of colossal dielectric constant in gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes using in-situ x-ray diffraction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarma, Abhisakh; Sanyal, Milan K., E-mail: milank.sanyal@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2014-09-15

    In-situ x-ray diffraction technique has been used to study the growth process of gold incorporated polypyrrole nanotubes that exhibit colossal dielectric constant due to existence of quasi-one-dimensional charge density wave state. These composite nanotubes were formed within nanopores of a polycarbonate membrane by flowing pyrrole monomer from one side and mixture of ferric chloride and chloroauric acid from other side in a sample cell that allows collection of x-ray data during the reaction. The size of the gold nanoparticle embedded in the walls of the nanotubes was found to be dependent on chloroauric acid concentration for nanowires having diameter more than 100 nm. For lower diameter nanotubes the nanoparticle size become independent of chloroauric acid concentration and depends on the diameter of nanotubes only. The result of this study also shows that for 50 nm gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes obtained with 5.3 mM chloroauric acid gives colossal dielectric constant of about 10{sup 7}. This value remain almost constant over a frequency range from 1Hz to 10{sup 6} Hz even at 80 K temperature.

  2. Evaluation of fluorescent in-situ hybridization technique for diagnosis of malaria in Ahero Sub-County hospital, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandie, Regina; Ochola, Rachel; Njaanake, Kariuki

    2018-01-08

    Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Treatment of malaria in a timely manner could avert deaths. Treatment ultimately relies on the rapid and accurate diagnosis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), a cytogenetic technique based on detection of specific nucleic acid, has the potential to address the limitations of the current diagnostic approaches. This study investigates further the performance of FISH for the diagnosis of malaria in a rural setting in Western Kenya. Blood samples from 302 patients presenting with fever (temperature ≥ 37.5 °C) were examined for malaria using the Giemsa microscopy (GM), rapid diagnostic test (RDT), polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and FISH. The sensitivity and specificity of FISH was 85.6% and 96.2% respectively, while the corresponding values for GM were 82.2% and 100% respectively. RDT and PCR had sensitivities of 91.1% and 98.9%, respectively with their specificities being 89.6 and 100%, respectively. The positive predictive values for RDT, GM, FISH and PCR were 78.8%, 100%, 90.6% and 100%, respectively. The negative predictive values for RDT, GM, FISH and PCR were 96.0%, 93.0%, 94.0% and 99.5%, respectively. Their respective diagnostic accuracies were 90.1%, 94.7% 93.0% and 99.7%. The present study demonstrates that the specificity and reproducibility of FISH assays are high, thus adding to the growing evidence on the potential of the technique as an effective tool for the detection of malaria parasites in remote settings.

  3. Technical Note: A novel rocket-based in situ collection technique for mesospheric and stratospheric aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Reid

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A technique for collecting aerosol particles between altitudes of 17 and 85 km is described. Spin-stabilized collection probes are ejected from a sounding rocket allowing for multi-point measurements. Each probe is equipped with 110 collection samples that are 3 mm in diameter. The collection samples are one of three types: standard transmission electron microscopy carbon grids, glass fibre filter paper or silicone gel. Collection samples are exposed over a 50 m to 5 km height range with a total of 45 separate ranges. Post-flight electron microscopy will give size-resolved information on particle number, shape and elemental composition. Each collection probe is equipped with a suite of sensors to capture the probe's status during the fall. Parachute recovery systems along with GPS-based localization will ensure that each probe can be located and recovered for post-flight analysis.

  4. Following the Formation of Active Co(III) Sites in Cobalt Substituted Aluminophosphates Catalysts by In-Situ Combined UV-VIS/XAFS/XRD Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, Gopinathan; Fiddy, Steven; Harvey, Ian; Hayama, Shusaku; Bushnell-Wye, Graham; Beale, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    Cobalt substituted aluminophosphates, CoAlPO-34 (Chabazite structure) and DAF-8 (Phillipsite structure) were investigated by in situ combined XRD/EXAFS/UV-VIS technique. In-situ combined XRD, Co K-edge EXAFS and UV-Vis measurements carried out during the calcination process reveal that CoAlPO-34 containing 10 wt percent cobalt is stable and the cobalt ions are converted from Co(II) in the as synthesised form to Co(III); DAF-8 containing about 25 percent cobalt is not stable and does not show change in oxidation state

  5. Experimental and mathematical simulation techniques for determining an in-situ response testing method for neutron sensors used in reactor power plant protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behbahani, A.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical neutron sensor response model and methods for transient response measurements of neutron sensors (compensated ionization chamber), including possible in-situ techniques have been developed and evaluated to meet the provisions of Draft Standard ISA Sd67.06, IEEE 338-1977, and NRC Guide 1.118. One in-situ method requires the perturbation of the high voltage detector (sensor) power supply and measurement of the sensor response. The response to a perturbation of the power supply is related to the response of the sensor to a transient change in neutron flux. Random signal analysis is another in-situ technique to monitor the neutron sensor response. In this method the power spectrum of the inherent fluctuations from the neutron sensor output (current in CIC) are measured and evaluated. Transient response techniques (including in-situ methods) are experimentally and analytically evaluated to identify the mechanisms which may cause degradation in the response of the neutron sensors. The objective of the experimental evaluation was to correlate the measured response time using transient radiation flux changes and power supply perturbation. The objective of the analytical model of the different sensor response was to predict response time and degradation mechanisms

  6. A Biomechanical Comparison of 3 Different Arthroscopic Lateral Ankle Stabilization Techniques in 36 Cadaveric Ankles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottom, James M; Baker, Joseph S; Richardson, Phillip E; Maker, Jared M

    Arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization has become an increasingly popular option among foot and ankle surgeons to address lateral ankle instability, because it combines a modified Broström-Gould procedure with the ability to address any intra-articular pathologic findings at the same session. The present study evaluated 3 different constructs in a cadaveric model. Thirty-six fresh frozen cadaver limbs were used, and the anterior talofibular ligament was identified and sectioned. The specimens were then placed into 1 of 3 groups. Group 1 received a repair with a single-row, 2-suture anchor construct; group 2 received repair with a novel, double-row, 4-anchor knotless construct; and group 3 received repair with a double-row, 3-anchor construct. Specimens were then tested for stiffness and load to ultimate failure using a customized jig. Stiffness was measured in each of the groups and was 12.10 ± 5.43 (range 5.50 to 22.24) N/mm for group 1, 13.40 ± 7.98 (range 6.71 to 36.28) N/mm for group 2, and 12.55 ± 4.00 (range 6.48 to 22.14) N/mm for group 3. No significant differences were found among the 3 groups in terms of stiffness (p = .939, 1-way analysis of variance, ɑ = 0.05). The groups were tested to failure, with observed force measurements of 156.43 ± 30.39 (range 83.69 to 192.00) N for group 1, 206.62 ± 55.62 (range 141.37 to 300.29) N for group 2, and 246.82 ± 82.37 (range 164.26 to 384.93) N for group 3. Statistically significant differences were noted between groups 1 and 3 (p = .006, 1-way analysis of variance, ɑ = 0.05). The results of the present study have shown that a previously reported arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization procedure, when modified with an additional proximal suture anchor into the fibula, results in a statistically significant increase in strength in terms of the maximum load to failure. Additionally, we have described a previously unreported, knotless technique for arthroscopic lateral ankle

  7. In-Situ Characterization of Tissue Blood Flow, Blood Content, and Water State Using New Techniques in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conturo, Thomas Edward

    Tissue blood flow, blood content, and water state have been characterized in-situ with new nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The sensitivities of standard techniques to the physiologic tissue parameters spin density (N_{rm r}) and relaxation times (T_1 and T_2 ) are mathematically defined. A new driven inversion method is developed so that tissue T_1 and T_2 changes produce cooperative intensity changes, yielding high contrast, high signal to noise, and sensitivity to a wider range of tissue parameters. The actual tissue parameters were imaged by automated collection of multiple-echo data having multiple T _1 dependence. Data are simultaneously fit by three-parameters to a closed-form expression, producing lower inter-parameter correlation and parameter noise than in separate T_1 or T_2 methods or pre-averaged methods. Accurate parameters are obtained at different field strengths. Parametric images of pathology demonstrate high sensitivity to tissue heterogeneity, and water content is determined in many tissues. Erythrocytes were paramagnetically labeled to study blood content and relaxation mechanisms. Liver and spleen relaxation were enhanced following 10% exchange of animal blood volumes. Rapid water exchange between intracellular and extracellular compartments was validated. Erythrocytes occupied 12.5% of renal cortex volume, and blood content was uniform in the liver, spleen and kidney. The magnitude and direction of flow velocity was then imaged. To eliminate directional artifacts, a bipolar gradient technique sensitized to flow in different directions was developed. Phase angle was reconstructed instead of intensity since the former has a 2pi -fold higher dynamic range. Images of flow through curves demonstrated secondary flow with a centrifugally-biased laminar profile and stationary velocity peaks along the curvature. Portal vein flow velocities were diminished or reversed in cirrhosis. Image artifacts have been characterized and removed. The

  8. Combining in situ chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to reduce contaminant mass and leachability in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassidy, Daniel P., E-mail: daniel.cassidy@wmich.edu [Department of Geosciences, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Srivastava, Vipul J., E-mail: vipul.srivastava@ch2m.com [CH2M HILL, 125S Wacker, Ste 3000, Chicago, IL 60606 (United States); Dombrowski, Frank J., E-mail: frank.dombrowski@we-energies.com [We Energies, 333W Everett St., A231, Milwaukee, WI 53203 (United States); Lingle, James W., E-mail: jlingle@epri.com [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), 4927W Willow Road, Brown Deer, WI 53223 (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Portland cement and lime activated persulfate by increasing pH and temperature. • Chemical oxidation achieved BTEX and PAH removal ranging from 55% to 75%. • Activating persulfate with ISS amendments reduced leachability more than NaOH. • Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded PAHs within weeks after ISCO finished. • ISCO, ISS, and anaerobic bioremediation were combined in a single application. - Abstract: Laboratory batch reactors were maintained for 32 weeks to test the potential for an in situ remedy that combines chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to treat soil from a manufactured gas plant, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Portland cement and slaked lime were used to activate the persulfate and to stabilize/encapsulate the contaminants that were not chemically oxidized. Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded residual contaminants using the sulfate left after persulfate activation. The ability of the combined remedy to reduce contaminant mass and leachability was compared with NaOH-activated persulfate, stabilization, and sulfate-reducing bioremediation as stand-alone technologies. The stabilization amendments increased pH and temperature sufficiently to activate the persulfate within 1 week. Activation with both stabilization amendments and NaOH removed between 55% and 70% of PAH and BTEX. However, combined persulfate and stabilization significantly reduced the leachability of residual BTEX and PAH compared with NaOH activation. Sulfide, 2-naphthoic acid, and the abundance of subunit A of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) were used to monitor native sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were negatively impacted by activated persulfate, but recovered completely within weeks.

  9. Combining in situ chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to reduce contaminant mass and leachability in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassidy, Daniel P.; Srivastava, Vipul J.; Dombrowski, Frank J.; Lingle, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Portland cement and lime activated persulfate by increasing pH and temperature. • Chemical oxidation achieved BTEX and PAH removal ranging from 55% to 75%. • Activating persulfate with ISS amendments reduced leachability more than NaOH. • Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded PAHs within weeks after ISCO finished. • ISCO, ISS, and anaerobic bioremediation were combined in a single application. - Abstract: Laboratory batch reactors were maintained for 32 weeks to test the potential for an in situ remedy that combines chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to treat soil from a manufactured gas plant, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Portland cement and slaked lime were used to activate the persulfate and to stabilize/encapsulate the contaminants that were not chemically oxidized. Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded residual contaminants using the sulfate left after persulfate activation. The ability of the combined remedy to reduce contaminant mass and leachability was compared with NaOH-activated persulfate, stabilization, and sulfate-reducing bioremediation as stand-alone technologies. The stabilization amendments increased pH and temperature sufficiently to activate the persulfate within 1 week. Activation with both stabilization amendments and NaOH removed between 55% and 70% of PAH and BTEX. However, combined persulfate and stabilization significantly reduced the leachability of residual BTEX and PAH compared with NaOH activation. Sulfide, 2-naphthoic acid, and the abundance of subunit A of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) were used to monitor native sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were negatively impacted by activated persulfate, but recovered completely within weeks

  10. Growth of block copolymer stabilized metal nanoparticles probed simultaneously by in situ XAS and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, C; Bhattacharyya, D; Jha, S N; Sahoo, N K

    2016-01-01

    The growth of Au and Pt nanoparticles from their respective chloride precursors using block copolymer-based reducers has been studied by simultaneous in situ measurement of XAS and UV-Vis spectroscopy at the energy-dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS at RRCAT, Indore, India. While the XANES spectra of the precursor give real-time information on the reduction process, the EXAFS spectra reveal the structure of the clusters formed at the intermediate stages of growth. The growth kinetics of both types of nanoparticles are found to be almost similar and are found to follow three stages, though the first stage of nucleation takes place earlier in the case of Au than in the case of Pt nanoparticles due to the difference in the reduction potential of the respective precursors. The first two stages of the growth of Au and Pt nanoparticles as obtained by in situ XAS measurements could be corroborated by simultaneous in situ measurement of UV-Vis spectroscopy also.

  11. An in-depth stability analysis of nonuniform FDTD combined with novel local implicitization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Londersele, Arne; De Zutter, Daniël; Vande Ginste, Dries

    2017-08-01

    This work focuses on efficient full-wave solutions of multiscale electromagnetic problems in the time domain. Three local implicitization techniques are proposed and carefully analyzed in order to relax the traditional time step limit of the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method on a nonuniform, staggered, tensor product grid: Newmark, Crank-Nicolson (CN) and Alternating-Direction-Implicit (ADI) implicitization. All of them are applied in preferable directions, alike Hybrid Implicit-Explicit (HIE) methods, as to limit the rank of the sparse linear systems. Both exponential and linear stability are rigorously investigated for arbitrary grid spacings and arbitrary inhomogeneous, possibly lossy, isotropic media. Numerical examples confirm the conservation of energy inside a cavity for a million iterations if the time step is chosen below the proposed, relaxed limit. Apart from the theoretical contributions, new accomplishments such as the development of the leapfrog Alternating-Direction-Hybrid-Implicit-Explicit (ADHIE) FDTD method and a less stringent Courant-like time step limit for the conventional, fully explicit FDTD method on a nonuniform grid, have immediate practical applications.

  12. Development and application of denuder sampling techniques with in situ derivatization for the determination of hydrogenbromide in volcanic plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, Alexandra; Rüdiger, Julian; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    The composition of gases in volcanic plumes shifts with subsurface processes inside volcanoes. For monitoring volcanic activity by studying volcanic plumes it is essential to understand the chemical reactions inside the volcanic plume (Bobrowski and Platt, 2013). Measurements of BrO/SO2-ratio already enable insights into magmatic processes (Bobrowski and Giuffrida, 2012). Both, BrO and SO2, are measurable by Remote Sensing Techniques at a safe distance. Models suggest not a direct emission of BrO but formation due to photochemical and multiphase reactions in the gas and particle phase. These model presume HBr as first emitted species (Gerlach, 2004). So HBr is an important connecting link between easily measurable BrO/SO2-ratios and conclusions on a volcanic system. It is of high importance to know if there is a variation in the amount of HBr transformed into BrO and to gain knowledge on the factor of its dependence. Apart from depletion of surrounded ozone also decreasing or depletion of emitted HBr or even HCl could be responsible for the shift (Bobrowski and Giuffrida, 2012). Knowledge about complex processes in volcanic plumes will simplify interpretation and predictions. In this study, first applications of coated gas diffusion denuder (similar to Huang and Hoffmann, 2008) to derivatize gaseous HBr were successful. Due to the lack of adequate remote sensing techniques an in situ method was developed and will be presented in detail. The epoxide of oleic acid was determined as a suitable derivatization agent. The reaction with HBr gives 10-bromo-9-hydroxyoctadecanoic acid. Other hydrogenhalogens give corresponding products. Derivatized analytes were removed from denuder by solvent elution and subsequent analysed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A limit of quantification below 1 ng was achieved. The method was applied on volcanic gas plumes at Mt. Etna in Italy in July and August 2015. The results showed HBr in higher ppt-range. These first proof

  13. A systematic review of biochar research, with a focus on its stability in situ and its promise as a climate mitigation strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel P Gurwick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Claims about the environmental benefits of charring biomass and applying the resulting "biochar" to soil are impressive. If true, they could influence land management worldwide. Alleged benefits include increased crop yields, soil fertility, and water-holding capacity; the most widely discussed idea is that applying biochar to soil will mitigate climate change. This claim rests on the assumption that biochar persists for hundreds or thousands of years, thus storing carbon that would otherwise decompose. We conducted a systematic review to quantify research effort directed toward ten aspects of biochar and closely evaluated the literature concerning biochar's stability. FINDINGS: We identified 311 peer-reviewed research articles published through 2011. We found very few field studies that addressed biochar's influence on several ecosystem processes: one on soil nutrient loss, one on soil contaminants, six concerning non-CO2 greenhouse gas (GHG fluxes (some of which fail to support claims that biochar decreases non-CO2 GHG fluxes, and 16-19 on plants and soil properties. Of 74 studies related to biochar stability, transport or fate in soil, only seven estimated biochar decomposition rates in situ, with mean residence times ranging from 8 to almost 4,000 years. CONCLUSIONS: Our review shows there are not enough data to draw conclusions about how biochar production and application affect whole-system GHG budgets. Wide-ranging estimates of a key variable, biochar stability in situ, likely result from diverse environmental conditions, feedstocks, and study designs. There are even fewer data about the extent to which biochar stimulates decomposition of soil organic matter or affects non-CO2 GHG emissions. Identifying conditions where biochar amendments yield favorable GHG budgets requires a systematic field research program. Finally, evaluating biochar's suitability as a climate mitigation strategy requires comparing its effects with

  14. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  15. Investigation of the Lobular Carcinoma in Situ, Using Molecular Genetic Techniques, for the Involvement of Novel Genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mastracci, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), i.e. lobular neoplasia (LN), are lesions of significance in terms of implication to the patient in the development of invasive carcinoma...

  16. Investigation of the Lobular Carcinoma in Situ, Using Molecular Genetic Techniques, for the Involvement of Novel Genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mastracci, Teresa L; Andrulis, Irene L

    2005-01-01

    Atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), i.e. lobular neoplasia (LN), are lesions of significance in terms of risk to the patient in the development of invasive carcinoma...

  17. Realization of a collection of reference minerals to develop a technique for in situ dating of the Martian rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattani, F.; Gillot, P. Y.; Hildenbrand, A.; Quidelleur, X.; Courtade, F.; Boukari, C.; Lefevre, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Absolute dating within ± 20% is needed to check and to calibrate the relative Martian chronology presently available. For that purpose, a K-Ar dating system has been developed to experiment the feasibility of such dating in future landing planetary missions. It consists in a laser ablation-based system built to vaporize a reproducible volume of rock. Potassium content is measured by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and argon by quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS). Improvements of LIBS acquisition (optimization of optics part and normalization by total intensity spectrum) and QMS calibration (by reproducible known amount of argon) have been achieved. In addition, we have test the determination of ablated mass from volume measurement performed by profilometry technique. Instrument calibration for Martian analyses requires terrestrial analogues to determine the most suitable analytical conditions. For that purpose, total chemistry, electron microprobe analyses, flame absorption spectrometry and mass spectrometry have been performed in order to qualify stoichiometry, mineralogy, K concentration and Ar content from a collection of old terrestrial rocks. These analyses coupled with those published have helped to select 14 mineral phases (e.g. feldspars) showing a large range of K content (0.15 - 11%). The objective is to calibrate the LIBS on different geological material with Mars-like %K values ( 0.4%), and assess the detection limit of the LIBS with extreme %K values. All these mineral phases display a K-Ar age older than 260 Ma. Hence, the content of radiogenic Ar atoms per gram is within the range of Martian samples (on the order of 1 Ga for 0.4 %K). Furthermore, the ablated mass is estimated by measurement of Ar extracted from an analogue mineral of known amount of radiogenic Ar content per gram. This quantification is then compared with the mass estimated from the volume measured by profilometry technique. Finally, it provides a well

  18. Predicting the stability of horizontal wells and multi-laterals - the role of in situ stress and rock properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moos, A.; Peska, P. [GeoMechanics International (United States); Zoback, M. D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    A new suite of software tools, developed to study wellbore stability in a wide variety of geologic environments is introduced as means by which to accurately predict optimally-stable wellbore trajectories from knowledge of the stress tensor. In step one of the process stress, is determined from observations of failure in existing wells; in step two, this knowledge is applied to predict the stability of proposed wells while drilling, as well as later during production. Three case studies are presented to illustrate use of this approach. The examples concentrate on issues related to the stability of highly inclined wells, but the approach can be used to determine the state of stress for other purposes as well. 21 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Advanced techniques for the analysis of crisis stability, deterrence, and latency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-12-01

    Studies on crisis stability, deterrence, and latency are presented in chronological order, which also reflects their logical order of development, captures the main features of stability analysis; relates first strike, crisis, and arms control stability as seen from US and Russian perspective; and addresses questions such as whether uncertainty in damage preference or defense deployment can be destabilizing. It illustrates the problems with alternative metrics, latency and reconstitution, and deep unilateral and proportional force reductions.

  20. Biodegradable surfactant stabilized nanoscale zero-valent iron for in situ treatment of vinyl chloride and 1,2-dichloroethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Yu-Ting; Wu, Shian-chee; Yang, Shi-Wei; Che, Choi-Hong; Lien, Hsing-Lung; Huang, De-Huang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Biodegradable surfactant stabilized nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) is tested. ► Vinyl chloride and 1,2-dichloroethane are remediated by NZVI in the field. ► Multiple functions of biodegradable surfactants are confirmed. ► Biodegradable surfactants stabilize NZVI and facilitate the bioremediation. ► NZVI creates reducing conditions beneficial to an anaerobic bioremediation. - Abstract: Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) stabilized with dispersants is a promising technology for the remediation of contaminated groundwater. In this study, we demonstrated the use of biodegradable surfactant stabilized NZVI slurry for successful treatment of vinyl chloride (VC) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) in a contaminated site in Taiwan. The biodegradable surfactant stabilized NZVI was coated with palladium and synthesized on-site. From monitoring the iron concentration breakthrough and distribution, it was found that the stabilized NZVI is capable of transporting in the aquifer at the test plot (200 m 2 ). VC was effectively degraded by NZVI while the 1,2-DCA degradation was relatively sluggish during the 3-month field test. Nevertheless, as 1,2-DCA is known to resist abiotic reduction by NZVI, the observation of 1,2-DCA degradation and hydrocarbon production suggested a bioremediation took place. ORP and pH results revealed that a reducing condition was achieved at the testing area facilitating the biodegradation of chlorinated organic hydrocarbons. The bioremediation may be attributed to the production of hydrogen gas as electron donor from the corrosion of NZVI in the presence of water or the added biodegradable surfactant serving as the carbon source as well as electron donor to stimulate microbial growth.

  1. Advanced techniques for the analysis of crisis stability, deterrence, and latency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The principal results of studies on crisis stability, deterrence, and latency are presented in their order of development. They capture the main features of stability analysis; relate first strike, crisis, and arms control stability as seen from US and Russian perspective; and address whether different metrics, uncertain damage preferences, or the deployment of defenses can be destabilizing. The report explores differences between unilateral and proportional force reductions in the region of deep reductions where concern shifts from stability to latency.

  2. Ultraviolet electroluminescence from nitrogen-doped ZnO-based heterojuntion light-emitting diodes prepared by remote plasma in situ atomic layer-doping technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Jui-Fen; Liao, Hua-Yang; Yu, Sheng-Fu; Lin, Ray-Ming; Shiojiri, Makoto; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2013-01-23

    Remote plasma in situ atomic layer doping technique was applied to prepare an n-type nitrogen-doped ZnO (n-ZnO:N) layer upon p-type magnesium-doped GaN (p-GaN:Mg) to fabricate the n-ZnO:N/p-GaN:Mg heterojuntion light-emitting diodes. The room-temperature electroluminescence exhibits a dominant ultraviolet peak at λ ≈ 370 nm from ZnO band-edge emission and suppressed luminescence from GaN, as a result of the decrease in electron concentration in ZnO and reduced electron injection from n-ZnO:N to p-GaN:Mg because of the nitrogen incorporation. The result indicates that the in situ atomic layer doping technique is an effective approach to tailoring the electrical properties of materials in device applications.

  3. The in situ side-to-side bypass technique: a comprehensive review of the technical characteristics, current anastomosis approaches and surgical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long; Cai, Li; Qian, Hai; Lawton, Michael T; Shi, Xiang'en

    2018-05-02

    In situ side-to-side (STS) revascularization is an intracranial-intracranial (IC-IC) bypass technique that is increasingly used to treat complex aneurysms and cerebral ischemia. This sophisticated technique involves connecting two proximal parallel vessels to create an artificial conduit for blood flow. This study aims to provide a detailed description of the configuration of the STS bypass technique and extensive information regarding its technical characteristics, current anastomosis approaches and surgical significance. A literature search was performed using the PubMed, Medline, ScienceDirect, Embase, Wiley Online Library, Cambridge Journals, SAGE Journals, Oxford Journals, Research Gate, and Google Scholar databases. The terms "intracranial-intracranial bypass", "in situ bypass", "communicating bypass" and "STS anastomosis" were searched to identify pertinent articles. Articles involving in situ STS anastomosis combined with other bypass methods were excluded. Computer tablet-drawn illustrations of this technique are provided to enhance comprehension. In total, seventy articles that met our search and inclusion criteria were identified. Overall, the radiographical and clinical outcomes of one-hundred and thirty-two (125 aneurysm and 7 cerebral ischemia) patients who underwent in situ STS revascularization were analyzed. IC-IC bypass in the STS fashion can be a safe and effective strategy for the management of complex intracranial aneurysms and cerebral ischemia and is particularly attractive in rescue, anticipated and troubleshooting cases. Despite its extreme rarity, a de novo aneurysm may be observed following STS anastomosis; thus, long-term follow-up is mandatory. Vascular neurosurgeons should consider including this procedure in their treatment armamentarium. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. In situ investigation of dye adsorption on TiO2 films using a quartz crystal microbalance with a dissipation technique

    KAUST Repository

    Harms, Hauke A.

    2012-01-01

    Dye adsorption plays a crucial role in dye-sensitized solar cells. Herein, we demonstrate an in situ liquid-phase analytical technique to quantify in real time adsorption of dye and coadsorbates on flat and mesoporous TiO 2 films. For the first time, a molar ratio of co-adsorbed Y123 and chenodeoxycholic acid has been measured. © 2012 the Owner Societies.

  5. Structure and stability of human hemoglobin microparticles prepared with a double emulsion technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedrati, N; Bonneaux, F; Labrude, P; Maincent, P

    1997-09-01

    Hemoglobin solutions can be used as blood substitutes but they present some disadvantages often due to their rapid removal from the bloodstream after injection. A possible way of overcoming this problem is to trap hemoglobin inside particles. This study deals with the preparation, structure and stability of poly(lactic acid) and ethylcellulose microparticles containing human hemoglobin obtained with a double emulsion technique. We investigated the manufacturing process of these particles in order to increase the encapsulation ratio of hemoglobin. For this purpose, some parameters involved in the procedure were optimized, such as hemoglobin concentration and duration of stirring: hemoglobin loading increases with its concentration in the preparation and well-defined stirring time avoids a leakage of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin concentration, surfactant concentration i.e. poly(vinylic alcohol), amounts of polymer and solvent (methylene chloride), duration and speed of stirring. The microparticles were prepared with satisfactory yields (60 to 73%). They were spherical and their mean size was lower than 200 microns. The functional properties of entrapped hemoglobin were studied. The encapsulation did not alter hemoglobin and the oxygen affinity of the hemoglobin remained unmodified (P50 about 13.9 mm Hg in a Bis-Tris buffer pH 7.4 at 37 degrees C). Moreover, only low levels of methemoglobin could be detected (less than 3%). Besides, about 90% of encapsulated hemoglobin could be released from microparticles, with a speed related to the internal structure of the particles. The prepared microparticles were stored during one month at +4 degrees C. No degradation of the particle structure occurred and the functional properties of hemoglobin were preserved. These particles could provide a potential source of oxygen in the field of biotechnologies but any application for a transfusional purpose would first require a drastic reduction in particle size.

  6. Detection of distribution of avian influenza H5N1 virus by immunohistochemistry, chromogenic in situ hybridization and real-time PCR techniques in experimentally infected chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamnanpood, Chanpen; Sanguansermsri, Donruedee; Pongcharoen, Sutatip; Sanguansermsri, Phanchana

    2011-03-01

    Ten specific pathogen free (SPF) chickens were inoculated intranasally with avian influenza virus subtype H5N1. Evaluation revealed distribution of the virus in twelve organs: liver, intestine, bursa, lung, trachea, thymus, heart, pancreas, brain, spleen, kidney, and esophagus. Immunohistochemistry (IHC), chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH), and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were developed and compared for detection of the virus from the organs. The distribution of avian influenza H5N1 in chickens varied by animal and detecting technique. The heart, kidneys, intestines, lungs, and pancreas were positive with all three techniques, while the others varied by techique. The three techniques can be used to detect avian influenza effectively, but the pros and cons of each technique need to be determined. The decision of which technique to use depends on the objective of the examination, budget, type and quality of samples, laboratory facilities and technician skills.

  7. A new contact electric resistance technique for in-situ measurement of the electric resistance of surface films on metals in electrolytes at high temperatures and pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saario, T.; Marichev, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    Surface films play a major role in corrosion assisted cracking. A new Contact Electric Resistance (CER) method has been recently developed for in situ measurement of the electric resistance of surface films. The method has been upgraded for high temperature high pressure application. The technique can be used for any electrically conductive material in any environment including liquid, gas or vacuum. The technique has been used to determine in situ the electric resistance of films on metals during adsorption of water and anions, formation and destruction of oxides and hydrides, electroplating of metals and to study the electric resistance of films on semiconductors. The resolution of the CER technique is 10 -9 Ω, which corresponds to about 0.03 monolayers of deposited copper during electrochemical deposition Cu/Cu 2+ . Electric resistance data can be measured with a frequency of the order of one hertz, which enables one to follow in situ the kinetics of surface film related processes. The kinetics of these processes and their dependence on the environment, temperature, pH and electrochemical potential can be investigated

  8. Polarization switching detection method using a ferroelectric liquid crystal for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock frequency stabilization techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzik, Grzegorz; Rzepka, Janusz; Abramski, Krzysztof M

    2015-04-01

    We present a concept of the polarization switching detection method implemented for frequency-stabilized lasers, called the polarization switching dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (PSDAVLL) technique. It is a combination of the well-known dichroic atomic vapor laser lock method for laser frequency stabilization with a synchronous detection system based on the surface-stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal (SSFLC).The SSFLC is a polarization switch and quarter wave-plate component. This technique provides a 9.6 dB better dynamic range ratio (DNR) than the well-known two-photodiode detection configuration known as the balanced polarimeter. This paper describes the proposed method used practically in the VCSEL laser frequency stabilization system. The applied PSDAVLL method has allowed us to obtain a frequency stability of 2.7×10⁻⁹ and a reproducibility of 1.2×10⁻⁸, with a DNR of detected signals of around 81 dB. It has been shown that PSDAVLL might be successfully used as a method for spectra-stable laser sources.

  9. Microstructure evolution, thermal stability and fractal behavior of water vapor flow assisted in situ growth poly(vinylcarbazole)-titania quantum dots nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombrú, Dominique; Romero, Mariano; Faccio, Ricardo; Mombrú, Alvaro W.

    2017-12-01

    Here, we report a novel strategy for the preparation of TiO2 quantum dots fillers prepared from alkoxide precursor via in situ water vapor flow diffusion into poly(N-vinylcarbazole) host. A detailed characterization by means of infrared and Raman spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, small angle X-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry is reported. The growth mechanism of both crystallites and particles was mostly governed by the classical coarsening reaction limited growth and the polymer host showed no detectable chemical modifications at the interface or active participation in the growing process. The main relevance of our strategy respect to the typical sol-gel growth in solution is the possibility of the interruption of the reaction by simple stopping the water vapor flow diffusion into the polymer host thus achieving good control in the nanoparticles size. The thermal stability and fractal behavior of our nanocomposites were also studied by differential scanning calorimetry and in situ small angle X-ray scattering versus temperature. Strong correlations between modifications in the fractal behavior and glass transition or fusion processes were observed for these nanocomposites.

  10. In Situ Studies of Fe4+ Stability in β-Li3Fe2(PO4)3 Cathodes for Li Ion Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ane Sælland; Johnsen, Rune E.; Norby, Poul

    2015-01-01

    In commercial Fe-based batteries the Fe2+/Fe3+ oxidation states are used, however by also utilizing the Fe4+ oxidation state, intercalation of up to two Li ions per Fe ion could be possible. In this study, we investigate whether Fe4+ can be formed and stabilized in β-Li3Fe2(PO4)3. The work includes...... of Fe4+ formation. Oxidation of the organic electrolyte is inevitable at 4.5 V but this alone cannot explain the volume change. Instead, a reversible oxygen redox process (O2− → O−) could possibly explain and charge compensate for the reversible extraction of lithium ions from β-Li3Fe2(PO4)3....... in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction studies (XRPD) during charging of β-Li3Fe2(PO4)3 up to 5.0 V vs. Li/Li+. A novel capillary-based micro battery cell for in situ XRPD has been designed for this. During charge, a plateau at 4.5 V was found and a small contraction in volume was observed...

  11. Understanding the Thermal Stability of Palladium-Platinum Core-Shell Nanocrystals by In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vara, Madeline; Roling, Luke T; Wang, Xue; Elnabawy, Ahmed O; Hood, Zachary D; Chi, Miaofang; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2017-05-23

    Core-shell nanocrystals offer many advantages for heterogeneous catalysis, including precise control over both the surface structure and composition, as well as reduction in loading for rare and costly metals. Although many catalytic processes are operated at elevated temperatures, the adverse impacts of heating on the shape and structure of core-shell nanocrystals are yet to be understood. In this work, we used ex situ heating experiments to demonstrate that Pd@Pt 4L core-shell nanoscale cubes and octahedra are promising for catalytic applications at temperatures up to 400 °C. We also used in situ transmission electron microscopy to monitor the thermal stability of the core-shell nanocrystals in real time. Our results demonstrate a facet dependence for the thermal stability in terms of shape and composition. Specifically, the cubes enclosed by {100} facets readily deform shape at a temperature 300 °C lower than that of the octahedral counterparts enclosed by {111} facets. A reversed trend is observed for composition, as alloying between the Pd core and the Pt shell of an octahedron occurs at a temperature 200 °C lower than that for the cubic counterpart. Density functional theory calculations provide atomic-level explanations for the experimentally observed behaviors, demonstrating that the barriers for edge reconstruction determine the relative ease of shape deformation for cubes compared to octahedra. The opposite trend for alloying of the core-shell structure can be attributed to a higher propensity for subsurface Pt vacancy formation in octahedra than in cubes.

  12. Determination of stability constants of iron(III and chromium(III-nitrilotriacetate-methyl cysteine mixed complexes by electrophoretic technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brij Bhushan Tewari

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The stability constants of Fe(III and Cr(III with methyl cysteine and nitrilotriacetate (NTA were determined by paper electrophoretic technique. Beside binary ternary complexes have also been studied, in which nitrilotriacetate and methyl cysteine acts as primary and secondary ligand, respectively. The stability constants of mixed ligand complexes metal (M-nitrilotriacetate-methyl cysteine have been found to be 5.72 plus or minus 0.09 and 5.54 plus or minus 0.11 (log K values for Fe(III and Cr(III complexes, respectively, at 35 oC and ionic strength 0.1 M.

  13. Report of the first research co-ordination meeting under co-ordinated research project on 'In situ applications of XRF techniques'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence is a well-established analytical technique widely used in industrial and research applications for materials characterisation. However, a relatively recent development has been the availability of portable instrumentation, which can be used for both the direct in situ non-destructive analysis of samples, and also is readily transportable to field sites for use in a 'mobile laboratory' style of operation. In situ analyses using the XRF technique can make an essential contribution to a wide range of projects, including: - Analysis of soils, particularly in the assessment of agricultural land and contaminated land - Sorting scrap metal alloys and plastics to increase the value of recyclable materials - Geochemical mapping and exploration to locate mineralisation deposits - Environmental monitoring related to air pollution studies and contamination of the work - The on-line control of industrial processes for the production of raw materials - Archaeological studies and the classification of artefacts, the restoration of sculptures, paintings and other objects of cultural heritage. - In situ geochemical studies on Mars, including the 1997 NASA Pathfinder mission and the forthcoming European Space Agency Mars Express mission, which includes the In these applications, the major advantages of field-portable X-ray fluorescence (FPXRF) spectrometry include: on-site immediate availability of analytical results, non-destructive analysis, a multielement capability, speed of operation and access to valuable/unique samples that otherwise would be unavailable for chemical analysis. The CRP on 'In situ applications of XRF techniques' is one element of the project on Nuclear Instruments for Specific Applications the major objective of which is to assist Member States in the development of nuclear instruments and software for special applications, such as the characterisation of materials. An overall objective of this CRP is to assist laboratories in Member States

  14. In situ study of Li-ions diffusion and deformation in Li-rich cathode materials by using scanning probe microscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Kaiyang; Li, Tao; Tian, Tian

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) based techniques, namely, conductive-AFM, electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) and AM-FM (amplitude modulation-frequency modulation) techniques, are used to in situ characterize the changes in topography, conductivity and elastic properties of Li-rich layered oxide cathode (Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2) materials, in the form of nanoparticles, when subject to the external electric field. Nanoparticles are the basic building blocks for composite cathode in a Li-ion rechargeable battery. Characterization of the structure and electrochemical properties of the nanoparticles is very important to understand the performance and reliability of the battery materials and devices. In this study, the conductivity, deformation and mechanical properties of the Li-rich oxide nanoparticles under different polarities of biases are studied using the above-mentioned SPM techniques. This information can be correlated with the Li+-ion diffusion and migration in the particles under external electrical field. The results also confirm that the SPM techniques are ideal tools to study the changes in various properties of electrode materials at nano- to micro-scales during or after the ‘simulated’ battery operation conditions. These techniques can also be used to in situ characterize the electrochemical performances of other energy storage materials, especially in the form of the nanoparticles.

  15. Modeling and Stability Assessment of Single-Phase Grid Synchronization Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golestan, Saeed; Guerrero, Josep M.; Vasquez, Juan

    2018-01-01

    (GSTs) is of vital importance. This task is most often based on obtaining a linear time-invariant (LTI) model for the GST and applying standard stability tests to it. Another option is modeling and dynamics/stability assessment of GSTs in the linear time-periodic (LTP) framework, which has received...... a very little attention. In this letter, the procedure of deriving the LTP model for single-phase GSTs is first demonstrated. The accuracy of the LTP model in predicting the GST dynamic behavior and stability is then evaluated and compared with that of the LTI one. Two well-known single-phase GSTs, i...

  16. ANALYSIS OF MONTE CARLO SIMULATION SAMPLING TECHNIQUES ON SMALL SIGNAL STABILITY OF WIND GENERATOR- CONNECTED POWER SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TEMITOPE RAPHAEL AYODELE

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo simulation using Simple Random Sampling (SRS technique is popularly known for its ability to handle complex uncertainty problems. However, to produce a reasonable result, it requires huge sample size. This makes it to be computationally expensive, time consuming and unfit for online power system applications. In this article, the performance of Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS technique is explored and compared with SRS in term of accuracy, robustness and speed for small signal stability application in a wind generator-connected power system. The analysis is performed using probabilistic techniques via eigenvalue analysis on two standard networks (Single Machine Infinite Bus and IEEE 16–machine 68 bus test system. The accuracy of the two sampling techniques is determined by comparing their different sample sizes with the IDEAL (conventional. The robustness is determined based on a significant variance reduction when the experiment is repeated 100 times with different sample sizes using the two sampling techniques in turn. Some of the results show that sample sizes generated from LHS for small signal stability application produces the same result as that of the IDEAL values starting from 100 sample size. This shows that about 100 sample size of random variable generated using LHS method is good enough to produce reasonable results for practical purpose in small signal stability application. It is also revealed that LHS has the least variance when the experiment is repeated 100 times compared to SRS techniques. This signifies the robustness of LHS over that of SRS techniques. 100 sample size of LHS produces the same result as that of the conventional method consisting of 50000 sample size. The reduced sample size required by LHS gives it computational speed advantage (about six times over the conventional method.

  17. In situ, real-time thickness measurement techniques for bath-deposited CdS thin films on Cu(In,Ga)Se2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, Jonathan R.; Noufi, Rommel

    2012-01-01

    A technique has been developed that can measure the thickness of a 30–70 nm thin film of cadmium sulfide on a Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 substrate, in real time, as it grows in a chemical bath. The technique does not damage the film, and can be used to monitor batch depositions and roll-to-roll depositions with equal accuracy. The technique is based on reflectance spectroscopy through the chemical bath. - Highlights: ► Reflection spectra were collected during the chemical bath deposition of CdS. ► Two algorithms were generated to extract film thickness from each spectrum. ► Two conventional techniques were used to independently verify CdS film thicknesses. ► The accuracies of the algorithms are within 7% of the actual thicknesses. ► The algorithms offer in situ, real time thicknesses through the chemical bath.

  18. Low-temperature technique for thick film resist stabilization and curing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minter, Jason P.; Wong, Selmer S.; Marlowe, Trey; Ross, Matthew F.; Narcy, Mark E.; Livesay, William R.

    1999-06-01

    For a range of thick film photoresist applications, including MeV ion implant processing, thin film head manufacturing, and microelectromechanical systems processing, there is a need for a low-temperature method for resist stabilization and curing. Traditional methods of stabilizing or curing resist films have relied on thermal cycling, which may not be desirable due to device temperature limitations or thermally-induced distortion of the resist features.

  19. Developing a western Siberia reference site for tropospheric water vapour isotopologue observations obtained by different techniques (in situ and remote sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gribanov

    2014-06-01

    water cycle, affected by changes in air mass origin, non-convective and convective processes and continental recycling. Novel remote sensing and in situ measuring techniques have recently offered opportunities for monitoring atmospheric water vapour isotopic composition. Recently developed infrared laser spectrometers allow for continuous in situ measurements of surface water vapour δDv and δ18Ov. So far, very few intercomparisons of measurements conducted using different techniques have been achieved at a given location, due to difficulties intrinsic to the comparison of integrated with local measurements. Nudged simulations conducted with high-resolution isotopically enabled general circulation models (GCMs provide a consistent framework for comparison with the different types of observations. Here, we compare simulations conducted with the ECHAM5-wiso model with two types of water vapour isotopic data obtained during summer 2012 at the forest site of Kourovka, western Siberia: hourly ground-based FTIR total atmospheric columnar δDv amounts, and in situ hourly Picarro δDv measurements. There is an excellent correlation between observed and predicted δDv at surface while the comparison between water column values derived from the model compares well with FTIR estimates.

  20. Effect of annealing on the superconducting and normal state properties of the doped multifilamentary Cu-Nb composite wires prepared by in situ technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubey, S.S.; Dheer, P.N.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of annealing on the superconducting and normal state properties of the Ga-, In-, Ti- and Zr-doped (1 wt%) Cu-Nb composite wires prepared by in situ technique have been investigated in this paper. The wires annealed at 700 C for 10 h and then quenched at room temperature, show a decrease in the superconducting transition temperature, T c , and increase in the transition width, ΔT. Doping of the Cu-Nb wires causes an increase in the normal state resistivity and hence the upper critical field, H C2 . This results in a significant increase of J c . Annealing of these doped samples decreases H C2 and J c . In the case of In- and Ga-doped samples J c shows a marginal improvement at lower field but decreases at higher field. Zr and Ti doping appears to be beneficial for the improved J c in these in situ materials. (orig.)

  1. The radiation stability of glycine in solid CO2 - In situ laboratory measurements with applications to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2015-05-01

    The detection of biologically important, organic molecules on Mars is an important goal that may soon be reached. However, the current small number of organic detections at the martian surface may be due to the harsh UV and radiation conditions there. It seems likely that a successful search will require probing the subsurface of Mars, where penetrating cosmic rays and solar energetic particles dominate the radiation environment, with an influence that weakens with depth. Toward the goal of understanding the survival of organic molecules in cold radiation-rich environments on Mars, we present new kinetics data on the radiolytic destruction of glycine diluted in frozen carbon dioxide. Rate constants were measured in situ with infrared spectroscopy, without additional sample manipulation, for irradiations at 25, 50, and 75 K with 0.8-MeV protons. The resulting half-lives for glycine in CO2-ice are compared to previous results for glycine in H2O-ice and show that glycine in CO2-ice is much less stable in a radiation environment, with destruction rate constants ∼20-40 times higher than glycine in H2O-ice. Extrapolation of these results to conditions in the martian subsurface results in half-lives estimated to be less than 100-200 Myr even at depths of a few meters.

  2. In Situ Formation of AgCo Stabilized on Graphitic Carbon Nitride and Concomitant Hydrolysis of Ammonia Borane to Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Xu, Caili; Ming, Mei; Yang, Yingchun; Xu, Bin; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Yun; Wu, Jie; Fan, Guangyin

    2018-04-26

    The development of highly-efficient heterogeneous supported catalysts for catalytic hydrolysis of ammonia borane to yield hydrogen is of significant importance considering the versatile usages of hydrogen. Herein, we reported the in situ synthesis of AgCo bimetallic nanoparticles supported on g-C₃N₄ and concomitant hydrolysis of ammonia borane for hydrogen evolution at room temperature. The as-synthesized Ag 0.1 Co 0.9 /g-C₃N₄ catalysts displayed the highest turnover frequency (TOF) value of 249.02 mol H₂·(mol Ag ·min) −1 for hydrogen evolution from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane, which was higher than many other reported values. Furthermore, the Ag 0.1 Co 0.9 /g-C₃N₄ catalyst could be recycled during five consecutive runs. The study proves that Ag 0.1 Co 0.9 /g-C₃N₄ is a potential catalytic material toward the hydrolysis of ammonia borane for hydrogen production.

  3. In Situ Formation of AgCo Stabilized on Graphitic Carbon Nitride and Concomitant Hydrolysis of Ammonia Borane to Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of highly-efficient heterogeneous supported catalysts for catalytic hydrolysis of ammonia borane to yield hydrogen is of significant importance considering the versatile usages of hydrogen. Herein, we reported the in situ synthesis of AgCo bimetallic nanoparticles supported on g-C3N4 and concomitant hydrolysis of ammonia borane for hydrogen evolution at room temperature. The as-synthesized Ag0.1Co0.9/g-C3N4 catalysts displayed the highest turnover frequency (TOF value of 249.02 mol H2·(molAg·min−1 for hydrogen evolution from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane, which was higher than many other reported values. Furthermore, the Ag0.1Co0.9/g-C3N4 catalyst could be recycled during five consecutive runs. The study proves that Ag0.1Co0.9/g-C3N4 is a potential catalytic material toward the hydrolysis of ammonia borane for hydrogen production.

  4. In situ growth of hollow gold-silver nanoshells within porous silica offers tunable plasmonic extinctions and enhanced colloidal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chien-Hung; Jamison, Andrew C; Rittikulsittichai, Supparesk; Lee, Tai-Chou; Lee, T Randall

    2014-11-26

    Porous silica-coated hollow gold-silver nanoshells were successfully synthesized utilizing a procedure where the porous silica shell was produced prior to the transformation of the metallic core, providing enhanced control over the structure/composition of the bimetallic hollow core. By varying the reaction time and the precise amount of gold salt solution added to a porous silica-coated silver-core template solution, composite nanoparticles were tailored to reveal a readily tunable surface plasmon resonance that could be centered across the visible and near-IR spectral regions (∼445-800 nm). Characterization by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the synthetic methodology afforded particles having uniform composition, size, and shape. The optical properties were evaluated by absorption/extinction spectroscopy. The stability of colloidal solutions of our composite nanoparticles as a function of pH was also investigated, revealing that the nanoshells remain intact over a wide range of conditions (i.e., pH 2-10). The facile tunability, enhanced stability, and relatively small diameter of these composite particles (∼110 nm) makes them promising candidates for use in tumor ablation or as photothermal drug-delivery agents.

  5. A technique to stabilize record bases for Gothic arch tracings in patients with implant-retained complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raigrodski, A J; Sadan, A; Carruth, P L

    1998-12-01

    Clinicians have long expressed concern about the accuracy of the Gothic arch tracing for recording centric relation in edentulous patients. With the use of dental implants to assist in retaining complete dentures, the problem of inaccurate recordings, made for patients without natural teeth, can be significantly reduced. This article presents a technique that uses healing abutments to stabilize the record bases so that an accurate Gothic arch tracing can be made.

  6. Orbital stability analysis in biomechanics: a systematic review of a nonlinear technique to detect instability of motor tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, F; Bisi, M C; Stagni, R

    2013-01-01

    Falls represent a heavy economic and clinical burden on society. The identification of individual chronic characteristics associated with falling is of fundamental importance for the clinicians; in particular, the stability of daily motor tasks is one of the main factors that the clinicians look for during assessment procedures. Various methods for the assessment of stability in human movement are present in literature, and methods coming from stability analysis of nonlinear dynamic systems applied to biomechanics recently showed promise. One of these techniques is orbital stability analysis via Floquet multipliers. This method allows to measure orbital stability of periodic nonlinear dynamic systems and it seems a promising approach for the definition of a reliable motor stability index, taking into account for the whole task cycle dynamics. Despite the premises, its use in the assessment of fall risk has been deemed controversial. The aim of this systematic review was therefore to provide a critical evaluation of the literature on the topic of applications of orbital stability analysis in biomechanics, with particular focus to methodologic aspects. Four electronic databases have been searched for articles relative to the topic; 23 articles were selected for review. Quality of the studies present in literature has been assessed with a customised quality assessment tool. Overall quality of the literature in the field was found to be high. The most critical aspect was found to be the lack of uniformity in the implementation of the analysis to biomechanical time series, particularly in the choice of state space and number of cycles to include in the analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. High sensitive diagnostic technique for virus gene using radioisotope. Development of PCR in situ hybridization and its application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, Takuya; Sada, Tetsutaro; Terai, Masanori; Sato, Yuko; Kurata, Takeshi [National Inst. of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo (Japan); Yamaguchi, Kazuyoshi; Yanagisawa, Akio; Sakai, Yuzo

    1998-02-01

    An animal model, experimentally induced squamous cell carcinoma was produced in hamster mucosa to establish a carcinogenic system inducible by interaction of a virus and chemical(s). Human hydatid mole and cholioepithelioma were chosen as the target subjects. Several tumor cells and host cells were isolated under microscopy and DNA was extracted from these cells to indentify the respective origins (maternal, paternal or host origin). The base sequence of HLADRB region was analyzed by PCR using synthetic primer and the tissue localization was examined by PCR in situ hybridization. A PCR product of 82 bp was found in 15 of 17 samples and there were 2 samples in which the product was not detectable with the constructed primer and 6 samples were negative. While significant differences were not observed by in situ hybridization compared with the negative control. (M.N.)

  8. High sensitive diagnostic technique for virus gene using radioisotope. Development of PCR in situ hybridization and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Takuya; Sada, Tetsutaro; Terai, Masanori; Sato, Yuko; Kurata, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Kazuyoshi; Yanagisawa, Akio; Sakai, Yuzo

    1998-01-01

    An animal model, experimentally induced squamous cell carcinoma was produced in hamster mucosa to establish a carcinogenic system inducible by interaction of a virus and chemical(s). Human hydatid mole and cholioepithelioma were chosen as the target subjects. Several tumor cells and host cells were isolated under microscopy and DNA was extracted from these cells to indentify the respective origins (maternal, paternal or host origin). The base sequence of HLADRB region was analyzed by PCR using synthetic primer and the tissue localization was examined by PCR in situ hybridization. A PCR product of 82 bp was found in 15 of 17 samples and there were 2 samples in which the product was not detectable with the constructed primer and 6 samples were negative. While significant differences were not observed by in situ hybridization compared with the negative control. (M.N.)

  9. Modelling the Small Throw Fault Effect on the Stability of a Mining Roadway and Its Verification by In Situ Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małkowski Piotr

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The small throw fault zones cause serious problems for mining engineers. The knowledge about the range of fractured zone around the roadway and about roadway’s contour deformations helps a lot with the right support design or its reinforcement. The paper presents the results of numerical analysis of the effect of a small throw fault zone on the convergence of the mining roadway and the extent of the fracturing induced around the roadway. The computations were performed on a dozen physical models featuring various parameters of rock mass and support for the purpose to select the settings that reflects most suitably the behavior of tectonically disturbed and undisturbed rocks around the roadway. Finally, the results of the calculations were verified by comparing them with in situ convergence measurements carried out in the maingate D-2 in the “Borynia-Zofiówka-Jastrzębie” coal mine. Based on the results of measurements it may be concluded that the rock mass displacements around a roadway section within a fault zone during a year were four times in average greater than in the section tectonically unaffected. The results of numerical calculations show that extent of the yielding zone in the roof reaches two times the throw of the fault, in the floor 3 times the throw, and horizontally approx. 1.5 to 1.8 times the width of modelled fault zone. Only a few elasto-plastic models or models with joints between the rock beds can be recommended for predicting the performance of a roadway which is within a fault zone. It is possible, using these models, to design the roadway support of sufficient load bearing capacity at the tectonically disturbed section.

  10. Liquid Salt as Green Solvent: A Novel Eco-Friendly Technique to Enhance Solubility and Stability of Poorly Soluble Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anant A.

    As a result of tremendous efforts in past few decades, various techniques have been developed in order to resolve solubility issues associated with class II and IV drugs, However, majority of these techniques offer benefits associated with certain drawbacks; majorly including low drug loading, physical instability on storage and excessive use of environmentally challenging organic solvents. Hence, current effort was to develop an eco-friendly technique using liquid salt as green solvent, which can offer improvement in dissolution while maintaining long term stability. The liquid salt formulations (LSF) of poorly soluble model drugs ibuprofen, gemfibrozil and indomethacin were developed using 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate (EMIM ES) as a non-toxic and environmentally friendly alternate to organic solvents. Liquid medications containing clear solutions of drug, EMIM ES and polysorbate 20, were adsorbed onto porous carrier Neusilin US2 to form free flowing powder. The LSF demonstrated greater rate and extent of dissolution compared to crystalline drugs. The dissolution data revealed that more than 80% drug release from LSF within 20 mins compared to less than 18% release from pure drugs. As high as 70% w/w liquid loading was achieved while maintaining good flowability and compressibility. In addition, the LSF samples exposed to high temperature and high humidity i.e. 40°C/80% RH for 8 weeks, demonstrated excellent physical stability without any signs of precipitation or crystallization. As most desirable form of administration is tablet, the developed liquid salt formulations were transformed into tablets using design of experiment approach by Design Expert Software. The tablet formulation composition and critical parameter were optimized using Box-Behnken Design. This innovative liquid salt formulation technique offered improvement in dissolution rate and extent as well as contributed to excellent physical stability on storage. Moreover, this formulation

  11. The application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technique for studying the microbial communities in intestinal tissues of white shrimp (Penaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supamattaya, K.

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in situ hybridization technique is very useful for the evaluation of microbial communities in various environments. It is possible to apply this technique to study the intestinal microflora in white shrimp (Penaeus vannamei. Different fixatives and storage temperature were tested in this technique. It was found that fixation with 10% buffered formalin for 12 hours and changed to 70% ethanol shown positive results when compared to the fixation with Davidson's fixative or RF fixative. The best signaling was obtainedfrom the samples which were stored in -20ºC. By using the DNA probe targeted to the Eubacteria domain (EUB338 probe, 5′-GCT GCC TCC CGT AGG AGT-3′ labeled with fluorescein as a hybridizing probe, it was found that most intestinal microflora were aggregated with the intestinal contents, or dispersed in the lumen. There was not evidence of the attachment of the microflora with the intestinal epithelium in this study.

  12. Stabilization techniques for reactive aggregate in soil-cement base course : technical summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this research are 1) to identify the mineralogical properties of soil-cement bases which have heaved or can potentially heave, 2) to simulate expansion of cement-stabilized soil in the laboratory, 3) to correlate expansion with the ...

  13. Consideration of the restoring plan in subsidence prone areas through the development of ground stability assessment techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Im-Ho; Baek, Sang-Ho [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (KR)] (and others)

    1999-12-01

    This report consists of 2 subjects. (1) Consideration of the restoring plan in subsidence prone areas through the development of ground stability assessment techniques : The number of mines at rest as well as closed have abruptly increased since the 1980's, which has caused subsidence problems around the mined areas. To protect such places from damage due to subsidence, it is necessary to develop the assessment techniques of ground stability and make restoration plan. To achieve this goal, the site investigation should have been conducted before the subsidence events occurred, but ground behaviors around the places where a vertical movement is expected and recognised in advance before the occurrence of the subsidence events. In this study ground stability analysis for the area surrounding the Moo-Geuk Mine, located close to a city, was conducted and the measurements were recorded. The objectives of the present study include, the development of a risk assessment technique for the subsidence using GIS tool, an evaluation of the numerical methods related to the site investigation and the ground stability analysis, the application of the numerical tools to the present problems. (2) Integration of coal mine data and use of remote sensing in investigation of coal mine area : This study attempt to integrate the previous geological and mining data to avoid confusions often occurred when accessing source data. And the investigation of underground mining place using remote sensing method is the other effort to assure the geographic locations of mining places as well as to find out unknown mining place. The sample region for examining the remote sensing method is the Chungnam coal field, which locates in the middle western part of South Korea. Detailed investigation was held on the Seongju area, locating north eastern part of the coal field. (author). 54 refs., tabs., figs.

  14. Structural study on Ni nanowires in an anodic alumina membrane by using in situ heating extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Quan; Chen Xing; Chen Zhongjun; Wang Wei; Mo Guang; Wu Zhonghua; Zhang Junxi; Zhang Lide; Pan Wei

    2008-01-01

    Polycrystalline Ni nanowires have been prepared by electrochemical deposition in an anodic alumina membrane template with a nanopore size of about 60 nm. In situ heating extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction techniques are used to probe the atomic structures. The nanowires are identified as being mixtures of nanocrystallites and amorphous phase. The nanocrystallites have the same thermal expansion coefficient, of 1.7 x 10 -5 K -1 , as Ni bulk; however, the amorphous phase has a much larger thermal expansion coefficient of 3.5 x 10 -5 K -1 . Details of the Ni nanowire structures are discussed in this paper

  15. In-situ fluorimetry: A powerful non-invasive diagnostic technique for natural dyes used in artefacts. Part II. Identification of orcein and indigo in Renaissance tapestries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, C.; Miliani, C.; Romani, A.; Santamaria, U.; Morresi, F.; Mlynarska, K.; Favaro, G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, three Renaissance tapestries depicting scenes painted by Raffaello Sanzio, conserved at the Vatican Museum, were investigated using in-situ UV-Visible fluorimetric measurements. The results show that this technique is suitable for the detection of natural organic colorants used for dyeing the threads woven in these tapestries. The emission signals detected on red-purple colours were assigned to the colorant orcein and those on different nuances of blue and green colours to indigo by comparison with data from reference laboratory samples. The assignments were supported by chromatographic experiments carried out on threads taken from the back side of the tapestry in the same points analysed by spectrofluorimentry.

  16. High impact of in situ dextran coating on biocompatibility, stability and magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaterabadi, Zhila; Nabiyouni, Gholamreza; Soleymani, Meysam

    2017-06-01

    Biocompatible ferrofluids based on dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles were fabricated by conventional co-precipitation method. The experimental results show that the presence of dextran in reaction medium not only causes to the appearance of superparamagnetic behavior but also results in significant suppression in saturation magnetization of dextran coated samples. These results can be attributed to size reduction originated from the role of dextran as a surfactant. Moreover, weight ratio of dextran to magnetic nanoparticles has a remarkable influence on size and magnetic properties of nanoparticles, so that the sample prepared with a higher weight ratio of dextran to nanoparticles has the smaller size and saturation magnetization compare with the other samples. In addition, the ferrofluids containing such nanoparticles have an excellent stability at physiological pH for several months. Furthermore, the biocompatibility studies reveal that surface modification of nanoparticles by dextran dramatically decreases the cytotoxicity of bare nanoparticles and consequently improves their potential application for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Study on development of evaluation technique of in-situ tracer test in Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory project (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Hideharu; Amano, Kenji; Maekawa, Keisuke; Kunimaru, Takanori; Naemura, Yumi; Ijiri, Yuji; Motoshima, Takayuki; Suzuki, Shunichi; Teshima, Kazufumi

    2013-06-01

    In the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory Project, in-situ tracer tests are valuable and important as the investigations to obtain the mass transportation data of fractures in hostrock. However, it is difficult that the in-situ tests are executed under various conditions due to long test period and the tests results are evaluated about permeable heterogeneity in a fracture and/or scale effects. In this study, a number of tracer tests are simulated in a fictitious single plate fracture generated on computer. And the transport parameters are identified by fitting one- and two-dimensional models to the breakthrough curves obtained from the simulations in order to investigate the applicability of these models to the evaluation of in-situ tracer test. As a result, one-dimensional model yields larger longitudinal dispersion length than two-dimensional model in the both cases of homogeneous and heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields of the fictitious fracture. This is because that the effect of transverse dispersion has to be included in the longitudinal dispersion length parameter in the one-dimensional model. It is also found that the larger dipole ratio and the larger natural groundwater flow crossing the flow generated between two boreholes make the identified longitudinal dispersion length larger. And, the longitudinal dispersion length identified from a tracer test is smaller and/or larger than the macroscopic longitudinal dispersion length identified from whole fracture. It is clarified that these are occurred by shorter or longer distance between boreholes compare to the correlation length of geostatistical heterogeneity of fictitious fracture. (author)

  18. Design of a Stability Augmentation System for an Unmanned Helicopter Based on Adaptive Control Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouzhao Sheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The task of control of unmanned helicopters is rather complicated in the presence of parametric uncertainties and measurement noises. This paper presents an adaptive model feedback control algorithm for an unmanned helicopter stability augmentation system. The proposed algorithm can achieve a guaranteed model reference tracking performance and speed up the convergence rates of adjustable parameters, even when the plant parameters vary rapidly. Moreover, the model feedback strategy in the algorithm further contributes to the improvement in the control quality of the stability augmentation system in the case of low signal to noise ratios, mainly because the model feedback path is noise free. The effectiveness and superiority of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated through a series of tests.

  19. Application of stabilization techniques in the dynamic analysis of multibody systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajžman M.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is intended to the discussion of possible methods for the solution of the motion equations of constrained multibody systems. They can be formulated in the form of differential-algebraic equations and their numerical solution brings the problems of constraint violation and numerical stability. Therefore special methods were proposed to handle these problems. Various approaches for the numerical solution of equations are briefly reviewed and the application of the Baumgarte’s stabilization method on testing examples is shown. The paper was motivated by the effort to find the suitable solution methods for the equations of motion in the form of differentialalgebraic equations using the MATLAB standard computational system.

  20. EFFECTS OF VARIOUS STABILIZATION TECHNIQUES ON THE NUTRITIONAL QUALITY AND ANTIOXIDANT POTENTIAL OF BREWER’S RICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIK NOR ADILAH MUHAMAD NORDIN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Brewer’s rice is a nutritionally rich by-product of rice milling industries but remained unutilized due to its high susceptibility to lipid oxidation. Thus, it is desirable to develop certain strategies to stabilize the brewer’s rice for food application. In the present study, the effects of microwave heating, gamma irradiation, and chemical (hydrochloric acid treatments in stabilizing brewer’s rice were investigated. Result showed that microwave-heated brewer’s rice contained lower FFA content as compared with control and irradiation. However, FFA content in brewer’s rice increased significantly (p < 0.05 during storage for all methods, except for hydrochloric acid (HCl treatment. All the stabilizations methods showed non-significant (p < 0.05 effect on protein, fat, and ash content. However, microwave and chemical treatment significantly (p < 0.05 reduced moisture content. All methods showed no significant (p < 0.05 reduction on phenolic contents but significantly (p < 0.05 reduced the γ-oryzanol and α-tocopherol contents. Microwave heating was able to reduce the oxidation of brewer’s rice without affecting other bioactive molecules present in brewer’s rice. Therefore, microwave heating can be considered as the most suitable technique for stabilizing brewer’s rice.

  1. Comparative study of different techniques of composting and their stability evaluation in municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.K.; Khan, R.A.; Nadeem, A.; Hussnain, A.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial differences in the physical and chemical characteristics related to maturity of composted organic matter are strongly influenced by composting methods. For evaluation of compost maturity three locally fabricated composters (aerobic, mixed type, anaerobic) processes were examined at seven days interval up to 91 days by loading MSW along with bulking agent. Gradual changes in physico chemical characteristics (temperature, pH, moisture, CEC, humification) related to stability and maturity of compost were studied and compared. Increase in ammonia nitrogen level due to rise in temperature was maximum in aerobic process. Substantial increase in CEC in aerobic process was earlier which leads to establish the optimal degree of maturity as compared to other processes. FA and HI decrease rapidly as composting progressed. Optimal level in stability and maturity parameters like C:N, HA, DH and HR were attained earlier in aerobic process as compared to mixed type and anaerobic processes due to continuous aeration. The parameters (HR, DH, FA, HA), which indicate the compost stability were correlated among themselves. The parameters defining maturity such as CEC, ammonia nitrate and C:N ratio were also related to above mention parameters. The compost from the aerobic process provided good humus and micro nutrients. Result from this study will assist in method optimization and quality of the compost product. (author)

  2. Maintaining stability of standalone Micro-Grid by employing electrical and mechanical fault ride through techniques upon fixed speed wind generation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamel, Rashad M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper presented two fault ride through techniques for fixed speed wind systems. • The first technique is implemented by inserting a series resistance with the terminals of wind generator. • Second technique is performed by adapting the gear ratio to spill some mechanical power. - Abstract: This study presents two different Fault Ride Through (FRT) techniques to keep and restore stability of Fixed Speed Wind Generation system (FSWGs) installed in standalone Micro-Grid (MG). The first technique is an electrical FRT and is implemented by inserting a series resistance with the terminals of FSWGs during fault to maintain reasonable value of terminal voltage and consequently help stability restoration. The second controller is a mechanical FRT controller and is performed by change the gear ratio of wind generation systems to spill part of extracted mechanical power and consequently improving stability issue. Obtained results proved that each controller able to maintain the stability of FSWGs under the most severe disturbance conditions (400 ms three phase fault at FSWGs terminals). The first controller is faster than the second controller in restoring FSWGs stability. Superior results and performances are obtained when the two FRT techniques are employed simultaneously. Without employing any one of the two FRT techniques, FSWGs is not able to maintain or restore its stability after fault clearing. Consequently, MG will lose one of its micro-sources and cannot keep its stability during the standalone mode, unless load shedding strategy is activated. The two proposed controllers are simple, effective, and economical attractive

  3. In Situ formation of pentafluorophosphate benzimidazole anion stabilizes high-temperature performance of lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradanawati, Sylvia Ayu; Wang, Fu-Ming; Rick, John

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new pentafluorophosphate benzimidazole anion was formed by Lewis acid-base reaction. • This pentafluorophosphate benzimidazole anion is fabricated with the benzimidazole anion and PF 5 . • This pentafluorophosphate benzimidazole anion avoids the ominous side reactions that PF 5 reacts SEI to form LiF and HF at high temperature. • The additional pentafluorophosphate benzimidazole anion formation well maintains the battery performance at 60 °C measurement compares to the electrolyte only with contains the salt, LiPF 6 . - Abstract: Lithium salts play a critical role in initiating electrochemical reactions in Li-ion batteries. Single Li ions dissociate from bulk-salt and associate with carbonates to form a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) during the first charge-discharge of the battery. SEI formation and the chemical stability of salt must both be controlled and optimized to minimize irreversible reactions in SEI formation and to suppress the decomposition of the salt at high temperatures. This study synthesizes a new benzimidazole-based anion in the electrolyte. This anion, pentafluorophosphate benzimidazole, results from a Lewis acid-base reaction between the benzimidazole anion and PF 5 . The new pentafluorophosphate benzimidazole anion inhibits the decomposition of LiPF 6 by inhibiting PF 5 side reactions, which degrade the SEI, and lead to the formation of LiF and HF at high temperatures. In addition, the use of the pentafluorophosphate benzimidazole anion results in the formation of a modified SEI that is able to modify the battery's performance. Cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, as well as charge-discharge and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements have been used to characterize the materials in this study. The formation of the pentafluorophosphate benzimidazole anion in the electrolyte caused a 14% decrease in the activation energy

  4. In patients with extensive subcutaneous emphysema, which technique achieves maximal clinical resolution: infraclavicular incisions, subcutaneous drain insertion or suction on in situ chest drain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Charles H N; Lang, Sommer A; Bilal, Haris; Rammohan, Kandadai S

    2014-06-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: 'In patients with extensive subcutaneous emphysema, which technique achieves maximal clinical resolution: infraclavicular incisions, subcutaneous drain insertion or suction on in situ chest drain?'. Altogether more than 200 papers were found using the reported search, of which 14 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Subcutaneous emphysema is usually a benign, self-limiting condition only requiring conservative management. Interventions are useful in the context of severe patient discomfort, respiratory distress or persistent air leak. In the absence of any comparative study, it is not possible to choose definitively between infraclavicular incisions, drain insertion and increasing suction on an in situ drain as the best method for managing severe subcutaneous emphysema. All the three techniques described have been shown to provide effective relief. Increasing suction on a chest tube already in situ provided rapid relief in patients developing SE following pulmonary resection. A retrospective study showed resolution in 66%, increasing to 98% in those who underwent video-assisted thoracic surgery with identification and closure of the leak. Insertion of a drain into the subcutaneous tissue also provided rapid sustained relief. Several studies aided drainage by using regular compressive massage. Infraclavicular incisions were also shown to provide rapid relief, but were noted to be more invasive and carried the potential for cosmetic defect. No major complications were illustrated. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. In situ and real-time atomic force microscopy studies of the stability of oligothiophene langmuir-blodgett monolayers in liquid

    KAUST Repository

    Yin, Naining

    2014-03-20

    Oligothiophene thin films have been considered as promising material for molecular electronics due to their desirable electronic properties and high structural stability under ambient conditions. To ensure performance in devices the functional structures, such as individual ordered domains, must be stable under practical and operational conditions or environments including exposure to various media. This work investigates the structure of oligothiophene Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films upon exposure to liquid media such as water, ethanol (EtOH), and mixed tetrahydrofuran (THF)/EtOH solutions. The LB films form islands ranging from 500 nm up to 1 μm consisting of densely packed oligothiophene molecules. These islands are surrounded by bare substrate and loosely packed adsorbates. In situ and time-dependent AFM images were acquired to reveal the structural evolution, from which degradation pathways and kinetics are extracted. Degradation of these LB films initiates and propagates from intraisland defect sites, such as cracks and pin holes, whereas the edges of islands remain intact on the surface. The observations appear to be in contrast to the known degradation mechanism among self-assembled monolayers, such as alkanethiols on gold, which initiates and progresses at domain boundaries. Rationale for the observed degradation processes will also be discussed. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  6. Structural stability and self-healing capability of Er2O3 in situ coating on V-4Cr-4Ti in liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Zhenyu; Suzuki, Akihiro; Muroga, Takeo; Nagasaka, Takuya

    2006-01-01

    The in situ Er 2 O 3 insulating coating is under development for the self-cooled Li/V-alloy type fusion blanket. In this study, the structural stability and self-healing capability of the coating are investigated. Since the cracking in the coating was not observed after exposure when Li was removed with a weak lotion (liquid NH 3 ), the cracking observed in the previous studies is not a practical issue in a real blanket. The re-exposure of the coating in pure Li showed that the coating once formed in Li (Er) is thought to be stable in pure Li. Thus, coating has the possibility to be serviced in a Li environment without an Er supply. By prior exposure to Li (Er) at 873 K, the exhaustion of the oxygen storage in V-alloy substrate during exposure at 973 K could be delayed effectively. The self-healing capability of the coating was demonstrated by the examination with the re-exposing cracked coating in Li (Er)

  7. Incorporation of low energy activated nitrogen onto HOPG surface: Chemical states and thermal stability studies by in-situ XPS and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Maneesh; Shasha, Michal; Michaelson, Shaul; Hoffman, Alon

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we report the chemical states analysis of activated nitrogen incorporated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface under well-controlled conditions. Nitrogen incorporation is carried out by two different processes: an indirect RF nitrogen plasma and low energy (1 keV) N2+ implantation. Bonding configuration, concentration and thermal stability of the incorporated nitrogen species by aforesaid processes are systematically compared by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Relatively large concentration of nitrogen is incorporated onto RF nitride HOPG surface (16.2 at.%), compared to N2+ implanted HOPG surface (7.7 at.%). The evolution of N 1s components (N1, N2, N3) with annealing temperature is comprehensively discussed, which indicates that the formation and reorganization of local chemical bonding states are determined by the process of nitridation and not by the prior chemical conditioning (i.e., amorphization or hydrogenation) of the HOPG surface. A combined XPS and Raman spectroscopy studies revealed that N2+ implantation process resulted in a high level of defects to the HOPG surface, which cannot be annealed-out by heat treatment up to 1000 °C. On the other hand, the RF nitrogen plasma process did not produce a high level of surface defects, while incorporating nearly the same amount of stable nitrogen species.

  8. In-situ grown CNTs modified SiO2/C composites as anode with improved cycling stability and rate capability for lithium storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siqi; Zhao, Naiqin; Shi, Chunsheng; Liu, Enzuo; He, Chunnian; He, Fang; Ma, Liying

    2018-03-01

    Silica (SiO2) is regarded as one of the most promising anode materials for lithium ion batteries owing to its high theoretical specific capacity, relatively low operation potentials, abundance, environmental benignity and low cost. However, the low intrinsic electrical conductivity and large volume change of SiO2 during the discharge/charge cycles usually results in poor electrochemical performance. In this work, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) modified SiO2/C composites have been fabricated through an in-situ chemical vapor deposition method. The results show that the electrical conductivity of the SiO2/C/CNTs is visibly enhanced through a robust connection between the CNTs and SiO2/C particles. Compared with the pristine SiO2 and SiO2/C composites, the SiO2/C/CNTs composites display a high initial capacity of 1267.2 mA h g-1. Besides, an excellent cycling stability with the capacity of 315.7 mA h g-1 is achieved after 1000th cycles at a rate of 1 A g-1. The significantly improved electrochemical properties of the SiO2/C/CNTs composites are mainly attributed to the formation of three dimensional CNT networks in the SiO2/C substrate, which can not only shorten the Li-ion diffusion path but also relieve the volume change during the lithium-ion insertion/extraction processes.

  9. In-situ investigation of adsorption of dye and coadsorbates on TiO 2 films using QCM-D, fluorescence and AFM techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Harms, Hauke A.

    2013-09-11

    Simultaneous adsorption of dye molecules and coadsorbates is important for the fabrication of high-efficiency dyesensitized solar cells, but its mechanism is not well understood. Herein, we use a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation technique (QCM-D) to study dynamically and quantitatively the sensitization of TiO2 in situ. We investigate dye loading for a ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complex (Z907), of a triphenylamine-based D-π-A dye (Y123), and of a ullazine sensitizer (JD21), as well as the simultaneous adsorption of the latter two with the coadsorbate chenodeoxycholic acid. By combining the QCM-D technique with fluorescence measurements, we quantify molar ratios between the dye and coadsorbate. Furthermore, we will present first studies using liquid-phase AFM on the adsorbed dye monolayer, thus obtaining complementary microscopic information that may lead to understanding of the adsorption mechanism on the molecular scale. © 2013 SPIE.

  10. Novel implementation of the use of the EPR-in situ technique (Electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation) to identify intergranular corrosion susceptability of stainless steels exposed to high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, N.; Pineda, Y.; Vera, E.; Sepulveda, H.; Heyn, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (18 % Cr), are often used in pieces that are exposed to temperatures of 450 o C to 900 o C (heat exchangers). At these temperatures sensibilization occurs on the grain boundaries, becoming a key factor in the appearance of intergranular corrosion. In order to prevent this phenomena from occurring 0.3% to 0.8% of niobium is added as an alloying element in the manufacturing process, which prevents the carbon present in the steel combines with the chromium, avoiding the formation of carbides. An electrochemical method for in-situ application was developed to evaluate the corrosive behavior of stainless steel and its susceptibility and degree of sensibilizaton to an intergranular attack. This work shows the effectiveness of this technique in evaluating niobium's inhibitory effect in preventing the formation of chromium carbides on the grain boundaries of 18% chromium steel, and also shows the technique's potentiality in determining how susceptible these steels are to intercrystalline corrosion

  11. Optimization of colorimetric DET technique for the in situ, two-dimensional measurement of iron(II) distributions in sediment porewaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, William W.; Teasdale, Peter R.; Welsh, David T.

    2012-01-01

    The recently developed colorimetric diffusive equilibration in thin films (DET) technique for the in situ, high-resolution measurement of iron(II) in marine sediments is optimized to allow measurement of the higher iron concentrations typical of freshwater sediment porewaters. Computer imaging...... the sensitivity of the assay as required; by processing the image with different color channel filters, the sensitivity of the assay can be optimized for lower concentrations (up to 100 μmol L -1) or higher concentrations (up to 2000 μmol L -1) of iron(II), depending on the specific site characteristics......(II) in sediment porewaters. The detection limit of the optimized technique was 4.1 ± 0.3 μmol L -1 iron(II) and relative standard deviations were less than 6%....

  12. Recent developments for in situ treatment of metal contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Metals contamination is a common problem at hazardous waste sites. This report assists the remedy selection process by providing information on four in situ technologies for treating soil contaminated with metals. The four approaches are electrokinetic remediation, phytoremediation, soil flushing, and solidification/stabilization. Electrokinetic remediation separates contaminants from soil through selective migration upon application of an electric current. Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that uses plants to isolate or stabilize contaminants. Soil flushing techniques promote mobility and migration of metals by solubilizing contaminants so that they can be recovered. Two types of in situ solidification/stabilization (S/S) techniques are discussed, one based on addition of reagents and the other based on the use of energy. The report discusses different techniques currently in practice or under development, identifies vendors and summarizes performance data, and discusses technology attributes that should be considered during early screening of potential remedies. 8 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs., 2 apps.

  13. Combined Characterization Techniques to Understand the Stability of a Variety of Organic Photovoltaic Devices - the ISOS-3 inter- laboratory collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lira-Cantu, Monica; Tanenbaum, David M.; Norrman, Kion

    2012-01-01

    . The results reported from the combination of the different characterization techniques results in a proposed degradation mechanism. The final conclusion is that the failure of the photovoltaic response of the device with time under full sun solar simulation, is mainly due to the degradation of the electrodes...... and not to the active materials of the solar cell.......This work is part of the inter-laboratory collaboration to study the stability of seven distinct sets of state-of-the-art organic photovoltaic (OPVs) devices prepared by leading research laboratories. All devices have been shipped to and degraded at the Danish Technical University (DTU, formerly...

  14. Improvement of Stability and Antioxidant Activities by Using Phycocyanin - Chitosan Encapsulation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzery, Meiny; Hadiyanto; Majid, Dian; Setyawan, Deny; Sutanto, Heri

    2017-02-01

    Encapsulation is a coating process to improve the stability of bioactive compounds. Phycocyanin with high antioxidant activity has been encapsulated with chitosan in microcapsules form. In this study aims to determine the best conditions in the encapsulation process using the extrusion method, characterization of the physicochemical properties of the microcapsules, antioxidant activity test using DPPH, in vitro release performance and evaluate the storage stability against temperature. The results of the encapsulation process is obtained: Na-TPP is better than Na-citrate as crosslinker and chitosan content 3% as a coating with ratio of chitosan to phycocyanin ratio 1: 1. Test of antioxidant activity also showed encapsulation with chitosan content 3% has the highest antioxidant activity. Morphological analysis microcapsules were found to have compact spherical shape with diameter range 900-1000 µm. In vitro release testing showed a quick release in an acidic environment (SGF) for 2 hours and slowly release under alkaline conditions (SIF) for 8 hours under mechanical stirring at 37°C. Phycocyanin much more stable against temperature during storage in microcapsules.

  15. Stability of pre-orthodontic orthognathic surgery depending on mandibular surgical techniques: SSRO vs IVRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Hwan; Yoo, Ho Jin; Lee, Jang-Yeol; Jung, Young-Soo; Choi, Jong-Woo; Lee, Kee-Joon

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the postoperative stability of sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) and intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO) in pre-orthodontic orthognathic surgery (POGS) for skeletal Class III malocclusion. Thirty-seven patients (SSRO, n = 18; IVRO, n = 19) who underwent bimaxillary surgery were divided into two groups according to the type of surgery. During the postoperative period, there were no significant differences in anterior and superior movements of the mandible at point B between the two groups, but occlusal plane angle of the SSRO group significantly decreased more than that of the IVRO group (P = 0.003). Only the SSRO group showed a linear relationship between the amount of postoperative horizontal and vertical movements of the mandible (R(2) = 0.254; P = 0.033), indicating that the amount of postoperative upward movement of the mandible increased as the amount of postoperative forward movement increased (r = -0.504; P = 0.033). The mandible after SSRO in POGS rotated counterclockwise due to rigid fixation between two segments, whereas the mandible after IVRO without rigid fixation in POGS moved mainly in a superior direction. These differences must be considered before surgery to ensure postsurgical stability for patients with mandibular prognathism. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Synthesis of nanocrystalline Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 via in situ polymerization technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xianming; Fu Shaoyun

    2007-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Zn 0.5 Mn 0.5 Fe 2 O 4 was synthesized through the pyrolysis of polyacrylate salt precursors prepared via in situ polymerization of the metal salts and acrylic acid. The pyrolysis behavior of the polymeric precursors was studied by use of thermal analysis. The as-obtained product was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), electron diffraction (ED) pattern, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The results revealed that the particle size is in the range of 15-25 nm for Zn-Mn ferrites with good crystallinity. Magnetic properties of the sample at 300 K were measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer, which showed that the sample exhibited characteristics of superparamagnetism

  17. Reduction of Bacterial Pathogenic Risk during Ex-situ Stabilization of Previously Buried Foot-and-Mouth Disease Carcasses in a Pilot-scale Bio-augmented Aerobic Composting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.; Park, J.; Park, J. K.; Park, S.; Jeon, H.; Kwon, H.

    2017-12-01

    Foot and mouth disease outbreaks globally occur. Although livestock suspected to be infected or actually infected by animal infectious diseases is typically treated with various methods including burial, burning, incineration, rendering, and composting, burial into soil is currently the major treatment method in Korea. However, buried carcasses are often found to remain undecomposed or incompletely decomposed even after the legal burial period (3 years). To reuse the land used for the burial purposes, Korea government is considering a novel approach to conduct in-situ burial treatment and then to move remaining carcasses from the burial sites to other sites designated for further ex-situ stabilization treatment (burial-composting sequential treatment). In this work, the feasibility of the novel approach was evaluated at a pilot scale facility. For the ex-situ stabilization, we tested the validity of use of a bio-augmented aerobic composting with carcass-degrading microorganisms, with emphasis on examining if the novel aerobic composting has reducing effects on potential pathogenic bacteria. As results, the decreased chemical oxygen demand (COD, 160,000 mg/kg to 40,000 mg/kg) and inorganic nitrogen species (total nitrogen, 5,000 mg/kg to 2,000 mg/kg) indicated effective bio-stabilization of carcasses. During the stabilization, bacterial community structure and dynamics determined by bacterial 16S rRNA sequencing were significantly changed. The prediction of potential pathogenic bacteria showed that bacterial pathogenic risk was significantly reduced up to a normal soil level during the ex-situ stabilization. The conclusion was confirmed by the following functional analysis of dominant bacteria using PICRUST. The findings support the microbiological safety of the ex-site use of the novel burial-composting sequential treatment. Acknowledgement : This study is supported by Korea Ministry of Environmental as "The GAIA Project"

  18. Fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques (FISH) to detect changes in CYP19a gene expression of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, June-Woo; Tompsett, Amber; Zhang, Xiaowei; Newsted, John L.; Jones, Paul D.; Au, Doris; Kong, Richard; Wu, Rudolf S.S.; Giesy, John P.; Hecker, Markus

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive in situ hybridization methodology using fluorescence-labeled riboprobes (FISH) that allows for the evaluation of gene expression profiles simultaneously in multiple target tissues of whole fish sections of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). To date FISH methods have been limited in their application due to autofluorescence of tissues, fixatives or other components of the hybridization procedure. An optimized FISH method, based on confocal fluorescence microscopy was developed to reduce the autofluorescence signal. Because of its tissue- and gender-specific expression and relevance in studies of endocrine disruption, gonadal aromatase (CYP19a) was used as a model gene. The in situ hybridization (ISH) system was validated in a test exposure with the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole. The optimized FISH method revealed tissue-specific expression of the CYP19a gene. Furthermore, the assay could differentiate the abundance of CYP19a mRNA among cell types. Expression of CYP19a was primarily associated with early stage oocytes, and expression gradually decreased with increasing maturation. No expression of CYP19a mRNA was observed in other tissues such as brain, liver, or testes. Fadrozole (100 μg/L) caused up-regulation of CYP19a expression, a trend that was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis on excised tissues. In a combination approach with gonad histology, it could be shown that the increase in CYP19a expression as measured by RT-PCR on a whole tissue basis was due to a combination of both increases in numbers of CYP19a-containing cells and an increase in the amount of CYP19a mRNA present in the cells

  19. In-place cement stabilized base reconstruction techniques interim report : "construction and two year evaluation".

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of soil cement shrinkage crack mitigation techniques. The contents of this report reflect an evaluation of the construction of the test sections and a two-year evaluation of the test sect...

  20. VALIDATING A COMPUTER-BASED TECHNIQUE FOR ASSESSING STABILITY TO FAILURE STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. F. Arshava

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An upsurge of interest in the implicit personality assessment, currently observed both in personality psycho-diagnostics and in experimental studies of social attitudes and prejudices, signals the shifting of researchers’ attention from de?ning between-person personality taxonomy to specifying comprehensive within-person processes, the dynamics of which can be captured at the level of an individual case. This research examines the possibility of the implicit assessment of the individual’s stability vs. susceptibility to failure stress by comparing the degrees of ef?cacy in the voluntary self-regulation of a computer-simulated information-processing activity under different conditions (patent of Ukraine № 91842, issued in 2010. By exposing two groups of participants (university undergraduates to processing the information, the scope of which exceeds the human short-term memory capacity at one of the stages of the modeled activity an unexpected and unavoidable failure is elicited. The participants who retain stability of their self-regulation behavior after having been exposed to failure, i.e. who keep processing information as effectively as they did prior to failure, are claimed to retain homeostasis and thus possess emotional stability. Those, who loose homeostasis after failure and display lower standards of self-regulation behavior, are considered to be susceptible to stress. The validity of the suggested type of the implicit diagnostics was empirically tested by clustering (K-means algorithm two samples of the participants on the  properties of their self-regulation behavior and testing between-cluster differences by a set of the explicitly assessed variables: Action control ef?cacy (Kuhl, 2001, preferred strategies of Coping with Stressful Situations (Endler, Parker, 1990,  Purpose-in-Life orientation (a Russian version of the test by Crumbaugh and Maholick, modi?ed by D.Leontiev, 1992, Psychological Well-being (Ryff, 1989

  1. Laser Ablation in situ (U-Th-Sm)/He and U-Pb Double-Dating of Apatite and Zircon: Techniques and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, B.; Danišík, M.; Evans, N.; McDonald, B.; Becker, T.; Vermeesch, P.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new laser-based technique for rapid, quantitative and automated in situ microanalysis of U, Th, Sm, Pb and He for applications in geochronology, thermochronometry and geochemistry (Evans et al., 2015). This novel capability permits a detailed interrogation of the time-temperature history of rocks containing apatite, zircon and other accessory phases by providing both (U-Th-Sm)/He and U-Pb ages (+trace element analysis) on single crystals. In situ laser microanalysis offers several advantages over conventional bulk crystal methods in terms of safety, cost, productivity and spatial resolution. We developed and integrated a suite of analytical instruments including a 193 nm ArF excimer laser system (RESOlution M-50A-LR), a quadrupole ICP-MS (Agilent 7700s), an Alphachron helium mass spectrometry system and swappable flow-through and ultra-high vacuum analytical chambers. The analytical protocols include the following steps: mounting/polishing in PFA Teflon using methods similar to those adopted for fission track etching; laser He extraction and analysis using a 2 s ablation at 5 Hz and 2-3 J/cm2fluence; He pit volume measurement using atomic force microscopy, and U-Th-Sm-Pb (plus optional trace element) analysis using traditional laser ablation methods. The major analytical challenges for apatite include the low U, Th and He contents relative to zircon and the elevated common Pb content. On the other hand, apatite typically has less extreme and less complex zoning of parent isotopes (primarily U and Th). A freeware application has been developed for determining (U-Th-Sm)/He ages from the raw analytical data and Iolite software was used for U-Pb age and trace element determination. In situ double-dating has successfully replicated conventional U-Pb and (U-Th)/He age variations in xenocrystic zircon from the diamondiferous Ellendale lamproite pipe, Western Australia and increased zircon analytical throughput by a factor of 50 over conventional methods

  2. Polyurethane Foam Wound Dressing Technique for Areola Skin Graft Stabilization and Nipple Protection After Nipple-Areola Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Toshihiko; Muto, Mayu; Nagashima, Yu; Haga, Shoko; Homma, Yuki; Nakasone, Reiko; Kadokura, Marina; Kou, Seiko; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Maegawa, Jiro

    2018-04-01

    We describe a new wound management technique using a soft dressing material to stabilize the areola skin graft and protect the nipple after nipple-areola reconstruction at the final stage of breast reconstruction. We introduced a center-fenestrated multilayered hydrocellular polyurethane foam dressing material that provides adequate pressure and retains a moist environment for a smooth skin graft "take." Moreover, the reconstructed nipple can be monitored at any time through the fenestrated window for adequate blood circulation. Altogether, this simple and inexpensive wound dressing technique improves the clinical outcome. Level of Evidence IV This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  3. The development in the in-situ decontamination technique for the large quantity of soils contaminated by radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubaki, Junichiro

    2012-01-01

    The new filtration and condensation techniques that decontaminate effectively the large quantity of contaminated soils, was developed. The facility treating the soils of 5 tons per day is being developed. (M.H.)

  4. Rotorcraft system identification techniques for handling qualities and stability and control evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, W. E., Jr.; Gupta, N. K.; Hansen, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    An integrated approach to rotorcraft system identification is described. This approach consists of sequential application of (1) data filtering to estimate states of the system and sensor errors, (2) model structure estimation to isolate significant model effects, and (3) parameter identification to quantify the coefficient of the model. An input design algorithm is described which can be used to design control inputs which maximize parameter estimation accuracy. Details of each aspect of the rotorcraft identification approach are given. Examples of both simulated and actual flight data processing are given to illustrate each phase of processing. The procedure is shown to provide means of calibrating sensor errors in flight data, quantifying high order state variable models from the flight data, and consequently computing related stability and control design models.

  5. Predictive tools and data needs for long term performance of in-situ stabilization and containment systems: DOE/OST stabilization workshop, June 26-27, Park City, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borns, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes the discussion within the Predictive Tools and Data Needs for Long Term Performance Assessment Subgroup. This subgroup formed at the DOE Office of Science and Technology workshop to address long-term performance of in situ stabilization and containment systems. The workshop was held in Park City, Utah, 26 and 27 June, 1996. All projects, engineering and environmental, have built-in decision processes that involve varying risk/reward scenarios. Such decision-processes maybe awkward to describe but are utilized every day following approaches that range from intuitive to advanced mathematical and numerical. Examples are the selection of components of home sound system, the members of a sports team, investments in a portfolio, and the members of a committee. Inherent in the decision method are an understanding of the function or process of the system requiring a decision or prediction, an understanding of the criteria on which decisions are made such as cost, performance, durability and verifiability. Finally, this process requires a means to judge or predict how the objects, activities, people and processes being analyzed will perform relative to the operations and functions of the system and relative to the decision criteria posed for the problem. These risk and decision analyses are proactive and iterative throughout the life of a remediation project. Prediction inherent to the analyses are based on intuition, experience, trial and error, and system analysis often using numerical approaches

  6. Mechanical Stability of Stratified Sediments along the upper continental Slope off Vesterålen, northern Norway - Insights from in situ CPTU Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, D.; Stegmann, S.; Kreiter, S.; L'Heureux, J. S.; Vanneste, M. W. B.; Baeten, N. J.; Knudsen, S.; Rise, L.; Longva, O.; Brendryen, J.; Haflidason, H.; Chand, S.; Mörz, T.; Kopf, A.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution single channel-seismic data (3.5 kHz) reveal small-scale submarine landslide structures and superficial deformation features (e.g. tension cracks) along the gently dipping (3°) upper continental slope west of the Vesterålen Archipelago off northern Norway. Previous laboratory-based geotechnical studies attest that the slope is per sestable and that seismic events in an order of magnitude M5.7 may have triggered the slope sediments to fail. Here we present geotechnical in situ data (sedimentary strength, pore pressure), which were obtained with RV Poseidon in summer 2014 using the static CPTU system GOST. The CPTU system provided high-resolution geotechnical profiles of the uppermost sediments to a maximum penetration depth of ~ 20 m at six sites within the landslide features and beside them in undisturbed slope sediments as reference. The CPTU data reveal the occurrence of mechanically weaker zones (MWZ) by the drop of sedimentary strength. These zones are interbedded by coarser, more competent layers. The occurrence of sensitive fine-grained material may be responsible for the loss of strength in the deeper portion (appx. 12 to 18 m below seafloor). An 1D infinite pseudo-static stability analysis attests that the mechanically weaker zones (MWZ) correlate well with portions, where the Factor of Safety (FoS) ≤ 1 (meta-stable to unstable) indicates permanent deformation or failure in case additional dynamic load is induced by an earthquake. Thus, the mechanically weak layers can be considered as one important pre-condition for landslide activity. In conclusion, the integration of in situ CPTU data with geophysical data improves soil characterization and hence foster a better understanding of the pre-conditioning factors for slope instability at the upper continental slope off Vesterålen. Risk assessment for the present-day slope off Vesterålen is particularly crucial, because the opening of the region for offshore oil and gas exploration is

  7. Studies of MHD stability using data mining technique in helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Pretty, David; Blackwell, Boyd

    2010-01-01

    Data mining techniques, which automatically extract useful knowledge from large datasets, are applied to multichannel magnetic probe signals of several helical plasmas in order to identify and classify MHD instabilities in helical plasmas. This method is useful to find new MHD instabilities as well as previously identified ones. Moreover, registering the results obtained from data mining in a database allows us to investigate the characteristics of MHD instabilities with parameter studies. We introduce the data mining technique consisted of pre-processing, clustering and visualizations using results from helical plasmas in H-1 and Heliotron J. We were successfully able to classify the MHD instabilities using the criterion of phase differences of each magnetic probe and identify them as energetic-ion-driven MHD instabilities using parameter study in Heliotron J plasmas. (author)

  8. Evaluation of the in situ, time-integrated DGT technique by monitoring changes in heavy metal concentrations in estuarine waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, R.J.K.; Teasdale, P.R.; Warnken, J.; Jordan, M.A.; Arthur, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Various natural and anthropogenic processes influence heavy metal concentrations within estuaries. In situ, time-integrated DGT measurements made over concurrent tidal phases found significantly higher concentrations of Cu (probability p = 0.017), Zn (p = 0.003) and Ni (p = 0.003) during the flood phase, because the incoming tide passes several point sources. DGT-reactive Cu concentrations significantly decreased with increased tidal-flushing and vice versa within a marina (correlation r = -0.788, p = 0.02). DGT measurements also recorded significant increases in Cu (4 out of 4 sites, p < 0.001) and Zn (3 out of 4 sites, p ≤ 0.015) after a 24 mm rainfall event. Finally, DGT-reactive Cu increased significantly (p < 0.001) during peak boating times, due to increased numbers of Cu-antifouled boats. This study demonstrates that, with judicious selection of deployment times, DGT measurements enable changes in heavy metal concentrations to be related to various cycles and events within estuaries. - Demonstration of the usefulness of DGT as a monitoring tool for heavy metals in dynamic estuaries

  9. The use of a neutron backscatter technique for in-situ water measurement in paper-recycling industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, Norpaiza Mohamad; Zain, Rasif Mohd; Abdul Rahman, Mohd Fitri; Mustapha, Ismail

    2009-01-01

    A bulk of used paper supplied to recycling industry may contain water in their internal voids. This is because the price of the used paper is currently based on their weight and it has a huge potential of suppliers to add with water in order to increase the price. Currently used methods for detecting moisture content in a paper are restricted to a sheet of paper only. This paper presents a non-intrusive method for quick and in-situ measurement of water content in a bulk of used paper. The proposed method extends the capability of common paper moisture gauge, by using a neutron device. A fast neutron source (Am-Be 241) and a portable backscattering neutron detector are used for water measurement. It theoretically indicates that the slow neutron counts can be correlated to the hydrogen or water level in a paper. The method has the potential of being used by the paper-recycling industry for rapid and non-destructive measurement of water in a bulk of used paper.

  10. EnVision+, a new dextran polymer-based signal enhancement technique for in situ hybridization (ISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedorn, K H; Goldmann, T; Henne, C; Kühl, H; Vollmer, E

    2001-09-01

    Seventy paraffin-embedded cervical biopsy specimens and condylomata were tested for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) by conventional in situ hybridization (ISH) and ISH with subsequent signal amplification. Signal amplification was performed either by a commercial biotinyl-tyramide-based detection system [GenPoint (GP)] or by the novel two-layer dextran polymer visualization system EnVision+ (EV), in which both EV-horseradish peroxidase (EV-HRP) and EV-alkaline phosphatase (EV-AP) were applied. We could demonstrate for the first time, that EV in combination with preceding ISH results in a considerable increase in signal intensity and sensitivity without loss of specificity compared to conventional ISH. Compared to GP, EV revealed a somewhat lower sensitivity, as measured by determination of the integrated optical density (IOD) of the positively stained cells. However, EV is easier to perform, requires a shorter assay time, and does not raise the background problems that may be encountered with biotinyl-tyramide-based amplification systems. (J Histochem Cytochem 49:1067-1071, 2001)

  11. A technique for improved stability of adaptive feedforward controllers without detailed uncertainty measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkhoff, A P

    2012-01-01

    Model errors in adaptive controllers for the reduction of broadband noise and vibrations may lead to unstable systems or increased error signals. Previous research on active structures with small damping has shown that the addition of a low-authority controller which increases damping in the system may lead to improved performance of an adaptive, high-authority controller. Other researchers have suggested the use of frequency dependent regularization based on measured uncertainties. In this paper an alternative method is presented that avoids the disadvantages of these methods, namely the additional complex hardware and the need to obtain detailed information on the uncertainties. An analysis is made of an adaptive feedforward controller in which a difference exists between the secondary path and the model as used in the controller. The real parts of the eigenvalues that determine the stability of the system are expressed in terms of the amount of uncertainty and the singular values of the secondary path. Modifications of the feedforward control scheme are suggested that aim to improve performance without requiring detailed uncertainty measurements. (paper)

  12. Assessing the stability of soil organic matter by fractionation and 13C isotope techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionova, A. A.; Zolotareva, B. N.; Kvitkina, A. K.; Evdokimov, I. V.; Bykhovets, S. S.; Stulin, A. F.; Kuzyakov, Ya. V.; Kudeyarov, V. N.

    2015-02-01

    Carbon pools of different stabilities have been separated from the soil organic matter of agrochernozem and agrogray soil samples. The work has been based on the studies of the natural abundance of the carbon isotope composition by C3-C4 transition using the biokinetic, size-density, and chemical fractionation (6 M HCl hydrolysis) methods. The most stable pools with the minimum content of new carbon have been identified by particle-size and chemical fractionation. The content of carbon in the fine fractions has been found to be close to that in the nonhydrolyzable residue. This pool makes up 65 and 48% of Corg in the agrochernozems and agrogray soils, respectively. The combination of the biokinetic approach with particle-size fractionation or 6 M HCl hydrolysis has allowed assessing the size of the medium-stable organic carbon pool with a turnover time of several years to several decades. The organic matter pool with this turnover rate is usually identified from the variation in the 13C abundance by C3-C4 transition. In the agrochernozems and agrogray soils, the medium-stable carbon pool makes up 35 and 46% of Corg, respectively. The isotope indication may be replaced by a nonisotope method to significantly expand the study of the inert and mediumstable organic matter pools in the geographical aspect, but this requires a comparative analysis of particle-size and chemical fractionation data for all Russian soils.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films using spray pyrolysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamale, A.P.; Chourasiya, M.G.; Chavan, A.U.; Patil, S.P.; Jadhav, L.D.

    2009-01-01

    Micro solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are of great potential, which require components in film form. We are reporting the spray pyrolysis of 8YSZ films as solid electrolyte for micro-SOFC. The process parameters of the technique were optimized to get stoichiometric films of YSZ. The micro-structural and electrical properties of the films were studied. The elemental analysis of the film showed the desired composition in the film. The conductivity of the film was 0.05 S/cm at 500 deg C with activation energy of 0.90eV. (author)

  14. A one-step in-situ assembly strategy to construct PEG@MOG-100-Fe shape-stabilized composite phase change material with enhanced storage capacity for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junyong; Andriamitantsoa, Radoelizo S.; Atinafu, Dimberu G.; Gao, Hongyi; Dong, Wenjun; Wang, Ge

    2018-03-01

    A novel in-situ assembly strategy has been developed to synthesis polyethylene glycol (PEG)@iron-benzenetricarboxylate metal-organic gel (MOG-100-Fe) shape-stabilized composite phase change materials by regulating metal-to-ligand ratio. The PEG@MOG-100-Fe was prepared by an ingenious introduction of PEG into the traditional sol-gel prepared MOG-100-Fe. The composite exhibited high heat storage density and thermal stability. The PEG loading content reached up to 92% without any leakage above its melting point. The heat storage density reaches to 152.88

  15. In Situ Characterization Techniques Based on Synchrotron Radiation and Neutrons Applied for the Development of an Engineering Intermetallic Titanium Aluminide Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Erdely

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Challenging issues concerning energy efficiency and environmental politics require novel approaches to materials design. A recent example with regard to structural materials is the emergence of lightweight intermetallic TiAl alloys. Their excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, low density and high stiffness constitute a profile perfectly suitable for their application as advanced aero-engine turbine blades or as turbocharger turbine wheels in next-generation automotive engines. As the properties of TiAl alloys during processing as well as during service are dependent on the phases occurring, detailed knowledge of their volume fractions and distribution within the microstructure is of paramount importance. Furthermore, the behavior of the individual phases during hot deformation and subsequent heat treatments is of interest to define reliable and cost-effective industrial production processes. In situ high-energy X-ray diffraction methods allow tracing the evolution of phase fractions over a large temperature range. Neutron diffraction unveils information on order-disorder transformations in TiAl alloys. Small-angle scattering experiments offer insights into the materials’ precipitation behavior. This review attempts to shine a light on selected in situ diffraction and scattering techniques and the ways in which they promoted the development of an advanced engineering TiAl alloy.

  16. In-Situ Compositional Analysis and Provenance Study of the Historic Terengganu Stone (“Batu Bersurat Piagam Terengganu”) Using Neutron-Induced Prompt Gamma-Ray Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, J.; Yahya, R.; Dahing, N. S.; Shaari, M. R.; Mahmood, A. A.; Hassan, H.; Jamaluddin, T. A.; Abdullah, M. Y.; Mahmud, N. A.; Mosorov, V.

    2018-01-01

    Terengganu inscribed stone is the oldest artifact with Jawi writing on it. It is a most treasured heritage for the history of Malaysian civilisation. The artifact proves that the Kingdom of Terengganu exist earlier than 1326 or 1386. It was accidentally discovered near Tersat River at Kampong Buluh, Kuala Berang, Terengganu, Malaysia by a gold & tin trader after a flash flood hit Kuala Berang in 1902.The inscription turned out to be a proclamation issued by the ''Sri Paduka Tuan'' of Terengganu. The significant is the date on the first face of the inscription, which is given as the year 1303 AD. This project focuses on the development of in-situ compositional analysis and provenance study of the Inscribed Terengganu Stone using Neutron-Induced Prompt Gamma-Ray Techniques (NIPGAT). To date, a lot of studies have been carried out by historians and archaeologists about the content of the inscription, but no scientific investigation about the material composition and its provenance has been performed. In this project, an instrumental analysis NIPGAT was designed as a portable non-destructive investigation tool employing an isotopic neutron source (Cf-252) and a gamma-ray spectroscopy system for in-situ investigation of the Inscribed Stone. (author)

  17. Design of in situ dispersible and calcium cross-linked alginate pellets as intestinal-specific drug carrier by melt pelletization technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurulaini, Harjoh; Wong, Tin Wui

    2011-06-01

    Conventional alginate pellets underwent rapid drug dissolution and loss of multiparticulate characteristics such as aggregation in acidic medium, thereby promoting oral dose dumping. This study aimed to design sustained-release dispersible alginate pellets through rapid in situ matrix dispersion and cross-linking by calcium salts during dissolution. Pellets made of alginate and calcium salts were prepared using a solvent-free melt pelletization technique that prevented reaction between processing materials during agglomeration and allowed such a reaction to occur only in dissolution phase. Drug release was remarkably retarded in acidic medium when pellets were formulated with water-soluble calcium acetate instead of acid-soluble calcium carbonate. Different from calcium salt-free and calcium carbonate-loaded matrices that aggregated or underwent gradual erosion, rapid in situ solvation of calcium acetate in pellets during dissolution resulted in burst of gas bubbles, fast pellet breakup, and dispersion. The dispersed fragments, though exhibiting a larger specific surface area for drug dissolution than intact matrix, were rapidly cross-linked by Ca(2+) from calcium acetate and had drug release retarded till a change in medium pH from 1.2 to 6.8. Being dispersible and pH-dependent in drug dissolution, these pellets are useful as multiparticulate intestinal-specific drug carrier without exhibiting dose dumping tendency of a "single-unit-like" system via pellet aggregation. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Enhanced cycle stability of micro-sized Si/C anode material with low carbon content fabricated via spray drying and in situ carbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dingsheng; Gao, Mingxia, E-mail: gaomx@zju.edu.cn; Pan, Hongge; Liu, Yongfeng; Wang, Junhua; Li, Shouquan; Ge, Hongwei

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Micro-sized Si/C composites were fabricated via. spray drying and carbonization. • Multi-morphology carbon was formed in the Si/C composites. • Si/C composite with 5.6 wt.% C provides significant improved cycling stability. • Multi-morphology carbon plays effective role in improving the electrochemical property. • The method provides potential for mass production of superior Si-based anode materials. - Abstract: Micro-sized Si/C composites with in situ introduced carbon of multi-morphology were fabricated via spray drying a suspension of commercial micro-sized Si and citric acid followed by a carbonization. Different ratios of Si to citric acid were used to optimize the composition and structure of the composites and thus the electrochemical performance. Carbon flakes including crooked and flat ones were well dispersed in between the Si particles, forming Si/C composites. Floc-like carbon layers and carbon fragments were also found to cover partially the Si particles. The Si/C composite with a low carbon content of 5.6 wt.% provides an initial reversible capacity of 2700 mA h/g and a capacity of 1860 mA h/g after 60 cycles at a current density of 100 mA/g as anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), which are much higher than those of pristine Si and the Si/C composites with higher carbon content. The mechanism of the enhancement of electrochemical performance of the micro-sized Si/C composite is discussed. The fabrication method and the structure design of the composites offer valuable potential in developing adaptable Si-based anode materials for industrial applications.

  19. Wood-derived-biochar combined with compost or iron grit for in situ stabilization of Cd, Pb, and Zn in a contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oustriere, Nadège; Marchand, Lilian; Rosette, Gabriel; Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang; Mench, Michel

    2017-03-01

    In situ stabilization of Cd, Pb, and Zn in an Austrian agricultural soil contaminated by atmospheric depositions from a smelter plant was assessed with a pine bark chip-derived biochar, alone and in combination with either compost or iron grit. Biochar amendment was also trialed in an uncontaminated soil to detect any detrimental effect. The pot experiment consisted in ten soil treatments (% w/w): untreated contaminated soil (Unt); Unt soil amended with biochar alone (1%: B1; 2.5%: B2.5) and in combination: B1 and B2.5 + 5% compost (B1C and B2.5C), B1 and B2.5 + 1% iron grit (B1Z and B2.5Z); uncontaminated soil (Ctrl); Ctrl soil amended with 1 or 2.5% biochar (CtrlB1, CtrlB2.5). After a 3-month reaction period, the soil pore water (SPW) was sampled in potted soils and dwarf beans were grown for a 2-week period. The SPW Cd, Pb, and Zn concentrations decreased in all amended-contaminated soils. The biochar effects increased with its addition rate and its combination with either compost or iron grit. Shoot Cd and Zn removals by beans were reduced and shoot Cd, Pb, and Zn concentrations decreased to common values in all amended soils except the B1 soil. Decreases in the SPW Cd/Pb/Zn concentrations did not improve the root and shoot yields of plants as compared to the Ctrl soil.

  20. Titanium dioxide-based DGT technique for in situ measurement of dissolved reactive phosphorus in fresh and marine waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panther, Jared G.; Teasdale, Peter R.; Bennett, William W.

    2010-01-01

    A new diffusive gradients in a thin film (DGT) technique for measuring dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) in fresh and marine waters is reported. The new method, which uses a commercially available titanium dioxide based adsorbent (Metsorb), was evaluated and compared to the well-established fer...

  1. Demonstration of In-Situ Stabilization of Buried Waste at Pit G-11 at the Brookhaven National laboratory Glass Pits Disposal Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, B.P.; Gilbert, J.; Heiser, J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1989 BNL was added to the EPAs National Priorities List. The site is divided into seven operable units (OU). OU-I includes the former landfill area. The field task site is noted as the AOC 2C Glass Holes location. Beginning in the 1960s and continuing into the 1980s, BNL disposed of laboratory waste (glassware, chemicals and animal carcasses) in numerous shallow pits. The drivers for remediating the pits are; historical records that indicate hazardous materials may have been disposed of in the pits; ground water contamination down gradient of the pits; a test excavation of one of the glass holes that unearthed laboratory glass bottles with unidentified liquids still contained; and the fact that BNL rests atop an EPA designated sole-source aquifer. The specific site chosen for this demonstration was pit G-11. The requirements that lead to choosing this pit were; a well characterized pit and a relatively isolated pit where our construction operations would not impact on adjacent pits. The glass holes area, including pit G-11, was comprehensively surveyed using a suite of geophysical techniques (e.g., EM-31, EM-61, GPR). Prior to stabilizing the waste form a subsurface barrier was constructed to contain the entire waste pit. The pit contents were then stabilized using a cement grout applied via jet grouting. The stabilization was performed to make removal of the waste from the pit easier and safer in terms of worker exposure. The grouting process would mix and masticate the waste and grout and form a single monolithic waste form. This large monolith would then be subdivided into smaller 4 foot by 4 foot by 10-12 foot block using a demolition grout. The smaller blocks would then be easily removed from the site and disposed of in a CERCLA waste site

  2. Thermal expansion behavior study of Co nanowire array with in situ x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption fine structure techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Guang; Cai, Quan; Jiang, Longsheng; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Kunhao; Cheng, Weidong; Xing, Xueqing; Chen, Zhongjun; Wu, Zhonghua

    2008-10-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption fine structure techniques were used to study the structural change of ordered Co nanowire array with temperature. The results show that the Co nanowires are polycrystalline with hexagonal close packed structure without phase change up until 700 °C. A nonlinear thermal expansion behavior has been found and can be well described by a quadratic equation with the first-order thermal expansion coefficient of 4.3×10-6/°C and the second-order thermal expansion coefficient of 5.9×10-9/°C. The mechanism of this nonlinear thermal expansion behavior is discussed.

  3. In Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS) Technique: Cost-Effective Tool for NDA Verification in IAEA Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braverman, E.; Lebrun, A.; Nizhnik, V.; Rorif, F.

    2010-01-01

    Uranium materials measurements using the ISOCS technique play an increasing role in IAEA verification activities. This methodology provides high uranium/plutonium sensitivity and a low detection limit together with the capability to measure items with different shapes and sizes. In addition, the numerical absolute efficiency calibration of a germanium detector which is used by the technique does not require any calibration standards or reference materials. ISOCS modelling software allows performing absolute efficiency calibration for items of arbitrary container shape and wall material, matrix chemical composition, material fill-height, uranium or plutonium weight fraction inside the matrix and even nuclear material/matrix non-homogeneous distribution. Furthermore, in a number of cases, some key parameters such as matrix density and U/Pu weight fraction can be determined along with analysis of nuclear material mass and isotopic composition. These capabilities provide a verification solution suitable for a majority of cases where quantitative and isotopic analysis should be performed. Today, the basic tool for uranium and plutonium mass measurement used in Safeguards verification activities is the neutron counting technique which employs neutron coincidence and multiplicity counters. In respect to the neutron counting technique, ISOCS calibrated detectors have relatively low cost. Taking into account its advantages, this methodology becomes a cost-effective solution for nuclear material NDA verification. At present, the Agency uses ISOCS for quantitative analysis in a wide range of applications: - Uranium scrap materials; - Uranium contaminated solid wastes; - Uranium fuel elements; - Some specific verification cases like measurement of Pu-Be neutron sources, quantification of fission products in solid wastes etc. For uranium hold-up measurements, ISOCS the only available methodology for quantitative and isotopic composition analysis of nuclear materials deposited

  4. Enhancing trunk stability in acute poststroke subjects using physioball exercise and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation technique: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandran Hariharasudhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Poststroke, most survivors experience trunk control impairment and instability. Previous works on exercise on an unstable surface to improve trunk stability in nonstroke population had proven effective. Thus, physioball exercises (PBEs in poststroke subjects may be useful in the recovery of trunk stability and thereby reduce disability. We hypothesize that PBE is feasible and effective in enhancing trunk stability. Aims: To test the feasibility and successful implementation of conducting a randomized controlled study to assess the clinical effectiveness of PBE and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF technique to enhance trunk control in poststroke subjects. Methods: This study was conducted in a stroke unit of Global Hospitals and Health City, Chennai, India. Thirty patients with the first onset of stroke within 40 days of stroke duration, lesion to one side, and ability to sit independently with or without arm support for 15 days were recruited. All thirty poststroke subjects were randomized either into PBE group or PNF group, and outcome assessors involved in the trail were blinded to allocation. PBE group performed task-oriented activities on an unstable surface and PNF group were treated with PNF-specific trunk stability exercise program for 4 weeks (30 min/day, 5 times/week. Trunk impairment scale (TIS was used as a main outcome measure. Results: Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed rank sum test and Mann–Whitney U-test for intra- and inter-group comparison. The baseline characteristics between both groups were statistically nonsignificant. Within groups, there were significant improvements between baseline and at 4 weeks in the measure of TIS. In addition, PBE group showed a significant increase in trunk control (mean 2.33, 95% confidence interval 1.14-3.52, P = 0.002 than the PNF subject. Conclusion: This pilot randomized controlled trial

  5. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) - a new imaging technique for in situ localization of spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trottmann, Matthias; Stepp, Herbert; Sroka, Ronald; Heide, Michael; Liedl, Bernhard; Reese, Sven; Becker, Armin J; Stief, Christian G; Kölle, Sabine

    2015-05-01

    In azoospermic patients, spermatozoa are routinely obtained by testicular sperm extraction (TESE). However, success rates of this technique are moderate, because the site of excision of testicular tissue is determined arbitrarily. Therefore the aim of this study was to establish probe-based laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) a noval biomedical imaging technique, which provides the opportunity of non-invasive, real-time visualisation of tissue at histological resolution. Using pCLE we clearly visualized longitudinal and horizontal views of the tubuli seminiferi contorti and localized vital spermatozoa. Obtained images and real-time videos were subsequently compared with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) of spermatozoa and tissues, respectively. Comparative visualization of single native Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM, left) and probe-based laser endomicroscopy (pCLE, right) using Pro Flex(TM) UltraMini O after staining with acriflavine. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Development of in-situ laser cutting technique for removal of single selected coolant channel from pressurized heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishwakarma, S.C.; Upadhyaya, B.N.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the development of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser based cutting technique for removal of single coolant channel from pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR). It includes development of special tools/manipulators and optimization of laser cutting process parameters for cutting of liner tube, end fitting, bellow lip weld joint, and pressure tube stubs. For each cutting operation, a special tool with precision motion control is utilized. These manipulators/tools hold and move the laser cutting nozzle in the required manner and are fixed on the same coolant channel, which has to be removed. This laser cutting technique has been successfully deployed for removal of selected coolant channels Q-16, Q-15 and N-6 of KAPS-2 reactor with minimum radiation dose consumption and in short time. (author)

  7. Consideration on the restoring plan in the subsidence prone areas through the development of ground stability assessment techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, S.O.; Kwon, K.S.; Kim, I.H.; Cho, W.J.; Shin, H.S.; Lee, J.R.; Song, W.K.; Synn, J.H.; Park, C. [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Most of the ground stability analysis on the subsidence prone areas used to be performed through the conventional routine work which consist of a geological survey, a review of the ragged mining map, a trace-investigation on the surface subsidence, a coring job on the prone areas, a rock mass classification, and a two dimensional numerical analysis. Through the above works, we could analyze the stability problems of a surface structure and the tendency of a surface subsidence. However so many problems have been pointed out during the analysis of the subsidence problem owing to the lack of quantitative data in geological survey, the unreliability of the input data for numerical analysis. Also new techniques for ground stability on subsidence area which can replace the conventional passive method are requested among the civil and mining engineers for the safety control of the surface structure including the road and tunnel. In this study, the basic mechanism for the surface subsidence was surveyed first, and the proper input data for the two and three dimensional numerical analysis was selected. And these results were applied to Si-Heung Mine. According to the two dimensional numerical analysis, there is no possibility of surface subsidence even though tension failure was developed up to the region three times to the height of the cavity. Meanwhile the existing data for joints and the ground water was re-evaluated in order to analyze their effects on the subsidence. If we can recognize the characteristics of the spatial data on them in the future, the effect of the joint and ground water on the subsidence can be found out more precisely through the combination with GIS. Finally a finite difference numerical method was applied to Si-Heung Mine in the three dimension. But it was revealed that there are some problems in the three dimensional technique. In other words, it is difficult to obtain the exact spatial coordinates of the cavity, and the researcher should have

  8. Iodination and stability of somatostatin analogues: comparison of iodination techniques. A practical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blois, Erik; Chan, Ho Sze; Breeman, Wouter A P

    2012-01-01

    For iodination ((125/127)I) of tyrosine-containing peptides, chloramin-T, Pre-Coated Iodo-Gen(®) tubes and Iodo-Beads(®) (Pierce) are commonly used for in vitro radioligand investigations and there have been reliant vendors hereof for decades. However, commercial availability of these radio-iodinated peptides is decreasing. For continuation of our research in this field we investigated and optimized (radio-)iodination of somatostatin analogues. In literature, radioiodination using here described somatostatin analogues and iodination techniques are described separately. Here we present an overview, including High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) separation and characterisation by mass spectrometry, to obtain mono- and di-iodinated analogues. Reaction kinetics of (125/127)I iodinated somatostatin analogues were investigated as function of reaction time and concentration of reactants, including somatostatin analogues, iodine and oxidizing agent. To our knowledge, for the here described somatostatin analogues, no (127)I iodination and optimization are described. (Radio-)iodinated somatostatin analogues could be preserved with a >90% radiochemical purity for 1 month after reversed phase HPLC-purification.

  9. Fabrication of mullite-bonded porous SiC ceramics from multilayer-coated SiC particles through sol-gel and in-situ polymerization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimpour, Omid

    In this work, mullite-bonded porous silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics were prepared via a reaction bonding technique with the assistance of a sol-gel technique or in-situ polymerization as well as a combination of these techniques. In a typical procedure, SiC particles were first coated by alumina using calcined powder and alumina sol via a sol-gel technique followed by drying and passing through a screen. Subsequently, they were coated with the desired amount of polyethylene via an in-situ polymerization technique in a slurry phase reactor using a Ziegler-Natta catalyst. Afterward, the coated powders were dried again and passed through a screen before being pressed into a rectangular mold to make a green body. During the heating process, the polyethylene was burnt out to form pores at a temperature of about 500°C. Increasing the temperature above 800°C led to the partial oxidation of SiC particles to silica. At higher temperatures (above 1400°C) derived silica reacted with alumina to form mullite, which bonds SiC particles together. The porous SiC specimens were characterized with various techniques. The first part of the project was devoted to investigating the oxidation of SiC particles using a Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) apparatus. The effects of particle size (micro and nano) and oxidation temperature (910°C--1010°C) as well as the initial mass of SiC particles in TGA on the oxidation behaviour of SiC powders were evaluated. To illustrate the oxidation rate of SiC in the packed bed state, a new kinetic model, which takes into account all of the diffusion steps (bulk, inter and intra particle diffusion) and surface oxidation rate, was proposed. Furthermore, the oxidation of SiC particles was analyzed by the X-ray Diffraction (XRD) technique. The effect of different alumina sources (calcined Al2O 3, alumina sol or a combination of the two) on the mechanical, physical, and crystalline structure of mullite-bonded porous SiC ceramics was studied in the

  10. Microbial and molecular techniques to evaluate and to implement in-situ biodegradation potential and activity at sites contaminated with aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karg, F.; Henkler, Ch.

    2005-01-01

    Intrinsic bio-remediation harnesses the ability of indigenous microorganisms to degrade contaminants that are present in soil and groundwater. Over the past decade many environmental regulatory agencies especially in Europe have come to recognize the importance of these natural processes in contaminant attenuation. In order to use in-situ bio-remediation to clean up a site successfully it is necessary to investigate the indigenous microbial population and its potential activity to degrade the contaminants of concern (COCs). The evaluation of naturally-occurring degradative activity in initial screening of soil and groundwater samples using recently developed molecular and microbial methods may allow for the implementation of a contaminant reduction and management program without the need for fully engineered remediation intervention. Limited engineering approaches (nutrient delivery etc.) can be implemented to support naturally-occurring bio-restoration processes to achieve a controlled, dynamic attenuation of COCs. Techniques for monitoring pollutant-degrading microorganisms were previously limited to standard culturing techniques. More recently, techniques based upon detection of genetic elements and metabolic activities have been developed in collaboration with university partners Europe, especially in France. The modern techniques are more sensitive for monitoring microbial populations, metabolic activity and the genetic potential to degrade the COCs, and avoid the need for cultivation of microbes under artificial conditions in the laboratory. Especially the application of PCR-Tests (Polymerase Chain Reaction) are able to quantify the Genetic Potential of Pollutant Microbiological Degradation on a contaminated site. This enables to use very economic in-situ site rehabilitation strategies as for example (Dynamic Natural Attenuation). For this modern application of these new strategies PLANREAL created with HPC Envirotec and together with a French University

  11. In situ object counting system (ISOCSi3TM) technique: A cost-effective tool for NDA verification in IAEA Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizhnik, V.; Belian, A.; Shephard, A.; Lebrun, A.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear material measurements using the ISOCS technique are playing an increasing role in IAEA verification activities. The ISOCS capabilities include: a high sensitivity to the presence of U and Pu; the ability to detect very small amounts of material; and the ability to measure items of different shapes and sizes. In addition, the numerical absolute efficiency calibration of a germanium detector used in the technique does not require any calibration standards or reference materials. The ISOCS modelling software performs an absolute efficiency calibration for items with various container shapes, container wall materials, material compositions, material fill-heights, U/Pu weight fractions and even heterogeneously distributed emitting materials. In a number of cases, some key parameters, such as the matrix density and U/Pu weight fraction, can be determined in addition to the emitting material mass and isotopic composition. These capabilities provide a verification solution suitable for a majority of cases where quantitative and isotopic analysis should be performed. Taking into account these advantages, the technique becomes a cost-effective solution for nuclear material non-destructive assay (NDA) verification. At present, the IAEA uses the ISOCS for a wide range of applications including the quantitative analysis of U scrap materials, U/Pu contaminated solid wastes, U fuel elements, U hold-up materials. Additionally, the ISOCS is also applied to some specific verification cases such as the measurement of PuBe neutron sources and the quantification of fission products in solid wastes. In reprocessing facilities with U/Pu waste compaction or facilities with item re-batching, the continuity-of-knowledge can be assured by applying either video surveillance systems together with seals (requiring attaching/detaching and verification activities for each seal) or verification of operator declarations using quantitative measurements for items selected on a random basis

  12. Determining of Degradation and Digestion Coefficients of Canola meal Using of In situ and Gas production Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Younes Tahmazi; Akbar Taghizadeh; Yousef Mehmannavaz; Mehdi Moghaddam

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to the determination of nutritive value of canola meal using naylon bag and cumulative gas production techniques in Gizel sheep. Tow fistulated Gizel sheep with average BW 45±2 kg used in a complete randomized design. The cumulative gas production was measured at 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 24, 36 and 48 h and ruminal DM and CP disappearance were measured up to 96 h. Coefficients of soluble CP degradation of canola meal (A), canola meal treated with 0.5% urea (B) and canola...

  13. Surgical stabilization of rib fractures using Inion OTPS wraps--techniques and quality of life follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Nicole; Conaglen, Paul; Martin, Katherine; Antippa, Phillip

    2009-09-01

    A variety of operative techniques have been described in the past for the surgical stabilization of fractured ribs. From February 2004 to November 2008, consecutive patients who underwent open reduction and internal fixation of traumatic fractured ribs during their index admission using the Inion orthopedic trauma plating system (OTPS) at a Level I trauma center were retrospectively analyzed. Demographics, Injury Severity Scores, number and site of rib fractures, operative details, and complications were recorded. All patients were followed-up with a questionnaire assessing chest symptoms, disability, and quality of life. Thirty-two patients underwent surgical stabilization with Inion OTPS. Road crashes were the commonest mechanism of injury (81%), followed by falls. Seventy-two percent of patients were male, with a median age at operation of 53 years (interquartile range [IQR], 40-64 years). Median number of ribs fixed was 3 (IQR, 2-4), while median number of fractures was 9 (IQR, 6-13). Median time to fixation was 5 days (IQR, 3-7 days), intensive care unit stay 3 days (IQR, 0.8-6.3 days), and total hospital stay 13.5 days (IQR, 8.8-22 days). Wound infection occurred in 19%, with nonunion of a fixed fracture in one patient. Sixty-three percent of patients completed the survey with a mean time between open reduction and internal fixation and questionnaire of 1,039 days (+/-480 days). Patients reported low levels of pain at rest and with coughing (median at rest 1.0/10 [IQR, 0-2.3/10]; with coughing 1.3/10 [IQR, 0-3.75/10]). Chest wall stiffness was experienced by 60% of patients, while dyspnoea at rest was reported by 20% of patients. Mean return to work (for 55%) was 3.9 months (+/-3.3 months). All patients were satisfied with the results of their operation. Patients demonstrated low levels of pain and satisfactory rehabilitation. The Inion OTPS system has several advantages including gradual transference of stress loads to bone, micromotion across the fracture

  14. A comparison of multiple regression and neural network techniques for mapping in situ pCO2 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, Nathalie; Watson, Andrew J.; Watson, Adam R.

    2005-01-01

    Using about 138,000 measurements of surface pCO 2 in the Atlantic subpolar gyre (50-70 deg N, 60-10 deg W) during 1995-1997, we compare two methods of interpolation in space and time: a monthly distribution of surface pCO 2 constructed using multiple linear regressions on position and temperature, and a self-organizing neural network approach. Both methods confirm characteristics of the region found in previous work, i.e. the subpolar gyre is a sink for atmospheric CO 2 throughout the year, and exhibits a strong seasonal variability with the highest undersaturations occurring in spring and summer due to biological activity. As an annual average the surface pCO 2 is higher than estimates based on available syntheses of surface pCO 2 . This supports earlier suggestions that the sink of CO 2 in the Atlantic subpolar gyre has decreased over the last decade instead of increasing as previously assumed. The neural network is able to capture a more complex distribution than can be well represented by linear regressions, but both techniques agree relatively well on the average values of pCO 2 and derived fluxes. However, when both techniques are used with a subset of the data, the neural network predicts the remaining data to a much better accuracy than the regressions, with a residual standard deviation ranging from 3 to 11 μatm. The subpolar gyre is a net sink of CO 2 of 0.13 Gt-C/yr using the multiple linear regressions and 0.15 Gt-C/yr using the neural network, on average between 1995 and 1997. Both calculations were made with the NCEP monthly wind speeds converted to 10 m height and averaged between 1995 and 1997, and using the gas exchange coefficient of Wanninkhof

  15. Combining X-ray Absorption and X-ray Diffraction Techniques for in Situ Studies of Chemical Transformations in Heterogeneous Catalysis: Advantages and Limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenkel, A.I.; Hanson, J.; Wang, Q.; Marinkovic, N.; Chen, J.G.; Barrio, L.; Si, R.; Lopez Camara, A.; Estrella, A.M.; Rodriguez, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in catalysis instrumentations include synchrotron-based facilities where time-resolved X-ray scattering and absorption techniques are combined in the same in situ or operando experiment to study catalysts at work. To evaluate the advances and limitations of this method, we performed a series of experiments at the new XAFS/XRD instrument in the National Synchrotron Light Source. Nearly simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) measurements of structure and kinetics of several catalysts under reducing or oxidizing conditions have been performed and carefully analyzed. For CuFe 2 O 4 under reducing conditions, the combined use of the two techniques allowed us to obtain accurate data on kinetics of nucleation and growth of metallic Cu. For the inverse catalyst CuO/CeO 2 that underwent isothermal reduction (with CO) and oxidation (with O 2 ), the XAFS data measured in the same experiment with XRD revealed strongly disordered Cu species that went undetected by diffraction. These and other examples emphasize the unique sensitivity of these two complementary methods to follow catalytic processes in the broad ranges of length and time scales.

  16. In situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy/synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray diffraction-A powerful new technique for the characterization of electrochemical surfaces and interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Marco, Roland [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)]. E-mail: r.demarco@exchange.curtin.edu.au; Jiang, Z.-T. [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Martizano, Jay [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Lowe, Alex [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Pejcic, Bobby [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Riessen, Arie van [Materials Research Group, Department of Applied Physics, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2006-08-15

    A marriage of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and in situ synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (SR-GIXRD) has provided a powerful new technique for the elucidation of the mechanistic chemistry of electrochemical systems. In this study, EIS/SR-GIXRD has been used to investigate the influence of metal ion buffer calibration ligands, along with natural organic ligands in seawater, on the behaviour of the iron chalcogenide glass ion-selective electrode (ISE). The SR-GIXRD data demonstrated that citrate - a previously reported poor iron calibration ligand for the analysis of seawater - induced an instantaneous and total dissolution of crystalline GeSe and Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} in the modified surface layer (MSL) of the ISE, while natural organic ligands in seawater and a mixture of ligands in a mimetic seawater ligand system protected the MSL's crystalline inclusions of GeSe and Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} from oxidative attack. Expectedly, the EIS data showed that citrate induced a loss in the medium frequency time constant for the MSL of the ISE, while seawater's natural organic ligands and the mimetic ligand system preserved the medium frequency EIS response characteristics of the ISE's MSL. The new EIS/SR-GIXRD technique has provided insights into the suitability of iron calibration ligands for the analysis of iron in seawater.

  17. Nanocomposite hydrogels stabilized by self-assembled multivalent bisphosphonate-magnesium nanoparticles mediate sustained release of magnesium ion and promote in-situ bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kunyu; Lin, Sien; Feng, Qian; Dong, Chaoqun; Yang, Yanhua; Li, Gang; Bian, Liming

    2017-12-01

    Hydrogels are appealing biomaterials for applications in regenerative medicine due to their tunable physical and bioactive properties. Meanwhile, therapeutic metal ions, such as magnesium ion (Mg 2+ ), not only regulate the cellular behaviors but also stimulate local bone formation and healing. However, the effective delivery and tailored release of Mg 2+ remains a challenge, with few reports on hydrogels being used for Mg 2+ delivery. Bisphosphonate exhibits a variety of specific bioactivities and excellent binding affinity to multivalent cations such as Mg 2+ . Herein, we describe a nanocomposite hydrogel based on hyaluronic acid and self-assembled bisphosphonate-magnesium (BP-Mg) nanoparticles. These nanoparticles bearing acrylate groups on the surface not only function as effective multivalent crosslinkers to strengthen the hydrogel network structure, but also promote the mineralization of hydrogels and mediate sustained release of Mg 2+ . The released Mg 2+ ions facilitate stem cell adhesion and spreading on the hydrogel substrates in the absence of cell adhesion ligands, and promote osteogenesis of the seeded hMSCs in vitro. Furthermore, the acellular porous hydrogels alone can support in situ bone regeneration without using exogenous cells and inductive agents, thereby greatly simplifying the approaches of bone regeneration therapy. In this study, we developed a novel bioactive nanocomposite hydrogel based on hyaluronic acid and self-assembled bisphosphonate-magnesium (BP-Mg) nanoparticles. Such hydrogels are stabilized by the multivalent crosslinking domains formed by the aggregation of Ac-BP-Mg NPs, and therefore show enhanced mechanical properties, improved capacity for mineralization, and controlled release kinetics of Mg 2+ . Moreover, the released Mg 2+ can enhance cell adhesion and spreading, and further promote the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Owing to these unique properties, these acellular hydrogels alone can well facilitate the in vivo

  18. Novel in situ self-assembly nanoparticles for formulating a poorly water-soluble drug in oral solid granules, improving stability, palatability, and bioavailability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo S

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Shujie Guo,1 Kevin Pham,2 Diana Li,2 Scott R Penzak,3 Xiaowei Dong2 1State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Hypertension, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 3Department of Pharmacotherapy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a novel lipid-based nanotechnology to formulate poorly water-soluble drugs in oral solid granules to improve stability, palatability, and bioavailability. Materials and methods: In one method, we prepared ritonavir (RTV nanoparticles (NPs by a microemulsion-precursor method and then converted the RTV NPs to solid granules by wet granulation to produce RTV NP-containing granules. In the other innovative method, we did not use water in the formulation preparation, and discovered novel in situ self-assembly nanoparticles (ISNPs. We prepared RTV ISNP granules that did not initially contain NPs, but spontaneously produced RTV ISNPs when the granules were introduced to water with gentle agitation. We fully characterized these RTV nanoformulations. We also used rats to test the bioavailability of RTV ISNP granules. Finally, an Astree electronic tongue was used to assess the taste of the RTV ISNP granules. Results: RTV NP-containing granules only had about 1% drug loading of RTV in the solid granules. In contrast, RTV ISNP granules achieved over 16% drug loading and were stable at room temperature over 24 weeks. RTV ISNPs had particle size between 160 nm and 300 nm with narrow size distribution. RTV ISNPs were stable in simulated gastric fluid for 2 hours and in simulated intestinal fluid for another 6 hours. The data from the electronic tongue showed that the RTV ISNP granules were similar in taste to blank ISNP granules, but were much different from RTV solution. RTV ISNP granules increased RTV bioavailability

  19. Accuracy assessment of water vapour measurements from in situ and remote sensing techniques during the DEMEVAP 2011 campaign at OHP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Bock

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Development of Methodologies for Water Vapour Measurement (DEMEVAP project aims at assessing and improving humidity sounding techniques and establishing a reference system based on the combination of Raman lidars, ground-based sensors and GPS. Such a system may be used for climate monitoring, radiosonde bias detection and correction, satellite measurement calibration/validation, and mm-level geodetic positioning with Global Navigation Satellite Systems. A field experiment was conducted in September–October 2011 at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP. Two Raman lidars (IGN mobile lidar and OHP NDACC lidar, a stellar spectrometer (SOPHIE, a differential absorption spectrometer (SAOZ, a sun photometer (AERONET, 5 GPS receivers and 4 types of radiosondes (Vaisala RS92, MODEM M2K2-DC and M10, and Meteolabor Snow White participated in the campaign. A total of 26 balloons with multiple radiosondes were flown during 16 clear nights. This paper presents preliminary findings from the analysis of all these data sets. Several classical Raman lidar calibration methods are evaluated which use either Vaisala RS92 measurements, point capacitive humidity measurements, or GPS integrated water vapour (IWV measurements. A novel method proposed by Bosser et al. (2010 is also tested. It consists in calibrating the lidar measurements during the GPS data processing. The methods achieve a repeatability of 4–5%. Changes in the calibration factor of IGN Raman lidar are evidenced which are attributed to frequent optical re-alignments. When modelling and correcting the changes as a linear function of time, the precision of the calibration factors improves to 2–3%. However, the variations in the calibration factor, and hence the absolute accuracy, between methods and types of reference data remain at the level of 7%. The intercomparison of radiosonde measurements shows good agreement between RS92 and Snow White measurements up to 12 km. An overall dry bias is found

  20. A combined interfacial and in-situ polymerization strategy to construct well-defined core-shell epoxy-containing SiO2-based microcapsules with high encapsulation loading, super thermal stability and nonpolar solvent tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Jia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available SiO2-based microcapsules containing hydrophobic molecules exhibited potential applications such as extrinsic self-healing, drug delivery, due to outstanding thermal and chemical stability of SiO2. However, to construct SiO2-based microcapsules with both high encapsulation loading and long-term structural stability is still a troublesome issue, limiting their further utilization. We herein design a single-batch route, a combined interfacial and in-situ polymerization strategy, to fabricate epoxy-containing SiO2-based microcapsules with both high encapsulation loading and long-term structural stability. The final SiO2-based microcapsules preserve high encapsulation loading of 85.7 wt% by controlling exclusively hydrolysis and condensed polymerization at oil/water interface in the initial interfacial polymerization step. In the subsequent in-situ polymerization step, the initial SiO2-based microcapsules as seeds could efficiently harvest SiO2 precursors and primary SiO2 particles to finely tune the SiO2 wall thickness, thereby enhancing long-term structural stability of the final SiO2-based microcapsules including high thermal stability with almost no any weight loss until 250°C, and strong tolerance against nonpolar solvents such as CCl4 with almost unchanged core-shell structure and unchanged core weight after immersing into strong solvents for up to 5 days. These SiO2-based microcapsules are extremely suited for processing them into anticorrosive coating in the presence of nonpolar solvents for self-healing application.

  1. Frequencies of X-ray induced chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of xeroderma pigmentosum and Fanconi anemia patients estimated by Giemsa and fluorescence in situ hybridization staining techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraswathy Radha

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood lymphocytes from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP and Fanconi anemia (FA patients were assessed for their sensitivity to ionizing radiation by estimating the frequency of X-ray (1 and 2 Gy-induced chromosome aberrations (CA. The frequencies of aberrations in the whole genome were estimated in Giemsa-stained preparations of lymphocytes irradiated at G0 or G2 stages. The frequencies of translocations and dicentrics involving chromosomes 1 and 3 as well as the X-chromosome were determined in slides stained by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technique. An increase in all types of CA was observed in XP and FA lymphocytes irradiated at G0 when compared to controls. The frequency of dicentrics and rings was 6 to 27% higher (at 1 and 2 Gy in XP lymphocytes and 37% higher (at 2 Gy in FA lymphocytes than in controls, while chromosome deletions were higher in irradiated (30% in 1 Gy and 72% in 2 Gy than in control XP lymphocytes and 28 to 102% higher in FA lymphocytes. In G2-irradiated lymphocytes the frequency of CA was 24 to 55% higher in XP lymphocytes than in controls. In most cases the translocation frequencies were higher than the frequencies of dicentrics (21/19.

  2. In-situ investigation of stress conditions during expansion of bare metal stents and PLLA-coated stents using the XRD sin(2)ψ-technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Wolfgang; Dammer, Markus; Bakczewitz, Frank; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter; Grabow, Niels; Kessler, Olaf

    2015-09-01

    Drug eluting stents (DES) consist of platform, coating and drug. The platform often is a balloon-expandable bare metal stent made of the CoCr alloy L-605 or stainless steel 316 L. The function of the coating, typically a permanent polymer, is to hold and release the drug, which should improve therapeutic outcome. Before implantation, DES are compressed (crimped) to allow implantation in the human body. During implantation, DES are expanded by balloon inflation. Crimping, as well as expansion, causes high stresses and high strains locally in the DES struts, as well as in the polymer coating. These stresses and strains are important design criteria of DES. Usually, they are calculated numerically by finite element analysis (FEA), but experimental results for validation are hardly available. In this work, the X-ray diffraction (XRD) sin(2)ψ-technique is applied to in-situ determination of stress conditions of bare metal L-605 stents, and Poly-(L-lactide) (PLLA) coated stents. This provides a realistic characterization of the near-surface stress state and a validation option of the numerical FEA. XRD-results from terminal stent struts of the bare metal stent show an increasing compressive load stress in tangential direction with increasing stent expansion. These findings correlate with numerical FEA results. The PLLA-coating also bears increasing compressive load stress during expansion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Preparation and stability investigation of tamsulosin hydrochloride sustained release pellets containing acrylic resin polymers with two different techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Fan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to prepare tamsulosin hydrochloride-sustained release (TSH-SR pellets which showed good release stability with frame-controlled method. TSH was added to Eudragit®NE30D and Eudragit®L30D-55 polymers to form drug-loaded inner core. Afterwards, enteric Eudragit®L30D-55 polymer was modified on the surface of it to the final product. Dissolution studies showed that TSH-SR pellets were more stable during the coating process, different curing temperatures and storage conditions compared with TSH pellets produced by film-controlled technique. Appearances and glass transition temperatures (Tgs of free films and surface morphologies observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM of blank sustained release pellets prepared by different ratios of Eudragit®NE30D and Eudragit®L30D-55 further indicated that temperature and relative humidity (RH were the key factors when Eudragit®NE30D blended with Eudragit®L30D-55 were applied to sustained/controlled release preparations. In addition, SEM identified the surface morphologies of TSH-SR pellets before and after dissolution, which showed intact surface structure and great correlation with release curve respectively.

  4. Stabilization of compactible waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Influence of gas atmospheres and ceria on the stability of nanoporous gold studied by environmental electron microscopy and In situ ptychography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baier, Sina; Wittstock, Arne; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad

    2016-01-01

    A novel complementary approach of electron microscopy/environmental TEM and in situ hard X-ray ptychography was used to study the thermally induced coarsening of nanoporous gold under different atmospheres, pressures and after ceria deposition. The temperature applied during ptychographic imaging...

  6. The effect of water on the stability of iron oxide and iron carbide nanoparticles in hydrogen and syngas followed by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuene, P.C.; Moodley - Gengan, P.; Scheijen, F.J.E.; Fredriksson, H.O.A.; Lancee, R.J.; Kropf, J.; Miller, J.T.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of water on iron-based nanoparticles under hydrogen and syngas was investigated by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The iron oxide (¿-Fe2O3) nanoparticles, dispersed as a monolayer on flat silica surfaces, were readily converted into metallic iron in dry hydrogen at 350 °C and into

  7. A PILOT PROJECT FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH TECHNIQUES AND PROCEDURES SUITABLE FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF INSTITUTIONAL STABILITY AND CHANGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TURNEY, DAVID T.

    THE PROBLEM INVESTIGATED IN THIS STUDY INVOLVED THE DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNIQUES AND PROCEDURES THAT COULD YIELD MEASURES OF INSTITUTIONAL STABILITY AND CHANGE ALONG A TIME CONTINUUM. THE STUDY FOCUSED ON THE PUPILS AND TEACHERS IN THE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF KENT STATE UNIVERSITY (658 PUPILS IN KINDERGARTEN CLASSES THROUGH GRADE 12 AND 29 INSTRUCTORS).…

  8. Influence of the surgical technique and surface roughness on the primary stability of an implant in artificial bone with a density equivalent to maxillary bone: a laboratory study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabassum, A.; Meijer, G.J.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this biomechanical study was to assess the effect of surgical technique and surface roughness on primary implant stability in low-density bone. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighty screw-shaped (Biocomp) implants with machined or etched surface topography were inserted into a

  9. Influence of surgical technique and surface roughness on the primary stability of an implant in artificial bone with different cortical thickness: a laboratory study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabassum, A.; Meijer, G.J.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this biomechanical study was to assess the interrelated effect of both surface roughness and surgical technique on the primary stability of dental implants. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the experiment, 160 screw-designed implants (Biocomp), with either a machined or an etched

  10. A one year prospective study on ankle stability and landing technique : The occurrence of ankle and knee injuries in elite ball team athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Msc Henrike van der Does; M.S. Brink; Koen A.P.M. Lemmink

    2014-01-01

    Background: In team sports lower extremity injuries account for more than 50% of all injuries, indicating the importance of early detection of athletes at risk. Objective: To investigate the predictive value of ankle stability and landing technique at baseline for ankle and knee injury occurrence

  11. Applicability study of using in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry technique for 137Cs and 210Pbex inventories measurement in grassland environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Junjie; Li Yong; Wang Yanglin; Wu Jiansheng

    2010-01-01

    In-situ measurement of fallout radionuclides 137 Cs and 210 Pb ex has the potential to assess soil erosion and sedimentation rapidly. In this study, inventories of 137 Cs and 210 Pb ex in the soil of Inner Mongolia grassland were measured using an In-situ Object Counting System (ISOCS). The results from the field study indicate that in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry has the following advantages over traditional laboratory measurements: no extra time is required for sample collection, no reference inventories are required, more economic, prompt availability of the results, the ability to average radionuclide inventory over a large area, and high precision.

  12. Using the charge-stabilization technique in the double ionization potential equation-of-motion calculations with dianion references.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuś, Tomasz; Krylov, Anna I

    2011-08-28

    The charge-stabilization method is applied to double ionization potential equation-of-motion (EOM-DIP) calculations to stabilize unstable dianion reference functions. The auto-ionizing character of the dianionic reference states spoils the numeric performance of EOM-DIP limiting applications of this method. We demonstrate that reliable excitation energies can be computed by EOM-DIP using a stabilized resonance wave function instead of the lowest energy solution corresponding to the neutral + free electron(s) state of the system. The details of charge-stabilization procedure are discussed and illustrated by examples. The choice of optimal stabilizing Coulomb potential, which is strong enough to stabilize the dianion reference, yet, minimally perturbs the target states of the neutral, is the crux of the approach. Two algorithms of choosing optimal parameters of the stabilization potential are presented. One is based on the orbital energies, and another--on the basis set dependence of the total Hartree-Fock energy of the reference. Our benchmark calculations of the singlet-triplet energy gaps in several diradicals show a remarkable improvement of the EOM-DIP accuracy in problematic cases. Overall, the excitation energies in diradicals computed using the stabilized EOM-DIP are within 0.2 eV from the reference EOM spin-flip values. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  13. Changes in implant stability using different site preparation techniques: twist drills versus piezosurgery. A single-blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacchi, Claudio; Vercellotti, Tomaso; Torelli, Lucio; Furlan, Fabio; Di Lenarda, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to longitudinally monitor stability changes of implants inserted using traditional rotary instruments or piezoelectric inserts, and to follow their variations during the first 90 days of healing. A randomized, controlled trial was conducted on 20 patients. Each patient received two identical, adjacent implants in the upper premolar area: the test site was prepared with piezosurgery, and the control site was prepared using twist drills. Resonance frequency analysis measurements were taken by a blinded operator on the day of surgery and after 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, 56, and 90 days. At 90 days, 39 out of 40 implants were osseointegrated (one failure in the control group). Both groups showed an initial decrease in mean implant stability quotient (ISQ) values: a shift in implant stability to increasing ISQ values occurred after 14 days in the test group and after 21 days in the control group. The lowest mean ISQ value was recorded at 14 days for test implants (97.3% of the primary stability) and at 21 days for the control implants (90.8% of the primary stability). ISQ variations with respect to primary stability differed significantly between the two groups during the entire period of observation: from day 14 to day 42, in particular, the differences were extremely significant (p < .0001). All 39 implants were in function successfully at the visit scheduled 1 year after insertion. The findings from this study suggest that ultrasonic implant site preparation results in a limited decrease of ISQ values and in an earlier shifting from a decreasing to an increasing stability pattern, when compared with the traditional drilling technique. From a clinical point of view, implants inserted with the piezoelectric technique demonstrated a short-term clinical success similar to those inserted using twist drills. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Application of spectrophotometric, densitometric, and HPLC techniques as stability indicating methods for determination of Zaleplon in pharmaceutical preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metwally, Fadia H.; Abdelkawy, M.; Abdelwahab, Nada S.

    2007-12-01

    Spectrophotometric, spectrodensitometric and HPLC are stability indicating methods described for determination of Zaleplon in pure and dosage forms. As Zaleplon is easily degradable, the proposed techniques in this manuscript are adopted for its determination in presence of its alkaline degradation product, namely N-[4-(3-cyano-pyrazolo[1,5a]pyridin-7-yl)-phenyl]- N-ethyl-acetamide. These approaches are successfully applied to quantify Zaleplon using the information included in the absorption spectra of appropriate solutions. The second derivative (D 2) spectrophotometric method, allows determination of Zaleplon without interference of its degradate at 235.2 nm using 0.01N HCl as a solvent with obedience to Beer's law over a concentration range of 1-10 μg ml -1 with mean percentage recovery 100.24 ± 0.86%. The first derivative of the ratio spectra ( 1DD) based on the simultaneous use of ( 1DD) and measurement at 241.8 nm using the same solvent and over the same concentration range as (D 2) spectrophotometric method, with mean percentage recovery 99.9 ± 1.07%. The spectrodensitometric analysis allows the separation and quantitation of Zaleplon from its degradate on silica gel plates using chloroform:acetone:ammonia solution (9:1:0.2 by volume) as a mobile phase. This method depends on quantitave densitometric evaluation of thin layer chromatogram of Zaleplon at 338 nm over a concentration range of 0.2-1 μg band -1, with mean percentage recovery 99.73 ± 1.35. Also a reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method using 5-C8 (22 cm × 4.6 mm i.d. 5 μm particle size) column was described and validated for quantitation of Zaleplon using acetonitrile:deionised water (35:65, v/v) as a mobile phase using Paracetamol as internal standard and a flow rate of 1.5 ml min -1 with UV detection of the effluent at 232 nm at ambient temperature over a concentration range of 2-20 μg ml -1 with mean percentage recovery 100.19 ± 1.15%. The insignificance difference of the proposed

  15. An Assessment of the Stability and the Potential for In-Situ Synthesis of Regulated Organic Compounds in High Level Radioactive Waste Stored at Hanford, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiemers, K.D.; Babad, H.; Hallen, R.T.; Jackson, L.P.; Lerchen, M.E.

    1999-01-04

    The stability assessment examined 269 non-detected regulated compounds, first seeking literature references of the stability of the compounds, then evaluating each compound based upon the presence of functional groups using professional judgment. Compounds that could potentially survive for significant periods in the tanks (>1 year) were designated as stable. Most of the functional groups associated with the regulated organic compounds were considered unstable under tank waste conditions. The general exceptions with respect to functional group stability are some simple substituted aromatic and polycyclic aromatic compounds that resist oxidation and the multiple substituted aliphatic and aromatic halides that hydrolyze or dehydrohalogenate slowly under tank waste conditions. One-hundred and eighty-one (181) regulated, organic compounds were determined as likely unstable in the tank waste environment.

  16. An Assessment of the Stability and the Potential for In-Situ Synthesis of Regulated Organic Compounds in High Level Radioactive Waste Stored at Hanford, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiemers, K.D.; Babad, H.; Hallen, R.T.; Jackson, L.P.; Lerchen, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    The stability assessment examined 269 non-detected regulated compounds, first seeking literature references of the stability of the compounds, then evaluating each compound based upon the presence of functional groups using professional judgment. Compounds that could potentially survive for significant periods in the tanks (>1 year) were designated as stable. Most of the functional groups associated with the regulated organic compounds were considered unstable under tank waste conditions. The general exceptions with respect to functional group stability are some simple substituted aromatic and polycyclic aromatic compounds that resist oxidation and the multiple substituted aliphatic and aromatic halides that hydrolyze or dehydrohalogenate slowly under tank waste conditions. One-hundred and eighty-one (181) regulated, organic compounds were determined as likely unstable in the tank waste environment

  17. The role of post-failure brittleness of soft rocks in the assessment of stability of intact masses: FDEM technique applications to ideal problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lollino, Piernicola; Andriani, Gioacchino Francesco; Fazio, Nunzio Luciano; Perrotti, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Strain-softening under low confinement stress, i.e. the drop of strength that occurs in the post-failure stage, represents a key factor of the stress-strain behavior of rocks. However, this feature of the rock behavior is generally underestimated or even neglected in the assessment of boundary value problems of intact soft rock masses. This is typically the case when the stability of intact rock masses is treated by means of limit equilibrium or finite element analyses, for which rigid-plastic or elastic perfectly-plastic constitutive models, generally implementing peak strength conditions of the rock, are respectively used. In fact, the aforementioned numerical techniques are characterized by intrinsic limitations that do not allow to account for material brittleness, either for the method assumptions or due to numerical stability problems, as for the case of the finite element method, unless sophisticated regularization techniques are implemented. However, for those problems that concern the stability of intact soft rock masses at low stress levels, as for example the stability of shallow underground caves or that of rock slopes, the brittle stress-strain response of rock in the post-failure stage cannot be disregarded due to the risk of overestimation of the stability factor. This work is aimed at highlighting the role of post-peak brittleness of soft rocks in the analysis of specific ideal problems by means of the use of a hybrid finite-discrete element technique (FDEM) that allows for the simulation of the rock stress-strain brittle behavior in a proper way. In particular, the stability of two ideal cases, represented by a shallow underground rectangular cave and a vertical cliff, has been analyzed by implementing a post-peak brittle behavior of the rock and the comparison with a non-brittle response of the rock mass is also explored. To this purpose, the mechanical behavior of a soft calcarenite belonging to the Calcarenite di Gravina formation, extensively

  18. Finite Element Optimised Back Analysis of In Situ Stress Field and Stability Analysis of Shaft Wall in the Underground Gas Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel optimised back analysis method is proposed in this paper. The in situ stress field of an underground gas storage (UGS reservoir in a Turkey salt cavern is analysed by the basic theory of elastic mechanics. A finite element method is implemented to optimise and approximate the objective function by systematically adjusting boundary loads. Optimising calculation is performed based on a novel method to reduce the error between measurement and calculation as much as possible. Compared with common back analysis methods such as regression method, the method proposed can further improve the calculation precision. By constructing a large circular geometric model, the effect of stress concentration is eliminated and a minimum difference between computed and measured stress can be guaranteed in the rectangular objective region. The efficiency of the proposed method is investigated and confirmed by its capability on restoring in situ stress field, which agrees well with experimental results. The characteristics of stress distribution of chosen UGS wells are obtained based on the back analysis results and by applying the corresponding fracture criterion, the shaft walls are proven safe.

  19. Use of cement-fly ash-based stabilization techniques for the treatment of waste containing aromatic contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszkiewicz, Kamil; Marcinkowski, Tadeusz

    2017-11-01

    Research on evaluation of evaporation rate of volatile organic compounds from soil beds during processing is presented. For the experiment, soil samples were prepared with the same amounts of benzene and stabilized using a mixture of CEMI 42.5R cement and fly ash from pit-coal combustion. Solidification of soils contaminated with BTEX hydrocarbons using hydraulic binders involves a risk of releasing vapours of these compounds during homogenization of waste with stabilizing mixture introduced and its dilution with water. The primary purposes of the research were: analysis of benzene volume emitted from soil during stabilization/solidification process and characterization of factors that may negatively affect the quality of measurements/the course of stabilization process. Analysis of benzene emission intensity during the process was based on concentration (C6H6) values, recorded with flame-ionization detector above the surface of reacting mixture. At the same time, gaseous contaminants emitted during waste stabilization were passed through pipes filled with activated carbon (SCK, Anasorb CSC). Benzene vapours adsorbed on activated carbon were subjected to analysis using gas chromatograph Varian 450-GC. Evaporation characteristics of benzene during processing contaminated soils revealed the stages creating the highest danger to workers' health, as well as a need for actions connected with modification of technological line.

  20. On the stability of a variety of organic photovoltaic devices by IPCE and in situ IPCE analyses: the ISOS-3 inter-laboratory collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teran-Escobar, G.; Tanenbaum, D.M.; Voroshazi, E.; Hermenau, M.; Norrman, K.; Lloyd, M.T.; Galagan, Y.O.; Zimmermann, B.; Hösel, M.; Dam, H.F.; Jorgensen, M.; Gevorgyan, S.; Kudret, S.; Maes, W.; Lutsen, L.; Vanderzande, D.; Würfel, U.; Andriessen, H.A.J.M.; Rösch, R.; Hoppe, H.; Rivaton, A.; Uzunoglu, G.Y.; Germack, D.; Andreasen, B.; Madsen, M.V.; Bundgaard, E.; Krebs, F.C.; Lira-Cantu, M.

    2012-01-01

    This work is part of the inter-laboratory collaboration to study the stability of seven distinct sets of state-of-the-art organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices prepared by leading research laboratories. All devices have been shipped to and degraded at RISO-DTU up to 1830 hours in accordance with

  1. On the stability of a variety of organic photovoltaic devices by IPCE and in situ IPCE analyses – the ISOS-3 inter-laboratory collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teran-Escobar, Gerardo; Tanenbaum, David; Voroshazi, Eszter

    2012-01-01

    This work is part of the inter-laboratory collaboration to study the stability of seven distinct sets of state-of-the-art organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices prepared by leading research laboratories. All devices have been shipped to and degraded at RISØ-DTU up to 1830 hours in accordance...

  2. [Development of Patient Transfer Techniques based on Postural-stability Principles for the Care Helpers in Nursing Homes and Evaluation of Effectiveness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ryewon; Jung, Dukyoo

    2016-02-01

    This study was done to develop a postural-stability patient transfer technique for care helpers in nursing homes and to evaluate its effectiveness. Four types of patient transfer techniques (Lifting towards the head board of the bed, turning to the lateral position, sitting upright on the bed, transferring from wheel chair to bed) were practiced in accordance with the following three methods; Care helpers habitually used transfer methods (Method 1), patient transfer methods according to care helper standard textbooks (Method 2), and a method developed by the author ensuring postural-stability (Method 3). The care helpers' muscle activity and four joint angles were measured. The collected data were analyzed using the program SPSS Statistic 21.0. To differentiate the muscle activity and joint angle, the Friedman test was executed and the post-hoc analysis was conducted using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. Muscle activity was significantly lower during Method 3 compared to Methods 1 and 2. In addition, the joint angle was significantly lower for the knee and shoulder joint angle while performing Method 3 compared to Methods 1 and 2. Findings indicate that using postural-stability patient transfer techniques can contribute to the prevention of musculoskeletal disease which care helpers suffer from due to physically demanding patient care in nursing homes.

  3. Polymer-Based Black Phosphorus (bP) Hybrid Materials by in Situ Radical Polymerization: An Effective Tool To Exfoliate bP and Stabilize bP Nanoflakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Black phosphorus (bP) has been recently investigated for next generation nanoelectronic multifunctional devices. However, the intrinsic instability of exfoliated bP (the bP nanoflakes) toward both moisture and air has so far overshadowed its practical implementation. In order to contribute to fill this gap, we report here the preparation of new hybrid polymer-based materials where bP nanoflakes (bPn) exhibit a significantly improved stability. The new materials have been prepared by different synthetic paths including: (i) the mixing of conventionally liquid-phase exfoliated bP (in dimethyl sulfoxide, DMSO) with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) solution; (ii) the direct exfoliation of bP in a polymeric solution; (iii) the in situ radical polymerization after exfoliating bP in the liquid monomer (methyl methacrylate, MMA). This last methodology concerns the preparation of stable suspensions of bPn–MMA by sonication-assisted liquid-phase exfoliation (LPE) of bP in the presence of MMA followed by radical polymerization. The hybrids characteristics have been compared in order to evaluate the bP dispersion and the effectiveness of the bPn interfacial interactions with polymer chains aimed at their long-term environmental stabilization. The passivation of the bPn is particularly effective when the hybrid material is prepared by in situ polymerization. By using this synthetic methodology, the nanoflakes, even if with a gradient of dispersion (size of aggregates), preserve their chemical structure from oxidation (as proved by both Raman and 31P-solid state NMR studies) and are particularly stable to air and UV light exposure. The feasibility of this approach, capable of efficiently exfoliating bP while protecting the bPn, has been then verified by using different vinyl monomers (styrene and N-vinylpyrrolidone), thus obtaining hybrids where the nanoflakes are embedded in polymer matrices with a variety of intriguing thermal, mechanical, and solubility characteristics.

  4. Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification technology for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, G.K.; Spalding, B.P.

    1991-11-01

    This plan summarizes the activities to be performed during FY 1990 and FY 1991 for the tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale in situ vitrification (ISV) test. This test is the second step in evaluating ISV as a remedial action for the pits and trenches at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A previous test used nonradioactive tracers for cesium and strontium. This new test will again use a one-half-scale model of trench 7 and the pilot-scale ISV equipment of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A small and precisely known amount of waste from a liquid waste disposal pit will be used for the test. An actually contaminated waste site cannot be used for this test because of the necessity to use an exactly known inventory of radionuclides so that a precise measurement of the volatilization of various constituents to the off-gas can be determined

  5. High selectivity and stability of Mg-doped Al-MCM-41 for in-situ catalytic upgrading fast pyrolysis bio-oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnjanakom, Surachai; Suriya-umporn, Thanyamai; Bayu, Asep; Kongparakul, Suwadee; Samart, Chanatip; Fushimi, Chihiro; Abudula, Abuliti; Guan, Guoqing

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Mg-doped Al-MCM-41 was developed for in-situ catalytic upgrading of bio-oils. • Mg/Al-MCM-41 exhibited high selectivity to aromatic hydrocarbons. • The ratio of produced hydrocarbon reached up to 80% in upgraded bio-oil. • 1 wt.% Mg/Al-MCM-41 showed the highest catalytic activity. • Mg/Al-MCM-41 had stable reusability due to its coking inhabitation ability. - Abstract: In-situ catalytic upgrading of bio-oils derived from the fast pyrolysis of cellulose, lignin or sunflower stalk over Mg-doped Al-MCM-41 was investigated in details. It is found that Mg species with doping amounts ranged between 0.25 and 10 wt.% was well dispersed on Al-MCM-41, and that doping Mg on Al-MCM-41 effectively adjusted the acidity and basicity of the catalysts, resulting in significant improvement of bio-oil quality. Mg/Al-MCM-41 exhibited high selective conversion of bio-oils derived from cellulose, lignin or sunflower stalk to high value-added aromatic hydrocarbons via catalytic cracking, deoxygenation and aromatization. In the upgraded bio-oil, the relative total hydrocarbon amount reached up to approximately ≥80%, which consisted of aromatic hydrocarbon approximately 76% and aliphatic hydrocarbon approximately 4% for all feedstocks. The selectivity to the monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) such as benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTXs) increased while the coke formed on the catalyst decreased with the increase in Mg doping amount. 1 wt.% Mg/Al-MCM-41 resulted in the highest relative total hydrocarbon amount in the upgraded bio-oil at lower catalytic deoxygenation temperature, and showed stable reusability for at least 5 cycles. It is expected that Mg/Al-MCM-41 can be widely applied for bio-oil upgrading in a practical process.

  6. Evaluation of a New Technique for iFOBT Utilising a New Sample Collection Device with Increased Buffer Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns-Toepler, Markus; Hardt, Philip

    2017-07-01

    The aims of the present study were: (i) Evaluate specificity and sensitivity of Hb Smart enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (ScheBo Biotech) compared to colonoscopy results and (ii) assess stability of a new sample collection device containing a newly formulated buffer to extract haemoglobin using buffer and stool samples spiked with defined concentrations of haemoglobin. Stool samples were quantified with the ELISA method. The stability of haemoglobin in the extraction buffer and in native stool samples, respectively, was determined daily by ELISA during storage for 5 days at 4°C and at room temperature after addition of haemoglobin. Haemoglobin ELISA had a sensitivity of 78.4% for detection of CRC with a specificity of 98%. Haemoglobin extracted in corresponding extraction buffer demonstrated stability throughout storage for 5 days at 4°C and at room temperature. Hb Smart represents a very promising tool for large-scale screening of CRC with regard to sample handling, stability and analysis of haemoglobin in faeces. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  7. Alternative technique of cervical spinal stabilization employing lateral mass plate and screw and intra-articular spacer fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Goel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The author discusses an alternative technique of segmental cervical spinal fixation. Material and Methods: The subtleties of the technique are discussed on the basis of experience with 3 cases with a follow-up of between 30 and 36 months. Technique: The technique involves debridement of facetal articular cartilage, distraction of facets, jamming of ′Goel spacer′ into the articular cavity and fortification of the fixation by lateral mass plate and screw fixation. The ′double-insurance′ method of fixation is safe for vertebral artery, nerve roots and spinal neural structures and the fixation is strong. Conclusions: The discussed technique is safe and provides a strong fixation and a ground for ultimate arthrodesis.

  8. Polynomial fuzzy model-based control systems stability analysis and control synthesis using membership function dependent techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, Hak-Keung

    2016-01-01

    This book presents recent research on the stability analysis of polynomial-fuzzy-model-based control systems where the concept of partially/imperfectly matched premises and membership-function dependent analysis are considered. The membership-function-dependent analysis offers a new research direction for fuzzy-model-based control systems by taking into account the characteristic and information of the membership functions in the stability analysis. The book presents on a research level the most recent and advanced research results, promotes the research of polynomial-fuzzy-model-based control systems, and provides theoretical support and point a research direction to postgraduate students and fellow researchers. Each chapter provides numerical examples to verify the analysis results, demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed polynomial fuzzy control schemes, and explain the design procedure. The book is comprehensively written enclosing detailed derivation steps and mathematical derivations also for read...

  9. Development and application of compact denuder sampling techniques with in situ derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for halogen speciation in volcanic plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, Julian; Bobrowski, Nicole; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Volcanoes are a large source for several reactive atmospheric trace gases including sulphur and halogen containing species. The detailed knowledge of volcanic plume chemistry can give insights into subsurface processes and can be considered as a useful geochemical tool for monitoring of volcanic activity, especially halogen to sulphur ratios (e.g. Bobrowski and Giuffrida, 2012; Donovan et al., 2014). The reactive bromine species bromine monoxide (BrO) is of particular interest, because BrO as well as SO2 are readily measurable by UV spectrometers at a safe distance. Furthermore it is formed in the plume by a multiphase reaction mechanism under depletion of ozone in the plume. The abundance of BrO changes as a function of the reaction time and therefore distance from the vent as well as the spatial position in the plume. Due to the lack of analytical approaches for the accurate speciation of certain halogens (HBr, Br2, Br, BrCl, HOBr etc.) there are still uncertainties about the magnitude of volcanic halogen emissions and in particular their specificationtheir species and therefore also in the understanding of the bromine chemistry in volcanic plumes (Bobrowski et al., 2007). In this study, the first application of a 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene (1,3,5-TMB)-coated gas diffusion denuder (Huang and Hoffmann, 2008) on volcanic gases proved to be suitable to collect selectively gaseous bromine species with oxidation states of +1 or 0 (Br2 and BrO(H)), while being ignorant to HBr (OS -1). The reaction of 1,3,5-TMB with bromine gives 1-bromo-2,4,6-trimethoxybenzene (1-bromo-2,4,6-TMB) - other halogens give corresponding products. The diffusion denuder technique allows sampling of gaseous compounds exclusively without collecting particulate matter. Choosing a flow rate of 500 mL-min-1 and a denuder length of 0.5 m a nearly quantitative collection efficiency was achieved. Solvent elution of the derivatized analytes and subsequent analysis with gas chromatography

  10. Techniques to determine ignition, flame stability and burnout of blended coals in p.f. power station boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, S.; Pohl, J.H.; Holcombe, D.; Hart, J.A. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2001-07-01

    The blending of coals has become popular to improve the performance of coals, to meet specifications of power plants and to reduce the cost of coals. This article reviews the results and provides new information on ignition, flame stability, and carbon burnout studies of blended coals. The reviewed studies were conducted in laboratory-, pilot-, and full-scale facilities. The new information was taken in pilot-scale studies. The results generally show that blending a high-volatile coal with a low-volatile coal or anthracite can improve the ignition, flame stability and burnout of the blends. This paper discusses two general methods to predict the performance of blended coals: (1) experiment; and (2) indices. Laboratory- and pilot-scale tests, at least, provide a relative ranking of the combustion performance of coal/blends in power station boilers. Several indices, volatile matter content, heating value and a maceral index, can be used to predict the relative ranking of ignitability and flame stability of coals and blends. The maceral index, fuel ratio, and vitrinite reflectance can also be used to predict the absolute carbon burnout of coal and blends within limits. 59 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. The thermal behaviour and structural stability of nesquehonite, MgCO3.3H2O, evaluated by in situ laboratory parallel-beam X-ray powder diffraction: New constraints on CO2 sequestration within minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballirano, Paolo; De Vito, Caterina; Ferrini, Vincenzo; Mignardi, Silvano

    2010-06-15

    In order to gauge the appropriateness of CO(2) reaction with Mg chloride solutions as a process for storing carbon dioxide, the thermal behaviour and structural stability of its solid product, nesquehonite (MgCO(3).3H(2)O), were investigated in situ using real-time laboratory parallel-beam X-ray powder diffraction. The results suggest that the nesquehonite structure remains substantially unaffected up to 373 K, with the exception of a markedly anisotropic thermal expansion acting mainly along the c axis. In the 371-390 K range, the loss of one water molecule results in the nucleation of a phase of probable composition MgCO(3).2H(2)O, which is characterized by significant structural disorder. At higher temperatures (423-483 K), both magnesite and MgO.2MgCO(3) coexist. Finally, at 603 K, periclase nucleation starts and the disappearance of carbonate phases is completed at 683 K. Consequently, the structural stability of nesquehonite at high temperatures suggests that it will remain stable under the temperature conditions that prevail at the Earth's surface. These results will help (a) to set constraints on the temperature conditions under which nesquehonite may be safely stored and (b) to develop CO(2) sequestration via the synthesis of nesquehonite for industrial application. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of inorganic amendments for in situ stabilization of cadmium in contaminated soils and its phyto-availability to wheat and rice under rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Muhammad Zia-ur; Rizwan, Muhammad; Ghafoor, Abdul; Naeem, Asif; Ali, Shafaqat; Sabir, Muhammad; Qayyum, Muhammad Farooq

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) toxicity is a widespread problem in crops grown on contaminated soils, and little information is available on the role of inorganic amendments in Cd immobilization, uptake, and tolerance in crops especially under filed conditions. The effect of three amendments, monoammonium phosphate (MAP), gypsum, and elemental sulfur (S), on Cd immobilization in soil and uptake in wheat and rice plants, under rotation, were investigated under field conditions receiving raw city effluent since >20 years and contaminated with Cd. Three levels of each treatment, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8% by weight, were applied at the start of the experiment, and wheat was sown in the field. After wheat harvesting, rice was sown in the same field without application of amendments. Both crops were harvested at physiological maturity, and data regarding grain yield, straw biomass, Cd concentrations, and uptake in grain and straw, and bioavailable Cd in soil and soil pH were recorded. Both MAP and gypsum application increased grain yield and biomass of wheat and rice, while S application did not increase the yield of both crops. MAP and gypsum amendments decreased gain and straw Cd concentrations and uptake in both crops, while S application increased Cd concentrations in these parts which were correlated with soil bioavailable Cd. We conclude that MAP and gypsum amendments could be used to decrease Cd uptake by plants receiving raw city effluents, and gypsum might be a better amendment for in situ immobilization of Cd due to its low cost and frequent availability.

  13. A new technique for obtaining high-resolution pore pressure records in thick claystone aquitards and its use to determine in situ compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laura A.; van der Kamp, Garth; Jim Hendry, M.

    2013-02-01

    Laboratory tests are commonly used to determine properties (vertical compressibility, α; specific storage, SS; and vertical hydraulic conductivity, Kv) of claystone aquitards; however, whether data representative of in situ conditions can be obtained from disturbed samples is questionable. Here, we present a method to determine the in situ α and SS of a thick sequence of Cretaceous aged claystone by estimating the loading efficiency (γ) of a formation from pore pressure responses to barometric pressure fluctuations. We installed 10 vibrating wire pressure transducers at different depths (25-325 m below ground) in a thick claystone aquitard by placing them directly within the cement-bentonite grout. Two years of continuous transducer records using this method appeared to provide pore pressure data with a resolution of better than one part in 105, equivalent to millimeter of hydraulic head change. Pore pressure responses to barometric pressure changes, earth tides, and precipitation events can be clearly identified, and the barometric responses can be easily analyzed. The resulting values of γ (0.6-0.93), α (2.5 × 10-7 to 2.2 × 10-6 kPa-1), and SS (2.6 × 10-5 to 4.5 × 10-6 m-1) all decrease with depth. The results are comparable with the limited existing data for in situ estimates of SS and are as much as an order of magnitude smaller than laboratory estimates of SS for similar aquitard deposits. Our findings suggest that the fully grouted transducer method can provide an accurate and reliable means to monitor pore pressure changes and to determine in situ parameters for bedrock aquitard systems.

  14. Aminolysis of polyethylene terephthalate surface along with in situ synthesis and stabilizing ZnO nanoparticles using triethanolamine optimized with response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poortavasoly, Hajar; Montazer, Majid, E-mail: tex5mm@aut.ac.ir; Harifi, Tina

    2016-01-01

    This research concerned the simultaneous polyester surface modification and synthesis of zinc oxide nano-reactors to develop durable photo-bio-active fabric with variable hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity under sunlight. For this purpose, triethanolamine (TEA) was applied as a stabilizer and pH adjusting chemical for the aminolysis of polyester surface and enhancing the surface reactivity along with synthesis and deposition of ZnO nanoparticles on the fabric. Therefore, TEA played a crucial role in providing the alkaline condition for the preparation of zinc oxide nanoparticles and acting as stabilizer controlling the size of the prepared nanoparticles. The stain–photodegradability regarded as self-cleaning efficiency, wettability and weight change under the process was optimized based on zinc acetate and TEA concentrations, using central composite design (CCD). Findings also suggested the potential of the prepared fabric in inhibiting Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria growth with greater than 99.99% antibacterial efficiency. Besides, the proposed treatment had no detrimental effect on tensile strength and hand feeling of the polyester fabric. - Highlights: • Durable photo-bio-active polyester with variable hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity • Simultaneous polyester surface aminolysis and ZnO ball-like nanoparticle production • Multi-role of TEA for polyester aminolysis and nanoparticle formation • Optimization of photoactivity and wettability by central composite design.

  15. Determination of Reasons of Obstruction in the Condensate Stabilizer System of Namconson Gas Treatment Terminal by Radioisotope Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui Quang Tri; Nguyen Huu Quang; Dang Nguyen The Duy; Tran Tri Hai; Tran Thanh Minh

    2008-01-01

    The Condensate Stabilizer System of Namconson Gas Treatment Terminal was designed with operational flow rate of 60 m 3 /h but for unknown reason it ran efficiently below 20 m 3 /h. The Radiotracer in combination with Gamma Scan was used to investigate in understanding the reasons. The results showed the build up at the bottom of Trap out Tray which caused obstruction of condensate flow in the outlet of Trap out Tray. As a results the feed flow rate to Reboiler from Trap out Tray lowered into 1/3 and the remaining 2/3 by passing the Reboiler by overflow to the Sump. (author)

  16. Stability of mineral fibres in contact with human cell cultures. An in situ μXANES, μXRD and XRF iron mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollastri, Simone; Gualtieri, Alessandro F; Vigliaturo, Ruggero; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Strafella, Elisabetta; Pugnaloni, Armanda; Croce, Alessandro

    2016-12-01

    Relevant mineral fibres of social and economic importance (chrysotile UICC, crocidolite UICC and a fibrous erionite from Jersey, Nevada, USA) were put in contact with cultured diploid human non-tumorigenic bronchial epithelial (Beas2B) and pleural transformed mesothelial (MeT5A) cells to test their cytotoxicity. Slides of each sample at different contact times up to 96 h were studied in situ using synchrotron XRF, μ-XRD and μ-XAS (I18 beamline, Diamond Light Source, UK) and TEM investigations. XRF maps of samples treated for 96 h evidenced that iron is still present within the chrysotile and crocidolite fibres and retained at the surface of the erionite fibres, indicating its null to minor mobilization in contact with cell media; this picture was confirmed by the results of XANES pre-edge analyses. μ-XRD and TEM data indicate greater morphological and crystallinity modifications occurring in chrysotile, whereas crocidolite and erionite show to be resistant in the biological environment. The contact of chrysotile with the cell cultures seems to lead to earlier amorphization, interpreted as the first dissolution step of these fibres. The formation of such silica-rich fibre skeleton may prompt the production of HO in synergy with surface iron species and could indicate that chrysotile may be much more reactive and cytotoxic in vitro in the (very) short term whereas the activity of crocidolite and erionite would be much more sluggish but persistent in the long term. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T.; Dunbar, N.W.; Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D.

    1992-11-01

    A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were 137 Cs and 90 Sr, with lesser amounts of 6O Co, 241 Am, and 239,240 Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the 137 Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of 90 Sr, 241 Am, or 239,240 Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500 degrees C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms

  18. A Comparison of Traditional, Step-Path, and Geostatistical Techniques in the Stability Analysis of a Large Open Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, J. M.; Stead, D.

    2017-04-01

    With the increased drive towards deeper and more complex mine designs, geotechnical engineers are often forced to reconsider traditional deterministic design techniques in favour of probabilistic methods. These alternative techniques allow for the direct quantification of uncertainties within a risk and/or decision analysis framework. However, conventional probabilistic practices typically discretize geological materials into discrete, homogeneous domains, with attributes defined by spatially constant random variables, despite the fact that geological media display inherent heterogeneous spatial characteristics. This research directly simulates this phenomenon using a geostatistical approach, known as sequential Gaussian simulation. The method utilizes the variogram which imposes a degree of controlled spatial heterogeneity on the system. Simulations are constrained using data from the Ok Tedi mine site in Papua New Guinea and designed to randomly vary the geological strength index and uniaxial compressive strength using Monte Carlo techniques. Results suggest that conventional probabilistic techniques have a fundamental limitation compared to geostatistical approaches, as they fail to account for the spatial dependencies inherent to geotechnical datasets. This can result in erroneous model predictions, which are overly conservative when compared to the geostatistical results.

  19. In Situ Encapsulating α-MnS into N,S-Codoped Nanotube-Like Carbon as Advanced Anode Material: α → β Phase Transition Promoted Cycling Stability and Superior Li/Na-Storage Performance in Half/Full Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dai-Huo; Li, Wen-Hao; Zheng, Yan-Ping; Cui, Zheng; Yan, Xin; Liu, Dao-Sheng; Wang, Jiawei; Zhang, Yu; Lü, Hong-Yan; Bai, Feng-Yang; Guo, Jin-Zhi; Wu, Xing-Long

    2018-04-02

    Incorporation of N,S-codoped nanotube-like carbon (N,S-NTC) can endow electrode materials with superior electrochemical properties owing to the unique nanoarchitecture and improved kinetics. Herein, α-MnS nanoparticles (NPs) are in situ encapsulated into N,S-NTC, preparing an advanced anode material (α-MnS@N,S-NTC) for lithium-ion/sodium-ion batteries (LIBs/SIBs). It is for the first time revealed that electrochemical α → β phase transition of MnS NPs during the 1st cycle effectively promotes Li-storage properties, which is deduced by the studies of ex situ X-ray diffraction/high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electrode kinetics. As a result, the optimized α-MnS@N,S-NTC electrode delivers a high Li-storage capacity (1415 mA h g -1 at 50 mA g -1 ), excellent rate capability (430 mA h g -1 at 10 A g -1 ), and long-term cycling stability (no obvious capacity decay over 5000 cycles at 1 A g -1 ) with retained morphology. In addition, the N,S-NTC-based encapsulation plays the key roles on enhancing the electrochemical properties due to its high conductivity and unique 1D nanoarchitecture with excellent protective effects to active MnS NPs. Furthermore, α-MnS@N,S-NTC also delivers high Na-storage capacity (536 mA h g -1 at 50 mA g -1 ) without the occurrence of such α → β phase transition and excellent full-cell performances as coupling with commercial LiFePO 4 and LiNi 0.6 Co 0.2 Mn 0.2 O 2 cathodes in LIBs as well as Na 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 2 O 2 F cathode in SIBs. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. A novel method for in Situ detection of hydrolyzable casein fragments in a cheese matrix by antibody phage display technique and CLSM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Zhi; Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    three small synthetic peptides of the alpha(s1)-casein sequence. These peptides traverse enzymatic cleavage sites of casein during cheese ripening. The specificity of the generated anti-peptide antibodies was determined by ELISA and Western blot. Finally, an immunofluorescent labeling protocol......A novel method to monitor in situ hydrolyzable casein fragments during cheese ripening by using immunofluorescent labeling and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was developed. Monoclonal single chain variable fragments of antibody (scFvs) were generated by antibody phage display toward...

  1. CoMet: an airborne mission to simultaneously measure CO2 and CH4 using lidar, passive remote sensing, and in-situ techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Andreas; Amediek, Axel; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Ehret, Gerhard; Gerbig, Christoph; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Roiger, Anke; Zöger, Martin

    2018-04-01

    TIn order to improve our current knowledge on the budgets of the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases, CO2 and CH4, an airborne mission on board the German research aircraft HALO in coordination with two smaller Cessna aircraft is going to be conducted in April/May 2017. The goal of CoMet is to combine a suite of the best currently available active (lidar) and passive remote sensors as well as in-situ instruments to provide regional-scale data of greenhouse gases which are urgently required.

  2. In situ stabilization of heavy metals in multiple-metal contaminated paddy soil using different steel slag-based silicon fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Dongfeng; Liang, Yongchao; Song, Alin; Duan, Aiwang; Liu, Zhandong

    2016-12-01

    Steel slag has been widely used as amendment and silicon fertilizer to alleviate the mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals in soil. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of particle size, composition, and application rate of slag on metal immobilization in acidic soil, metals uptake by rice and rice growth. The results indicated that application of slag increased soil pH, plant-available silicon concentrations in soil, and decreased the bioavailability of metals compared with control treatment, whereas pulverous slag (S1) was more effective than granular slag (S2 and S3). The acid-extractable fraction of Cd in the spiked soil was significantly decreased with application of S1 at rates of 1 and 3 %, acid-extractable fractions of Cu and Zn were decreased when treated at 3 %. Use of S1 at both rates resulted in significantly lower Cd, Cu, and Zn concentrations in rice tissues than in controls by 82.6-92.9, 88.4-95.6, and 67.4-81.4 %, respectively. However, use of pulverous slag at 1 % significantly promotes rice growth, restricted rice growth when treated at 3 %. Thus, the results explained that reduced particle size and suitable application rate of slag could be beneficial to rice growth and metals stabilization.

  3. Thermal Stability of Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch (OPEFB) Nanocrystalline Cellulose: Effects of post-treatment of oven drying and solvent exchange techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indarti, E; Wanrosli, W D; Marwan

    2015-01-01

    Nanocrystallinecellulose (NCC) from biomass is a promising material with huge potentials in various applications. A big challenge in its utilization is the agglomeration of the NCC's during processing due to hydrogen bonding among the cellulose chains when in close proximity to each other. Obtaining NCC's in a non-agglomerated and non-aqueous condition is challenging. In the present work NCC's was isolated from oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) using TEMPO-oxidation reaction method. To obtain non-agglomerated and non-aqueous products, the NCC's underwent post-treatment using oven drying (OD) and solvent exchanged (SE) techniques. The thermal stability of all samples was determined from TGA and DTG profiles whilst FTIR was used to analyzethe chemical modifications that occurred under these conditions. NCC-SE has better thermal stability than the NCC-OD and its on-set degradation temperature and residue are also higher. FTIR analysis shows that NCC-SE has a slightly different chemical composition whereby the absorption band at 1300 cm -1 (due to C-O symmetric stretching) is absent as compared to NCC-OD indicating that in NCC-SE the carboxylate group is in acid form which contribute to its thermal stability (paper)

  4. A technique for recording polycrystalline structure and orientation during in situ deformation cycles of rock analogues using an automated fabric analyser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peternell, M; Russell-Head, D S; Wilson, C J L

    2011-05-01

    Two in situ plane-strain deformation experiments on norcamphor and natural ice using synchronous recording of crystal c-axis orientations have been performed with an automated fabric analyser and a newly developed sample press and deformation stage. Without interrupting the deformation experiment, c-axis orientations are determined for each pixel in a 5 × 5 mm sample area at a spatial resolution of 5 μm/pixel. In the case of norcamphor, changes in microstructures and associated crystallographic information, at a strain rate of ∼2 × 10(-5) s(-1), were recorded for the first time during a complete in situ deformation-cycle experiment that consisted of an annealing, deformation and post-deformation annealing path. In the case of natural ice, slower external strain rates (∼1 × 10(-6) s(-1)) enabled the investigation of small changes in the polycrystal aggregate's crystallography and microstructure for small amounts of strain. The technical setup and first results from the experiments are presented. © 2010 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2010 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. Strain-free GaN thick films grown on single crystalline ZnO buffer layer with in situ lift-off technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. W.; Minegishi, T.; Lee, W. H.; Goto, H.; Lee, H. J.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Ha, J. S.; Goto, T.; Hanada, T.; Cho, M. W.; Yao, T.

    2007-01-01

    Strain-free freestanding GaN layers were prepared by in situ lift-off process using a ZnO buffer as a sacrificing layer. Thin Zn-polar ZnO layers were deposited on c-plane sapphire substrates, which was followed by the growth of Ga-polar GaN layers both by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The MBE-grown GaN layer acted as a protecting layer against decomposition of the ZnO layer and as a seeding layer for GaN growth. The ZnO layer was completely in situ etched off during growth of thick GaN layers at low temperature by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. Hence freestanding GaN layers were obtained for the consecutive growth of high-temperature GaN thick layers. The lattice constants of freestanding GaN agree with those of strain-free GaN bulk. Extensive microphotoluminescence study indicates that strain-free states extend throughout the high-temperature grown GaN layers

  6. Trace Metals in Groundwater and Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment and Stabilization of Stronthium-90 and Other Divalent Metals and Radionuclides at Arid Western DOE Sites: Final Report for Award Number DE-FG07-02ER63486 to the University of Idaho (RW Smith) Environmental Management Science Program Project Number 87016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert W.; Fujita, Yoshiko

    2007-11-07

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants are present in the vadose zone and groundwater throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) energy research and weapons complex. In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants represents a cost-effective treatment strategy that minimizes workers’ exposure to hazardous substances, does not require removal or transport of contaminants, and generally does not generate a secondary waste stream. We have investigated an in situ bioremediation approach that immobilizes radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., strontium-90) by their microbially facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Calcite, a common mineral in many aquifers and vadose zones in the arid west, can incorporate divalent metals such as strontium, cadmium, lead, and cobalt into its crystal structure by the formation of a solid solution. Collaborative research undertaken by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), University of Idaho, and University of Toronto as part of this Environmental Management Science Program project has focused on in situ microbially-catalyzed urea hydrolysis, which results in an increase in pH, carbonate alkalinity, ammonium, calcite precipitation, and co-precipitation of divalent cations. In calcite-saturated aquifers, microbially facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate represents a potential long-term contaminant sequestration mechanism. Key results of the project include: **Demonstrating the linkage between urea hydrolysis and calcite precipitation in field and laboratory experiments **Observing strontium incorporation into calcite precipitate by urea hydrolyzers with higher distribution coefficient than in abiotic **Developing and applying molecular methods for characterizing microbial urease activity in groundwater including a quantitative PCR method for enumerating ureolytic bacteria **Applying the suite of developed molecular methods to assess the feasibility of the

  7. Trace Metals in Groundwater and Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment and Stabilization of Strontium-90 and Other Divalent Metals and Radionuclides at Arid Western DOE Sites: Final Report for Award Number DE-FG07-02ER63486 to the University of Idaho (RW Smith) Environmental Management Science Program Project Number 87016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Robert W.; Fujita, Yoshiko

    2007-01-01

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants are present in the vadose zone and groundwater throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) energy research and weapons complex. In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants represents a cost-effective treatment strategy that minimizes workers exposure to hazardous substances, does not require removal or transport of contaminants, and generally does not generate a secondary waste stream. We have investigated an in situ bioremediation approach that immobilizes radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., strontium-90) by their microbially facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Calcite, a common mineral in many aquifers and vadose zones in the arid west, can incorporate divalent metals such as strontium, cadmium, lead, and cobalt into its crystal structure by the formation of a solid solution. Collaborative research undertaken by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), University of Idaho, and University of Toronto as part of this Environmental Management Science Program project has focused on in situ microbially-catalyzed urea hydrolysis, which results in an increase in pH, carbonate alkalinity, ammonium, calcite precipitation, and co-precipitation of divalent cations. In calcite-saturated aquifers, microbially facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate represents a potential long-term contaminant sequestration mechanism. Key results of the project include: **Demonstrating the linkage between urea hydrolysis and calcite precipitation in field and laboratory experiments **Observing strontium incorporation into calcite precipitate by urea hydrolyzers with higher distribution coefficient than in abiotic **Developing and applying molecular methods for characterizing microbial urease activity in groundwater including a quantitative PCR method for enumerating ureolytic bacteria **Applying the suite of developed molecular methods to assess the feasibility of the

  8. Hemodynamic stability ensured by a low dose, low volume, unilateral hypobaric spinal block: modification of a technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzinga, L; Marcus, M; Peek, D; Borg, P; Jansen, J; Koster, J; Enk, D

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of an 89-year-old female with a history of arterial hypertension, intermittent rapid atrial fibrillation and severe aortic valve stenosis, suffering from femoral neck fracture. Hyperbaric unilateral spinal anesthesia is a known technique to obtain stable hemodynamics combined with the possibility of continuous neurologic evaluation and preservation of cognitive functions. Because a hyperbaric unilateral technique can be very painful in case of traumatic hip fracture, a low dose, low volume, unilateral hypobaric spinal block may be an adequate alternative. In the present case report, a unilateral hypobaric spinal anesthesia was performed using 5 mg of bupivacaine in a 1.5 mL volume and a slow and steady, "air-buffered", directed injection technique, to allow an urgent hip arthroplasty. During surgery the patient was kept in the lateral recumbent position. Hemodynamics remained stable throughout the entire procedure without any need for vasoconstrictors. The impact of aortic valve stenosis combined with atrial fibrillation on anesthetic management and our considerations to opt for a unilateral hypobaric spinal anesthesia are discussed.

  9. In-Situ and Remote-Sensing Data Fusion Using Machine Learning Techniques to Infer Urban and Fire Related Pollution Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P. B.; Segal-Rozenhaimer, M.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J. M.; Flynn, C.J.; Johnson, R. R.; Dunagan, S. E.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Airmass type characterization is key in understanding the relative contribution of various emission sources to atmospheric composition and air quality and can be useful in bottom-up model validation and emission inventories. However, classification of pollution plumes from space is often not trivial. Sub-orbital campaigns, such as SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) give us a unique opportunity to study atmospheric composition in detail, by using a vast suite of in-situ instruments for the detection of trace gases and aerosols. These measurements allow identification of spatial and temporal atmospheric composition changes due to various pollution plumes resulting from urban, biogenic and smoke emissions. Nevertheless, to transfer the knowledge gathered from such campaigns into a global spatial and temporal context, there is a need to develop workflow that can be applicable to measurements from space. In this work we rely on sub-orbital in-situ and total column remote sensing measurements of various pollution plumes taken aboard the NASA DC-8 during 2013 SEAC4RS campaign, linking them through a neural-network (NN) algorithm to allow inference of pollution plume types by input of columnar aerosol and trace-gas measurements. In particular, we use the 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) airborne measurements of wavelength dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD), particle size proxies, O3, NO2 and water vapor to classify different pollution plumes. Our method relies on assigning a-priori ground-truth labeling to the various plumes, which include urban pollution, different fire types (i.e. forest and agriculture) and fire stage (i.e. fresh and aged) using cluster analysis of aerosol and trace-gases in-situ and auxiliary (e.g. trajectory) data and the training of a NN scheme to fit the best prediction parameters using 4STAR measurements as input. We explore our

  10. In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties using New Cavity Ring-Down and Photoacoustics Instruments and Comparison with more Traditional Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawa, A. W.; Arnott, P.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Ferrare, R.; Hallar, A. G.; Jonsson, H.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Luu, A. P.; Ogren, J.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonaceous species (BC and OC) are responsible for most of the absorption associated with aerosol particles. The amount of radiant energy an aerosol absorbs has profound effects on climate and air quality. It is ironic that aerosol absorption coefficient is one of the most difficult aerosol properties to measure. A new cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument, called Cadenza (NASA-ARC), measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. Absorption coefficient is obtained from the difference of measured extinction and scattering within the instrument. Aerosol absorption coefficient is also measured by a photoacoustic (PA) instrument (DRI) that was operated on an aircraft for the first time during the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP). This paper will report on measurements made with this new instrument and other in-situ instruments during two field recent field studies. The first field study was an airborne cam;oaign, the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period flown in May, 2003 over northern Oklahoma. One of the main purposes of the IOP was to assess our ability to measure extinction and absorption coefficient in situ. This paper compares measurements of these aerosol optical properties made by the CRD, PA, nephelometer, and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) aboard the CIRPAS Twin-Otter. During the IOP, several significant aerosol layers were sampled aloft. These layers are identified in the remote (AATS-14) as well as in situ measurements. Extinction profiles measured by Cadenza are compared to those derived from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14, NASA-ARC). The regional radiative impact of these layers is assessed by using the measured aerosol optical properties in a radiative transfer model. The second study was conducted in the Caldecott Tunnel, a heavily-used tunnel located north of San Francisco, Ca. The aerosol sampled in this study was

  11. A novel technique for optimal integration of active steering and differential braking with estimation to improve vehicle directional stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaeinejad, Hossein; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Rafatnia, Sadra

    2018-06-11

    This study deals with the enhancement of directional stability of vehicle which turns with high speeds on various road conditions using integrated active steering and differential braking systems. In this respect, the minimum usage of intentional asymmetric braking force to compensate the drawbacks of active steering control with small reduction of vehicle longitudinal speed is desired. To this aim, a new optimal multivariable controller is analytically developed for integrated steering and braking systems based on the prediction of vehicle nonlinear responses. A fuzzy programming extracted from the nonlinear phase plane analysis is also used for managing the two control inputs in various driving conditions. With the proposed fuzzy programming, the weight factors of the control inputs are automatically tuned and softly changed. In order to simulate a real-world control system, some required information about the system states and parameters which cannot be directly measured, are estimated using the Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF). Finally, simulations studies are carried out using a validated vehicle model to show the effectiveness of the proposed integrated control system in the presence of model uncertainties and estimation errors. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Flexible body stability analysis of Space Shuttle ascent flight control system by using lambda matrix solution techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bown, R. L.; Christofferson, A.; Lardas, M.; Flanders, H.

    1980-01-01

    A lambda matrix solution technique is being developed to perform an open loop frequency analysis of a high order dynamic system. The procedure evaluates the right and left latent vectors corresponding to the respective latent roots. The latent vectors are used to evaluate the partial fraction expansion formulation required to compute the flexible body open loop feedback gains for the Space Shuttle Digital Ascent Flight Control System. The algorithm is in the final stages of development and will be used to insure that the feedback gains meet the design specification.

  13. Molecular Interaction of a New Antibacterial Polymer with a Supported Lipid Bilayer Measured by an in situ Label-Free Optical Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Horvath

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the antibacterial polymer–branched poly(ethylene imine substituted with quaternary ammonium groups, PEO and alkyl chains, PEI25QI5J5A815–with a solid supported lipid bilayer was investigated using surface sensitive optical waveguide spectroscopy. The analysis of the optogeometrical parameters was extended developing a new composite layer model in which the structural and optical anisotropy of the molecular layers was taken into consideration. Following in situ the change of optical birefringence we were able to determine the composition of the lipid/polymer surface layer as well as the displacement of lipid bilayer by the antibacterial polymer without using additional labeling. Comparative assessment of the data of layer thickness and optical anisotropy helps to reveal the molecular mechanism of antibacterial effect of the polymer investigated.

  14. In-situ construction of Au nanoparticles confined in double-shelled TiO2/mSiO2 hollow architecture for excellent catalytic activity and enhanced thermal stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yiwei; Zhou, Yuming; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Shuo; Zhang, Hongxing; Sheng, Xiaoli

    2017-01-01

    A facile strategy has been developed for the synthesis of H-TS-Au microspheres (MCs) with double-shelled hollow architecture and sub-5 nm Au nanoparticles (Au NPs). The synthetic procedure involves the successive sol-gel template-assisted method for the preparation of uniform hierarchical hollow-in-hollow H-TS MCs with TiO2/mSiO2 as yolks/shells, and the unique deposition-precipitation method mediated with Au(en)2Cl3 precursors for the in-situ construction of extremely stable Au NPs under a low-temperature hydrogen reduction. The synthesized H-TS-Au MCs were characterized by TEM, SEM, FTIR, XRD, BET and UV-vis absorption spectra. Catalytic activity of H-TS-Au was evaluated using the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) into 4-aminophenol (4-AP) by NaBH4. Results established that H-TS-Au MCs possessed a large-size double-shelled architecture with high structural integrity and robustness,which can effectively confine numerous tiny Au NPs and restrict them from sintering aggregation even up to further calcination at 800 °C. Owing to the advantageous structural configuration and the synergistic effect of TiO2/mSiO2 double shells, the H-TS-Au MCs were demonstrated to exhibit a remarkable catalytic activity and stability, and preserve the intact morphology after 6 repeating reduction of 4-NP.

  15. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies of the effect of microstructure on tensile behavior and retained austenite stability of thermo-mechanically processed transformation induced plasticity steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Kun [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Liss, Klaus-Dieter [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Timokhina, Ilana B. [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3217 (Australia); Pereloma, Elena V., E-mail: elenap@uow.edu.au [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2016-04-26

    Transmission electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the martensitic transformation and lattice strains under uniaxial tensile loading of Fe-Mn-Si-C-Nb-Mo-Al Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel subjected to different thermo-mechanical processing schedules. In contrast with most of the diffraction analysis of TRIP steels reported previously, the diffraction peaks from the martensite phase were separated from the peaks of the ferrite-bainite α-matrix. The volume fraction of retained γ-austenite, as well as the lattice strain, were determined from the diffraction patterns recorded during tensile deformation. Although significant austenite to martensite transformation starts around the macroscopic yield stress, some austenite grains had already experienced martensitic transformation. Hooke’s Law was used to calculate the phase stress of each phase from their lattice strain. The ferrite-bainite α-matrix was observed to yield earlier than austenite and martensite. The discrepancy between integrated phase stresses and experimental macroscopic stress is about 300 MPa. A small increase in carbon concentration in retained austenite at the early stage of deformation was detected, but with further straining a continuous slight decrease in carbon content occurred, indicating that mechanical stability factors, such as grain size, morphology and orientation of the retained austenite, played an important role during the retained austenite to martensite transformation.

  16. Nanodiamond-enhanced MRI via in situ hyperpolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, David E. J.; Sarracanie, Mathieu; Zhang, Huiliang; Salameh, Najat; Glenn, David R.; Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Reilly, David J.; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2017-04-01

    Nanodiamonds are of interest as nontoxic substrates for targeted drug delivery and as highly biostable fluorescent markers for cellular tracking. Beyond optical techniques, however, options for noninvasive imaging of nanodiamonds in vivo are severely limited. Here, we demonstrate that the Overhauser effect, a proton-electron polarization transfer technique, can enable high-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of nanodiamonds in water at room temperature and ultra-low magnetic field. The technique transfers spin polarization from paramagnetic impurities at nanodiamond surfaces to 1H spins in the surrounding water solution, creating MRI contrast on-demand. We examine the conditions required for maximum enhancement as well as the ultimate sensitivity of the technique. The ability to perform continuous in situ hyperpolarization via the Overhauser mechanism, in combination with the excellent in vivo stability of nanodiamond, raises the possibility of performing noninvasive in vivo tracking of nanodiamond over indefinitely long periods of time.

  17. Development and Testing of Techniques for In-Ground Stabilization, Size Reduction and Safe Removal of Radioactive Wastes Stored in Large Containments in Burial Grounds - 13591

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliwell, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive waste materials, including Transuranic (TRU) wastes from laboratories have been stored below ground in large containments at a number of sites in the US DOE Complex, and at nuclear sites in Europe. These containments are generally referred to as caissons or shafts. The containments are in a range of sizes and depths below grade. The caissons at the DOE's Hanford site are cylindrical, of the order of 2,500 mm in diameter, 3,050 mm in height and are buried about 6,000 mm below grade. One type of caisson is made out of corrugated pipe, whereas others are made of concrete with standard re-bar. However, the larger shafts in the UK are of the order of 4,600 mm in diameter, 53,500 mm deep, and 12,000 below grade. This paper describes the R and D work and testing activities performed to date to evaluate the concept of in-ground size reduction and stabilization of the contents of large containments similar to those at Hanford. In practice, the height of the Test Facility provided for a test cell that was approximately 22' deep. That prevented a 'full scale mockup' test in the sense that the Hanford Caisson configuration would be an identical replication. Therefore, the project was conducted in two phases. The first phase tested a simulated Caisson with surrogate contents, and part of a Chute section, and the second phase tested a full chute section. These tests were performed at VJ Technologies Test Facility located in East Haven, CT, as part of the Proof of Design Concept program for studying the feasibility of an in-situ grout/grind/mix/stabilize technology for the remediation of four caissons at the 618-11 Burial Ground at US Department of Energy Hanford Site. The test site was constructed such that multiple testing areas were provided for the evaluation of various tools, equipment and procedures under conditions that simulated the Hanford site, with representative soils and layout dimensions. (authors)

  18. Development and Testing of Techniques for In-Ground Stabilization, Size Reduction and Safe Removal of Radioactive Wastes Stored in Large Containments in Burial Grounds - 13591

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliwell, Stephen [VJ Technologies Inc, 89 Carlough Road, Bohemia, NY (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive waste materials, including Transuranic (TRU) wastes from laboratories have been stored below ground in large containments at a number of sites in the US DOE Complex, and at nuclear sites in Europe. These containments are generally referred to as caissons or shafts. The containments are in a range of sizes and depths below grade. The caissons at the DOE's Hanford site are cylindrical, of the order of 2,500 mm in diameter, 3,050 mm in height and are buried about 6,000 mm below grade. One type of caisson is made out of corrugated pipe, whereas others are made of concrete with standard re-bar. However, the larger shafts in the UK are of the order of 4,600 mm in diameter, 53,500 mm deep, and 12,000 below grade. This paper describes the R and D work and testing activities performed to date to evaluate the concept of in-ground size reduction and stabilization of the contents of large containments similar to those at Hanford. In practice, the height of the Test Facility provided for a test cell that was approximately 22' deep. That prevented a 'full scale mockup' test in the sense that the Hanford Caisson configuration would be an identical replication. Therefore, the project was conducted in two phases. The first phase tested a simulated Caisson with surrogate contents, and part of a Chute section, and the second phase tested a full chute section. These tests were performed at VJ Technologies Test Facility located in East Haven, CT, as part of the Proof of Design Concept program for studying the feasibility of an in-situ grout/grind/mix/stabilize technology for the remediation of four caissons at the 618-11 Burial Ground at US Department of Energy Hanford Site. The test site was constructed such that multiple testing areas were provided for the evaluation of various tools, equipment and procedures under conditions that simulated the Hanford site, with representative soils and layout dimensions. (authors)

  19. In-Situ Catalytic Surface Modification of Micro-Structured La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF Oxygen Permeable Membrane Using Vacuum-Assisted technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman Nur Hidayati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at investigating the means to carry out in-situ surface modification of La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF oxygen permeable membrane by using vacuum assisted technique. The unique structure of the LSCF hollow fibre membrane used in this study, which consists of an outer dense oxygen separation layer and conical-shaped microchannels open at the inner surface has allowed the membrane to be used as oxygen separation membrane and as a structured substrate for where catalyst can be deposited. A catalyst solution of similar material, LSCF was prepared using sol-gel technique. Effects of calcination temperature and heating rate were investigated using XRD and TGA to ensure pure perovskites structure of LSCF was obtained. It was found that a lower calcination temperature can be used to obtain pure perovskite phase if slower heating rate is used. The SEM photograph shows that the distribution of catalyst onto the membrane microchannels using in-situ deposition technique was strongly related to the viscosity of LSCF catalytic sol. Interestingly, it was found that the amount of catalyst deposited using viscous solution was slightly higher than the less viscous sol. This might be due to the difficulty of catalyst sol to infiltrate the membrane and as a result, thicker catalyst layer was observed at the lumen rather than onto the conical-shaped microchannels. Therefore, the viscosity of catalyst solution and calcination process should be precisely controlled to ensure homogeneous catalyst layer deposition. Analysis of the elemental composition will be studied in the future using energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX to determine the elements deposited onto the membranes. Once the elemental analysis is confirmed, oxygen permeation analysis will be carried out.

  20. Detecting in situ copepod diet diversity using molecular technique: development of a copepod/symbiotic ciliate-excluding eukaryote-inclusive PCR protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Simin; Guo, Zhiling; Li, Tao; Carpenter, Edward J; Liu, Sheng; Lin, Senjie

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of in situ copepod diet diversity is crucial for accurately describing pelagic food web structure but is challenging to achieve due to lack of an easily applicable methodology. To enable analysis with whole copepod-derived DNAs, we developed a copepod-excluding 18S rDNA-based PCR protocol. Although it is effective in depressing amplification of copepod 18S rDNA, its applicability to detect diverse eukaryotes in both mono- and mixed-species has not been demonstrated. Besides, the protocol suffers from the problem that sequences from symbiotic ciliates are overrepresented in the retrieved 18S rDNA libraries. In this study, we designed a blocking primer to make a combined primer set (copepod/symbiotic ciliate-excluding eukaryote-common: CEEC) to depress PCR amplification of symbiotic ciliate sequences while maximizing the range of eukaryotes amplified. We firstly examined the specificity and efficacy of CEEC by PCR-amplifying DNAs from 16 copepod species, 37 representative organisms that are potential prey of copepods and a natural microplankton sample, and then evaluated the efficiency in reconstructing diet composition by detecting the food of both lab-reared and field-collected copepods. Our results showed that the CEEC primer set can successfully amplify 18S rDNA from a wide range of isolated species and mixed-species samples while depressing amplification of that from copepod and targeted symbiotic ciliate, indicating the universality of CEEC in specifically detecting prey of copepods. All the predetermined food offered to copepods in the laboratory were successfully retrieved, suggesting that the CEEC-based protocol can accurately reconstruct the diets of copepods without interference of copepods and their associated ciliates present in the DNA samples. Our initial application to analyzing the food composition of field-collected copepods uncovered diverse prey species, including those currently known, and those that are unsuspected, as copepod prey

  1. Final report, Ames Mobile Laboratory Project: The development and operation of instrumentation in a mobile laboratory for in situ, real-time screening and characterization of soils using the laser ablation sampling technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.S.; Braymen, S.D.

    1995-01-01

    The main focus of the Ames Laboratory's Technology Integration Program, TIP, from May 1991 through December 1994 was the development, fabrication, and demonstration of a mobile instrumentation laboratory incorporating rapid in situ sampling systems for safe, rapid, and cost effective soil screening/characterization. The Mobile Demonstration Laboratory for Environmental Screening Technologies, MDLEST, containing the analysis instrumentation, along with surface and subsurface sampling probe prototypes employing the laser ablation sampling technique were chosen to satisfy the particular surface and subsurface soil characterization needs of the various Department of Energy facilities for determining the extent of heavy metal and radionuclide contamination. The MDLEST, a 44 foot long 5th wheel trailer, is easily configured for the analysis instrumentation and sampling system required for the particular site work. This mobile laboratory contains all of the utilities needed to satisfy the operating requirements of the various instrumentation installed. These utilities include, an electric generator, a chilled water system, process gases, a heating/air conditioning system, and computer monitoring and automatic operating systems. Once the MDLEST arrives at the job site, the instrumentation is aligned and calibration is completed, sampling and analysis operations begin. The sample is acquired, analyzed and the results reported in as little as 10 minutes. The surface sampling probe is used in two modes to acquire samples for analysis. It is either set directly on the ground over the site to be sampled, in situ sampling, or in a special fixture used for calibrating the sampling analysis system with standard soil samples, having the samples brought to the MDLEST. The surface sampling probe was used to in situ sample a flat concrete surface (nondestructively) with the ablated sample being analyzed by the instrumentation in the MDLEST

  2. Dense and high-stability Ti2AlN MAX phase coatings prepared by the combined cathodic arc/sputter technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Liu, Jingzhou; Wang, Li; Li, Xiaowei; Ke, Peiling; Wang, Aiying

    2017-02-01

    Ti2AlN belongs to a family of ternary nano-laminate alloys known as the MAX phases, which exhibit a unique combination of metallic and ceramic properties. In the present work, the dense and high-stability Ti2AlN coating has been successfully prepared through the combined cathodic arc/sputter deposition, followed by heat post-treatment. It was found that the as-deposited Ti-Al-N coating behaved a multilayer structure, where (Ti, N)-rich layer and Al-rich layer grew alternately, with a mixed phase constitution of TiN and TiAlx. After annealing at 800 °C under vacuum condition for 1.5 h, although the multilayer structure still was found, part of multilayer interfaces became indistinct and disappeared. In particular, the thickness of the Al-rich layer decreased in contrast to that of as-deposited coating due to the inner diffusion of the Al element. Moreover, the Ti2AlN MAX phase emerged as the major phase in the annealed coatings and its formation mechanism was also discussed in this study. The vacuum thermal analysis indicated that the formed Ti2AlN MAX phase exhibited a high-stability, which was mainly benefited from the large thickness and the dense structure. This adva