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Sample records for situ multielemental monitoring

  1. Multielemental characterization of sediments from rivers and reservoirs of a sediment quality monitoring network of Sao Paulo state, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Walace A.A.; Quinaglia, Gilson A., E-mail: wasoares@sp.gov.br, E-mail: gquinaglia@sp.gov.br [Companhia Ambiental do Estado de Sao Paulo (CETESB), SP (Brazil). Setor de Analises Toxicologicas; Favaro, Deborah I.T., E-mail: defavaro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (LAN/CRPq/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise por Ativacao Neutronica

    2013-07-01

    The Environment Company of the State of Sao Paulo (CETESB) by means of its quality monitoring network does, systematically, the assessment of water and sediment quality in rivers and reservoirs in the Sao Paulo state. The quality evaluation is done by means 50 parameters in water and 63 for sediment that are considered the more representative for CETESB monitoring. In 2011 the network monitoring analyzed 420 points being 24 in sediments. In the present study the multielemental characterization (total concentration) of 13 sediment samples from 24 rivers and reservoirs belonging to the CETESB monitoring network were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The analytical validation according to precision and accuracy was checked through certified reference materials analyzes BEN (Basalt-IWG-GIT), SL-1 (Lake Sediment - IAEA) and Soil-5 (IAEA), that presents certified concentration values for all elements analyzed. The results obtained for multielemental characterization were compared to NASC values (North American Shale Composite) and the enrichment factor (EF) by using Sc as a normalizer element was calculated. The results showed higher enrichment values for As, Br, Cr, Hf, Ta, Th , U and Zn and rare earth elements (REE) Ce, Eu, La, Nd, Sm, Tb and Yb in many of the tested sediment samples indicating that there may be an anthropogenic contribution for these elements. The multielemental results were also compared to the granulometric composition of the sediment samples. Factorial and Cluster Analysis were applied and indicated that the elements distribution is controlled, mainly by the granulometric fractions of the sediments. (author)

  2. Multielemental characterization of sediments from rivers and reservoirs of a sediment quality monitoring network of Sao Paulo state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Walace A.A.; Quinaglia, Gilson A.; Favaro, Deborah I.T.

    2013-01-01

    The Environment Company of the State of Sao Paulo (CETESB) by means of its quality monitoring network does, systematically, the assessment of water and sediment quality in rivers and reservoirs in the Sao Paulo state. The quality evaluation is done by means 50 parameters in water and 63 for sediment that are considered the more representative for CETESB monitoring. In 2011 the network monitoring analyzed 420 points being 24 in sediments. In the present study the multielemental characterization (total concentration) of 13 sediment samples from 24 rivers and reservoirs belonging to the CETESB monitoring network were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The analytical validation according to precision and accuracy was checked through certified reference materials analyzes BEN (Basalt-IWG-GIT), SL-1 (Lake Sediment - IAEA) and Soil-5 (IAEA), that presents certified concentration values for all elements analyzed. The results obtained for multielemental characterization were compared to NASC values (North American Shale Composite) and the enrichment factor (EF) by using Sc as a normalizer element was calculated. The results showed higher enrichment values for As, Br, Cr, Hf, Ta, Th , U and Zn and rare earth elements (REE) Ce, Eu, La, Nd, Sm, Tb and Yb in many of the tested sediment samples indicating that there may be an anthropogenic contribution for these elements. The multielemental results were also compared to the granulometric composition of the sediment samples. Factorial and Cluster Analysis were applied and indicated that the elements distribution is controlled, mainly by the granulometric fractions of the sediments. (author)

  3. Efficacy monitoring of in situ fuel bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.; Borchert, S.; Heard, C.

    1996-01-01

    The wide-scale, multiple-purpose use of fossil fuels throughout the industrialized world has resulted in the inadvertent contamination of myriad environments. Given the scope and magnitude of these environmental contamination problems, bioremediation often represents the only practical and economically feasible solution. This is especially true when depth of contamination, magnitude of the problem, and nature of contaminated material preclude other remedial actions, short of the no-response alternative. From the perspective, the effective, safe and scientifically valid use of in situ bioremediation technologies requires cost-efficient and effective implementation strategies in combination with unequivocal approaches for monitoring efficacy of performance. Accordingly, with support from the SERDP program, the authors are field-testing advanced in situ bioremediation strategies and new approaches in efficacy monitoring that employ techniques instable carbon and nitrogen isotope biogeochemistry. One field demonstration has been initiated at the NEX site in Port Hueneme, CA (US Navy's National Test Site). The objectives are: (1) to use stable isotopes as a biogeochemical monitoring tool for in situ bioremediation of refined petroleum (i.e., BTEX), and (2) to use vertical groundwater circulation technology to effect in situ chemical containment and enhanced in situ bioremediation

  4. Multielemental analysis of milk samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar Al-Dayel; Jameel Al-Hefne; Didarul A Chowdhury; Turki Al-Ajyan

    2002-01-01

    Milk is a basic food since it provides essential nutrients (proteins, lipids, carbohydrates) and micronutrients (minerals, Vitamins, enzymes). In fact, in formula milk essential elements have been usually added in order to satisfy nutritional requirements. However, too high additions of these elements can produce detrimental effects on human health. More important, milk can also constitute a source of exposure to toxic elements, especially dangerous for infants. Method is presented for the multielemental analysis of a wide range of elements in milk samples. The aim of this work is the development of a multielemental method for the analysis of major, minor and trace essential and toxic elements in milk. Several milk samples with different origins were collected from the Saudi Arabia markets and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). For preparation of the samples for analysis, they were digested by closed vessel microwave digestion system with H 2 O 2 /HNO 3 . About 40 elements were determined. A reference material was analysed for the validation of the proposed method. (Author)

  5. In situ health monitoring of piezoelectric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Scott L. (Inventor); Drouant, George J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An in situ health monitoring apparatus may include an exciter circuit that applies a pulse to a piezoelectric transducer and a data processing system that determines the piezoelectric transducer's dynamic response to the first pulse. The dynamic response can be used to evaluate the operating range, health, and as-mounted resonance frequency of the transducer, as well as the strength of a coupling between the transducer and a structure and the health of the structure.

  6. Development of in-situ monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bong Soo; Cho, Dong Hyun; Yoo, Wook Jae; Heo, Ji Yeon

    2010-03-01

    Development of in-situ monitoring system using an optical fiber to measure the real time temperature variation of subsurface water for the evaluation of flow characteristics. We describe the feasibility of developing a fiber-optic temperature sensor using a thermochromic material. A sensor-tip is fabricated by mixing of a thermochromic material powder. The relationships between the temperatures and the output voltages of detectors are determined to measure the temperature of water. It is expected that the fiber-optic temperature monitoring sensor using thermochromic material can be used to measure the real time temperature variation of subsurface water

  7. Monitoring of electrokinetic in-situ-decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldmann, T. [INTUS Inst. fuer Technologie und Umweltschutz e.V., Berlin (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    The need for a monitoring system for in-situ soil decontamination is two-fold: Firstly, to ensure that remediation is attained and secondly to minimize costs and treatment time. A further reason is the potential risk of unexpected mobilization or chemical generation of hazardous compounds which could result in an extension of the contamination into other regions of soil, the ground water or the atmosphere. Electrokinetic in-situ decontamination is based on transport processes in the ground that proceed with relatively low velocity. This results in treatment times of several months. Since the transport processes can be described by a mathematical model, monitoring should always be combined with qualified mathematical processing. This makes it possible to estimate treatment time and costs to be expected. The challenge of in-situ monitoring is to identify relevant parameters describing the state of the ground. These parameters must be independent from influences like weather but they must be sensitive to changes of soil characteristics. In the case of electrokinetic soil remediation, probes and sensors must be resistant to influences of electric fields. The function of sensors or measuring systems can be disturbed or even damaged or destroyed by electric fields (for example by electro-corrosion). (orig.)

  8. In situ monitoring of the electrochemical dissolution of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebsz, Melinda [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Combinatorial Oxide Chemistry at ICTAS, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Kollender, Jan Philipp [Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials (ICTAS), Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Hassel, Achim Walter [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Combinatorial Oxide Chemistry at ICTAS, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials (ICTAS), Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria)

    2017-09-15

    In the present work, which is aimed to monitor in situ the electrochemical dissolution of tungsten by using a Flow-Type Scanning Droplet Cell Microscope (FT-SDCM) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), novel results are reported. The anodic oxide growth and its dissolution on the surface of W have been monitored in situ. The results of this current study show the importance of coupling electrochemical experiments to ICP-MS. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Multielemental speciation analysis by advanced hyphenated technique - HPLC/ICP-MS: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkowska, Monika; Barałkiewicz, Danuta

    2016-12-01

    Speciation analysis has become an invaluable tool in human health risk assessment, environmental monitoring or food quality control. Another step is to develop reliable multielemental speciation methodologies, to reduce costs, waste and time needed for the analysis. Separation and detection of species of several elements in a single analytical run can be accomplished by high performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC/ICP-MS). Our review assembles articles concerning multielemental speciation determination of: As, Se, Cr, Sb, I, Br, Pb, Hg, V, Mo, Te, Tl, Cd and W in environmental, biological, food and clinical samples analyzed with HPLC/ICP-MS. It addresses the procedures in terms of following issues: sample collection and pretreatment, selection of optimal conditions for elements species separation by HPLC and determination using ICP-MS as well as metrological approach. The presented work is the first review article concerning multielemental speciation analysis by advanced hyphenated technique HPLC/ICP-MS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Signal processing methods for in-situ creep specimen monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guers, Manton J.; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2018-04-01

    Previous work investigated using guided waves for monitoring creep deformation during accelerated life testing. The basic objective was to relate observed changes in the time-of-flight to changes in the environmental temperature and specimen gage length. The work presented in this paper investigated several signal processing strategies for possible application in the in-situ monitoring system. Signal processing methods for both group velocity (wave-packet envelope) and phase velocity (peak tracking) time-of-flight were considered. Although the Analytic Envelope found via the Hilbert transform is commonly applied for group velocity measurements, erratic behavior in the indicated time-of-flight was observed when this technique was applied to the in-situ data. The peak tracking strategies tested had generally linear trends, and tracking local minima in the raw waveform ultimately showed the most consistent results.

  11. A practical approach: in-situ continuous emission monitoring analysers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.B. Daw; A.J. Bowers [Procal Analytics Ltd, Peterborough (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Advances in design and construction of stack-mounted analyzers has resulted in a large demand for this technology for continuous emission monitoring (CEM) of air pollutants from fossil-fuel power plants. The paper looks at some difficulties encountered in use of on-stack CEMs and how to overcome them. Examples are given of installations' use of in-situ CEMS systems at three coal-fired power plants; the Drax (UK), Powerton (United States) and TVA Paradise power station (United States). 12 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Environmental monitoring with in-situ gamma spectrometer; Umweltueberwachung mit in-situ-Gamma-Spektrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, S. [ENVINET GmbH, Haar (Germany)

    2014-01-20

    The in-situ gamma spectroscopy allows large area and continuous monitoring of the radio nuclides and there composition in the environment. In comparison to the gamma dose rate measurement the additional spectral information gives the possibility for a quick and effective action in the case of a man-made radiation exposition in the environment. The knowledge respectively localization of the possible nuclides, which a responsible for the increased dose rate, supports responsible organization in the quick identification of the situation, definition of the actions and tracking of the temporal and local process of the radiation exposition. Due to dedicate actions the risk for people and environment is reduced.

  13. Do conventional monitoring practices indicate in situ air sparging performance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    Short-term pilot tests play a key role in the selection and design of in situ air sparging systems. Most pilot tests are less than 24 h in duration and consist of monitoring changes in dissolved oxygen, water levels in wells, soil gas pressures, and soil gas contaminant concentrations while air is injected into the aquifer. These parameters are assumed to be indicators of air sparging feasibility and performance, and are also used in the design of full-scale systems. In this work the authors assess the validity of this critical assumption. Data are presented from a study site where a typical pilot-scale short-term test was conducted, followed by continued operation of a full-scale system for 110 days. Conventional sampling practices were augmented with more discrete and detailed assessment methods. In addition, a tracer gas was used to better understand air distributions, vapor flow paths, and vapor recovery efficiency. The data illustrate that conclusions regarding the performance and applicability of air sparging at the study site vary significantly depending on the monitoring approach used. There was no clear correlation between short-term pilot-test data and extended system performance when using data collected only from conventional groundwater monitoring wells. Attention is focused on petroleum hydrocarbons

  14. A mini-microscope for in situ monitoring of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Bok; Koo, Kyo-in; Bae, Hojae; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Hamilton, Geraldine A; Bahinski, Anthony; Kim, Sun Min; Ingber, Donald E; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-10-21

    A mini-microscope was developed for in situ monitoring of cells by modifying off-the-shelf components of a commercial webcam. The mini-microscope consists of a CMOS imaging module, a small plastic lens and a white LED illumination source. The CMOS imaging module was connected to a laptop computer through a USB port for image acquisition and analysis. Due to its compact size, 8 × 10 × 9 cm, the present microscope is portable and can easily fit inside a conventional incubator, and enables real-time monitoring of cellular behaviour. Moreover, the mini-microscope can be used for imaging cells in conventional cell culture flasks, such as Petri dishes and multi-well plates. To demonstrate the operation of the mini-microscope, we monitored the cellular migration of mouse 3T3 fibroblasts in a scratch assay in medium containing three different concentrations of fetal bovine serum (5, 10, and 20%) and demonstrated differential responses depending on serum levels. In addition, we seeded embryonic stem cells inside poly(ethylene glycol) microwells and monitored the formation of stem cell aggregates in real time using the mini-microscope. Furthermore, we also combined a lab-on-a-chip microfluidic device for microdroplet generation and analysis with the mini-microscope and observed the formation of droplets under different flow conditions. Given its cost effectiveness, robust imaging and portability, the presented platform may be useful for a range of applications for real-time cellular imaging using lab-on-a-chip devices at low cost.

  15. In-Situ Creep Monitoring Using the Potential Drop Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhi, E.; Sposito, G.; Davies, C. M.; Cawley, P.; Nagy, P. B.

    2011-06-01

    A directional low-frequency Alternating Current Potential Drop (ACPD) sensor was developed for in-situ monitoring of creep in metals. The sensor relies on a modified ACPD technique that measures simultaneously both values of resistance in the axial and lateral directions using a square electrode configuration. As compared to the more commonly used in-line electrode configuration, the square arrangement used in this sensor is much more directional and thus allows the detection of creep-induced anisotropy and texture. The technique monitors the variation in the ratio of the measured axial and lateral resistances, therefore can efficiently separate the mostly isotropic common part of the resistivity variation caused by reversible temperature variations from the mostly anisotropic differential part caused by direct geometrical and indirect material effects of creep. Initially, this ratio is roughly proportional to the axial creep strain, while at later stages, the resistance ratio increases even faster with creep strain because of the formation of directional discontinuities such as preferentially oriented grain boundary cavities and multiple-site microcracks in the material.

  16. Reactor neutron activation for multielemental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, A.V.R.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis using single comparator (K 0 NAA method) has been used for obtaining multielemental profiles in a variety of matrices related to environment. Gold was used as the comparator. Neutron flux was characterised by determining f, the epithermal to thermal neutron flux ratio and cc, the deviation from ideal shape of the neutron spectrum. The f and a were determined in different irradiation positions in APSARA reactor, PCF position in CIRUS reactor and tray rod position in Dhruva reactor using both cadmium cut off and multi isotope detector methods. High resolution gamma ray spectrometry was used for radioactive assay of the activation products. This technique is being used for multielement analysis in a variety of matrices like lake sediments, sea nodules and crusts, minerals, leaves, cereals, pulses, leaves, water and soil. Elemental profiles of the sediments corresponding to different depths from Nainital lake were determined and used to understand the history of natural absorption/desorption pattern of the previous 160 years. Ferromanganese crusts from different locations of Indian Ocean were analysed with a view to studying the distribution of some trace elements along with Fe and Mn. Variation of Mn/Fe ratio was used to identify the nature of the crusts as hydrogenous or hydrothermal. Fe-rich and Fe-depleted nodules from Indian Ocean were analysed to understand the REE patterns and it is proposed that REE-Th associated minerals could be the potential Th contributors to the sea water and thus reached ferromanganese nodules. Dolomites (unaltered and altered), two types of serpentines and intrusive rock dolerite from the asbestos mines of Cuddapah basin were analysed for major, minor and trace elements. The elemental concentrations are used for distinguishing and characterising these minerals. From our investigations, it was concluded that both dolomite and dolerite contribute elements in the serpentinisation process. Chemical neutron

  17. The development of sensors and techniques for in situ water quality monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. C.

    1976-01-01

    Enzyme electrodes and chloride ion electrodes were investigated for in situ monitoring of water quality. Preliminary results show that miniature chloride ion electrodes and a phenol sensor are most promising in determining trace contaminants in water.

  18. Lightweight, Wearable Metal Rubber-Textile Sensor for In Situ Lunar Autonomous Health Monitoring, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NanoSonic proposes to develop a low-weight, non-invasive in situ autonomous health-monitoring system for crewmembers' lunar extravehicular activity (EVA). This novel...

  19. Digital TV-echelle spectrograph for simultaneous multielemental analysis using microcomputer control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.B.; Case, A.L.

    1980-12-01

    A digital TV-echelle spectrograph with microcomputer control was developed for simultaneous multielemental analysis. The optical system is a commercially available unit originally equipped for film and photomultiplier (single element) readout. The film port was adapted for the intensifier camera. The camera output is digitized and stored in a microcomputer-controlled, 512 x 512 x 12 bit memory and image processor. Multiple spectra over the range of 200 to 800 nm are recorded in a single exposure. Spectra lasting from nanoseconds to seconds are digitized and stored in 0.033 s and displayed on a TV monitor. An inexpensive microcomputer controls the exposure, reads and displays the intensity of predetermined spectral lines, and calculates wavelengths of unknown lines. The digital addresses of unknown lines are determined by superimposing a cursor on the TV display. The microcomputer also writes into memory wavelength fiducial marks for alignment of the TV camera

  20. In situ Raman spectroscopy for growth monitoring of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes in plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labbaye, T.; Gaillard, M.; Lecas, T.; Kovacevic, E.; Boulmer-Leborgne, Ch.; Guimbretière, G. [GREMI, Université-CNRS, BP6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Canizarès, A.; Raimboux, N.; Simon, P.; Ammar, M. R., E-mail: mohamed-ramzi.ammar@cnrs-orleans.fr [CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Univ. Orléans, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Strunskus, T. [Institute of Material Science, Chritian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, D-24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2014-11-24

    Portable and highly sensitive Raman setup was associated with a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor enabling in situ growth monitoring of multi-wall carbon nanotubes despite the combination of huge working distance, high growth speed and process temperature and reactive plasma condition. Near Edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was used for ex situ sample analysis as a complementary method to in situ Raman spectroscopy. The results confirmed the fact that the “alternating” method developed here can accurately be used for in situ Raman monitoring under reactive plasma condition. The original analytic tool can be of great importance to monitor the characteristics of these nanostructured materials and readily define the ultimate conditions for targeted results.

  1. Multielemental neutron activation analysis of some egyptian cement samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissa, E.A.; Rofail, N.B.; Abdel-Basset, N.; Soroor, A.; Hassan, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Multielemental analysis of normal, Karnak and sea-water cement samples were performed by neutron activation analysis technique using the (ET-R R-1) reactor for sample irradiation. The Data were collected and analysed by means of the (HPGe) detection system and a Pca computer. A total of 23 elements namely, Na, A1, C 1, K, Ca, Sc, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Zn, Sr, Ba, La, Sm, Eu, Yb, Lu, Ta, Au, Th and U were identified and analysed with concentrations ranging from 1 ppm upto 62% a comparison between the elemental concentrations of the three cement types is given. 2 tabs

  2. Preconcentration NAA for simultaneous multielemental determination in water sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatt, A.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Environment concerns with water, air, land and their interrelationship viz., human beings, fauna and flora. One of the important environmental compartments is water. Elements present in water might face a whole lot of physico-chemical conditions. This poses challenges to measure their total concentrations as well as different species. Preconcentration of the elements present in water samples is a necessary requisites in water analysis. For multi elements concentration measurements, Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) is one of the preferred analytical techniques due to its sensitivity and selectivity. In this talk preconcentration NAA for multielemental determination in water sample determination will be discussed

  3. Electrocatalytic oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution reactions on phthalocyanine modified electrodes: Electrochemical, in situ spectroelectrochemical, and in situ electrocolorimetric monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koca, Atif, E-mail: akoca@eng.marmara.edu.tr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Marmara University, Goeztepe, 34722 Istanbul (Turkey); Kalkan, Ayfer; Bayir, Zehra Altuntas [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Istanbul, Maslak, 34469 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2011-06-30

    Highlights: > Electrochemical and in situ spectroelectrochemical characterizations of the metallophthalocyanines were performed. > The presence of O{sub 2} influences both oxygen reduction reaction and the electrochemical behaviors of the complexes. > Homogeneous catalytic ORR process occurs via an 'inner sphere' chemical catalysis process. > CoPc and CuPc coated on a glassy carbon electrode decrease the overpotential of the working electrode for H{sup +} reduction. - Abstract: This study describes electrochemical, in situ spectroelectrochemical, and in situ electrocolorimetric monitoring of the electrocatalytic reduction of molecular oxygen and hydronium ion on the phthalocyanine-modified electrodes. For this purpose, electrochemical and in situ spectroelectrochemical characterizations of the metallophthalocyanines (MPc) bearing tetrakis-[4-((4'-trifluoromethyl)phenoxy)phenoxy] groups were performed. While CoPc gives both metal-based and ring-based redox processes, H{sub 2}Pc, ZnPc and CuPc show only ring-based electron transfer processes. In situ electrocolorimetric method was applied to investigate the color of the electrogenerated anionic and cationic forms of the complexes. The presence of O{sub 2} in the electrolyte system influences both oxygen reduction reaction and the electrochemical and spectral behaviors of the complexes, which indicate electrocatalytic activity of the complexes for the oxygen reduction reaction. Perchloric acid titrations monitored by voltammetry represent possible electrocatalytic activities of the complexes for hydrogen evolution reaction. CoPc and CuPc coated on a glassy carbon electrode decrease the overpotential of the working electrode for H{sup +} reduction. The nature of the metal center changes the electrocatalytic activities for hydrogen evolution reaction in aqueous solution. Although CuPc has an inactive metal center, its electrocatalytic activity is recorded more than CoPc for H{sup +} reduction in aqueous

  4. Monitoring dynamic electrochemical processes with in situ ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourousias, George; Bozzini, Benedetto; Jones, Michael W. M.; Van Riessen, Grant A.; Dal Zilio, Simone; Billè, Fulvio; Kiskinova, Maya; Gianoncelli, Alessandra

    2018-03-01

    The present work reports novel soft X-ray Fresnel CDI ptychography results, demonstrating the potential of this method for dynamic in situ studies. Specifically, in situ ptychography experiments explored the electrochemical fabrication of Co-doped Mn-oxide/polypyrrole nanocomposites for sustainable and cost-effective fuel-cell air-electrodes. Oxygen-reduction catalysts based on Mn-oxides exhibit relatively high activity, but poor durability: doping with Co has been shown to improve both reduction rate and stability. In this study, we examine the chemical state distribution of the catalytically crucial Co dopant to elucidate details of the Co dopant incorporation into the Mn/polymer matrix. The measurements were performed using a custom-made three-electrode thin-layer microcell, developed at the TwinMic beamline of Elettra Synchrotron during a series of experiments that were continued at the SXRI beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. Our time-resolved ptychography-based investigation was carried out in situ after two representative growth steps, controlled by electrochemical bias. In addition to the observation of morphological changes, we retrieved the spectroscopic information, provided by multiple ptychographic energy scans across Co L3-edge, shedding light on the doping mechanism and demonstrating a general approach for the molecular-level investigation complex multimaterial electrodeposition processes.

  5. Simultaneous monitoring of faecal indicators and harmful algae using an in-situ autonomous sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamahara, K M; Demir-Hilton, E; Preston, C M; Marin, R; Pargett, D; Roman, B; Jensen, S; Birch, J M; Boehm, A B; Scholin, C A

    2015-08-01

    Faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and harmful algal blooms (HABs) threaten the health and the economy of coastal communities worldwide. Emerging automated sampling technologies combined with molecular analytical techniques could enable rapid detection of micro-organisms in-situ, thereby improving resource management and public health decision-making. We evaluated this concept using a robotic device, the Environmental Sample Processor (ESP). The ESP automates in-situ sample collection, nucleic acid extraction and molecular analyses. Here, the ESP measured and reported concentrations of FIB (Enterococcus spp.), a microbial source-tracking marker (human-specific Bacteriodales) and a HAB species (Psuedo-nitzschia spp.) over a 45-day deployment on the Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf (Santa Cruz, CA, USA). Both FIB and HABs were enumerated from single in-situ collected water samples. The in-situ qPCR efficiencies ranged from 86% to 105%, while the limit of quantifications during the deployment was 10 copies reaction(-1) . No differences were observed in the concentrations of enterococci, the human-specific marker in Bacteroidales spp., and P. australis between in-situ collected sample and traditional hand sampling methods (P > 0·05). Analytical results were Internet-accessible within hours of sample collection, demonstrating the feasibility of same-day public notification of current water quality conditions. This study presents the first report of in-situ qPCR enumeration of both faecal indicators and harmful algal species in coastal marine waters. We utilize a robotic device for in-situ quantification of enterococci, the human-specific marker in Bacteriodales and Pseudo-nitzschia spp. from the same water samples collected and processed in-situ. The results demonstrate that rapid, in-situ monitoring can be utilized to identify and quantify multiple health-relevant micro-organisms important in water quality monitoring and that this monitoring can be used to inform same

  6. In-Situ Monitoring of Immune Function, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Monitoring the health and wellness of mission pilots is a critically important function. Space flight has an adverse effect on the human immune response. During...

  7. Monitoring and diagnosis in situ: noise analysis; Vigilancia y diagnostico in situ analisis de ruido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montalvo, C.; Garcia-Berrocal, A.

    2014-04-01

    Predictive maintenance based on surveillance and breakdowns diagnostics can be achieved through the analysis of the noise hidden in the signals. At the beginning noise analysis was development to monitor the power signals coming from neutron detectors. Nowadays its applications are very diverse. For instance: process sensors surveillance such us Resistance Temperature detectors, thermocouples and pressure transmitters, internals vibration monitoring, abnormal vibrations detection, etc. In this work some examples from the literature and from the authors experience are presented. (Author)

  8. In-situ acoustic signature monitoring in additive manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Lucas W.; Taheri, Hossein; Bigelow, Timothy A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Faierson, Eric J.

    2018-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapidly maturing process for the production of complex metallic, ceramic, polymeric, and composite components. The processes used are numerous, and with the complex geometries involved this can make quality control and standardization of the process and inspection difficult. Acoustic emission measurements have been used previously to monitor a number of processes including machining and welding. The authors have identified acoustic signature measurement as a potential means of monitoring metal additive manufacturing processes using process noise characteristics and those discrete acoustic emission events characteristic of defect growth, including cracks and delamination. Results of acoustic monitoring for a metal additive manufacturing process (directed energy deposition) are reported. The work investigated correlations between acoustic emissions and process noise with variations in machine state and deposition parameters, and provided proof of concept data that such correlations do exist.

  9. Evaluating Acoustic Emission Signals as an in situ process monitoring technique for Selective Laser Melting (SLM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Karl A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Candy, Jim V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Guss, Gabe [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mathews, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-14

    In situ real-time monitoring of the Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process has significant implications for the AM community. The ability to adjust the SLM process parameters during a build (in real-time) can save time, money and eliminate expensive material waste. Having a feedback loop in the process would allow the system to potentially ‘fix’ problem regions before a next powder layer is added. In this study we have investigated acoustic emission (AE) phenomena generated during the SLM process, and evaluated the results in terms of a single process parameter, of an in situ process monitoring technique.

  10. Portable Mass Spectrometer Applications for In Situ Environmental Gas Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Timothy P.; Diaz, J. Andres; Arkin, C. Richard; Conejo, Elian

    2005-01-01

    Primary Goal of this project is to (1) Design/build a flexible system to monitor air contamination (2) Learn requirements for operating system in low pressure and low temperature environments (3) Design/build system for integration into aircraft and automobiles Secondary Goals/Offshoots are (1) Fly aboard different aircraft (2)Hand-carry unit (3) Drive unit in automobiles.

  11. In-situ formation compaction monitoring in deep reservoirs by use of fiber optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ikeda

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We have devised a new in situ monitoring method for the amount of stratified compaction in borehole drilled several hundred meters underground. This newly developed epoch-making monitoring system differs from conventional monitoring methods for land subsidence in that it is designed to continuously monitor the amounts of displacement in several intervals separately, using optical fibers fitted in the sensor assembly. This report presents results from a deep observation well. This is a continued report from the previous one on EISOLS 2010.

  12. Applicability of PIXE for multielemental analysis in a biomedical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakir, N.S.

    1987-07-01

    The applicability of PIXE for multielemental analysis is demonstrated. The method is used in a major systematic study on hair samples using one target analysis. The pathological state considered is agitated elderly people. The main elements examined are S, K, Ca, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Br, Hg and Pb. The minimum detectable limits are 1-10 ppm using 180 μg of dry hair at 25 μe irradiations for elements between K and Br. The significance of differences between the hair elements in control populations and patients suffering from the pathological conditions are investigated. Investigations of possible linear and multiple-correlations between elements in each population are made. The work indicates that some elements do exhibit variation with pathological state, and the multielement PIXE analysis gives useful information about the subject. (author). 13 refs, 4 figs, 6 tabs

  13. In-situ Blockage Monitoring of Sensing Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijaz Ahmed Mangi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A reactor vessel level monitoring system measures the water level in a reactor during normal operation and abnormal conditions. A drop in the water level can expose nuclear fuel, which may lead to fuel meltdown and radiation spread in accident conditions. A level monitoring system mainly consists of a sensing line and pressure transmitter. Over a period of time boron sediments or other impurities can clog the line which may degrade the accuracy of the monitoring system. The aim of this study is to determine blockage in a sensing line using the energy of the composite signal. An equivalent Pi circuit model is used to simulate blockages in the sensing line and the system's response is examined under different blockage levels. Composite signals obtained from the model and plant's unblocked and blocked channels are decomposed into six levels of details and approximations using a wavelet filter bank. The percentage of energy is calculated at each level for approximations. It is observed that the percentage of energy reduces as the blockage level in the sensing line increases. The results of the model and operational data are well correlated. Thus, in our opinion variation in the energy levels of approximations can be used as an index to determine the presence and degree of blockage in a sensing line.

  14. In Situ Guided Wave Structural Health Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, George; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft engine rotating equipment operates at high temperatures and stresses. Noninvasive inspection of microcracks in those components poses a challenge for nondestructive evaluation. A low-cost, low-profile, high-temperature ultrasonic guided wave sensor was developed that detects cracks in situ. The transducer design provides nondestructive evaluation of structures and materials. A key feature of the sensor is that it withstands high temperatures and excites strong surface wave energy to inspect surface and subsurface cracks. The sol-gel bismuth titanate-based surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor can generate efficient SAWs for crack inspection. The sensor is very thin (submillimeter) and can generate surface waves up to 540 C. Finite element analysis of the SAW transducer design was performed to predict the sensor behavior, and experimental studies confirmed the results. The sensor can be implemented on structures of various shapes. With a spray-coating process, the sensor can be applied to the surface of large curvatures. It has minimal effect on airflow or rotating equipment imbalance, and provides good sensitivity.

  15. In-situ electrical analysis in view of monitoring the processing of thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnet, J. M.; Guillet, J.; Ainser, A.; Boiteux, G.; Fulchiron, R.; Seytre, Gerard

    1999-12-01

    In the last recent years, electrical techniques like microdielectrometry have presented an attracting and increasing interest for continuous monitoring, in a nondestructive way, of the advancement of the reaction of thermoset resins under cure. We think that the use of electrical analysis for in situ monitoring of chemical reactions can be extended to get information on thermoplastic and the physical phenomena such sa crystallization or study of residence time distribution in processing machines such as extruders.

  16. In-situ quality monitoring during laser brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungers, Michael; Fecker, Daniel; Frank, Sascha; Donst, Dmitri; Märgner, Volker; Abels, Peter; Kaierle, Stefan

    Laser brazing of zinc coated steel is a widely established manufacturing process in the automotive sector, where high quality requirements must be fulfilled. The strength, impermeablitiy and surface appearance of the joint are particularly important for judging its quality. The development of an on-line quality control system is highly desired by the industry. This paper presents recent works on the development of such a system, which consists of two cameras operating in different spectral ranges. For the evaluation of the system, seam imperfections are created artificially during experiments. Finally image processing algorithms for monitoring process parameters based the captured images are presented.

  17. Sustainability and in situ monitoring in battery development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, C. P.; Tarascon, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    The development of improved rechargeable batteries represents a major technological challenge for this new century, as batteries constitute the limiting components in the shift from petrol (gasoline) powered to electric vehicles, while also enabling the use of more renewable energy on the grid. To minimize the ecological implications associated with their wider use, we must integrate sustainability of battery materials into our research endeavours, choosing chemistries that have a minimum footprint in nature and that are more readily recycled or integrated into a full circular economy. Sustainability and cost concerns require that we greatly increase the battery lifetime and consider second lives for batteries. As part of this, we must monitor the state of health of batteries continuously during operation to minimize their degradation. It is thus important to push the frontiers of operando techniques to monitor increasingly complex processes. In this Review, we will describe key advances in both more sustainable chemistries and operando techniques, along with some of the remaining challenges and possible solutions, as we personally perceive them.

  18. In situ monitoring of cocrystals in formulation development using low-frequency Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaki, Takashi; Tanabe, Yuta; Kojima, Takashi; Miura, Masaru; Ikeda, Yukihiro; Koide, Tatsuo; Fukami, Toshiro

    2018-05-05

    In recent years, to guarantee a quality-by-design approach to the development of pharmaceutical products, it is important to identify properties of raw materials and excipients in order to determine critical process parameters and critical quality attributes. Feedback obtained from real-time analyses using various process analytical technology (PAT) tools has been actively investigated. In this study, in situ monitoring using low-frequency (LF) Raman spectroscopy (10-200 cm -1 ), which may have higher discriminative ability among polymorphs than near-infrared spectroscopy and conventional Raman spectroscopy (200-1800 cm -1 ), was investigated as a possible application to PAT. This is because LF-Raman spectroscopy obtains information about intermolecular and/or lattice vibrations in the solid state. The monitoring results obtained from Furosemide/Nicotinamide cocrystal indicate that LF-Raman spectroscopy is applicable to in situ monitoring of suspension and fluidized bed granulation processes, and is an effective technique as a PAT tool to detect the conversion risk of cocrystals. LF-Raman spectroscopy is also used as a PAT tool to monitor reactions, crystallizations, and manufacturing processes of drug substances and products. In addition, a sequence of conversion behaviors of Furosemide/Nicotinamide cocrystals was determined by performing in situ monitoring for the first time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Process defects and in situ monitoring methods in metal powder bed fusion: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Marco; Colosimo, Bianca Maria

    2017-04-01

    Despite continuous technological enhancements of metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) systems, the lack of process repeatability and stability still represents a barrier for the industrial breakthrough. The most relevant metal AM applications currently involve industrial sectors (e.g. aerospace and bio-medical) where defects avoidance is fundamental. Because of this, there is the need to develop novel in situ monitoring tools able to keep under control the stability of the process on a layer-by-layer basis, and to detect the onset of defects as soon as possible. On the one hand, AM systems must be equipped with in situ sensing devices able to measure relevant quantities during the process, a.k.a. process signatures. On the other hand, in-process data analytics and statistical monitoring techniques are required to detect and localize the defects in an automated way. This paper reviews the literature and the commercial tools for in situ monitoring of powder bed fusion (PBF) processes. It explores the different categories of defects and their main causes, the most relevant process signatures and the in situ sensing approaches proposed so far. Particular attention is devoted to the development of automated defect detection rules and the study of process control strategies, which represent two critical fields for the development of future smart PBF systems.

  20. Process defects and in situ monitoring methods in metal powder bed fusion: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, Marco; Colosimo, Bianca Maria

    2017-01-01

    Despite continuous technological enhancements of metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) systems, the lack of process repeatability and stability still represents a barrier for the industrial breakthrough. The most relevant metal AM applications currently involve industrial sectors (e.g. aerospace and bio-medical) where defects avoidance is fundamental. Because of this, there is the need to develop novel in situ monitoring tools able to keep under control the stability of the process on a layer-by-layer basis, and to detect the onset of defects as soon as possible. On the one hand, AM systems must be equipped with in situ sensing devices able to measure relevant quantities during the process, a.k.a. process signatures. On the other hand, in-process data analytics and statistical monitoring techniques are required to detect and localize the defects in an automated way. This paper reviews the literature and the commercial tools for in situ monitoring of powder bed fusion (PBF) processes. It explores the different categories of defects and their main causes, the most relevant process signatures and the in situ sensing approaches proposed so far. Particular attention is devoted to the development of automated defect detection rules and the study of process control strategies, which represent two critical fields for the development of future smart PBF systems. (paper)

  1. Optimized autonomous space in-situ sensor web for volcano monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.-Z.; Shirazi, B.; Huang, R.; Xu, M.; Peterson, N.; LaHusen, R.; Pallister, J.; Dzurisin, D.; Moran, S.; Lisowski, M.; Kedar, S.; Chien, S.; Webb, F.; Kiely, A.; Doubleday, J.; Davies, A.; Pieri, D.

    2010-01-01

    In response to NASA's announced requirement for Earth hazard monitoring sensor-web technology, a multidisciplinary team involving sensor-network experts (Washington State University), space scientists (JPL), and Earth scientists (USGS Cascade Volcano Observatory (CVO)), have developed a prototype of dynamic and scalable hazard monitoring sensor-web and applied it to volcano monitoring. The combined Optimized Autonomous Space In-situ Sensor-web (OASIS) has two-way communication capability between ground and space assets, uses both space and ground data for optimal allocation of limited bandwidth resources on the ground, and uses smart management of competing demands for limited space assets. It also enables scalability and seamless infusion of future space and in-situ assets into the sensor-web. The space and in-situ control components of the system are integrated such that each element is capable of autonomously tasking the other. The ground in-situ was deployed into the craters and around the flanks of Mount St. Helens in July 2009, and linked to the command and control of the Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite. ?? 2010 IEEE.

  2. Eddy current sensor for in-situ monitoring of swelling of Li-ion prismatic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotnikov, Yuri, E-mail: plotnikov@ge.com; Karp, Jason, E-mail: plotnikov@ge.com; Knobloch, Aaron, E-mail: plotnikov@ge.com; Kapusta, Chris, E-mail: plotnikov@ge.com; Lin, David, E-mail: plotnikov@ge.com [GE Global Research, One Research Circle, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    2015-03-31

    In-situ monitoring an on-board rechargeable battery in hybrid cars can be used to ensure a long operating life of the battery and safe operation of the vehicle. Intercalations of ions in the electrode material during charge and discharge of a Lithium Ion battery cause periodic stress and strain of the electrode materials that can ultimately lead to fatigue resulting in capacity loss and potential battery failure. Currently this process is not monitored directly on the cells. This work is focused on development technologies that would quantify battery swelling and provide in-situ monitoring for onboard vehicle applications. Several rounds of tests have been performed to spatially characterize cell expansion of a 5 Ah cell with a nickel/manganese/cobalt-oxide cathode (Sanyo, Japan) used by Ford in their Fusion HEV battery pack. A collaborative team of researchers from GE and the University of Michigan has characterized the free expansion of these cells to be in the range of 100×125 microns (1% of total cell thickness) at the center point of the cell. GE proposed to use a thin eddy current (EC) coil to monitor these expansions on the cells while inside the package. The photolithography manufacturing process previously developed for EC arrays for detecting cracks in aircraft engine components was used to build test coils for gap monitoring. These sensors are thin enough to be placed safely between neighboring cells and capable of monitoring small variations in the gap between the cells. Preliminary investigations showed that these coils can be less than 100 micron thick and have sufficient sensitivity in a range from 0 to 2 mm. Laboratory tests revealed good correlation between EC and optical gap measurements in the desired range. Further technology development could lead to establishing a sensor network for a low cost solution for the in-situ monitoring of cell swelling during battery operation.

  3. Eddy current sensor for in-situ monitoring of swelling of Li-ion prismatic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Yuri; Karp, Jason; Knobloch, Aaron; Kapusta, Chris; Lin, David

    2015-03-01

    In-situ monitoring an on-board rechargeable battery in hybrid cars can be used to ensure a long operating life of the battery and safe operation of the vehicle. Intercalations of ions in the electrode material during charge and discharge of a Lithium Ion battery cause periodic stress and strain of the electrode materials that can ultimately lead to fatigue resulting in capacity loss and potential battery failure. Currently this process is not monitored directly on the cells. This work is focused on development technologies that would quantify battery swelling and provide in-situ monitoring for onboard vehicle applications. Several rounds of tests have been performed to spatially characterize cell expansion of a 5 Ah cell with a nickel/manganese/cobalt-oxide cathode (Sanyo, Japan) used by Ford in their Fusion HEV battery pack. A collaborative team of researchers from GE and the University of Michigan has characterized the free expansion of these cells to be in the range of 100×125 microns (1% of total cell thickness) at the center point of the cell. GE proposed to use a thin eddy current (EC) coil to monitor these expansions on the cells while inside the package. The photolithography manufacturing process previously developed for EC arrays for detecting cracks in aircraft engine components was used to build test coils for gap monitoring. These sensors are thin enough to be placed safely between neighboring cells and capable of monitoring small variations in the gap between the cells. Preliminary investigations showed that these coils can be less than 100 micron thick and have sufficient sensitivity in a range from 0 to 2 mm. Laboratory tests revealed good correlation between EC and optical gap measurements in the desired range. Further technology development could lead to establishing a sensor network for a low cost solution for the in-situ monitoring of cell swelling during battery operation.

  4. An Optimized Autonomous Space In-situ Sensorweb (OASIS) for Volcano Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Shirazi, B.; Lahusen, R.; Chien, S.; Kedar, S.; Webb, F.

    2006-12-01

    In response to NASA's announced requirement for Earth hazard monitoring sensor-web technology, we are developing a prototype real-time Optimized Autonomous Space In-situ Sensorweb. The prototype will be focused on volcano hazard monitoring at Mount St. Helens, which has been in continuous eruption since October 2004. The system is designed to be flexible and easily configurable for many other applications as well. The primary goals of the project are: 1) integrating complementary space (i.e., Earth Observing One (EO- 1) satellite) and in-situ (ground-based) elements into an interactive, autonomous sensor-web; 2) advancing sensor-web power and communication resource management technology; and 3) enabling scalability for seamless infusion of future space and in-situ assets into the sensor-web. To meet these goals, we are developing: 1) a test-bed in-situ array with smart sensor nodes capable of making autonomous data acquisition decisions; 2) efficient self-organization algorithm of sensor-web topology to support efficient data communication and command control; 3) smart bandwidth allocation algorithms in which sensor nodes autonomously determine packet priorities based on mission needs and local bandwidth information in real- time; and 4) remote network management and reprogramming tools. The space and in-situ control components of the system will be integrated such that each element is capable of triggering the other. Sensor-web data acquisition and dissemination will be accomplished through the use of SensorML language standards for geospatial information. The three-year project will demonstrate end-to-end system performance with the in-situ test-bed at Mount St. Helens and NASA's EO-1 platform.

  5. Optimized Autonomous Space In-situ Sensor-Web for volcano monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.-Z.; Shirazi, B.; Kedar, S.; Chien, S.; Webb, F.; Tran, D.; Davis, A.; Pieri, D.; LaHusen, R.; Pallister, J.; Dzurisin, D.; Moran, S.; Lisowski, M.

    2008-01-01

    In response to NASA's announced requirement for Earth hazard monitoring sensor-web technology, a multidisciplinary team involving sensor-network experts (Washington State University), space scientists (JPL), and Earth scientists (USGS Cascade Volcano Observatory (CVO)), is developing a prototype dynamic and scaleable hazard monitoring sensor-web and applying it to volcano monitoring. The combined Optimized Autonomous Space -In-situ Sensor-web (OASIS) will have two-way communication capability between ground and space assets, use both space and ground data for optimal allocation of limited power and bandwidth resources on the ground, and use smart management of competing demands for limited space assets. It will also enable scalability and seamless infusion of future space and in-situ assets into the sensor-web. The prototype will be focused on volcano hazard monitoring at Mount St. Helens, which has been active since October 2004. The system is designed to be flexible and easily configurable for many other applications as well. The primary goals of the project are: 1) integrating complementary space (i.e., Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite) and in-situ (ground-based) elements into an interactive, autonomous sensor-web; 2) advancing sensor-web power and communication resource management technology; and 3) enabling scalability for seamless infusion of future space and in-situ assets into the sensor-web. To meet these goals, we are developing: 1) a test-bed in-situ array with smart sensor nodes capable of making autonomous data acquisition decisions; 2) efficient self-organization algorithm of sensor-web topology to support efficient data communication and command control; 3) smart bandwidth allocation algorithms in which sensor nodes autonomously determine packet priorities based on mission needs and local bandwidth information in real-time; and 4) remote network management and reprogramming tools. The space and in-situ control components of the system will be

  6. Task 1. Monitoring real time materials degradation. NRC extended In-situ and real-time Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhtiari, Sasan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-03-01

    The overall objective of this project was to perform a scoping study to identify, in concert with the nuclear industry, those sensors and techniques that have the most promising commercial viability and fill a critical inspection or monitoring need. Candidates to be considered include sensors to monitor real-time material degradation, characterize residual stress, monitor and inspect component fabrication, assess radionuclide and associated chemical species concentrations in ground water and soil, characterize fuel properties, and monitor severe accident conditions. Under Task 1—Monitoring Real-Time Materials Degradation—scoping studies were conducted to assess the feasibility of potential inspection and monitoring technologies (i.e., a combination of sensors, advanced signal processing techniques, and data analysis methods) that could be utilized in LWR and/or advanced reactor applications for continuous monitoring of degradation in-situ. The goal was to identify those techniques that appear to be the most promising, i.e., those that are closest to being both technically and commercially viable and that the nuclear industry is most likely to pursue. Current limitations and associated issues that must be overcome before commercial application of certain techniques have also been addressed.

  7. In Situ Monitoring of Temperature inside Lithium-Ion Batteries by Flexible Micro Temperature Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chi Chen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Lithium-ion secondary batteries are commonly used in electric vehicles, smart phones, personal digital assistants (PDA, notebooks and electric cars. These lithium-ion secondary batteries must charge and discharge rapidly, causing the interior temperature to rise quickly, raising a safety issue. Over-charging results in an unstable voltage and current, causing potential safety problems, such as thermal runaways and explosions. Thus, a micro flexible temperature sensor for the in in-situ monitoring of temperature inside a lithium-ion secondary battery must be developed. In this work, flexible micro temperature sensors were integrated into a lithium-ion secondary battery using the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS process for monitoring temperature in situ.

  8. Improved design and in-situ measurements of new beam position monitors for Indus-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M.; Babbar, L. K.; Holikatti, A. C.; Yadav, S.; Tyagi, Y.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Senecha, V. K.

    2018-01-01

    Beam position monitors (BPM) are important diagnostic devices used in particle accelerators to monitor position of the beam for various applications. Improved version of button electrode BPM has been designed using CST Studio Suite for Indus-2 ring. The new BPMs are designed to replace old BPMs which were designed and installed more than 12 years back. The improved BPMs have higher transfer impedance, resonance free output signal, equal sensitivity in horizontal and vertical planes and fast decaying wakefield as compared to old BPMs. The new BPMs have been calibrated using coaxial wire method. Measurement of transfer impedance and time domain signals has also been performed in-situ with electron beam during Indus-2 operation. The calibration and beam based measurements results showed close agreement with the design parameters. This paper presents design, electromagnetic simulations, calibration result and in-situ beam based measurements of newly designed BPMs.

  9. Multielemental X-ray radiometric analysis of ferromanganese concretions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metelev, A.Yu.; Grigor'ev, A.I.; Rakita, K.A.; Mamaenko, M.V.; Ivanenko, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Ferromanganese concretions are promising mineral resources of the ocean. Most often, they are analyzed by atomic-absorption, spectra, X-ray spectral, neutron-activation, and X-ray radiometric methods. Note that X-ray radiometric analysis (XRRA) allows the sufficiently rapid determination of a great number of elements in ferromanganese concretions. The possibility of using XRRA with saturated and thin layers was shown; however, the data on the precision and accuracy of the technique was not given. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the basic performance characteristics of the multielemental X-ray radiometric analysis of ferromanganese concretions (Pacific Ocean). Determinations for K,Ca and Ti content were made using a 55 Fe source and for Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, and Mo contents by using a 109 Cd source. The precision and accuracy of the method was investigated by using reference concretions; it was found the confidence intervals overlap for all of the elements except Ca and Pb. The relative standard deviation was 1-5%, indicating the high precision of the method. The described technique is successfully used on research vessels of the Far East Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences and in South Pacific Ocean geological expeditions of PO open-quotes Dal'morgeologiyaclose quotes

  10. Monitoring microstructural evolution in-situ during cyclic deformation by high resolution reciprocal space mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichs, Annika Martina; Thiel, Felix; Fischer, Torben

    2017-01-01

    The recently developed synchrotron technique High Resolution Reciprocal Space Mapping (HRRSM) is used to characterize the deformation structures evolving during cyclic deformation of commercially pure, polycrystalline aluminium AA1050. Insight into the structural reorganization within single grains...... is gained by in-situ monitoring of the microstructural evolution during cyclic deformation. By HRRSM, a large number of individual subgrains can be resolved within individual grains in the bulk of polycrystalline specimens and their fate, their individual orientation and elastic stresses, tracked during...

  11. Description and field test of an in situ coliform monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grana, D. C.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    A prototype in situ system for monitoring the levels of fecal coliforms in shallow water bodies was developed and evaluated. This system was based on the known relationship between the concentration of the coliform bacteria and the amount of hydrogen they produce during growth in a complex organic media. The prototype system consists of a sampler platform, which sits on the bottom; a surface buoy, which transmits sampler-generated data; and a shore station, which receives, displays the data, and controls the sampler. The concept of remote monitoring of fecal coliform concentrations by utilizing a system based on the electrochemical method was verified during the evaluation of the prototype.

  12. In situ process monitoring in selective laser sintering using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Michael R.; Lewis, Adam; Park, Jongwan; McElroy, Austin B.; Estrada, Arnold D.; Fish, Scott; Beaman, Joseph J.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2018-04-01

    Selective laser sintering (SLS) is an efficient process in additive manufacturing that enables rapid part production from computer-based designs. However, SLS is limited by its notable lack of in situ process monitoring when compared with other manufacturing processes. We report the incorporation of optical coherence tomography (OCT) into an SLS system in detail and demonstrate access to surface and subsurface features. Video frame rate cross-sectional imaging reveals areas of sintering uniformity and areas of excessive heat error with high temporal resolution. We propose a set of image processing techniques for SLS process monitoring with OCT and report the limitations and obstacles for further OCT integration with SLS systems.

  13. Seismic monitoring of in situ combustion process in a heavy oil field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadeh, Hossein Mehdi; Srivastava, Ravi P; Vedanti, Nimisha; Landrø, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Three time-lapse 3D seismic surveys are analysed to monitor the effect of in situ combustion, a thermal-enhanced oil recovery process in the Balol heavy oil reservoir in India. The baseline data were acquired prior to the start of the in situ combustion process in four injection wells, while the two monitor surveys were acquired 1 and 2 years after injection start, respectively. We present the results of baseline and second monitor surveys. Fluid substitution studies based on acoustic well logs predict a seismic amplitude decrease at the top reservoir and an increase at the base reservoir. Both the amplitude dimming at the top reservoir and the brightening at the base reservoir are observed in the field data. The extent of the most pronounced 4D anomaly is estimated from the seismic amplitude and time shift analysis. The interesting result of seismic analysis is that the anomalies are laterally shifted towards the northwest, rather than the expected east, from the injector location suggesting a northwest movement of the in situ combustion front. No clear evidence of air leakage into other sand layers, neither above nor below the reservoir sand, is observed. This does not necessarily mean that all the injected air is following the reservoir sand, especially if the thief sand layers are thin. These layers might be difficult to observe on seismic data

  14. In Situ Monitoring of Chemical Reactions at a Solid-Water Interface by Femtosecond Acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chih-Chiang; Weng, Meng-Yu; Sheu, Jinn-Kong; Yao, Yi-Ting; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2017-11-02

    Chemical reactions at a solid-liquid interface are of fundamental importance. Interfacial chemical reactions occur not only at the very interface but also in the subsurface area, while existing monitoring techniques either provide limited spatial resolution or are applicable only for the outmost atomic layer. Here, with the aid of the time-domain analysis with femtosecond acoustics, we demonstrate a subatomic-level-resolution technique to longitudinally monitor chemical reactions at solid-water interfaces, capable of in situ monitoring even the subsurface area under atmospheric conditions. Our work was proven by monitoring the already-known anode oxidation process occurring during photoelectrochemical water splitting. Furthermore, whenever the oxide layer thickness equals an integer  number of the effective atomic layer thickness, the measured acoustic echo will show higher signal-to-noise ratios with reduced speckle noise, indicating the quantum-like behavior of this coherent-phonon-based technique.

  15. In situ nonlinear ultrasonic technique for monitoring microcracking in concrete subjected to creep and cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gun; Loreto, Giovanni; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Kurtis, Kimberly E; Wall, James J; Jacobs, Laurence J

    2018-08-01

    This research conducts in situ nonlinear ultrasonic (NLU) measurements for real time monitoring of load-induced damage in concrete. For the in situ measurements on a cylindrical specimen under sustained load, a previously developed second harmonic generation (SHG) technique with non-contact detection is adapted to a cylindrical specimen geometry. This new setup is validated by demonstrating that the measured nonlinear Rayleigh wave signals are equivalent to those in a flat half space, and thus the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, β can be defined and interpreted in the same way. Both the acoustic nonlinearity parameter and strain are measured to quantitatively assess the early-age damage in a set of concrete specimens subjected to either 25 days of creep, or 11 cycles of cyclic loading at room temperature. The experimental results show that the acoustic nonlinearity parameter is sensitive to early-stage microcrack formation under both loading conditions - the measured β can be directly linked to the accumulated microscale damage. This paper demonstrates the potential of NLU for the in situ monitoring of mechanical load-induced microscale damage in concrete components. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigation on the Vibration Effect of Shock Wave in Rock Burst by In Situ Microseismic Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingshi Gao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rock burst is a physical explosion associated with enormous damage at a short time. Due to the complicity of mechanics of rock burst in coal mine roadway, the direct use of traditional investigation method applied in tunnel is inappropriate since the components of surrounding rock are much more complex in underground than that of tunnel. In addition, the reliability of the results obtained through these methods (i.e., physical simulation, theoretical analysis, and monitoring in filed application is still not certain with complex geological conditions. Against this background, present experimental study was first ever conducted at initial site to evaluate the effect of shock wave during the rock burst. TDS-6 microseismic monitoring system was set up in situ to evaluate the propagation of shock wave resulting in microexplosions of roadway surrounding rock. Various parameters including the distance of epicentre and the characteristic of response have been investigated. Detailed test results revealed that (1 the shock wave attenuated exponentially with the increase of the distance to seismic source according to the equation of E=E0e-ηl; particularly, the amplitude decreased significantly after being 20 m apart from explosive resource and then became very weak after being 30 m apart from the seismic source; (2 the response mechanics are characteristic with large scatter based on the real location of surrounding rock despite being at the same section. That is, the surrounding rock of floor experienced serious damage, followed by ribs, the roof, and the humeral angles. This in situ experimental study also demonstrated that microseismic monitoring system can be effectively used in rock burst through careful setup and data investigation. The proposed in situ monitoring method has provided a new way to predict rock burst due to its simple instalment procedure associated with direct and reasonable experimental results.

  17. Qualification, commissioning and in situ monitoring of high heat flux plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escourbiac, F. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)], E-mail: frederic.escourbiac@cea.fr; Durocher, A.; Grosman, A.; Cismondi, F.; Courtois, X.; Farjon, J.L.; Schlosser, J. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Merola, M.; Tivey, R. [ITER Team, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2007-10-15

    Up-to-date development of actively cooled high heat flux (HHF) plasma facing components (PFC) prototypes only allows reduced margins with regards to the ITER thermal requirements. Additionally, perfect quality cannot be ensured along series manufacturing: the presence of flaws which impair the heat transfer capability of the component, in particular at the interface armour/heat sink appears to be statistically unavoidable. In order to ensure a successful series production, a qualification methodology of actively cooled high heat flux plasma facing components is proposed. Secondly, advanced non-destructive techniques developed for HHF PFC commissioning are detailed with definition of acceptance criteria. Finally, innovative diagnostics for in situ monitoring during plasma operations or tokamak shutdowns are investigated in order to prevent immediate damage (safety monitoring); or evaluate component degradation (health monitoring). This work takes into account the relevance to Tore Supra, and is applied to W7X and ITER Divertor HHF PFC.

  18. Qualification, commissioning and in situ monitoring of high heat flux plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escourbiac, F.; Durocher, A.; Grosman, A.; Cismondi, F.; Courtois, X.; Farjon, J.L.; Schlosser, J.; Merola, M.; Tivey, R.

    2007-01-01

    Up-to-date development of actively cooled high heat flux (HHF) plasma facing components (PFC) prototypes only allows reduced margins with regards to the ITER thermal requirements. Additionally, perfect quality cannot be ensured along series manufacturing: the presence of flaws which impair the heat transfer capability of the component, in particular at the interface armour/heat sink appears to be statistically unavoidable. In order to ensure a successful series production, a qualification methodology of actively cooled high heat flux plasma facing components is proposed. Secondly, advanced non-destructive techniques developed for HHF PFC commissioning are detailed with definition of acceptance criteria. Finally, innovative diagnostics for in situ monitoring during plasma operations or tokamak shutdowns are investigated in order to prevent immediate damage (safety monitoring); or evaluate component degradation (health monitoring). This work takes into account the relevance to Tore Supra, and is applied to W7X and ITER Divertor HHF PFC

  19. The application of x-ray fluorescence spectrometry for multielemental analysis of air particulate samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Rashid Mohamad Yusoff

    1986-01-01

    The performance of XRF spectrometer as a tool for multielemental analysis of air pollution samples was discussed. The non-destructive couples with multielemental nature of the technique satisfactory sensitivity for most elements were the most important characteristics for its popularity as a method of analysis. Thus, the technique promises a significant reduction in cost and time of analysis. As a result, more extensive and revealing air particulates survey should be possible, with consequent improvements in the discovery and positive identification of particulate pollution sources. (author)

  20. Performance Analysis of Retrofitted Tribo-Corrosion Test Rig for Monitoring In Situ Oil Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpith Siddaiah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oils and lubricants, once extracted after use from a mechanical system, can hardly be reused, and should be refurbished or replaced in most applications. New methods of in situ oil and lubricant efficiency monitoring systems have been introduced for a wide variety of mechanical systems, such as automobiles, aerospace aircrafts, ships, offshore wind turbines, and deep sea oil drilling rigs. These methods utilize electronic sensors to monitor the “byproduct effects” in a mechanical system that are not indicative of the actual remaining lifecycle and reliability of the oils. A reliable oil monitoring system should be able to monitor the wear rate and the corrosion rate of the tribo-pairs due to the inclusion of contaminants. The current study addresses this technological gap, and presents a novel design of a tribo-corrosion test rig for oils used in a dynamic system. A pin-on-disk tribometer test rig retrofitted with a three electrode-potentiostat corrosion monitoring system was used to analyze the corrosion and wear rate of a steel tribo-pair in industrial grade transmission oil. The effectiveness of the retrofitted test rig was analyzed by introducing various concentrations of contaminants in an oil medium that usually leads to a corrosive working environment. The results indicate that the retrofitted test rig can effectively monitor the in situ tribological performance of the oil in a controlled dynamic corrosive environment. It is a useful method to understand the wear–corrosion synergies for further experimental work, and to develop accurate predictive lifecycle assessment and prognostic models. The application of this system is expected to have economic benefits and help reduce the ecological oil waste footprint.

  1. Performance Analysis of Retrofitted Tribo-Corrosion Test Rig for Monitoring In Situ Oil Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddaiah, Arpith; Khan, Zulfiqar Ahmad; Ramachandran, Rahul; Menezes, Pradeep L

    2017-09-28

    Oils and lubricants, once extracted after use from a mechanical system, can hardly be reused, and should be refurbished or replaced in most applications. New methods of in situ oil and lubricant efficiency monitoring systems have been introduced for a wide variety of mechanical systems, such as automobiles, aerospace aircrafts, ships, offshore wind turbines, and deep sea oil drilling rigs. These methods utilize electronic sensors to monitor the "byproduct effects" in a mechanical system that are not indicative of the actual remaining lifecycle and reliability of the oils. A reliable oil monitoring system should be able to monitor the wear rate and the corrosion rate of the tribo-pairs due to the inclusion of contaminants. The current study addresses this technological gap, and presents a novel design of a tribo-corrosion test rig for oils used in a dynamic system. A pin-on-disk tribometer test rig retrofitted with a three electrode-potentiostat corrosion monitoring system was used to analyze the corrosion and wear rate of a steel tribo-pair in industrial grade transmission oil. The effectiveness of the retrofitted test rig was analyzed by introducing various concentrations of contaminants in an oil medium that usually leads to a corrosive working environment. The results indicate that the retrofitted test rig can effectively monitor the in situ tribological performance of the oil in a controlled dynamic corrosive environment. It is a useful method to understand the wear-corrosion synergies for further experimental work, and to develop accurate predictive lifecycle assessment and prognostic models. The application of this system is expected to have economic benefits and help reduce the ecological oil waste footprint.

  2. Evaluation of chemical sensors for in situ ground-water monitoring at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, E.M.; Hostetler, D.D.

    1989-03-01

    This report documents a preliminary review and evaluation of instrument systems and sensors that may be used to detect ground-water contaminants in situ at the Hanford Site. Three topics are covered in this report: (1) identification of a group of priority contaminants at Hanford that could be monitored in situ, (2) a review of current instrument systems and sensors for environmental monitoring, and (3) an evaluation of instrument systems that could be used to monitor Hanford contaminants. Thirteen priority contaminants were identified in Hanford ground water, including carbon tetrachloride and six related chlorinated hydrocarbons, cyanide, methyl ethyl ketone, chromium (VI), fluoride, nitrate, and uranium. Based on transduction principles, chemical sensors were divided into four classes, ten specific types of instrument systems were considered: fluorescence spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), spark excitation-fiber optic spectrochemical emission sensor (FOSES), chemical optrodes, stripping voltammetry, catalytic surface-modified ion electrode immunoassay sensors, resistance/capacitance, quartz piezobalance and surface acoustic wave devices. Because the flow of heat is difficult to control, there are currently no environmental chemical sensors based on thermal transduction. The ability of these ten instrument systems to detect the thirteen priority contaminants at the Hanford Site at the required sensitivity was evaluated. In addition, all ten instrument systems were qualitatively evaluated for general selectivity, response time, reliability, and field operability. 45 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Characterization of subcritical water oxidation with in situ monitoring and self-modeling curve resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemperline, Paul J.; Yang Yu; Bian Zhihui

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a subcritical water oxidation (SBWO) process was monitored using self-modeling curve resolution (SMCR) of in situ UV-Vis measurements to estimate time-dependant composition profiles of reactants, intermediates and products. A small laboratory scale reactor with UV-Vis fiber-optic probes and a flow cell was used to demonstrate the usefulness of SMCR for monitoring the destruction of model compounds phenol, benzoic acid, and aniline in a dilute aqueous solutions. Hydrogen peroxide was used as the oxidizing reagent at moderate temperature (150-250 deg. C) and pressure (60-90 atm) in a single phase. By use of in situ monitoring, reaction times were easily determined and conditions for efficient oxidations were easily diagnosed without the need for time consuming off-line reference measurements. For selected runs, the destruction of the model compound was confirmed by gas chromatography and chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements. Suspected intermediate oxidation products were easily detected by the use of UV-Vis spectrometry and self-modeling curve resolution, but could not be detected by gas chromatography

  4. Evaluation of chemical sensors for in situ ground-water monitoring at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.M.; Hostetler, D.D.

    1989-03-01

    This report documents a preliminary review and evaluation of instrument systems and sensors that may be used to detect ground-water contaminants in situ at the Hanford Site. Three topics are covered in this report: (1) identification of a group of priority contaminants at Hanford that could be monitored in situ, (2) a review of current instrument systems and sensors for environmental monitoring, and (3) an evaluation of instrument systems that could be used to monitor Hanford contaminants. Thirteen priority contaminants were identified in Hanford ground water, including carbon tetrachloride and six related chlorinated hydrocarbons, cyanide, methyl ethyl ketone, chromium (VI), fluoride, nitrate, and uranium. Based on transduction principles, chemical sensors were divided into four classes, ten specific types of instrument systems were considered: fluorescence spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), spark excitation-fiber optic spectrochemical emission sensor (FOSES), chemical optrodes, stripping voltammetry, catalytic surface-modified ion electrode immunoassay sensors, resistance/capacitance, quartz piezobalance and surface acoustic wave devices. Because the flow of heat is difficult to control, there are currently no environmental chemical sensors based on thermal transduction. The ability of these ten instrument systems to detect the thirteen priority contaminants at the Hanford Site at the required sensitivity was evaluated. In addition, all ten instrument systems were qualitatively evaluated for general selectivity, response time, reliability, and field operability. 45 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs

  5. Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy to monitor microbial metabolism in situ under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2006-12-01

    Although high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) biotopes are ubiquitous on Earth, little is known about the metabolism of piezophile organisms. Cell culture under HHP can be technically challenging, and equipment- dependent. In addition, the depressurization step required for analysis can lead to erroneous data. Therefore, to understand how piezophile organisms react to pressure, it is crucial to be able to monitor their activity in situ under HHP. We developed the use of Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy (QRS, 1) to monitor in situ the metabolism of organic molecules. This technique is based on the specific spectral signature of an analyte from which its concentration can be deduced. An application of this technique to the monitoring of alcoholic fermentation by the piezotolerant micro-eucaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae is presented. Ethanol fermentation from glucose was monitored during 24h from ambient P up to 100 MPa in the low- pressure Diamond Anvil Cell (lpDAC, 2). The experimental compression chamber consisted in a 300 μm-thick Ni gasket in which a 500 μm-diameter hole was drilled. Early-stationnary yeast cells were inoculated into fresh low-fluorescence medium containing 0.15 M of glucose. Ethanol concentration was determined in situ by QRS using the symmetric C-C stretching mode of ethanol at 878 cm-1 normalizing the data to the intensity of the sulfate S-O stretching mode at 980 cm-1. In our setup, the detection limit of ethanol is lower than 0.05 mM with a precision below 1%. At ambient P, ethanol production in the lpDAC and in control experiments proceeds with the same kinetics. Thus, yeast is not affected by its confinement. This is further confirmed by its ability to bud with a generation time similar to control experiments performed in glass tubes at ambient pressure inside the lpDAC. Ethanol production by yeast occurs to at least 65 MPa (3). At 10 MPa, fermentation proceeds 3 times faster than at ambient P. Fermentation rates decrease linearly from 20 to

  6. Opto-electrochemical In Situ Monitoring of the Cathodic Formation of Single Cobalt Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasiliense, Vitor; Clausmeyer, Jan; Dauphin, Alice L; Noël, Jean-Marc; Berto, Pascal; Tessier, Gilles; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Kanoufi, Fréderic

    2017-08-21

    Single-particle electrochemistry at a nanoelectrode is explored by dark-field optical microscopy. The analysis of the scattered light allows in situ dynamic monitoring of the electrodeposition of single cobalt nanoparticles down to a radius of 65 nm. Larger sub-micrometer particles are directly sized optically by super-localization of the edges and the scattered light contains complementary information concerning the particle redox chemistry. This opto-electrochemical approach is used to derive mechanistic insights about electrocatalysis that are not accessible from single-particle electrochemistry. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. In-situ monitoring of the growth of nanostructured aluminum thin film

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Michal; Bulíř, Jiří; Lančok, Ján; Pokorný, Petr; Bodnár, Michal

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 5 (2011), "051503-1"-"051503-10" ISSN 1934-2608 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100718; GA AV ČR IAA100100729; GA ČR GP202/09/P324 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : aluminum ultrathin film * magnetron sputtering * in-situ monitoring * electrical conductivity * spectral ellipsometry * optical emission spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.570, year: 2011

  8. Computer simulation of multi-elemental fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voertler, K.

    2011-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion is a sustainable energy solution, in which energy is produced using similar processes as in the sun. In this technology hydrogen isotopes are fused to gain energy and consequently to produce electricity. In a fusion reactor hydrogen isotopes are confined by magnetic fields as ionized gas, the plasma. Since the core plasma is millions of degrees hot, there are special needs for the plasma-facing materials. Moreover, in the plasma the fusion of hydrogen isotopes leads to the production of high energetic neutrons which sets demanding abilities for the structural materials of the reactor. This thesis investigates the irradiation response of materials to be used in future fusion reactors. Interactions of the plasma with the reactor wall leads to the removal of surface atoms, migration of them, and formation of co-deposited layers such as tungsten carbide. Sputtering of tungsten carbide and deuterium trapping in tungsten carbide was investigated in this thesis. As the second topic the primary interaction of the neutrons in the structural material steel was examined. As model materials for steel iron chromium and iron nickel were used. This study was performed theoretically by the means of computer simulations on the atomic level. In contrast to previous studies in the field, in which simulations were limited to pure elements, in this work more complex materials were used, i.e. they were multi-elemental including two or more atom species. The results of this thesis are in the microscale. One of the results is a catalogue of atom species, which were removed from tungsten carbide by the plasma. Another result is e.g. the atomic distributions of defects in iron chromium caused by the energetic neutrons. These microscopic results are used in data bases for multiscale modelling of fusion reactor materials, which has the aim to explain the macroscopic degradation in the materials. This thesis is therefore a relevant contribution to investigate the

  9. Monitoring groundwater variation by satellite and implications for in-situ gravity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Keiko; Hasegawa, Takashi; Nakaegawa, Toshiyuki; Nishijima, Jun; Taniguchi, Makoto

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish a new technique for monitoring groundwater variations in urban areas, the applicability of precise in-situ gravity measurements and extremely high precision satellite gravity data via GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) was tested. Using the GRACE data, regional scale water mass variations in four major river basins of the Indochina Peninsula were estimated. The estimated variations were compared with Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (SVATS) models with a river flow model of 1) globally uniform river velocity, 2) river velocity tuned by each river basin, 3) globally uniform river velocity considering groundwater storage, and 4) river velocity tuned by each river basin considering groundwater storage. Model 3) attained the best fit to the GRACE data, and the model 4) yielded almost the same values. This implies that the groundwater plays an important role in estimating the variation of total terrestrial storage. It also indicates that tuning river velocity, which is based on the in-situ measurements, needs further investigations in combination with the GRACE data. The relationships among GRACE data, SVATS models, and in-situ measurements were also discussed briefly.

  10. Detecting impacts of extreme events with ecological in situ monitoring networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Mahecha

    2017-09-01

    be achieved by randomly designed networks. Spatio-temporal expansions of ecological in situ monitoring networks should carefully consider the size distribution characteristics of extreme events if the aim is also to monitor the impacts of such events in the terrestrial biosphere.

  11. In-situ health monitoring of piezoelectric sensors using electromechanical impedance: A numerical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgunde, Prathamesh N.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2018-04-01

    Current work presents a numerical investigation to classify the in-situ health of the piezoelectric sensors deployed for structural health monitoring (SHM) of large civil, aircraft and automotive structures. The methodology proposed in this work attempts to model the in-homogeneities in the adhesive with which typically the sensor is bonded to the structure for SHM. It was found that weakening of the bond state causes reduction in the resonance frequency of the structure and eventually approaches the resonance characteristics of a piezoelectric material under traction-free boundary conditions. These changes in the resonance spectrum are further quantified using root mean square deviation-based damage index. Results demonstrate that the electromechanical impedance method can be used to monitor structural integrity of the sensor bonded to the host structure. This cost-effective method can potentially reduce misinterpretation of SHM data for critical infrastructures.

  12. Bear diet, seasonality and migration based on chemical multielemental teeth analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nývltová Fišáková, Miriam; Galiová, M.; Kaiser, J.; Fortes, F. J.; Novotný, K.; Malina, R.; Prokeš, L.; Hrdlička, A.; Vaculovič, T.; Laserna, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 50, 1-2 (2009), s. 27-34 ISSN 1211-7250 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB800010701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80010507 Keywords : Mammalia * Upper Palaeolithic * Migration * Diet * Seasonality * Multielemental analysis * LIBS * LA-ICP-MS Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  13. Simultaneous and multielemental analysis by muonic x-rays for inside Japanese bronze and gold coins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninomiya, K.; Yoshida, G.; Inagaki, M.; Shinohara, A.; Kubo, M.K.; Suzuki, T.; Nagatomo, T.; Kawamura, N.; Strasser, P.; Shimomura, K.; Miyake, Y.; Kobayashi, Y.; Higemoto, Wataru; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Saito, T.

    2013-01-01

    A nondestructive, quantitative and multielemental analysis method for bulk samples was develop, which was based on the measurement of high-energy muonic X-rays emitted from muonic atoms inside material after muon irradiation. We demonstrated quantitative determination of the elemental composition inside archaeological artifacts without sample destruction. (author)

  14. Redox cycling-based amplifying electrochemical sensor for in situ clozapine antipsychotic treatment monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Winkler, Thomas E.; Kim, Eunkyoung; Chocron, Sheryl E.; Kelly, Deanna L.; Payne, Gregory F.; Ghodssi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new concept for clozapine in situ sensing with minimal pre-treatment procedures. • A catechol-chitosan redox cycling system amplifies clozapine oxidation current. • The modified amplifier signal is 3 times greater than the unmodified system. • Differentiation between clozapine and its metabolite norclozapine has been shown. • The sensor has the capability to detect clozapine in human serum. - Abstract: Schizophrenia is a lifelong mental disorder with few recent advances in treatment. Clozapine is the most effective antipsychotic for schizophrenia treatment. However, it remains underutilized since frequent blood draws are required to monitor adverse side effects, and maintain clozapine concentrations in a therapeutic range. Micro-system technology utilized towards real-time monitoring of efficacy and safety will enable personalized medicine and better use of this medication. Although work has been reported on clozapine detection using its electrochemical oxidation, no in situ monitoring of clozapine has been described. In this work, we present a new concept for clozapine in situ sensing based on amplifying its oxidation current. Specifically, we use a biofabricated catechol-modified chitosan redox cycling system to provide a significant amplification of the generated oxidizing current of clozapine through a continuous cycle of clozapine reduction followed by re-oxidation. The amplified signal has improved the signal-to-noise ratio and provided the required limit-of-detection and dynamic range for clinical applications with minimal pre-treatment procedures. The sensor reports on the functionality and sensitivity of clozapine detection between 0.1 and 10 μg/mL. The signal generated by clozapine using the catechol-modified chitosan amplifier has shown to be 3 times greater than the unmodified system. The sensor has the ability to differentiate between clozapine and its metabolite norclozapine, as well as the feasibility to detect clozapine in

  15. Monitoring in situ biodegradation of hydrocarbons by using stable carbon isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, P.K.; Hinchee, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Spilled or leaked nonhalogenated petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil can generally be metabolized by indigenous, aerobic bacteria. In situ biological degradation of hydrocarbons may be accelerated by supplying inorganic nutrients and/or oxygen. Approaches to monitoring and verifying enhanced in situ biodegradation have included measurements of changes over time in the (a) concentration of hydrocarbons, (b) temperature, (c) number of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms, (d) ratio of fast-degrading hydrocarbons (e.g., pristanes or phytanes), and (e) metabolic intermediates. Measurements of oxygen consumption over time and elevated carbon dioxide concentrations in soil gas also have been used as indicators of hydrocarbon degradation. An alternative approach that may help substantiate biodegradation is to measure stable carbon isotope ratios in soil gas CO 2 . Stable carbon isotope ratio analysis is inexpensive and commercially available at many laboratories. Carbon dioxide produced by hydrocarbon degradation may be distinguished from that produced by other processes based on the carbon isotopic compositions characteristic of the source material and/or fractionation accompanying microbial metabolism. Here the authors demonstrate the applicability of the stable isotope technique for monitoring enhanced. aerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons using data from three locations in the United States

  16. Development of Advanced In-Situ Techniques for Chemistry Monitoring and Corrosion Mitigation in SCWO Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D. D.; Lvov, S. N.

    2000-01-01

    This project is developing sensing technologies and corrosion monitoring techniques for use in super critical water oxidation (SCWO) systems to reduce the volume of mixed low-level nuclear waste by oxidizing organic components in a closed cycle system where CO2 and other gaseous oxides are produced, leaving the radioactive elements concentrated in ash. The technique uses water at supercritical temperatures under highly oxidized conditions by maintaining a high fugacity of molecular oxygen in the system, which causes high corrosion rates of even the most corrosive resistant reactor materials. This project significantly addresses the high corrosion shortcoming through development of (a) advanced electrodes and sensors for in situ potentiometric monitoring of pH in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous solutions, (b) an approach for evaluating the association constants for 1-1 aqueous electrolytes using a flow-through electrochemical thermocell; (c) an electrochemical noise sensor for the in situ measurement of corrosion rate in subcritical and supercritical aqueous systems; (d) a model for estimating the effect of pressure on reaction rates, including corrosion reactions, in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous systems. The project achieved all objectives, except for installing some of the sensors into a fully operating SCWO system

  17. Monitoring of In-Situ Remediation By Time Lapse 3D Geo-Electric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanli, A. I.; Tildy, P.; Neducza, B.; Nagy, P.; Hegymegi, C.

    2017-12-01

    Injection of chemical oxidant solution to degrade the subsurface contaminants can be used for hydrocarbon contamination remediation. In this study, we developed a non-destructive measurement strategy to monitor oxidative in-situ remediation processes. The difficulties of the presented study originate from the small volume of conductive solution that can be used due to environmental considerations. Due to the effect of conductive groundwater and the high clay content of the targeted layer and the small volume of conductive solution that can be used due to environmental considerations, a site specific synthetic modelling is necessary for measurement design involving the results of preliminary 2D ERT measurements, electrical conductivity measurements of different active agents and expected resistivity changes calculated by soil resistivity modelling. Because of chemical biodegradation, the results of soil resistivity modelling have suggested that the reagent have complex effects on contaminated soils. As a result the plume of resistivity changes caused by the injected agent was determined showing strong fracturing effect because of the high pressure of injection. 3D time-lapse geo-electric measurements were proven to provide a usable monitoring tool for in-situ remediation as a result of our sophisticated tests and synthetic modelling.

  18. In situ ellipsometry — A powerful tool for monitoring alkali doping of organic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haidu, F.; Ludemann, M.; Schäfer, P.; Gordan, O.D.; Zahn, D.R.T.

    2014-01-01

    The changes of the optical properties of several organic thin films induced by potassium doping were monitored using in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. The samples were prepared in a high vacuum chamber by organic molecular deposition. Then, potassium (K) was evaporated by passing current through K getters. The three different organic molecules used, show very distinct and different spectral behaviour upon doping. While for Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminium(III) and N,N′-Di-[(1-naphthyl)-N,N′-diphenyl]-(1,1′-biphenyl)-4,4′-diamine only small shifts of the spectral features were noticed, Manganese Phthalocyanine revealed significant changes of the optical properties induced by the K doping. This work indicates that the K doping process can have a dramatic effect on the electronic and the optical properties of the organic molecules, but the effect on the optical spectra remains specific for each organic molecule used, and cannot be easily predicted. - Highlights: • Monitoring organic film growth and doping with in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry • K doped organic thin films • Optical properties of organic thin films change by K doping. • The changes in the optical spectra remain specific for each organic molecule used

  19. In situ observations from STEREO/PLASTIC: a test for L5 space weather monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. D. C. Simunac

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Stream interaction regions (SIRs that corotate with the Sun (corotating interaction regions, or CIRs are known to cause recurrent geomagnetic storms. The Earth's L5 Lagrange point, separated from the Earth by 60 degrees in heliographic longitude, is a logical location for a solar wind monitor – nearly all SIRs/CIRs will be observed at L5 several days prior to their arrival at Earth. Because the Sun's heliographic equator is tilted about 7 degrees with respect to the ecliptic plane, the separation in heliographic latitude between L5 and Earth can be more than 5 degrees. In July 2008, during the period of minimal solar activity at the end of solar cycle 23, the two STEREO observatories were separated by about 60 degrees in longitude and more than 4 degrees in heliographic latitude. This time period affords a timely test for the practical application of a solar wind monitor at L5. We compare in situ observations from PLASTIC/AHEAD and PLASTIC/BEHIND, and report on how well the BEHIND data can be used as a forecasting tool for in situ conditions at the AHEAD spacecraft with the assumptions of ideal corotation and minimal source evolution. Preliminary results show the bulk proton parameters (density and bulk speed are not in quantitative agreement from one observatory to the next, but the qualitative profiles are similar.

  20. In situ observations from STEREO/PLASTIC: a test for L5 space weather monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. D. C. Simunac

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Stream interaction regions (SIRs that corotate with the Sun (corotating interaction regions, or CIRs are known to cause recurrent geomagnetic storms. The Earth's L5 Lagrange point, separated from the Earth by 60 degrees in heliographic longitude, is a logical location for a solar wind monitor – nearly all SIRs/CIRs will be observed at L5 several days prior to their arrival at Earth. Because the Sun's heliographic equator is tilted about 7 degrees with respect to the ecliptic plane, the separation in heliographic latitude between L5 and Earth can be more than 5 degrees. In July 2008, during the period of minimal solar activity at the end of solar cycle 23, the two STEREO observatories were separated by about 60 degrees in longitude and more than 4 degrees in heliographic latitude. This time period affords a timely test for the practical application of a solar wind monitor at L5. We compare in situ observations from PLASTIC/AHEAD and PLASTIC/BEHIND, and report on how well the BEHIND data can be used as a forecasting tool for in situ conditions at the AHEAD spacecraft with the assumptions of ideal corotation and minimal source evolution. Preliminary results show the bulk proton parameters (density and bulk speed are not in quantitative agreement from one observatory to the next, but the qualitative profiles are similar.

  1. Development of Advanced In-Situ Techniques for Chemistry Monitoring and Corrosion Mitigation in SCWO Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, D. D.; Lvov, S. N.

    2000-03-31

    This project is developing sensing technologies and corrosion monitoring techniques for use in super critical water oxidation (SCWO) systems to reduce the volume of mixed low-level nuclear waste by oxidizing organic components in a closed cycle system where CO2 and other gaseous oxides are produced, leaving the radioactive elements concentrated in ash. The technique uses water at supercritical temperatures under highly oxidized conditions by maintaining a high fugacity of molecular oxygen in the system, which causes high corrosion rates of even the most corrosive resistant reactor materials. This project significantly addresses the high corrosion shortcoming through development of (a) advanced electrodes and sensors for in situ potentiometric monitoring of pH in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous solutions, (b) an approach for evaluating the association constants for 1-1 aqueous electrolytes using a flow-through electrochemical thermocell; (c) an electrochemical noise sensor for the in situ measurement of corrosion rate in subcritical and supercritical aqueous systems; (d) a model for estimating the effect of pressure on reaction rates, including corrosion reactions, in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous systems. The project achieved all objectives, except for installing some of the sensors into a fully operating SCWO system.

  2. In Situ Monitoring of Groundwater Contamination Using the Kalman Filter For Sustainable Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, F.; Wainwright, H. M.; Faybishenko, B.; Denham, M. E.; Eddy-Dilek, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Sustainable remediation - based on less intensive passive remediation and natural attenuation - has become a desirable remediation alternative at contaminated sites. Although it has a number of benefits, such as reduced waste and water/energy usage, it carries a significant burden of proof to verify plume stability and to ensure insignificant increase of risk to public health. Modeling of contaminant transport is still challenging despite recent advances in numerical methods. Long-term monitoring has, therefore, become a critical component in sustainable remediation. However, the current approach, which relies on sparse groundwater sampling, is problematic, since it could miss sudden significant changes in plume behavior. A new method is needed to combine existing knowledge about contaminant behavior and latest advances in in situ groundwater sensors. This study presents an example of the effective use of the Kalman filter approach to estimate contaminant concentrations, based on in situ measured water quality parameters (e.g. electrical conductivity and pH) along with the results of sparse groundwater sampling. The Kalman filter can effectively couple physical models and data correlations between the contaminant concentrations and in situ measured variables. We aim (1) to develop a framework capable of integrating different data types to provide accurate contaminant concentration estimates, (2) to demonstrate that these results remain reliable, even when the groundwater sampling frequency is reduced, and (3) to evaluate the future efficacy of this strategy using reactive transport simulations. This framework can also serve as an early warning system for detecting unexpected plume migration. We demonstrate our approach using historical and current groundwater data from the Savannah River Site (SRS) F-Area Seepage Basins to estimate uranium and tritium concentrations. The results show that the developed method can provide reliable estimates of contaminant

  3. Real-time monitoring of high-gravity corn mash fermentation using in situ raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Steven R; Peretti, Steven W; Lamb, H Henry

    2013-06-01

    In situ Raman spectroscopy was employed for real-time monitoring of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of corn mash by an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An accurate univariate calibration model for ethanol was developed based on the very strong 883 cm(-1) C-C stretching band. Multivariate partial least squares (PLS) calibration models for total starch, dextrins, maltotriose, maltose, glucose, and ethanol were developed using data from eight batch fermentations and validated using predictions for a separate batch. The starch, ethanol, and dextrins models showed significant prediction improvement when the calibration data were divided into separate high- and low-concentration sets. Collinearity between the ethanol and starch models was avoided by excluding regions containing strong ethanol peaks from the starch model and, conversely, excluding regions containing strong saccharide peaks from the ethanol model. The two-set calibration models for starch (R(2)  = 0.998, percent error = 2.5%) and ethanol (R(2)  = 0.999, percent error = 2.1%) provide more accurate predictions than any previously published spectroscopic models. Glucose, maltose, and maltotriose are modeled to accuracy comparable to previous work on less complex fermentation processes. Our results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy is capable of real time in situ monitoring of a complex industrial biomass fermentation. To our knowledge, this is the first PLS-based chemometric modeling of corn mash fermentation under typical industrial conditions, and the first Raman-based monitoring of a fermentation process with glucose, oligosaccharides and polysaccharides present. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. In situ monitoring using Lab on Chip devices, with particular reference to dissolved silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, G. S. C.; Loucaides, S.; Slavik, G. J.; Owsianka, D. R.; Beaton, A.; Nightingale, A.; Mowlem, M. C.

    2016-02-01

    In situ sensors are attractive alternatives to discrete sampling of natural waters, offering the potential for sustained long term monitoring and eliminating the need for sample handling. This can reduce sample contamination and degradation. In addition, sensors can be clustered into multi-parameter observatories and networked to provide both spatial and time series coverage. High resolution, low cost, and long term monitoring are the biggest advantages of these technologies to oceanographers. Microfluidic technology miniaturises bench-top assay systems into portable devices, known as a `lab on a chip' (LOC). The principle advantages of this technology are low power consumption, simplicity, speed, and stability without compromising on quality (accuracy, precision, selectivity, sensitivity). We have successfully demonstrated in situ sensors based on this technology for the measurement of pH, nitrate and nitrite. Dissolved silica (dSi) is an important macro-nutrient supporting a major fraction of oceanic primary production carried out by diatoms. The biogeochemical Si cycle is undergoing significant modifications due to human activities, which affects availability of dSi, and consequently primary production. Monitoring dSi concentrations is therefore critical in increasing our understanding of the biogeochemical Si cycle to predict and manage anthropogenic perturbations. The standard bench top air segmented flow technique utilising the reduction of silicomolybdic acid with spectrophotometric detection has been miniaturised into a LOC system; the target limit of detection is 1 nM, with ± 5% accuracy and 3% precision. Results from the assay optimisation are presented along with reagent shelf life to demonstrate the robustness of the chemistry. Laboratory trials of the sensor using ideal solutions and environmental samples in environmentally relevant conditions (temperature, pressure) are discussed, along with an overview of our current LOC analytical capabilities.

  5. The aquatic real-time monitoring network; in-situ optical sensors for monitoring the nation's water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, Brian A.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Murdoch, Peter S.; Downing, Bryan D.; Saraceno, John Franco; Aiken, George R.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Floods, hurricanes, and longer-term changes in climate and land use can have profound effects on water quality due to shifts in hydrologic flow paths, water residence time, precipitation patterns, connectivity between rivers and uplands, and many other factors. In order to understand and respond to changes in hydrology and water quality, resource managers and policy makers have a need for accurate and early indicators, as well as the ability to assess possible mechanisms and likely outcomes. In-situ optical sensors-those making continuous measurements of constituents by absorbance or fluorescence properties in the environment at timescales of minutes to years-have a long history in oceanography for developing highly resolved concentrations and fluxes, but are not commonly used in freshwater systems. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) has developed the Aquatic Real-Time Monitoring Network, with high-resolution optical data collection for organic carbon, nutrients, and sediment in large coastal rivers, along with continuous measurements of discharge, water temperature, and dissolved inorganic carbon. The collecting of continuous water-quality data in the Nation?s waterways has revealed temporal trends and spatial patterns in constituents that traditional sampling approaches fail to capture, and will serve a critical role in monitoring, assessment and decision-making in a rapidly changing landscape.

  6. CMEMS (Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service) In Situ Thematic Assembly Centre: A service for operational Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano Muñoz, Fernando; Pouliquen, Sylvie; Petit de la Villeon, Loic; Carval, Thierry; Loubrieu, Thomas; Wedhe, Henning; Sjur Ringheim, Lid; Hammarklint, Thomas; Tamm, Susanne; De Alfonso, Marta; Perivoliotis, Leonidas; Chalkiopoulos, Antonis; Marinova, Veselka; Tintore, Joaquin; Troupin, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Copernicus, previously known as GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security), is the European Programme for the establishment of a European capacity for Earth Observation and Monitoring. Copernicus aims to provide a sustainable service for Ocean Monitoring and Forecasting validated and commissioned by users. From May 2015, the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) is working on an operational mode through a contract with services engagement (result is regular data provision). Within CMEMS, the In Situ Thematic Assembly Centre (INSTAC) distributed service integrates in situ data from different sources for operational oceanography needs. CMEMS INSTAC is collecting and carrying out quality control in a homogeneous manner on data from providers outside Copernicus (national and international networks), to fit the needs of internal and external users. CMEMS INSTAC has been organized in 7 regional Dissemination Units (DUs) to rely on the EuroGOOS ROOSes. Each DU aggregates data and metadata provided by a series of Production Units (PUs) acting as an interface for providers. Homogeneity and standardization are key features to ensure coherent and efficient service. All DUs provide data in the OceanSITES NetCDF format 1.2 (based on NetCDF 3.6), which is CF compliant, relies on SeaDataNet vocabularies and is able to handle profile and time-series measurements. All the products, both near real-time (NRT) and multi-year (REP), are available online for every CMEMS registered user through an FTP service. On top of the FTP service, INSTAC products are available through Oceanotron, an open-source data server dedicated to marine observations dissemination. It provides services such as aggregation on spatio-temporal coordinates and observed parameters, and subsetting on observed parameters and metadata. The accuracy of the data is checked on various levels. Quality control procedures are applied for the validity of the data and correctness tests for the

  7. In-situ strain monitoring in liquid containers of LNG transporting carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Min-Cheol; Seo, Jun-Kyu; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Lee, Sang-Min; Kim, Myung-Hyun

    2008-08-01

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) transport carriers are exposed to a risk by the repeated bump in the LNG container during the vessel traveling over the wave in ocean. The liquid inside the container, especially when it was not fully contained, make a strong bump onto the insulation panel of the tank wall. The insulation panel consists of several layers of thick polyurethane foam (PUF) to maintain the LNG below the cryogenic temperature, -162°C. Due to the repeated shock on the PUF, a crack could be developed on the tank wall causing a tremendous disaster for LNG carriers. To prevent the accidental crack on the tank, a continuous monitoring of the strain imposed on the PUF is recommended. In this work, a fiber-optic Bragg grating was imbedded inside the PUF for monitoring the strain parallel to the impact direction. The optical fiber sensor with a small diameter of 125 μm was suitable to be inserted in the PUF through a small hole drilled after the PUF was cured. In-situ monitoring of the strain producing the change of Bragg reflection wavelength, a high speed wavelength interrogation method was employed by using an arrayed waveguide grating. By dropping a heavy mass on the PUF, we measured the strain imposed on the insulation panel.

  8. In-situ photopolymerization and monitoring device for controlled shaping of tissue fillers, replacements, or implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmocker, Andreas M.; Khoushabi, Azadeh; Bourban, Pierre-Etienne; Schizas, Constantin; Pioletti, Dominique; Moser, Christophe

    2015-03-01

    Photopolymerization is a common tool to harden materials initially in a liquid state. A surgeon can directly trigger the solidification of a dental implant or a bone or tissue filler simply by illumination. Traditionally, photopolymerization has been used mainly in dentistry. Over the last decade advances in material development including a wide range of biocompatible gel- and cement-systems open up a new avenue for in-situ photopolymerization. However, at the device level, surgical endoscopic probes are required. We present a miniaturized light probe where a photoactive material can be 1) mixed, pressurized and injected 2) photopolymerized or photoactivated and 3) monitored during the chemical reaction. The device enables surgeries to be conducted through a hole smaller than 1 mm in diameter. Beside basic injection mechanics, the tool consists of an optical fiber guiding the light required for photopolymerization and for chemical analysis. Combining photorheology and fluorescence spectroscopy, the current state of the photopolymerization is inferred and monitored in real time. Biocompatible and highly tuneable Poly-Ethylene-Glycol (PEG) hydrogels were used as the injection material. The device was tested on a model for intervertebral disc replacement. Gels were successfully implanted into a bovine caudal model and mechanically tested in-vitro during two weeks. The photopolymerized gel was evaluated at the tissue level (adherence and mechanical properties of the implant), at the cellular level (biocompatibility and cytotoxicity) and ergonomic level (sterilization procedure and feasibility study). This paper covers the monitoring aspect of the device.

  9. In situ monitoring of PTHLH secretion in neuroblastoma cells cultured onto nanoporous membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Escosura-Muñiz, Alfredo; Espinoza-Castañeda, Marisol; Chamorro-García, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Hernández, Carlos J; de Torres, Carmen; Merkoçi, Arben

    2018-06-01

    In this work, we propose for the first time the use of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanoporous membranes for in situ monitoring of parathyroid hormone-like hormone (PTHLH) secretion in cultured human cells. The biosensing system is based on the nanochannels blockage upon immunocomplex formation, which is electrically monitored through the voltammetric oxidation of Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs). Models evaluated include a neuroblastoma cell line (SK-N-AS) and immortalized keratinocytes (HaCaT) as a control of high PTHLH production. The effect of total number of seeded cells and incubation time on the secreted PTHLH levels is assessed, finding that secreted PTHLH levels range from approximately 60 to 400 ng/mL. Moreover, our methodology is also applied to analyse PTHLH production following PTHLH gene knockdown upon transient cell transfection with a specific silencing RNA (siRNA). Given that inhibition of PTHLH secretion reduces cell proliferation, survival and invasiveness in a number of tumors, our system provides a powerful tool for the preclinical evaluation of therapies that regulate PTHLH production. This nanoporous membrane - based sensing technology might be useful to monitor the active secretion of other proteins as well, thus contributing to characterize their regulation and function. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. In-situ continuous scanning high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, K.N.; Johnson, C.M.; Lucerna, J.J.; Barnett, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The testing and replacement of HEPA filters, which are widely used in the nuclear industry to purify process air before it is ventilated to the atmosphere, is a costly and labor-intensive undertaking. Current methods of testing filter performance, such as differential pressure measurement and scanning air monitoring, allow for determination of overall filter performance but preclude detection of symptoms of incipient filter failure, such as small holes in the filters themselves. Using current technology, a continual in-situ monitoring system has been designed which provides three major improvements over current methods of filter testing and replacement. This system (1) realizes a cost savings by reducing the number of intact filters which are currently being replaced unnecessarily, (2) provides a more accurate and quantitative measurement of filter performance than is currently achieved with existing testing methods, and (3) reduces personnel exposure to a radioactive environment by automatically performing most testing operations. The operation and performance of the HEPA filter monitoring system are discussed

  11. In situ microscopy for online monitoring of cell concentration in Pichia pastoris cultivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquard, D; Enders, A; Roth, G; Rinas, U; Scheper, T; Lindner, P

    2016-09-20

    In situ Microscopy (ISM) is an optical non-invasive technique to monitor cells in bioprocesses in real-time. Pichia pastoris is one of the most promising protein expression systems. This yeast combines fast growth on simple media and important eukaryotic features such as glycosylation. In this work, the ISM technology was applied to Pichia pastoris cultivations for online monitoring of the cell concentration during cultivation. Different ISM settings were tested. The acquired images were analyzed with two image processing algorithms. In seven cultivations the cell concentration was monitored by the applied algorithms and offline samples were taken to determine optical density (OD) and dry cell mass (DCM). Cell concentrations up to 74g/L dry cell mass could be analyzed via the ISM. Depending on the algorithm and the ISM settings, an accuracy between 0.3 % and 12 % was achieved. The overall results show that for a robust measurement a combination of the two described algorithms is required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Monitoring an in-situ uranium mining site with radio tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolarczyk, L.; Mondt, W.; Mays, W.

    1991-01-01

    A field test site has been developed to monitor ground water restoration in an in-situ uranium mining project. Uranium deposited in a shallow buried fluvial sandstone channel (aquifer) has been mined by the injection and recovery of ammonia carbonate leachant from a constellation of drillholes. Ground water restoration is accomplished by injecting clean water into a well and recovering contaminated water from companion wells. The restoration process exchanges clean water for contaminated water in the aquifer. The stratigraphic cross section of the aquifer and the hydro-dynamics of the ground water restoration process is currently being investigated with radio wave tomography. Crosshole continuous wave (CW) radio signals are propagated from a well to a second well in the constellation of drillholes. The magnitude and phase of the radio wave are measured in the second well with Radio Imaging Method (RIM) instruments. The acquired data is processed in tomography algorithms to determine the EM wave propagation constants (attenuation rate [α] and phase constant [β]) in each pixel that covers the image plane between wells. The in-situ electrical conductivity values are computed from the pixel propagation constants. Contaminated ground water causes the conductivity of the local zone of the aquifer to increase. This paper describes the initial radio tomography mapping of the deposit lithology and compares radio tomography and E log conductivity values

  13. In Situ Stem Psychrometry: toward a Physiologically-Based Drought Monitoring Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    KOCH, G. W.; Williams, C.; Ambrose, A.

    2012-12-01

    Plant water potential is a synoptic variable that integrates soil and atmospheric moisture stress and interacts with plant-internal factors to regulate gas exchange and determine vulnerability to drought-induced hydraulic dysfunction. Despite its importance, methods for measuring water potential are labor intensive. This limitation reduces measurement frequency, likely causes important transient events to be overlooked, and restricts development of a richer understanding of the impacts of integrated water stress on plant and ecosystem function. Recent technological advances have enabled in-situ, automated measurement of branch water potential over periods of weeks to months using stem psychrometers. We evaluated this technology through laboratory and field comparisons to standard pressure chamber measurements and with field installations in temperate forest, semi-arid woodland, and chaparral ecosystems. Performance was highly sensitive to installation procedures. With proper sealing, insulation, and radiation shielding, psychrometers typically differed from pressure chamber measurements by less than 0.2 MPa down to water potentials as low as -7 MPa. Measurements in tall trees reaffirmed the influence of gravity on water potential as previously documented with the pressure chamber. Psychrometer performance in situ was stable for periods of several weeks to months, with tissue wound response degrading sensor operation over time. We conclude that stem psychrometer technology is now suitable to serve as the foundation for a physiologically-based drought monitoring network that can anticipate important ecosystem impacts including changes in whole-system fluxes and mortality events.

  14. 3D shape measurements with a single interferometric sensor for in-situ lathe monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschmierz, R.; Huang, Y.; Czarske, J.; Metschke, S.; Löffler, F.; Fischer, A.

    2015-05-01

    Temperature drifts, tool deterioration, unknown vibrations as well as spindle play are major effects which decrease the achievable precision of computerized numerically controlled (CNC) lathes and lead to shape deviations between the processed work pieces. Since currently no measurement system exist for fast, precise and in-situ 3d shape monitoring with keyhole access, much effort has to be made to simulate and compensate these effects. Therefore we introduce an optical interferometric sensor for absolute 3d shape measurements, which was integrated into a working lathe. According to the spindle rotational speed, a measurement rate of 2,500 Hz was achieved. In-situ absolute shape, surface profile and vibration measurements are presented. While thermal drifts of the sensor led to errors of several mµm for the absolute shape, reference measurements with a coordinate machine show, that the surface profile could be measured with an uncertainty below one micron. Additionally, the spindle play of 0.8 µm was measured with the sensor.

  15. In situ ice and structure thickness monitoring using integrated and flexible ultrasonic transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Q; Wu, K-T; Kobayashi, M; Jen, C-K; Mrad, N

    2008-01-01

    Two types of ultrasonic sensors are presented for in situ capability development of ice detection and structure thickness measurement. These piezoelectric film based sensors have been fabricated by a sol–gel spray technique for aircraft environments and for temperatures ranging from −80 to 100 °C. In one sensor type, piezoelectric films of thickness greater than 40 µm are deposited directly onto the interior of a 1.3 mm thick aluminum (Al) alloy control surface (stabilizer) of an aircraft wing structure as integrated ultrasonic transducers (UTs). In the other sensor type, piezoelectric films are coated onto a 50 µm thick polyimide membrane as flexible UTs. These were subsequently glued onto similar locations at the same control surfaces. In situ monitoring of stabilizer outer skin thickness was performed. Ice build-up ranging from a fraction of 1 mm to less than 1.5 mm was also detected on a 3 mm thick Al plate. Measurements using these ultrasonic sensors agreed well with those obtained by a micrometer. Tradeoffs of these two approaches are presented

  16. IMPORTANCE OF IN SITU MONITORS IN THE PREPARATION OF LAYERED OXIDE HETEROSTRUCTURES BY REACTIVE MBE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlom, Darrell G.; Haeni, J. H.; Theis, C. D. (Christopher); Tian, W.; Pan, X. Q.; Brown, G. W. (Geoffrey W.); Hawley, M. E. (Marilyn E.)

    2001-01-01

    Using a variety of in situ monitors and when possible adsorption-controlled growth conditions, layered oxide heterostructures including new compounds and metastable superlattices have been grown by reactive molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The heteroepitaxial layers grown include Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12}-SrTiO{sub 3} and Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12}-PbTiO{sub 3} Aurivillius phases, Sr{sub n+1}Ti{sub n}O{sub 3n+1} Ruddlesden-Popper phases, and metastable PbTiO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} and BaTiO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} superlattices. Accurate composition control is key to the controlled growth of such structures, and to this end combinations of reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA), a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and adsorption-controlled growth conditions were employed during growth. The structural perfection of the films has been investigated using in situ RHEED, four-circle x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  17. Cerenkov Counter for In-Situ Groundwater Monitoring of 90Sr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay C. Todd

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater contamination from 90Sr is an environmental challenge posed topresent and former nuclear weapons related sites. Traditional methods of extractinggroundwater samples and performing laboratory analyses are expensive, time-consumingand induce significant disposal challenges. The authors present here a prototype countercapable of measuring 90Sr groundwater concentrations in-situ at or below the drinking waterlimit of 8 pCi/liter. The 90Y daughter of 90Sr produces high-energy electrons, which cancreate Cerenkov light. Photomultiplier tubes convert the Cerenkov light into an electronicpulse, which then undergoes signal processing with standard electronics. Strontium-90concentrations near the drinking water limit can be measured in a matter of hours if it is insecular equilibrium with the 90Y daughter. The prototype counter is compact, can bedeployed in an American Standard 6-inch, well while operated by a single person, andtransmits the results to a central monitoring location.

  18. Hydrochemical processes in lowland rivers: insights from in situ, high-resolution monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Wade

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces new insights into the hydrochemical functioning of lowland river systems using field-based spectrophotometric and electrode technologies. The streamwater concentrations of nitrogen species and phosphorus fractions were measured at hourly intervals on a continuous basis at two contrasting sites on tributaries of the River Thames – one draining a rural catchment, the River Enborne, and one draining a more urban system, The Cut. The measurements complement those from an existing network of multi-parameter water quality sondes maintained across the Thames catchment and weekly monitoring based on grab samples. The results of the sub-daily monitoring show that streamwater phosphorus concentrations display highly complex dynamics under storm conditions dependent on the antecedent catchment wetness, and that diurnal phosphorus and nitrogen cycles occur under low flow conditions. The diurnal patterns highlight the dominance of sewage inputs in controlling the streamwater phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations at low flows, even at a distance of 7 km from the nearest sewage treatment works in the rural River Enborne. The time of sample collection is important when judging water quality against ecological thresholds or standards. An exhaustion of the supply of phosphorus from diffuse and multiple septic tank sources during storm events was evident and load estimation was not improved by sub-daily monitoring beyond that achieved by daily sampling because of the eventual reduction in the phosphorus mass entering the stream during events. The results highlight the utility of sub-daily water quality measurements and the discussion considers the practicalities and challenges of in situ, sub-daily monitoring.

  19. A mini-microscope for in situ monitoring of cells†‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Bok; Koo, Kyo-in; Bae, Hojae; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Hamilton, Geraldine A.; Bahinski, Anthony; Kim, Sun Min; Ingber, Donald E.

    2013-01-01

    A mini-microscope was developed for in situ monitoring of cells by modifying off-the-shelf components of a commercial webcam. The mini-microscope consists of a CMOS imaging module, a small plastic lens and a white LED illumination source. The CMOS imaging module was connected to a laptop computer through a USB port for image acquisition and analysis. Due to its compact size, 8 × 10 × 9 cm, the present microscope is portable and can easily fit inside a conventional incubator, and enables real-time monitoring of cellular behaviour. Moreover, the mini-microscope can be used for imaging cells in conventional cell culture flasks, such as Petri dishes and multi-well plates. To demonstrate the operation of the mini-microscope, we monitored the cellular migration of mouse 3T3 fibroblasts in a scratch assay in medium containing three different concentrations of fetal bovine serum (5, 10, and 20%) and demonstrated differential responses depending on serum levels. In addition, we seeded embryonic stem cells inside poly(ethylene glycol) microwells and monitored the formation of stem cell aggregates in real time using the mini-microscope. Furthermore, we also combined a lab-on-a-chip microfluidic device for microdroplet generation and analysis with the mini-microscope and observed the formation of droplets under different flow conditions. Given its cost effectiveness, robust imaging and portability, the presented platform may be useful for a range of applications for real-time cellular imaging using lab-on-a-chip devices at low cost. PMID:22911426

  20. Data Mining of the Thermal Performance of Cool-Pipes in Massive Concrete via In Situ Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Zheng; Hu, Yu; Li, Qingbin; Zhang, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    Embedded cool-pipes are very important for massive concrete because their cooling effect can effectively avoid thermal cracks. In this study, a data mining approach to analyzing the thermal performance of cool-pipes via in situ monitoring is proposed. Delicate monitoring program is applied in a high arch dam project that provides a good and mass data source. The factors and relations related to the thermal performance of cool-pipes are obtained in a built theory thermal model. The supporting ...

  1. A Mobile Remote Lab System to Monitor in Situ Thermal Solar Installations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastón Saez de Arregui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the design and development of interconnected devices which allow monitoring in situ the performance of solar boilers. This mobile remote lab system comprises two huge blocks of hardware: a mobile station located by the boiler, which is monitored and controlled in a remote way, and a fixed station, located in the Laboratory of Energy for the Sustained Development of the Universidad Nacional de Rosario. The communication between the fixed and mobile devices is controlled by microcontrollers included in both stations and programmed in C language. The project is being developed through three parallel lines of work: 1 Design and development of fixed and mobile hardware; 2 Development of firmware and software necessary to register and communicate data; 3 Design and development of learning activities. This mobile remote lab will be useful to test the behavior of solar boilers in the place and environmental conditions where they are placed so as to evaluate their performance and efficiency anywhere. This is also in order to contribute for the implementation of norms for the certification of solar boilers. On the other hand, the data and results obtained from the development will be used as supplies for the design of learning activities

  2. In-situ photopolymerized and monitored implants: successful application to an intervertebral disc replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmocker, Andreas M.; Khoushabi, Azadeh; Bourban, Pierre-Etienne; Schizas, Constantin; Pioletti, Dominique; Moser, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Photopolymerization is a common method to harden materials initially in a liquid state. A surgeon can directly trigger the solidification of a dental implant or a bone or tissue filler by using ultra-violet light. Traditionally, photopolymerization has been used mainly in dentistry. Over the last decade advances in material development including a wide range of biocompatible gel- and cement-systems open up a new avenue for in-situ photopolymerization. We designed a miniaturized light probe where a photoactive material can be 1) mixed, pressurized and injected 2) photopolymerized or photoactivated and 3) monitored during the chemical reaction. The device enables surgeries to be conducted through a hole smaller than 500 μm in diameter. Using a combination of Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy, the current state of the photopolymerization was inferred and monitored in real time within an in-vitro tissue model. It was also possible to determine roughly the position of the probe within the tissue cavity by analysing the fluorescence signal. Using the technique hydrogels were successfully implanted into a bovine intervertebral disc model. Mechanical tests could not obstruct the functionality of the implant. Finally, the device was also used for other application such as the implantation of a hydrogel into an aneurysm tissue cavity which will be presented at the conference.

  3. Monitoring the in-situ oxide growth on uranium by ultraviolet-visible reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweke, Danielle; Maimon, Chen; Chernia, Zelig; Livneh, Tsachi

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate the in-situ monitoring of oxide growth on U-0.1 wt. % Cr by means of UV-visible reflectance spectroscopy in the thickness range of ˜20-150 nm. Two different approaches are presented: In the "modeling approach," we employ a model for a metallic substrate covered by a dielectric layer, while taking into account the buildup of oxygen gradient and surface roughness. Then, we fit the simulated spectra to the experimental one. In the "extrema analysis," we derive an approximated analytical expression, which relates the oxide thickness to the position of the extrema in the reflectance spectra based on the condition for optical interference of the reflected light. Good agreement is found between the values extracted by the two procedures. Activation energy of ˜21 kcal/mole was obtained by monitoring the oxide growth in the temperature range of 22-90 °C. The upper bound for the thickness determination is argued to be mostly dictated by cracking and detachment processes in the formed oxide.

  4. Monitoring biodegradation of diesel fuel in bioventing processes using in situ respiration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T H; Byun, I G; Kim, Y O; Hwang, I S; Park, T J

    2006-01-01

    An in situ measuring system of respiration rate was applied for monitoring biodegradation of diesel fuel in a bioventing process for bioremediation of diesel contaminated soil. Two laboratory-scale soil columns were packed with 5 kg of soil that was artificially contaminated by diesel fuel as final TPH (total petroleum hydrocarbon) concentration of 8,000 mg/kg soil. Nutrient was added to make a relative concentration of C:N:P = 100:10:1. One soil column was operated with continuous venting mode, and the other one with intermittent (6 h venting/6 h rest) venting mode. On-line O2 and CO2 gas measuring system was applied to measure O2 utilisation and CO2 production during biodegradation of diesel for 5 months. Biodegradation rate of TPH was calculated from respiration rate measured by the on-line gas measuring system. There were no apparent differences between calculated biodegradation rates from two columns with different venting modes. The variation of biodegradation rates corresponded well with trend of the remaining TPH concentrations comparing other biodegradation indicators, such as C17/pristane and C18/phytane ratio, dehydrogenase activity, and the ratio of hydrocarbon utilising bacteria to total heterotrophic bacteria. These results suggested that the on-line measuring system of respiration rate would be applied to monitoring biodegradation rate and to determine the potential applicability of bioventing process for bioremediation of oil contaminated soil.

  5. In-situ monitoring of curing and ageing effects in FRP plates using embedded FBG sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Guijun; Wang, Chuan; Li, Hui

    2010-04-01

    In recent years, fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites have been widely applied in civil engineering for retrofitting or renewal of existing structures. Since FRP composite may degrade when exposed to severe outdoor environments, a serious concern has been raised on its long term durability. In the present study, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors were embedded in glass-, carbon- and basalt-fiber reinforced epoxy based FRP plates with wet lay-up technology, to in-situ monitor the stain changes in FRPs during the curing, and water immersion and freeze-thaw ageing processes. The study demonstrates that the curing of epoxy resin brings in a slight tension strain (e.g., 10 ~ 30 μɛ) along the fiber direction and a high contraction (e.g., ~ 1100μɛ) in the direction perpendicular to the fibers, mainly due to the resin shrinkage. The cured FRP strips were then subjected to distilled water immersion at 80oC and freeze-thaw cycles from -30°C to 30°C. Remarkable strain changes of FRPs due to the variation of the temperatures during freeze-thaw cycles indicate the potential property degradation from fatigue. The maximum strain change is dependent on the fiber types and directions to the fiber. Based on the monitored strain values with temperature change and water uptake content, CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) and CME (coefficient of moisture expansion) are exactly determined for the FRPs.

  6. An in situ method for real-time monitoring of soil gas diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laemmel, Thomas; Maier, Martin; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Lang, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    Soil aeration is an important factor for the biogeochemistry of soils. Generally, gas exchange between soil and atmosphere is assumed to be governed by molecular diffusion and by this way fluxes can be calculated using by Fick's Law. The soil gas diffusion coefficient DS represents the proportional factor between the gas flux and the gas concentration gradient in the soil and reflects the ability of the soil to "transport passively" gas through the soil. One common way to determine DS is taking core samples in the field and measuring DS in the lab. Unfortunately this method is destructive and laborious and it can only reflect a small fraction of the whole soil. As a consequence, uncertainty about the resulting effective diffusivity on the profile scale, i.e. the real aeration status remains. We developed a method to measure and monitor DS in situ. The set-up consists of a custom made gas sampling device, the continuous injection of an inert tracer gas and inverse gas transport modelling in the soil. The gas sampling device has seven sampling depths (from 0 to -43 cm of depth) and can be easily installed into vertical holes drilled by an auger, which allows for fast installation of the system. Helium (He) as inert tracer gas was injected continuously at the lower end of the device. The resulting steady state distribution of He was used to deduce the DS depth distribution of the soil. For Finite Element Modeling of the gas-sampling-device/soil system the program COMSOL was used. We tested our new method both in the lab and in a field study and compared the results with a reference lab method using soil cores. DS profiles obtained by our in-situ method were consistent with DS profiles determined based on soil core analyses. Soil gas profiles could be measured with a temporal resolution of 30 minutes. During the field study, there was an important rain event and we could monitor the decrease in soil gas diffusivity in the top soil due to water infiltration. The effect

  7. Multielemental analysis of surface sediments in Havana bay (Cuba) using X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelen, A.; Corrales, Y.; Lopez, N.; Manso Guevara, M. V.; Casanova, A. O.; Alessandro, K. D'; Diaz, O.; Espen, P. Van; Beltran, J.; Soto, J.

    2006-01-01

    Multielemental Analysis was performed in Superficial Sediments in Havana Bay. Twenty one samples were analysed by Dispersive Energy X- Ray Fluorescence using an spectrometer based on Si (Li) semiconductor detector an a 109 Cd source. The results showed a similar behaviour in the levels of contamination related with neutron activation analysis. The data suggest that an anthropogenic input into the bay from domestic sewage and industries occurred. (Full text)

  8. Universal chitosan-assisted synthesis of Ag-including heterostructured nanocrystals for label-free in situ SERS monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Kai; Xiao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Huan; Lu, Zhicheng; Liu, Jiawei; Li, Qin; Liu, Chen; Foda, Mohamed F; Han, Heyou

    2015-12-07

    A universal chitosan-assisted method was developed to synthesize various Ag-including heterostructured nanocrystals, in which chelation probably plays a vital role. The as-prepared Ag/Pd heterostructured nanocrystals show outstanding properties when used as bifunctional nanocomposites in label-free in situ SERS monitoring of Pd-catalyzed reaction.

  9. Multielemental analysis in small amounts of environmental reference materials with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombovári, J; Becker, J S; Dietze, H J

    2000-07-01

    The lowest possible sample weight for performing multielemental trace element analysis on environmental and biological samples by ICP-MS has been investigated. The certified reference materials Bovine Liver NIST SRM 1577b, Human Hair NCS DC 73347 and Oriental Tobacco Leaves CTA-OTL-1 were applied at sample weights (1, 5, 20 and 50 mg aliquots, n = 10) which were significantly lower than those recommended with most recoveries in the range of 95-110%. Samples were digested in a mixture of nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide and hydrogen fluoride by closed-vessel microwave digestion. Multielemental analysis was performed with an optimized ICP-QMS method. Aqueous standard solutions were applied for external calibration with rhodium as the internal standard element. The detection limits varied between 0.02-0.38 microg/g for Li, Na, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, Ba and Pb, and up to 1.92 microg/g for Mg, Al, Ca, Fe and Ni. Digested human plasma samples were spiked with multielemental solution (0.5-10 microg/L) to test the analytical method and the recoveries were 95-105% for most analytes. Our results show that in the case of homogeneous SRMs it is possible to use them in very low amounts (1-5 mg) for method development and quality control.

  10. Methods for monitoring corals and crustose coralline algae to quantify in-situ calcification rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jennifer M.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Hickey, T. Don

    2013-01-01

    The potential effect of global climate change on calcifying marine organisms, such as scleractinian (reef-building) corals, is becoming increasingly evident. Understanding the process of coral calcification and establishing baseline calcification rates are necessary to detect future changes in growth resulting from climate change or other stressors. Here we describe the methods used to establish a network of calcification-monitoring stations along the outer Florida Keys Reef Tract in 2009. In addition to detailing the initial setup and periodic monitoring of calcification stations, we discuss the utility and success of our design and offer suggestions for future deployments. Stations were designed such that whole coral colonies were securely attached to fixed apparati (n = 10 at each site) on the seafloor but also could be easily removed and reattached as needed for periodic weighing. Corals were weighed every 6 months, using the buoyant weight technique, to determine calcification rates in situ. Sites were visited in May and November to obtain winter and summer rates, respectively, and identify seasonal patterns in calcification. Calcification rates of the crustose coralline algal community also were measured by affixing commercially available plastic tiles, deployed vertically, at each station. Colonization by invertebrates and fleshy algae on the tiles was low, indicating relative specificity for the crustose coralline algal community. We also describe a new, nonlethal technique for sampling the corals, used following the completion of the monitoring period, in which two slabs were obtained from the center of each colony. Sampled corals were reattached to the seafloor, and most corals had completely recovered within 6 months. The station design and sampling methods described herein provide an effective approach to assessing coral and crustose coralline algal calcification rates across time and space, offering the ability to quantify the potential effects of

  11. Chemiresistor microsensors for in-situ monitoring of volatile organic compounds : final LDRD report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Michael Loren; Hughes, Robert Clark; Kooser, Ara S.; McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wright, Jerome L.; Davis, Chad Edward

    2003-09-01

    This report provides a summary of the three-year LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) project aimed at developing microchemical sensors for continuous, in-situ monitoring of volatile organic compounds. A chemiresistor sensor array was integrated with a unique, waterproof housing that allows the sensors to be operated in a variety of media including air, soil, and water. Numerous tests were performed to evaluate and improve the sensitivity, stability, and discriminatory capabilities of the chemiresistors. Field tests were conducted in California, Nevada, and New Mexico to further test and develop the sensors in actual environments within integrated monitoring systems. The field tests addressed issues regarding data acquisition, telemetry, power requirements, data processing, and other engineering requirements. Significant advances were made in the areas of polymer optimization, packaging, data analysis, discrimination, design, and information dissemination (e.g., real-time web posting of data; see www.sandia.gov/sensor). This project has stimulated significant interest among commercial and academic institutions. A CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) was initiated in FY03 to investigate manufacturing methods, and a Work for Others contract was established between Sandia and Edwards Air Force Base for FY02-FY04. Funding was also obtained from DOE as part of their Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative program from FY01 to FY03, and a DOE EMSP contract was awarded jointly to Sandia and INEEL for FY04-FY06. Contracts were also established for collaborative research with Brigham Young University to further evaluate, understand, and improve the performance of the chemiresistor sensors.

  12. Self-potential and Complex Conductivity Monitoring of In Situ Hydrocarbon Remediation in Microbial Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Revil, A.; Ren, Z.; Karaoulis, M.; Mendonca, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of soil and groundwater in both non-aqueous phase liquid and dissolved forms generated from spills and leaks is a wide spread environmental issue. Traditional cleanup of hydrocarbon contamination in soils and ground water using physical, chemical, and biological remedial techniques is often expensive and ineffective. Recent studies show that the microbial fuel cell (MFC) can simultaneously enhance biodegradation of hydrocarbons in soil and groundwater and yield electricity. Non-invasive geophysical techniques such as self-potential (SP) and complex conductivity (induced polarization) have shown the potential to detect and characterize the nature of electron transport mechanism of in situ bioremediation of organic contamination plumes. In this study, we deployed both SP and complex conductivity in lab scale MFCs to monitor time-laps geophysical response of degradation of hydrocarbons by MFC. Two different sizes of MFC reactors were used in this study (DI=15 cm cylinder reactor and 94.5cm x 43.5 cm rectangle reactor), and the initial hydrocarbon concentration is 15 g diesel/kg soil. SP and complex conductivity measurements were measured using non-polarizing Ag/AgCl electrodes. Sensitivity study was also performed using COMSOL Multiphysics to test different electrode configurations. The SP measurements showed stronger anomalies adjacent to the MFC than locations afar, and both real and imaginary parts of complex conductivity are greater in areas close to MFC than areas further away and control samples without MFC. The joint use of SP and complex conductivity could in situ evaluate the dynamic changes of electrochemical parameters during this bioremediation process at spatiotemporal scales unachievable with traditional sampling methods. The joint inversion of these two methods to evaluate the efficiency of MFC enhanced hydrocarbon remediation in the subsurface.

  13. Development of an In-Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network Test Bed for Structural Condition Monitoring - 12156

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeigler, Kristine E.; Ferguson, Blythe A. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has established an In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) Sensor Network Test Bed, a unique, small scale, configurable environment, for the assessment of prospective sensors on actual ISD system material, at minimal cost. The Department of Energy (DOE) is presently implementing permanent entombment of contaminated, large nuclear structures via ISD. The ISD end state consists of a grout-filled concrete civil structure within the concrete frame of the original building. Validation of ISD system performance models and verification of actual system conditions can be achieved through the development a system of sensors to monitor the materials and condition of the structure. The ISD Sensor Network Test Bed has been designed and deployed to addresses the DOE-Environmental Management Technology Need to develop a remote monitoring system to determine and verify ISD system performance. Commercial off-the-shelf sensors have been installed on concrete blocks taken from walls of the P Reactor Building at the Savannah River Site. Deployment of this low-cost structural monitoring system provides hands-on experience with sensor networks. The initial sensor system consists of groutable thermistors for temperature and moisture monitoring, strain gauges for crack growth monitoring, tilt-meters for settlement monitoring, and a communication system for data collection. Baseline data and lessons learned from system design and installation and initial field testing will be utilized for future ISD sensor network development and deployment. The Sensor Network Test Bed at SRNL uses COTS sensors on concrete blocks from the outer wall of the P Reactor Building to measure conditions expected to occur in ISD structures. Knowledge and lessons learned gained from installation, testing, and monitoring of the equipment will be applied to sensor installation in a meso-scale test bed at FIU and in future ISD structures. The initial data collected from the sensors

  14. In situ, dual-mode monitoring of organ-on-a-chip with smartphone-based fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Soohee; Islas-Robles, Argel; Nicolini, Ariana M; Monks, Terrence J; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2016-12-15

    The use of organ-on-a-chip (OOC) platforms enables improved simulation of the human kidney's response to nephrotoxic drugs. The standard method of analyzing nephrotoxicity from existing OOC has majorly consisted of invasively collecting samples (cells, lysates, media, etc.) from an OOC. Such disruptive analyses potentiate contamination, disrupt the replicated in vivo environment, and require expertize to execute. Moreover, traditional analyses, including immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblot, and microplate immunoassay are essentially not in situ and require substantial time, resources, and costs. In the present work, the incorporation of fluorescence nanoparticle immunocapture/immunoagglutination assay into an OOC enabled dual-mode monitoring of drug-induced nephrotoxicity in situ. A smartphone-based fluorescence microscope was fabricated as a handheld in situ monitoring device attached to an OOC. Both the presence of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) on the apical brush-border membrane of 786-O proximal tubule cells within the OOC surface, and the release of GGT to the outflow of the OOC were evaluated with the fluorescence scatter detection of captured and immunoagglutinated anti-GGT conjugated nanoparticles. This dual-mode assay method provides a novel groundbreaking tool to enable the internal and external in situ monitoring of the OOC, which may be integrated into any existing OOCs to facilitate their subsequent analyses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Applications of synergistic combination of remote sensing and in-situ measurements on urban monitoring of air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Adrian; Dominguez, Victor; Campmier, Mark; Wu, Yonghua; Arend, Mark; Vladutescu, Daniela Viviana; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2017-08-01

    In this study, multiple remote sensing and in-situ measurements are combined in order to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the aerosol distribution in New York City. Measurement of the horizontal distribution of aerosols is performed using a scanning eye-safe elastic-backscatter micro-pulse lidar. Vertical distribution of aerosols is measured with a co-located ceilometer. Furthermore, our analysis also includes in-situ measurements of particulate matter and wind speed and direction. These observations combined show boundary layer dynamics as well as transport and inhomogeneous spatial distribution of aerosols, which are of importance for air quality monitoring.

  16. In situ monitored in-pile creep testing of zirconium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, R. W.; Jaworski, A. W.; Webb, T. W.; Smith, R. W.

    2014-01-01

    The experiments described herein were designed to investigate the detailed irradiation creep behavior of zirconium based alloys in the HALDEN Reactor spectrum. The HALDEN Test Reactor has the unique capability to control both applied stress and temperature independently and externally for each specimen while the specimen is in-reactor and under fast neutron flux. The ability to monitor in situ the creep rates following a stress and temperature change made possible the characterization of creep behavior over a wide stress-strain-rate-temperature design space for two model experimental heats, Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-2 + 1 wt%Nb, with only 12 test specimens in a 100-day in-pile creep test program. Zircaloy-2 specimens with and without 1 wt% Nb additions were tested at irradiation temperatures of 561 K and 616 K and stresses ranging from 69 MPa to 455 MPa. Various steady state creep models were evaluated against the experimental results. The irradiation creep model proposed by Nichols that separates creep behavior into low, intermediate, and high stress regimes was the best model for predicting steady-state creep rates. Dislocation-based primary creep, rather than diffusion-based transient irradiation creep, was identified as the mechanism controlling deformation during the transitional period of evolving creep rate following a step change to different test conditions.

  17. In-Situ monitoring and modeling of metal additive manufacturing powder bed fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldredge, Jacob; Slotwinski, John; Storck, Steven; Kim, Sam; Goldberg, Arnold; Montalbano, Timothy

    2018-04-01

    One of the major challenges in metal additive manufacturing is developing in-situ sensing and feedback control capabilities to eliminate build errors and allow qualified part creation without the need for costly and destructive external testing. Previously, many groups have focused on high fidelity numerical modeling and true temperature thermal imaging systems. These approaches require large computational resources or costly hardware that requires complex calibration and are difficult to integrate into commercial systems. In addition, due to the rapid change in the state of the material as well as its surface properties, getting true temperature is complicated and difficult. Here, we describe a different approach where we implement a low cost thermal imaging solution allowing for relative temperature measurements sufficient for detecting unwanted process variability. We match this with a faster than real time qualitative model that allows the process to be rapidly modeled during the build. The hope is to combine these two, allowing for the detection of anomalies in real time, enabling corrective action to potentially be taken, or parts to be stopped immediately after the error, saving material and time. Here we describe our sensor setup, its costs and abilities. We also show the ability to detect in real time unwanted process deviations. We also show that the output of our high speed model agrees qualitatively with experimental results. These results lay the groundwork for our vision of an integrated feedback and control scheme that combines low cost, easy to use sensors and fast modeling for process deviation monitoring.

  18. In Situ Monitoring of Dispersion Dynamics of Carbon Nanotubes during Sonication Using Electrical Conductivity Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Sadiq Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main challenge in the fabrication of carbon nanotube- (CNT- based composite materials is the optimization of the sonication time in order to obtain homogenous and uniform dispersion of CNTs. Past studies mostly relied on postprocessing characterization techniques to address this issue. In the present, however, in situ monitoring of dispersion dynamics of CNTs in distilled water is carried out using instantaneous conductivity measurements. Using a computer controlled data acquisition system, the time evolution of the solution conductivity was carefully recorded. The data were then used to evaluate the intensity of turbulent fluctuations, which clearly highlighted the existence of three distinct sonication phases. During the first phase, the conductivity fluctuations initially increased attaining ultimately a maximum, thus indicating the occurrence of large agglomerates of CNTs. During the second phase of sonication, the solution conductivity showed a rather steep increase while fluctuations steadily declined. This phenomenon can be attributed to the breakdown of large CNT agglomerates, resulting in greater dispersion homogeneity of CNTs. During the third phase, after almost 650 kJ/L of sonication energy, the conductivity increase was almost negligible. The fluctuation intensity also remained constant during this phase signifying that the further sonication was no longer required.

  19. In-situ high-resolution gamma-spectrometric survey of burial ground-monitoring wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, W.W.

    1981-09-01

    In situ high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry with an intrinsic germanium detector assembly of special design surveyed the burial ground monitoring wells to locate and identify gamma emitters that may have migrated from the burial trenches toward the water table. Gamma-ray spectra were acquired as a function of depth in each well and recorded on magnetic tape. These spectra were reduced by a series of computer programs to produce count rate versus depth profiles for natural and man-made activities. The original spectra and the profiles have been archived on magnetic tape for comparison with similar future surveys. Large amounts of man-made activities were observed in some of the burial trenches; however, below the trench bottoms, only very low but detectable amounts of 60 Co and 137 Cs were observed in eleven wells. The highest level of man-made gamma activity observed below the trench bottoms has a count rate roughly equal to that observed for uranium daughter activities which are natural to the subsoil

  20. Investigating the Trimethylaluminium/Water ALD Process on Mesoporous Silica by In Situ Gravimetric Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena E. Strempel

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A low amount of AlOx was successfully deposited on an unordered, mesoporous SiO2 powder using 1–3 ALD (Atomic Layer Deposition cycles of trimethylaluminium and water. The process was realized in a self-built ALD setup featuring a microbalanceand a fixed particle bed. The reactor temperature was varied between 75, 120, and 200 °C. The self-limiting nature of the deposition was verified by in situ gravimetric monitoring for all temperatures. The coated material was further analyzed by nitrogen sorption, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The obtained mass gains correspond to average growth between 0.81–1.10 Å/cycle depending on substrate temperature. In addition, the different mass gains during the half-cycles in combination with the analyzed aluminum content after one, two, and three cycles indicate a change in the preferred surface reaction of the trimethylaluminium molecule from a predominately two-ligand exchange with hydroxyl groups to more single-ligand exchange with increasing cycle number. Nitrogen sorption isotherms demonstrate (1 homogeneously coated mesopores, (2 a decrease in surface area, and (3 a reduction of the pore size. The experiment is successfully repeated in a scale-up using a ten times higher substrate batch size.

  1. DOE capabilities for in-situ characterization and monitoring of formation properties in the vadose zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearst, J.R.; Brodeur, J.R.; Koizumi, C.J.; Conaway, J.G.; Mikesell, J.L.; Nelson, P.H.; Stromswold, D.C.; Wilson, R.D.

    1993-09-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) Program faces the difficult task of characterizing the properties of the subsurface and identifying and mapping a large number of contaminants at landfills, surface disposal areas, spill sites, nuclear waste tanks, and subsurface contaminant plumes throughout the complex of DOE facilities. Geophysical borehole logs can measure formation properties such as bulk density, water content, and lithology, and can quantitatively analyze for radionuclides and such elements as chlorine and heavy metals. Since these measurements can be replaced as desired, they can be used for both initial characterization and monitoring of changes in contaminant concentration and water content (sometimes linked to contaminant migration), at a fraction of the cost of conventional sampling. The techniques develop at several DOE laboratories, and the experience that the authors have gained in making in-situ measurements in the vadose zone, are applicable to problems at many other DOE sites. Moreover, they can capitalize on existing inventories of boreholes. By building on this experience workers involved in ER projects at those sites should be able to obtain high-quality data at substantial reductions in cost and time

  2. In Situ Acoustic Monitoring of Thermal Spray Process Using High-Frequency Impulse Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Wolfgang; Walther, Frank; Luo, Weifeng; Haack, Matthias; Nellesen, Jens; Knyazeva, Marina

    2018-01-01

    In order to guarantee their protective function, thermal spray coatings must be free from cracks, which expose the substrate surface to, e.g., corrosive media. Cracks in thermal spray coatings are usually formed because of tensile residual stresses. Most commonly, the crack occurrence is determined after the thermal spraying process by examination of metallographic cross sections of the coating. Recent efforts focus on in situ monitoring of crack formation by means of acoustic emission analysis. However, the acoustic signals related to crack propagation can be absorbed by the noise of the thermal spraying process. In this work, a high-frequency impulse measurement technique was applied to separate different acoustic sources by visualizing the characteristic signal of crack formation via quasi-real-time Fourier analysis. The investigations were carried out on a twin wire arc spraying process, utilizing FeCrBSi as a coating material. The impact of the process parameters on the acoustic emission spectrum was studied. Acoustic emission analysis enables to obtain global and integral information on the formed cracks. The coating morphology and coating defects were inspected using light microscopy on metallographic cross sections. Additionally, the resulting crack patterns were imaged in 3D by means of x-ray microtomography.

  3. Examining the Suitability of a Sparse In Situ Soil Moisture Monitoring Network for Assimilation into a Spatially Distributed Hydrologic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vleeschouwer, N.; Verhoest, N.; Pauwels, V. R. N.

    2015-12-01

    The continuous monitoring of soil moisture in a permanent network can yield an interesting data product for use in hydrological data assimilation. Major advantages of in situ observations compared to remote sensing products are the potential vertical extent of the measurements, the finer temporal resolution of the observation time series, the smaller impact of land cover variability on the observation bias, etc. However, two major disadvantages are the typical small integration volume of in situ measurements and the often large spacing between monitoring locations. This causes only a small part of the modelling domain to be directly observed. Furthermore, the spatial configuration of the monitoring network is typically temporally non-dynamic. Therefore two questions can be raised. Do spatially sparse in situ soil moisture observations contain a sufficient data representativeness to successfully assimilate them into the largely unobserved spatial extent of a distributed hydrological model? And if so, how is this assimilation best performed? Consequently two important factors that can influence the success of assimilating in situ monitored soil moisture are the spatial configuration of the monitoring network and the applied assimilation algorithm. In this research the influence of those factors is examined by means of synthetic data-assimilation experiments. The study area is the ± 100 km² catchment of the Bellebeek in Flanders, Belgium. The influence of the spatial configuration is examined by varying the amount of locations and their position in the landscape. The latter is performed using several techniques including temporal stability analysis and clustering. Furthermore the observation depth is considered by comparing assimilation of surface layer (5 cm) and deeper layer (50 cm) observations. The impact of the assimilation algorithm is assessed by comparing the performance obtained with two well-known algorithms: Newtonian nudging and the Ensemble Kalman

  4. Method and Circuit for In-Situ Health Monitoring of Solar Cells in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasowski, Michael J.; Prokop, Norman F.

    2010-01-01

    This innovation represents a method and circuit realization of a system designed to make in-situ measurements of test solar-cell operational parameters on orbit using readily available high-temperature and high-ionizing-radiation- tolerant electronic components. This innovation enables on-orbit in-situ solar-array health monitoring and is in response to a need recognized by the U.S. Air Force for future solar arrays for unmanned spacecraft. This system can also be constructed out of commercial-grade electronics and can be embedded into terrestrial solar power system as a diagnostics instrument. This innovation represents a novel approach to I-V curve measurement that is radiation and temperature hard, consumes very few system resources, is economical, and utilizes commercially available components. The circuit will also operate at temperatures as low as 55 C and up to +225 C, allowing it to reside close to the array in direct sunlight. It uses a swept mode transistor functioning as a resistive load while utilizing the solar cells themselves as the biasing device, so the size of the instrument is small and there is no danger of over-driving the cells. Further, this innovation utilizes nearly universal spacecraft bus resources and therefore can be readily adapted to any spacecraft bus allowing for ease of retrofit, or designed into new systems without requiring the addition of infrastructure. One unique characteristic of this innovation is that it effects the measurement of I-V curves without the use of large resistor arrays or active current sources normally used to characterize cells. A single transistor is used as a variable resistive load across the cell. This multi-measurement instrument was constructed using operational amplifiers, analog switches, voltage regulators, MOSFETs, resistors, and capacitors. The operational amplifiers, analog switches, and voltage regulators are silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology known for its hardness to the effects of ionizing

  5. The environmental radiation monitoring system and in-situ measurements for early notification and OIL (Operational Intervention Levels) calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haquin, G.; Ne'eman, E.; Brenner, S.; Lavi, N.

    1997-01-01

    The efficiency of the environmental radiation monitoring, low level laboratory and in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry are evaluated as the systems for early notification and for determination of dose rate in air, surface contamination and activity concentration in food during emergencies for Operational Intervention Levels (OIL) recalculation.The National Environmental Radiation Monitoring System has proved its efficiency in the early detection of unregistered radiography work. A mobile station of the network can be used for absorbed dose rate measurement during emergencies in contaminated areas. The calibrated in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry system in an open phosphate ore mine has showed the efficiency of this technique for fast and accurate determination of soil activity concentration. The calibration for an uniform depth distribution can be easily mathematically converted to an exponential depth distribution in cases of radioactive material fallout

  6. Preservation status and priorities for in situ monitoring of the weapon sacrifice in Illerup Ådal, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjellden, Anna Katarina Ejgreen; Kristiansen, Søren Munch; Botfeldt, Knud B.

    2012-01-01

    Excavations of the southern part of a very rich sacrificial bog in Illerup Ådal, Denmark between 1950 and 1985 recovered approximately 15,000 Iron Age artefacts. At the time, 60% of the area was left unexcavated and thousands of objects are now preserved in situ, but the present preservation status...... has not been investigated for approximately 25 years. Extensive in situ monitoring was carried out for one year in order to present a prioritized plan for further monitoring of the unexcavated areas, producing documentation of groundwater table variations, water quality and vegetation in the area....... Results show that the remaining artefacts in general are well preserved in the waterlogged and anaerobic environment. However, in the north-eastern part of the bog, the groundwater table is too low even in a year when net precipitation and hydrological conditions were near normal. Here, slow, continuous...

  7. Preservation status and priorities for in situ monitoring of the weapon sacrifice in Illerup Ådal, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjelldén, A.K.E.; Kristiansen, S.M.; Botfeldt, Knud Bo

    2012-01-01

    Excavations of the southern part of a very rich sacrificial bog in Illerup Ådal, Denmark between 1950 and 1985 recovered approximately 15,000 Iron Age artefacts. At the time, 60 per cent of the area was left unexcavated and thousands of objects are now preserved in situ, but the present preservation...... status has not been investigated for approximately twenty-five years. Extensive in situ monitoring was carried out for one year in order to present a prioritized plan for further monitoring of the unexcavated areas, producing documentation of groundwater table variations, water quality and vegetation...... in the area. Results show that the remaining artefacts are generally well preserved in a waterlogged and anaerobic environment. However, in the north-eastern part of the bog, the groundwater table is too low even in a year when net precipitation and hydrological conditions were near normal. In the centre...

  8. VAMOS: The verification and monitoring options study: Current research options for in-situ monitoring and verification of contaminant remediation and containment within the vadose zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betsill, J.D.; Gruebel, R.D.

    1995-09-01

    The Verification and Monitoring Options Study Project (VAMOS) was established to identify high-priority options for future vadose-zone environmental research in the areas of in-situ remediation monitoring, post-closure monitoring, and containment emplacement and verification monitoring. VAMOS examined projected needs not currently being met with applied technology in order to develop viable monitoring and verification research options. The study emphasized a compatible systems approach to reinforce the need for utilizing compatible components to provide user friendly site monitoring systems. To identify the needs and research options related to vadose-zone environmental monitoring and verification, a literature search and expert panel forums were conducted. The search included present drivers for environmental monitoring technology, technology applications, and research efforts. The forums included scientific, academic, industry, and regulatory environmental professionals as well as end users of environmental technology. The experts evaluated current and future monitoring and verification needs, methods for meeting these needs, and viable research options and directions. A variety of high-priority technology development, user facility, and technology guidance research options were developed and presented as an outcome of the literature search and expert panel forums

  9. Impact of Membrane-Induced Particle Immobilization on Seeded Growth Monitored by In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Rebecca G; Chen, Dennis P; Unocic, Raymond R; Skrabalak, Sara E

    2016-05-01

    In situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy probes seeded growth in real time. The growth of Pd on Au nanocubes is monitored as a model system to compare growth within a liquid cell and traditional colloidal synthesis. Different growth patterns are observed due to seed immobilization and the highly reducing environment within the liquid cell. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Radiation-induced polymerization monitored in situ by time-resolved fluorescence of probe molecules in methyl methacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frahn, Mark S.; Abellon, Ruben D.; Luthjens, Leonard H.; Vermeulen, Martien J.W.; Warman, John M.

    2003-01-01

    A technique is presented for monitoring radiation-induced polymerizations in situ based on the measurement of the fluorescence lifetime of molecular probes dissolved in the polymerizing medium. This method is illustrated with results on methyl methacrylate (MMA) using two fluorogenic probe molecules; N-(2-anthracene)methacrylamide (AnMA) and maleimido-fluoroprobe (MFP), a molecule which has a highly dipolar excited state

  11. In Situ Monitoring of Crystal Growth Using MEPHISTO, Mission STS 87-Program USMP-4: Experimental Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaschian, Reza; Chen, F.; Mileham, J. R.; deGroh, H., III; Timchenko, V.; Leonardi, E.; deVahlDavis, G.; Coriell, S.; Cambon, G.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the In situ Monitoring of Crystal Growth Using MEPHISTO (Material por l'Etude des Phenomenes Interessant de la Solidification sur Terre et en Orbite) experiment on USMP-4. The report includes microstructural and compositional data obtained during the first year of the post flight analysis, as well as numerical simulation of the flight experiment. Additional analyses are being continued and will be reported in the near future. The experiments utilized MEPHISTO hardware to study the solidification and melting behavior of bismuth alloyed with 1 at% tin. The experiments involved repeated melting and solidification of three samples, each approximately 90 cm long and 6mm in diameter. Half of each sample also included a 2 mm. diameter growth capillary, to assist in the formation of single grain inside. One sample provided the Seebeck voltage generated during melting and freezing processes. Another one provided temperature data and Peltier pulsed demarcation of the interface shape for post flight analysis. The third sample provided resistance and velocity measurements, as well as additional thermal data. The third sample was also quenched at the end of the mission to preserve the interface composition for post flight determination. A total of more than 45cm of directionally solidified alloy were directionally solidified at the end of the flight for post mission structural and compositional characterization. Metallurgical analysis of the samples has shown that the interfacial kinetics play a key role in controlling the morphological stability of faceted alloys. Substantial differences were observed in the Seebeck signal between the ground-based experiments and the space-based experiments. The temperature gradient in the liquid for the ground-based experiments was also significantly lower than the temperature gradient in the liquid for the space-based experiments. Both of these observations indicate significant influence of liquid

  12. Transformation of Mg-bearing amorphous calcium carbonate to Mg-calcite - In situ monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purgstaller, Bettina; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Immenhauser, Adrian; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The formation of Mg-bearing calcite via an amorphous precursor is a poorly understood process that is of relevance for biogenic and abiogenic carbonate precipitation. In order to gain an improved insight on the controls of Mg incorporation in calcite formed via an Mg-rich amorphous calcium carbonate (Mg-ACC) precursor, the precipitation of Mg-ACC and its transformation to Mg-calcite was monitored by in situ Raman spectroscopy. The experiments were performed at 25.0 ± 0.03 °C and pH 8.3 ± 0.1 and revealed two distinct pathways of Mg-calcite formation: (i) At initial aqueous Mg/Ca molar ratios ⩽ 1:6, Mg-calcite formation occurs via direct precipitation from solution. (ii) Conversely, at higher initial Mg/Ca molar ratios, Mg-calcite forms via an intermediate Mg-rich ACC phase. In the latter case, the final product is a calcite with up to 20 mol% Mg. This Mg content is significant higher than that of the Mg-rich ACC precursor phase. Thus, a strong net uptake of Mg ions from the solution into the crystalline precipitate throughout and also subsequent to ACC transformation is postulated. Moreover, the temporal evolution of the geochemical composition of the reactive solution and the Mg-ACC has no significant effect on the obtained ;solubility product; of Mg-ACC. The enrichment of Mg in calcite throughout and subsequent to Mg-ACC transformation is likely affected by the high aqueous Mg/Ca ratio and carbonate alkalinity concentrations in the reactive solution. The experimental results have a bearing on the formation mechanism of Mg-rich calcites in marine early diagenetic environments, where high carbonate alkalinity concentrations are the rule rather than the exception, and on the insufficiently investigated inorganic component of biomineralisation pathways in many calcite secreting organisms.

  13. Bromine cycle in subduction zones through in situ Br monitoring in diamond anvil cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Hélène; Foy, Eddy; Raepsaet, Caroline; Somogyi, Andrea; Munsch, Pascal; Simon, Guilhem; Kubsky, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    The geochemical partitioning of bromine between hydrous haplogranitic melts, initially enriched with respect to Br and aqueous fluids, has been continuously monitored in situ during decompression. Experiments were carried out in diamond anvil cells from 890 °C to room temperature and from 1.7 GPa to room pressure, typically from high P, T conditions corresponding to total miscibility (presence of a supercritical fluid). Br contents were measured in aqueous fluids, hydrous melts and supercritical fluids. Partition coefficients of bromine were characterized at pressure and temperature between fluids, hydrous melts and/or glasses, as appropriate: DBrfluid/melt = (Br) fluid/(Br) melt, ranges from 2.18 to 9.2 ± 0.5 for conditions within the ranges 0.66-1.7 GPa, 590-890 °C; and DBrfluid/glass = (Br) fluid/(Br) glass ranges from 60 to 375 at room conditions. The results suggest that because high pressure melts and fluids are capable of accepting high concentrations of bromine, this element may be efficiently removed from the slab to the mantle source of arc magmas. We show that Br may be highly concentrated in subduction zone magmas and strongly enriched in subduction-related volcanic gases, because its mobility is strongly correlated with that of water during magma degassing. Furthermore, our experimental results suggest that a non negligible part of Br present in the subducted slab may remain in the down-going slab, being transported toward the transition zone. This indicates that the Br cycle in subduction zones is in fact divided in two related but independent parts: (1) a shallower one where recycled Br may leave the slab with a water and silica-bearing "fluid" leading to enriched arc magmas that return Br to the atmosphere. (2) A deeper cycle where Br may be recycled back to the mantle maybe to the transition zone, where it may be present in high pressure water-rich metasomatic fluids.

  14. Multielemental fingerprinting as a tool for authentication of organic wheat, barley, faba bean, and potato

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Kristian Holst; Schjørring, Jan Kofod; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind

    2011-01-01

    The multielemental composition of organic and conventional winter wheat, spring barley, faba bean, and potato was analyzed with inductively coupled plasma−optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and −mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The crops were cultivated in two years at three geographically...... different field locations, each accommodating one conventional and two organic cropping systems. The conventional system produced the highest harvest yields for all crops except the nitrogen-fixing faba bean, whereas the dry matter content of each crop was similar across systems. No systematic differences...

  15. IN-SITU, LONG-TERM MONITORING SYSTEM FOR RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, James S.; McKeever, Stephen W.S.; Akselrod, Mark S.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of the first phase of the project entitled ''In-situ, Long-term Monitoring System for Radioactive Contaminants.'' Phase one of this effort included four objectives, each with specific success criteria. The first objective was to produce dosimetry grade fibers and rods of aluminum oxide. The success criterion for this milestone was the production of aluminum oxide rods and fibers that have a minimum measurable dose (MMD) of 100 mrem or less. This milestone was completed and the MMD for the rods was measured to be 1.53 mrem. Based on the MMD, the ability of the sensor to measure 137 Cs, 90 Sr/ 90 Y, and 99 Tc was evaluated. It was determined that the sensor can measure the release limit of these radionuclides (50 pCi/cm 3 ) in 150 h, 200 h, and 54,000 h, respectively. The monitor is adequate for measuring 137 Cs and 90 Sr/ 90 Y but is unsuitable for measuring 99 Tc in soil. The second objective was to construct a prototype sensor (dosimeter and fiber optic channel). There were three success criteria for this milestone: (1) Perform measurements with the sensor for both gamma and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 10% or less; (2) Demonstrate the ability of the sensor to discriminate between gamma and beta radiation; and (3) Obtain similar or relatable results for differing lengths of fiber optic cable. These milestones were met. The sensor was able to measure gamma radiation repeatedly with a standard deviation of 3.15% and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 2.85%. Data is presented that demonstrates that an end cap can be used to discriminate between beta plus gamma radiation using beta radiation from a 90 Sr/ 90 Y source, and gamma radiation alone. It is shown that some amount of attenuation occurs in longer fiber optic cables, but it is unclear if the attenuation is due to poor alignment of the dosimeter and the cable. This issue will be investigated further when more dosimeters are available so that the dosimeters

  16. IN-SITU, LONG-TERM MONITORING SYSTEM FOR RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, James S.; McKeever, Stephen W.S.; Akselrod, Mark S.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of the first phase of the project entitled ''In-situ, Long-term Monitoring System for Radioactive Contaminants.'' Phase one of this effort included four objectives, each with specific success criteria. The first objective was to produce dosimetry grade fibers and rods of aluminum oxide. The success criterion for this milestone was the production of aluminum oxide rods and fibers that have a minimum measureable dose (MMD) of 100 mrem or less. This milestone was completed and the MMD for the rods was measured to be 1.53 mrem. Based on the MMD, the ability of the sensor to measure 137 Cs, 90 Sr/ 90 Y, and 99 Tc was evaluated. It was determined that the sensor can measure the release limit of these radionuclides (50 pCi/cm 3 ) in 150 h, 200 h, and 54,000 h, respectively. The monitor is adequate for measuring 137 Cs and 90 Sr/ 90 Y but is unsuitable for measuring 99 Tc in soil. The second objective was to construct a prototype sensor (dosimeter and fiber optic channel). There were three success criteria for this milestone: (1) Perform measurements with the sensor for both gamma and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 10% or less; (2) Demonstrate the ability of the sensor to discriminate between gamma and beta radiation; and (3) Obtain similar or relatable results for differing lengths of fiber optic cable. These milestones were met. The sensor was able to measure gamma radiation repeatedly with a standard deviation of 3.15% and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 2.85%. Data is presented that demonstrates that an end cap can be used to discriminate between beta plus gamma and gamma radiation. It is shown that some amount of attenuation occurs in longer fiber optic cables, but it is unclear if the attenuation is due to poor alignment of the dosimeter and the cable. This issue will be investigated further when more dosimeters are available so that the dosimeters can be permanently attached to the longer cables. The third

  17. Field Tests of Real-time In-situ Dissolved CO2 Monitoring for CO2 Leakage Detection in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Zou, Y.; Delgado, J.; Guzman, N.; Pinedo, J.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater monitoring for detecting CO2 leakage relies on groundwater sampling from water wells drilled into aquifers. Usually groundwater samples are required be collected periodically in field and analyzed in the laboratory. Obviously groundwater sampling is labor and cost-intensive for long-term monitoring of large areas. Potential damage and contamination of water samples during the sampling process can degrade accuracy, and intermittent monitoring may miss changes in the geochemical parameters of groundwater, and therefore signs of CO2 leakage. Real-time in-situ monitoring of geochemical parameters with chemical sensors may play an important role for CO2 leakage detection in groundwater at a geological carbon sequestration site. This study presents field demonstration of a real-time in situ monitoring system capable of covering large areas for detection of low levels of dissolved CO2 in groundwater and reliably differentiating natural variations of dissolved CO2 concentration from small changes resulting from leakage. The sand-alone system includes fully distributed fiber optic sensors for carbon dioxide detection with a unique sensor technology developed by Intelligent Optical Systems. The systems were deployed to the two research sites: the Brackenridge Field Laboratory where the aquifer is shallow at depths of 10-20 ft below surface and the Devine site where the aquifer is much deeper at depths of 140 to 150 ft. Groundwater samples were periodically collected from the water wells which were installed with the chemical sensors and further compared to the measurements of the chemical sensors. Our study shows that geochemical monitoring of dissolved CO2 with fiber optic sensors could provide reliable CO2 leakage signal detection in groundwater as long as CO2 leakage signals are stronger than background noises at the monitoring locations.

  18. In Situ 3D Monitoring of Geometric Signatures in the Powder-Bed-Fusion Additive Manufacturing Process via Vision Sensing Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongwei; Liu, Xingjian; Wen, Shifeng; He, Piyao; Zhong, Kai; Wei, Qingsong; Shi, Yusheng; Liu, Sheng

    2018-04-12

    Lack of monitoring of the in situ process signatures is one of the challenges that has been restricting the improvement of Powder-Bed-Fusion Additive Manufacturing (PBF AM). Among various process signatures.

  19. In-situ nanoelectrospray for high-throughput screening of enzymes and real-time monitoring of reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuhan; Han, Feifei; Ouyang, Jin; Zhao, Yunling; Han, Juan; Na, Na

    2016-01-01

    The in-situ and high-throughput evaluation of enzymes and real-time monitoring of enzyme catalyzed reactions in liquid phase is quite significant in the catalysis industry. In-situ nanoelectrospray, the direct sampling and ionization method for mass spectrometry, has been applied for high-throughput evaluation of enzymes, as well as the on-line monitoring of reactions. Simply inserting a capillary into a liquid system with high-voltage applied, analytes in liquid reaction system can be directly ionized at the capillary tip with small volume consumption. With no sample pre-treatment or injection procedure, different analytes such as saccharides, amino acids, alkaloids, peptides and proteins can be rapidly and directly extracted from liquid phase and ionized at the capillary tip. Taking irreversible transesterification reaction of vinyl acetate and ethanol as an example, this technique has been used for the high-throughput evaluation of enzymes, fast optimizations, as well as real-time monitoring of reaction catalyzed by different enzymes. In addition, it is even softer than traditional electrospray ionization. The present method can also be used for the monitoring of other homogenous and heterogeneous reactions in liquid phases, which will show potentials in the catalysis industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. In Situ Hall Effect Monitoring of Vacuum Annealing of In2O3:H Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans F. Wardenga

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen doped In2O3 thin films were prepared by room temperature sputter deposition with the addition of H2O to the sputter gas. By subsequent vacuum annealing, the films obtain high mobility up to 90 cm2/Vs. The films were analyzed in situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and ex situ by X-ray diffraction (XRD, optical transmission and Hall effect measurements. Furthermore, we present results from in situ Hall effect measurements during vacuum annealing of In2O3:H films, revealing distinct dependence of carrier concentration and mobility with time at different annealing temperatures. We suggest hydrogen passivation of grain boundaries as the main reason for the high mobility obtained with In2O3:H films.

  1. In situ electrical and thermal monitoring of printed electronics by two-photon mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastorelli, Francesco; Accanto, Nicolo; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    Printed electronics is emerging as a new, large scale and cost effective technology that will be disruptive in fields such as energy harvesting, consumer electronics and medical sensors. The performance of printed electronic devices relies principally on the carrier mobility and molecular packing...... of the polymer semiconductor material. Unfortunately, the analysis of such materials is generally performed with destructive techniques, which are hard to make compatible with in situ measurements, and pose a great obstacle for the mass production of printed electronics devices. A rapid, in situ, non...

  2. Development of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor for In-Situ Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome L. Wright

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW sensor that is designed to be operated continuously and in situ to detect volatile organic compounds. A ruggedized stainless-steel package that encases the SAW device and integrated circuit board allows the sensor to be deployed in a variety of media including air, soil, and even water. Polymers were optimized and chosen based on their response to chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene, which are common groundwater contaminants. Initial testing indicates that a running-average data-logging algorithm can reduce the noise and increase the sensitivity of the in-situ sensor.

  3. Monitoring of the microbial community composition of the saline aquifers during CO2 storage by fluorescence in situ hybridisation

    OpenAIRE

    Daria Morozova; M. Wandrey; Mashal Alawi; Martin Zimmer; Andrea Vieth-Hillebrand [Vieth; M. Zettlitzer; Hilke Würdemann

    2010-01-01

    This study reveals the first analyses of the composition and activity of the microbial community of a saline CO2 storage aquifer. Microbial monitoring during CO2 injection has been reported. By using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), we have shown that the microbial community was strongly influenced by the CO2 injection. Before CO2 arrival, up to 6 × 106 cells ml−1 were detected by DAPI staining at a depth of 647 m below the surface. The microbial community was dominated by the dom...

  4. Cytochrome C Dynamics at Gold and Glassy Carbon Surfaces Monitored by in Situ Scanning Tunnel Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Møller, Per; Pedersen, Marianne Vind

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the absorption of cytochrome c on gold and glassy carbon substrates by in situ scanning tunnel microscopy under potentiostatic control of both substrate and tip. Low ionic strength and potential ranges where no Faradaic current flows were used. Cyt c aggregates into flat...

  5. Solid Acid-Catalyzed Cellulose Hydrolysis Monitored by In Situ ATR-IR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakzeski, J.; Grisel, R.J.H.; Smit, A.T.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    The solid acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose was studied under elevated temperatures and autogenous pressures using in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy. Standards of cellulose and pure reaction products, which include glucose, fructose, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), levulinic acid (LA), formic acid, and

  6. In-situ monitoring of undercoating corrosion damage by Direct Optical Interrogation (DOI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Garrity, Meng

    An approach referred to as "Direct Optical Interrogation" (DOI) has been developed as an extension of the thin film pitting approach developed and used by Frankel and others. Samples were prepared by depositing Al and Al-Cu alloy metallizations about 800 nm thick on glass substrates. These metallizations were then coated with various coatings and coating systems. Samples were introduced to aggressive environments and the progression of corrosion of the metallization under the coating was monitored in situ using low power videography. Because metallizations were thin, corrosion quickly penetrated through the metal layer to the glass substrate and then spread laterally. Measurement of the lateral spread of corrosion enabled non-electrochemical assessment of the corrosion kinetics. In Al-Cu thin films, both aged and as-deposited, corrosion sites are irregularly shaped because there is not enough cathodic current to propagate the entire corrosion site margin at equal rates. In a number of cases, corrosion propagates with a filamentary morphology resembling filiform corrosion. Cu played a strong role in determining under coating corrosion morphology and growth kinetics in experiments with Al-Cu thin films substrates. As-deposited Al-Cu metallizations were more corrosion resistant than aged metallization and both were more corrosion resistant than pure Al. Cu-rich dendrites were formed on the corrosion front. Corrosion rate (current density) was calculated using Faraday's law by collecting corrosion site perimeter and bottom area. Systematic exploration of the effects of a chromate and chromate-free conversion coatings, chromate and chromate-free primer coatings and the presence or absence of a polyurethane topcoat confirmed the extraordinary corrosion protection by chromates. A commercial praseodymium-pigmented primer coating was not particularly effective in retarding undercoating corrosion site growth unless paired with a chromate conversion coating. The presence of a

  7. LOCAL AIR: Local Aerosol monitoring combining in-situ and Remote Sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Caggiano, Rosa; Donvito, Angelo; Giannini, Vincenzo; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Sarli, Valentina; Trippetta, Serena

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric aerosols have effects on climate, environment and health. Although the importance of the study of aerosols is well recognized, the current knowledge of the characteristics and their distribution is still insufficient, and there are large uncertainties in the current understanding of the role of aerosols on climate and the environment, both on a regional and local level. Overcoming these uncertainties requires a search strategy that integrates data from multiple platforms (eg, terrestrial, satellite, ships and planes) and the different acquisition techniques (for example, in situ measurements, remote sensing, modeling numerical and data assimilation) (Yu et al., 2006). To this end, in recent years, there have been many efforts such as the creation of networks dedicated to systematic observation of aerosols (eg, European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme-EMEP, European Aerosol Research Lidar NETwork-EARLINET, MicroPulse Lidar Network- MPLNET, and Aerosol Robotic NETwork-AERONET), the development and implementation of new satellite sensors and improvement of numerical models. The recent availability of numerous data to the ground, columnar and profiles of aerosols allows to investigate these aspects. An integrated approach between these different techniques could be able to provide additional information, providing greater insight into the properties of aerosols and their distribution and overcoming the limits of each single technique. In fact, the ground measurements allow direct determination of the physico-chemical properties of aerosols, but cannot be considered representative for large spatial and temporal scales and do not provide any information about the vertical profile of aerosols. On the other hand, the remote sensing techniques from the ground and satellite provide information on the vertical distribution of atmospheric aerosols both in the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL), mainly characterized by the presence of aerosols originating from

  8. An assessment of African lion Panthera leo sociality via social network analysis: prerelease monitoring for an ex situ reintroduction program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunston, Emma J; Abell, Jackie; Doyle, Rebecca E; Kirk, Jacqui; Hilley, Victoria B; Forsyth, Andrew; Jenkins, Emma; Freire, Rafael

    2017-06-01

    The wild population of the African lion Panthera leo continues to decline, requiring alternate conservation programs to be considered. One such program is ex situ reintroduction. Prior to release, long-term monitoring and assessment of behavior is required to determine whether prides and coalitions behave naturally and are sufficiently adapted to a wild environment. Social network analysis (SNA) can be used to provide insight into how the pride as a whole and individuals within it, function. Our study was conducted upon 2 captive-origin prides who are part of an ex situ reintroduction program, and 1 wild pride of African lion. Social interactions were collected at all occurrence for each pride and categorized into greet, social grooming, play, and aggression. Betweenness centrality showed that offspring in each pride were central to the play network, whereas degree indicated that adults received (indegree) the greatest number of overall social interactions, and the adult males of each pride were least likely to initiate (outdegree) any interactions. Through the assessment of individual centrality and degree values, a social keystone adult female was identified for each pride. Social network results indicated that the 2 captive-origin prides had formed cohesive social units and possessed relationships and behaviors comparable with the wild pride for the studied behaviors. This study provided the first SNA comparison between captive-bred origin and a wild pride of lions, providing valuable information on individual and pride sociality, critical for determining the success of prides within an ex situ reintroduction program.

  9. An assessment of African lion Panthera leo sociality via social network analysis: prerelease monitoring for an ex situ reintroduction program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Jackie; Doyle, Rebecca E.; Kirk, Jacqui; Hilley, Victoria B.; Forsyth, Andrew; Jenkins, Emma; Freire, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The wild population of the African lion Panthera leo continues to decline, requiring alternate conservation programs to be considered. One such program is ex situ reintroduction. Prior to release, long-term monitoring and assessment of behavior is required to determine whether prides and coalitions behave naturally and are sufficiently adapted to a wild environment. Social network analysis (SNA) can be used to provide insight into how the pride as a whole and individuals within it, function. Our study was conducted upon 2 captive-origin prides who are part of an ex situ reintroduction program, and 1 wild pride of African lion. Social interactions were collected at all occurrence for each pride and categorized into greet, social grooming, play, and aggression. Betweenness centrality showed that offspring in each pride were central to the play network, whereas degree indicated that adults received (indegree) the greatest number of overall social interactions, and the adult males of each pride were least likely to initiate (outdegree) any interactions. Through the assessment of individual centrality and degree values, a social keystone adult female was identified for each pride. Social network results indicated that the 2 captive-origin prides had formed cohesive social units and possessed relationships and behaviors comparable with the wild pride for the studied behaviors. This study provided the first SNA comparison between captive-bred origin and a wild pride of lions, providing valuable information on individual and pride sociality, critical for determining the success of prides within an ex situ reintroduction program. PMID:29491989

  10. In situ health monitoring for bogie systems of CRH380 train on Beijing-Shanghai high-speed railway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ming; Wang, Qiang; Su, Zhongqing; Cheng, Li

    2014-04-01

    Based on the authors' research efforts over the years, an in situ structural health monitoring (SHM) technique taking advantage of guided elastic waves has been developed and deployed via an online diagnosis system. The technique and the system were recently implemented on China's latest high-speed train (CRH380CL) operated on Beijing-Shanghai High-Speed Railway. The system incorporated modularized components including active sensor network, active wave generation, multi-channel data acquisition, signal processing, data fusion, and results presentation. The sensor network, inspired by a new concept—"decentralized standard sensing", was integrated into the bogie frames during the final assembly of CRH380CL, to generate and acquire bogie-guided ultrasonic waves, from which a wide array of signal features were extracted. Fusion of signal features through a diagnostic imaging algorithm led to a graphic illustration of the overall health state of the bogie in a real-time and intuitive manner. The in situ experimentation covered a variety of high-speed train operation events including startup, acceleration/deceleration, full-speed operation (300 km/h), emergency braking, track change, as well as full stop. Mock-up damage affixed to the bogie was identified quantitatively and visualized in images. This in situ testing has demonstrated the feasibility, effectiveness, sensitivity, and reliability of the developed SHM technique and the system towards real-world applications.

  11. Multielemental analyses of tree rings by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was evaluated for major, minor, trace, and ultra-trace elemental analyses of individual tree rings. The samples were obtained from an old-growth Douglas fir growing near Mount St. Helens volcano, and from trees at various other North American sites. Eightly percent of elements from Li to U had detection limits in the solid (wood) below 8.0 ng g -1 . Two anomalous peaks occur in Mount St. Helens samples at A.D. 1478 and 1490 that closely correlate with past eruptions of the volcano. These results show that ICP-MS is a rapid and sensitive analytical method for multielemental analyses of individual tree rings. (author) 16 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  12. Multielemental analysis of ferromanganese nodules from Central Indian Ocean Basin by PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, R. K.; Vijayan, V.; Ghosh, S.; Chakravortty, V.

    1997-01-01

    Ferromanganese nodules found on the Ocean bed are complex heterogeneous mixtures of several components. Two nodules from Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) were analysed by proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique using 3UD Tandem pelletron. The precision and the accuracy of this technique for chemical analyses has been confirmed by analysing USGS Geological Standards. Thick sample targets were bombarded by 3 MeV protons for the multielemental analysis. GUPIX-96 software was used for spectral data analysis. Quantitative estimate of K, Ca, Tl, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Mo, Ba, Ce, Tl and Pb has been ascertained. The occurrence of Ga, Ge, Rb and Zr in nodules from this region is reported for the first time. The role of manganese and iron oxide phases in determining the uptake of various trace elements from ocean water and bottom sediment pore water has been discussed. (author)

  13. Multi-elemental profile of some Brazilian make-up products by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmazio, Ilza; Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C., E-mail: id@cdtn.b, E-mail: menezes@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Reator e Tecnicas Analiticas. Lab. de Ativacao Neutronica

    2011-07-01

    Recent works have shown that analysis in cosmetics and beauty products from the European and Asian markets indicate the presence of U, Th and rare earths besides other trace elements. Considering these previous findings and health issues, it would be valuable to obtain information on elements in cosmetics available in the Brazilian market. The purpose of this study was to acquire a multi-elemental profile of some Brazilian make-up products of diverse brands. Samples of eye shadow, liquid base, facial concealer, lipstick, and compact face powder were analyzed applying neutron activation analysis, k{sub 0}-standardization method at CDTN/CNEN, using the TRIGA Mark I IPR-R1 research reactor. Concentrations of more than 30 elements in samples are presented and it was found elements included in Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency prohibitive list, rare earths, Th and U in a minimum of two cosmetic samples. (author)

  14. Multi-elemental profile of some Brazilian make-up products by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalmazio, Ilza; Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C.

    2011-01-01

    Recent works have shown that analysis in cosmetics and beauty products from the European and Asian markets indicate the presence of U, Th and rare earths besides other trace elements. Considering these previous findings and health issues, it would be valuable to obtain information on elements in cosmetics available in the Brazilian market. The purpose of this study was to acquire a multi-elemental profile of some Brazilian make-up products of diverse brands. Samples of eye shadow, liquid base, facial concealer, lipstick, and compact face powder were analyzed applying neutron activation analysis, k 0 -standardization method at CDTN/CNEN, using the TRIGA Mark I IPR-R1 research reactor. Concentrations of more than 30 elements in samples are presented and it was found elements included in Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency prohibitive list, rare earths, Th and U in a minimum of two cosmetic samples. (author)

  15. The environmental radiation monitoring system and in-situ measurements for early notification and OIL (Operational Intervention Levels) calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haquin, G.; Ne`eman, E.; Brenner, S.; Lavi, N. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Sackler School of Medicine. Inst. for Environmental Research

    1997-12-31

    The efficiency of the environmental radiation monitoring, low level laboratory and in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry are evaluated as the systems for early notification and for determination of dose rate in air, surface contamination and activity concentration in food during emergencies for Operational Intervention Levels (OIL) recalculation.The National Environmental Radiation Monitoring System has proved its efficiency in the early detection of unregistered radiography work. A mobile station of the network can be used for absorbed dose rate measurement during emergencies in contaminated areas. The calibrated in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry system in an open phosphate ore mine has showed the efficiency of this technique for fast and accurate determination of soil activity concentration. The calibration for an uniform depth distribution can be easily mathematically converted to an exponential depth distribution in cases of radioactive material fallout 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.; e-mail: envirad at post.tau.ac.il; env{sub r}ad at netvision,net.il

  16. Continuous in-situ monitoring of dissolved gases for the characterization of the Critical Zone with a MIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatton, Eliot; Labasque, Thierry; Aquilina, Luc; de la Bernardie, Jérôme; Guihéneuf, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    In the perspective of a temporal and spatial exploration of the Critical Zone, we developed an in situ monitoring instrument for continuous dissolved gas analysis (N2, O2, CO2, CH4, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe). With a large resolution (5 orders of magnitude) and a capability of high frequency multi-tracer analysis (1 gas every 1.5 seconds), the MIMS (Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometer) is an innovative tool allowing the investigation of a large panel of physical and biogeochemical processes. First of all, this study presents the results of groundwater tracer tests using dissolved gases in order to evaluate transport properties of a fractured media in Brittany, France (Ploemeur, ORE H+). The tracer test experiment showed that the MIMS is perfectly suitable for field work. The instrument provides precise measurements accurate enough to produce breakthrough curves during groundwater tracer tests. The results derived from 4He data gives transport parameters in good agreement with the results obtained with a fluorescent tracer. Combined with a pump and a multi-parameter probe, the MIMS is also capable to perform accurate dissolved gases well-logs allowing a real-time estimation of recharge conditions (temperature, excess air), aquifer stratification, redox conditions and groundwater residence time by 4He dating. Therefore, the MIMS is a valuable tool for in situ characterization of biogeochemical reactivity in aquatic systems, the determination of aquifer transport properties, the monitoring of groundwater recharge conditions and the characterization of aquifer-river exchanges.

  17. Integrating Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing and In-situ Measurements for Africa Drought Monitoring and Food Security Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, X.; Qu, J. J.; Motha, R. P.; Stefanski, R.; Malherbe, J.

    2015-12-01

    Drought is one of the most complicated natural hazards, and causes serious environmental, economic and social consequences. Agricultural production systems, which are highly susceptible to weather and climate extremes, are often the first and most vulnerable sector to be affected by drought events. In Africa, crop yield potential and grazing quality are already nearing their limit of temperature sensitivity, and, rapid population growth and frequent drought episodes pose serious complications for food security. It is critical to promote sustainable agriculture development in Africa under conditions of climate extremes. Soil moisture is one of the most important indicators for agriculture drought, and is a fundamentally critical parameter for decision support in crop management, including planting, water use efficiency and irrigation. While very significant technological advances have been introduced for remote sensing of surface soil moisture from space, in-situ measurements are still critical for calibration and validation of soil moisture estimation algorithms. For operational applications, synergistic collaboration is needed to integrate measurements from different sensors at different spatial and temporal scales. In this presentation, a collaborative effort is demonstrated for drought monitoring in Africa, supported and coordinated by WMO, including surface soil moisture and crop status monitoring. In-situ measurements of soil moisture, precipitation and temperature at selected sites are provided by local partners in Africa. Measurements from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are integrated with in-situ observations to derive surface soil moisture at high spatial resolution. Crop status is estimated through temporal analysis of current and historical MODIS measurements. Integrated analysis of soil moisture data and crop status provides both in-depth understanding of drought conditions and

  18. In situ spectroscopic monitoring of CO2 reduction at copper oxide electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liying; Gupta, Kalyani; Goodall, Josephine B M; Darr, Jawwad A; Holt, Katherine B

    2017-04-28

    Copper oxide modified electrodes were investigated as a function of applied electrode potential using in situ infrared spectroscopy and ex situ Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In deoxygenated KHCO 3 electrolyte bicarbonate and carbonate species were found to adsorb to the electrode during reduction and the CuO was reduced to Cu(i) or Cu(0) species. Carbonate was incorporated into the structure and the CuO starting material was not regenerated on cycling to positive potentials. In contrast, in CO 2 saturated KHCO 3 solution, surface adsorption of bicarbonate and carbonate was not observed and adsorption of a carbonato-species was observed with in situ infrared spectroscopy. This species is believed to be activated, bent CO 2 . On cycling to negative potentials, larger reduction currents were observed in the presence of CO 2 ; however, less of the charge could be attributed to the reduction of CuO. In the presence of CO 2 CuO underwent reduction to Cu 2 O and potentially Cu, with no incorporation of carbonate. Under these conditions the CuO starting material could be regenerated by cycling to positive potentials.

  19. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M. R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C. A.; Griesmayer, E.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I.; Egorov, N.; Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.

    2015-05-01

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×1016 proton/cm2, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×1016 p/cm2 irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage.

  20. A Low-Level Real-Time In Situ Monitoring System for Tritium in Groundwater and Vadose Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo, J. T.; Levitt, D. G.

    2002-12-01

    Tritium is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen produced as a by-product of the nuclear fuel cycle. It is also an integral part of the nuclear weapons industry and has been released into the environment through both the production and testing of nuclear weapons. There are many sites across the DOE complex where tritium has been released into the subsurface through the disposal of radioactive waste and at the Nevada Test Site, through the underground testing of nuclear weapons. Numerous DOE facilities have an on-going regulatory need to be able to monitor tritium concentrations in groundwater within deep hydrologic zones and in the shallower non-saturated vadose zone beneath waste disposal pits and shafts and other release sites. Typical access to groundwater is through deep monitoring wells and situated in remote locations. In response to this need, Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (SEA) and its subcontractor, the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) Harry Reid Center (HRC) for Environmental Studies has conducted the applied research and engineering and produced a real time, in situ monitoring system for the detection and measurement of low levels of tritium in the groundwater and in the shallower vadose zone. The monitoring system has been deployed to measure tritium in both the vadose zone near a subsurface radioactive waste package and the groundwater in a deep hydrologic reservoir at the Nevada Test Site. The monitoring system has been designed to detect tritium in the subsurface below federal and/or state regulatory limits for safe drinking water and has been successfully demonstrated. The development effort is being funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory and the DOE Nevada Operations Office Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative (AMSI).

  1. In-Situ Real-Time Temperature Monitoring of Thermal Protection Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This program addresses the need for interfacial and in-depth temperature monitoring of thermal protection systems (TPS). Novel, linear drive, eddy current methods...

  2. REMOTE BIOSENSOR FOR IN SITU MONITORING OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE NERVE AGENTS. (R823663)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A remote electrochemical biosensor for field monitoring of organophosphate nerve agents is described. The new sensor relies on the coupling of the effective biocatalytic action of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) with a submersible amperometric probe design. This combination resu...

  3. Cu-Ti Formation in Nb-Ti/Cu Superconducting Strand Monitored by in situ Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Pong, I; Pong, Ian; Gerardin, Alexandre; Scheuerlein, Christian; Bottura, Luca

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the high temperature exposure effect on Nb-Ti/Cu superconducting strands, as might be encountered in joining by soldering and in cabling annealing, X-ray diffraction and resistometry measurements were performed in situ during heat treatment, and complemented by conventional metallography, mechanical tests and superconducting properties measurements. Changes of the Nb-Ti nanostructure at temperatures above 300 degrees C are manifested in the degradation of critical current in an applied external magnetic field, although degradation at self field was insignificant up to 400 degrees C for several minutes. Above 500 degrees C, the formation of various Cu-Ti intermetallic compounds, due to Ti diffusion from Nb-Ti into Cu, is detected by in situ XRD albeit not resolvable by SEM-EDS. There is a ductile to brittle transition near 600 degrees C, and liquid formation is observed below 900 degrees C. The formation of Cu-Ti causes a delayed reduction of the residual resistivity ratio (RRR) and adv...

  4. Clinical system for non-invasive in situ monitoring of gases in the human paranasal sinuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewander, Märta; Guan, Zuguang; Svanberg, Katarina; Svanberg, Sune; Svensson, Tomas

    2009-06-22

    We present a portable system for non-invasive, simultaneous sensing of molecular oxygen (O(2)) and water vapor (H(2)O) in the human paranasal cavities. The system is based on high-resolution tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLAS) and digital wavelength modulation spectroscopy (dWMS). Since optical interference and non-ideal tuning of the diode lasers render signal processing complex, we focus on Fourier analysis of dWMS signals and procedures for removal of background signals. Clinical data are presented, and exhibit a significant improvement in signal-to-noise with respect to earlier work. The in situ detection limit, in terms of absorption fraction, is about 5x10(-5) for oxygen and 5x10(-4) for water vapor, but varies between patients due to differences in light attenuation. In addition, we discuss the use of water vapor as a reference in quantification of in situ oxygen concentration in detail. In particular, light propagation aspects are investigated by employing photon time-of-flight spectroscopy.

  5. In situ electrical and thermal monitoring of printed electronics by two-photon mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorelli, Francesco; Accanto, Nicolò; Jørgensen, Mikkel; van Hulst, Niek F; Krebs, Frederik C

    2017-06-19

    Printed electronics is emerging as a new, large scale and cost effective technology that will be disruptive in fields such as energy harvesting, consumer electronics and medical sensors. The performance of printed electronic devices relies principally on the carrier mobility and molecular packing of the polymer semiconductor material. Unfortunately, the analysis of such materials is generally performed with destructive techniques, which are hard to make compatible with in situ measurements, and pose a great obstacle for the mass production of printed electronics devices. A rapid, in situ, non-destructive and low-cost testing method is needed. In this study, we demonstrate that nonlinear optical microscopy is a promising technique to achieve this goal. Using ultrashort laser pulses we stimulate two-photon absorption in a roll coated polymer semiconductor and map the resulting two-photon induced photoluminescence and second harmonic response. We show that, in our experimental conditions, it is possible to relate the total amount of photoluminescence detected to important material properties such as the charge carrier density and the molecular packing of the printed polymer material, all with a spatial resolution of 400 nm. Importantly, this technique can be extended to the real time mapping of the polymer semiconductor film, even during the printing process, in which the high printing speed poses the need for equally high acquisition rates.

  6. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M.R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C.A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Griesmayer, E. [CIVIDEC Instrumentation, GmbH, Vienna (Austria); Eremin, V. [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Verbitskaya, E., E-mail: elena.verbitskaya@cern.ch [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I. [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Egorov, N. [Research Institute of Material Science and Technology, Zelenograd, Moscow (Russian Federation); Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-05-11

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×10{sup 16} proton/cm{sup 2}, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage. - Highlights: • Silicon and diamond detectors are proposed for beam loss monitoring at LHC. • The first in situ radiation test of Si and diamond detectors at 1.9 K is described. • Both diamond and silicon detectors survived after 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} irradiation at 1.9 K. • The rate of Si detectors degradation depends on bias polarity and is larger at V{sub forw}. • Sensitivity of Si detectors irradiated to 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2} is independent on resistivity.

  7. Data Mining of the Thermal Performance of Cool-Pipes in Massive Concrete via In Situ Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Embedded cool-pipes are very important for massive concrete because their cooling effect can effectively avoid thermal cracks. In this study, a data mining approach to analyzing the thermal performance of cool-pipes via in situ monitoring is proposed. Delicate monitoring program is applied in a high arch dam project that provides a good and mass data source. The factors and relations related to the thermal performance of cool-pipes are obtained in a built theory thermal model. The supporting vector machine (SVM technology is applied to mine the data. The thermal performances of iron pipes and high-density polyethylene (HDPE pipes are compared. The data mining result shows that iron pipe has a better heat removal performance when flow rate is lower than 50 L/min. It has revealed that a turning flow rate exists for iron pipe which is 80 L/min. The prediction and classification results obtained from the data mining model agree well with the monitored data, which illustrates the validness of the approach.

  8. Sensitive in situ monitoring of a recombinant bioluminescent Yersinia enterocolitica reporter mutant in real time on Camembert cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoz, Ariel; Mayr, Ralf; Bresolin, Geraldine; Neuhaus, Klaus; Francis, Kevin P; Scherer, Siegfried

    2002-11-01

    Bioluminescent mutants of Yersinia enterocolitica were generated by transposon mutagenesis using a promoterless, complete lux operon (luxCDABE) derived from Photorhabdus luminescens, and their production of light in the cheese environment was monitored. Mutant B94, which had the lux cassette inserted into an open reading frame of unknown function was used for direct monitoring of Y. enterocolitica cells on cheeses stored at 10 degrees C by quantifying bioluminescence using a photon-counting, intensified charge-coupled device camera. The detection limit on cheese was 200 CFU/cm(2). Bioluminescence of the reporter mutant was significantly regulated by its environment (NaCl, temperature, and cheese), as well as by growth phase, via the promoter the lux operon had acquired upon transposition. At low temperatures, mutant B94 did not exhibit the often-reported decrease of photon emission in older cells. It was not necessary to include either antibiotics or aldehyde in the food matrix in order to gain quantitative, reproducible bioluminescence data. As far as we know, this is the first time a pathogen has been monitored in situ, in real time, in a "real-product" status, and at a low temperature.

  9. Self-Calibrating Ultrasonic Methods for In-Situ Monitoring of Fatigue Crack Progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, J.E.; Mi, B.; Cobb, A.C.; Michaels, T.E.; Stobbe, D.M.

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasonic sensors permanently affixed to aluminum coupons are used to monitor progression of damage during fatigue testing with the long term goal of structural health monitoring for diagnostics and prognostics. Necessary for success are proper design of the ultrasonic testing methods, robust transducer mounting techniques, and real-time signal processing for determining the state of the structure. It is also highly desirable for the overall system to be self-calibrating with built-in diagnostics in order to detect and compensate for sensor degradation or failure. Self-calibrating ultrasonic techniques are applied for monitoring of cracks initiating and propagating from the inaccessible inner diameters of rivet holes where the transducers are mounted on the accessible specimen surface. Angle beam ultrasonic methods are utilized that are suitable for detecting small defects in critical local regions of high stress. Results are presented for aluminum coupons subjected to low cycle fatigue and demonstrate ultrasonic tracking of crack growth

  10. Development of Nano-crystalline Doped-Ceramic Enabled Fiber Sensors for High Temperature In-Situ Monitoring of Fossil Fuel Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Hai [Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Dong, Junhang [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lin, Jerry [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Romero, Van [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This is a final technical report for the first project year from July 1, 2005 to Jan 31, 2012 for DoE/NETL funded project DE-FC26-05NT42439: Development of Nanocrystalline Doped-Ceramic Enabled Fiber Sensors for High Temperature In-Situ Monitoring of Fossil Fuel Gases. This report summarizes the technical progresses and achievements towards the development of novel nanocrystalline doped ceramic material-enabled optical fiber sensors for in situ and real time monitoring the gas composition of flue or hot gas streams involved in fossil-fuel based power generation and hydrogen production.

  11. Miniature GC for in-situ monitoring of VOC's within a cone penetrometer. Final report, July 1994--May 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The open-quotes Cone-GCclose quotes was developed in response to a need for down hole, in-situ characterization of volatile organics within the soil profile, in the vadose zone, or a water headspace. A design based on the use of a miniature gas chromatograph was selected since it was believed that such an instrument would be adaptable to a broad range of analytes and could be used in complex, real-world situations where the environmental contaminants to be monitored may exist in complex mixtures with other vapors. The Cone-GC is versatile and will also fit within many other soil probes, hole liners, and minimally intrusive emplacement systems where small size in addition to high performance are required. The Cone-GC was designed to allow environmental specialists for the first time to obtain immediate, in-situ chemical measurements in a soil probe and to make real-time, on-site decisions that will greatly reduce the time (and cost) of site characterization and remediation. It will no longer be necessary to collect samples (using long sampling lines that may become contaminated), send them to an off-site laboratory for analysis, and then wait hours or days for results

  12. Laser-induced incandescence (LII) diagnostic for in situ monitoring of nanoparticle synthesis in a high-pressure arc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatom, Shurik; Vekselman, Vladislav; Mitrani, James; Stratton, Brentley; Raitses, Yevgeny; LaboratoryPlasma Nanosynthesis Team

    2016-10-01

    A DC arc discharge is commonly used for synthesis of carbon nanoparticles, including buckyballs, carbon nanotubes, and graphene flakes. In this work we show the first results of nanoparticles monitored during the arc discharge. The graphite electrode is vaporized by high current (60 A) in a buffer Helium gas leading to nanoparticle synthesis in a low temperature plasma. The arc was shown to oscillate, which can possibly influence the nano-synthesis. To visualize the nanoparticles in-situ we employ the LII technique. The nanoparticles with radii >50 nm, emerging from the arc area are heated with a short laser pulse and incandesce. The resulting radiation is captured with an ICCD camera, showing the location of the generated nanoparticles. The images of incandescence are studied together with temporally synchronized fast-framing imaging of C2 emission, to connect the dynamics of arc instabilities, C2 molecules concentration and nanoparticles. The time-resolved incandescence signal is analyzed with combination of ex-situ measurements of the synthesized nanoparticles and LII modeling, to provide the size distribution of produced nanoparticles. This work was supported by US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  13. In situ, subsurface monitoring of vapor-phase TCE using fiber optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossabi, J.; Colston, B. Jr.; Brown, S.; Milanovich, F.; Lee, L.T. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A vapor-phase, reagent-based, fiber optic trichloroethylene (TCE) sensor developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was demonstrated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in two configurations. The first incorporated the sensor into a down-well instrument bounded by two inflatable packers capable of sealing an area for discrete depth analysis. The second involved an integration of the sensor into the probe tip of the Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station (WES) cone penetrometry system. Discrete depth measurements of vapor-phase concentrations of TCE in the vadose zone were successfully made using both configurations. These measurements demonstrate the first successful in situ sensing (as opposed to sampling) of TCE at a field site

  14. High precision AlGaAsSb ridge-waveguide etching by in situ reflectance monitored ICP-RIE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, N. T.; Breivik, Magnus; Patra, S. K.; Fimland, Bjørn-Ove

    2014-05-01

    GaSb-based semiconductor diode lasers are promising candidates for light sources working in the mid-infrared wavelength region of 2-5 μm. Using edge emitting lasers with ridge-waveguide structure, light emission with good beam quality can be achieved. Fabrication of the ridge waveguide requires precise etch stop control for optimal laser performance. Simulation results are presented that show the effect of increased confinement in the waveguide when the etch depth is well-defined. In situ reflectance monitoring with a 675 nm-wavelength laser was used to determine the etch stop with high accuracy. Based on the simulations of laser reflectance from a proposed sample, the etching process can be controlled to provide an endpoint depth precision within +/- 10 nm.

  15. Monitoring of high temperature zone by resistivity tomography during in-situ heater test in sedimentary soft rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kenji; Suzuki, Koichi; Ikenoya, Takafumi; Takakura, Nozomu; Tani, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    In-situ heater test has been conducted to evaluate the influence of high temperature in an underground facility at a depth of 50 m. Resistivity monitoring is thought to be effective to map the extent of the high temperature zone. So we have conducted resistivity tomography during the heater test. As a result, low resistivity zone was appeared near the heated area as starting the heating, and the zone was expanded. Resistivity of rock is proportional to resistivity of pore water. It is known that pore water resistivity decreases as the temperature rise. This suggests that high temperature zone is detected and spatial distribution of temperature can be mapped by resistivity tomography. (author)

  16. Development of sensors for in-situ monitoring of corrosion and water chemistry parameters for the electric power utility industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.D.; Pang, J.; Liu, C.; Medina, E.; Villa, J.; Bueno, J.

    1993-01-01

    The in situ monitoring of the chemistry and electrochemistry of aqueous heat transport fluids in thermal (nuclear and fossil) power plants is now considered essential if adequate assessment and close control of corrosion and mass transfer phenomena are to be achieved. Because of the elevated temperatures and pressures involved, new sensor technologies are required that are able to measure key parameters under plant operating conditions for extended periods of time. In this paper, the authors outline a research and development program that is designed to develop practical sensors for use in thermal power plants. The current emphasis is on sensors for measuring corrosion potential, pH, the concentrations of oxygen and hydrogen, and the electrochemical noise generated by corrosion processes at temperatures ranging from ∼250 C to 500 C. The program is currently at the laboratory stage, but testing of prototype sensors in a coal-fired supercritical power plant in Spain will begin shortly

  17. Polyurethane nanofiber strain sensors via in situ polymerization of polypyrrole and application to monitoring joint flexion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Inhwan; Cho, Gilsoo

    2018-07-01

    Strain sensors made of intrinsically conductive polymers (ICPs) and nanofibers were fabricated and tested for suitability for use in wearable technology. The sensors were fabricated and evaluated based on their surface appearances, and electrical, tensile, and chemical/thermal properties. Polypyrrole (PPy) was in situ polymerized onto polyurethane (PU) nanofiber substrates by exposing pyrrole monomers to ammonium persulfate as oxidant and 2,6-naphthalenedisulfonic acid disodium salt as doping agents in an aqueous bath. The PPy treated PU nanofibers were then coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Both pyrrole concentrations and layer numbers were significantly related to change in electrical conductivity. Specimen treated with 0.1 M of PPy and having three layered structure showed the best electrical conductivity. Regarding tensile strength, the in situ polymerization process decreased tensile strength because the oxidant chemically degraded the PU fibers. Adding layers and PDMS treatment generally improved tensile properties while adding layers created fracture parts in the stress–strain curves. The treatment condition of 0.1 M of PPy, two layered, and PDMS treated specimen showed the best tensile properties as a strain sensor. The chemical property evaluation with Fourier transform infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy tests showed successful PPy polymerization and PDMS treatments. The functional groups and chemical bonds in polyol, urethane linkage, backbone ring structure in PPy, silicon-based functional groups in PDMS, and elemental content changes by treatment at each stage were characterized. The real-time data acquired from the dummy and five human subjects with repetition of motion at three different speeds of 0.16, 0.25 and 0.5 Hz generated similar trends and tendencies. The PU nanofiber sensors based on PPy and PDMS treatments in this study point to the possibility of developing textiles based wearable strain sensors developed using ICPs.

  18. In-situ protein determination to monitor contamination in a centrifugal partition chromatograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouiche, Feriel; Faure, Karine

    2017-05-15

    Centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) works with biphasic liquid systems including aqueous two-phase systems. Metallic rotors are able to retain an aqueous stationary phase able to purify proteins. But the adhesion of proteins to solid surface may pose a cross-contamination risk during downstream processes. So it is of utmost importance to ensure the cleanliness of the equipment and detect possible protein contamination in a timely manner. Thereby, a direct method that allows the determination of the effective presence of proteins and the extent of contamination in the metallic CPC rotors was developed. This in-situ method is derived from the Amino Density Estimation by Colorimetric Assay (ADECA) which is based on the affinity of a dye, Coomassie Brillant Blue (CBB), with protonated N + groups of the proteins. In this paper, the ADECA method was developed dynamically, on a 25 mL stainless-steel rotor with various extents of protein contaminations using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a fouling model. The eluted CBB dye was quantified and found to respond linearly to BSA contamination up to 70 mg injected. Limits of detection and quantification were recorded as 0.9 mg and 3.1 mg, respectively. While the non-specific interactions between the dye and the rotor cannot currently be neglected, this method allows for in situ determination of proteins contamination and should contribute to the development of CPC as a separation tool in protein purification processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Micro Ion Mobility Sensor for In Situ Monitoring of Contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Inset 1: Portable ME GC-DMS monitor; Inset 2: Sending ME assembly to the groundwater well; Inset 3: Bees and their nest located on the cover of the...covered and locked for a period of a few months. During this time a wasp’s nest was built in the outer cover of the well, as shown in Insert 3 of

  20. Development of an Open Source Based Sensor Platform for an Advanced and Comprehensive in-situ DOC Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schima, Robert; Goblirsch, Tobias; Paschen, Mathias; Rinke, Karsten; Schelwat, Heinz; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The impact of global change, intensive agriculture and complex interactions between humans and the environment show different effects on different scales. However, the desire to obtain a better understanding of ecosystems and process dynamics in nature accentuates the need for observing these processes in higher temporal and spatial resolutions. Especially with regard to the process dynamics and heterogeneity of water catchment areas, a comprehensive monitoring of the ongoing processes and effects remains to be a challenging issue in the field of applied environmental research. Moreover, harsh conditions and a variety of influencing process parameters are representing a particular challenge due to an adaptive in-situ monitoring of vast areas. Today, open source based electronics and cost-effective sensors and sensor components are offering a promising approach to investigate new possibilities of smart phone based mobile data acquisition and comprehensive ad-hoc monitoring of environmental processes. Accordingly, our project aims the development of new strategies for mobile data acquisition and real-time processing of user-specific environmental data, based on a holistic and integrated process. To this end, the concept of our monitoring system covers the data collection, data processing and data integration as well as the data provision within one infrastructure. The whole monitoring system consists of several mobile sensor devices, a smart phone app (Android) and a web service for data processing, data provision and data visualization. The smart phone app allows the configuration of the mobile sensor device and provides some built-in functions such as data visualization or data transmission via e-mail. Besides the measurement of temperature and humidity in air, the mobile sensor device is able to acquire sensor readings for the content of dissolved organic compounds (λ = 254 nm) and turbidity (λ = 860 nm) of surface water based on the developed optical in-situ

  1. Multi-sensor satellite and in situ monitoring of phytoplankton development in a eutrophic-mesotrophic lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörnhöfer, Katja; Klinger, Philip; Heege, Thomas; Oppelt, Natascha

    2018-01-15

    Phytoplankton indicated by its photosynthetic pigment chlorophyll-a is an important pointer on lake ecology and a regularly monitored parameter within the European Water Framework Directive. Along with eutrophication and global warming cyanobacteria gain increasing importance concerning human health aspects. Optical remote sensing may support both the monitoring of horizontal distribution of phytoplankton and cyanobacteria at the lake surface and the reduction of spatial uncertainties associated with limited water sample analyses. Temporal and spatial resolution of using only one satellite sensor, however, may constrain its information value. To discuss the advantages of a multi-sensor approach the sensor-independent, physically based model MIP (Modular Inversion and Processing System) was applied at Lake Kummerow, Germany, and lake surface chlorophyll-a was derived from 33 images of five different sensors (MODIS-Terra, MODIS-Aqua, Landsat 8, Landsat 7 and Sentinel-2A). Remotely sensed lake average chlorophyll-a concentration showed a reasonable development and varied between 2.3±0.4 and 35.8±2.0mg·m -3 from July to October 2015. Match-ups between in situ and satellite chlorophyll-a revealed varying performances of Landsat 8 (RMSE: 3.6 and 19.7mg·m -3 ), Landsat 7 (RMSE: 6.2mg·m -3 ), Sentinel-2A (RMSE: 5.1mg·m -3 ) and MODIS (RMSE: 12.8mg·m -3 ), whereas an in situ data uncertainty of 48% needs to be respected. The temporal development of an index on harmful algal blooms corresponded well with the cyanobacteria biomass development during summer months. Satellite chlorophyll-a maps allowed to follow spatial patterns of chlorophyll-a distribution during a phytoplankton bloom event. Wind conditions mainly explained spatial patterns. Integrating satellite chlorophyll-a into trophic state assessment resulted in different trophic classes. Our study endorsed a combined use of satellite and in situ chlorophyll-a data to alleviate weaknesses of both approaches and

  2. Field tests of a chemiresistor sensor for in-situ monitoring of vapor-phase contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C.; McGrath, L.; Wright, J.

    2003-04-01

    An in-situ chemiresistor sensor has been developed that can detect volatile organic compounds in subsurface environmental applications. Several field tests were conducted in 2001 and 2002 to test the reliability, operation, and performance of the in-situ chemiresistor sensor system. The chemiresistor consists of a carbon-loaded polymer deposited onto a microfabricated circuit. The polymer swells reversibly in the presence of volatile organic compounds as vapor-phase molecules absorb into the polymer, causing a change in the electrical resistance of the circuit. The change in resistance can be calibrated to known concentrations of analytes, and arrays of chemiresistors can be used on a single chip to aid in discrimination. A waterproof housing was constructed to allow the chemiresistor to be used in a variety of media including air, soil, and water. The integrated unit, which can be buried in soils or emplaced in wells, is connected via cable to a surface-based solar-powered data logger. A cell-phone modem is used to automatically download the data from the data logger on a periodic basis. The field tests were performed at three locations: (1) Edwards Air Force Base, CA; (2) Nevada Test Site; and (3) Sandia's Chemical Waste Landfill near Albuquerque, NM. The objectives of the tests were to evaluate the ruggedness, longevity, operation, performance, and engineering requirements of these sensors in actual field settings. Results showed that the sensors could be operated continuously for long periods of time (greater than a year) using remote solar-powered data-logging stations with wireless telemetry. The sensor housing, which was constructed of 304 stainless steel, showed some signs of corrosion when placed in contaminated water for several months, but the overall integrity was maintained. The detection limits of the chemiresistors were generally found to be near 0.1% of the saturated vapor pressure of the target analyte in controlled laboratory conditions (e

  3. Total reflection x-ray fluorescence spectrometers for multielemental analysis: status of commercial equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala Jimenez, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    Multi-elemental analysis by total reflection x-ray fluorescence spectrometry has evolved during two decades. At the present there are commercial equipment available for the chemical analysis in all kind of biological and mineral samples. The electronic industry has also been benefited from the scientific and technological developments in the field of TXRF. The basic components of the spectrometers can be summarized as follow: a) excitation source; b) geometric arrangement (optics) for collimation and monochromatization of the primary radiation; c) x-ray detector; d) hardware and software for operation of the instrument, data acquisition and spectral deconvolution to determine the concentrations of the element present in the sample (quantitative analysis). As optional there are manufacturers offering the conventional 45 degrees geometry for direct excitation of bulky liquid or solid samples. Personal communications of the author and the commercial brochures available at the moment of writing this presentation have allowed to list the following type of components used in the TXRF spectrometers for multi-elemental analysis (the devices used in the electronic industry to analyze silicon wafers are excluded). Excitation: high power x-ray tube, output from 1300 to 2000 watts; metal ceramic low power-ray tube, output up to 50 watts. Different anodes are used but molybdenum, tungsten and copper are frequent. The excitation systems can be customized according to the requirements of the laboratory. Detector: Si-Li semi-conductor liquid nitrogen cooled; silicon solid state thermoelectrically cooled (silicon drift detector SDD and Si-PIN diode). Optics: multilayer monochromator of Si-W or Ni-C; double multilayer monochromator. Electronics: spectroscopy amplifier, analog to digital converter adapted to a PC compatible computer with software in Windows environment for the whole operation of the spectrometer and for qualy/quantitative analysis of samples are standards in the

  4. Micro-scaled high-throughput digestion of plant tissue samples for multi-elemental analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husted Søren

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative multi-elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma (ICP spectrometry depends on a complete digestion of solid samples. However, fast and thorough sample digestion is a challenging analytical task which constitutes a bottleneck in modern multi-elemental analysis. Additional obstacles may be that sample quantities are limited and elemental concentrations low. In such cases, digestion in small volumes with minimum dilution and contamination is required in order to obtain high accuracy data. Results We have developed a micro-scaled microwave digestion procedure and optimized it for accurate elemental profiling of plant materials (1-20 mg dry weight. A commercially available 64-position rotor with 5 ml disposable glass vials, originally designed for microwave-based parallel organic synthesis, was used as a platform for the digestion. The novel micro-scaled method was successfully validated by the use of various certified reference materials (CRM with matrices rich in starch, lipid or protein. When the micro-scaled digestion procedure was applied on single rice grains or small batches of Arabidopsis seeds (1 mg, corresponding to approximately 50 seeds, the obtained elemental profiles closely matched those obtained by conventional analysis using digestion in large volume vessels. Accumulated elemental contents derived from separate analyses of rice grain fractions (aleurone, embryo and endosperm closely matched the total content obtained by analysis of the whole rice grain. Conclusion A high-throughput micro-scaled method has been developed which enables digestion of small quantities of plant samples for subsequent elemental profiling by ICP-spectrometry. The method constitutes a valuable tool for screening of mutants and transformants. In addition, the method facilitates studies of the distribution of essential trace elements between and within plant organs which is relevant for, e.g., breeding programmes aiming at

  5. Characteristics Study of In-Situ Capacitive Sensor for Monitoring Lubrication Oil Debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhibin; Wang, Yishou; Qing, Xinlin

    2017-12-08

    As an essential part of engine health monitoring (EHM), online lubrication oil debris monitoring has recently received great attention for the assessment of rotating and reciprocating parts in aero-engines, due to its high integration, low cost and safe characteristics. However, it is be a challenge to find a suitable sensor operating in such a complex environment. We present an unconventional novel approach, in which a cylinder capacitive sensor is designed and integrated with the pipeline of an engine lubrication system, so that the capacitive sensor can effectively detect changes in the lubrication oil condition. In this paper, an attempt to illustrate the performance characteristics of the developed cylinder capacitive sensor is made, through an experiment system that simulates a real scenario of a lubrication oil system. The main aim of the research was to qualitatively describe the relationship between the sensor parameter and the lubrication oil debris. In addition, the effect of the temperature and flow rate of the lubrication oil on capacitance change was performed by several experiments and we figured out a compensation method. The experimental results demonstrated that the cylinder capacitive sensor can potentially be used for lubrication oil debris monitoring of the health condition of an aero-engine.

  6. MEDUSA: The ExoMars experiment for in-situ monitoring of dust and water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangeli, L.; Lopez-Moreno, J. J.; Nørnberg, P.; Della Corte, V.; Esposito, F.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Merrison, J.; Molfese, C.; Palumbo, P.; Rodriguez-Gomez, J. F.; Rotundi, A.; Visconti, G.; Zarnecki, J. C.; The International Medusa Team

    2009-07-01

    Dust and water vapour are fundamental components of the Martian atmosphere. In view of tracing the past environmental conditions on Mars, that possibly favoured the appearing of life forms, it is important to study the present climate and its evolution. Here dust and water vapour have (and have had) strong influence. Of major scientific interest is the quantity and physical, chemical and electrical properties of dust and the abundance of water vapour dispersed in the atmosphere and their exchange with the surface. Moreover, in view of the exploration of the planet with automated systems and in the future by manned missions, it is of primary importance to analyse the hazards linked to these environmental factors. The Martian Environmental Dust Systematic Analyser (MEDUSA) experiment, included in the scientific payload of the ESA ExoMars mission, accommodates a complement of sensors, based on optical detection and cumulative mass deposition, that aims to study dust and water vapour in the lower Martian atmosphere. The goals are to study, for the first time, in-situ and quantitatively, physical properties of the airborne dust, including the cumulative dust mass flux, the dust deposition rate, the physical and electrification properties, the size distribution of sampled particles and the atmospheric water vapour abundance versus time.

  7. In situ monitoring of the hydration process of K-PS geopolymer cement with ESEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Wei; Zhang Yunsheng; Lin Wei; Liu Zhiyong

    2004-01-01

    Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) was used to in situ quantitatively study the hydration process of K-PS geopolymer cement under an 80% RH environment. An energy dispersion X-ray analysis (EDXA) was also employed to distinguish the chemical composition of hydration product. The ESEM micrographs showed that metakaolin particles pack loosely at 10 min after mixing, resulting in the existence of many large voids. As hydration proceeds, a lot of gels were seen and gradually precipitated on the surfaces of these particles. At later stage, these particles were wrapped by thick gel layers and their interspaces were almost completely filled. The corresponding EDXA results illustrated that the molar ratios of K/Al increase while Si/Al decrease with the development of hydration. As a result, the molar ratios of K/Al and Si/Al of hydration products at an age of 4 h amounted to 0.99 and 1.49, respectively, which were close to the theoretical values (K/Al=1.0, Si/Al=1.0 for K-PS geopolymer cement paste). In addition, well-developed crystals could not been found at any ages; instead, spongelike amorphous gels were always been observed

  8. In situ monitoring magnetism and resistance of nanophase platinum upon electrochemical oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva-Maria Steyskal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Controlled tuning of material properties by external stimuli represents one of the major topics of current research in the field of functional materials. Electrochemically induced property tuning has recently emerged as a promising pathway in this direction making use of nanophase materials with a high fraction of electrode-electrolyte interfaces. The present letter reports on electrochemical property tuning of porous nanocrystalline Pt. Deeper insight into the underlying processes could be gained by means of a direct comparison of the charge-induced response of two different properties, namely electrical resistance and magnetic moment. For this purpose, four-point resistance measurements and SQUID magnetometry were performed under identical in situ electrochemical control focussing on the regime of electrooxidation. Fully reversible variations of the electrical resistance and the magnetic moment of 6% and 1% were observed upon the formation or dissolution of a subatomic chemisorbed oxygen surface layer, respectively. The increase of the resistance, which is directly correlated to the amount of deposited oxygen, is considered to be primarily caused by charge-carrier scattering processes at the metal–electrolyte interfaces. In comparison, the decrease of the magnetic moment upon positive charging appears to be governed by the electric field at the nanocrystallite–electrolyte interfaces due to spin–orbit coupling.

  9. Experiences from in-situ monitoring of pavement under weather conditions change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likar Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Very strong winters with temperatures under 0°C and hot summers with temperatures more than 30°C are observed in the South East part of Slovenia. Those big differences in temperature during the year and especially temperatures below freezing point have strong influence on asphalt layer and sub base of road pavement. The freeze/thaw cycles lead to formation of ice lenses in base course causing cracks in asphalt layers and degrade the pavement usually in a few years. For this reason one section of the national road in the South East part of Slovenia was rebuilt with cold in-situ pavement retreatment. A test field with inbuilt sensors for measuring water content, temperature and deformation in various depths and locations was constructed during the remediation works to study the mechanism of freeze-thaw degradation of pavements. The main goal of the test field is to determine water content in sub base, freezing depth, temperature distribution and deformations, which lead to cracks in asphalt layer after the remediation work in the road construction.

  10. Uranium oxidation kinetics monitored by in-situ X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalkind, S., E-mail: shimonzl@nrcn.org.il; Rafailov, G.; Halevy, I.; Livneh, T.; Rubin, A.; Maimon, H.; Schweke, D.

    2017-03-15

    The oxidation kinetics of U-0.1 wt%Cr at oxygen pressures of 150 Torr and the temperature range of 90–150 °C was studied by means of in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). A “breakaway” in the oxidation kinetics is found at ∼0.25 μm, turning from a parabolic to a linear rate law. At the initial stage of oxidation the growth plane of UO{sub 2}(111) is the prominent one. As the oxide thickens, the growth rate of UO{sub 2}(220) plane increases and both planes grow concurrently. The activation energies obtained for the oxide growth are Q{sub parabolic} = 17.5 kcal/mol and Q{sub linear} = 19 kcal/mol. Enhanced oxidation around uranium carbide (UC) inclusions is clearly observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  11. Monitoring and modeling crop health and water use via in-situ, airborne and space-based platforms

    KAUST Repository

    McCabe, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    The accurate retrieval of plant water use, health and function together with soil state and condition, represent key objectives in the management and monitoring of large-scale agricultural production. In regions of water shortage or stress, understanding the sustainable use of available water supplies is critical. Unfortunately, this need is all too often limited by a lack of reliable observations. Techniques that balance the demand for reliable ground-based data with the rapid retrieval of spatially distributed crop characteristics represent a needed line of research. Data from in-situ monitoring coupled with advances in satellite retrievals of key land surface variables, provide the information necessary to characterize many crop health and water use features, including evaporation, leaf-chlorophyll and other common vegetation indices. With developments in UAV and quadcopter solutions, the opportunity to bridge the spatio-temporal gap between satellite and ground based sensing now exists, along with the capacity for customized retrievals of crop information. While there remain challenges in the routine application of autonomous airborne systems, the state of current technology and sensor developments provide the capacity to explore the operational potential. While this presentation will focus on the multi-scale estimation of crop-water use and crop-health characteristics from satellite-based sensors, the retrieval of high resolution spatially distributed information from near-surface airborne and ground-based systems will also be examined.

  12. An Operational In Situ Soil Moisture & Soil Temperature Monitoring Network for West Wales, UK: The WSMN Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulos, George P; McCalmont, Jon P

    2017-06-23

    This paper describes a soil moisture dataset that has been collecting ground measurements of soil moisture, soil temperature and related parameters for west Wales, United Kingdom. Already acquired in situ data have been archived to the autonomous Wales Soil Moisture Network (WSMN) since its foundation in July 2011. The sites from which measurements are being collected represent a range of conditions typical of the Welsh environment, with climate ranging from oceanic to temperate and a range of the most typical land use/cover types found in Wales. At present, WSMN consists of a total of nine monitoring sites across the area with a concentration of sites in three sub-areas around the region of Aberystwyth located in Mid-Wales. The dataset of composed of 0-5 (or 0-10) cm soil moisture, soil temperature, precipitation, and other ancillary data. WSMN data are provided openly to the public via the International Soil Moisture Network (ISMN) platform. At present, WSMN is also rapidly expanding thanks to funding obtained recently which allows more monitoring sites to be added to the network to the wider community interested in using its data.

  13. Manufacturing technology of integrated textile-based sensor networks for in situ monitoring applications of composite wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haentzsche, Eric; Mueller, Ralf; Huebner, Matthias; Ruder, Tristan; Unger, Reimar; Nocke, Andreas; Cherif, Chokri

    2016-10-01

    Based on in situ strain sensors consisting of piezo-resistive carbon filament yarns (CFYs), which have been successfully integrated into textile reinforcement structures during their textile-technological manufacturing process, a continuous load of fibre-reinforced plastic (FRP) components has been realised. These sensors are also suitable for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. The two-dimensional sensor layout is made feasible by the usage of a modular warp yarn path manipulation unit. Using a functional model of a small wind turbine blade in thermoset composite design, the sensor function for basic SHM applications (e.g. static load monitoring) are demonstrated. Any mechanical loads along the pressure or suction side of the wind turbine blade can be measured and calculated via a correlative change in resistance of the CFYs within the textile reinforcement plies. Performing quasi-static load tests on both tensile specimen and full-scale wind turbine blade, elementary results have been obtained concerning electro-mechanical behaviour and spatial resolution of global and even local static stresses according to the CFY sensor integration length. This paper demonstrates the great potential of textile-based and textile-technological integrated sensors in reinforcement structures for future SHM applications of FRPs.

  14. In-situ monitoring of pitting corrosion on vertically positioned 304 stainless steel by analyzing acoustic-emission energy parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Kaige; Jung, Woo-Sang; Byeon, Jai-Won

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pitting process in vertically positioned 304 SS is investigated by AE energy. • Gravity-influenced elongated pit, crack and rupture of pit cover were observed. • Hydrogen bubble evolution and pit covers rupturing were separately monitored by AE. • Four stages of AE energy were correlated with observed pitting mechanism. - Abstract: The acoustic emission (AE) energy was analyzed to monitor the pitting process on a vertically positioned 304-stainless steel. The gravity-dependent morphology of the elongated corrosion pits was observed. A scatter plot of the duration and energy indicated two AE clusters with different energy levels. There was a time delay after the detection of the low-energy hydrogen-bubble signals. Subsequently, high-energy signals were observed, whose AE source was attributed to large-scale cracks formed during the rupture of the elongated pit cover. An in-situ analysis of the AE energy evolution provided detailed insights into the corrosion process in relation to the specimen position.

  15. Monitoring and Modeling Crop Health and Water Use via in-situ, Airborne and Space-based Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    The accurate retrieval of plant water use, health and function together with soil state and condition, represent key objectives in the management and monitoring of large-scale agricultural production. In regions of water shortage or stress, understanding the sustainable use of available water supplies is critical. Unfortunately, this need is all too often limited by a lack of reliable observations. Techniques that balance the demand for reliable ground-based data with the rapid retrieval of spatially distributed crop characteristics represent a needed line of research. Data from in-situ monitoring coupled with advances in satellite retrievals of key land surface variables, provide the information necessary to characterize many crop health and water use features, including evaporation, leaf-chlorophyll and other common vegetation indices. With developments in UAV and quadcopter solutions, the opportunity to bridge the spatio-temporal gap between satellite and ground based sensing now exists, along with the capacity for customized retrievals of crop information. While there remain challenges in the routine application of autonomous airborne systems, the state of current technology and sensor developments provide the capacity to explore the operational potential. While this presentation will focus on the multi-scale estimation of crop-water use and crop-health characteristics from satellite-based sensors, the retrieval of high resolution spatially distributed information from near-surface airborne and ground-based systems will also be examined.

  16. Application of electrical capacitance measurement for in situ monitoring of competitive interactions between maize and weed plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cseresnyés, I.; Takács, T.; Füzy, A.; Végh, K.R.; Lehoczky, E.

    2016-11-01

    Applicability of root electrical capacitance (EC) measurement for monitoring of crop–weed competition was studied in a pot experiment. Maize (Zea mays L.) was grown both alone and with Echinochloa crus-galli or Abutilon theophrasti in different densities with regular measurement of root EC. Plants were harvested 42 days after planting to determine above- and belowground biomass. Depending on weed density, E. crus-galli-A. theophrasti interaction reduced the root EC of maize by 22–66% and 3–57%, respectively. Competitive effect of crop on weeds and intraspecific competition among weeds could also be detected by EC values: E. crus-galli was less sensitive both to the presence of maize and to intraspecific competition than A. theophrasti. Strong linear correlations between root dry mass and root EC for crop and weeds (with R2 from 0.901 to 0.956) were obtained by regression analyses at the end of the experiment. EC monitoring informed us on the emergence time of competition: E. crus-galli interfered with maize root growth a week earlier then A. theophrasti, and increasing weed densities accelerated the emergence of competition. In conclusion, the simple, non-destructive EC method should be considered a potential in situ technique for pot studies on crop–weed competition, which may partially substitute the intrusive techniques commonly used in agricultural researches. (Author)

  17. A novel headspace gas chromatographic method for in situ monitoring of monomer conversion during polymerization in an emulsion environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Xin-Sheng; Zhong, Jin-Feng; Hu, Hui-Chao

    2012-05-18

    This paper describes a novel multiple-headspace extraction/gas chromatographic (MHE-GC) technique for monitoring monomer conversion during a polymerization reaction in a water-based emulsion environment. The polymerization reaction of methyl methacrylate (MMA) in an aqueous emulsion is used as an example. The reaction was performed in a closed headspace sample vial (as a mini-reactor), with pentane as a tracer. In situ monitoring of the vapor concentration of the tracer, employing a multiple headspace extraction (sampling) scheme, coupled to a GC, makes it possible to quantitatively follow the conversion of MMA during the early stages of polymerization. Data on the integrated amount of the tracer vapor released from the monomer droplet phase during the polymerization is described by a mathematic equation from which the monomer conversion can be calculated. The present method is simple, automated and economical, and provides an efficient tool in the investigation of the reaction kinetics and effects of the reaction conditions on the early stage of polymerization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. In-situ monitoring of deformation of clayey and volcanic sequences in the lacustrine plain of Iztapalapa, Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreon-Freyre, D.; Cerca, M.; Barrientos, B.; Gutierrez, R.; Blancas, D.

    2012-12-01

    Major cities of Central Mexico with lowering of land elevation problems are located in inter-volcanic and fault bounded basins within the central Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). The most representative and studied case of ground deformation is Mexico City, where the Iztapalapa Municipality presents the highest population density. This area is located over the geological contact between the "Sierra de Santa Catarina" volcanic range and a lacustrine plain. Filling of lacustrine basins includes silty and clayey sediments as well as pyroclastic deposits (coarse and fine grained) and volcanic rocks layers. We used Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and MASW prospection to evaluate contrasts in the physical properties of fine grained soils and identify geometry of the deformational features and implemented a mechanical system for in situ monitoring in fractured sites. Deformational features in this basin reflect an interplay between the geological history (depositional conditions), load history, seismic activity, and faulting. Plastic mechanical behaviour predominates in these clayey sediments and differential deformation locally triggers brittle fracturing and/or subsidence of the surface. In this work we present the results of monitoring and characterization of ground deformation and fracturing in different sequences, our results show a dynamic interplay between the mechanisms of ground fracturing and the stress history of sedimentary sequences. Relating the mechanical behaviour of the studied sequences with variations of physical and geological properties should be taken into account to estimate land level lowering and risk of fracturing for urban development planning.

  19. In situ corrosion monitoring of PC structures with distributed hybrid carbon fiber reinforced polymer sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C. Q.; Wu, Z. S.

    2007-08-01

    Firstly, the fabrication and sensing properties of hybrid carbon fiber reinforced polymer (HCFRP) composite sensors are addressed. In order to provide a distributed sensing manner, the HCFRP sensors were divided into multi-zones with electrodes, and each zone was regarded as a separate sensor. Secondly, their application is studied to monitor the steel corrosion of prestressed concrete (PC) beams. The HCFRP sensors with different gauge lengths were mounted on a PC tendon, steel bar and embedded in tensile and compressive sides of the PC beam. The experiment was carried out under an electric accelerated corrosion and a constant load of about 54 kN. The results reveal that the corrosion of the PC tendon can be monitored through measuring the electrical resistance (ER) change of the HCFRP sensors. For the sensors embedded in tensile side of the PC beam, their ER increases as the corrosion progresses, whereas for the sensors embedded in compressive side, their ER decreases with corrosion time. Moreover, the strains due to the corrosion can be obtained based on the ER change and calibration curves of HCFRP sensors. The strains measured with traditional strain gauges agree with the strains calculated from the ER changes of HCFRP sensors. The electrical behavior of the zones where the corrosion was performed is much different from those of the other zones. In these zones, either there exist jumps in ER, or the ER increases with a much larger rate than those of the other zones. Distributed corrosion monitoring for PC structures is thus demonstrated with the application of HCFRP sensors through a proper installation of multi-electrodes.

  20. In-situ IR monitoring of the formation of Zr-fumarate MOF

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ren, Jianwei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available monitoring of the formation of Zr-fumarate MOF Authors: Jianwei Ren, Nicholas M. Musyoka, Henrietta W. Langmi, Brian C. North, Mkhulu Mathe, Wan Pang, Mingjie Wang, Joseph Walker PII: S0169-4332(17)30296-9 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1016/j.apsusc.2017....01.271 Reference: APSUSC 35066 To appear in: APSUSC Received date: 21-9-2016 Revised date: 20-1-2017 Accepted date: 25-1-2017 Please cite this article as: Jianwei Ren, Nicholas M.Musyoka, Henrietta W.Langmi, Brian C.North, Mkhulu Mathe, Wan Pang, Mingjie Wang...

  1. In-Situ Real Time Monitoring and Control of Mold Making and Filling Processes: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed Abdelrahman; Kenneth Currie

    2010-12-22

    This project presents a model for addressing several objectives envisioned by the metal casting industries through the integration of research and educational components. It provides an innovative approach to introduce technologies for real time characterization of sand molds, lost foam patterns and monitoring of the mold filling process. The technology developed will enable better control over the casting process. It is expected to reduce scrap and variance in the casting quality. A strong educational component is integrated into the research plan to utilize increased awareness of the industry professional, the potential benefits of the developed technology, and the potential benefits of cross cutting technologies.

  2. A Review of In-Situ and Remote Sensing Technologies to Monitor Water and Sanitation Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Andres

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs, announced in September 2015, present a vision of achieving a higher level of human health and well-being worldwide by the year 2030. The SDG targets specific to water and sanitation call for more detailed monitoring and response to understand the coverage and quality of safely managed sources. It is hoped that improved monitoring of water and sanitation interventions will reveal more cost-effective and efficient ways of meeting the SDGs. In this paper, we review the landscape of approaches that can be used to support and improve on the water and sanitation targets SDG 6.1, “By 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all”, and SDG 6.2, “By 2030, achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation, paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations”.

  3. In-Situ NDE Characterization of Kevlar and Carbon Composite Micromechanics for Improved COPV Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess M.; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2009-01-01

    This project is a subtask of a multi-center project to advance the state-of-the-art by developing NDE techniques that are capable of evaluating stress rupture (SR) degradation in Kevlar/epoxy (K/Ep) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), and damage progression in carbon/epoxy (C/Ep) COPVs. In this subtask, acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during intermittent load hold tensile testing of K/Ep and C/Ep composite tow materials-of-construction used in COPV fabrication were analyzed to monitor progressive damage during the approach to tensile failure. Insight into the progressive damage of composite tow was gained by monitoring AE event rate, energy, source location, and frequency. Source location based on arrival time data was used to discern between significant AE attributable to microstructural damage and spurious AE attributable to background and grip noise. One of the significant findings was the observation of increasing violation of the Kaiser effect (Felicity ratio < 1.0) with damage accumulation.

  4. Multielemental analysis of tissues from Cangrande della Scala, Prince of Verona, in the 14th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostoli, Pietro; De Palma, Giuseppe; Catalani, Simona; Bortolotti, Federica; Tagliaro, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Cangrande della Scala, Prince of Verona (Italy), died suddenly shortly after his triumph in the battle of Treviso (July 18, 1329). Thus, in the frame of a multidisciplinary paleo-pathological study, we carried out a multielemental analysis on the Prince's tissue specimens, including hair, liver, muscle, and bone, in order to characterize a multitissue profile of metallic elements in a nobleman of the 14th century. Biological specimens were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. We were able to rule out arsenic poisoning as the primary cause of death. High levels of gold and silver in both hair and liver samples were probably due to prolonged contact of the mummy with precious metals in the funeral garments. High lead concentrations in both liver and bone tissue can be traced back to the ingestion of contaminated food and alcoholic beverages. Most of the essential elements were in the normal range of values for contemporary living people. The low arsenic and chromium levels in the Prince's tissues as compared to modern people would be suggestive of raised concentrations of both the elements in the present era, which are likely due to industrial pollution.

  5. Multi-elemental imaging of paraffin-embedded human samples by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, S.; Trichard, F.; Busser, B.; Sabatier-Vincent, M.; Pelascini, F.; Pinel, N.; Templier, I.; Charles, J.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2017-07-01

    Chemical elements play central roles for physiological homeostasis in human cells, and their dysregulation might lead to a certain number of pathologies. Novel imaging techniques that improve the work of pathologists for tissue analysis and diagnostics are continuously sought. We report the use of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) to perform multi-elemental images of human paraffin-embedded skin samples on the entire biopsy scale in a complementary and compatible way with microscope histopathological examination. A specific instrumental configuration is proposed in order to detect most of the elements of medical interest (i.e. P, Al, Mg, Na, Zn, Si, Fe, and Cu). As an example of medical application, we selected and analysed skin biopsies, including healthy skin tissue, cutaneous metastasis of melanoma, Merkel-cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Clear distinctions in the distribution of chemical elements are observed from the different samples investigated. This study demonstrates the high complementarity of LIBS elemental imaging with conventional histopathology, opening new opportunities for any medical application involving metals.

  6. Monitoring of high temperature area by resistivity tomography during in-situ heating test in sedimentary soft rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kenji; Suzuki, Koichi; Ikenoya, Takafumi; Takakura, Nozomu; Tani, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    One of the major issues in disposal of nuclear waste is that the long term behaviors of sedimentary soft rocks can be affected by various environmental factors such as temperature, mechanical conditions or hydraulic conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a method for evaluating the long term stability of caverns in sedimentary soft rocks as subjected to changes of environment. We have conducted in-situ heating test to evaluate the influence of high temperature to the surrounding rock mass at a depth of 50 m. The well with a diameter of 30 cm and 60 cm of height, was drilled and filled with groundwater. The heater was installed in the well for heating the surrounding rock mass. During the heating, temperature and deformation around the well were measured. To evaluate the influence of heating on sedimentary soft rocks, it is important to monitor the extent of heated area. Resistivity monitoring is thought to be effective to map the extent of the high temperature area. So we have conducted resistivity tomography during the heating test. The results demonstrated that the resistivity of the rock mass around the heating well decreased and this area was gradually expanded from the heated area during the heating. The decreasing rate of resistivity on temperature is correlated to that of laboratory experimental result and existing empirical formula between aqueous solution resistivity and temperature. Resistivity is changed by many other factors, but it is expected that resistivity change by other factors is very few in this test. This suggests that high temperature area is detected and spatial distribution of temperature can be mapped by resistivity tomography. So resistivity tomography is expected to be one of the promising methods to monitor the area heated by nuclear waste. (author)

  7. In situ monitoring of localized shear stress and fluid flow within developing tissue constructs by Doppler optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yali; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2008-02-01

    Mechanical stimuli can be introduced to three dimensional (3D) cell cultures by use of perfusion bioreactor. Especially in musculoskeletal tissues, shear stress caused by fluid flow generally increase extra-cellular matrix (ECM) production and cell proliferation. The relationship between the shear stress and the tissue development in situ is complicated because of the non-uniform pore distribution within the cell-seeded scaffold. In this study, we firstly demonstrated that Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) is capable of monitoring localized fluid flow and shear stress in the complex porous scaffold by examining their variation trends at perfusion rate of 5, 8, 10 and 12 ml/hr. Then, we developed the 3D porous cellular constructs, cell-seeded chitosan scaffolds monitored during several days by DOCT. The fiber based fourier domain DOCT employed a 1300 nm superluminescent diode with a bandwidth of 52 nm and a xyz resolution of 20×20×15 μm in free space. This setup allowed us not only to assess the cell growth and ECM deposition by observing their different scattering behaviors but also to further investigate how the cell attachment and ECM production has the effect on the flow shear stress and the relationship between flow rate and shear stress in the developing tissue construct. The possibility to monitor continuously the constructs under perfusion will easily indicate the effect of flow rate or shear stress on the cell viability and cell proliferation, and then discriminate the perfusion parameters affecting the pre-tissue formation rate growth.

  8. Novel XRD technique and equipment for in-situ monitoring of phase transformations in lithium batteries during cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolov, J.; Howlett, P.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Safe, rechargeable batteries utilising a lithium metal electrode have not been realised due to phenomena, which occur on the lithium surface during the cycling of a battery. Lithium ion conduction inhomogeneities through the surface film give rise to uneven deposition of lithium, which can result in short circuits. The large potential increase in energy density that the use of the lithium electrode represents makes the nature of the surface film of interest to battery researchers. The lithium surface is highly reactive, particularly in the case of electrodes with a rough surface deposit. This presents difficulties to researchers hoping to obtain representative measurements of the lithium surface and requires the use of environmental sample chambers and in-situ techniques. X-ray diffraction techniques have been used to probe changes in cathode materials (typically transition metal oxides) for lithium batteries, but to our knowledge has not been successfully used to study changes taking place on the lithium surface during cycling. We present early results from work we have undertaken to develop a technique for characterising the surface film on lithium battery electrodes. The instrumentation was set-up as follows. An XRD was fitted with an INEL CPS 120 position sensitive detector (PSD), multilayer mirror and environmental chamber. The latter was specially developed in our laboratory for the purpose of these experiments. The lithium cells were sealed in laminated foil. Cycled and uncycled cells were investigated. Different radiation sources were used (Cu, Co and Cr). The in-situ measurements aiming at monitoring the phase transitions of cycled/uncycled cells at different angles (including grazing angles) in time were carried out in both transmission and reflection mode. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  9. Fluorescence in situ hybridization is superior for monitoring Epstein Barr viral load in infectious mononucleosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Pengfei; Zhang, Meili; Wang, Wei; Dai, Yafei; Sai, Buqing; Sun, Jun; Wang, Lujuan; Wang, Fan; Li, Guiyuan; Xiang, Juanjuan

    2017-05-03

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV) plays a causal role in some diseases, including infectious mononucleosis, lymphoproliferative diseases and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Detection of EBV infection has been shown to be a useful tool for diagnosing EBV-related diseases. In the present study, we compared the performance of molecular tests, including fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and EBV real-time PCR, to those of serological assays for the detection of EBV infection. Thirty-eight patients with infectious mononucleosis (IM) were enrolled, of whom 31 were diagnosed with a mild type, and seven were diagnosed with IM with haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and chronic active EBV infection. Twenty healthy controls were involved in the study. The atypical lymphocytes in peripheral blood were detected under a microscope and the percentage of positive cells was calculated. EBV DNA load in peripheral blood was detected using real-time PCR. The FISH assay was developed to detect the EBV genome from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Other diagnosis methods including the heterophil agglutination (HA) test and EBV-VCA-IgM test, to detect EBV were also compared. SPSS17.0 was used for statistical analysis. In all, 5-41% atypical lymphocytes were found among the PBMC in mild IM patients, whereas 8-51% atypical lymphocytes were found in IM patients with haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and chronic active EBV infection patients. There was no significant difference in the ratios of atypical lymphoma between patients of the different types. We observed that 71.2% of mild IM patients and 85.7% of IM patients with haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and chronic active EBV infection patients were positive for EBV-VCA-IgM. EBV-VCA-IgM was negative in all healthy control subjects. In addition, 67.1% of mild IM patients tested heterophile antibody positive, whereas 71.4% of IM patients with haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and chronic active EBV infection tested positive. EBV

  10. Development of Advanced In-Situ Techniques for Chemistry Monitoring and Corrosion Mitigation in SCWO Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.D.

    2000-01-01

    Super Critical Water Oxidation (SCWO) is a promising technology for destroying highly toxic organic waste (including physiological agents) and for reducing the volume of DOE's low-level nuclear waste. The major problem inhibiting the wide implementation of SCWO is the lack of fundamental knowledge about various physico-chemical and corrosion processes that occur in SCW environments. In particular, the lack of experimental techniques for accurately monitoring important parameters, such as pH, corrosion potential and corrosion rate, has severely hampered the development of a quantitative understanding of the degradation of materials in this extraordinarily aggressive environment. Accordingly, the principal objective of the present program has been to develop new, innovative methods for accurately measuring parameters that characterize corrosion processes under super critical conditions

  11. Sensor fabrication method for in situ temperature and humidity monitoring of light emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Su, Ay; Liu, Yin-Chieh; Chan, Pin-Cheng; Lin, Chia-Hung

    2010-01-01

    In this work micro temperature and humidity sensors are fabricated to measure the junction temperature and humidity of light emitting diodes (LED). The junction temperature is frequently measured using thermal resistance measurement technology. The weakness of this method is that the timing of data capture is not regulated by any standard. This investigation develops a device that can stably and continually measure temperature and humidity. The device is light-weight and can monitor junction temperature and humidity in real time. Using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), this study minimizes the size of the micro temperature and humidity sensors, which are constructed on a stainless steel foil substrate (40 μm-thick SS-304). The micro temperature and humidity sensors can be fixed between the LED chip and frame. The sensitivities of the micro temperature and humidity sensors are 0.06±0.005 (Ω/°C) and 0.033 pF/%RH, respectively.

  12. Hot Ta filament resistance in-situ monitoring under silane containing atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunsky, D.; Schroeder, B.

    2008-01-01

    Monitoring of the electrical resistance of the Ta catalyst during the hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of thin silicon films gives information about filament condition. Using Ta filaments for silane decomposition not only the well known strong changes at the cold ends, but also changes of the central part of the filament were observed. Three different phenomena can be distinguished: silicide (stoichiometric Ta X Si Y alloys) growth on the filament surfaces, diffusion of Si into the Ta filament and thick silicon deposits (TSD) formation on the filament surface. The formation of different tantalum silicides on the surface as well as the in-diffusion of silicon increase the filament resistance, while the TSDs form additional electrical current channels and that result in a decrease of the filament resistance. Thus, the filament resistance behaviour during ageing is the result of the competition between these two processes

  13. Acrylamide inverse miniemulsion polymerization: in situ, real-time monitoring using nir spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. E. Colmán

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the ability of on-line NIR spectroscopy for the prediction of the evolution of monomer concentration, conversion and average particle diameter in acrylamide inverse miniemulsion polymerization was evaluated. The spectral ranges were chosen as those representing the decrease in concentration of monomer. An increase in the baseline shift indicated that the NIR spectra were affected by particle size. Multivariate partial least squares calibration models were developed to relate NIR spectra collected by the immersion probe with off-line conversion and polymer particle size data. The results showed good agreement between off-line data and values predicted by the NIR calibration models and these latter were also able to detect different types of operational disturbances. These results indicate that it is possible to monitor variables of interest during acrylamide inverse miniemulsion polymerizations.

  14. Modern limnology of two lakes in the Tibetan Plateau - evidence from in-situ monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M.; Li, X.; Lei, L.; He, Y.; Hou, J.

    2013-12-01

    The mechanisms of climate change in the Tibetan Plateau, known as the Third Pole, receive more and more attention due to its unique geographic location and the influence of multiple climate systems. Among the paleoclimate archives, widespread lakes provide abundant information on past climate changes and have been investigated for decades. Though many high-quality paleolimnological records have been reported in the Tibetan Plateau, little is known about the modern limnological processes in most Tibetan lakes as most lakes are difficult to access and not ready for long-term monitoring. We have installed a series of temperature data logger at different water levels in two Tibetan lakes, Bangong Co and Dagze Co in July 2012 to monitor hourly variability of temperature profile. Bangong Co (33.5°N, 79.8°E, 4245 m asl) is a freshwater lake (salinity ~0.5 g/L) in the westernmost Tibetan Plateau, receiving melt water from mountain glaciers in the basin. Dagze Co (31.9°N, 87.5°E, 4470 m asl) is saline lake (salinity ~15 g/L) in the central Tibetan Plateau, mostly fed by precipitation. In combination with the climate data in the nearby weather stations, we wish to understand the modern limnological processes in the two lakes and their potential effect on the lake biology, sedimentation, and sedimentary biomarkers. Based on the data collected for the first calendar year (Jul 2012 ~ Aug 2013), we anticipate to understand: 1) the influence of climate on the hydrological processes in high elevation lakes; 2) the difference in the metalimnion in meltwater-fed lake (Bangong Co) and precipitation-fed lake (Dagze Co) and their potential effect on the lake biology; 3) the difference in the spring turnover and fall turnover and the effect of meltwater and salinity.

  15. Development of an online biosensor for in situ monitoring of chlorine dioxide gas disinfection efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Busto-Ramos, M.; Budzik, M.; Corvalan, C.; Morgan, M.; Nivens, D.; Applegate, B. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Food Science; Turco, R. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Agronomy

    2008-03-15

    A prototype bioluminescence-based biosensor was designed and constructed to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO{sub 2}) gas under various treatment conditions. The biosensor consisted of a bioluminescent bioreporter (Pseudomonas fluorescens 5RL), an optical transducer (photomultiplier tube), and a light-tight chamber housing, the bioreporter and the transducer. The bioluminescent recombinant P. fluorescens 5RL in the biosensor allowed for online monitoring of bioluminescence during ClO{sub 2} gas disinfection. Experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of the two key physical parameters associated with ClO{sub 2} disinfection: relative humidity (40, 60, 80%) and ClO{sub 2} gas concentration (0.5, 1.0, 1.6, 2.1 mg/l) on the bioreporter. Results showed that increasing concentrations of ClO{sub 2} gas corresponded to a faster decrease in luminescence. The rates of luminescence decrease from P. fluorescens 5RL, and the log reduction time (LRT, time required to obtain 1-log reduction in luminescence) were calculated for each treatment tested. The LRT values of luminescence were 103, 78, 53, and 35 s for 0.5, 1.0, 1.6, and 2.1 mg/l of ClO{sub 2} gas treatment, respectively, at 78% relative humidity. The gas concentration which caused a tenfold change in LRT (z value) for luminescence of P. fluorescens 5RL was 3.4 mg/l of ClO{sub 2}. The prototype biosensor showed potential for many applications, such as monitoring real-time microbial inactivation and understanding parameters that influence the efficacy of gaseous decontamination procedures. (orig.)

  16. Sensor Fabrication Method for in Situ Temperature and Humidity Monitoring of Light Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Yuan Lee

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work micro temperature and humidity sensors are fabricated to measure the junction temperature and humidity of light emitting diodes (LED. The junction temperature is frequently measured using thermal resistance measurement technology. The weakness of this method is that the timing of data capture is not regulated by any standard. This investigation develops a device that can stably and continually measure temperature and humidity. The device is light-weight and can monitor junction temperature and humidity in real time. Using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS, this study minimizes the size of the micro temperature and humidity sensors, which are constructed on a stainless steel foil substrate (40 μm-thick SS-304. The micro temperature and humidity sensors can be fixed between the LED chip and frame. The sensitivities of the micro temperature and humidity sensors are 0.06 ± 0.005 (Ω/°C and 0.033 pF/%RH, respectively.

  17. Development of self-powered wireless high temperature electrochemical sensor for in situ corrosion monitoring of coal-fired power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Naing Naing; Crowe, Edward; Liu, Xingbo

    2015-03-01

    Reliable wireless high temperature electrochemical sensor technology is needed to provide in situ corrosion information for optimal predictive maintenance to ensure a high level of operational effectiveness under the harsh conditions present in coal-fired power generation systems. This research highlights the effectiveness of our novel high temperature electrochemical sensor for in situ coal ash hot corrosion monitoring in combination with the application of wireless communication and an energy harvesting thermoelectric generator (TEG). This self-powered sensor demonstrates the successful wireless transmission of both corrosion potential and corrosion current signals to a simulated control room environment. Copyright © 2014 ISA. All rights reserved.

  18. In Situ Monitoring of Pb2+ Leaching from the Galvanic Joint Surface in a Prepared Chlorinated Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiangmeng; Armas, Stephanie M; Soliman, Mikhael; Lytle, Darren A; Chumbimuni-Torres, Karin; Tetard, Laurene; Lee, Woo Hyoung

    2018-02-20

    A novel method using a micro-ion-selective electrode (micro-ISE) technique was developed for in situ lead monitoring at the water-metal interface of a brass-leaded solder galvanic joint in a prepared chlorinated drinking water environment. The developed lead micro-ISE (100 μm tip diameter) showed excellent performance toward soluble lead (Pb 2+ ) with sensitivity of 22.2 ± 0.5 mV decade -1 and limit of detection (LOD) of 1.22 × 10 -6 M (0.25 mg L -1 ). The response time was less than 10 s with a working pH range of 2.0-7.0. Using the lead micro-ISE, lead concentration microprofiles were measured from the bulk to the metal surface (within 50 μm) over time. Combined with two-dimensional (2D) pH mapping, this work clearly demonstrated that Pb 2+ ions build-up across the lead anode surface was substantial, nonuniform, and dependent on local surface pH. A large pH gradient (ΔpH = 6.0) developed across the brass and leaded-tin solder joint coupon. Local pH decreases were observed above the leaded solder to a pH as low as 4.0, indicating it was anodic relative to the brass. The low pH above the leaded solder supported elevated lead levels where even small local pH differences of 0.6 units (ΔpH = 0.6) resulted in about four times higher surface lead concentrations (42.9 vs 11.6 mg L -1 ) and 5 times higher fluxes (18.5 × 10 -6 vs 3.5 × 10 -6 mg cm -2 s -1 ). Continuous surface lead leaching monitoring was also conducted for 16 h.

  19. In situ monitoring of urban air in Córdoba, Argentina using the Tradescantia-micronucleus (Trad-MCN) bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, H. A.; Pignata, M. L.; Saldiva, P. H. N.

    During the last decades, a significant deterioration of ambient air quality has been observed in Argentina. However, the availability of air pollution monitoring stations is still limited to only few cities. In this study, we investigated the genotoxicity of ambient levels of air pollution in Córdoba using the Tradescantia micronucleus assay. The experiment was performed from October, 2004 to April 2005. Pots with Tradescantia pallida were placed in three sites: Córdoba city center, characterized by important avenues with high traffic activity (cars, taxis, and public transport vehicles); the university campus, along a side road with heavy traffic of gasoline and diesel powered vehicles, buses and trucks; and a residential area, with no significant local sources of air pollution. Twenty young T. pallida inflorescences were collected from each sampling site in November, February and April. Micronuclei frequencies were determined in early tetrads of pollen mother cells and expressed as MCN/100 tetrads. Simultaneously, the environmental levels of total suspended particles (24 h mean) were determined for each site. A significant difference in micronuclei frequency was observed among sites ( p=0.036). Post-hoc analysis revealed that the residential area exhibited a lower micronuclei frequency than the university and city center areas. In conclusion, we found that the gradients of ambient air pollution of Córdoba are associated with changes in the spontaneous micronuclei frequency of Tradescantia pollen mother cells. These results indicate that in situ biomonitoring with higher plants may be useful for characterizing air pollution in areas without instrumental monitoring techniques, or for exploring the distribution of air contaminants at a microscale.

  20. In Situ Monitoring and Modeling of the Solution-Mediated Polymorphic Transformation of Rifampicin: From Form II to Form I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Nannan; Hou, Baohong; Wang, Na; Xiao, Yan; Huang, Jingjing; Guo, Yanmei; Zong, Shuyi; Hao, Hongxun

    2018-01-01

    In this article, the solution-mediated polymorphic transformation of rifampicin was investigated and simulated in 3 solvents at 30°C. The solid-state form I and form II of rifampicin was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). To explore the relative stability, solubility data of form I and form II of rifampicin in butan-1-ol were determined using a dynamical method. In addition, Raman spectroscopy and focused beam reflectance measurement were used to in situ monitor the transformation of rifampicin from form II to form I. The liquid state concentration of rifampicin was measured by UV spectroscopic method. To investigate the effect of solvent on transformation, the transformation experiments were carried out in 3 solvents. Furthermore, a mathematical model was built to describe the kinetics of dissolution, nucleation, and growth processes during transformation by using experimental data. By combination of experimental and simulation results, it was found that the transformation process of rifampicin is controlled by dissolution of form II in heptane, whereas the transformation in hexane and octane was firstly controlled by dissolution of solid-state form and then controlled by growth of form I. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the in situ, time-integrated DGT technique by monitoring changes in heavy metal concentrations in estuarine waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, R.J.K.; Teasdale, P.R.; Warnken, J.; Jordan, M.A.; Arthur, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Various natural and anthropogenic processes influence heavy metal concentrations within estuaries. In situ, time-integrated DGT measurements made over concurrent tidal phases found significantly higher concentrations of Cu (probability p = 0.017), Zn (p = 0.003) and Ni (p = 0.003) during the flood phase, because the incoming tide passes several point sources. DGT-reactive Cu concentrations significantly decreased with increased tidal-flushing and vice versa within a marina (correlation r = -0.788, p = 0.02). DGT measurements also recorded significant increases in Cu (4 out of 4 sites, p < 0.001) and Zn (3 out of 4 sites, p ≤ 0.015) after a 24 mm rainfall event. Finally, DGT-reactive Cu increased significantly (p < 0.001) during peak boating times, due to increased numbers of Cu-antifouled boats. This study demonstrates that, with judicious selection of deployment times, DGT measurements enable changes in heavy metal concentrations to be related to various cycles and events within estuaries. - Demonstration of the usefulness of DGT as a monitoring tool for heavy metals in dynamic estuaries

  2. Smart multifunctional nanoagents for in situ monitoring of small molecules with a switchable affinity towards biomedical targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, Konstantin G.; Cherkasov, Vladimir R.; Nikitina, Irina L.; Babenyshev, Andrey V.; Nikitin, Maxim P.

    2018-02-01

    The great diversity of nanomaterials provides ample opportunities for constructing effective agents for biomedical applications ranging from biosensing to drug delivery. Multifunctional nanoagents that combine several features in a single particle are of special interest due to capabilities that substantially exceed those of molecular drugs. An ideal theranostic agent should simultaneously be an advanced biosensor to identify a disease and report the diagnosis and a biomedical actuator to treat the disease. While many approaches were developed to load a nanoparticle with various drugs for actuation of the diseased cells (e.g., to kill them), the nanoparticle-based approaches for the localized biosensing with real-time reporting of the marker concentration severely lag behind. Here, we show a smart in situ nanoparticle-based biosensor/actuator system that dynamically and reversibly changes its structural and optical properties in response to a small molecule marker to allow real-time monitoring of the marker concentration and adjustment of the system ability to bind its biomedical target. Using the synergistic combination of signal readout based on the localized surface plasmon resonance and an original method of fabrication of smart ON/OFF-switchable nanoagents, we demonstrate reversible responsiveness of the system to a model small molecule marker (antibiotic chloramphenicol) in a wide concentration range. The proposed approach can be used for the development of advanced multifunctional nanoagents for theranostic applications.

  3. A novel method for in-situ estimation of time constant for core temperature monitoring thermocouples of operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sylvia, J.I.; Chandar, S. Clement Ravi; Velusamy, K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Core temperature sensor was mathematically modeled. • Ramp signal generated during reactor operating condition is used. • Procedure and methodology has been demonstrated by applying it to FBTR. • Same technique will be implemented for all fast reactors. - Abstract: Core temperature monitoring system is an important component of reactor protection system in the current generation fast reactors. In this system, multiple thermocouples are housed inside a thermowell of fuel subassemblies. Response time of the thermocouple assembly forms an important input for safety analysis of fast reactor and hence frequent calibration/time constant estimation is essential. In fast reactors the central fuel subassembly is provided with bare fast response thermocouples to detect under cooling events in reactor and take proper safety action. On the other hand, thermocouples in thermowell are mainly used for blockage detection in individual fuel subassemblies. The time constant of thermocouples in thermowell can drift due to creep, vibration and thermal fatigue of the thermowell assembly. A novel method for in-situ estimation of time constant is proposed. This method uses the Safety Control Rod Accelerated Mechanism (SCRAM) or lowering of control Rod (LOR) signals of the reactor along with response of the central subassembly thermocouples as reference data. Validation of the procedure has been demonstrated by applying it to FBTR

  4. Multielemental accumulation and its intracellular distribution in tissues of some aquatic birds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Dong-Ha; Anan, Yasumi; Ikemoto, Tokutaka; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2005-01-01

    This study was aimed at determining multielemental concentration and its intracellular distribution in selected tissues of cormorant and waterfowl species. Non-essential elements such as Hg, Tl, Cd, Pb and V in tissues were generally consistent with those in ingested items, indicating the significance of food sources of non-essential metal accumulation in great cormorants and mallards. Great cormorants and four waterfowl species examined reflected natural background levels of toxic metals such as Cd, Hg and Pb as well as some essential elements, indicating no specific metal exposure from local sources. Most of Cu, Zn, Se, Rb, Ag, Cd, Cs, and Hg contents were present in the hepatocytosolic fraction, whereas a large percentage of V and Mo were present in insoluble fraction in great cormorant, mallard, and spot-billed duck. The major role of these subcelluar fractions in elemental regulation accounts for the high percentage contribution of each cellular fraction to the total metal contents. Cadmium and Cu are chiefly sequestered through binding to metallothioneins (MTs) of hepatocytosolic fraction in these three avian species. Both MTs and high-molecular-weight substance (HMWS) for Zn and low-molecular-weight substance (LMWS) for Rb were also involved in their sequestration in cytosolic fractions. Relatively different species-specific cytosolic substances were responsible for varying degrees of Ag, Mn, and Co accumulation. It is worth noting that these intracellular metal levels in birds are closely regulated by metal-associated cellular constituents. Therefore, risk assessment studies of metal accumulation in such wild birds should take intracellular metal distribution and specific cellular constituents into account

  5. Two-year study of atmospheric aerosols in Alta Floresta, Brazil: Multielemental composition and source apportionment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maenhaut, Willy; Fernandez-Jimenez, Maria-Teresa; Rajta, Istvan; Artaxo, Paulo

    2002-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected nearly continuously from August 1996 until September 1998 at Alta Floresta in a primary forest region of the Amazon basin, Brazil. The sampling device consisted of a stacked filter unit (SFU), which separates the aerosol into a coarse (2-10 μm equivalent aerodynamic diameter (EAD)) and a fine (<2 μm EAD) size fraction. The coarse and fine filters of all SFU samples (205 in total) were analysed for the particulate mass (PM), black carbon (BC), and up to 47 elements (from Na upward). The multielemental analyses were done by a combination of PIXE and instrumental neutron activation analysis. Absolute principal component analysis was used for source (source type) identification and apportionment. Five components were identified in the fine size fraction, i.e. mineral dust, a biomass burning (pyrogenic) component (with PM, BC, S, K, Zn, Br, Rb and I, having loadings in the range 0.7-0.9), a Na/Ca component, a biogenic component (with P), and an almost pure Pb component. On average 67% of the fine PM was attributed to the pyrogenic component, 14% to the mineral dust, 7% each to the biogenic and Na/Ca components, and 4% to the Pb component. The relative contribution from the pyrogenic aerosol varied substantially with season, however. It was generally between 60% and 100% during the dry season. During the wet season, on the other hand, it often became insignificant. During that season, most of the fine aerosol was attributed to the biogenic component

  6. Evaluation of pressed powders and thin section standards for multi-elemental analysis by conventional and micro-PIXE analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homma-Takeda, Shino; Iso, Hiroyuki; Ito, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    For multi-elemental analysis, various standards are used to quantify the elements consists of environmental and biological samples. In this paper two different configuration standards, pressed powders and thin section standards, were assessed for their purpose as standards by conventional and micro-PIXE analysis. Homogeneity of manganese, iron, zinc (Zn), copper and yttrium added to pressed powder standard materials were validated and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the X-ray intensity of the standards was 2 area and the metal concentration was acceptable. (author)

  7. In situ growth monitoring of AlGaN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors at 530 nm using a 633 nm laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Feng; Huang Lirong; Jiang Bo; Tong Liangzhu; Xu Wei; Liu Deming, E-mail: hlr5649@163.co [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, College of Opto-Electronics Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2010-09-15

    The metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of AlGaN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) with a reflection peak at 530 nm was in situ monitored using 633 nm laser reflectometry. Evolutions of in situ reflected reflectivity for different kinds of AlGaN/GaN DBR were simulated by the classical transfer matrix method. Two DBR samples, which have the same parameters as the simulated structures, were grown by MOCVD. The simulated and experimental results show that it is possible to evaluate the DBR parameters from the envelope shape of the in situ reflectivity spectrum. With the help of the 633 nm laser reflectometry, a DBR light emitting diode (LED) was grown. The room temperature photoluminescence spectra show that the reflection peak of the DBR in the LED is within the design region. (semiconductor devices)

  8. Design and implementation of a laser-based absorption spectroscopy sensor for in situ monitoring of biomass gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveros Salazar, David; Goldenstein, Christopher S.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Seiser, Reinhard; Cattolica, Robert J.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2017-12-01

    Research to demonstrate in situ laser-absorption-based sensing of H2O, CH4, CO2, and CO mole fraction is reported for the product gas line of a biomass gasifier. Spectral simulations were used to select candidate sensor wavelengths that optimize sensitive monitoring of the target species while minimizing interference from other species in the gas stream. A prototype sensor was constructed and measurements performed in the laboratory at Stanford to validate performance. Field measurements then were demonstrated in a pilot scale biomass gasifier at West Biofuels in Woodland, CA. The performance of a prototype sensor was compared for two sensor strategies: wavelength-scanned direct absorption (DA) and wavelength-scanned wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). The lasers used had markedly different wavelength tuning response to injection current, and modern distributed feedback lasers (DFB) with nearly linear tuning response to injection current were shown to be superior, leading to guidelines for laser selection for sensor fabrication. Non-absorption loss in the transmitted laser intensity from particulate scattering and window fouling encouraged the use of normalized WMS measurement schemes. The complications of using normalized WMS for relatively large values of absorbance and its mitigation are discussed. A method for reducing adverse sensor performance effects of a time-varying WMS background signal is also presented. The laser absorption sensor provided measurements with the sub-second time resolution needed for gasifier control and more importantly provided precise measurements of H2O in the gasification products, which can be problematic for the typical gas chromatography sensors used by industry.

  9. The management of scarce water resources using GNSS, InSAR and in-situ micro gravity measurements as monitoring tools

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wonnacott, R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available of Geomatics, Vol. 4, No. 3, August 2015 213  The management of scarce water resources using GNSS, InSAR and in-situ micro gravity measurements as monitoring tools Richard Wonnacott1, Chris Hartnady1, Jeanine Engelbrecht2 1Umvoto Africa (Pty) Ltd... shown to provide a useful tool for the measurement and monitoring of ground subsidence resulting from numerous natural and anthropogenic causes including the abstraction of groundwater and gas. Zerbini et al (2007) processed and combined data from a...

  10. Surface monitoring for pitting evolution into uniform corrosion on Cu-Ni-Zn ternary alloy in alkaline chloride solution: ex-situ LCM and in-situ SECM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Decheng; Dong, Chaofang; Zheng, Zhaoran; Mao, Feixiong; Xu, Aoni; Ni, Xiaoqing; Man, Cheng; Yao, Jizheng; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2018-05-01

    The evolution of the corrosion process on Cu-Ni-Zn alloy in alkaline chloride solution was investigated by in-situ scanning electrochemical microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ex-situ laser confocal microscopy, and the effects of ambient temperature and polarization time were also discussed. The results demonstrated a higher pitting nucleation rate and lower pit growth rate at low temperature. The ratio of pit depth to mouth diameter decreased with increasing pit volume and temperature, indicating that pits preferentially propagate in the horizontal direction rather than the vertical direction owing to the presence of corrosion products and deposited copper. The surface current was uniform and stabilized at approximately 2.2 nA during the passive stage, whereas the current increased after the pits were formed with the maximum approaching 3 nA. Increasing the temperature led to an increase in porous corrosion products (CuO, Zn(OH)2, and Ni(OH)2) and significantly increased the rate of transition from pitting to uniform corrosion. Dezincification corrosion was detected by energy dispersive spectrometry, and a mechanism for pitting transition into uniform corrosion induced by dezincification at the grain boundaries is proposed.

  11. In situ Volcanic Plume Monitoring with small Unmanned Aerial Systems for Cal/Val of Satellite Remote Sensing Data: CARTA-UAV 2013 Mission (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, J. A.; Pieri, D. C.; Bland, G.; Fladeland, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    The development of small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) with a variety of sensor packages, enables in situ and proximal remote sensing measurements of volcanic plumes. Using Costa Rican volcanoes as a Natural Laboratory, the University of Costa Rica as host institution, in collaboration with four NASA centers, have started an initiative to develop low-cost, field-deployable airborne platforms to perform volcanic gas & ash plume research, and in-situ volcanic monitoring in general, in conjunction with orbital assets and state-of-the-art models of plume transport and composition. Several gas sensors have been deployed into the active plume of Turrialba Volcano including a miniature mass spectrometer, and an electrochemical SO2 sensor system with temperature, pressure, relative humidity, and GPS sensors. Several different airborne platforms such as manned research aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles, tethered balloons, as well as man-portable in-situ ground truth systems are being used for this research. Remote sensing data is also collected from the ASTER and OMI spaceborne instruments and compared with in situ data. The CARTA-UAV 2013 Mission deployment and follow up measurements successfully demonstrated a path to study and visualize gaseous volcanic emissions using mass spectrometer and gas sensor based instrumentation in harsh environment conditions to correlate in situ ground/airborne data with remote sensing satellite data for calibration and validation purposes. The deployment of such technology improves on our current capabilities to detect, analyze, monitor, model, and predict hazards presented to aircraft by volcanogenic ash clouds from active and impending volcanic eruptions.

  12. In Situ Monitoring of the Mechanosynthesis of the Archetypal Metal-Organic Framework HKUST-1: Effect of Liquid Additives on the Milling Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolar, Tomislav; Batzdorf, Lisa; Lukin, Stipe; Žilić, Dijana; Motillo, Cristina; Friščić, Tomislav; Emmerling, Franziska; Halasz, Ivan; Užarević, Krunoslav

    2017-06-05

    We have applied in situ monitoring of mechanochemical reactions by high-energy synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction to study the role of liquid additives on the mechanochemical synthesis of the archetypal metal-organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1, which was one of the first and is still among the most widely investigated MOF materials to be synthesized by solvent-free procedures. It is shown here how the kinetics and mechanisms of the mechanochemical synthesis of HKUST-1 can be influenced by milling conditions and additives, yielding on occasion two new and previously undetected intermediate phases containing a mononuclear copper core, and that finally rearrange to form the HKUST-1 architecture. On the basis of in situ data, we were able to tune and direct the milling reactions toward the formation of these intermediates, which were isolated and characterized by spectroscopic and structural means and their magnetic properties compared to those of HKUST-1. The results have shown that despite the relatively large breadth of analysis available for such widely investigated materials as HKUST-1, in situ monitoring of milling reactions can help in the detection and isolation of new materials and to establish efficient reaction conditions for the mechanochemical synthesis of porous MOFs.

  13. Origin and assessment of deep groundwater inflow in the Ca' Lita landslide using hydrochemistry and in situ monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cervi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in soil water content, groundwater flow and a rise in pore water pressure are well-known causal or triggering factors for hillslope instability. Rainfall and snowmelt are generally assumed as the main sources of groundwater recharge. This assumption neglects the role of deep water inflow in highly tectonized areas, a factor that can influence long-term pore-pressure regimes and play a role on local slope instability.

    This paper aims to assess the origin of groundwater in the Ca' Lita landslide (northern Italian Apennines and to qualify and quantify the aliquot attributable to deep water inflow. The research is essentially based on in situ monitoring and hydrochemical analyses. It involved 5 yr of continuous monitoring of groundwater levels, electrical conductivity and temperature and with groundwater sampling followed by determination of major ions (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl, HCO3, SO42−, tracers (such as Btot and Sr2+, and isotopes (δ18O, δ2H and 3H. Leaching experiments on soil samples, hydrochemical modelling and water recharge estimation were also carried out.

    Results show that the groundwater balance in the Ca' Lita landslide must take into account an inflow of deep and highly mineralised Na-SO4 water (more than 9500 μS cm−1 with non-negligible amounts of Cl (up to 800 mg l−1. The chemical and isotopic fingerprint of this water points to oilfield water hosted at large depths in the Apennine chain and that uprises through a regional fault line crossing the landslide area. It recharges the aquifer hosted in the bedrock underlying the sliding surface (at a rate of about 49 000–85 700 m3 yr−1 and it also partly recharges the landslide body. In both the aquifers, the hydrochemical

  14. A new method for in-situ monitoring of the underground development of Orobanche cumana in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) with a mini-rhizotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eizenberg, H; Shtienberg, D; Silberbush, M; Ephrath, J E

    2005-11-01

    To develop an in-situ, non-destructive method for observation and monitoring of the underground developmental stages of the root parasite Orobanche cumana. The parasitic weed Orobanche causes severe damage to vegetables and field crops. Most of the damage caused to the crops occurs during the underground, unobservable parasitism stage. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus 'Adi') plants were planted in soil that was artificially inoculated with O. cumana seeds. Clear Plexiglas mini-rhizotron plastic observation tubes were inserted into the soil. Seed germination, early stage of penetration, and formation of tubercles and spikes were observed non-destructively and were monitored throughout the growing season by mean of a mini-rhizotron camera. Use of this technology enabled the complete individual parasite life cycle from the very early development (including germination) to Orobanche shoot to be monitored. In addition, the effect of the systemic herbicide Cadre (imazapic) on the development of O. cumana was inspected and quantified. This novel methodology facilitates the in-situ study of major aspects of the host-parasite interaction and of parasite suppression, such as parasitism dynamics, parasite growth rate, and the effect of chemical treatments on the parasite.

  15. In Situ Near Infrared Spectroscopy for Analyte-Specific Monitoring of Glucose and Ammonium in Streptomyces coelicolor Fermentations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nanna; Ödman, Peter; Cervera Padrell, Albert Emili

    2010-01-01

    was used as a model process. Partial least squares (PLS) regression models were calibrated for glucose and ammonium based on NIR spectra collected in situ. To ensure that the models were calibrated based on analyte-specific information, semisynthetic samples were used for model calibration in addition...... resulting in a RMSEP of 1.1 g/L. The prediction of ammonium based on NIR spectra collected in situ was not satisfactory. A comparison with models calibrated based on NIR spectra collected off line suggested that this is caused by signal attenuation in the optical fibers in the region above 2,000 nm...

  16. In situ reverse transcription-PCR for monitoring gene expression in individual Methanosarcina mazei S-6 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Marianne; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Molin, Søren

    2000-01-01

    An in situ reverse transcription-PCR protocol for detecting specific mRNA in Methanosarcina mazei S-6 is described. This method allowed us to detect heat shock-induced increases in the intracellular levels of the transcript of the universal stress gene dnaK. The cell walls of paraformaldehyde...

  17. pH-sensitive pHluorins as a molecular sensor for in situ monitoring of enzyme-catalyzed prodrug activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Cao, Xiaodan; Wang, Ping; Ma, Xingyuan

    2017-07-01

    This work examines the feasibility of using a pH-sensitive fluorescent protein as a molecular reporter for enzyme-catalyzed prodrug activation reaction. Specifically, a ratiometric pHluorins was examined for detection of the activity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for the activation of indole-3-acetic acid. The pHluorins and HRP were conjugated chemically, forming a biocatalyst with a self-reporting function. Results showed that the characteristic fluorescence intensity ratio of the conjugate shifted from 1.47 to 1.40 corresponding to the progress of the prodrug activation reaction. The effectiveness of applying the conjugate for inhibition of the growth of Bcap-37 cells was also demonstrated simultaneously with reaction monitoring. The results reveal a very promising approach to realizing in situ monitoring of enzyme activities based on pH shifting for enzyme-based prodrug therapy applications. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Calibration Transfer Between a Bench Scanning and a Submersible Diode Array Spectrophotometer for In Situ Wastewater Quality Monitoring in Sewer Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Rita S; Pinheiro, Helena M; Ferreira, Filipa; Matos, José S; Pinheiro, Alexandre; Lourenço, Nídia D

    2016-03-01

    Online monitoring programs based on spectroscopy have a high application potential for the detection of hazardous wastewater discharges in sewer systems. Wastewater hydraulics poses a challenge for in situ spectroscopy, especially when the system includes storm water connections leading to rapid changes in water depth, velocity, and in the water quality matrix. Thus, there is a need to optimize and fix the location of in situ instruments, limiting their availability for calibration. In this context, the development of calibration models on bench spectrophotometers to estimate wastewater quality parameters from spectra acquired with in situ instruments could be very useful. However, spectra contain information not only from the samples, but also from the spectrophotometer generally invalidating this approach. The use of calibration transfer methods is a promising solution to this problem. In this study, calibration models were developed using interval partial least squares (iPLS), for the estimation of total suspended solids (TSS) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in sewage from Ultraviolet-visible spectra acquired in a bench scanning spectrophotometer. The feasibility of calibration transfer to a submersible, diode array equipment, to be subsequently operated in situ, was assessed using three procedures: slope and bias correction (SBC); single wavelength standardization (SWS) on mean spectra; and local centering (LC). The results showed that SBC was the most adequate for the available data, adding insignificant error to the base model estimates. Single wavelength standardization was a close second best, potentially more robust, and independent of the base iPLS model. Local centering was shown to be inadequate for the samples and instruments used. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. SR-XRD in situ monitoring of copper-IUD corrosion in simulated uterine fluid using a portable spectroelectrochemical cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayburn, Rosie A; Dowsett, Mark G; Sabbe, Pieter-Jan; Wermeille, Didier; Anjos, Jorge Alves; Flexer, Victoria; De Keersmaecker, Michel; Wildermeersch, Dirk; Adriaens, Annemie

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this work is to study the initial corrosion of copper in the presence of gold when placed in simulated uterine fluid in order to better understand the evolution of active components of copper-IUDs. In order to carry out this study, a portable cell was designed to partially simulate the uterine environment and provide a way of tracking the chemical changes occurring in the samples in situ within a controlled environment over a long period of time using synchrotron spectroelectrochemistry. The dynamically forming crystalline corrosion products are determined in situ for a range of copper-gold surface ratios over the course of a 10-day experiment in the cell. It is concluded that the insoluble deposits forming over this time are not the origin of the anticonception mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. New Textile Sensors for In Situ Structural Health Monitoring of Textile Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites Based on the Conductive Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) Polymer Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerkovic, Ivona; Koncar, Vladan; Grancaric, Ana Marija

    2017-10-10

    Many metallic structural and non-structural parts used in the transportation industry can be replaced by textile-reinforced composites. Composites made from a polymeric matrix and fibrous reinforcement have been increasingly studied during the last decade. On the other hand, the fast development of smart textile structures seems to be a very promising solution for in situ structural health monitoring of composite parts. In order to optimize composites' quality and their lifetime all the production steps have to be monitored in real time. Textile sensors embedded in the composite reinforcement and having the same mechanical properties as the yarns used to make the reinforcement exhibit actuating and sensing capabilities. This paper presents a new generation of textile fibrous sensors based on the conductive polymer complex poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) developed by an original roll to roll coating method. Conductive coating for yarn treatment was defined according to the preliminary study of percolation threshold of this polymer complex. The percolation threshold determination was based on conductive dry films' electrical properties analysis, in order to develop highly sensitive sensors. A novel laboratory equipment was designed and produced for yarn coating to ensure effective and equally distributed coating of electroconductive polymer without distortion of textile properties. The electromechanical properties of the textile fibrous sensors confirmed their suitability for in situ structural damages detection of textile reinforced thermoplastic composites in real time.

  1. New Textile Sensors for In Situ Structural Health Monitoring of Textile Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites Based on the Conductive Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene-poly(styrenesulfonate Polymer Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivona Jerkovic

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Many metallic structural and non-structural parts used in the transportation industry can be replaced by textile-reinforced composites. Composites made from a polymeric matrix and fibrous reinforcement have been increasingly studied during the last decade. On the other hand, the fast development of smart textile structures seems to be a very promising solution for in situ structural health monitoring of composite parts. In order to optimize composites’ quality and their lifetime all the production steps have to be monitored in real time. Textile sensors embedded in the composite reinforcement and having the same mechanical properties as the yarns used to make the reinforcement exhibit actuating and sensing capabilities. This paper presents a new generation of textile fibrous sensors based on the conductive polymer complex poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene-poly(styrenesulfonate developed by an original roll to roll coating method. Conductive coating for yarn treatment was defined according to the preliminary study of percolation threshold of this polymer complex. The percolation threshold determination was based on conductive dry films’ electrical properties analysis, in order to develop highly sensitive sensors. A novel laboratory equipment was designed and produced for yarn coating to ensure effective and equally distributed coating of electroconductive polymer without distortion of textile properties. The electromechanical properties of the textile fibrous sensors confirmed their suitability for in situ structural damages detection of textile reinforced thermoplastic composites in real time.

  2. In situ loading of well-dispersed silver nanoparticles on nanocrystalline magnesium oxide for real-time monitoring of catalytic reactions by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaige; Li, Gongke; Hu, Yuling

    2015-10-28

    The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique is of great importance for insight into the transient reaction intermediates and mechanistic pathways involved in heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions under actual reaction conditions, especially in water. Herein, we demonstrate a facile method for in situ synthesis of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide-Ag(0) (nano MgO-Ag(0)) hybrid nanomaterials with dispersed Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on the surface of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide (nano MgO) via Sn(2+) linkage and reduction. As a benefit from the synergy effect of nano MgO and Ag NPs, the nano MgO-Ag(0) exhibited both excellent SERS and catalytic activities for the reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol in the presence of NaBH4. The nano MgO-Ag(0) was used for real-time monitoring of the catalytic reaction process of 4-nitrothiophenol to 4-aminothiophenol in an aqueous medium by observing the SERS signals of the reactant, intermediate and final products. The intrinsic reaction kinetics and reaction mechanism of this reaction were also investigated. This SERS-based synergy technique provides a novel approach for quantitative in situ monitoring of catalytic chemical reaction processes.

  3. Bi-functional Au/FeS (Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite for in situ SERS monitoring and degradation of organic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Shuzhen; Cai, Qian; Lu, Kailing; Liao, Fan, E-mail: fliao@suda.edu.cn; Shao, Mingwang, E-mail: mwshao@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano & Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices & Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University (China)

    2016-01-15

    The bi-functional Au/FeS (Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite was fabricated by in situ reducing Au nanoparticles onto the surface of FeS (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}). The as-prepared FeS possessed a multi-structure composed of plenty of nanoplates, which were coated by Au nanoparticles with an average size of ∼47.5 nm. While the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} showed a thin hexagonal sheet containing Au nanoparticles on its surface with an average size of ∼79.0 nm. Both the as-prepared Au/FeS and Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites exhibited excellent SERS performance, capable of enhancing the Raman signals of R6G molecules with the enhancement factor up to 1.81 × 10{sup 6} and 7.60 × 10{sup 4}, respectively. Moreover, Au/FeS (Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite also has been verified to have intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, which could decompose H{sub 2}O{sub 2} into hydroxyl radicals and then degrade organic pollutants into small molecules. Therefore, SERS can be used to real-time and in situ monitoring the degradation process of R6G molecules, employing the Au/FeS (Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite both as SERS substrate and catalyst. Graphical abstract: SERS was used to real-time and in situ monitoring the degradation of R6G, employing the Au/FeS and Au/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites both as SERS substrates and catalysts.

  4. In situ monitoring of structure formation in the active layer of polymer solar cells during roll-to-roll coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea H. Rossander

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The active layer crystallization during roll-to-roll coating of organic solar cells is studied in situ. We developed an X-ray setup where the coater unit is an integrated part of the small angle X-ray scattering instrument, making it possible to control the coating process while recording scattering measurements in situ, enabling us to follow the crystal formation during drying. By varying the distance between the coating head and the point where the X-ray beam hits the film, we obtained measurements of 4 different stages of drying. For each of those stages, the scattering from as long a foil as possible is summed together, with the distance from coating head to scattering point kept constant. The results are average crystallographic properties for the active layer coated on a 30 m long foil. With this insight into the dynamics of crystallization in a roll-coated polymer film, we find that the formation of textured and untextured crystallites seems uncorrelated, and happens at widely different rates. Untextured P3HT crystallites form later in the drying process than expected which may explain previous studies speculating that untextured crystallization depends on concentration. Textured crystallites, however, begin forming much earlier and steadily increases as the film dries, showing a development similar to other in situ studies of these materials.

  5. An in-situ real-time optical fiber sensor based on surface plasmon resonance for monitoring the growth of TiO2 thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Yu-Chia; Tsai, Woo-Hu; Shih, Wen-Ching; Wu, Mu-Shiang

    2013-07-23

    An optical fiber sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is proposed for monitoring the thickness of deposited nano-thin films. A side-polished multimode SPR optical fiber sensor with an 850 nm-LD is used as the transducing element for real-time monitoring of the deposited TiO2 thin films. The SPR optical fiber sensor was installed in the TiO2 sputtering system in order to measure the thickness of the deposited sample during TiO2 deposition. The SPR response declined in real-time in relation to the growth of the thickness of the TiO2 thin film. Our results show the same trend of the SPR response in real-time and in spectra taken before and after deposition. The SPR transmitted intensity changes by approximately 18.76% corresponding to 50 nm of deposited TiO2 thin film. We have shown that optical fiber sensors utilizing SPR have the potential for real-time monitoring of the SPR technology of nanometer film thickness. The compact size of the SPR fiber sensor enables it to be positioned inside the deposition chamber, and it could thus measure the film thickness directly in real-time. This technology also has potential application for monitoring the deposition of other materials. Moreover, in-situ real-time SPR optical fiber sensor technology is in inexpensive, disposable technique that has anti-interference properties, and the potential to enable on-line monitoring and monitoring of organic coatings.

  6. In situ monitoring of electrical resistance during deposition of Ag and Al thin films by pulsed laser deposition: comparative study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abdellaoui, N.; Pereira, A.; Novotný, Michal; Bulíř, Jiří; Fitl, Přemysl; Lančok, Ján; Moine, B.; Pillonnet, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 418, Oct (2017), s. 517-521 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA ČR GA16-22092S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-10279S; GA MŠk LM2015088; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14FR010 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : pulsed laser deposition * metallic thin film * in-situ resistance measurement * silver * aluminium Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  7. Phase transition of pNIPAM grafted on plasma-activated PEO monitored in-situ by quartz crystal microbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz, P; Bretagnol, F; Mannelli, I; Gillil, D; Rauscher, H; Rossi, F [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, 21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy)], E-mail: hubert.rauscher@jrc.it

    2008-03-15

    Thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) layers were grafted on plasma-activated poly(ethylene oxide)-like substrate. Analysis by ToF-SIMS confirmed the presence of a pNIPAM film, which shows a phase transition temperature at 28 - 32 deg. C with hysteresis, as determined in-situ by quartz crystal microbalance. During the transition, the frequency of the pNIPAM coated quartz sensor exhibits a pronounced and unexpected minimum while the dissipation changes monotonously. This peculiar behaviour is explained by temporary formation of water-rich regions, which may cause delayed release and uptake of water during the collapse and re-swelling of the layer.

  8. Phase transition of pNIPAM grafted on plasma-activated PEO monitored in-situ by quartz crystal microbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, P; Bretagnol, F; Mannelli, I; Gillil, D; Rauscher, H; Rossi, F

    2008-01-01

    Thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) layers were grafted on plasma-activated poly(ethylene oxide)-like substrate. Analysis by ToF-SIMS confirmed the presence of a pNIPAM film, which shows a phase transition temperature at 28 - 32 deg. C with hysteresis, as determined in-situ by quartz crystal microbalance. During the transition, the frequency of the pNIPAM coated quartz sensor exhibits a pronounced and unexpected minimum while the dissipation changes monotonously. This peculiar behaviour is explained by temporary formation of water-rich regions, which may cause delayed release and uptake of water during the collapse and re-swelling of the layer

  9. A Lab-On-Chip Phosphate Analyzer for Long-term In Situ Monitoring at Fixed Observatories: Optimization and Performance Evaluation in Estuarine and Oligotrophic Coastal Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime M. Grand

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of phosphate sensors suitable for long-term in situ deployments in natural waters, is essential to improve our understanding of the distribution, fluxes, and biogeochemical role of this key nutrient in a changing ocean. Here, we describe the optimization of the molybdenum blue method for in situ work using a lab-on-chip (LOC analyzer and evaluate its performance in the laboratory and at two contrasting field sites. The in situ performance of the LOC sensor is evaluated using hourly time-series data from a 56-day trial in Southampton Water (UK, as well as a month-long deployment in the subtropical oligotrophic waters of Kaneohe Bay (Hawaii, USA. In Kaneohe Bay, where phosphate concentrations were characteristic of the dry season (0.13 ± 0.03 μM, n = 704, the in situ sensor accuracy was 16 ± 12% and a potential diurnal cycle in phosphate concentrations was observed. In Southampton Water, the sensor data (1.02 ± 0.40 μM, n = 1,267 were accurate to ±0.10 μM relative to discrete reference samples. Hourly in situ monitoring revealed striking tidal and storm derived fluctuations in phosphate concentrations in Southampton Water that would not have been captured via discrete sampling. We show the impact of storms on phosphate concentrations in Southampton Water is modulated by the spring-neap tidal cycle and that the 10-fold decline in phosphate concentrations observed during the later stages of the deployment was consistent with the timing of a spring phytoplankton bloom in the English Channel. Under controlled laboratory conditions in a 250 L tank, the sensor demonstrated an accuracy and precision better than 10% irrespective of the salinity (0–30, turbidity (0–100 NTU, colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM concentration (0–10 mg/L, and temperature (5–20°C of the water (0.3–13 μM phosphate being analyzed. This work demonstrates that the LOC technology is mature enough to quantify the influence of stochastic events on

  10. Monitoring and modeling crop health and water use via in-situ, airborne and space-based platforms

    KAUST Repository

    McCabe, Matthew; Houborg, Rasmus; Jensen, Rasmus; Nielsen, Helene

    2014-01-01

    The accurate retrieval of plant water use, health and function together with soil state and condition, represent key objectives in the management and monitoring of large-scale agricultural production. In regions of water shortage or stress

  11. Lightweight, Wearable Metal Rubber-Textile Sensor for In-Situ Lunar Autonomous Health Monitoring, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Phase II SBIR program would develop comfortable garments with multiple integrated sensor functions for the monitoring of astronauts during long duration...

  12. Using stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen as in-situ tracers for monitoring the natural attenuation of explosives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miyares, Paul H

    1999-01-01

    The use of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope measurements from TNT was examined as a possible tool for monitoring the natural attenuation of TNT incubation studies of spiked soil samples were conducted...

  13. In-situ monitoring of etching of bovine serum albumin using low-temperature atmospheric plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousal, J.; Shelemin, A.; Kylián, O.; Slavínská, D.; Biederman, H.

    2017-01-01

    Bio-decontamination of surfaces by means of atmospheric pressure plasma is nowadays extensively studied as it represents promising alternative to commonly used sterilization/decontamination techniques. The non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas were already reported to be highly effective in removal of a wide range of biological residual from surfaces. Nevertheless the kinetics of removal of biological contamination from surfaces is still not well understood as the majority of performed studies were based on ex-situ evaluation of etching rates, which did not allow investigating details of plasma action on biomolecules. This study therefore presents a real-time, in-situ ellipsometric characterization of removal of bovine serum albumin (BSA) from surfaces by low-temperature atmospheric plasma jet operated in argon. Non-linear and at shorter distances between treated samples and nozzle of the plasma jet also non-monotonic dependence of the removal rate on the treatment duration was observed. According to additional measurements focused on the determination of chemical changes of treated BSA as well as temperature measurements, the observed behavior is most likely connected with two opposing effects: the formation of a thin layer on the top of BSA deposit enriched in inorganic compounds, whose presence causes a gradual decrease of removal efficiency, and slight heating of BSA that facilitates its degradation and volatilization induced by chemically active radicals produced by the plasma.

  14. Monitoring and characterisation of bacteria in corroding district heating systems using fluorescence in situ hybridisation and microautoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjellerup, B.V. [Danish Technological Institute, Teknologiparken (Denmark). Dept. of Environment; Aalborg University (Denmark). Dept. of Environmental Engineering; Olesen, B.H.; Frolund, B. [Danish Technological Institute, Teknologiparken (Denmark). Dept. of Environment; Nielsen, J.L.; Nielsen, P.H. [Aalborg University (Denmark). Dept. of Environmental Engineering; Odum, S. [CTR I/S, Frederiksberg (Denmark)

    2003-07-01

    Presence of biofilm and biocorrosion has been observed in Danish district heating (DH) systems despite very good water quality that was expected to prevent significant microbial growth. The microbiological water quality was investigated in order to identify the dominating bacterial groups on surfaces with corrosion problems. Water samples from 29 DH systems were investigated for the total number of bacteria and presence of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRBs). SRBs were found to be present in more than 80% of the DH systems. The microbial population in samples from 2 DH systems (biofilm from a test coupon and an in situ sample from a heat exchanger) was investigated with fluorescence in situ hybridisation, and the results showed significant differences in population composition. Betaproteobacteria was the dominant population in both samples. SRBs were present in both samples but were most numerous in the biofilm from the test coupon. Examination of functional groups based on uptake of radiolabelled acetate (microautoradiography) showed presence of both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria despite the fact that oxygen is not anticipated in DH systems. (author)

  15. Multi-sensor system for in situ shape monitoring and damage identification of high-speed composite rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, K.; Filippatos, A.; Kuschmierz, R.; Langkamp, A.; Gude, M.; Fischer, A.; Czarske, J.

    2016-08-01

    Glass fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites offer a higher stiffness-to-weight ratio than conventional rotor materials used in turbomachinery. However, the material behaviour of GFRP high-speed rotors is difficult to predict due to the complexity of the composite material and the dynamic loading conditions. Consequently dynamic expansion measurements of GRFP rotors are required in situ and with micron precision. However, the whirling motion amplitude is about two orders of magnitude higher than the desired precision. To overcome this problem, a multi-sensor system capable of separating rotor expansion and whirling motion is proposed. High measurement rates well above the rotational frequency and micron uncertainty are achieved at whirling amplitudes up to 120μm and surface velocities up to 300 m/s. The dynamic elliptical expansion of a GFRP rotor is investigated in a rotor loading test rig under vacuum conditions. In situ measurements identified not only the introduced damage but also damage initiation and propagation.

  16. EC MoDeRn Project: In-situ Demonstration of Innovative Monitoring Technologies for Geological Disposal - 12053

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breen, B.J. [NDA, Herdus House, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria, CA24 3HU (United Kingdom); Garcia-Sineriz, J.L. [AITEMIN, c/Margarita Salas 14-Parque Leganes Tecnologico-Leganes, ES-28918, Madrid (Spain); Maurer, H. [ETH Zurich, ETH Honggerberg, CH-8093, Zurich (Switzerland); Mayer, S. [ANDRA, 1-7 rue Jean-Monnet, F-92298 Chatenay-Malabry cedex (France); Schroeder, T.J. [NRG, P.O. Box 25, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Verstricht, J. [EURIDICE EIG, c/o SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, BE-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2012-07-01

    Monitoring to provide information on the evolution of geological disposal presents several challenges. The 4-year, euros M 5, EC MoDeRn Project (http://www.modern-fp7.eu/), which commenced in 2009, addresses monitoring processes, state-of-the-art technology and innovative research and development of monitoring techniques. This paper discusses some of the key drivers for the development of innovative monitoring techniques and provides outlines of the demonstration programmes being conducted within MoDeRn. The aim is to develop these innovative monitoring techniques and to demonstrate them under realistic conditions present in underground laboratories. These demonstration projects, applying a range of different monitoring techniques, are being carried out at underground research facilities in different geological environments at HADES URL in Belgium (plastic clay), Bure in France (indurated clay) and at Grimsel Test Site (granite) in Switzerland. These are either built upon existing infrastructure (EC ESDRED Low pH shotcrete and TEM experiments at Grimsel; and PRACLAY experiment and underground galleries in HADES) or will be attached to infrastructure that is being developed and financed by resources outside of this project (mock-up disposal cell in Bure). At Grimsel Test Site, cross-hole and hole-to-tunnel seismic methods are being employed as a means to monitor induced changes in an artificially saturated bentonite wall confined behind a shotcrete plug. Recognising the limitations for travel-time tomography for monitoring a disposal cell, full waveform inversion techniques are being employed to enhance the capacity to monitor remote from the excavation. At the same Grimsel location, an investigation will be conducted of the potential for using a high frequency wireless (HFW) sensor network embedded within the barrier system; this will include the possibility of providing energy remotely to isolated sensors. At the HADES URL, the monitoring programme will utilise

  17. Development of a generic system for real-time data access and remote control of multiple in-situ water quality monitoring instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S. A.; Bennett, G. E.; Andrews, T.; Melis, T. S.; Topping, D. J.

    2005-05-01

    Currently, in-situ monitoring of water quality parameters (e.g. water temperature, conductivity, turbidity) in the Colorado River ecosystem typically consists of deploying instruments in the river, retrieving them at a later date, downloading the datalogger, then examining the data; an arduous process in the remote settings of Grand Canyon. Under this protocol, data is not available real-time and there is no way to detect problems with the instrumentation until after retrieval. The next obvious stage in the development of in-situ monitoring in Grand Canyon was the advent of one-way telemetry, i.e. streaming data in real-time from the instrument to the office and/or the world-wide-web. This protocol allows for real-time access to data and the identification of instrumentation problems, but still requires a site visit to address instrument malfunctions, i.e. the user does not have the ability to remotely control the instrument. At some field sites, such as the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, site visitation is restricted by remoteness and lack of traditional access routes (i.e. roads). Even at less remote sites, it may still be desirable to have two-way communication with instruments in order to, for example, diagnose and potentially fix instrumentation problems, change sampling parameters to save battery power, etc., without having to visit the site. To this end, the U.S. Geological Survey, Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, is currently developing and testing a high-speed, two-way communication system that allows for real-time data access and remote control of instrumentation. The approach tested relies on internet access and may be especially useful in areas where land-line or cellular connections are unavailable. The system is composed of off-the-shelf products, uses a commercial broadband satellite service, and is designed in a generic way such that any instrument that communicates through RS-232 communication (i.e. a serial port) is compatible with

  18. A MEMS platform for in situ, real-time monitoring of electrochemically induced mechanical changes in lithium-ion battery electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomerantseva, Ekaterina; Jung, Hyun; Gnerlich, Markus; Baron, Sergio; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Ghodssi, Reza

    2013-01-01

    We report the first successful demonstration of an optical microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensing platform for the in situ characterization of electrochemically induced reversible mechanical changes in lithium-ion battery (LIB) electrodes. The platform consists of an array of flexible membranes with a reflective surface on one side and a thin-film LIB electrode on the other side. The membranes deflect due to the active battery material volume change caused by lithium intercalation (expansion) and extraction (contraction). This deflection is monitored using the Fabry–Perot optical interferometry principle. The active material volume change causes high internal stresses and mechanical degradation of the electrodes. The stress evolution observed in a silicon thin-film electrode incorporated into this MEMS platform follows a ‘first elastic, then plastic’ deformation scheme. Understanding of the internal stresses in battery electrodes during discharge/charge is important for improving the reliability and cycle lifetime of LIBs. The developed MEMS platform presents a new method for in situ diagnostics of thin-film LIB electrodes to aid the development of new materials, optimization of electrode performance, and prevention of battery failure. (paper)

  19. In Situ Solid-State Reactions Monitored by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Temperature-Induced Proton Transfer Leads to Chemical Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Joanna S; Walczak, Monika; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A

    2016-10-24

    The dramatic colour and phase alteration with the solid-state, temperature-dependent reaction between squaric acid and 4,4'-bipyridine has been probed in situ with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The electronic and chemical sensitivity to the local atomic environment through chemical shifts in the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) revealed proton transfer from the acid to the bipyridine base through the change in nitrogen protonation state in the high-temperature form. Direct detection of proton transfer coupled with structural analysis elucidates the nature of the solid-state process, with intermolecular proton transfer occurring along an acid-base chain followed by a domino effect to the subsequent acid-base chains, leading to the rapid migration along the length of the crystal. NEXAFS thereby conveys the ability to monitor the nature of solid-state chemical reactions in situ, without the need for a priori information or long-range order. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Redox Reaction in Silicate Melts Monitored by ''Static'' In-Situ Fe K-Edge XANES up to 1180 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, Max; Partzsch, Georg M.; Welter, Edmund; Farges, Francois

    2007-01-01

    A new experimental setup to measure in-situ kinetics of redox reactions in silicate melts is presented. To study the progress of the Fe-redox reaction, the variation of the signal is recorded at an energy, where the difference between the spectra of the oxidized and reduced Fe in the melt is largest (''static XANES''). To control the redox conditions, the gas atmosphere could be changed between to types of gases using computer-controlled valves (N2:H2 and air, respectively). In this way, a number of reduction/oxidation cycles can be monitored in-situ and continuously. Applied at the Fe K-edge in molten silicates, we obtained a set of high quality data, which includes the very first steps of the redox reaction. An Avrami-type equation is used to investigate rate-controlling parameters for the iron oxidation/reduction kinetics for two melts (basaltic and Na trisilicate) for temperatures up to 1180 deg. C

  1. Transformation Heat Treatment of Rapidly Quenched Nb3A1 Precursor Monitored in situ by High Energy Synchrotron Diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Di Michiel, M; Jin, X; Takeuchi, T; Kikuchi, A; Tsuchiya, K; Nakagawa, K; Nakamoto, T

    2013-01-01

    Nb3Al superconductors are studied for use in high field magnets. Fine grained Nb3Al with nearly stoichiometric Al content is obtained by a Rapid Heating Quenching and Transformation (RHQT) process. We describe a non destructive in situ study of the transformation process step of a RHQ Nb3Al precursor wire with ramp rates of either 120 °C/h or 800 °C/h. High energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements show the transformation from a Nb(Al)SS supersaturated solid solution into Nb3Al. When heating with a ramp rate of 120 °C/h a strong reduction of the Nb(Al)SS (110) diffraction peak component is observed when the temperature exceeds 660 °C. Additional diffraction peaks are detectable in the approximate temperature interval 610 °C - 750 °C and significant Nb3Al growth is observed above 730 °C.

  2. In situ 3D monitoring of corrosion on carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel embedded in cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien; Serdar, Marijana; Meral, Cagla; Parkinson, Dula; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Bjegović, Dubravka; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The morphology of the corrosion of steel in cement paste was studied in situ. • During galvanostatic corrosion, carbon steel reinforcement corroded homogeneously. • On ferritic stainless steel, deep corrosion pits formed and caused wider cracks. • The measured rate of steel loss correlated well with Faraday’s law of electrolysis. - Abstract: In a X-ray microcomputed tomography study, active corrosion was induced by galvanostatically corroding steel embedded in cement paste. The results give insight into corrosion product build up, crack formation, leaching of products into the cracks and voids, and differences in morphology of corrosion attack in the case of carbon steel or stainless steel reinforcement. Carbon steel was homogeneously etched away with a homogeneous layer of corrosion products forming at the steel/cement paste interface. For ferritic stainless steel, pits were forming, concentrating the corrosion products locally, which led to more extensive damage on the cement paste cover

  3. In Situ Monitoring of RAFT Polymerization by Tetraphenylethylene-Containing Agents with Aggregation-Induced Emission Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shunjie; Cheng, Yanhua; Zhang, Haoke; Qiu, Zijie; Kwok, Ryan T K; Lam, Jacky W Y; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2018-05-22

    A facile and efficient approach is demonstrated to visualize the polymerization in situ. A group of tetraphenylethylene (TPE)-containing dithiocarbamates were synthesized and screened as agents for reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerizations. The spatial-temporal control characteristics of photochemistry enabled the RAFT polymerizations to be ON and OFF on demand under alternating visible light irradiation. The emission of TPE is sensitive to the local viscosity change owing to its aggregation-induced emission characteristic. Quantitative information could be easily acquired by the naked eye without destroying the reaction system. Furthermore, the versatility of such a technique was well demonstrated by 12 different polymerization systems. The present approach thus demonstrated a powerful platform for understanding the controlled living radical polymerization process. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. In situ monitoring of stacking fault formation and its carrier lifetime mediation in p-type 4H-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bin, E-mail: chenbinmse@gmail.com; Chen, Jun; Yao, Yuanzhao; Sekiguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Matsuhata, Hirofumi; Okumura, Hajime [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-07-28

    Using the fine control of an electron beam (e-beam) in scanning electron microscopy with the capabilities of both electrical and optical imaging, the stacking fault (SF) formation together with its tuning of carrier lifetime was in situ monitored and investigated in p-type 4H-SiC homoepitaxial films. The SFs were formed through engineering basal plane dislocations with the energy supplied by the e-beam. The e-beam intensity required for the SF formation in the p-type films was ∼100 times higher than that in the n-type ones. The SFs reduced the minority-carrier lifetime in the p-type films, which was opposite to that observed in the n-type case. The reason for the peculiar SF behavior in the p-type 4H-SiC is discussed with the cathodoluminescence results.

  5. ADEQUATE UV EXPOSURES FOR HEALTHY LIFE: IN SITU MONITORING AND MODEL CALCULATION OF THE VITAMIN-D-SYNTHETIC CAPACITY OF SUNLIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Terenetskaya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D which is formed upon UV solar radiation in human skin is essential in many physiological functions. To estimate beneficial vitamin-D-synthetic capacity of sunlight a bio-equivalent UV dosimeter that is based on the same molecular photochemistry from which vitamin D is photosynthesized in human skin has been developed. The examples of an in situ monitoring of the vitamin-D-synthetic capacity of sunlight using an in vitro model of vitamin D synthesis are presented, and various operational principles of the UV biodosimeter are discussed. In addition, reliable algorithm is presented for direct calculation of previtamin D3 accumulation using the photoreaction mathematical model with solar UV spectra as input data. Critical dependence of previtamin D3 accumulation on cloudiness and aerosols is demonstrated.

  6. A novel method for in-situ monitoring of local voltage, temperature and humidity distributions in fuel cells using flexible multi-functional micro sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Fan, Wei-Yuan; Chang, Chih-Ping

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation, micro voltage, temperature and humidity sensors were fabricated and integrated for the first time on a stainless steel foil using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). These flexible multi-functional micro sensors have the advantages of high temperature resistance, flexibility, smallness, high sensitivity and precision of location. They were embedded in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and used to simultaneously measure variations in the inner voltage, temperature and humidity. The accuracy and reproducibility of the calibrated results obtained using the proposed micro sensors is excellent. The experimental results indicate that, at high current density and 100%RH or 75%RH, the relative humidity midstream and downstream saturates due to severe flooding. The performance of the PEM fuel cell can be stabilized using home-made flexible multi-functional micro sensors by the in-situ monitoring of local voltage, temperature and humidity distributions within it.

  7. A Novel Method for In-Situ Monitoring of Local Voltage, Temperature and Humidity Distributions in Fuel Cells Using Flexible Multi-Functional Micro Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, micro voltage, temperature and humidity sensors were fabricated and integrated for the first time on a stainless steel foil using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS. These flexible multi-functional micro sensors have the advantages of high temperature resistance, flexibility, smallness, high sensitivity and precision of location. They were embedded in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC and used to simultaneously measure variations in the inner voltage, temperature and humidity. The accuracy and reproducibility of the calibrated results obtained using the proposed micro sensors is excellent. The experimental results indicate that, at high current density and 100%RH or 75%RH, the relative humidity midstream and downstream saturates due to severe flooding. The performance of the PEM fuel cell can be stabilized using home-made flexible multi-functional micro sensors by the in-situ monitoring of local voltage, temperature and humidity distributions within it.

  8. A Novel Method for In-Situ Monitoring of Local Voltage, Temperature and Humidity Distributions in Fuel Cells Using Flexible Multi-Functional Micro Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Fan, Wei-Yuan; Chang, Chih-Ping

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation, micro voltage, temperature and humidity sensors were fabricated and integrated for the first time on a stainless steel foil using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). These flexible multi-functional micro sensors have the advantages of high temperature resistance, flexibility, smallness, high sensitivity and precision of location. They were embedded in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and used to simultaneously measure variations in the inner voltage, temperature and humidity. The accuracy and reproducibility of the calibrated results obtained using the proposed micro sensors is excellent. The experimental results indicate that, at high current density and 100%RH or 75%RH, the relative humidity midstream and downstream saturates due to severe flooding. The performance of the PEM fuel cell can be stabilized using home-made flexible multi-functional micro sensors by the in-situ monitoring of local voltage, temperature and humidity distributions within it. PMID:22319361

  9. Inspection Correlation Study of Ultrasonic-Based In Situ Structural Health Monitoring Monthly Report for December 2014-January 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    fatigue an induced ultrasonic elastic vibration (via piezoelectric transducers [ PZTs ]) propagates through the dogbone specimen. A receiver PZT picks up...inspection of fatigue crack growth in aluminum 7075-T6 dogbone specimens. Acellent Technologies, Inc., is supporting this project through providing...January 2015. 15. SUBJECT TERMS structural health monitoring, probabilistics, fatigue damage, guided waves, Lamb waves 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  10. Monitoring of Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in Danish hares (Lepus europaeus) by fluorescent in-situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette Sif; Chriél, Mariann; Larsen, Gitte

    . pseudotuberculosis has a wide host range and causes high mortality in hares. When it comes to zoonotic potential F. tularensis poses the major risk for humans, where it causes tularemia - a potentially deadly disease. FISH is an easy, cheap and not at least safe method for monitoring F. tularensis and Y...

  11. Raspberry Pi in-situ network monitoring system of groundwater flow and temperature integrated with OpenGeoSys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-Hee; Lee, Cholwoo

    2016-04-01

    Raspberry Pi series is a low cost, smaller than credit-card sized computers that various operating systems such as linux and recently even Windows 10 are ported to run on. Thanks to massive production and rapid technology development, the price of various sensors that can be attached to Raspberry Pi has been dropping at an increasing speed. Therefore, the device can be an economic choice as a small portable computer to monitor temporal hydrogeological data in fields. In this study, we present a Raspberry Pi system that measures a flow rate, and temperature of groundwater at sites, stores them into mysql database, and produces interactive figures and tables such as google charts online or bokeh offline for further monitoring and analysis. Since all the data are to be monitored on internet, any computers or mobile devices can be good monitoring tools at convenience. The measured data are further integrated with OpenGeoSys, one of the hydrogeological models that is also ported to the Raspberry Pi series. This leads onsite hydrogeological modeling fed by temporal sensor data to meet various needs.

  12. In-situ soil loss monitoring in a small Mediterranean catchment to assess the siltation risk of a limno-reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Navarro, E.; Bienes-Allas, R.; Martínez-Pérez, S.; Sastre-Merlín, A.

    2012-04-01

    The existence of large reservoirs under Mediterranean climate causes some negative impacts. The construction of small dams in the riverine zone of these reservoirs is an innovative idea designed to counteract some of those impacts, generating a body of water with a constant level which we have termed "limno-reservoirs". Pareja Limno-reservoir, located in the influence area of the Entrepeñas Reservoir (Guadalajara) is among the first limno-reservoirs built in Spain, and the first having a double function: environmental and recreational. The limno-reservoir basin (85.5 Km2) enjoys a Mediterranean climate, however, cold temperatures prevail in winter and maximum annual variation may be around 50 °C. Average annual precipitation is 600 mm, with high variability too. Most of the basin is dominated by a high limestone plateau, while a more erodible lithology surfaces in the hillsides of the Ompólveda River and its tributaries. These characteristics make the basin representative of central Spain. Despite the unquestionable interest of the initiative, it construction has raised some issues about its environmental viability. One of them is related to its siltation risk, as the area shows signs of high erosion rates that have been contrasted in previous empirical studies. An in-situ soil loss monitoring network has been installed in order to determine the soil loss and deposition rates in the limno-reservoir basin (85.5 km2). It includes 15 sampling plots for inter-rill erosion and 8 for sedimentation, each one containing 16 erosion sticks. Rill erosion was studied monitoring 8 rills with a needle micro-profiler, quantifying the sediment deposition in their terminal zone with sticks. These control points have been located in places where the soil type, land use and slope present are representative of the basin, in order to extrapolate the results to similar areas. In-situ monitoring has been performed for three years, starting in 2009 and carrying out sampling every 3

  13. Monitoramento in situ e em tempo real de variáveis morfológicas do poli(cloreto de vinila usando espectroscopia NIR Monitoring in situ and in real time the morphological variables of pvc using NIR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M. de Faria Jr.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho ilustra o uso de espectroscopia do infravermelho próximo (NIRS para fins de monitoramento da polimerização em suspensão de cloreto de vinila em tempo real. Resultados inéditos mostraram que é possível acompanhar a evolução de importantes propriedades morfológicas de resinas de PVC [poli(cloreto de vinila], como por exemplo, BD (densidade aparente, CPA (absorção de plastificante a frio, DTP (distribuição de tamanho de partículas e Dp (diâmetro de partícula. Mostrou-se também, pela primeira vez, que é possível analisar quantitativamente, com o auxílio da sonda NIRS in situ, a estrutura morfológica da partícula de PVC. Com a possibilidade de predizer a evolução dinâmica dos parâmetros morfológicos em tempo real, mostrou-se que é possível injetar dispersantes e variar a velocidade de agitação durante a reação para fins de controle das variáveis BD, CPA e DTP do PVC, até que o ponto de identificação da partícula seja atingido. Por meio do monitoramento e da estratégia de controle proposta, é possível antecipar fugas de temperatura no reator, aumentar a segurança do processo, diminuir o tempo de desenvolvimento de resinas com características morfológicas diferenciadas, evitando perdas de margem oriundas da venda de produtos fora de especificação, e otimizar os recursos para o desenvolvimento de novos produtos.This work illustrates the use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS for monitoring of the suspension polymerization of vinyl chloride in real time. Obtained results showed that it is possible to track in situ and in real time important morphological properties of PVC resins, such as BD (bulk density, CPA (cold plasticizer absorption, PSD (particle size distribution and Dp (average particle diameter. It was also shown for the first time that it is possible to analyze quantitatively, with the help of in situ NIRS probe, the morphological structure of the PVC particles. As a consequence, it

  14. Invited Article: In situ comparison of passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors at subsurface workplaces in Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kávási, Norbert, E-mail: norbert@fml.nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Social Organization for Radioecological Cleanliness, Veszprém (Hungary); Vigh, Tamás [Social Organization for Radioecological Cleanliness, Veszprém (Hungary); Manganese Mining Process Ltd., Úrkút (Hungary); Németh, Csaba [Social Organization for Radioecological Cleanliness, Veszprém (Hungary); University of Pannonia, Veszprém (Hungary); Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Omori, Yasutaka; Janik, Miroslaw; Yonehara, Hidenori [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    During a one-year long measurement period, radon and thoron data obtained by two different passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors were compared at subsurface workplaces in Hungary, such as mines (bauxite and manganese ore) and caves (medical and touristic). These workplaces have special environmental conditions, such as, stable and high relative humidity (100%), relatively stable temperature (12°C–21°C), low or high wind speed (max. 2.4 m s{sup −1}) and low or elevated aerosol concentration (130–60 000 particles m{sup −3}). The measured radon and thoron concentrations fluctuated in a wide range among the different workplaces. The respective annual average radon concentrations and their standard deviations (in brackets) measured by the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with cellulose filter (CF) and the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with sponge filter (SF) were: 350(321) Bq m{sup −3} and 550(497) Bq m{sup −3} in the bauxite mine; 887(604) Bq m{sup −3} and 1258(788) Bq m{sup −3} in the manganese ore mine; 2510(2341) Bq m{sup −3} and 3403(3075) Bq m{sup −3} in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 6239(2057) Bq m{sup −3} and 8512(1955) Bq m{sup −3} in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). The respective average thoron concentrations and their standard deviation (in brackets) measured by CF and SF monitors were: 154(210) Bq m{sup −3} and 161(148) Bq m{sup −3} in the bauxite mine; 187(191) Bq m{sup −3} and 117(147) Bq m{sup −3} in the manganese-ore mine; 360(524) Bq m{sup −3} and 371(789) Bq m{sup −3} in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 1420(1184) Bq m{sup −3} and 1462(3655) Bq m{sup −3} in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). Under these circumstances, comparison of the radon data for the SF and CF monitors showed the former were consistently 51% higher in the bauxite mine, 38% higher in the manganese ore mine, and 34% higher in the caves

  15. Invited Article: In situ comparison of passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors at subsurface workplaces in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kávási, Norbert; Vigh, Tamás; Németh, Csaba; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Omori, Yasutaka; Janik, Miroslaw; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    During a one-year long measurement period, radon and thoron data obtained by two different passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors were compared at subsurface workplaces in Hungary, such as mines (bauxite and manganese ore) and caves (medical and touristic). These workplaces have special environmental conditions, such as, stable and high relative humidity (100%), relatively stable temperature (12°C–21°C), low or high wind speed (max. 2.4 m s −1 ) and low or elevated aerosol concentration (130–60 000 particles m −3 ). The measured radon and thoron concentrations fluctuated in a wide range among the different workplaces. The respective annual average radon concentrations and their standard deviations (in brackets) measured by the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with cellulose filter (CF) and the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with sponge filter (SF) were: 350(321) Bq m −3 and 550(497) Bq m −3 in the bauxite mine; 887(604) Bq m −3 and 1258(788) Bq m −3 in the manganese ore mine; 2510(2341) Bq m −3 and 3403(3075) Bq m −3 in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 6239(2057) Bq m −3 and 8512(1955) Bq m −3 in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). The respective average thoron concentrations and their standard deviation (in brackets) measured by CF and SF monitors were: 154(210) Bq m −3 and 161(148) Bq m −3 in the bauxite mine; 187(191) Bq m −3 and 117(147) Bq m −3 in the manganese-ore mine; 360(524) Bq m −3 and 371(789) Bq m −3 in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 1420(1184) Bq m −3 and 1462(3655) Bq m −3 in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). Under these circumstances, comparison of the radon data for the SF and CF monitors showed the former were consistently 51% higher in the bauxite mine, 38% higher in the manganese ore mine, and 34% higher in the caves. Consequently, correction is required on previously obtained radon data acquired by CF

  16. Invited Article: In situ comparison of passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors at subsurface workplaces in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kávási, Norbert; Vigh, Tamás; Németh, Csaba; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Omori, Yasutaka; Janik, Miroslaw; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2014-02-01

    During a one-year long measurement period, radon and thoron data obtained by two different passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors were compared at subsurface workplaces in Hungary, such as mines (bauxite and manganese ore) and caves (medical and touristic). These workplaces have special environmental conditions, such as, stable and high relative humidity (100%), relatively stable temperature (12°C-21°C), low or high wind speed (max. 2.4 m s-1) and low or elevated aerosol concentration (130-60 000 particles m-3). The measured radon and thoron concentrations fluctuated in a wide range among the different workplaces. The respective annual average radon concentrations and their standard deviations (in brackets) measured by the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with cellulose filter (CF) and the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with sponge filter (SF) were: 350(321) Bq m-3 and 550(497) Bq m-3 in the bauxite mine; 887(604) Bq m-3 and 1258(788) Bq m-3 in the manganese ore mine; 2510(2341) Bq m-3 and 3403(3075) Bq m-3 in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 6239(2057) Bq m-3 and 8512(1955) Bq m-3 in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). The respective average thoron concentrations and their standard deviation (in brackets) measured by CF and SF monitors were: 154(210) Bq m-3 and 161(148) Bq m-3 in the bauxite mine; 187(191) Bq m-3 and 117(147) Bq m-3 in the manganese-ore mine; 360(524) Bq m-3 and 371(789) Bq m-3 in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 1420(1184) Bq m-3 and 1462(3655) Bq m-3 in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). Under these circumstances, comparison of the radon data for the SF and CF monitors showed the former were consistently 51% higher in the bauxite mine, 38% higher in the manganese ore mine, and 34% higher in the caves. Consequently, correction is required on previously obtained radon data acquired by CF monitors at subsurface workplaces to gain comparable data for SF monitors. In the

  17. In-situ heating test in the sedimentary soft rock. Part 3. Monitoring of the extent of high temperature zone by resistivity tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kenji; Suzuki, Koichi; Ikenoya, Takafumi; Takakura, Nozomu; Tani, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    One of the major issues in disposal of nuclear waste is that the long term behaviors of sedimentary soft rocks can be affected by various environmental factors such as temperature or hydraulic conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a method for evaluating the long term stability of caverns in sedimentary soft rocks as subjected to changes of environment. We have conducted in-situ heating test to evaluate the influence of high temperature to the surrounding rock mass at a depth of 50m. Resistivity monitoring is thought to be effective to map the extent of high temperature zone. So resistivity tomography was conducted during the heating. The results demonstrated that the resistivity of the rock mass around the heater well was decreased and this area was gradually expanded from the heated area during the heating. Resistivity of rock is proportional to that of pore water which is known to decrease with increasing temperature. This suggests that high temperature zone is detected and spatial distribution of temperature can be mapped by resistivity tomography. So resistivity tomography is expected to be one of the promising methods to monitor the heated area by nuclear waste. (author)

  18. In situ monitoring the growth of thin-film ZnS/Zn (S,O) bilayer on Cu-chalcopyrite for high performance thin film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saez-Araoz, R.; Abou-Ras, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Solar Energy Division, Glienicker Strasse 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Niesen, T.P. [AVANCIS GmbH and Co KG Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 Munich (Germany); Neisser, A.; Wilchelmi, K. [SULFURCELL Solartechnik GmbH Barbara-McClintock-Strasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Lux-Steiner, M.Ch. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Solar Energy Division, Glienicker Strasse 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Ennaoui, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Solar Energy Division, Glienicker Strasse 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: ennaoui@helmholtz-berlin.de

    2009-02-02

    This paper highlights the crucial role that the control of the chemical bath deposition (CBD) process plays for buffer production of Cu-chalcopyrite solar-cell devices. ZnS/Zn (S,O) bilayer was deposited on CuInS{sub 2} (CIS) and Cu(In,Ga)(SSe){sub 2} (CIGSSe) and monitored using turbidity measurements of the solution. The results were correlated to the X-ray photoemission spectra of the samples obtained by interruption of the process at sequential stages. Two different feature regimes were distinguished: In the first stage, a heterogeneous reaction takes place on the absorber resulting in the formation of pure ZnS. The second stage of the process is homogeneous, and the in-situ turbidity measurement shows a loss in the transmission of light through the CBD solution. The measured ZnL3M45M45 Auger-peaks, during this second stage of the process, show a shift of the kinetic energy from pure ZnS to a solid-solution ZnS/ZnO ('Zn (S,O)') with decreasing amount of sulfur. These results are supported by the observations from Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy. This paper also demonstrates that monitoring of the CBD process combined with the basic understanding using surface and interface analysis have contributed to improve the reproducibility and to enhance the photovoltaic performance of Cu-chalcopyrite thin-film solar modules.

  19. In situ monitoring the growth of thin-film ZnS/Zn (S,O) bilayer on Cu-chalcopyrite for high performance thin film solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez-Araoz, R.; Abou-Ras, D.; Niesen, T.P.; Neisser, A.; Wilchelmi, K.; Lux-Steiner, M.Ch.; Ennaoui, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper highlights the crucial role that the control of the chemical bath deposition (CBD) process plays for buffer production of Cu-chalcopyrite solar-cell devices. ZnS/Zn (S,O) bilayer was deposited on CuInS 2 (CIS) and Cu(In,Ga)(SSe) 2 (CIGSSe) and monitored using turbidity measurements of the solution. The results were correlated to the X-ray photoemission spectra of the samples obtained by interruption of the process at sequential stages. Two different feature regimes were distinguished: In the first stage, a heterogeneous reaction takes place on the absorber resulting in the formation of pure ZnS. The second stage of the process is homogeneous, and the in-situ turbidity measurement shows a loss in the transmission of light through the CBD solution. The measured ZnL3M45M45 Auger-peaks, during this second stage of the process, show a shift of the kinetic energy from pure ZnS to a solid-solution ZnS/ZnO ('Zn (S,O)') with decreasing amount of sulfur. These results are supported by the observations from Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy. This paper also demonstrates that monitoring of the CBD process combined with the basic understanding using surface and interface analysis have contributed to improve the reproducibility and to enhance the photovoltaic performance of Cu-chalcopyrite thin-film solar modules

  20. Time series geophysical monitoring of permanganate injections and in situ chemical oxidation of PCE, OU1 area, Savage Superfund Site, Milford, NH, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Philip T.; Smith, Thor E.; Williams, John H.; Degnan, James R.

    2012-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) treatment with sodium permanganate, an electrically conductive oxidant, provides a strong electrical signal for tracking of injectate transport using time series geophysical surveys including direct current (DC) resistivity and electromagnetic (EM) methods. Effective remediation is dependent upon placing the oxidant in close contact with the contaminated aquifer. Therefore, monitoring tools that provide enhanced tracking capability of the injectate offer considerable benefit to guide subsequent ISCO injections. Time-series geophysical surveys were performed at a superfund site in New Hampshire, USA over a one-year period to identify temporal changes in the bulk electrical conductivity of a tetrachloroethylene (PCE; also called tetrachloroethene) contaminated, glacially deposited aquifer due to the injection of sodium permanganate. The ISCO treatment involved a series of pulse injections of sodium permanganate from multiple injection wells within a contained area of the aquifer. After the initial injection, the permanganate was allowed to disperse under ambient groundwater velocities. Time series geophysical surveys identified the downward sinking and pooling of the sodium permanganate atop of the underlying till or bedrock surface caused by density-driven flow, and the limited horizontal spread of the sodium permanganate in the shallow parts of the aquifer during this injection period. When coupled with conventional monitoring, the surveys allowed for an assessment of ISCO treatment effectiveness in targeting the PCE plume and helped target areas for subsequent treatment.

  1. Time series geophysical monitoring of permanganate injections and in situ chemical oxidation of PCE, OU1 area, Savage Superfund Site, Milford, NH, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Philip T; Smith, Thor E; Williams, John H; Degnan, James R

    2012-05-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) treatment with sodium permanganate, an electrically conductive oxidant, provides a strong electrical signal for tracking of injectate transport using time series geophysical surveys including direct current (DC) resistivity and electromagnetic (EM) methods. Effective remediation is dependent upon placing the oxidant in close contact with the contaminated aquifer. Therefore, monitoring tools that provide enhanced tracking capability of the injectate offer considerable benefit to guide subsequent ISCO injections. Time-series geophysical surveys were performed at a superfund site in New Hampshire, USA over a one-year period to identify temporal changes in the bulk electrical conductivity of a tetrachloroethylene (PCE; also called tetrachloroethene) contaminated, glacially deposited aquifer due to the injection of sodium permanganate. The ISCO treatment involved a series of pulse injections of sodium permanganate from multiple injection wells within a contained area of the aquifer. After the initial injection, the permanganate was allowed to disperse under ambient groundwater velocities. Time series geophysical surveys identified the downward sinking and pooling of the sodium permanganate atop of the underlying till or bedrock surface caused by density-driven flow, and the limited horizontal spread of the sodium permanganate in the shallow parts of the aquifer during this injection period. When coupled with conventional monitoring, the surveys allowed for an assessment of ISCO treatment effectiveness in targeting the PCE plume and helped target areas for subsequent treatment. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. In-situ marine monitoring and environmental management of SWRO concentrate discharge: A case study of the KAUST SWRO plant

    KAUST Repository

    Van Der Merwe, Riaan

    2014-06-01

    Concentrate (when discharged to the ocean) may have chronic/acute impacts on marine ecosystems, particularly in the mixing zone around outfalls. The environmental impact of the desalination plant discharges is very site- and volumetric specific, and depends to a great extent on the salinity tolerance of the specific marine microbial communities as well as higher order organisms inhabiting the water column in and around this extreme discharge environment. Scientific studies that aim to grant insight into possible impacts of concentrate discharge are very important, in order to understand how this may affect different marine species when exposed to elevated salinity levels or residual chemicals from the treatment process in the discharge site. The objective of this PhD research was to investigate the potential environmental effects of the concentrate discharge in the near-field area around the submerged discharge of the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) plant by a combination of biological and hydrological studies. Possible changes in microbial abundance were assessed by using flow cytometric (FCM) analysis on a single-cell level in 107 samples, taken from the discharge area, the feed-water intake area and two control sites. Results indicate that changes in microbial abundance in the near-field area of the KAUST SWRO outfall are minor and appear to bethe result of a dilution effect rather than a direct impact of the concentrate discharge. In order to also investigate potential impacts on higher order organisms, a longterm in-situ salinity tolerance test at the discharge site was conducted on the coral Fungia granulosa and its photophysiology. The corals were exposed to elevated levels of salinity as a direct result of concentrate discharge. Their photosynthetic response after exposure to extreme salinity conditions around the full-scale operating SWRO desalination discharge was measured. A pulse amplitude

  3. Monitoring Groundwater Variations from Satellite Gravimetry and Hydrological Models: A Comparison with in-situ Measurements in the Mid-Atlantic Region of the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruya Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aimed at mapping time variations in the Earth’s gravity field, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE satellite mission is applicable to access terrestrial water storage (TWS, which mainly includes groundwater, soil moisture (SM, and snow. In this study, SM and accumulated snow water equivalent (SWE are simulated by the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS land surface models (LSMs and then used to isolate groundwater anomalies from GRACE-derived TWS in Pennsylvania and New York States of the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. The monitoring well water-level records from the U.S. Geological Survey Ground-Water Climate Response Network from January 2005 to December 2011 are used for validation. The groundwater results from different combinations of GRACE products (from three institutions, CSR, GFZ and JPL and GLDAS LSMs (CLM, NOAH and VIC are compared and evaluated with in-situ measurements. The intercomparison analysis shows that the solution obtained through removing averaged simulated SM and SWE of the three LSMs from the averaged GRACE-derived TWS of the three centers would be the most robust to reduce the noises, and increase the confidence consequently. Although discrepancy exists, the GRACE-GLDAS estimated groundwater variations generally agree with in-situ observations. For monthly scales, their correlation coefficient reaches 0.70 at 95% confidence level with the RMSE of the differences of 2.6 cm. Two-tailed Mann-Kendall trend test results show that there is no significant groundwater gain or loss in this region over the study period. The GRACE time-variable field solutions and GLDAS simulations provide precise and reliable data sets in illustrating the regional groundwater storage variations, and the application will be meaningful and invaluable when applied to the data-poor regions.

  4. Nuclear Power Plant environment`s surveillance by satellite remote sensing and in-situ monitoring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoran, Maria

    The main environmental issues affecting the broad acceptability of nuclear power plant are the emission of radioactive materials, the generation of radioactive waste, and the potential for nuclear accidents. All nuclear fission reactors, regardless of design, location, operator or regulator, have the potential to undergo catastrophic accidents involving loss of control of the reactor core, failure of safety systems and subsequent widespread fallout of hazardous fission products. Risk is the mathematical product of probability and consequences, so lowprobability and high-consequence accidents, by definition, have a high risk. NPP environment surveillance is a very important task in frame of risk assessment. Satellite remote sensing data had been applied for dosimeter levels first time for Chernobyl NPP accident in 1986. Just for a normal functioning of a nuclear power plant, multitemporal and multispectral satellite data in complementarily with field data are very useful tools for NPP environment surveillance and risk assessment. Satellite remote sensing is used as an important technology to help environmental research to support research analysis of spatio-temporal dynamics of environmental features nearby nuclear facilities. Digital processing techniques applied to several LANDSAT, MODIS and QuickBird data in synergy with in-situ data are used to assess the extent and magnitude of radiation and non-radiation effects on the water, near field soil, vegetation and air. As a test case the methodology was applied for for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Cernavoda, Romania. Thermal discharge from nuclear reactors cooling is dissipated as waste heat in Danube-Black -Sea Canal and Danube River. Water temperatures captured in thermal IR imagery are correlated with meteorological parameters. If during the winter thermal plume is localized to an area of a few km of NPP, the temperature difference between the plume and non-plume areas being about 1.5 oC, during summer and fall , is

  5. In-situ thermoelectric temperature monitoring and "Closed-loop integrated control" system for concentrator photovoltaic-thermoelectric hybrid receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolley, Matthew H.; Sweet, Tracy K. N.; Min, Gao

    2017-09-01

    This work demonstrates a new technique that capitalizes on the inherent flexibility of the thermoelectric module to provide a multifunctional platform, and exhibits a unique advantage only available within CPV-TE hybrid architectures. This system is the first to use the thermoelectric itself for hot-side temperature feedback to a PID control system, needing no additional thermocouple or thermistor to be attached to the cell - eliminating shading, and complex mechanical designs for mounting. Temperature measurement accuracy and thermoelectric active cooling functionality is preserved. Dynamic "per-cell" condition monitoring and protection is feasible using this technique, with direct cell-specific temperature measurement accurate to 1°C demonstrated over the entire experimental range. The extrapolation accuracy potential of the technique was also evaluated.

  6. The feasibility of automated online flow cytometry for in-situ monitoring of microbial dynamics in aquatic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besmer, Michael D.; Weissbrodt, David G.; Kratochvil, Bradley E.; Sigrist, Jürg A.; Weyland, Mathias S.; Hammes, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent staining coupled with flow cytometry (FCM) is often used for the monitoring, quantification and characterization of bacteria in engineered and environmental aquatic ecosystems including seawater, freshwater, drinking water, wastewater, and industrial bioreactors. However, infrequent grab sampling hampers accurate characterization and subsequent understanding of microbial dynamics in all of these ecosystems. A logic technological progression is high throughput and full automation of the sampling, staining, measurement, and data analysis steps. Here we assess the feasibility and applicability of automated FCM by means of actual data sets produced with prototype instrumentation. As proof-of-concept we demonstrate examples of microbial dynamics in (i) flowing tap water from a municipal drinking water supply network and (ii) river water from a small creek subject to two rainfall events. In both cases, automated measurements were done at 15-min intervals during 12–14 consecutive days, yielding more than 1000 individual data points for each ecosystem. The extensive data sets derived from the automated measurements allowed for the establishment of baseline data for each ecosystem, as well as for the recognition of daily variations and specific events that would most likely be missed (or miss-characterized) by infrequent sampling. In addition, the online FCM data from the river water was combined and correlated with online measurements of abiotic parameters, showing considerable potential for a better understanding of cause-and-effect relationships in aquatic ecosystems. Although several challenges remain, the successful operation of an automated online FCM system and the basic interpretation of the resulting data sets represent a breakthrough toward the eventual establishment of fully automated online microbiological monitoring technologies. PMID:24917858

  7. Rapid methods for multi-elemental X-ray fluorescence analysis using excitation isotope sources and Si(Li)-semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuravleva, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    Some rapid methods using an unique calibration curve have been developed for multi-elemental X-ray fluorescence analysis of thin and thick layers of various samples having low contents of heavy elements. The matrix absorption effect in thick samples is taken into account according to the scattered radiation.The similar method using a unique calibration curve for determination of low contents of trace elements in thin layers without account of matrix effect is proposed. The results on the intercomposition run soil-5 are in good agreement with the data obtained in different laboratories. The errors of the method are 10 %; in a case of peak superposition - 15 %

  8. Optimization and development of the instrumental parameters for a method of multielemental analysis through atomic spectroscopy emission, for the determination of My, Fe Mn and Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzoni Vindas, E.

    1998-01-01

    This study optimized the instrumental parameters of a method of multielemental (sequential) analysis, through atomic emission, for the determination of My, Fe,Mn and Cr. It used the factorial design at two levels and the method of Simplex optimization, that permitted the determination of the four cations under the same instrumental conditions. The author studied an analytic system, in which the conditions were not lineal between instrumental answers and the concentration, having to make adjustment of the calibration curves in homocedastic and heterocedastic conditions. (S. Grainger)

  9. Amperometric Microsensors Monitoring Glutamate-Evoked In Situ Responses of Nitric Oxide and Carbon Monoxide from Live Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yejin Ha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the brain, nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO are important signaling gases which have multifaceted roles, such as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and vasodilators. Even though it is difficult to measure NO and CO in a living system due to their high diffusibility and extremely low release levels, electrochemical sensors are promising tools to measure in vivo and in vitro NO and CO gases. In this paper, using amperometric dual and septuple NO/CO microsensors, real-time NO and CO changes evoked by glutamate were monitored simultaneously for human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y cells. In cultures, the cells were differentiated and matured into functional neurons by retinoic acid and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. When glutamate was administrated to the cells, both NO and CO increases and subsequent decreases returning to the basal levels were observed with a dual NO/CO microsensor. In order to facilitate sensor’s measurement, a flower-type septuple NO/CO microsensor was newly developed and confirmed in terms of the sensitivity and selectivity. The septuple microsensor was employed for the measurements of NO and CO changes as a function of distances from the position of glutamate injection. Our sensor measurements revealed that only functionally differentiated cells responded to glutamate and released NO and CO.

  10. In situ monitoring of molecular changes during cell differentiation processes in marine macroalgae through mass spectrometric imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ralf W; Crecelius, Anna C; Schubert, Ulrich S; Wichard, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI) was employed to discriminate between cell differentiation processes in macroalgae. One of the key developmental processes in the algal life cycle is the production of germ cells (gametes and zoids). The gametogenesis of the marine green macroalga Ulva mutabilis (Chlorophyta) was monitored by metabolomic snapshots of the surface, when blade cells differentiate synchronously into gametangia and giving rise to gametes. To establish MSI for macroalgae, dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a known algal osmolyte, was determined. MSI of the surface of U. mutabilis followed by chemometric data analysis revealed dynamic metabolomic changes during cell differentiation. DMSP and a total of 55 specific molecular biomarkers, which could be assigned to important stages of the gametogenesis, were detected. Our research contributes to the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying macroalgal cell differentiation. Graphical abstract Molecular changes during cell differentiation of the marine macroalga Ulva were visualized by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI).

  11. Thumb-size ultrasonic-assisted spectroscopic imager for in-situ glucose monitoring as optional sensor of conventional dialyzers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogo, Kosuke; Mori, Keita; Qi, Wei; Hosono, Satsuki; Kawashima, Natsumi; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    We proposed the ultrasonic-assisted spectroscopic imaging for the realization of blood-glucose-level monitoring during dialytic therapy. Optical scattering and absorption caused by blood cells deteriorate the detection accuracy of glucose dissolved in plasma. Ultrasonic standing waves can agglomerate blood cells at nodes. In contrast, around anti-node regions, the amount of transmitted light increases because relatively clear plasma appears due to decline the number of blood cells. Proposed method can disperse the transmitted light of plasma without time-consuming pretreatment such as centrifugation. To realize the thumb-size glucose sensor which can be easily attached to dialysis tubes, an ultrasonic standing wave generator and a spectroscopic imager are required to be small. Ultrasonic oscillators are ∅30[mm]. A drive circuit of oscillators, which now size is 41×55×45[mm], is expected to become small. The trial apparatus of proposed one-shot Fourier spectroscopic imager, whose size is 30×30×48[mm], also can be little-finger size in principal. In the experiment, we separated the suspension mixed water and micro spheres (Θ10[mm) into particles and liquid regions with the ultrasonic standing wave (frequency: 2[MHz]). Furthermore, the spectrum of transmitted light through the suspension could be obtained in visible light regions with a white LED.

  12. Application of the micronucleus test and comet assay in Trachemys callirostris erythrocytes as a model for in situ genotoxic monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Lina M; Bock, Brian C; Orozco, Luz Yaneth; Palacio, Jaime A

    2016-05-01

    Trachemys callirostris is a turtle species endemic to northern South America. In northern Colombia it occurs in the middle and lower Magdalena River drainage and its principal tributaries (lower Cauca and San Jorge rivers) and in other minor drainages such as the lower Sinú River. In recent years, industrial, agricultural, and mining activities have altered natural habitats in Colombia where this species occurs, and many of the pollutants released there are known to induce genetic alterations in wildlife species. The micronucleus test and comet assay are two of the most widely used methods to characterize DNA damage induced by physical and chemical agents in wildlife species, but have not been employed previously for genotoxic evaluations in T. callirostris. The goal of this study was to optimize these genotoxic biomarkers for T. callirostris erythrocytes in order to establish levels of DNA damage in this species and thereby evaluate its potential as a sentinel species for monitoring genotoxic effects in freshwater environments in northern Colombia. Both genotoxic techniques were applied on peripheral blood erythrocytes from 20 captive-reared T. callirostris individuals as a negative control, as well as from samples obtained from 49 individuals collected in Magangué (Magdalena River drainage) and 24 individuals collected in Lorica (Sinú River drainage) in northern Colombia. Negative control individuals exhibited a baseline frequency of micronuclei of 0.78±0.58 and baseline values for comet tail length and tail moment of 3.34±0.24µm and 10.70±5.5, respectively. In contrast, samples from both field sites exhibited significantly greater evidence of genotoxic effects for both tests. The mean MN frequencies in the samples from Magangué and Lorica were 8.04±7.08 and 12.19±12.94, respectively. The mean tail length for samples from Magangué and Lorica were 5.78±3.18 and 15.46±7.39, respectively. Finally, the mean tail moment for samples from Magangué and

  13. Applications of a nanocomposite-inspired in-situ broadband ultrasonic sensor to acousto-ultrasonics-based passive and active structural health monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Menglong; Zeng, Zhihui; Xu, Hao; Liao, Yaozhong; Zhou, Limin; Zhang, Zhong; Su, Zhongqing

    2017-07-01

    A novel nanocomposite-inspired in-situ broadband ultrasonic sensor previously developed, with carbon black as the nanofiller and polyvinylidene fluoride as the matrix, was networked for acousto-ultrasonic wave-based passive and active structural health monitoring (SHM). Being lightweight and small, this kind of sensor was proven to be capable of perceiving strain perturbation in virtue of the tunneling effect in the formed nanofiller conductive network when acousto-ultrasonic waves traverse the sensor. Proof-of-concept validation was implemented, to examine the sensor performance in responding to acousto-ultrasonic waves in a broad frequency regime: from acoustic emission (AE) of lower frequencies to guided ultrasonic waves (GUWs) of higher frequencies. Results have demonstrated the high fidelity, ultrafast response and high sensitivity of the sensor to acousto-ultrasonic waves up to 400kHz yet with an ultra-low magnitude (of the order of micro-strain). The sensor is proven to possess sensitivity and accuracy comparable with commercial piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers, whereas with greater flexibility in accommodating curved structural surfaces. Application paradigms of using the sensor for damage evaluation have spotlighted the capability of the sensor in compromising "sensing cost" with "sensing effectiveness" for passive AE- or active GUW-based SHM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. In situ monitoring the effects of a magnetic field on the open-circuit corrosion states of iron in acidic and neutral solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Zhanpeng; Yang Wu

    2008-01-01

    The effects of a 0.4 T horizontal magnetic field (HMF) on the open-circuit corrosion states of iron in static aqueous solutions are studied by in situ monitoring the responses of two electrochemical parameters to the applied magnetic field, i.e. the open-circuit potential (OCP) and the current under potentiostatic polarization. The applied magnetic field makes the OCP shift in the noble direction. Withdrawing the magnetic field causes a negative shift of the OCP in acidic solutions, but it does not cause any significant change of OCP in neutral solutions. Imposing a magnetic field induces a cathodic current for iron that was previously potentiostatically polarized at the OCP without magnetic field. Withdrawing the magnetic field induces an anodic current for iron that was previously potentiostatically polarized at the OCP with the magnetic field. The magnetic field effect is more significant in the acid solutions than in the salt solutions. The magnetic field effects on the oxygen reduction and on the activation-controlled iron dissolution reaction are found to be insignificant. The magnetic field effect on the hydrogen reduction reaction on iron in acidic solutions is demonstrated. Results show the possibility that a magnetic field would affect the hydrogen evolution by enhancing the electron-transfer process that has been categorized in the classical electrochemistry kinetics to be the rate-determining process. The memory effect of the magnetic field on the electrochemical reaction is identified and discussed

  15. In situ high-temperature gas sensors: continuous monitoring of the combustion quality of different wood combustion systems and optimization of combustion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kohler

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The sensing characteristics and long-term stability of different kinds of CO ∕ HC gas sensors (non-Nernstian mixed potential type during in situ operation in flue gas from different types of low-power combustion systems (wood-log- and wood-chip-fuelled were investigated. The sensors showed representative but individual sensing behaviour with respect to characteristically varying flue gas composition over the combustion process. The long-term sensor signal stability evaluated by repeated exposure to CO ∕ H2 ∕ N2 ∕ synthetic air mixtures showed no sensitivity loss after operation in the flue gas. Particularly for one of the sensors (Heraeus GmbH, this high signal stability was observed in a field test experiment even during continuous operation in the flue gas of the wood-chip firing system over 4 months. Furthermore, it was experimentally shown that the signals of these CO ∕ HC sensing elements yield important additional information about the wood combustion process. This was demonstrated by the adaptation of an advanced combustion airstream control algorithm on a wood-log-fed fireplace and by the development of a combustion quality monitoring system for wood-chip-fed central heaters.

  16. Multielemental Determination of As, Bi, Ge, Sb, and Sn in Agricultural Samples Using Hydride Generation Coupled to Microwave-Induced Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Raquel C; Amaral, Clarice D B; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Araujo Nogueira, Ana Rita

    2017-06-14

    A microwave-induced plasma optical emission spectrometer with N 2 -based plasma was combined with a multimode sample introduction system (MSIS) for hydride generation (HG) and multielemental determination of As, Bi, Ge, Sb, and Sn in samples of forage, bovine liver, powdered milk, agricultural gypsum, rice, and mineral fertilizer, using a single condition of prereduction and reduction. The accuracy of the developed analytical method was evaluated using certified reference materials of water and mineral fertilizer, and recoveries ranged from 95 to 106%. Addition and recovery experiments were carried out, and the recoveries varied from 85 to 117% for all samples evaluated. The limits of detection for As, Bi, Ge, Sb, and Sn were 0.46, 0.09, 0.19, 0.46, and 5.2 μg/L, respectively, for liquid samples, and 0.18, 0.04, 0.08, 0.19, and 2.1 mg/kg, respectively, for solid samples. The method proposed offers a simple, fast, multielemental, and robust alternative for successful determination of all five analytes in agricultural samples with low operational cost without compromising analytical performance.

  17. A prototypical non-malignant epithelial model to study genome dynamics and concurrently monitor micro-RNAs and proteins in situ during oncogene-induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komseli, Eirini-Stavroula; Pateras, Ioannis S; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Stawiski, Konrad; Rizou, Sophia V; Polyzos, Alexander; Roumelioti, Fani-Marlen; Chiourea, Maria; Mourkioti, Ioanna; Paparouna, Eleni; Zampetidis, Christos P; Gumeni, Sentiljana; Trougakos, Ioannis P; Pefani, Dafni-Eleftheria; O'Neill, Eric; Gagos, Sarantis; Eliopoulos, Aristides G; Fendler, Wojciech; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Bartek, Jiri; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G

    2018-01-10

    Senescence is a fundamental biological process implicated in various pathologies, including cancer. Regarding carcinogenesis, senescence signifies, at least in its initial phases, an anti-tumor response that needs to be circumvented for cancer to progress. Micro-RNAs, a subclass of regulatory, non-coding RNAs, participate in senescence regulation. At the subcellular level micro-RNAs, similar to proteins, have been shown to traffic between organelles influencing cellular behavior. The differential function of micro-RNAs relative to their subcellular localization and their role in senescence biology raises concurrent in situ analysis of coding and non-coding gene products in senescent cells as a necessity. However, technical challenges have rendered in situ co-detection unfeasible until now. In the present report we describe a methodology that bypasses these technical limitations achieving for the first time simultaneous detection of both a micro-RNA and a protein in the biological context of cellular senescence, utilizing the new commercially available SenTraGor TM compound. The method was applied in a prototypical human non-malignant epithelial model of oncogene-induced senescence that we generated for the purposes of the study. For the characterization of this novel system, we applied a wide range of cellular and molecular techniques, as well as high-throughput analysis of the transcriptome and micro-RNAs. This experimental setting has three advantages that are presented and discussed: i) it covers a "gap" in the molecular carcinogenesis field, as almost all corresponding in vitro models are fibroblast-based, even though the majority of neoplasms have epithelial origin, ii) it recapitulates the precancerous and cancerous phases of epithelial tumorigenesis within a short time frame under the light of natural selection and iii) it uses as an oncogenic signal, the replication licensing factor CDC6, implicated in both DNA replication and transcription when over

  18. In Situ Real-Time Mechanical and Morphological Characterization of Electrodes for Electrochemical Energy Storage and Conversion by Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpigel, Netanel; Levi, Mikhael D; Sigalov, Sergey; Daikhin, Leonid; Aurbach, Doron

    2018-01-16

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) generates surface-acoustic waves in quartz crystal plates that can effectively probe the structure of films, particulate composite electrodes of complex geometry rigidly attached to quartz crystal surface on one side and contacting a gas or liquid phase on the other side. The output QCM-D characteristics consist of the resonance frequency (MHz frequency range) and resonance bandwidth measured with extra-ordinary precision of a few tenths of Hz. Depending on the electrodes stiffness/softness, QCM-D operates either as a gravimetric or complex mechanical probe of their intrinsic structure. For at least 20 years, QCM-D has been successfully used in biochemical and environmental science and technology for its ability to probe the structure of soft solvated interfaces. Practical battery and supercapacitor electrodes appear frequently as porous solids with their stiffness changing due to interactions with electrolyte solutions or as a result of ion intercalation/adsorption and long-term electrode cycling. Unfortunately, most QCM measurements with electrochemical systems are carried out based on a single (fundamental) frequency and, as such, provided that the resonance bandwidth remains constant, are suitable for only gravimetric sensing. The multiharmonic measurements have been carried out mainly on conducting/redox polymer films rather than on typical composite battery/supercapacitor electrodes. Here, we summarize the most recent publications devoted to the development of electrochemical QCM-D (EQCM-D)-based methodology for systematic characterization of mechanical properties of operating battery/supercapacitor electrodes. By varying the electrodes' composition and structure (thin/thick layers, small/large particles, binders with different mechanical properties, etc.), nature of the electrolyte solutions and charging/cycling conditions, the method is shown to be operated in different application modes. A

  19. Simultaneous monitoring of biofilm growth, microbial activity, and inorganic deposits on surfaces with an in situ, online, real-time, non-destructive, optical sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strathmann, Martin; Mittenzwey, Klaus-Henrik; Sinn, Gert; Papadakis, Wassilios; Flemming, Hans-Curt

    2013-01-01

    Deposits on surfaces in water-bearing systems, also known as 'fouling', can lead to substantial losses in the performance of industrial processes as well as a decreased product quality. Early detection and localization of such deposits can, to a considerable extent, save such losses. However, most of the surfaces that become fouled, for example, in process water pipes, membrane systems, power plants, and food and beverage industries, are difficult to access and analyses conducted on the water phase do not reveal the site or extent of deposits. Furthermore, it is of interest to distinguish biological from non-biological deposits. Although they usually occur together, different countermeasures are necessary. Therefore, sensors are required that indicate the development of surface fouling in real-time, non-destructively, and in situ, preferably allowing for discrimination between chemical and/or biological deposits. In this paper, an optical deposit sensor is presented which fulfills these requirements. Based on multiple fluorescence excitation emission matrix analysis, it detects autofluorescence of amino acids as indicators of biomass. Autofluorescence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide + hydrogen is interpreted as an indicator of biological activity, thus it acts as a viability marker, making the method suited for assessing the efficacy of disinfection treatments. Scattering signals from abiotic deposits such as calcium carbonate or corrosion products can clearly be distinguished from biotic substances and monitored separately. The sensor provides an early warning of fouling, allowing for timely countermeasures to be deployed. It also provides an assessment of the success of cleaning treatments and is a promising tool for integrated antifouling strategies.

  20. Voltage-Controlled Topotactic Phase Transition in Thin-Film SrCoOx Monitored by In Situ X-ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiyang; Yildiz, Bilge

    2016-02-10

    Topotactic phase transition of functional oxides induced by changes in oxygen nonstoichiometry can largely alter multiple physical and chemical properties, including electrical conductivity, magnetic state, oxygen diffusivity, and electrocatalytic reactivity. For tuning these properties reversibly, feasible means to control oxygen nonstoichiometry-dependent phase transitions in functional oxides are needed. This paper describes the use of electrochemical potential to induce phase transition in strontium cobaltites, SrCoOx (SCO) between the brownmillerite (BM) phase, SrCoO₂.₅, and the perovskite (P) phase, SrCoO₃₋δ. To monitor the structural evolution of SCO, in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) was performed on an electrochemical cell having (001) oriented thin-film SrCoOx as the working electrode on a single crystal (001) yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte in air. In order to change the effective pO₂ in SCO and trigger the phase transition from BM to P, external electrical biases of up to 200 mV were applied across the SCO film. The phase transition from BM to P phase could be triggered at a bias as low as 30 mV, corresponding to an effective pO₂ of 1 atm at 500 °C. The phase transition was fully reversible and the epitaxial film quality was maintained after reversible phase transitions. These results demonstrate the use of electrical bias to obtain fast and easily accessible switching between different phases as well as distinct physical and chemical properties of functional oxides as exemplified here for SCO.

  1. In-Situ Nondestructive Evaluation of Kevlar(Registered Trademark)and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Micromechanics for Improved Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess; Saulsberry, Regor

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been faced with recertification and life extension issues for epoxy-impregnated Kevlar 49 (K/Ep) and carbon (C/Ep) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) used in various systems on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station, respectively. Each COPV has varying criticality, damage and repair histories, time at pressure, and pressure cycles. COPVs are of particular concern due to the insidious and catastrophic burst-before-leak failure mode caused by stress rupture (SR) of the composite overwrap. SR life has been defined [1] as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress level(s), time at stress level(s), and associated environment. SR has none of the features of predictability associated with metal pressure vessels, such as crack geometry, growth rate and size, or other features that lend themselves to nondestructive evaluation (NDE). In essence, the variability or surprise factor associated with SR cannot be eliminated. C/Ep COPVs are also susceptible to impact damage that can lead to reduced burst pressure even when the amount of damage to the COPV is below the visual detection threshold [2], thus necessitating implementation of a mechanical damage control plan [1]. Last, COPVs can also fail prematurely due to material or design noncompliance. In each case (SR, impact or noncompliance), out-of-family behavior is expected leading to a higher probability of failure at a given stress, hence, greater uncertainty in performance. For these reasons, NASA has been actively engaged in research to develop NDE methods that can be used during post-manufacture qualification, in-service inspection, and in-situ structural health monitoring. Acoustic emission (AE) is one of the more promising NDE techniques for detecting and monitoring, in real-time, the strain energy release and corresponding stress-wave propagation produced by actively growing flaws and defects in composite

  2. Optimization of a single-drop microextraction method for multielemental determination by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry following in situ vapor generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Sandra; Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T.C. de; Bendicho, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    A headspace single-drop microextraction (HS-SDME) method has been developed in combination with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) for the simultaneous determination of As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg in aqueous solutions. Vapor generation is carried out in a 40 mL volume closed-vial containing a solution with the target analytes in hydrochloric acid and potassium ferricyanide medium. Hydrides (As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn) and Hg vapor are trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3 μL volume) containing Pd(II), followed by the subsequent injection in the ETV. Experimental variables such as medium composition, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) volume and concentration, stirring rate, extraction time, sample volume, ascorbic acid concentration and palladium amount in the drop were fully optimized. The limits of detection (LOD) (3σ criterion) of the proposed method for As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg were 0.2, 0.04, 0.01, 0.07, 0.09 and 0.8 μg/L, respectively. Enrichment factors of 9, 85, 138, 130, 37 and 72 for As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg, respectively, were achieved in 210 s. The relative standard deviations (N = 5) ranged from 4 to 8%. The proposed HS-SDME-ETV-ICP-MS method has been applied for the determination of As, Sb, Bi, Pb, Sn and Hg in NWRI TM-28.3 certified reference material.

  3. Multielemental analysis of osseous remains by x-ray fluorescence to determine types of diets from the Cultura Lima (II B.C. - VIII A.C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montalvo B, A.

    1997-01-01

    The multielemental analysis of 29 human bone samples and sediments from the Lima Culture (III c. BC to IX c. AC) were analyzed by x-ray fluorescence technique with Cd-109 excitation source Si(Li) detector, Canberra associated electronic and PCA-II nucleus multichannel card, in order to determine to determine the diet type of these antique inhabitant. The elements found in bone rests were Ca, Sr, Zn, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Rb, Zn and Pb, and As in one of the clavicles. In sediment samples we obtained a major quantity of elements. According to the Sr an Zn obtained values in osseous rest and the developed regression model, we can conclude that the ancient inhabitants of Lima Culture had an omnivorous feeding with a carnivore tendency due to its geographic location. (author). 35 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs., 6 ills

  4. Multi-element analysis of wheat flour and white bread by neutron activation.; Analisis multielemental en harina de trigo y pan blanco por activacion neutronica.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godinez A, M A

    1994-12-31

    One of the best source of feeding even for the human being as for animals are the Cereals. Although they are mainly energetic aliment, due to its composition in starch, they are a very important source of proteins and amino acids. They contribute mineral elements to the diet. Even those elements constitute a very small part of the total diet, they take a very important place in many human metabolic processes. To make a multielemental analysis of an aliment is very important that we are based on a very sensible analytic technique so we are able to find them, just as the Neutronic Activation. This Nuclear technique allows you to make a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the elements that are in a sample, but it does n`t show the way in which the elements are presented. It is based in turning those elements into radioactive ones through its exposition to an uniform and constant fluid of neutrons, so then its radioactivity can be determined. The present work has as a main purpose to make a multielemental analysis of the wheat flour and white bread through the Neutronic Activation Technique, using the comparator method and establishing previously the most appropriate work conditions as much irradiation as digestion and measuring of the radioactivity of the sample. In this way, it was able to know that the wheat flour has potassium, chlorine, magnesium, sodium, iron, zinc, manganese, rubidium and selenium elements in a concentration of 2000, 700, 500, 25, 18, 13, 5.5, 0.9 and 0.01 - 0.3 mg/g respectively. In an other hand it was found that the white bread has the same elements than the wheat flour but its concentration was: 1700, 9000, 400, 7000, 52, 13, 6, 1 and 0.05 - 0.3 mg/g respectively. (Author).

  5. A-site order–disorder in the NdBaMn2O5+δ SOFC electrode material monitored in situ by neutron diffraction under hydrogen flow

    KAUST Repository

    Tonus, Florent

    2017-05-11

    The A-site disordered perovskite manganite, Nd0.5Ba0.5MnO3, has been obtained by heating the A-site-ordered and vacancy ordered layered double perovskite, NdBaMn2O5, in air at 1300 °C for 5 h. Combined transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and neutron powder diffraction (NPD) analysis at 25 °C revealed that Nd0.5Ba0.5MnO3 has a pseudotetragonal unit cell with orthorhombic symmetry (space group Imma, √2ap × 2ap × √2ap) at 20 °C with the cell dimensions a = 5.503(1) Å, b = 7.7962(4) Å, c = 5.502(1) Å, in contrast to Pm[3 with combining macron]m or Cmcm that have been previously stated from X-ray diffraction studies. The in situ neutron diffraction study carried out on Nd0.5Ba0.5MnO3 in hydrogen flow up to T ∼ 900 °C, allows monitoring the A-site cation disorder–order structural phase transition of this representative member of potential SOFC anode materials between air sintering conditions and hydrogen working conditions. Oxygen loss from Nd0.5Ba0.5MnO3 proceeds with retention of A-site disorder until the oxygen content reaches the Nd0.5Ba0.5MnO2.5 composition at 600 °C. The phase transition to layered NdBaMn2O5 and localization of the oxygen vacancies in the Nd layer proceeds at 800 °C with retention of the oxygen content. Impedance spectroscopy measurements for the oxidized A-site ordered electrode material, NdBaMn2O6, screen printed on a Ce0.9Gd0.1O2−δ (CGO) electrolyte showed promising electrochemical performance in air at 700 °C with a polarization resistance of 1.09 Ω cm2 without any optimization.

  6. Carbonate clumped isotopes and in situ temperature monitoring for Holocene soils in the San Luis Valley, USA indicate springtime carbonate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, A. M.; Paces, J. B.; Ruleman, C.

    2017-12-01

    Pedogenic carbonate horizons are abundant in semi-arid and arid regions worldwide and within the geologic record. They present a widely distributed archive of past environmental conditions, driven by global climate or tectonically-controlled elevation changes. Oxygen and carbon isotopes in calcite-rich nodules and clast rinds are widely-applied indicators of past soil water and CO2 composition linked to changing precipitation and plant communities. The temperature of carbonate formation, however, provides key constraint on past water/CO2 values and elucidate why they may have changed in the past. Clumped isotope thermometry can provide this constraint and additional climate information, given the carbonate forming system is well understood. We present preliminary clumped isotope (Δ47) temperatures for Holocene soil carbonates, constrained by 14C and U-Th disequilibrium dating, compared with two years of in situ soil temperature data to better understand the mechanism and seasonality of carbonate formation in the San Luis Valley region of the southern Rocky Mountains. Five temperature-monitoring sites ranging in elevation (1940-2450 m) and latitude (36.2-37.9°N) were installed in a variety of settings (range front, valley center, and canyon). The resulting records show indistinguishable seasonal temperature variations at >60 cm depth. This suggests Δ47 temperatures should be comparable at sites across the region. Temperatures based on Δ47 measurements of Holocene (>1.8 to 11.0 ka BP) carbonates at these sites yield consistent inter-site temperatures of 10±4°C, which are similar to modern springtime soil temperatures at depth. This seasonality matches previous results of isotopic modeling at sites further south along the Rio Grande corridor. Temperatures during March to May show multiple, abrupt warming and cooling cycles on weekly timescales caused by wetting and drying of the soil during spring precipitation events. This may drive carbonate precipitation

  7. Demonstration and Validation of a Portable Raman Sensor for In-Situ Detection and Monitoring of Perchlorate (ClO4-)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatzinger, Paul B. [Shaw Environmental, Inc., Lawrenceville, NJ (United States); Eres, Gyula [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gu, Baohua [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jubb, Aaron M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-01

    > M using a portable Raman analyzer. The performance of the commercial SERS sensors for ClO4- detection in the presence and absence of interferences was determined for a series of standard solutions. Sulfate (SO42-) was found to exhibit the greatest interference for the anions tested, which included Cl-, NO3-, and SO42-. • Field demonstration of the portable Raman sensor with commercially produced SERS substrates was completed at two Department of Defense (DoD) sites; twice at the Indian Head Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head, MD, and once at Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, AL. Multiple wells were sampled at both DoD sites, where a standard addition method was employed using the sensor to determine the ClO4-situ screening and analysis of ClO4- and possibly other energetics that are both important for environmental monitoring and of interest for national security. However, we point out that SERS technology is also prone to interferences due to its sensitivity and responses to other ionic species, such as NO3-, SO42-, and dissolved organics or co-contaminants present in the groundwater, which could potentially mask the SERS signal of the target analyte (i.e., ClO4-). As such, SERS analysis was

  8. Elucidating PID Degradation Mechanisms and In Situ Dark I-V Monitoring for Modeling Degradation Rate in CdTe Thin-Film Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hacke, Peter; Spataru, Sergiu; Johnston, Steve

    2016-01-01

    A progression of potential-induced degradation (PID) mechanisms are observed in CdTe modules, including shunting/junction degradation and two different manifestations of series resistance depending on the stress level and water ingress. The dark I-V method for in-situ characterization of Pmax bas...

  9. In situ monitoring of structure formation in the active layer of polymer solar cells during roll-to-roll coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossander, Lea Hildebrandt; Zawacka, Natalia Klaudia; Dam, Henrik Friis

    2014-01-01

    The active layer crystallization during roll-to-roll coating of organic solar cells is studied in situ. We developed an X-ray setup where the coater unit is an integrated part of the small angle X-ray scattering instrument, making it possible to control the coating process while recording...

  10. Estudio sobre la aplicación del análisis por activación en reactores nucleares a la determinación multielemental rutinaria en rocas silicatadas

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa, Ricardo; Cohen, Marcos

    1985-01-01

    Se investigan comparativamente las posibilidades del análisis por activación, con neutrones predominantemente térmicos (AANT) y epitérmicos (AANE), para le determinación multielemental no destructiva de muestras geológicas silicatadas. Se describe el método empleado para el análisis de 23 elementos de materiales de referencia del U.S.G.S. y granitos argentinos, aplicable a la determinación rutinaria.

  11. Multielemental analysis of osseous remains by x-ray fluorescence to determine types of diets from the Cultura Lima (II B.C. - VIII A.C); Analisis multielemental de restos oseos por fluorescencia de rayos-x para la reconstruccion de dietas del periodo temprano en la Cultura de Lima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montalvo B, A

    1998-12-31

    The multielemental analysis of 29 human bone samples and sediments from the Lima Culture (III c. BC to IX c. AC) were analyzed by x-ray fluorescence technique with Cd-109 excitation source Si(Li) detector, Canberra associated electronic and PCA-II nucleus multichannel card, in order to determine to determine the diet type of these antique inhabitant. The elements found in bone rests were Ca, Sr, Zn, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Rb, Zn and Pb, and As in one of the clavicles. In sediment samples we obtained a major quantity of elements. According to the Sr an Zn obtained values in osseous rest and the developed regression model, we can conclude that the ancient inhabitants of Lima Culture had an omnivorous feeding with a carnivore tendency due to its geographic location. (author). 35 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs., 6 ills.

  12. In-situ realtime monitoring of nanoscale gold electroplating using micro-electro-mechanical systems liquid cell operating in transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egawa, Minoru; Fujita, Hiroyuki [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Ishida, Tadashi, E-mail: ishida.t.ai@m.titech.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 225-8503 (Japan); Jalabert, Laurent [LIMMS/CNRS-IIS (UMI 2820), Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); CNRS, LAAS, 7 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31400 Toulouse, France and University of Toulouse, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2016-01-11

    The dynamics of nanoscale electroplating between gold electrodes was investigated using a microfabricated liquid cell mounted on a scanning transmission electron microscope. The electroplating was recorded in-situ for 10 min with a spatial resolution higher than 6 nm. At the beginning of the electroplating, gold spike-like structures of about 50 nm in size grew from an electrode, connected gold nanoclusters around them, and form three dimensional nanoscale structures. We visualized the elementary process of the gold electroplating, and believe that the results lead to the deeper understanding of electroplating at the nanoscale.

  13. In-situ realtime monitoring of nanoscale gold electroplating using micro-electro-mechanical systems liquid cell operating in transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egawa, Minoru; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Ishida, Tadashi; Jalabert, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of nanoscale electroplating between gold electrodes was investigated using a microfabricated liquid cell mounted on a scanning transmission electron microscope. The electroplating was recorded in-situ for 10 min with a spatial resolution higher than 6 nm. At the beginning of the electroplating, gold spike-like structures of about 50 nm in size grew from an electrode, connected gold nanoclusters around them, and form three dimensional nanoscale structures. We visualized the elementary process of the gold electroplating, and believe that the results lead to the deeper understanding of electroplating at the nanoscale

  14. Quantitative in situ monitoring of an elevated temperature reaction using a water-cooled mid-infrared fiber-optic probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclaurin, P; Crabb, N C; Wells, I; Worsfold, P J; Coombs, D

    1996-04-01

    A novel water-cooled mid-infrared fiber-optic probe is described which is heatable to 230 °C. The probe has chalcogenide fibers and a ZnSe internal reflection element and is compact and fully flexible, allowing access to a wide range of standard laboratory reaction vessels and fume cupboard arrangements. Performance is demonstrated via the in situ analysis of an acid-catalyzed esterification reaction in toluene at 110 °C, and the results are compared with those from a conventional extractive sampling loop flow cell arrangement. Particular emphasis is given to the quantitative interpretation of the spectroscopic data, using gas chromatographic reference data. Calibration data are presented for univariate and partial least squares models, with an emphasis on procedures for improving the quality of interpreparation calibration and prediction through the use of focused reference analysis regimes. Subset univariate procedures are presented that yield relative errors of spectroscopy combined with bias correction partial least squares procedures for the efficient in situ quantitative analysis of laboratory scale reactions.

  15. Real-time in-situ monitoring of the topotactic transformation of TlCu3Se2 into TlCu2Se2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ångström, J.; Sahlberg, M.; Berger, R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Topotactic transition from TlCu 3 Se 2 to TlCu 2 Se 2 followed in situ. • Synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction enabled short scans. • Relative abundance of phases refined from powder data. • Opens up for studying similar systems in the same manner. - Abstract: The solid state transformation of monoclinic TlCu 3 Se 2 into tetragonal TlCu 2 Se 2 by oxidative copper leaching in concentrated ammonia solution has been studied in situ by the use of synchrotron radiation. The diffraction patterns of parent and daughter phase are both sharp, indicating a strong topotactic relationship between them that effectuates a rapid change by “chimie douce” performed at +19 °C. The transformation rate is strongly connected to the access of oxygen from the surrounding air. The transformation was followed in a real-time mode, being almost complete after 2.5 h with 1 h incubation due to low oxygen content, as shown from refining the diffraction patterns by Rietveld profile technique

  16. Solvent exchange in a metal–organic framework single crystal monitored by dynamic in situ X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Jordan M.; Walton, Ian M.; Bateman, Gage; Benson, Cassidy A.; Mitchell, Travis; Sylvester, Eric; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Benedict, Jason B. (UC); (Buffalo)

    2017-07-25

    Understanding the processes by which porous solid-state materials adsorb and release guest molecules would represent a significant step towards developing rational design principles for functional porous materials. To elucidate the process of liquid exchange in these materials, dynamicin situX-ray diffraction techniques have been developed which utilize liquid-phase chemical stimuli. Using these time-resolved diffraction techniques, the ethanol solvation process in a flexible metal–organic framework [Co(AIP)(bpy)0.5(H2O)]·2H2O was examined. The measurements provide important insight into the nature of the chemical transformation in this system including the presence of a previously unreported neat ethanol solvate structure.

  17. Facile high-throughput forward chemical genetic screening by in situ monitoring of glucuronidase-based reporter gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek eHalder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of biologically active small molecules to perturb biological functions holds enormous potential for investigating complex signaling networks. However, in contrast to animal systems, the search for and application of chemical tools for basic discovery in the plant sciences, generally referred to as ‘chemical genetics’, has only recently gained momentum. In addition to cultured cells, the well-characterized, small-sized model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is suitable for cultivation in microplates, which allows employing diverse cell- or phenotype-based chemical screens. In such screens, a chemical’s bioactivity is typically assessed either through scoring its impact on morphological traits or quantifying molecular attributes such as enzyme or reporter activities. Here, we describe a facile forward chemical screening methodology for intact Arabidopsis seedlings harboring the β-glucuronidase (GUS reporter by directly quantifying GUS activity in situ with 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-glucuronide (4-MUG as substrate. The quantitative nature of this screening assay has an obvious advantage over the also convenient histochemical GUS staining method, as it allows application of statistical procedures and unbiased hit selection based on threshold values as well as distinction between compounds with strong or weak bioactivity. At the same time, the in situ bioassay is very convenient requiring less effort and time for sample handling in comparison to the conventional quantitative in vitro GUS assay using 4-MUG, as validated with several Arabidopsis lines harboring different GUS reporter constructs. To demonstrate that the developed assays is particularly suitable for large-scale screening projects, we performed a pilot screen for chemical activators or inhibitors of salicylic acid-mediated defense signaling using the Arabidopsis PR1p::GUS line. Importantly, the screening methodology provided here can be adopted for any inducible GUS reporter line.

  18. pH-Responsive, Self-Sacrificial Nanotheranostic Agent for Potential In Vivo and In Vitro Dual Modal MRI/CT Imaging, Real-Time, and In Situ Monitoring of Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ludan; Wang, Jinlong; Dai, Zhichao; Hu, Zunfu; Chen, Xue; Qi, Yafei; Zheng, Xiuwen; Yu, Dexin

    2017-02-15

    Multifunctional nanotheranostic agents have been highly commended due to the application to image-guided cancer therapy. Herein, based on the chemically disordered face centered cubic (fcc) FePt nanoparticles (NPs) and graphene oxide (GO), we develop a pH-responsive FePt-based multifunctional theranostic agent for potential in vivo and in vitro dual modal MRI/CT imaging and in situ cancer inhibition. The fcc-FePt will release highly active Fe ions due to the low pH in tumor cells, which would catalyze H 2 O 2 decomposition into reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the cells and further induce cancer cell apoptosis. Conjugated with folic acid (FA), the iron platinum-dimercaptosuccinnic acid/PEGylated graphene oxide-folic acid (FePt-DMSA/GO-PEG-FA) composite nanoassemblies (FePt/GO CNs) could effectively target and show significant toxicity to FA receptor-positive tumor cells, but no obvious toxicity to FA receptor-negative normal cells, which was evaluated by WST-1 assay. The FePt-based multifunctional nanoparticles allow real-time monitoring of Fe release by T 2 -weighted MRI, and the selective contrast enhancement in CT could be estimated in vivo after injection. The results showed that FePt-based NPs displayed excellent biocompatibility and favorable MRI/CT imaging ability in vivo and in vitro. Meanwhile, the decomposition of FePt will dramatically decrease the T 2 -weighted MRI signal and increase the ROS signal, which enables real-time and in situ visualized monitoring of Fe release in tumor cells. In addition, the self-sacrificial decomposition of fcc-FePt will be propitious to the self-clearance of the as-prepared FePt-based nanocomposite in vivo. Therefore, the FePt/GO CNs could serve as a potential multifunctional theranostic nanoplatform of MRI/CT imaging guided cancer diagnosis and therapy in the clinic.

  19. Development of an in situ fatigue sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A prototype in situ fatigue sensor has been designed, constructed and evaluated experimentally for its ability to monitor the accumulation of fatigue damage in a cyclically loaded steel structure, e.g., highway bridge. The sensor consists of multiple...

  20. Wireless in-situ Sensor Network for Agriculture and Water Monitoring on a River Basin Scale in Southern Finland: Evaluation from a Data User’s Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotamäki, Niina; Thessler, Sirpa; Koskiaho, Jari; Hannukkala, Asko O.; Huitu, Hanna; Huttula, Timo; Havento, Jukka; Järvenpää, Markku

    2009-01-01

    Sensor networks are increasingly being implemented for environmental monitoring and agriculture to provide spatially accurate and continuous environmental information and (near) real-time applications. These networks provide a large amount of data which poses challenges for ensuring data quality and extracting relevant information. In the present paper we describe a river basin scale wireless sensor network for agriculture and water monitoring. The network, called SoilWeather, is unique and the first of this type in Finland. The performance of the network is assessed from the user and maintainer perspectives, concentrating on data quality, network maintenance and applications. The results showed that the SoilWeather network has been functioning in a relatively reliable way, but also that the maintenance and data quality assurance by automatic algorithms and calibration samples requires a lot of effort, especially in continuous water monitoring over large areas. We see great benefits on sensor networks enabling continuous, real-time monitoring, while data quality control and maintenance efforts highlight the need for tight collaboration between sensor and sensor network owners to decrease costs and increase the quality of the sensor data in large scale applications. PMID:22574050

  1. In Situ Monitoring of Dispersion in the Water Column, Final Product for the Detection and Mitigation of Oil within the Water Column Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-31

    Applied Response Technologies (SMART) protocol in remote locations. RDC started with market research of commercially available monitoring technologies...SLDMB), which can begin collecting data immediately after impact with the water surface. It transmits data to users via satellite communication ...frequently used as a platform to detect submerged oil. RDC performed a market research of commercially available unmanned vehicles. They come in

  2. Use of high-intensity sonication for pre-treatment of biological tissues prior to multielemental analysis by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De La Calle, Inmaculada; Costas, Marta; Cabaleiro, Noelia; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In this work, two ultrasound-based procedures are developed for sample preparation prior to determination of P, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se and Sr in biological tissues by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Ultrasound-assisted extraction by means of a cup-horn sonoreactor and ultrasonic-probe slurry sampling were compared with a well-established procedure such as magnetic agitation slurry sampling. For that purpose, seven certified reference materials and different real samples of animal tissue were used. Similar accuracy and precision is obtained with the three sample preparation approaches tried. Limits of detection were dependent on both the sample matrix and the sample pre-treatment used, best values being achieved with ultrasound-assisted extraction. Advantages of ultrasound-assisted extraction include reduced sample handling, decreased contamination risks (neither addition of surfactants nor use of foreign objects inside the extraction vial), simpler background (no solid particles onto the sample carrier) and improved recovery for some elements such as P. A mixture of 10% v/v HNO 3 + 20–40% v/v HCl was suitable for extraction from biological tissues. - Highlights: ► We implement high-intensity sonication for pre-treatment of biological tissues. ► Multielemental analysis is performed by total reflection X-ray spectrometry. ► Ultrasound-based procedures are developed and compared to conventional slurry preparation. ► Features such as background, recovery and sample handling are favored by using ultrasonic extraction.

  3. Portable broadband cavity-enhanced spectrometer utilizing Kalman filtering: application to real-time, in situ monitoring of glyoxal and nitrogen dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bo; Zhao, Weixiong; Xu, Xuezhe; Zhou, Jiacheng; Ma, Xiao; Wang, Shuo; Zhang, Weijun; Venables, Dean S; Chen, Weidong

    2017-10-30

    This article describes the development and field application of a portable broadband cavity enhanced spectrometer (BBCES) operating in the spectral range of 440-480 nm for sensitive, real-time, in situ measurement of ambient glyoxal (CHOCHO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ). The instrument utilized a custom cage system in which the same SMA collimators were used in the transmitter and receiver units for coupling the LED light into the cavity and collecting the light transmitted through the cavity. This configuration realised a compact and stable optical system that could be easily aligned. The dimensions and mass of the optical layer were 676 × 74 × 86 mm 3 and 4.5 kg, respectively. The cavity base length was about 42 cm. The mirror reflectivity at λ = 460 nm was determined to be 0.9998, giving an effective absorption pathlength of 2.26 km. The demonstrated measurement precisions (1σ) over 60 s were 28 and 50 pptv for CHOCHO and NO 2 and the respective accuracies were 5% and 4%. By applying a Kalman adaptive filter to the retrieved concentrations, the measurement precisions of CHOCHO and NO 2 were improved to 8 pptv and 40 pptv in 21 s.

  4. Microbial analysis of in situ biofilm formation in drinking water distribution systems: implications for monitoring and control of drinking water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douterelo, Isabel; Jackson, M; Solomon, C; Boxall, J

    2016-04-01

    Biofilm formation in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) is influenced by the source water, the supply infrastructure and the operation of the system. A holistic approach was used to advance knowledge on the development of mixed species biofilms in situ, by using biofilm sampling devices installed in chlorinated networks. Key physico-chemical parameters and conventional microbial indicators for drinking water quality were analysed. Biofilm coverage on pipes was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The microbial community structure, bacteria and fungi, of water and biofilms was assessed using pyrosequencing. Conventional wisdom leads to an expectation for less microbial diversity in groundwater supplied systems. However, the analysis of bulk water showed higher microbial diversity in groundwater site samples compared with the surface water site. Conversely, higher diversity and richness were detected in biofilms from the surface water site. The average biofilm coverage was similar among sites. Disinfection residual and other key variables were similar between the two sites, other than nitrates, alkalinity and the hydraulic conditions which were extremely low at the groundwater site. Thus, the unexpected result of an exceptionally low diversity with few dominant genera (Pseudomonas and Basidiobolus) in groundwater biofilm samples, despite the more diverse community in the bulk water, is attributed to the low-flow hydraulic conditions. This finding evidences that the local environmental conditions are shaping biofilm formation, composition and amount, and hence managing these is critical for the best operation of DWDS to safeguard water quality.

  5. Using linoleic acid embedded cellulose acetate membranes to in situ monitor polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in lakes and predict their bioavailability to submerged macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yuqiang; Xue, Bin; Yao, Shuchun

    2015-05-19

    To date no passive sampler has been used to predict bioavailability of contaminants to macrophytes. Here a novel passive sampler, linoleic acid embedded cellulose acetate membrane (LAECAM), was developed and used to in situ measure the freely dissolved concentrations of ten polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the sediment porewaters and the water columns of two lakes in both winter and summer and predict their bioavailability to the shoots of resident submerged macrophytes (Potamogeton malainus, Myriophyllum spicata, Najas minor All., and Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara). PAH sampling by LAECAMs could reach equilibrium within 21 days. The influence of temperature on LAECAM-water partition coefficients was 0.0008-0.0116 log units/°C. The method of LAECAM was comparable with the active sampling methods of liquid-liquid extraction combined with fDOC adjustment, centrifugation/solid-phase extraction (SPE), and filtration/SPE but had several advantages. After lipid normalization, concentrations of the PAHs in LAECAMs were not significantly different from those in the macrophytes. In contrast, concentrations of the PAHs in the triolein containing passive sampler (TECAM) deployed simultaneously with LAECAM were much higher. The results suggest that linoleic acid is more suitable than triolein as the model lipid for passive samplers to predict bioavailability of PAHs to submerged macrophytes.

  6. High-Throughput Screening of Chemical Compound Libraries for Modulators of Salicylic Acid Signaling by In Situ Monitoring of Glucuronidase-Based Reporter Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Vivek; Kombrink, Erich

    2018-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a vital phytohormone that is intimately involved in coordination of the complex plant defense response to pathogen attack. Many aspects of SA signaling have been unraveled by classical genetic and biochemical methods using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, but many details remain unknown, owing to the inherent limitations of these methods. In recent years, chemical genetics has emerged as an alternative scientific strategy to complement classical genetics by virtue of identifying bioactive chemicals or probes that act selectively on their protein targets causing either activation or inhibition. Such selective tools have the potential to create conditional and reversible chemical mutant phenotypes that may be combined with genetic mutants. Here, we describe a facile chemical screening methodology for intact Arabidopsis seedlings harboring the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter by directly quantifying GUS activity in situ with 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-glucuronide (4-MUG) as substrate. The quantitative nature of this screening assay has an obvious advantage over the also convenient histochemical GUS staining method, as it allows application of statistical procedures and unbiased hit selection based on threshold values as well as distinction between compounds with strong or weak bioactivity. We show pilot screens for chemical activators or inhibitors of salicylic acid-mediated defense signaling using the Arabidopsis line expressing the SA-inducible PR1p::GUS reporter gene. Importantly, the screening methodology provided here can be adopted for any inducible GUS reporter line.

  7. Monitoring and assessment of mercury pollution in the vicinity of a chloralkali plant. IV. Bioconcentration of mercury in in situ aquatic and terrestrial plants at Ganjam, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenka, M; Panda, K K; Panda, B B

    1992-02-01

    In situ aquatic and terrestrial plants including a few vegetable and crop plants growing in and around a chloralkali plant at Ganjam, India were analyzed for concentrations of root and shoot mercury. The aquatic plants found to bioconcentrate mercury to different degrees included Marsilea spp., Spirodela polyrhiza, Jussiea repens, Paspalum scrobiculatam, Pistia stratiotes, Eichhornia crassipes, Hygrophila schulli, Monochoria hastata and Bacopa monniera. Among wild terrestrial plants Chloris barbata, Cynodon dactylon, Cyperus rotundus and Croton bonplandianum were found growing on heavily contaminated soil containing mercury as high as 557 mg/kg. Analysis of mercury in root and shoot of these plants in relation to the mercury levels in soil indicated a significant correlation between soil and plant mercury with the exception of C. bonplandianum. Furthermore, the tolerance to mercury toxicity was highest with C. barbata followed by C. dactylon and C. rotundus, in that order. The rice plants analyzed from the surrounding agricultural fields did not show any significant levels of bioconcentrated mercury. Of the different vegetables grown in a contaminated kitchen garden with mercury level at 8.91 mg/kg, the two leafy vegetables, namely cabbage (Brassica oleracea) and amaranthus (Amaranthus oleraceous), were found to bioconcentrate mercury at statistically significant levels. The overall study indicates that the mercury pollution is very much localized to the specific sites in the vicinity of the chloralkali plant.

  8. Synthesis of core-shell heterostructured Cu/Cu2O nanowires monitored by in situ XRD as efficient visible-light photocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Core-shell heterostructured Cu/Cu2O nanowires with a high aspect ratio were synthesized from Cu foam using a novel oxidation/reduction process. In situ XRD was used as an efficient tool to acquire phase transformation details during the temperature-programmed oxidation of Cu foam and the subsequent reduction process. Based on knowledge of the crucial phase transformation, optimal synthesis conditions for producing high-quality CuO and core-shell Cu/Cu2O nanowires were determined. In favor of efficient charge separation induced by the special core-shell heterostructure and the advanced three-dimensional spatial configuration, Cu/Cu2O nanowires exhibited superior visible-light activity in the degradation of methylene blue. The present study illustrates a novel strategy for fabricating efficiently core-shell heterostructured nanowires and provides the potential for developing their applications in electronic devices, for environmental remediation and in solar energy utilization fields. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. UV-Vis spectrophotometry of quinone flow battery electrolyte for in situ monitoring and improved electrochemical modeling of potential and quinhydrone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Liuchuan; Chen, Qing; Wong, Andrew A; Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J

    2017-12-06

    Quinone-based aqueous flow batteries provide a potential opportunity for large-scale, low-cost energy storage due to their composition from earth abundant elements, high aqueous solubility, reversible redox kinetics and their chemical tunability such as reduction potential. In an operating flow battery utilizing 9,10-anthraquinone-2,7-disulfonic acid, the aggregation of an oxidized quinone and a reduced hydroquinone to form a quinhydrone dimer causes significant variations from ideal solution behavior and of optical absorption from the Beer-Lambert law. We utilize in situ UV-Vis spectrophotometry to establish (a), quinone, hydroquinone and quinhydrone molar attenuation profiles and (b), an equilibrium constant for formation of the quinhydrone dimer (K QHQ ) ∼ 80 M -1 . We use the molar optical attenuation profiles to identify the total molecular concentration and state of charge at arbitrary mixtures of quinone and hydroquinone. We report density functional theory calculations to support the quinhydrone UV-Vis measurements and to provide insight into the dimerization conformations. We instrument a quinone-bromine flow battery with a Pd-H reference electrode in order to demonstrate how complexation in both the negative (quinone) and positive (bromine) electrolytes directly impacts measured half-cell and full-cell voltages. This work shows how accounting for electrolyte complexation improves the accuracy of electrochemical modeling of flow battery electrolytes.

  10. Biological monitors of air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, J.

    1994-01-01

    Direct biological monitoring of air pollution was introduced about 30 years ago. Although still under development, the application of biological monitors, or indicators, may provide important information on the levels, availability, and pathways of a variety of pollutants including heavy metals and other toxic trace elements in the air. A survey is given of the most frequently used biomonitors, such as herbaceous plants, tree leaves or needles, bryophytes, and lichens, with their possible advantages and/or limitations. In addition to using naturally-occurring biomonitors, a possibility of employing ''transplanted'' species in the study areas, for instance grasses grown in special containers in standard soils or lichens transplanted with their natural substrate to an exposition site, is also mentioned. Several sampling and washing procedures are reported. The important of employing nuclear analytical methods, especially instrumental neutron activation analysis, for multielemental analysis of biomonitors as a pre-requisite for unlocking the information contained in chemical composition of monitor's tissues, such as apportionment of emission sources using multivariate statistical procedures, is also outlined. (author). 32 refs, 2 figs

  11. Laboratory Testing of a MEMS Sensor System for In-Situ Monitoring of the Engineered Barrier in a Geological Disposal Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Geological disposal facilities for radioactive waste pose significant challenges for robust monitoring of environmental conditions within the engineered barriers that surround the waste canister. Temperatures are elevated, due to the presence of heat generating waste, relative humidity varies from 20% to 100%, and swelling pressures within the bentonite barrier can typically be 2–10 MPa. Here, we test the robustness of a bespoke design MEMS sensor-based monitoring system, which we encapsulate in polyurethane resin. We place the sensor within an oedometer cell and show that despite a rise in swelling pressure to 2 MPa, our relative humidity (RH measurements are unaffected. We then test the sensing system against a traditional RH sensor, using saturated bentonite with a range of RH values between 50% and 100%. Measurements differ, on average, by 2.87% RH, and are particularly far apart for values of RH greater than 98%. However, bespoke calibration of the MEMS sensing system using saturated solutions of known RH, reduces the measurement difference to an average of 1.97% RH, greatly increasing the accuracy for RH values close to 100%.

  12. A novel non-invasive electrochemical biosensing device for in situ determination of the alcohol content in blood by monitoring ethanol in sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamella, M; Campuzano, S; Manso, J; González de Rivera, G; López-Colino, F; Reviejo, A J; Pingarrón, J M

    2014-01-02

    A non-invasive, passive and simple to use skin surface based sensing device for determining the blood's ethanol content (BAC) by monitoring transdermal alcohol concentration (TAC) is designed and developed. The proposed prototype is based on bienzyme amperometric composite biosensors that are sensitive to the variation of ethanol concentration. The prototype correlates, through previous calibration set-up, the amperometric signal generated from ethanol in sweat with its content in blood in a short period of time. The characteristics of this sensor device permit determination of the ethanol concentration in isolated and in continuous form, giving information of the BAC of a subject either in a given moment or its evolution during long periods of time (8h). Moreover, as the measurements are performed in a biological fluid, the evaluated individual is not able to alter the result of the analysis. The maximum limit of ethanol in blood allowed by legislation is included within the linear range of the device (0.0005-0.6 g L(-1)). Moreover, the device shows higher sensitivity than the breathalyzers marketed at the moment, allowing the monitoring of the ethanol content in blood to be obtained just 5 min after ingestion of the alcoholic drink. The comparison of the obtained results using the proposed device in the analysis of 40 volunteers with those provided by the gas chromatographic reference method for determination of BAC pointed out that there were no significant differences between both methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Some principles of service life calculation of reinforcements and in situ corrosion monitoring by sensors in the radioactive waste containers of El Cabril disposal (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, C.; Martinez, I.; Castellote, M.; Zuloaga, P.

    2006-01-01

    Reinforced concrete is the most usual material used in engineered barriers in low-level nuclear waste disposal facilities. The record of modern concrete is no longer than about 100 years. During this time, it has been noticed that the material gives a good performance in many environments, however several chemical aggressive species in water, soil or the atmosphere may react with the cement mineralogical phases and perturb its integrity. El Cabril repository has a design life objective of longer than 300 years and therefore, these structures should maintain their main characteristics during this target service life. The potential aggressive conditions that the cement-based materials can suffer have been identified to be: carbonation, water permeation (leaching) and reinforcement corrosion. More unlikely may be the biological attack. Chlorides are not in the environment but they are inside the drums as part of analytical wastes. Vaults and containers are made of a very similar concrete composition while the mortar is specifically designed to be pumpable, with low hydration heat, low shrinkage and of low permeability. In this paper results of concrete characteristics are given as well as the monitoring of the behaviour of reinforcement corrosion parameters from 1995 on the same environmental conditions of the actual waste. This monitoring has been made in a buried structure with embedded sensors. The effect of temperature is commented

  14. From existing in situ, high-resolution measurement technologies to lab-on-a-chip - the future of water quality monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, A. J.; Palmer-Felgate, E. J.; Halliday, S. J.; Skeffington, R. A.; Loewenthal, M.; Jarvie, H. P.; Bowes, M. J.; Greenway, G. M.; Haswell, S. J.; Bell, I. M.; Joly, E.; Fallatah, A.; Neal, C.; Williams, R. J.; Gozzard, E.; Newman, J. R.

    2012-05-01

    This paper introduces new insights into the hydrochemical functioning of lowland river-systems using field-based spectrophotometric and electrode technologies. The streamwater concentrations of nitrogen species and phosphorus fractions were measured at hourly intervals on a continuous basis at two contrasting sites on tributaries of the River Thames, one draining a rural catchment, the River Enborne, and one draining a more urban system, The Cut. The measurements complement those from an existing network of multi-parameter water quality sondes maintained across the Thames catchment and weekly monitoring based on grab samples. The results of the sub-daily monitoring show that streamwater phosphorus concentrations display highly complex, seemingly chaotic, dynamics under storm conditions dependent on the antecedent catchment wetness, and that diurnal phosphorus and nitrogen cycles occur under low flow conditions. The diurnal patterns highlight the dominance of sewage inputs in controlling the streamwater phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations at low flows, even at a distance of 7 km from the nearest sewage works in the rural, River Enborne, and that the time of sample collection is important when judging water quality against ecological thresholds or standards. An exhaustion of the supply of phosphorus from diffuse and septic tank sources during storm events was evident and load estimation was not improved by sub-daily monitoring beyond that achieved by daily sampling because of the eventual reduction in the phosphorus mass entering the stream during events. The dominance of respiration over photosynthesis in The Cut indicated a prevalence of heterotrophic algae, and the seasonal patterns in respiration and photosynthesis corresponded with those of temperature and light in this nutrient over-enriched stream. These results highlight the utility of sub-daily water quality measurements but the deployment of modified wet-chemistry technologies into the field was limited

  15. UV-Vis/FT-NIR in situ monitoring of visible-light induced polymerization of PEGDA hydrogels initiated by eosin/triethanolamine/O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaastrup, Kaja; Aguirre-Soto, Alan; Wang, Chen; Bowman, Christopher N; Stansbury, Jeffery; Sikes, Hadley D

    In conjunction with a tertiary amine coinitiator, eosin, a photoreducible dye, has been shown to successfully circumvent oxygen inhibition in radical photopolymerization reactions. However, the role of O 2 in the initiation and polymerization processes remains inconclusive. Here, we employ a UV-Vis/FT-NIR analytical tool for real-time, simultaneous monitoring of chromophore and monomer reactive group concentrations to investigate the eosin-activated photopolymerization of PEGDA-based hydrogels under ambient conditions. First, we address the challenges associated with spectroscopic monitoring of the polymerization of hydrogels using UV-Vis and FT-NIR, proposing metrics for quantifying the extent of signal loss from reflection and scattering, and showing their relation to microgelation and network formation. Second, having established a method for extracting kinetic information by eliminating the effects of changing refractive index and scattering, the coupled UV-Vis/FT-NIR system is applied to the study of eosin-activated photopolymerization of PEGDA in the presence of O 2 . Analysis of the inhibition time, rate of polymerization, and rate of eosin consumption under ambient and purged conditions indicates that regeneration of eosin in the presence of oxygen and consumption of oxygen occur via a nonchain process. This suggests that the uniquely high O 2 resilience is due to alternative processes such as energy transfer from photo-activated eosin to oxygen. Uncovering the intricacies of the role of O 2 in eosin-mediated initiation aids the design of O 2 resistant free radical polymerization systems relevant to photonics, optoelectronics, biomaterials, and biosensing.

  16. Understanding the Effect of Stratification on Vertical and Temporal Heterogenieties of Cyanobacteria Blooms in Lakes Using a Long Term in-situ Monitoring Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, A.; Guala, M.; Hondzo, M.

    2017-12-01

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB) are made up of potentially toxic freshwater microorganisms called cyanobacteria, because of this they are a ecological and public health hazard. The occurrences of toxic HAB are unpredictable and highly spatially and temporary variable in freshwater ecosystems. To study the abiotic drivers for toxic HAB, a floating research station has been deployed in a hyper-eutrophic lake in Madison Lake, Minnesota, from June-October 2016. This research station provides full depth water quality (hourly) and meteorological monitoring (5 minutes). Water quality monitoring is performed by an autonomously traversed water quality sonde that provides chemical, physical and biological measurements; including phycocyanin, a photosynthetic pigment distinct to cyanobacteria. A bloom of cyanobacteria recorded in the epiliminion in mid-July was driven by prolonged strong thermal stratification in the water column, high surface water temperatures and high phosphate concentrations in the epiliminion. The high biovolume (BV) persisted until late September and was sustained below the surface after stratification weakened, when the thermocline did not confine cyanobacteria-rich layers any more, and cyanobacteria vertical heterogeneities decayed in the water column. High correlations among BV stratification, surface water temperature, and stratification stability informed the development of a quantitative relationship to determine how BV heterogeneities vary with thermal structure in the water column. The BV heterogeneity decreased with thermal stratification stability and surface water temperature, and the dynamic lake stability described by the Lake Number. Finally the location of maximum BV accumulation showed diurnal patterns ie. BV peaks were observed at 1 m depth during the day and deeper layers during the night, which followed patterns in light penetration and thermocline depth. These findings capture cyanobacteria vertical and temporal heterogeneities on a on

  17. Origin and in situ concentrations of hydrocarbons in the Kumano forearc basin from drilling mud gas monitoring during IODP NanTroSEIZE Exp. 319

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersberg, Thomas; Schleicher, Anja M.; Horiguchi, Keika; Doan, Mai-Linh; Eguchi, Nobuhisa; Erzinger, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Exp. 319 of IODP was the first cruise in the history of scientific ocean drilling with drilling mud gas monitoring. • Hydrocarbons were the only formation-derived gases identified in drilling mud. • Chemical and isotopic compositions of hydrocarbons exhibit a microbial origin. • Absolute CH 4 concentrations in the formation reaching up to 24 L gas /L sediment . - Abstract: NanTroSEIZE Exp. 319 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) was the first cruise in the history of scientific ocean drilling with drilling mud circulation through a riser. Drilling mud was pumped through the drill string and returned to the drill ship through the riser pipe during drilling of hole C0009A from 703 to 1604 mbsf (meter below sea floor) and hole enlargement from 703 to 1569 mbsf. During riser drilling, gas from returning drilling mud was continuously extracted, sampled and analyzed in real time to reveal information on the gas composition and gas concentrations at depth. Hydrocarbons were the only formation-derived gases identified in drilling mud and reached up to 14 vol.% of methane and 48 ppmv of ethane. The chemical and isotopic compositions of hydrocarbons exhibit a microbial origin. Hydrocarbons released from drilling mud and cuttings correlate with visible allochthonous material (wood, lignite) in drilling cuttings. At greater depth, addition of small but increasing amounts of hydrocarbons probably from low-temperature thermal degradation of organic matter is indicated. The methane content is also tightly correlated with several intervals of low Poisson’s ratio from Vp/Vs observed in sonic velocity logs, suggesting that the gas is situated in the pore space of the rock as free gas. The gas concentrations in the formation, determined from drilling mud gas monitoring, reaching up to 24 L gas /L sediment for methane in hole C0009A, in line with gas concentrations from interpreted downhole sonic logs

  18. Application of a microwave-based desolvation system for multi-elemental analysis of wine by inductively coupled plasma based techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grindlay, Guillermo [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Alicante, P.O. Box 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: guillermo.grindlay@ua.es; Mora, Juan; Maestre, Salvador; Gras, Luis [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Alicante, P.O. Box 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2008-11-23

    Elemental wine analysis is often required from a nutritional, toxicological, origin and authenticity point of view. Inductively coupled plasma based techniques are usually employed for this analysis because of their multi-elemental capabilities and good limits of detection. However, the accurate analysis of wine samples strongly depends on their matrix composition (i.e. salts, ethanol, organic acids) since they lead to both spectral and non-spectral interferences. To mitigate ethanol (up to 10% w/w) related matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), a microwave-based desolvation system (MWDS) can be successfully employed. This finding suggests that the MWDS could be employed for elemental wine analysis. The goal of this work is to evaluate the applicability of the MWDS for elemental wine analysis in ICP-AES and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). For the sake of comparison a conventional sample introduction system (i.e. pneumatic nebulizer attached to a spray chamber) was employed. Matrix effects, precision, accuracy and analysis throughput have been selected as comparison criteria. For ICP-AES measurements, wine samples can be directly analyzed without any sample treatment (i.e. sample dilution or digestion) using pure aqueous standards although internal standardization (IS) (i.e. Sc) is required. The behaviour of the MWDS operating with organic solutions in ICP-MS has been characterized for the first time. In this technique the MWDS has shown its efficiency to mitigate ethanol related matrix effects up to concentrations of 1% (w/w). Therefore, wine samples must be diluted to reduce the ethanol concentration up to this value. The results obtained have shown that the MWDS is a powerful device for the elemental analysis of wine samples in both ICP-AES and ICP-MS. In general, the MWDS has some attractive advantages for elemental wine analysis when compared to a conventional sample introduction system such

  19. Multielemental analysis of 18 essential and toxic elements in amniotic fluid samples by ICP-MS: Full procedure validation and estimation of measurement uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, B; Sajnóg, A; Lorenc, W; Hanć, A; Komorowicz, I; Suliburska, J; Kocyłowski, R; Barałkiewicz, D

    2017-11-01

    Amniotic fluid is the substantial factor in the development of an embryo and fetus due to the fact that water and solutes contained in it penetrate the fetal membranes in an hydrostatic and osmotic way as well as being swallowed by the fetus. Elemental composition of amniotic fluid influences the growth and health of the fetus, therefore, an analysis of amniotic fluid is important because the results would indicate abnormal levels of minerals or toxic elements. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) is often used for determination of trace and ultra-trace level elements in a wide range of matrices including biological samples because of its unique analytical capabilities. In the case of trace and ultra-trace level analysis detailed characteristics of analytical procedure as well as properties of the analytical result are particularly important. The purpose of this study was to develop a new analytical procedure for multielemental analysis of 18 elements (Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sr, U, V and Zn) in amniotic fluid samples using ICP-MS. Dynamic reaction cell (DRC) with two reaction gases, ammonia and oxygen, was involved in the experiment to eliminate spectral interferences. Detailed validation was conducted using 3 certified reference mterials (CRMs) and real amniotic fluid samples collected from patients. Repeatability for all analyzed analytes was found to range from 0.70% to 8.0% and for intermediate precision results varied from 1.3% to 15%. Trueness expressed as recovery ranged from 80% to 125%. Traceability was assured through the analyses of CRMs. Uncertainty of the results was also evaluated using single-laboratory validation approach. The obtained expanded uncertainty (U) results for CRMs, expressed as a percentage of the concentration of an analyte, were found to be between 8.3% for V and 45% for Cd. Standard uncertainty of the precision was found to have a greater influence on the combined standard uncertainty

  20. Application of a microwave-based desolvation system for multi-elemental analysis of wine by inductively coupled plasma based techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grindlay, Guillermo; Mora, Juan; Maestre, Salvador; Gras, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Elemental wine analysis is often required from a nutritional, toxicological, origin and authenticity point of view. Inductively coupled plasma based techniques are usually employed for this analysis because of their multi-elemental capabilities and good limits of detection. However, the accurate analysis of wine samples strongly depends on their matrix composition (i.e. salts, ethanol, organic acids) since they lead to both spectral and non-spectral interferences. To mitigate ethanol (up to 10% w/w) related matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), a microwave-based desolvation system (MWDS) can be successfully employed. This finding suggests that the MWDS could be employed for elemental wine analysis. The goal of this work is to evaluate the applicability of the MWDS for elemental wine analysis in ICP-AES and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). For the sake of comparison a conventional sample introduction system (i.e. pneumatic nebulizer attached to a spray chamber) was employed. Matrix effects, precision, accuracy and analysis throughput have been selected as comparison criteria. For ICP-AES measurements, wine samples can be directly analyzed without any sample treatment (i.e. sample dilution or digestion) using pure aqueous standards although internal standardization (IS) (i.e. Sc) is required. The behaviour of the MWDS operating with organic solutions in ICP-MS has been characterized for the first time. In this technique the MWDS has shown its efficiency to mitigate ethanol related matrix effects up to concentrations of 1% (w/w). Therefore, wine samples must be diluted to reduce the ethanol concentration up to this value. The results obtained have shown that the MWDS is a powerful device for the elemental analysis of wine samples in both ICP-AES and ICP-MS. In general, the MWDS has some attractive advantages for elemental wine analysis when compared to a conventional sample introduction system such

  1. Final Report: DoE SBIR Phase 2 Low-Cost Small Diameter NMR Technologies for In-Situ Subsurface Characterization and Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, David Oliver [Vista Clara Inc., Mukilteo, WA (United States)

    2010-09-03

    In this Phase 2 SBIR program, Vista Clara successfully developed and field-tested small diameter NNR logging tools for subsurface characterization and monitoring. This effort involved the design and development surface electronics, a winch with 470ft cable, and three interchangeable downhole probes: a 3.5â diameter borehole NMR probe, a 1.67â diameter borehole NMR probe, and a 2.5â diameter NMR probe that can be deployed using a Geoprobe direct push machine. The 3.5â probe was tested extensively over a 6 week period including 4â to 8â boreholes in Washington, Idaho, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, Connecticut and Massachusetts. The field test campaign was highly successful. The 1.67â probe was assembled, tested and calibrated in the laboratory. The 2.5â Geoprobe probe is in final assembly and testing at the time of this report. The completed Phase 2 R&D program has resulted in the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed in boreholes of 4â diameter, the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed in boreholes on 2â diameter, and the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed by a direct push machine. These small diameter tools make NMR logging technically and economically feasible, for the first time. Previously available NMR logging tools were developed for oilfield applications and are prohibitively large and expensive for the majority of near surface groundwater characterization problems.

  2. Geophysical monitoring of the EDZ during a gallery excavation in the Opalinus clay of the Mont Terri URL: design and principles of specific in situ experimental setups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, D.; Maineult, A.; Kergosien, B.; Le Gonidec, Y.; Nicollin, F.; Sarout, J.; Wassermann, J.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. At the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, the gallery Ga08 was excavated in August 2008 to join the end-face of the pre-existing gallery Ga04. The Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) induced during the gallery construction was monitored from the instrumented face of Ga04. The EZ-G08 experiments required original acquisition setups, specifically designed to be installed in small boreholes and to ensure long term measurements. Different geophysical methods have been experimented for the EZ-G08 project and specific design of the experiments were required in order to coordinate multiple and simultaneous acquisitions, including acoustic emission (AE) acquisition setup (16 acoustic receivers), manufacturing of a combined electrical (256 electrodes) and acoustic tomography setup (64 receivers) to be introduced in horizontal boreholes with small diameters (56 mm), design of an acoustic source, design and manufacturing of a combined electrical tomography (64 lead electrodes) and self-potential measurements (64 un-polarizable electrodes). Other arrays of electrodes have also been placed at the end-face of Ga04 (715 inox electrodes and an array of 16 un-polarizable electrodes). The self-potential (SP) monitoring took place in the borehole BEZ-G5 equipped in mid- February 2008 with a specific device on which custom-made electrodes were fixed. To avoid polarisation effect and guaranty a satisfactorily signal-to-noise ratio, SP was measured with 64 un-polarizable electrodes, with an offset of 15 cm made of a metallic wire in chemical equilibrium with a surrounding solution containing a salt of the same metal. The electrical contact between the solution and the natural medium is ensured by a porous material. The electrodes were mounted upward on a half-cylinder fixed onto an inflatable pipe and introduced in BEZ-G5. The internal pipe was inflated to ensure a good electrical contact between the electrodes and the borehole wall. The

  3. In-situ Monitoring of Plant-microbe Communication to Understand the Influence of Soil Properties on Symbiotic Biological Nitrogen Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, T.; Del Valle, I.; Cheng, H. Y.; Silberg, J. J.; Masiello, C. A.; Lehmann, J.

    2016-12-01

    Plant-microbe signaling is important for many symbiotic and pathogenic interactions. While this signaling often occurs in soils, very little research has evaluated the role that the soil mineral and organic matter matrix plays in plant-microbe communication. One hurdle to these studies is the lack of simple tools for evaluating how soil mineral phases and organic matter influence the availability of plant-produced flavonoids that initiate the symbiosis between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and legumes. Because of their range of hydrophobic and electrostatic properties, flavonoids represent an informative class of signaling molecules. In this presentation, we will describe studies examining the bioavailable concentrations of flavonoids in soils using traditional techniques, such as high-pressure liquid chromatography and fluorescent microbial biosensors. Additionally, we will describe our progress developing a Rhizobium leguminosarum reporter that can be deployed into soils to report on flavonoid levels. This new microbial reporter is designed so that Rhizobium only generates a volatile gas signal when it encounters a defined concentration of flavonoids. By monitoring the output of this biosensor using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry during real time during soil incubations, we are working to establish the impact of soil organic matter, pH, and mineral phases on the reception of these signaling molecules. We expect that the findings from these studies will be useful for recommending soil management strategies that can enhance the communication between legumes and nitrogen fixing bacteria. This research highlights the importance of studying the role of soil as a mediator of plant-microbe communication.

  4. In-situ Monitoring of Sub-cooled Nucleate Boiling on Fuel Cladding Surface in Water at 1 bar and 130 bars using Acoustic Emission Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Seung Heon; Wu, Kaige; Shim, Hee-Sang; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Crud deposition increases through a sufficient corrosion product supply around the steam-liquid interface of a boiling bubble. Therefore, the understanding of this SNB phenomenon is important for effective and safe operation of nuclear plants. The experimental SNB studies have been performed in visible conditions at a low pressure using a high speed video camera. Meanwhile, an acoustic emission (AE) method is an on-line non-destructive evaluation method to sense transient elastic wave resulting from a rapid release of energy within a dynamic process. Some researchers have investigated boiling phenomena using the AE method. However, their works were performed at atmospheric pressure conditions. Therefore, the objective of this work is for the first time to detect and monitor SNB on fuel cladding surface in simulated PWR primary water at 325 .deg. C and 130 bars using an AE technique. We successfully observed the boiling AE signals in primary water at 1 bar and 130 bars using AE technique. Visualization test was performed effectively to identify a correlation between water boiling phenomenon and AE signals in a transparent glass cell at 1 bar, and the boiling AE signals were in good agreement with the boiling behavior. Based on the obtained correlations at 1 bar, the AE signals obtained at 130 bars were analyzed. The boiling density and size of the AE signals at 130 bars were decreased by the flow parameters. However, overall AE signals showed characteristics and a trend similar to the AE signals at 1 bar. This indicates that boiling AE signals are detected successfully at 130 bars, and the AE technique can be effectively implemented in non-visualized condition at high pressures.

  5. In-situ Condition Monitoring of Components in Small Modular Reactors Using Process and Electrical Signature Analysis. Final report, volume 1. Development of experimental flow control loop, data analysis and plant monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, Belle [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hines, J. Wesley [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Damiano, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mehta, Chaitanya [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Collins, Price [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Lish, Matthew [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Cady, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Lollar, Victor [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); de Wet, Dane [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bayram, Duygu [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The research and development under this project was focused on the following three major objectives: Objective 1: Identification of critical in-vessel SMR components for remote monitoring and development of their low-order dynamic models, along with a simulation model of an integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR). Objective 2: Development of an experimental flow control loop with motor-driven valves and pumps, incorporating data acquisition and on-line monitoring interface. Objective 3: Development of stationary and transient signal processing methods for electrical signatures, machinery vibration, and for characterizing process variables for equipment monitoring. This objective includes the development of a data analysis toolbox. The following is a summary of the technical accomplishments under this project: - A detailed literature review of various SMR types and electrical signature analysis of motor-driven systems was completed. A bibliography of literature is provided at the end of this report. Assistance was provided by ORNL in identifying some key references. - A review of literature on pump-motor modeling and digital signal processing methods was performed. - An existing flow control loop was upgraded with new instrumentation, data acquisition hardware and software. The upgrading of the experimental loop included the installation of a new submersible pump driven by a three-phase induction motor. All the sensors were calibrated before full-scale experimental runs were performed. - MATLAB-Simulink model of a three-phase induction motor and pump system was completed. The model was used to simulate normal operation and fault conditions in the motor-pump system, and to identify changes in the electrical signatures. - A simulation model of an integral PWR (iPWR) was updated and the MATLAB-Simulink model was validated for known transients. The pump-motor model was interfaced with the iPWR model for testing the impact of primary flow perturbations (upsets) on

  6. In-situ Condition Monitoring of Components in Small Modular Reactors Using Process and Electrical Signature Analysis. Final report, volume 1. Development of experimental flow control loop, data analysis and plant monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyaya, Belle; Hines, J. Wesley; Damiano, Brian; Mehta, Chaitanya; Collins, Price; Lish, Matthew; Cady, Brian; Lollar, Victor; De Wet, Dane; Bayram, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    The research and development under this project was focused on the following three major objectives: Objective 1: Identification of critical in-vessel SMR components for remote monitoring and development of their low-order dynamic models, along with a simulation model of an integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR). Objective 2: Development of an experimental flow control loop with motor-driven valves and pumps, incorporating data acquisition and on-line monitoring interface. Objective 3: Development of stationary and transient signal processing methods for electrical signatures, machinery vibration, and for characterizing process variables for equipment monitoring. This objective includes the development of a data analysis toolbox. The following is a summary of the technical accomplishments under this project: - A detailed literature review of various SMR types and electrical signature analysis of motor-driven systems was completed. A bibliography of literature is provided at the end of this report. Assistance was provided by ORNL in identifying some key references. - A review of literature on pump-motor modeling and digital signal processing methods was performed. - An existing flow control loop was upgraded with new instrumentation, data acquisition hardware and software. The upgrading of the experimental loop included the installation of a new submersible pump driven by a three-phase induction motor. All the sensors were calibrated before full-scale experimental runs were performed. - MATLAB-Simulink model of a three-phase induction motor and pump system was completed. The model was used to simulate normal operation and fault conditions in the motor-pump system, and to identify changes in the electrical signatures. - A simulation model of an integral PWR (iPWR) was updated and the MATLAB-Simulink model was validated for known transients. The pump-motor model was interfaced with the iPWR model for testing the impact of primary flow perturbations (upsets) on

  7. Atmospheric CH 4 and H 2 O Monitoring With Near-Infrared InGaAs Laser Diodes by the SDLA, a Balloonborne Spectrometer for Tropospheric and Stratospheric In Situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durry, Georges; Megie, Gerard

    1999-12-01

    The Spectrom tre Diodes Laser Accordables (SDLA), a balloonborne spectrometer devoted to the in situ measurement of CH 4 and H 2 O in the atmosphere that uses commercial distributed-feedback InGaAs laser diodes in combination with differential absorption spectroscopy, is described. Absorption spectra of CH 4 (in the 1.653- m region) and H 2 O (in the 1.393- m region) are simultaneously sampled at 1-s intervals by coupling with optical fibers of two near-infrared laser diodes to a Herriott multipass cell open to the atmosphere. Spectra of methane and water vapor in an altitude range of 1 to 31 km recorded during the recent balloon flights of the SDLA are presented. Mixing ratios with a precision error ranging from 5% to 10% are retrieved from the atmospheric spectra by a nonlinear least-squares fit to the spectral line shape in conjunction with in situ simultaneous pressure and temperature measurements.

  8. Evaluation of chloride-ion-specific electrodes as in situ chemical sensors for monitoring total chloride concentration in aqueous solutions generated during the recovery of plutonium from molten salts used in plutonium electrorefining operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.

    1992-10-01

    Two commercially available chloride-ion-specific electrodes (CLISEs), a solid-state type and a membrane type, were evaluated as potential in situ chemical sensors for determining total chloride ion concentration in mixed sodium chloride/potassium chloride/hydrochloric acid solutions generated during the recovery of plutonium from molten salts used in plutonium electrorefining operations. Because the response of the solid-state CLISE was closer than was the response of the membrane-type CLISE to the theoretical response predicted by the Nernst equation, the solid-state CLISE was selected for further evaluation. A detailed investigation of the characteristics of the chloride system and the corresponding CLISE response to concentration changes suggested four methods by which the CLISE could be used either as a direct, in situ sensor or as an indirect sensor through which an analysis could be performed on-line with a sample extracted from the process solution

  9. In situ hydrogen loading on zirconium powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maimaitiyili, Tuerdi, E-mail: tuerdi.maimaitiyili@mah.se; Blomqvist, Jakob [Malmö University, Östra Varvsgatan 11 A, Malmö, Skane 20506 (Sweden); Steuwer, Axel [Lund University, Ole Römers väg, Lund, Skane 22100 (Sweden); Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Gardham Avenue, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Bjerkén, Christina [Malmö University, Östra Varvsgatan 11 A, Malmö, Skane 20506 (Sweden); Zanellato, Olivier [Ensam - Cnam - CNRS, 151 Boulevard de l’Hôpital, Paris 75013 (France); Blackmur, Matthew S. [Materials Performance Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Andrieux, Jérôme [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue J Horowitz, Grenoble 38043 (France); Université de Lyon, 43 Bd du 11 novembre 1918, Lyon 69100 (France); Ribeiro, Fabienne [Institut de Radioprotection et Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN, BP 3, 13115 Saint-Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-06-26

    Commercial-grade Zr powder loaded with hydrogen in situ and phase transformations between various Zr and ZrH{sub x} phases have been monitored in real time. For the first time, various hydride phases in a zirconium–hydrogen system have been prepared in a high-energy synchrotron X-ray radiation beamline and their transformation behaviour has been studied in situ. First, the formation and dissolution of hydrides in commercially pure zirconium powder were monitored in real time during hydrogenation and dehydrogenation, then whole pattern crystal structure analysis such as Rietveld and Pawley refinements were performed. All commonly reported low-pressure phases presented in the Zr–H phase diagram are obtained from a single experimental arrangement.

  10. In situ hydrogen loading on zirconium powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maimaitiyili, Tuerdi; Blomqvist, Jakob; Steuwer, Axel; Bjerkén, Christina; Zanellato, Olivier; Blackmur, Matthew S.; Andrieux, Jérôme; Ribeiro, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Commercial-grade Zr powder loaded with hydrogen in situ and phase transformations between various Zr and ZrH x phases have been monitored in real time. For the first time, various hydride phases in a zirconium–hydrogen system have been prepared in a high-energy synchrotron X-ray radiation beamline and their transformation behaviour has been studied in situ. First, the formation and dissolution of hydrides in commercially pure zirconium powder were monitored in real time during hydrogenation and dehydrogenation, then whole pattern crystal structure analysis such as Rietveld and Pawley refinements were performed. All commonly reported low-pressure phases presented in the Zr–H phase diagram are obtained from a single experimental arrangement

  11. Concomitant monitoring of implant formation and drug release of in situ forming poly (lactide-co-glycolide acid) implants in a hydrogel matrix mimicking the subcutis using UV-vis imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Jensen, Henrik; Petersen, Nickolaj J; Larsen, Susan W; Østergaard, Jesper

    2018-02-20

    For poly (lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA)-based in situ forming implants, the rate of implant formation plays an important role in determining the overall drug release kinetics. Currently, in vitro techniques capable of characterizing the processes of drug release and implant formation at the same time are not available. A hydrogel-based in vitro experimental setup was recently developed requiring only microliter of formulation and forming a closed system potentially suitable for interfacing with various spectroscopic techniques. The aim of the present proof-of-concept study was to investigate the feasibility of concomitant UV imaging, Vis imaging and light microscopy for detailed characterization of the behavior of in situ forming PLGA implants in the hydrogel matrix mimicking the subcutis. The model compounds, piroxicam and α-lactalbumin were added to PLGA-1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and PLGA-triacetin solutions. Upon bringing the PLGA-solvent-compound pre-formulation in contact with the hydrogel, Vis imaging and light microscopy were applied to visualize the depot formation and UV imaging was used to quantify drug transport in the hydrogel. As compared to piroxicam, the α-lactalbumin invoked an acceleration of phase separation and an increase of implant size. α-Lactalbumin was released faster from the PLGA-1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone system than the PLGA-triacetin system opposite to the piroxicam release pattern. A linear relationship between the rate of implant formation and initial compound release within the first 4h was established for the PLGA-NMP systems. This implies that phase separation may be one of the controlling factors in drug release. The rate of implant formation may be an important parameter for predicting and tailoring drug release. The approach combining UV imaging, Vis imaging and light microscopy may facilitate understanding of release processes and holds potential for becoming a useful tool in formulation development of in situ forming

  12. In Situ Preservation of Historic Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, R.; Brooks, R.

    The loss of the Mir space station is shown to symbolize a new consciousness of the value of space artefacts. The reasons why such artefacts as Mir become historic objects worthy of preservation are examined. Preservation of space vehicles in situ is discussed, with particular reference to safety, monitoring and long term costs. An argument is made for a wider definition for World Heritage designations to include material beyond the surface of the Earth, and for international bodies to assess, monitor and oversee these projects. Such heritage sites are seen as an economic driver for the development of space tourism in the 21st century.

  13. Real-time in-situ monitoring of the topotactic transformation of TlCu{sub 3}Se{sub 2} into TlCu{sub 2}Se{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ångström, J.; Sahlberg, M.; Berger, R.

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Topotactic transition from TlCu{sub 3}Se{sub 2} to TlCu{sub 2}Se{sub 2} followed in situ. • Synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction enabled short scans. • Relative abundance of phases refined from powder data. • Opens up for studying similar systems in the same manner. - Abstract: The solid state transformation of monoclinic TlCu{sub 3}Se{sub 2} into tetragonal TlCu{sub 2}Se{sub 2} by oxidative copper leaching in concentrated ammonia solution has been studied in situ by the use of synchrotron radiation. The diffraction patterns of parent and daughter phase are both sharp, indicating a strong topotactic relationship between them that effectuates a rapid change by “chimie douce” performed at +19 °C. The transformation rate is strongly connected to the access of oxygen from the surrounding air. The transformation was followed in a real-time mode, being almost complete after 2.5 h with 1 h incubation due to low oxygen content, as shown from refining the diffraction patterns by Rietveld profile technique.

  14. In-Situ Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Anders Thais; Slot, Susanne; Paltved, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    , and organisational characteristic. Therefore, it might fail to fully mimic real clinical team processes. Though research on in situ simulation in healthcare is in its infancy, literature is abundant on patient safety and team training1. Patient safety reporting systems that identify risks to patients can improve......Introduction: In situ simulation offers on-site training to healthcare professionals. It refers to a training strategy where simulation technology is integrated into the clinical encounter. Training in the simulation laboratory does not easily tap into situational resources, e.g. individual, team...... patient safety if coupled with training and organisational support. This study explored the use of critical incidents and adverse events reports for in situ simulation and short-term observations were used to create learning objectives and training scenarios. Method: This study used an interventional case...

  15. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  16. Sex in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøgholt, Ida

    2017-01-01

    Sex er en del af vores sociale praksis og centralt for det, vi hver især er. Men bortset fra pornoindustrien, har vi ikke mange muligheder for at få adgang til billeder af sex. Teater Nordkrafts forestilling Sex in situ vil gøre seksuelle billeder til noget, der kan deles, udveksles og tales om, og...

  17. In situ measurement of conductivity during nanocomposite film deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blattmann, Christoph O.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Flame-made nanosilver dynamics are elucidated in the gas-phase & on substrates. • The resistance of freshly depositing nanosilver layers is monitored. • Low T g polymers facilitate rapid synthesis of conductive films. • Conductive nanosilver films form on top of or within the polymer depending on MW. - Abstract: Flexible and electrically conductive nanocomposite films are essential for small, portable and even implantable electronic devices. Typically, such film synthesis and conductivity measurement are carried out sequentially. As a result, optimization of filler loading and size/morphology characteristics with respect to film conductivity is rather tedious and costly. Here, freshly-made Ag nanoparticles (nanosilver) are made by scalable flame aerosol technology and directly deposited onto polymeric (polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)) films during which the resistance of the resulting nanocomposite is measured in situ. The formation and gas-phase growth of such flame-made nanosilver, just before incorporation onto the polymer film, is measured by thermophoretic sampling and microscopy. Monitoring the nanocomposite resistance in situ reveals the onset of conductive network formation by the deposited nanosilver growth and sinternecking. The in situ measurement is much faster and more accurate than conventional ex situ four-point resistance measurements since an electrically percolating network is detected upon its formation by the in situ technique. Nevertheless, general resistance trends with respect to filler loading and host polymer composition are consistent for both in situ and ex situ measurements. The time lag for the onset of a conductive network (i.e., percolation) depends linearly on the glass transition temperature (T g ) of the host polymer. This is attributed to the increased nanoparticle-polymer interaction with decreasing T g . Proper selection of the host polymer in combination with in situ resistance monitoring

  18. Use of species of the genus Tillandsia as bio monitors of the atmospheric contamination using radiochemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, M. T.; Wilkinson, M. V.; Marques, R.

    2000-01-01

    The use of epiphytic plants as bio monitors of environmental pollution is studied in this paper. Species of the genus Tillandsia were selected to make studies, on the one hand, using the Neutron Activation Analysis in order to make multielemental analysis to detect possible pollutants. Optimum conditions of preparation and treatment of the samples were determined to verify the elemental uptake in plant tissues. On the other hand, some studies were carried out to investigate the uptake (translocation) of possible pollutants by using radiotracers. With this aim, a conditioned area (glove box) has been developed in order to reproduce the environment of these plants. This glove box was used for studies with radiotracers. The results of the experiments with Hg as radiotracer are presented in this paper. (author)

  19. Integrating Data Streams from in-situ Measurements, Social Networks and Satellite Earth Observation to Augment Operational Flood Monitoring and Forecasting: the 2017 Hurricane Season in the Americas as a Large-scale Test Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matgen, P.; Pelich, R.; Brangbour, E.; Bruneau, P.; Chini, M.; Hostache, R.; Schumann, G.; Tamisier, T.

    2017-12-01

    Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria generated large streams of heterogeneous data, coming notably from three main sources: imagery (satellite and aircraft), in-situ measurement stations and social media. Interpreting these data streams brings critical information to develop, validate and update prediction models. The study addresses existing gaps in the joint extraction of disaster risk information from multiple data sources and their usefulness for reducing the predictive uncertainty of large-scale flood inundation models. Satellite EO data, most notably the free-of-charge data streams generated by the Copernicus program, provided a wealth of high-resolution imagery covering the large areas affected. Our study is focussing on the mapping of flooded areas from a sequence of Sentinel-1 SAR imagery using a classification algorithm recently implemented on the European Space Agency's Grid Processing On Demand environment. The end-to-end-processing chain provided a fast access to all relevant imagery and an effective processing for near-real time analyses. The classification algorithm was applied on pairs of images to rapidly and automatically detect, record and disseminate all observable changes of water bodies. Disaster information was also retrieved from photos as well as texts contributed on social networks and the study shows how this information may complement EO and in-situ data and augment information content. As social media data are noisy and difficult to geo-localize, different techniques are being developed to automatically infer associated semantics and geotags. The presentation provides a cross-comparison between the hazard information obtained from the three data sources. We provide examples of how the generated database of geo-localized disaster information was finally integrated into a large-scale hydrodynamic model of the Colorado River emptying into the Matagorda Bay on the Gulf of Mexico in order to reduce its predictive uncertainty. We describe the

  20. Development of Self-Powered Wireless-Ready High Temperature Electrochemical Sensors for In-Situ Corrosion Monitoring for Boiler Tubes in Next Generation Coal-based Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xingbo [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The key innovation of this project is the synergy of the high temperature sensor technology based on the science of electrochemical measurement and state-of-the-art wireless communication technology. A novel self-powered wireless high temperature electrochemical sensor system has been developed for coal-fired boilers used for power generation. An initial prototype of the in-situ sensor demonstrated the capability of the wireless communication system in the laboratory and in a pilot plant (Industrial USC Boiler Setting) environment to acquire electrochemical potential and current signals during the corrosion process. Uniform and localized under-coal ash deposit corrosion behavior of Inconel 740 superalloy has been studied at different simulated coal ash hot corrosion environments using the developed sensor. Two typical potential noise patterns were found to correlate with the oxidation and sulfidation stages in the hot coal ash corrosion process. Two characteristic current noise patterns indicate the extent of the corrosion. There was a good correlation between the responses of electrochemical test data and the results from corroded surface analysis. Wireless electrochemical potential and current noise signals from a simulated coal ash hot corrosion process were concurrently transmitted and recorded. The results from the performance evaluation of the sensor confirm a high accuracy in the thermodynamic and kinetic response represented by the electrochemical noise and impedance test data.

  1. In situ ToF-SIMS monitoring of SOFC cathodes - A case study of La0.74Sr0.17Mn1.01O2.9 model electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohnke, M.; Schaepe, K.; Bachmann, A.-K.; Laenger, M.; Janek, J.

    2017-11-01

    The modelling of electrode kinetics of solid oxide fuel cells is challenging, as the electrodes can change their composition and microstructure during operation at high temperature. Here we present results from in situ studies, applying time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to investigate compositional surface changes of lanthanum strontium manganate (LSM) model electrodes. Geometrically well-defined LSM electrodes with the composition La0.74Sr0.17Mn1.01O2.9 were deposited as thin films on yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) single crystals by pulsed laser deposition. As counter electrode, a porous platinum electrode was applied on the backside of the solid electrolyte. The electrochemical polarisation experiments were carried out inside the ToF-SIMS analysis chamber at 430 °C, and the ToF-SIMS measurements were performed - in contrast to former work - for the first time during electrical polarisation at elevated temperatures. By applying either a cathodic or anodic potential to the LSM cathode, enrichment or depletion of the different metallic constituents on both, the LSM and free YSZ surface, and within the LSM near surface region, were observed. After polarisation, the system relaxes towards the thermodynamic equilibrium state. Already after the first heat treatment, diffusion of manganese and strontium from the LSM electrode onto the free YSZ surface is observed. The concomitant spreading of the three-phase boundary seems to be one reason for electrode activation after polarisation.

  2. In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications

  3. In situ reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Corey William; Blackwelder, David Bradley

    2004-01-27

    An in situ reactor for use in a geological strata, is described and which includes a liner defining a centrally disposed passageway and which is placed in a borehole formed in the geological strata; and a sampling conduit is received within the passageway defined by the liner and which receives a geological specimen which is derived from the geological strata, and wherein the sampling conduit is in fluid communication with the passageway defined by the liner.

  4. Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdoch, L.

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed

  5. A microfluidic membrane chip for in situ fouling characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngene, I.S.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Wessling, Matthias; van der Meer, Walterus Gijsbertus Joseph

    2010-01-01

    A new method for non-invasive in situ monitoring of a microfiltration process is described. In microfiltration systems, local information on the deposition characteristics can be used to determine the cake behavior during a filtration run. Typically, non-invasive methods of fouling study are

  6. In situ detection of horizontal transfer of mobile genetic elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Hansen, Susse Kirkelund; Johansen, Tove

    2002-01-01

    . The obtained data show that the several different types of fluorescent reporters, which are now available, allow more informative in situ investigations of horizontal gene transfer to be carried out, and by combining these genes with various expression systems it is possible to simultaneously monitor donor...

  7. Malignant mesothelioma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churg, Andrew; Hwang, Harry; Tan, Larry; Qing, Gefei; Taher, Altaf; Tong, Amy; Bilawich, Ana M; Dacic, Sanja

    2018-05-01

    The existence of malignant mesothelioma in situ (MIS) is often postulated, but there are no accepted morphological criteria for making such a diagnosis. Here we report two cases that appear to be true MIS on the basis of in-situ genomic analysis. In one case the patient had repeated unexplained pleural unilateral effusions. Two thoracoscopies 9 months apart revealed only visually normal pleura. Biopsies from both thoracoscopies showed only a single layer of mildly reactive mesothelial cells. However, these cells had lost BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) and showed loss of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2 (CDKN2A) (p16) by fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH). NF2 was not deleted by FISH but 28% of the mesothelial cells showed hyperploidy. Six months after the second biopsy the patient has persisting effusions but no evidence of pleural malignancy on imaging. The second patient presented with ascites and minimal omental thickening on imaging, but no visual evidence of tumour at laparoscopy. Omental biopsy showed a single layer of minimally atypical mesothelial cells with rare tiny foci of superficial invasion of fat. BAP1 immunostain showed loss of nuclear BAP1 in all the surface mesothelial cells and the invasive cells. There was CDKN2A deletion, but no deletion of NF2 by FISH. These cases show that morphologically bland single-layered surface mesothelial proliferations with molecular alterations seen previously only in invasive malignant mesotheliomas exist, and presumably represent malignant MIS. More cases are need to understand the frequency of such changes and the time-course over which invasive tumour develops. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. In situ breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, Luis

    2004-01-01

    In situ breast cancer, particularly the ductal type, is increasing in frequency in the developed countries as well as in Ecuador, most probably. These lesions carry a higher risk of developing a subsequent invasive cancer. Treatment has changed recently due to results of randomized studies, from classical mastectomy to conservative surgery associated to radiotherapy. The Van Nuys Prognostic Index is currently the most usual instrument to guide diagnosis and treatment. Tamoxifen seems to decrease significantly the risk of tumor recurrence after initial treatment. (The author)

  9. In-Field, In Situ, and In Vivo 3-Dimensional Elemental Mapping for Plant Tissue and Soil Analysis Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjiang Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sensing and mapping element distributions in plant tissues and its growth environment has great significance for understanding the uptake, transport, and accumulation of nutrients and harmful elements in plants, as well as for understanding interactions between plants and the environment. In this study, we developed a 3-dimensional elemental mapping system based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy that can be deployed in- field to directly measure the distribution of multiple elements in living plants as well as in the soil. Mapping is performed by a fast scanning laser, which ablates a micro volume of a sample to form a plasma. The presence and concentration of specific elements are calculated using the atomic, ionic, and molecular spectral characteristics of the plasma emission spectra. Furthermore, we mapped the pesticide residues in maize leaves after spraying to demonstrate the capacity of this method for trace elemental mapping. We also used the system to quantitatively detect the element concentrations in soil, which can be used to further understand the element transport between plants and soil. We demonstrate that this method has great potential for elemental mapping in plant tissues and soil with the advantages of 3-dimensional and multi-elemental mapping, in situ and in vivo measurement, flexible use, and low cost.

  10. Modelamiento del proceso de carbonatación del hormigón (UR-CORE, con datos de conversión fraccional obtenidos a través de experimentos de difracción de neutrones monitoreados in-situ Modelling of the carbonation of concrete (UR-CORE from fractionafconversion data obtained through in situ monitored neutrón diffraction experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Castellote

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Una de las principales causas de despasivación de las armaduras embebidas en hormigón es la denominada carbonatación, que consiste en la neutralización de la matriz de cemento como consecuencia de su interacción con el C0(2 atmosférico. En este trabajo, se presenta un resumen del desarrollo de un modelo de carbonatación de las matrices de base cemento (UR-CORE. En primer lugar se ha llevado a cabo la carbonatación acelerada (al 100% de C0(2 sobre probetas de pasta de cemento con distintas matrices cementantes tomando espectros de Difracción de Neutrones a lo largo del tiempo de experimento. La evolución de la intensidad de los picos correspondientes a cada una de las fases involucradas ha proporcionado datos de conversión fraccional en tiempo real, lo que ha posibilitado una aproximación cinética al fenómeno de la carbonatación y el desarrollo del modelo UR-CORE, basado en los principios de los sistemas de "núcleo sin reaccionar", típicos de los procesos en ingeniería química.One of the most important depassivation mechanisms of steel reinforcement in concrete is that caused by the neutralisation of the cement matrix. In this work, a summary of the development of a model for the carbonation of cementitious matrixes (UR-CORE is presented. On one hand, in-situ monitoring of the changes that take place in the phase composition of cement pastes during accelerated carbonation (100% C02 for different binders, is reported, by taking Neutrón Diffraction patterns in parallel with the carbonation experiments. The variation of the intensity of chosen reflections for each phase along the experiment supplied data, in real time, for fractional conversión of different phases. On the second hand, fitting of these results allowed to make a quantitative approach to the kinetics of the carbonation of the different phases, and develop the UR-CORE model that is based on the principies of the "unreacted-core" systems, typical of chemical

  11. Corrosion Monitors for Embedded Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alex L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pfeifer, Kent B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Casias, Adrian L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorensen, Neil R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Missert, Nancy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    We have developed and characterized novel in-situ corrosion sensors to monitor and quantify the corrosive potential and history of localized environments. Embedded corrosion sensors can provide information to aid health assessments of internal electrical components including connectors, microelectronics, wires, and other susceptible parts. When combined with other data (e.g. temperature and humidity), theory, and computational simulation, the reliability of monitored systems can be predicted with higher fidelity.

  12. Integrating In-Situ and Ex-Situ Data Management Processes for Biodiversity Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin R. Schwartz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing need for a “one plan approach” for conservation strategies that integrate in-situ and ex-situ management processes. Zoological institutions contribute directly to threatened species conservation through paradigms, such as reintroduction, head-starting, supplementation, or rescue/rehabilitation/release. This in-situ/ex-situ integration necessitates collaboration at all levels of conservation action including planning, implementation, monitoring and assessment to drive adaptive management processes. Each component is dependent on the availability and accuracy of data for evidence to facilitate evaluation and adaptive management processes. The Zoological Information Management System (ZIMS, managed by Species360, is a centralized web-based information system used in zoological institutions worldwide to pool life history, behavior and health data and facilitate animal husbandry, health, and breeding management processes. Currently used for few integrated conservation programs, ZIMS is an innovative tool that offers a new opportunity to link data management processes for animals that spend a part of their lives under human care and part in their natural environment and has great potential for use in managed wild populations.

  13. Multielemental analysis of geological materials using EDXRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández, Zahily Herrero; Santos Júnior, José A. dos; Amaral, Romilton dos Santos; Santos, Josineide Marques do Nascimento; Rojas, Lino A. Valcárcel, E-mail: zahily1985@gmail.com, E-mail: jaraujo@ufpe.br, E-mail: romilton@ufpe.br, E-mail: josineide.santos@ufpe.br, E-mail: linomarvic@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Alvarez, Juan R. Estevez, E-mail: jestevez@ceaden.edu.cu [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnológicas y Desarrollo Nuclear, Havana (Cuba); França, Elvis Joacir de, E-mail: ejfranca@gmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-EN/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In northeastern Brazil, there are few studies about the metal pollution of surface soils and for the first time it will be studied heavy metals contamination in soils with different cover land. The State of Pernambuco is representative of the Brazilian Northeast region in relation to the variability of climatic conditions, soil types, cover and land use. Based on this, this paper provides information on the determination of metals in soil samples collected in Pernambuco, Brazil. The analysis of Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Si, Sr, Ti and Zn were performed using Energy Dispersive X Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF). The 316 locations studied were specifically selected taking into account the different land use of soil. Analytical curves were obtained by means of the analysis of certified reference materials, for quantify the metals. The regression coefficients of the analytical curves were higher than 0.99. The quality of the analytical procedure was demonstrated at a 95% confidence level. The analysis of diverse geological samples from Pernambuco indicated higher concentrations of Ni and Zn in sugarcane, with maximum values of 41 mg kg{sup -1} and 118 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively and agricultural areas (41 mg kg{sup -1} and 127 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively). The trace element Sr was mainly enriched in urban soils with values of 400 mg kg{sup -1}. According to the results, the EDXRF method was successfully implemented, providing some chemical tracers for the quality assessment of tropical soils and sediments. (author)

  14. Multielemental analysis of geological materials using EDXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández, Zahily Herrero; Santos Júnior, José A. dos; Amaral, Romilton dos Santos; Santos, Josineide Marques do Nascimento; Rojas, Lino A. Valcárcel; França, Elvis Joacir de

    2017-01-01

    In northeastern Brazil, there are few studies about the metal pollution of surface soils and for the first time it will be studied heavy metals contamination in soils with different cover land. The State of Pernambuco is representative of the Brazilian Northeast region in relation to the variability of climatic conditions, soil types, cover and land use. Based on this, this paper provides information on the determination of metals in soil samples collected in Pernambuco, Brazil. The analysis of Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Si, Sr, Ti and Zn were performed using Energy Dispersive X Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF). The 316 locations studied were specifically selected taking into account the different land use of soil. Analytical curves were obtained by means of the analysis of certified reference materials, for quantify the metals. The regression coefficients of the analytical curves were higher than 0.99. The quality of the analytical procedure was demonstrated at a 95% confidence level. The analysis of diverse geological samples from Pernambuco indicated higher concentrations of Ni and Zn in sugarcane, with maximum values of 41 mg kg -1 and 118 mg kg -1 , respectively and agricultural areas (41 mg kg -1 and 127 mg kg -1 , respectively). The trace element Sr was mainly enriched in urban soils with values of 400 mg kg -1 . According to the results, the EDXRF method was successfully implemented, providing some chemical tracers for the quality assessment of tropical soils and sediments. (author)

  15. Multielemental analysis of ayurvedic medicines by INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, A.N.

    2006-01-01

    A large number of commonly used medicinal herbs, herbal formulations and bhasmas have been analyzed for minor and trace elements using short and long neutron irradiation in nuclear reactor followed by high resolution gamma ray spectrometry. Up to 30 elements have been determined. In addition Ni, Cd and Pb contents were determined by AAS. Elemental profiles of species derived from different geographical locations were found similar though some contents were found widely different depending on the geo environmental factors. Elemental contents have been attributed to the therapeutic importance of the herbal medicines. A review of our work is presented. (author)

  16. Feasibility of in situ beta ray measurements in underwater environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Min; Park, Ki Hyun; Kang, Sung Won; Joo, Koan Sik

    2017-09-01

    We describe an attempt at the development of an in situ detector for beta ray measurements in underwater environment. The prototype of the in situ detector is based on a CaF2: Eu scintillator using crystal light guide and Si photomultiplier. Tests were conducted using various reference sources for evaluating the linearity and stability of the detector in underwater environment. The system is simple and stable for long-term monitoring, and consumes low power. We show here an effective detection distance of 7 mm and a 2.273 MeV end-point energy spectrum of 90 Sr/ 90 Y when using the system underwater. The results demonstrate the feasibility of in situ beta ray measurements in underwater environment and can be applied for designing an in situ detector for radioactivity measurement in underwater environment. The in situ detector can also have other applications such as installation on the marine monitoring platform and quantitative analysis of radionuclides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  18. Aerial in situ survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cespirova, I.

    2004-01-01

    In 2001 a detailed exploration of soil contamination took place in the mountainous region Hruby Jesenik located in northeastern part of the Czech Republic. This region was selected for the higher contamination of 137 Cs after Chernobyl accident. For monitoring of an area about 100km 2 aerial monitoring system IRIS (located on board of helicopter MI-17) was used. The parameters of measurement were: flight height above ground 80 m, speed 100 km/h, distance of flight lines 250 m, intervals of spectra recording 1s. For more detailed exploration of ground contamination in this area complementary ground-based mobile group measurements were performed. (author)

  19. In situ zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sarah J; Johnson, Jason L

    2010-01-01

    In situ zymography is a unique laboratory technique that enables the localisation of matrix-degrading metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in histological sections. Frozen sections are placed on glass slides coated with fluorescently labelled matrix proteins. After incubation MMP activity can be observed as black holes in the fluorescent background due to proteolysis of the matrix protein. Alternatively frozen sections can be incubated with matrix proteins conjugated to quenched fluorescein. Proteolysis of the substrate by MMPs leads to the release of fluorescence. This technique can be combined with immunohistochemistry to enable co-location of proteins such as cell type markers or other proteins of interest. Additionally, this technique can be adapted for use with cell cultures, permitting precise location of MMP activity within cells, time-lapse analysis of MMP activity and analysis of MMP activity in migrating cells.

  20. A new device for monitoring moorings

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Namboothiri, E.G.; Krishnakumar, V.

    A new device - Mooring Monitoring Unit (MMU), which consists of an inwater unit and a deck unit has been designed to monitor mooring in situ. This device helps tracing underwater moorings, once its marker buoy is removed either by accident or theft...

  1. In plant corrosion potential monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, B.; Molander, A.

    1997-01-01

    Examples of in plant redox and corrosion potential monitoring in light water reactors are given. All examples are from reactors in Sweden. The measurements have either been performed in side-stream autoclaves connected to the reactor systems by sampling lines, or in-situ in the system piping itself. Potential monitoring can give quite different results depending upon the experimental method. For environments with small concentrations of oxidants sampling lines can introduce large errors. During such circumstances in-situ measurements are necessary. Electrochemical monitoring is a valuable technique as a complement to conventional water chemistry follow-up in plants. It can be used for water chemistry surveillance and can reveal unintentional and harmful water chemistry transients. (author). 15 figs

  2. In plant corrosion potential monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, B; Molander, A [Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1997-02-01

    Examples of in plant redox and corrosion potential monitoring in light water reactors are given. All examples are from reactors in Sweden. The measurements have either been performed in side-stream autoclaves connected to the reactor systems by sampling lines, or in-situ in the system piping itself. Potential monitoring can give quite different results depending upon the experimental method. For environments with small concentrations of oxidants sampling lines can introduce large errors. During such circumstances in-situ measurements are necessary. Electrochemical monitoring is a valuable technique as a complement to conventional water chemistry follow-up in plants. It can be used for water chemistry surveillance and can reveal unintentional and harmful water chemistry transients. (author). 15 figs.

  3. PERFORMANCE CONFIRMATION IN-SITU INSTRUMENTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.T. Raczka

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify and analyze the types of in-situ instruments and methods that could be used in support of the data acquisition portion of the Performance Confirmation (PC) program at the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The PC program will require geomechanical , geophysical, thermal, and hydrologic instrumentation of several kinds. This analysis is being prepared to document the technical issues associated with each type of measurement during the PC period. This analysis utilizes the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M andO 1999a) as its starting point. The scope of this analysis is primarily on the period after the start of waste package emplacement and before permanent closure of the repository, a period lasting between 15 and 300 years after last package emplacement (Stroupe 2000, Attachment 1, p. 1). The primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Review the design criteria as presented in the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M andO 1999a). The scope of this analysis will be limited to the instrumentation related to parameters that require continuous monitoring of the conditions underground. (2) Preliminary identification and listing of the data requirements and parameters as related to the current repository layout in support of PC monitoring. (3) Preliminary identification of methods and instrumentation for the acquisition of the required data. Although the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M andO 1999a) defines a broad range of data that must be obtained from a variety of methods, the focus of this analysis is on instrumentation related to the performance of the rock mass and the formation of water in the repository environment, that is obtainable from in-situ observation, testing, and monitoring

  4. Modeling in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecham, D.C.; MacKinnon, R.J.; Murray, P.E.; Johnson, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    In Situ Vitrification (ISV) process is being assessed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to determine its applicability to transuranic and mixed wastes buried at INEL'S Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). This process uses electrical resistance heating to melt waste and contaminated soil in place to produce a durable glasslike material that encapsulates and immobilizes buried wastes. This paper outlines the requirements for the model being developed at the INEL which will provide analytical support for the ISV technology assessment program. The model includes representations of the electric potential field, thermal transport with melting, gas and particulate release, vapor migration, off-gas combustion and process chemistry. The modeling objectives are to help determine the safety of the process by assessing the air and surrounding soil radionuclides and chemical pollution hazards, the nuclear criticality hazard, and the explosion and fire hazards, help determine the suitability of the ISV process for stabilizing the buried wastes involved, and help design laboratory and field tests and interpret results. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  5. Solar weather monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Hochedez

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Space Weather nowcasting and forecasting require solar observations because geoeffective disturbances can arise from three types of solar phenomena: coronal mass ejections (CMEs, flares and coronal holes. For each, we discuss their definition and review their precursors in terms of remote sensing and in-situ observations. The objectives of Space Weather require some specific instrumental features, which we list using the experience gained from the daily operations of the Solar Influences Data analysis Centre (SIDC at the Royal Observatory of Belgium. Nowcasting requires real-time monitoring to assess quickly and reliably the severity of any potentially geoeffective solar event. Both research and forecasting could incorporate more observations in order to feed case studies and data assimilation respectively. Numerical models will result in better predictions of geomagnetic storms and solar energetic particle (SEP events. We review the data types available to monitor solar activity and interplanetary conditions. They come from space missions and ground observatories and range from sequences of dopplergrams, magnetograms, white-light, chromospheric, coronal, coronagraphic and radio images, to irradiance and in-situ time-series. Their role is summarized together with indications about current and future solar monitoring instruments.

  6. In-situ uranium leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dotson, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    This invention provides a method for improving the recovery of mineral values from ore bodies subjected to in-situ leaching by controlling the flow behaviour of the leaching solution. In particular, the invention relates to an in-situ leaching operation employing a foam for mobility control of the leaching solution. A foam bank is either introduced into the ore bed or developed in-situ in the ore bed. The foam then becomes a diverting agent forcing the leaching fluid through the previously non-contacted regions of the deposit

  7. Development of portable HPGe spectrometer for in situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kail Artjoms

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ applications require a very high level of portability of high-resolution spectrometric equipment. Usage of HPGe detectors for radioactivity measurements in the environment or for nuclear safeguard applications, to combat illicit trafficking of nuclear materials or uranium and plutonium monitoring in nuclear wastes, has become a norm in the recent years. Portable HPGe-based radionuclide spectrometer with electrical cooling has lately appeared on the market for in situ applications. At the same time deterioration of energy resolution associated with vibrations produced by cryocooler or high weight of the instrument, short time of autonomous operation and high price of these spectrometers are limiting their usage in many cases. In this paper we present development results of ultra compact hand held all-in-one spectrometer for in situ measurements based on HPGe detector cooled by liquid nitrogen without listing the above disadvantages.

  8. Radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, L.Eh.; B'yuli, D.K.; Karmikel, Dzh.Kh.E.

    1985-01-01

    Recommendations on radiation monitoring of personnel, used medical ionizing radiation source, are given. The necessity to carry out radiation monitoring of situation at medical personnel's positions and personnel dosimetry is marked. It is convenient to subdivide radiation monitoring into 3 types: usual, surgical and special. Usual monitoring is connected with current work; surgical monitoring is carried out to receive information during a concrete operation; special monitoring is used to detect possible deviation from standard conditions of work or when suspecting them

  9. In situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, B.

    1980-01-01

    A process is described for the in-situ leaching of uranium-containing ores employing an acidic leach liquor containing peroxymonosulphuric acid. Preferably, additionally, sulphuric acid is present in the leach liquor. (author)

  10. Amperometric Carbon Fiber Nitrite Microsensor for In Situ Biofilm Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    A highly selective needle type solid state amperometric nitrite microsensor based on direct nitrite oxidation on carbon fiber was developed using a simplified fabrication method. The microsensor’s tip diameter was approximately 7 µm, providing a high spatial resolution of at lea...

  11. Carbon-Fiber Nitrite Microsensor for In Situ Biofilm Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    During nitrification, nitrite is produced as an intermediate when ammonia is oxidized to nitrate. It is well established that nitrifying biofilm are involved in nitrification episodes in chloraminated drinking water distribution systems with nitrite accumulation occurring during ...

  12. In Situ Guided Wave Structural Health Monitoring System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Corrosion and fatigue induced metal-loss and cracks are common problems for missiles and aircraft structures. A wide range of field conditions such as humidity,...

  13. In Situ Particle Asymmetry Factor Monitor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerosol particles affect the radiative balance of the earth directly, by scattering and absorbing solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly, by acting as cloud...

  14. RoVi: Continuous transport infrastructure monitoring framework for preventive maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seraj, Fatjon; Meratnia, Nirvana; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Ground transport infrastructures require in-situ monitoring to evaluate their condition and deterioration and to design appropriate preventive maintenance strategies. Current monitoring practices provide accurate and detailed spatial measurements but often lack the required temporal resolution. This

  15. Use of species of the genus Tillandsia as bio monitors of the atmospheric contamination using radiochemical analysis; Utilizacion de especies del genero Tillandsia como biomonitores de la contaminacion atmosferica utilizando tecnicas radioquimicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, M T; Wilkinson, M V; Marques, R [Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Dept. de Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica Fisica; Castro, M A [Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas; Di Risio, C [Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    The use of epiphytic plants as bio monitors of environmental pollution is studied in this paper. Species of the genus Tillandsia were selected to make studies, on the one hand, using the Neutron Activation Analysis in order to make multielemental analysis to detect possible pollutants. Optimum conditions of preparation and treatment of the samples were determined to verify the elemental uptake in plant tissues. On the other hand, some studies were carried out to investigate the uptake (translocation) of possible pollutants by using radiotracers. With this aim, a conditioned area (glove box) has been developed in order to reproduce the environment of these plants. This glove box was used for studies with radiotracers. The results of the experiments with Hg as radiotracer are presented in this paper. (author)

  16. Landelijk Meetnet Grondwaterkwaliteit ; Vergelijking "in situ"-pH-meting met pH-meting in het laboratorium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders HFR; Boumans LJM; Gast LFL; LBG

    1995-01-01

    The pH was measured in samples from the National Monitoring Network on Groundwater Quality at the laboratory up to 1989. The pH has been measured in situ and in the laboratory from 1989. To quantify differences results of the in situ pH measurements and the pH measurements in the laboratory are

  17. Radiological aspects of in situ uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BROWN, STEVEN H.

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium in situ leaching in situ recovery (ISL / ISR), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and may make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since 1975. Solution mining involves the pumping of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing and complexing agents into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant. Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which Radon gas is evolved in

  18. In Situ TEM Electrical Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canepa, Silvia; Alam, Sardar Bilal; Ngo, Duc-The

    2016-01-01

    understanding of complex physical and chemical interactions in the pursuit to optimize nanostructure function and device performance. Recent developments of sample holder technology for TEM have enabled a new field of research in the study of functional nanomaterials and devices via electrical stimulation...... influence the sample by external stimuli, e.g. through electrical connections, the TEM becomes a powerful laboratory for performing quantitative real time in situ experiments. Such TEM setups enable the characterization of nanostructures and nanodevices under working conditions, thereby providing a deeper...... and measurement of the specimen. Recognizing the benefits of electrical measurements for in situ TEM, many research groups have focused their effort in this field and some of these methods have transferred to ETEM. This chapter will describe recent advances in the in situ TEM investigation of nanostructured...

  19. Triplex in-situ hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresco, Jacques R.; Johnson, Marion D.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for detecting in situ the presence of a target sequence in a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment, which comprises: a) contacting in situ under conditions suitable for hybridization a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment with a detectable third strand, said third strand being capable of hybridizing to at least a portion of the target sequence to form a triple-stranded structure, if said target sequence is present; and b) detecting whether hybridization between the third strand and the target sequence has occured.

  20. In situ grouting of buried transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, B.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This task is a demonstration and evaluation of the in situ hydrologic stabilization of buried transuranic waste at a humid site via grout injection. Two small trenches, containing buried transuranic waste, were filled with 34,000 liters of polyacrylamide grout. Initial field results have indicated that voids within the trenches were totally filled by the grout and that the intratrench hydraulic conductivity was reduced to below field-measurable values. The grout was also completely contained within the two trenches as no grout constituents were observed in the 12 perimeter ground water monitoring wells. Polyacrylamide grout was selected for field demonstration over polyacrylate grout because of its superior performance in laboratory degradation studies. Also supporting the selection of polyacrylamide was the difficulty of controlling the set time of the acrylate polymerization process in the presence of potassium ferricyanide. Based on preliminary degradation monitoring, polyacrylamide was estimated to have a microbiological half-life of 115 years in the test soil. However, this calculated value is likely to be conservatively low because microbial degradation of the grout set accelerator or residual monomer may be contributing most to the measured microbial respiration. Addition work, using 14 C-labeled acrylate and acrylamide grouts, is being carried out to more accurately estimate the grouts' microbiological half-life

  1. Development of in-situ radon sensor using plastic scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shitashima, Kiminori

    2009-01-01

    Underwater in-situ radon measurement is important scientific priority for oceanography, especially for survey and monitoring of submarine groundwater discharge (SDG). The high sensitivity and lightweight underwater in-situ radon sensor using NaI(Tl) doped plastic scintillator was developed for application to SDG research. Because NaI(Tl) doped plastic scintillator contacts seawater directly, the plastic scintillator can expect high sensitivity in comparison with NaI(Tl) crystal sealed in a container. In order to improve condensation efficiency of scintillation, the plastic scintillator was processed in funnel form and coated by light-resistant paint. This sensor consists of plastic scintillator, photomultiplier tube, preamplifier unit, high-voltage power supply, data logger and lithium-ion battery, and all parts are stored in a pressure housing (200φx300L). The newly developed underwater in-situ radon sensor was tested at hydrothermal area (underwater hot springs) that the hydrothermal fluid containing high concentration of radon is discharged into seawater. The sensor was operated by a diver, and sensitivity tests and mapping survey for estimation of radon diffusion were carried out. The signals of the radon sensor ranged from 20 to 65 mV, and these signals corresponded with radon concentration of 2 to 12 becquerels per liter. The sensor was able to detect radon to 20 m above the hydrothermal point (seafloor). Since the sensor is small and light-weight, measurement, monitoring and mapping can perform automatically by installing the sensor to an AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle). Furthermore, underwater in-situ radon sensor is expected an application to earthquake prediction and volcanic activity monitoring as well as oceanography and hydrology. (author)

  2. IN-SITU TRITIUM BETA DETECTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthold, J.W.; Jeffers, L.A.

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of this three-phase project were to design, develop, and demonstrate a monitoring system capable of detecting and quantifying tritium in situ in ground and surface waters, and in water from effluent lines prior to discharge into public waterways. The tritium detection system design is based on measurement of the low energy beta radiation from the radioactive decay of tritium using a special form of scintillating optical fiber directly in contact with the water to be measured. The system consists of the immersible sensor module containing the optical fiber, and an electronics package, connected by an umbilical cable. The system can be permanently installed for routine water monitoring in wells or process or effluent lines, or can be moved from one location to another for survey use. The electronics will read out tritium activity directly in units of pico Curies per liter, with straightforward calibration. In Phase 1 of the project, we characterized the sensitivity of fluor-doped plastic optical fiber to tritium beta radiation. In addition, we characterized the performance of photomultiplier tubes needed for the system. In parallel with this work, we defined the functional requirements, target specifications, and system configuration for an in situ tritium beta detector that would use the fluor-doped fibers as primary sensors of tritium concentration in water. The major conclusions from the characterization work are: A polystyrene optical fiber with fluor dopant concentration of 2% gave best performance. This fiber had the highest dopant concentration of any fibers tested. Stability may be a problem. The fibers exposed to a 22-day soak in 120 F water experienced a 10x reduction in sensitivity. It is not known whether this was due to the build up of a deposit (a potentially reversible effect) or an irreversible process such as leaching of the scintillating dye. Based on the results achieved, it is premature to initiate Phase 2 and commit to a prototype

  3. IN-SITU TRITIUM BETA DETECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.W. Berthold; L.A. Jeffers

    1998-04-15

    The objectives of this three-phase project were to design, develop, and demonstrate a monitoring system capable of detecting and quantifying tritium in situ in ground and surface waters, and in water from effluent lines prior to discharge into public waterways. The tritium detection system design is based on measurement of the low energy beta radiation from the radioactive decay of tritium using a special form of scintillating optical fiber directly in contact with the water to be measured. The system consists of the immersible sensor module containing the optical fiber, and an electronics package, connected by an umbilical cable. The system can be permanently installed for routine water monitoring in wells or process or effluent lines, or can be moved from one location to another for survey use. The electronics will read out tritium activity directly in units of pico Curies per liter, with straightforward calibration. In Phase 1 of the project, we characterized the sensitivity of fluor-doped plastic optical fiber to tritium beta radiation. In addition, we characterized the performance of photomultiplier tubes needed for the system. In parallel with this work, we defined the functional requirements, target specifications, and system configuration for an in situ tritium beta detector that would use the fluor-doped fibers as primary sensors of tritium concentration in water. The major conclusions from the characterization work are: A polystyrene optical fiber with fluor dopant concentration of 2% gave best performance. This fiber had the highest dopant concentration of any fibers tested. Stability may be a problem. The fibers exposed to a 22-day soak in 120 F water experienced a 10x reduction in sensitivity. It is not known whether this was due to the build up of a deposit (a potentially reversible effect) or an irreversible process such as leaching of the scintillating dye. Based on the results achieved, it is premature to initiate Phase 2 and commit to a prototype

  4. In situ solution mining technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Learmont, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    A method of in situ solution mining is disclosed in which a primary leaching process employing an array of 5-spot leaching patterns of production and injection wells is converted to a different pattern by converting to injection wells all the production wells in alternate rows

  5. 'In situ' expanded graphite extinguishant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qixin; Shou Yuemei; He Bangrong

    1987-01-01

    This report is concerning the development of the extinguishant for sodium fire and the investigation of its extinguishing property. The experiment result shows that 'in situ' expanded graphite developed by the authors is a kind of extinguishant which extinguishes sodium fire quickly and effectively and has no environment pollution during use and the amount of usage is little

  6. In Situ Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talacua, H

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, the feasibility of in situ TE for vascular and valvular purposes were tested with the use of different materials, and animal models. First, the feasibility of a decellularized biological scaffold (pSIS-ECM) as pulmonary heart valve prosthesis is examined in sheep (Chapter 2). Next,

  7. Results from the first national in-situ gamma spectrometry survey of the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler, A.

    2004-01-01

    In-situ gamma spectrometry was introduced for the first time as part of a national soil and herbage pollution survey of the United Kingdom (UK) in 2002. The aim of introducing the in-situ approach was to evaluate its potential for replacing the conventional soil sampling approach in environmental monitoring. A total of 138 points were measured across the whole of the UK on a 50 km grid, encompassing a complete spectrum of soil types, geology (providing a range of natural radioactive backgrounds) and anthropogenic radioactivity (primarily derived from atmospheric weapons testing and Chernobyl fallout). Ten calibration sites were set up to derive an in-situ calibration from spatially distributed sampling points, designed to match the spatial response of the in-situ detector at 1 m above the ground. The importance of variations in the vertical activity distributions of 137 Cs on the in-situ detector calibration was verified and the advantages and disadvantages of implementing a forward scattering type approach for real time in-situ correction was evaluated. The accuracy of the in-situ calibrations was evaluated for the remaining 128 sites by independent comparison with soil core derived estimates of specific activity concentrations and inventories of a range of natural and anthropogenic gamma emitting radionuclides. Air kerma measurements were also derived from the in-situ gamma spectrometry measurements and compared with conventional GM tube derived estimates. (authors)

  8. Ex situ Flora of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwen Huang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of living collections-based research and discovery has been a prominent feature throughout the history of evolution and advance of botanical science: such research is the core and soul of the botanical gardens. Currently, there are c. 162 Chinese botanical gardens, harboring c. 20,000 species in China. As an example of initiatives to utilize the garden cultivated flora to address plant diversity conservation and germplasm discovery for sustainable agriculture and the bio-industries, the Ex situ Flora of China project aims to catalog and document this mega-diversity of plants that are cultivated in the Chinese botanical gardens. The concept of Ex situ Flora of China is a complete new formulation of species, based on garden cultivated individuals and populations, to obtain better morphological descriptions, provide multi-purpose applicability and a fundamental data service that will support national bio-strategies and bio-industries. It emphasises integrative information, accurately collected from living collections across different Chinese botanical gardens, on biology, phenology, cultivation requirements and uses of plant resources, which are normally not available from traditional Floras based on herbarium specimens. The ex situ flora should provide better information coverage for taxonomy, biological and introduction and collection data and color photos of stems, leaves, flowers, fruits and seed, as well as useful information of cultivation key points and main use of each plant. In general, the Ex situ Flora of China provides more useful information than the traditional Flora Reipublicae Popularis Sinicae. The project of Ex situ Flora of China is planned to be one of the most important initiatives of the plant diversity research platform for sustainable economic and social development in China.

  9. In-situ bioremediation at the French Limited Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, R.; Ramsden, D.

    1990-01-01

    In situ biodegradation of petrochemical wastes at the French Limited Superfund Site was stimulated by providing the appropriate pH, essential nutrients, oxygen, and substrate availability. Fourteen wastewater treatment parameters, plus toxicity, were monitored to document the program of bioremediation. Periodic, organic priority pollutant analysis of mixed liquor, settled sludges and subsoils provided data for kinetics interpretation and half life calculation. The half lives of thirteen PAH compounds ranged from 27 to 46 days, in contrast to the degradation rate, in months, reported for these compounds in LTUs. An ambitious air monitoring program measured fugitive emissions at lagoon side, fenceline, and from the lagoon surface by floating flux chamber. The amount of volatiles lost never exceeded 1/2 of the OSHA 8 hr TLV and it could be readily managed by adjusting the intensity and frequency of mixing and aeration. The demonstration confirmed the feasibility of in situ bioremediation and led to one of the first US EPA Record of Decisions to use bioremediation for cleanup of a large Superfund site. A consent Decree outlining the site remedial action program was signed by the PRP task group and published in the Federal Register. This represents a landmark project for in situ bioremediation and has established precedence for use of this technology at CERCLA and RCRA sites nationwide

  10. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR

  11. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  12. Noise canceling in-situ detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David O.

    2014-08-26

    Technologies applicable to noise canceling in-situ NMR detection and imaging are disclosed. An example noise canceling in-situ NMR detection apparatus may comprise one or more of a static magnetic field generator, an alternating magnetic field generator, an in-situ NMR detection device, an auxiliary noise detection device, and a computer.

  13. 40 CFR 430.02 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... monoxide (Cl2O). (g) Analyst may use NCASI Method CP-86.07, “Chlorinated Phenolics in Water by In situ Acetylation and GC/MS Determination” (January 2002) for determination of certain chlorinated phenols... chlorinated organic pollutants. The following monitoring frequencies apply to discharges subject to subpart B...

  14. Geothermal in situ experiments in the Asse salt-mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopietz, J.; Jung, R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents design and results of in situ experiments carried out by the Bundesanstat fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, F.R. of Germany) in the Asse salt-mine. With reference to model calculations of the temperature field which is produced in salt formations by radioactive waste, temperature measurements in the area of electrical heating elements and in situ measurements of thermal conductivity have been performed. The measured temperatures are in good accordance with the theoretical prediction. Preliminary results of the thermal conductivity measurements correspond with the data of single NaCl crystals published by Birch and Clark. At present a heating experiment is being conducted in the Asse mine to investigate thermo-mechanical effects of a cylindrical heat source upon the surrounding rock salt. Possible thermal induced fractures monitored by permeability changes and seismoacoustical phenomena are the main objects of this experiment

  15. Polyolefin nanocomposites in situ polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galland, Griselda Barrera; Fim, Fabiana de C.; Milani, Marceo A.; Silva, Silene P. da; Forest, Tadeu; Radaelli, Gislaine, E-mail: griselda.barrera@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande de Sul - UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Basso, Nara R.S. [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Quijada, Raul [Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-07-01

    Polyethylene and polypropylene nanocomposites using grapheme nanosheets and treated chrysotile have been synthesized by in situ polymerization using metallocene catalysts. The fillers have been submitted to acid, thermal and/ou ultrasound treatments before to introduce them into the polymerization reactor. A complete characterization of the fillers has been done. The nanocomposites have been characterized by SEM, TEM, DRX and AFM. The thermal, mechanic -dynamic, mechanical and electrical properties of the nanocomposites are discussed. (author)

  16. Polyolefin nanocomposites in situ polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galland, Griselda Barrera; Fim, Fabiana de C.; Milani, Marceo A.; Silva, Silene P. da; Forest, Tadeu; Radaelli, Gislaine; Basso, Nara R.S.; Quijada, Raul

    2011-01-01

    Polyethylene and polypropylene nanocomposites using grapheme nanosheets and treated chrysotile have been synthesized by in situ polymerization using metallocene catalysts. The fillers have been submitted to acid, thermal and/ou ultrasound treatments before to introduce them into the polymerization reactor. A complete characterization of the fillers has been done. The nanocomposites have been characterized by SEM, TEM, DRX and AFM. The thermal, mechanic -dynamic, mechanical and electrical properties of the nanocomposites are discussed. (author)

  17. Ex-situ and in-situ observations of the effects of gamma radiation on lithium ion battery performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chuting; Bashian, Nicholas H.; Hemmelgarn, Chase W.; Thio, Wesley J.; Lyons, Daniel J.; Zheng, Yuan F.; Cao, Lei R.; Co, Anne C.

    2017-07-01

    Radiation effects induced by gamma rays on battery performance were investigated by measuring the capacity and resistance of a series of battery coin cells in-situ directly under gamma radiation and ex-situ. An experimental setup was developed to charge and discharge batteries directly under gamma radiation, equipped with precise temperature control, at The Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Lab. Latent effects induced by gamma radiation on battery components directly influence their performance. Charge and discharge capacity and overall resistance throughout a time span of several weeks post irradiation were monitored and compared to control groups. It was found that exposure to gamma radiation does not significantly alter the available capacity and the overall cell resistance immediately, however, battery performance significantly decreases with time post irradiation. Also, batteries exposed to a higher cumulative dose showed close-to-zero capacity at two-week post irradiation.

  18. "In-Situ Chemical Oxidation" - Sessions: #6 Technology Development, Process Fundamentals, Mechanisms;#7 Advantages and Disadvantages; #9 Oxidant Selection; #10 Bench- and Pilot-Scale Studies; #11 Monitoring; #12 Field-Scale Implementation; #13 Chemical Oxidation Regeneration of Granular Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of seven technical presentations involving chemical oxidation will be given to faculty, graduate students, and environmental professionals at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, China (April 21-22, 2010). Chemical oxidation technologies include in-situ chemical o...

  19. Personnel monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    This film stresses the need for personnel monitoring in work areas where there is a hazard of exposure to radiation. It illustrates the use of personnel monitoring devices (specially the film dosimeter), the assessment of exposure to radiation and the detailed recording of the results on personnel filing cards

  20. Mobility Monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schæbel, Anne-Lise; Dybbro, Karina Løvendahl; Andersen, Lisbeth Støvring

    2015-01-01

    Undersøgelse af digital monitorering af plejehjemsbeboeres vendinger under søvn på Fremtidens Plejehjem, Nørresundby......Undersøgelse af digital monitorering af plejehjemsbeboeres vendinger under søvn på Fremtidens Plejehjem, Nørresundby...

  1. Personnel monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-12-31

    This film stresses the need for personnel monitoring in work areas where there is a hazard of exposure to radiation. It illustrates the use of personnel monitoring devices (specially the film dosimeter), the assessment of exposure to radiation and the detailed recording of the results on personnel filing cards

  2. Process monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Many of the measurements and observations made in a nuclear processing facility to monitor processes and product quality can also be used to monitor the location and movements of nuclear materials. In this session information is presented on how to use process monitoring data to enhance nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A). It will be seen that SNM losses can generally be detected with greater sensitivity and timeliness and point of loss localized more closely than by conventional MC and A systems if process monitoring data are applied. The purpose of this session is to enable the participants to: (1) identify process unit operations that could improve control units for monitoring SNM losses; (2) choose key measurement points and formulate a loss indicator for each control unit; and (3) describe how the sensitivities and timeliness of loss detection could be determined for each loss indicator

  3. Assessment of microbial in situ activity in contaminated aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaestner, M. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Bioremediation, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Fischer, A.; Nijenhuis, I.; Stelzer, N.; Bombach, P.; Richnow, H.H. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Isotopenbiogeochemie, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Geyer, R. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Umweltmikrobiologie, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Tebbe, C.C. [Institut fuer Agraroekologie, Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft (FAL), D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    unspecific for a community analysis at species level, the composition of the microbial communities was analyzed by genetic profiling and sequencing of partial 16S rRNA genes PCR-amplified from total DNA extracted directly from the microcosms. Sequences retrieved from the microcosms indicated a dominance of not yet cultivated bacteria. Several sequences were phylogenetically closely related to sequences of bacteria known to be iron and sulfate reducers, typically found at sites polluted with BTEX and/or mineral oil. The results show that the current methods for monitoring microbial in situ activity at present stage are valuable tools for improving environmental control of compound turnover and will speed up engineering approaches. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. In situ permeable flow sensor - OST reference No. 99. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This summary reports describes the In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor (ISPFS) developed to directly measure the direction and velocity of groundwater flow at a point in saturated soil sediments. The ISPFS provides information for locating, designing, and monitoring waste disposal sites, and for monitoring remediated waste sites. The design and performance are described and compared to alternative methods. Economic, regulatory, and policy issues are discussed. Applicability of the ISPFS to specific situations is also summarized. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  5. In Situ/Remote Sensing Integration to Assess Forest Health—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Pause

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For mapping, quantifying and monitoring regional and global forest health, satellite remote sensing provides fundamental data for the observation of spatial and temporal forest patterns and processes. While new remote-sensing technologies are able to detect forest data in high quality and large quantity, operational applications are still limited by deficits of in situ verification. In situ sampling data as input is required in order to add value to physical imaging remote sensing observations and possibilities to interlink the forest health assessment with biotic and abiotic factors. Numerous methods on how to link remote sensing and in situ data have been presented in the scientific literature using e.g. empirical and physical-based models. In situ data differs in type, quality and quantity between case studies. The irregular subsets of in situ data availability limit the exploitation of available satellite remote sensing data. To achieve a broad implementation of satellite remote sensing data in forest monitoring and management, a standardization of in situ data, workflows and products is essential and necessary for user acceptance. The key focus of the review is a discussion of concept and is designed to bridge gaps of understanding between forestry and remote sensing science community. Methodological approaches for in situ/remote-sensing implementation are organized and evaluated with respect to qualifying for forest monitoring. Research gaps and recommendations for standardization of remote-sensing based products are discussed. Concluding the importance of outstanding organizational work to provide a legally accepted framework for new information products in forestry are highlighted.

  6. Performance parameters for ex situ bioremediation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    The potential of biotechnology to reduce the concentration of undesirable hydrocarbons, i.e. gasoline and diesel fuel pollution, is very attractive due to its apparent benign nature and potentially low cost. When good industrial practices are used in the design, construction, and administration of the bioremediation system, the performance of the technology can be predicted and monitored. Some of the principles behind the design, construction, and operation of ex situ bioremediation systems and facilities are described. Biological considerations include creation of a favorable environment for hydrocarbon degrading bacteria in the soils, selection of bacteria, and bacterial byproducts. Chemical considerations include nutrient augmentation, oxygen availability, and the use of surfactants and dispersants. Physical considerations include soil textures and structures, soil temperatures, moisture content, and the use of bulking agents. Experience has shown that indigenous microbes will usually be sufficient to implement bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons if encouraged through the application of fertilizers. The introduction of additional carbon sources may be considered if rapid bioremediation rates are desired or if soil conditions are poor. Adjustments to a bioremediation system may be made to enhance the performance of the bacterial community by introducing bulking agents and external temperature sources. Surfactants may be helpful in promoting bacteria-hydrocarbon contact and may be particularly useful for mobilization of free-phase hydrocarbons. 7 refs

  7. Assessment of a biological in situ remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuerdemann, H.; Lund, N.C.; Gudehus, G.

    1995-01-01

    A field experiment using a bioventing technique has been conducted at the center of contamination at a former gasworks site for 3 years. The emphasis of this investigation is to determine the efficiency of in situ remediation. Due to an extremely heterogeneous distribution of contamination it was impossible to satisfactorily quantify the reduction of hydrocarbons. However, a comparison of highly contaminated soil samples shows a qualitative alteration. The analyses of pollutant composition reveal a significant decrease of low condensed PAHs up to anthracene. The relative increase of high condensed PAHs in the contaminant composition indicates a PAH degradation of 54%. Soil respiration is used to assess the course of remediation. Continuous monitoring of O 2 and CO 2 in the used air leads to an amount of about 2,400 kg of decomposed organics. Large-scale elution tests show a reduction of the sum parameters for the organic pollution of the flushing water of 80%. The PAHs have dropped about 97%. The Microtox test indicates a detoxification of 98%

  8. In-situ TEM characterization of nanomaterials and devices

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Moon; Park, Seongyong; Cha, Dong Kyu; Kim, Jiyoung; Floresca, Herman Carlo; Lu, Ning; Wang, Jinguo

    2011-01-01

    Electrical properties of nano size devices were directly measured by TEM. Real time observation of phase transition behavior in PRAM revealed that the volume of the crystalline phase is the main factor in determining cell resistance. In the transistor device, we have identified the doping type and area by measuring the I-V curve at the individual nano contact on the specimen. The evolution of the graphene edge structure was controlled and monitored at and up to 1200°C in-situ. © 2011 IEEE.

  9. In-situ TEM characterization of nanomaterials and devices

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Moon

    2011-10-01

    Electrical properties of nano size devices were directly measured by TEM. Real time observation of phase transition behavior in PRAM revealed that the volume of the crystalline phase is the main factor in determining cell resistance. In the transistor device, we have identified the doping type and area by measuring the I-V curve at the individual nano contact on the specimen. The evolution of the graphene edge structure was controlled and monitored at and up to 1200°C in-situ. © 2011 IEEE.

  10. In-situ solidification cleans up old gas plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatfield, A.D.; Dennis, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    A manufactured gas plant site in Columbus, Georgia, was the location of an environmental cleanup in 1992. Manufactured gas was produced at this site from 1854 to 1931 with the availability of natural gas from a transmission pipeline causing its demise. However, waste products, primarily coal tar from the earlier years of plant operation, remained with the site. In-situ solidification was chosen as the cleanup method. Post monitoring activities show that the project was successful and the site is now a park and a leading part of river front development

  11. Bulk monitoring and segregation of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beddow, H.; Adsley, I.; Pearman, I.; Sweeney, A.; Davies, M., E-mail: helen.beddow@nuvia.co.uk [Nuvia Limited, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Several sites in the UK are contaminated by radioactive legacy wastes. These include; radium luminising sites and more recently the oil, and (potentially) fracking industries; sites contaminated from thorium gas mantle factories; old nuclear research sites; nuclear power sites, and the Sellafield reprocessing site. Nuvia has developed a suite of technologies to map the location of and to recover and process wastes during remedial operations. The main method for delineating contaminated areas in-situ is by use of the Groundhog system, whilst bulk monitoring methods employ the Gamma Excavation Monitor, the High Resolution Assay Monitor, and the Conveyor Active Particle System. (author)

  12. Bulk monitoring and segregation of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddow, H.; Adsley, I.; Pearman, I.; Sweeney, A.; Davies, M.

    2014-01-01

    Several sites in the UK are contaminated by radioactive legacy wastes. These include; radium luminising sites and more recently the oil, and (potentially) fracking industries; sites contaminated from thorium gas mantle factories; old nuclear research sites; nuclear power sites, and the Sellafield reprocessing site. Nuvia has developed a suite of technologies to map the location of and to recover and process wastes during remedial operations. The main method for delineating contaminated areas in-situ is by use of the Groundhog system, whilst bulk monitoring methods employ the Gamma Excavation Monitor, the High Resolution Assay Monitor, and the Conveyor Active Particle System. (author)

  13. Four Models of In Situ Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter; Krogh, Kristian; Paltved, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In situ simulation is characterized by being situated in the clinical environment as opposed to the simulation laboratory. But in situ simulation bears a family resemblance to other types of on the job training. We explore a typology of in situ simulation and suggest that there are f......Introduction In situ simulation is characterized by being situated in the clinical environment as opposed to the simulation laboratory. But in situ simulation bears a family resemblance to other types of on the job training. We explore a typology of in situ simulation and suggest...... that there are four fruitful approaches to in situ simulation: (1) In situ simulation informed by reported critical incidents and adverse events from emergency departments (ED) in which team training is about to be conducted to write scenarios. (2) In situ simulation through ethnographic studies at the ED. (3) Using...... the following processes: Transition processes, Action processes and Interpersonal processes. Design and purpose This abstract suggests four approaches to in situ simulation. A pilot study will evaluate the different approaches in two emergency departments in the Central Region of Denmark. Methods The typology...

  14. Coalescence and compression in centrifuged emulsions studied with in situ optical microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krebs, T.; Ershov, D.S.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    We report an experimental method to investigate droplet dynamics in centrifuged emulsions and its application to study droplet compression and coalescence. The experimental setup permits in situ monitoring of an ensemble of droplets in a centrifuged monolayer of monodisperse emulsion droplets using

  15. Direct Observations of Oxygen-induced Platinum Nanoparticle Ripening Studied by In Situ TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Chorkendorff, Ib; Dahl, Søren

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses the sintering mechanism of Pt nanoparticles dispersed on a planar, amorphous Al2O3 support as a model system for a catalyst for automotive exhaust abatement. By means of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the model catalyst was monitored during the exposure to 10...

  16. In situ nuclear magnetic resonance study of defect dynamics during deformation of materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murty, K.L.; Detemple, K.; Kanert, O.; Peters, G; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques can be used to monitor in situ the dynamical behaviour of point and line defects in materials during deformation. These techniques are non-destructive and non-invasive. We report here the atomic transport, in particular the enhanced diffusion during deformation

  17. First in situ TOF-PET study using digital photon counters for proton range verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambraia Lopes Ferreira da Silva, P.; Bauer, J.; Salomon, A.; Rinaldi, I; Tabacchini, V.; Tessonnier, T.; Crespo, P; Parodi, K; Schaart, D.R.

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the imaging modality most extensively tested for treatment monitoring in particle therapy. Optimal use of PET in proton therapy requires in situ acquisition of the relatively strong 15O signal due to its relatively short half-life (∼2 min) and high

  18. Harmful Algal Blooms in the Mississippi Sound and Mobile Bay: Using MODIS Aqua and In Situ Data for HABs in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holiday, Dan; Carter, Gregory; Gould, Richard W; MacIntyre, Hugh

    2007-01-01

    .... Phytoplankton populations and in situ water quality were monitored at 3 to 6 week intervals at 17 locations in Mobile Bay and the Mississippi Sound beginning in July 2005 and continuing thru June...

  19. In situ measurement of diffusivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berne, F.; Pocachard, J.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of molecular diffusion controls the migration of contaminants in very low-permeability porous media, like underground facilities for the storage of hazardous waste. Determining of relevant diffusion coefficients is therefore of prime importance. A few techniques exist for in situ measurement of the quantity, but they suffer from many handicaps (duration, complexity and cost of the experiments). We propose here two innovative methods that have some potential to improve the situation. So far, we have found them feasible on the basis of design calculations and laboratory experiments. This work is presently protected by a patent. (author)

  20. In situ measurement of diffusivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berne, Ph.; Pocachard, J.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of molecular diffusion controls the migration of contaminants in very low-permeability porous media, like underground facilities for the storage of hazardous waste. Determining the relevant diffusion coefficients is, therefore, of prime importance. A few techniques exist for the in situ measurement of that quantity, but they suffer from many handicaps (duration, complexity and cost of the experiments). We propose here two innovative methods that have some potential to improve this situation. So far, we have found them feasible on the basis of design calculations and laboratory experiments. This work is presently protected by a patent. (author)

  1. In situ dehydration of yugawaralite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artioli, G.; Ståhl, Kenny; Cruciani, G.

    2001-01-01

    The structural response of the natural zeolite yugawaralite (CaAl2Si6O16. 4H(2)O) upon thermally induced dehydration has been studied by Rietveld analysis of temperature-resolved powder diffraction data collected in situ in the temperature range 315-791 K using synchrotron radiation. The room...... progressively disappearing as the dehydration proceeds. The yugawaralite structure reacts to the release of water molecules with small changes in the Ca-O bond distances and minor distortions of the tetrahedral framework up to about 695 K. Above this temperature the Ca coordination falls below 7 (four framework...

  2. Monitoring Hadoop

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Gurmukh

    2015-01-01

    This book is useful for Hadoop administrators who need to learn how to monitor and diagnose their clusters. Also, the book will prove useful for new users of the technology, as the language used is simple and easy to grasp.

  3. DOE In Situ Remediation Integrated Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISRP) supports and manages a balanced portfolio of applied research and development activities in support of DOE environmental restoration and waste management needs. ISRP technologies are being developed in four areas: containment, chemical and physical treatment, in situ bioremediation, and in situ manipulation (including electrokinetics). the focus of containment is to provide mechanisms to stop contaminant migration through the subsurface. In situ bioremediation and chemical and physical treatment both aim to destroy or eliminate contaminants in groundwater and soils. In situ manipulation (ISM) provides mechanisms to access contaminants or introduce treatment agents into the soil, and includes other technologies necessary to support the implementation of ISR methods. Descriptions of each major program area are provided to set the technical context of the ISM subprogram. Typical ISM needs for major areas of in situ remediation research and development are identified

  4. In situ visualization and data analysis for turbidity currents simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camata, Jose J.; Silva, Vítor; Valduriez, Patrick; Mattoso, Marta; Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

    2018-01-01

    Turbidity currents are underflows responsible for sediment deposits that generate geological formations of interest for the oil and gas industry. LibMesh-sedimentation is an application built upon the libMesh library to simulate turbidity currents. In this work, we present the integration of libMesh-sedimentation with in situ visualization and in transit data analysis tools. DfAnalyzer is a solution based on provenance data to extract and relate strategic simulation data in transit from multiple data for online queries. We integrate libMesh-sedimentation and ParaView Catalyst to perform in situ data analysis and visualization. We present a parallel performance analysis for two turbidity currents simulations showing that the overhead for both in situ visualization and in transit data analysis is negligible. We show that our tools enable monitoring the sediments appearance at runtime and steer the simulation based on the solver convergence and visual information on the sediment deposits, thus enhancing the analytical power of turbidity currents simulations.

  5. In situ respiration testing: A field treatability test for bioventing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittel, J.A.; Hinchee, R.E.; Miller, R.; Vogel, C.; Hoeppel, R.

    1993-01-01

    Bioventing is the process of aerating subsurface soils to stimulate in situ biological activity and promote bioremediation. Bioventing differs from soil venting in remedial approach. Soil venting is designed and operated to maximize the volatilization of low-molecular-weight compounds, with some biodegradation occurring. In contrast, bioventing is designed to maximize biodegradation of aerobically biodegradable compounds, regardless of their molecular weight, with some volatilization occurring. Bioventing is gaining wide acceptance as a remediation alternative at petroleum-contaminated sites. However, site variability usually requires that a short term treatability test be conducted in situ at potential sites to determine the applicability of bioventing. Battelle has worked with the US Air Force and the US Navy to develop a simple and inexpensive field test to evaluate bioventing potential-contaminated sites. This test has been used to evaluate the applicability of bioventing at over 50 sites. The in situ respiration test consists of injecting air and an inert tracer gas (helium) over a 24-hour period to aerate soils at an oxygen-deficient, petroleum-contaminated site. Soil vapor samples are collected to determine oxygen utilization rates and carbon dioxide production rates. The stoichiometric relationship for the oxidation of hexane is used to calculate the biodegradation rate. The tracer gas is monitored to estimate the effect of diffusion on changes in soil-gas concentrations

  6. In Situ Hybridization Pada Kanker Payudara

    OpenAIRE

    Diah Witari, Ni Putu

    2014-01-01

    Kesulitan yang dijumpai pada penanganan kanker payudara adalah terjadinya kekambuhan atau relaps. Deteksi status HER2 pada pasien merupakan salah satu upaya untuk mendeteksi terjadinya relaps dan juga untuk menentukan jenis terapi yang ada diberikan. Ekspresi protein HER2 dapat dideteksi dengan immunohistochemistry (IHC), sedangkan mutasi gen HER2 dapat dideteksi dengan teknik in situ hybridization baik berupa fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) ataupun chromogenic in situ hy...

  7. Training for teamwork through in situ simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Asta; Poehlman, Jon; Bollenbacher, John; Riggan, Scott; Davis, Stan; Miller, Kristi; Ivester, Thomas; Kahwati, Leila

    2015-01-01

    In situ simulations allow healthcare teams to practice teamwork and communication as well as clinical management skills in a team's usual work setting with typically available resources and equipment. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate how to plan and conduct in situ simulation training sessions, with particular emphasis on how such training can be used to improve communication and teamwork. The video features an in situ simulation conducted at a labour and delivery unit in response to postpartum hemorrhage. PMID:26294962

  8. Experimental Measurement of In Situ Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbo, Maria; Milkereit, Bernd; Nasseri, Farzine; Schmitt, Douglas; Young, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The World Stress Map data is determined by stress indicators including earthquake focal mechanisms, in situ measurement in mining, oil and gas boreholes as well as the borehole cores, and geologic data. Unfortunately, these measurements are not only infrequent but sometimes infeasible, and do not provide nearly enough data points with high accuracy to correctly infer stress fields in deep mines around the world. Improvements in stress measurements of Earth's crust is fundamental to several industries such as oil and gas, mining, nuclear waste management, and enhanced geothermal systems. Quantifying the state of stress and the geophysical properties of different rock types is a major complication in geophysical monitoring of deep mines. Most stress measurement techniques involve either the boreholes or their cores, however these measurements usually only give stress along one axis, not the complete stress tensor. The goal of this project is to investigate a new method of acquiring a complete stress tensor of the in situ stress in the Earth's crust. This project is part of a comprehensive, exploration geophysical study in a deep, highly stressed mine located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, and focuses on two boreholes located in this mine. These boreholes are approximately 400 m long with NQ diameters and are located at depths of about 1300 - 1600 m and 1700 - 2000 m. Two borehole logging surveys were performed on both boreholes, October 2013 and July 2015, in order to perform a time-lapse analysis of the geophysical changes in the mine. These multi-parameter surveys include caliper, full waveform sonic, televiewer, chargeability (IP), and resistivity. Laboratory experiments have been performed on borehole core samples of varying geologies from each borehole. These experiments have measured the geophysical properties including elastic modulus, bulk modulus, P- and S-wave velocities, and density. The apparatus' used for this project are geophysical imaging cells capable

  9. The SENSEI Generic In Situ Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayachit, Utkarsh [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Whitlock, Brad [Intelligent Light, Rutherford, NJ (United States); Wolf, Matthew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Loring, Burlen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Geveci, Berk [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Lonie, David [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Bethel, E. Wes [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-11

    The SENSEI generic in situ interface is an API that promotes code portability and reusability. From the simulation view, a developer can instrument their code with the SENSEI API and then make make use of any number of in situ infrastructures. From the method view, a developer can write an in situ method using the SENSEI API, then expect it to run in any number of in situ infrastructures, or be invoked directly from a simulation code, with little or no modification. This paper presents the design principles underlying the SENSEI generic interface, along with some simplified coding examples.

  10. In situ grouting of buried transuranic waste with polyacrylamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, B.P.; Lee, S.Y.; Farmer, C.D.; Hyder, L.K.; Supaokit, P.

    1987-01-01

    This project is a demonstration and evaluation of the in situ hydrologic stabilization of buried transuranic waste at a humid site via grout injection. Two small trenches, containing buried transuranic waste, were filled with 34.000 L of polyacrylamide grout. Initial field results have indicated that voids within the trenches were totally filled by the grout and that the intratrench hydraulic conductivity was reduced to below field-measurable values. No evidence of grout constituents were observed in twelve perimeter groundwater monitoring wells indicating that grout was contained completely within the two trenches. Polyacrylamide grout was selected for field demonstration over the polyacrylate grout due to its superior performance in laboratory degradation studies. Also supporting the selection of polyacrylamide was the difficulty in controlling the set time of the acrylate polymerization. Based on preliminary degradation monitoring, the polyacrylamide was estimated to have a microbiological half-life of 362 years in the test soil. 15 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs

  11. In situ grouting of buried transuranic waste with polyacrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, B.P.; Lee, S.Y.; Farmer, C.D.; Hyder, L.K.; Supaokit, P.

    1987-01-01

    This project is a demonstration and evaluation of the in situ hydrologic stabilization of buried transuranic waste at a humid site via grout injection. Two small trenches, containing buried transuranic waste, were filled with 34.000 L of polyacrylamide grout. Initial field results have indicated that voids within the trenches were totally filled by the grout and that the intratrench hydraulic conductivity was reduced to below field-measurable values. No evidence of grout constituents were observed in twelve perimeter groundwater monitoring wells indicating that grout was contained completely within the two trenches. Polyacrylamide grout was selected for field demonstration over the polyacrylate grout due to its superior performance in laboratory degradation studies. Also supporting the selection of polyacrylamide was the difficulty in controlling the set time of the acrylate polymerization. Based on preliminary degradation monitoring, the polyacrylamide was estimated to have a microbiological half-life of 362 years in the test soil. 15 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

  12. Methodology for studying strain inhomogeneities in polycrystalline thin films during in situ thermal loading using coherent x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaxelaire, N; Labat, S; Thomas, O [Aix-Marseille University, IM2NP, FST avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen, F-13397 Marseille Cedex (France); Proudhon, H; Forest, S [MINES ParisTech, Centre des materiaux, CNRS UMR 7633, BP 87, 91003 Evry Cedex (France); Kirchlechner, C; Keckes, J [Erich Schmid Institute for Material Science, Austrian Academy of Science and Institute of Metal Physics, University of Leoben, Jahnstrasse 12, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Jacques, V; Ravy, S [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)], E-mail: nicolas.vaxelaire@univ-cezanne.fr

    2010-03-15

    Coherent x-ray diffraction is used to investigate the mechanical properties of a single grain within a polycrystalline thin film in situ during a thermal cycle. Both the experimental approach and finite element simulation are described. Coherent diffraction from a single grain has been monitored in situ at different temperatures. This experiment offers unique perspectives for the study of the mechanical properties of nano-objects.

  13. Methodology for studying strain inhomogeneities in polycrystalline thin films during in situ thermal loading using coherent x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaxelaire, N; Labat, S; Thomas, O; Proudhon, H; Forest, S; Kirchlechner, C; Keckes, J; Jacques, V; Ravy, S

    2010-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction is used to investigate the mechanical properties of a single grain within a polycrystalline thin film in situ during a thermal cycle. Both the experimental approach and finite element simulation are described. Coherent diffraction from a single grain has been monitored in situ at different temperatures. This experiment offers unique perspectives for the study of the mechanical properties of nano-objects.

  14. Monitoring crack growth using thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djedjiga, Ait Aouita; Abdeldjalil, Ouahabi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a novel strategy for real-time monitoring crack growth of materials. The process is based on the use of thermal data extracted along the horizontal axis of symmetry of single edge notch tension (SENT) specimens, during fatigue tests. These data are exploited using an implemented program to detect in situ the growth of fatigue crack, with the critical size and propagation speed of the crack. This technique has the advantage to be applicable to a wide range of materials regardless of their electrical conductivity and their surface texture. (authors)

  15. Monitoring of Cr, Cu, Pb, V and Zn in polluted soils by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Aglio, Marcella; Gaudiuso, Rosalba; Senesi, Giorgio S; De Giacomo, Alessandro; Zaccone, Claudio; Miano, Teodoro M; De Pascale, Olga

    2011-05-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a fast and multi-elemental analytical technique particularly suitable for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of heavy metals in solid samples, including environmental ones. Although LIBS is often recognised in the literature as a well-established analytical technique, results about quantitative analysis of elements in chemically complex matrices such as soils are quite contrasting. In this work, soil samples of various origins have been analyzed by LIBS and data compared to those obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The emission intensities of one selected line for each of the five analytes (i.e., Cr, Cu, Pb, V, and Zn) were normalized to the background signal, and plotted as a function of the concentration values previously determined by ICP-OES. Data showed a good linearity for all calibration lines drawn, and the correlation between ICP-OES and LIBS was confirmed by the satisfactory agreement obtained between the corresponding values. Consequently, LIBS method can be used at least for metal monitoring in soils. In this respect, a simple method for the estimation of the soil pollution degree by heavy metals, based on the determination of an anthropogenic index, was proposed and determined for Cr and Zn.

  16. In situ bypass og diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Panduro; Schroeder, T V; Lorentzen, J E

    1993-01-01

    decreased survival rate was found in diabetics (p useful in the treatment of critical ischaemia of the lower limb in diabetic patients. The overall results in diabetic patients, whether insulin-dependent or not, were equal to those in non-diabetic......From 1986 through to 1990 a total of 483 in situ bypass procedures were performed in 444 patients. Preoperative risk-factors were equally distributed among diabetic (DM) and non-diabetic (NDM) patients, except for smoking habits (DM:48%, NDM:64%, p = 0.002) and cardiac disease (DM:45%, NDM:29%, p...... = 0.005). Critical limb-ischaemia was more often present in diabetic than non-diabetic patients (DM:57%, NDM:36%, p = 0.0002). Diabetic patients had a significantly lower distal anastomosis than non-diabetic patients (p = 0.00001). There were no differences among diabetic and non-diabetic patients...

  17. In situ treatability test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This document describes the plans for the in situ treatment zone (ISTZ) treatability test for groundwater contaminated with strontium-90. The treatability test is to be conducted at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, in a portion of the 100-N Area adjacent to the Columbia River referred to as N-Springs. The purpose of the treatability test is to evaluate the effectiveness of an innovative technology to prevent the discharge of strontium-90 contaminated groundwater into the Columbia River. The ISTZ is a passive technology that consists of placing a treatment agent in the path of the groundwater. The treatment agent must restrict target radioactive contaminants and provide time for the contaminant to decay to acceptable levels. The permeability of the treatment zone must be greater than or equal to that of the surrounding sediments to ensure that the contaminated groundwater flows through the treatment zone agent and not around the agent

  18. Treaty Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canty, M.; Jasani, B.; Lingenfelder, I.

    2009-01-01

    of remote sensing technologies. The book therefore comprises management aspects (issues and priorities of security research, crisis response), applied methodologies and process chains (treaty monitoring, estimation of population densities and characteristics, border permeability models, damage assessment...... companies, national research institutions and international organizations, all of whom were brought together under the aegis of the European research project GMOSS (Global Monitoring for Security and Stability). This book is tailored for the scientific community that deals with the application of EO data...... of civil security. Written for: Scientists, researchers in spatial sciences as well as practitioners, politicians, decision makers at NGO's in the field of security, crisis management, risk assessment and vulnerability....

  19. Avoiding treatment bias of REDD+ monitoring by sampling with partial replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Kohl; Charles T Scott; Andrew J Lister; Inez Demon; Daniel. Plugge

    2015-01-01

    Implementing REDD+ renders the development of a measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) system necessary to monitor carbon stock changes. MRV systems generally apply a combination of remote sensing techniques and in-situ field assessments. In-situ assessments can be based on 1) permanent plots, which are assessed on all successive occasions, 2) temporary plots,...

  20. Semi-on-line analysis for fast and precise monitoring of bioreaction processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, L.H.; Marcher, J.; Schulze, Ulrik

    1996-01-01

    Monitoring of substrates and products during fermentation processes can be achieved either by on-line, in situ sensors or by semi-on-line analysis consisting of an automatic sampling step followed by an ex situ analysis of the retrieved sample. The potential risk of introducing time delays...

  1. A method to provide rapid in situ determination of tip radius in dynamic atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Sergio; Guang Li; Souier, Tewfik; Gadelrab, Karim; Chiesa, Matteo; Thomson, Neil H.

    2012-01-01

    We provide a method to characterize the tip radius of an atomic force microscopy in situ by monitoring the dynamics of the cantilever in ambient conditions. The key concept is that the value of free amplitude for which transitions from the attractive to repulsive force regimes are observed, strongly depends on the curvature of the tip. In practice, the smaller the value of free amplitude required to observe a transition, the sharper the tip. This general behavior is remarkably independent of the properties of the sample and cantilever characteristics and shows the strong dependence of the transitions on the tip radius. The main advantage of this method is rapid in situ characterization. Rapid in situ characterization enables one to continuously monitor the tip size during experiments. Further, we show how to reproducibly shape the tip from a given initial size to any chosen larger size. This approach combined with the in situ tip size monitoring enables quantitative comparison of materials measurements between samples. These methods are set to allow quantitative data acquisition and make direct data comparison readily available in the community.

  2. PRINS and in situ PCR protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gosden, John R

    1997-01-01

    ... mapping of DNA sequences on chromosomes and location of gene expression followed the invention and refinement of in situ hybridization. Among the most recent technical developments has been the use of oligonucleotide primers to detect and amplify or extend complementary sequences in situ, and it is to this novel field that PRINS and In S...

  3. Technology assessment of in situ uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of the PNL portion of the Technology Assessment project is to provide a description of the current in situ uranium mining technology; to evaluate, based on available data, the environmental impacts and, in a limited fashion, the health effects; and to explore the impediments to development and deployment of the in situ uranium mining technology

  4. Cost performance assessment of in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showalter, W.E.; Letellier, B.C.; Booth, S.R.; Barnes-Smith, P.

    1992-01-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a thermal treatment technology with promise for the destruction or immobilization of hazardous materials in contaminated soils. It has developed over the past decade to a level of maturity where meaningful cost effectiveness studies may be performed. The ISV process melts 4 to 25 m 2 of undisturbed soil to a maximum depth of 6 m into an obsidian-like glass waste form by applying electric current (3750 kill) between symmetrically spaced electrodes. Temperatures of approximately 2000 degree C drive off and destroy complex organics which are captured in an off-gas treatment system, while radio-nuclides are incorporated into the homogeneous glass monolith. A comparative life-cycle cost evaluation between mobile rotary kiln incineration and ISV was performed to quantitatively identify appropriate performance regimes and components of cost which are sensitive to the implementation of each technology. Predictions of melt times and power consumption were obtained from an ISV performance model over ranges of several parameters including electrode spacing, soil moisture, melt depth, electrical resistivity, and soil density. These data were coupled with manpower requirements, capitalization costs, and a melt placement optimization routine to allow interpolation over a wide variety of site characteristics. For the purpose of this study, a single site scenario representative of a mixed waste evaporation pond was constructed. Preliminary comparisons between ISV and incineration show that while operating costs are comparable, ISV avoids secondary treatment and monitored storage of radioactive waste that would be required following conventional incineration. It is the long term storage of incinerated material that is the most expensive component

  5. Utilizing The Synergy of Airborne Backscatter Lidar and In-Situ Measurements for Evaluating CALIPSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsekeri Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne campaigns dedicated to satellite validation are crucial for the effective global aerosol monitoring. CALIPSO is currently the only active remote sensing satellite mission, acquiring the vertical profiles of the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients. Here we present a method for CALIPSO evaluation from combining lidar and in-situ airborne measurements. The limitations of the method have to do mainly with the in-situ instrumentation capabilities and the hydration modelling. We also discuss the future implementation of our method in the ICE-D campaign (Cape Verde, August 2015.

  6. Probing the phase composition of silicon films in situ by etch product detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingemans, G.; Donker, M. N. van den; Gordijn, A.; Kessels, W. M. M.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de

    2007-01-01

    Exploiting the higher etch probability for amorphous silicon relative to crystalline silicon, the transiently evolving phase composition of silicon films in the microcrystalline growth regime was probed in situ by monitoring the etch product (SiH 4 ) gas density during a short H 2 plasma treatment step. Etch product detection took place by the easy-to-implement techniques of optical emission spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The phase composition of the films was probed as a function of the SiH 4 concentration during deposition and as a function of the film thickness. The in situ results were corroborated by Raman spectroscopy and solar cell analysis

  7. Evaluating in situ thermal transmittance of green buildings masonries—A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Asdrubali

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a measurement campaign of in situ thermal transmittance, performed in some buildings in the Umbria Region (Italy, designed implementing bio-architecture solutions. The analyzed walls were previously monitored with thermographic surveys in order to assess the correct application of the sensors. Results of the investigation show that in situ thermal transmittance measurements and theoretical calculated U-value are not in perfect agreement. The mismatch becomes important for monolithic structures such as walls made of thermal blocks without insulating layers.

  8. In-situ measurement of environment radioactivity by mobile nuclear field laboratory (MNFL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalani, Deepak; Mathur, A.P.; Rawat, D.K.; Barala, S.S.; Singhal, K.P.; Singh, G.P.; Samant, R.P.

    2008-01-01

    In-situ measurement of environment radioactivity is useful tool for determine the unusual increase of radioactivity at any place due to any nuclear eventuality take place. A mobile nuclear field laboratory has been designed and developed for in-situ measurement of environment radioactivity at any desired location. This vehicle is equipped with different monitoring and analysis instruments. These equipment can be operated while vehicle is moving. The measured data can be stored in computer. This vehicle has the space for storage of various environmental matrices of affected area and these can analysis in laboratory. (author)

  9. In-situ ionic conductivity measurement of lithium ceramics under high energy heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Tetsuya; Noda, Kenji; Ishii, Yoshinobu; Ohno, Hideo; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Matsui, Hisayuki.

    1992-01-01

    To obtain fundamental information regarding the radiation damage in some lithium ceramics, e.g. Li 2 O, Li 4 SiO 4 etc., candidate of breeder materials exposed to severe irradiation environment, an in-situ experiment technique for the ionic conductivity measurement, which allows the specimen temperature control and the beam current monitoring, have been developed. This paper describes the features of an apparatus to measure in situ the ionic conductivity under the irradiation environment and presents some results of ionic conductivity measured for typical ceramic breeders using this apparatus. (J.P.N.)

  10. Time Reversal Acoustic Structural Health Monitoring Using Array of Embedded Sensors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) structural health monitoring with an embedded sensor array represents a new approach to in-situ nondestructive evaluation of air-space...

  11. An advanced online monitoring approach to study the scaling behavior in direct contact membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Jung Gil; Jang, Yongsun; Fortunato, Luca; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Sangho; Leiknes, TorOve; Ghaffour, NorEddine

    2017-01-01

    scaling was performed by using various analytical methods, especially an in-situ monitoring technique using an optical coherence tomography (OCT) to observe the cross-sectional view on the membrane surface during operation. Different concentrations of Ca

  12. Ullage Compatible Optical Sensor for Monitoring Safety-Significant Malfunctions, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The tasks of this Phase I proposal are designed to establish the feasibility of an optical sensor for real-time, in situ monitoring of the ullage environment of an...

  13. Monitoring apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keats, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    An improved monitoring apparatus for use with process plants, such as nuclear reactors, is described. System failure in the acquisition of data from the plant, owing to stuck signals, is avoided by arranging input signals from transducers in the plant in a test pattern. (U.K.)

  14. Monitor 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, D.L.; Ekberg, E.L.; Lambert, J.E.; Meyer, R.E.; Stroik, P.J.; Wickham, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    The status, improvements, and accomplishments of the Monitor remote-handling system previously reported are updated. It also outlines the goals for the future to improve the efficiency and speed of remote-maintenance operations at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility

  15. Monitoring programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution's 1992 report on its programme of monitoring radioactive substances is presented. Site operators' returns are verified and the report provides independent data on the environmental impact of authorized disposal of radioactive wastes. Radiation doses which may have been received by members of the public, fall well below the International Commission for Radiological Protection's (ICRP) recommended annual doses. (UK)

  16. FTIR analysis of flue gases - combined in-situ and dry extractive gas sampling; Kombination av in-situ och kallextraktiv roekgasmaetning med FTIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Christer; Soederbom, J [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy is a promising and versatile technique for gas analysis which lately has moved from the laboratory to industrial applications such as emission monitoring of combustion plants. This has been made possible by recent developments of spectrometers and software. The single most important advantage of the FTIR is its capability to simultaneously analyse virtually all gas species of interest in flue gas applications. The project has studied the feasibility of using the technique as a multi-component emission monitoring system. A specific aim was to evaluate different implementations of the technique to flue gas analysis: in-situ, hot/dry and cold extraction or combinations of these. The goal was to demonstrate a system in which gas components that normally require hot extraction (NH{sub 3}, HCl, H{sub 2}O) could instead be measured in-situ. In this way potential sampling artefacts e.g. for ammonia monitoring, can be avoided. The remaining gas components are measured using cold extraction and thereby minimizing interference from water. The latter advantage can be crucial for the accuracy of e.g. NO{sub x} measurements. Prior to the project start in-situ monitoring using FTIR was, a to a large extent, an untried method. The fact that broad band IR radiation can not be guided through optical fibres, presented a major technical obstacle. An `in-situ probe` was developed to serve the purpose. The probe is equipped with a gold plated mirror at the end and is mounted on the support structure of the FTIR-spectrometer. The arrangement proved to be a robust solution without being unnecessary complex or cumbersome to use. 10 refs, 45 figs, 10 tabs

  17. In Situ elastic property sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olness, D.; Hirschfeld, T.; Kishiyama, K.; Steinhaus, R.

    1987-01-01

    Elasticity is an important property of many materials. Loss of elasticity can have serious consequences, such as when a gasket deteriorates and permits leakage of an expensive or hazardous material, or when a damping system begins to go awry. Loss of elasticity can also provide information related to an ancillary activity such as degradation of electrical insulation, loss of plasticizer in a plastic, or changes in permeability of a thin film. In fact, the mechanical properties of most organic compounds are altered when the compound degrades. Thus, a sensor for the mechanical properties can be used to monitor associated characteristics as well. A piezoelectric material in contact with an elastomer forms an oscillating system that can provide real-time elasticity monitoring. This combination constitutes a forced harmonic oscillator with damping provided by the elastomer. A ceramic oscillator with a total volume of a few mm 3 was used as an elasticity sensor. It was placed in intimate contact with an elastomer and then monitored remotely with a simple oscillator circuit and standard frequency counting electronics. Resonant frequency shifts and changes in Q value were observed corresponding to changes in ambient temperature and/or changes in pressure applied to the sample. Elastomer samples pretreated with ozone (to simulate aging) showed changes in Q value and frequency response, even though there were no visible changes in the elastic samples

  18. A new FSA approach for in situ γ ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caciolli, A.; Baldoncini, M.; Bezzon, G.P.; Broggini, C.; Buso, G.P.; Callegari, I.; Colonna, T.; Fiorentini, G.; Guastaldi, E.; Mantovani, F.; Massa, G.; Menegazzo, R.; Mou, L.; Alvarez, C. Rossi

    2012-01-01

    An increasing demand of environmental radioactivity monitoring comes both from the scientific community and from the society. This requires accurate, reliable and fast response preferably from portable radiation detectors. Thanks to recent improvements in the technology, γ spectroscopy with sodium iodide scintillators has been proved to be an excellent tool for in-situ measurements for the identification and quantitative determination of γ ray emitting radioisotopes, reducing time and costs. Both for geological and civil purposes not only 40 K, 238 U, and 232 Th have to be measured, but there is also a growing interest to determine the abundances of anthropic elements, like 137 Cs and 131 I, which are used to monitor the effect of nuclear accidents or other human activities. The Full Spectrum Analysis (FSA) approach has been chosen to analyze the γ spectra. The Non Negative Least Square (NNLS) and the energy calibration adjustment have been implemented in this method for the first time in order to correct the intrinsic problem related with the χ 2 minimization which could lead to artifacts and non physical results in the analysis. A new calibration procedure has been developed for the FSA method by using in situ γ spectra instead of calibration pad spectra. Finally, the new method has been validated by acquiring γ spectra with a 10.16 cm × 10.16 cm sodium iodide detector in 80 different sites in the Ombrone basin, in Tuscany. The results from the FSA method have been compared with the laboratory measurements by using HPGe detectors on soil samples collected particular, the 137 Cs isotopes has been implemented in the analysis since it has been found not negligible during the in-situ measurements. - Highlights: ► The Full Spectrum Analysis technique is investigated with sodium iodide scintillator. ► Artifacts due to the free chi 2 minimization in standard FSA are solved applying the NNLS. ► New calibration approach has been developed without using

  19. Energy Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus T.; Madsen, Dines; Christiensen, Thomas

    Energy measurement has become an important aspect of our daily lives since we have learned that energy consumption, is one of the main source of global warming. Measuring instruments varies from a simple watt-meter to more sophisticated microprocessor control devices. The negative effects...... that fossil fuels induce on our environment has forced us to research renewable energy such as sunlight, wind etc. This new environmental awareness has also helped us to realize the importance of monitoring and controlling our energy use. The main purpose in this research is to introduce a more sophisticated...... but affordable way to monitor energy consumption of individuals or groups of home appliances. By knowing their consumption the utilization can be regulated for more efficient use. A prototype system has been constructed to demonstrate our idea....

  20. Personal monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Sources of ionizing radiation have innumerable applications in the workplace. The potential exposures of the individual workers involved may need to be routinely monitored and records kept of their cumulative radiation doses. There are also occasions when it is necessary to retrospectively determine a dose which may have been received by a worker. This Module explains the basic terminology associated with personal monitoring and describes the principal types of dosimeters and other related techniques and their application in the workplace. The Manual will be of most benefit if it forms part of more comprehensive training or is supplemented by the advice of a qualified expert in radiation protection. Most of the dosimeters and techniques described in this Module can only be provided by qualified experts

  1. Sewage Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Every U.S. municipality must determine how much waste water it is processing and more importantly, how much is going unprocessed into lakes and streams either because of leaks in the sewer system or because the city's sewage facilities were getting more sewer flow than they were designed to handle. ADS Environmental Services, Inc.'s development of the Quadrascan Flow Monitoring System met the need for an accurate method of data collection. The system consists of a series of monitoring sensors and microcomputers that continually measure water depth at particular sewer locations and report their findings to a central computer. This provides precise information to city managers on overall flow, flow in any section of the city, location and severity of leaks and warnings of potential overload. The core technology has been expanded upon in terms of both technical improvements, and functionality for new applications, including event alarming and control for critical collection system management problems.

  2. Material monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotter, W.; Zirker, L.; Hancock, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Waste Reduction Operations Complex (WROC) facilities are located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The overall goal for the Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization Unit is to identify and establish the correct amount of waste generated so that it can be reduced. Quarterly, the INEL Pollution Prevention (P2) Unit compares the projected amount of waste generated per process with the actual amount generated. Examples of waste streams that would be addresses for our facility would include be are not limited to: Maintenance, Upgrades, Office and Scrap Metal. There are three potential sources of this variance: inaccurate identification of those who generate the waste; inaccurate identification of the process that generates the waste; and inaccurate measurement of the actual amount generated. The Materials Monitoring Program was proposed to identify the sources of variance and reduce the variance to an acceptable level. Prior to the implementation of the Material Monitoring Program, all information that was gathered and recorded was done so through an informal estimation of waste generated by various personnel concerned with each processes. Due to the inaccuracy of the prior information gathering system, the Material Monitoring Program was established. The heart of this program consists of two main parts. In the first part potential waste generators provide information on projected waste generation process. In the second part, Maintenance, Office, Scrap Metal and Facility Upgrade wastes from given processes is disposed within the appropriate bin dedicated to that process. The Material Monitoring Program allows for the more accurate gathering of information on the various waste types that are being generated quarterly

  3. Individual monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This Practical Radiation Technical Manual is one of a series which has been designed to provide guidance on radiological protection for employers, Radiation Protection Officers, managers and other technically competent persons who have a responsibility to ensure the safety of employees working with ionizing radiation. The Manual may be used together with the appropriate IAEA Practical Radiation Safety Manual to provide adequate training, instruction or information on individual monitoring for all employees engaged in work with ionizing radiations. Sources of ionizing radiation have a large number of applications in the workplace. The exposures of the individual workers involved may need to be routinely monitored and records kept of their cumulative radiation doses. There are also occasions when it is necessary to retrospectively determine a dose which may have been received by a worker. This Manual explains the basic terminology associated with individual monitoring and describes the principal types of dosimeters and other related techniques and their application in the workplace. The Manual will be of most benefit if it forms part of more comprehensive training or is supplemented by the advice of a qualified expert in radiation protection. Most of the dosimeters and techniques described in this Manual can only be provided by qualified experts

  4. The In Situ Vitrification Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.

    1988-10-01

    The Columbia Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) is pleased to submit the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) Project to the Pacific Northwest Council for consideration as the Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement. The ISV process, developed by Battelle-Northwest researchers beginning in 1980, converts contaminated soils and sludges to a glass and crystalline product. In this way it stabilizes hazardous chemical and radioactive wastes and makes them chemically inert. This report describes the process. A square array of four molybdenum electrodes is inserted into the ground to the desired treatment depth. Because soil is not electrically conductive when the moisture has been driven off, a conductive mixture of flaked graphite and glass frit is placed among the electrodes as a starter path. An electrical potential is applied to the electrodes to establish an electric current in the starter path. The resultant power heats the starter path and surrounding soil to 2000/degree/C, well above the initial soil-melting temperature of 1100/degree/C to 1400/degree/C. The graphite starter path is eventually consumed by oxidation, and the current is transferred to the molten soil, which is electrically conductive. As the molten or vitrified zone grows, it incorporates radionuclides and nonvolatile hazardous elements, such as heavy metals, and destroys organic components by pyrolysis. 2 figs

  5. In situ vitrification: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, L.L.; Fields, D.E.

    1989-11-01

    The in situ vitrification process (ISV) converts contaminated soils and sludges to a glass and crystalline product. The process appears to be ideally suited for on site treatment of both wet and dry wastes. Basically, the system requires four molybdenum electrodes, an electrical power system for vitrifying the soil, a hood to trap gaseous effluents, an off-gas treatment system, an off-gas cooling system, and a process control station. Mounted in three transportable trailers, the ISV process can be moved from site to site. The process has the potential for treating contaminated soils at most 13 m deep. The ISV project has won a number of outstanding achievement awards. The process has also been patented with exclusive worldwide rights being granted to Battelle Memorial Institute for nonradioactive applications. While federal applications still belong to the Department of Energy, Battelle transferred the rights of ISV for non-federal government, chemical hazardous wastes to a separate corporation in 1989 called Geosafe. This report gives a review of the process including current operational behavior and applications

  6. Distillation of shale in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Ganahl, C F

    1922-07-04

    To distill buried shale or other carbon containing compounds in situ, a portion of the shale bed is rendered permeable to gases, and the temperature is raised to the point of distillation. An area in a shale bed is shattered by explosives, so that it is in a relatively finely divided form, and the tunnel is then blocked by a wall, and fuel and air are admitted through pipes until the temperature of the shale is raised to such a point that a portion of the released hydrocarbons will burn. When distillation of the shattered area takes place and the lighter products pass upwardly through uptakes to condensers and scrubbers, liquid oil passes to a tank and gas to a gasometer while heavy unvaporized products in the distillation zone collect in a drain, flow into a sump, and are drawn off through a pipe to a storage tank. In two modifications, methods of working are set out in cases where the shale lies beneath a substantially level surface.

  7. Biological monitoring of radiation exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.

    1998-11-01

    Complementary to physical dosimetry, biological dosimetry systems have been developed and applied which weight the different components of environmental radiation according to their biological efficacy. They generally give a record of the accumulated exposure of individuals with high sensitivity and specificity for the toxic agent under consideration. Basically three different types of biological detecting/monitoring systems are available: (i) intrinsic biological dosimeters that record the individual radiation exposure (humans, plants, animals) in measurable units. For monitoring ionizing radiation exposure, in situ biomarkers for genetic (e.g. chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes, germ line minisatellite mutation rates) or metabolic changes in serum, plasma and blood (e.g. serum lipids, lipoproteins, lipid peroxides, melatonin, antibody titer) have been used. (ii) Extrinsic biological dosimeters/indicators that record the accumulated dose in biological model systems. Their application includes long-term monitoring of changes in environmental UV radiation and its biological implications as well as dosimetry of personal UV exposure. (iii) Biological detectors/biosensors for genotoxic substances and agents such as bacterial assays (e.g. Ames test, SOS-type test) that are highly sensitive to genotoxins with high specificity. They may be applicable for different aspects in environmental monitoring including the International Space Station.

  8. Dielectric Cure Monitoring of Thermosetting Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyoung Geun [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dae Gil [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-15

    Cure monitoring can be used to improve the quality and productivity of thermosetting resin matrix composite products during their manufacturing process. In this work, the sensitivity of dielectrometry was improved by adequate separation the efforts of sensor and externals on the measured signal. A new algorithm to obtain the degree of cure during dielectric cure monitoring of glass/polyester and glass/epoxy composites was developed by employing a function of both temperature and dissipation factor, in which five cure monitoring parameters were used to calculate the degree of cure. The decreasing pattern of dissipation factor was compared with the relationships between the degree of cure and the resin viscosity. The developed algorithm might be employed for the in situ cure monitoring of thermosetting resin composites

  9. Dielectric Cure Monitoring of Thermosetting Matrix Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyoung Geun; Lee, Dae Gil

    2003-01-01

    Cure monitoring can be used to improve the quality and productivity of thermosetting resin matrix composite products during their manufacturing process. In this work, the sensitivity of dielectrometry was improved by adequate separation the efforts of sensor and externals on the measured signal. A new algorithm to obtain the degree of cure during dielectric cure monitoring of glass/polyester and glass/epoxy composites was developed by employing a function of both temperature and dissipation factor, in which five cure monitoring parameters were used to calculate the degree of cure. The decreasing pattern of dissipation factor was compared with the relationships between the degree of cure and the resin viscosity. The developed algorithm might be employed for the in situ cure monitoring of thermosetting resin composites

  10. Seeing the light: Applications of in situ optical measurements for understanding DOM dynamics in river systems (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, B. A.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Downing, B. D.; Saraceno, J.; Fleck, J.; Shanley, J. B.; Aiken, G.; Boss, E.; Fujii, R.

    2009-12-01

    A critical challenge for understanding the sources, character and cycling of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is making measurements at the time scales in which changes occur in aquatic systems. Traditional approaches for data collection (daily to monthly discrete sampling) are often limited by analytical and field costs, site access and logistical challenges, particularly for long-term sampling at a large number of sites. The ability to make optical measurements of DOM in situ has been known for more than 50 years, but much of the work on in situ DOM absorbance and fluorescence using commercially-available instruments has taken place in the last few years. Here we present several recent examples that highlight the application of in situ measurements for understanding DOM dynamics in riverine systems at intervals of minutes to hours. Examples illustrate the utility of in situ optical sensors for studies of DOM over short-duration events of days to weeks (diurnal cycles, tidal cycles, storm events and snowmelt periods) as well as longer-term continuous monitoring for months to years. We also highlight the application of in situ optical DOM measurements as proxies for constituents that are significantly more difficult and expensive to measure at high frequencies (e.g. methylmercury, trihalomethanes). Relatively simple DOM absorbance and fluorescence measurements made in situ could be incorporated into short and long-term ecological research and monitoring programs, resulting in advanced understanding of organic matter sources, character and cycling in riverine systems.

  11. Technology monitoring; Technologie-Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eicher, H.; Rigassi, R. [Eicher und Pauli AG, Liestal (Switzerland); Ott, W. [Econcept AG, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2003-07-01

    This study made for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) examines ways of systematically monitoring energy technology development and the cost of such technologies in order to pave the way to a basis for judging the economic development of new energy technologies. Initial results of a survey of the past development of these technologies are presented and estimates are made of future developments in the areas of motor-based combined heat and power systems, fuel-cell heating units for single-family homes and apartment buildings, air/water heat pumps for new housing projects and high-performance thermal insulation. The methodology used for the monitoring and analysis of the various technologies is described. Tables and diagrams illustrate the present situation and development potential of various fields of technology.

  12. Field instruments for real time in-situ crude oil concentration measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, C.B.; Bonner, J.S.; Page, C.A.; Arrambide, G.; Sterling, M.C.Jr.; Ojo, T.O.

    2003-01-01

    Accidental oil spills, contaminant release during resuspension, storms, and harmful algal blooms are all episodic events that can effect coastal margins. It is important to quantitatively describe water and ecological quality evolution and predict the impact to these areas by such events, but traditional sampling methods miss environmental activity during cyclical events. This paper presents a new sampling approach that involves continuous, real-time in-situ monitoring to provide data for development of comprehensive modeling protocols. It gives spill response coordinators greater assurance in making decisions using the latest visualization tools which are based on a good understanding of the physical processes at work in pulsed events. Five sensors for rapid monitoring of crude oil concentrations in aquatic systems were described. The in-situ and ex-situ sensors can measure plume transport and estimate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure concentrations to assess risk of toxicity. A brief description and evaluation of the following 5 sensors was provided: the LISST-100 by Sequoia Instrument, a submersible multi-angle laser scattering instrument; the AU-10 field fluorometer by Turner Designs, an ex-situ single wavelength fluorometer; the Flashlamp by WET Labs Inc., an in-situ single wavelength fluorometer; and, the ECO-FL3 and SAFire by WET Labs Inc., two in-situ multiple wavelength fluorometers. These instruments were used to analyze crude oil emissions of various concentrations. All of the instruments followed a linear response within the tested concentration range. At the lowest concentrations the LISST-100 was not as effective as the fluorometers because of limited particle volume for scatter. For the AU-10 field fluorometer, the highest concentrations tested were above the measurement range of the instrument. 6 refs., 5 figs

  13. Wireless monitoring of highways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Richard; Hayes-Gill, Barrie; Crowe, John A.; Armitage, Robert; Rodgers, Dale; Hendroff, Adrian

    1999-05-01

    Electronic hardware has been developed to telemetrically transmit temperature and strain measurements from within a public highway in the UK. These measurements provide an important health check for monitoring fatigue damage in pavements. Previous attempts at measuring strain and temperature have required lengths of cable to be installed in the highway. The installation of these cables is both expensive and damaging to the pavement and provides potentially unreliable electrical connections. The new systems consist of a retrofitted instrumented asphalt core which is bonded into the pavement structure. The core contains all the electronics necessary to record two temperatures and two strains. An analogue front end provides signal conditioning which is digitized and passed to microcontroller for endcoding. From there the data is transmitted via a low power radio link to a receiver and data logger positioned by the side of the road. The system has an in-situ operating life of 6 months on AA alkaline batteries. Results are presented of power management and fault tolerant radio protocol techniques, long term temperature variations, dynamic strain measurements within the highway, and RF transmission capabilities through a layer of asphalt.

  14. In Situ Aerosol Detector, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is developing new platform systems that have the potential to benefit Earth science research activities, which include in situ instruments for atmospheric...

  15. Past In-Situ Burning Possibilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoshioka, Gary

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of conducting in-situ burning (ISB) using current technology on post 1967 major oil spills over 10,00 barrels in North America and over 50,00 barrels in South America and Europe...

  16. Ammonia Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Richard L. (Inventor); Akse, James R. (Inventor); Thompson, John O. (Inventor); Atwater, James E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia monitor and method of use are disclosed. A continuous, real-time determination of the concentration of ammonia in an aqueous process stream is possible over a wide dynamic range of concentrations. No reagents are required because pH is controlled by an in-line solid-phase base. Ammonia is selectively transported across a membrane from the process stream to an analytical stream to an analytical stream under pH control. The specific electrical conductance of the analytical stream is measured and used to determine the concentration of ammonia.

  17. Oscillator monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeill, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Present high-speed data acquisition systems in nuclear diagnostics use high-frequency oscillators to provide timing references for signals recorded on fast, traveling-wave oscilloscopes. An oscillator's sinusoidal wave shape is superimposed on the recorded signal with each cycle representing a fixed time increment. During data analysis the sinusoid is stripped from the signal, leaving a clean signal shape with known timing. Since all signal/time relationships are totally dependant upon working oscillators, these critical devices must have remote verification of proper operation. This manual presents the newly-developed oscillator monitor which will provide the required verification

  18. Observatory Magnetometer In-Situ Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Marusenkov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental validation of the in-situ calibration procedure, which allows estimating parameters of observatory magnetometers (scale factors, sensor misalignment without its operation interruption, is presented. In order to control the validity of the procedure, the records provided by two magnetometers calibrated independently in a coil system have been processed. The in-situ estimations of the parameters are in very good agreement with the values provided by the coil system calibration.

  19. In-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Helps researchers develop new catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production Reviewing the latest developments in the field, this book explores the in-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts, enabling readers to take full advantage of the sophisticated techniques used to study heterogeneous catalysts and reaction mechanisms. In using these techniques, readers can learn to improve the selectivity and the performance of catalysts and how to prepare catalysts as efficiently as possible, with minimum waste. In-situ Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts feat

  20. Evaluation of integrated biotreatment processes for in situ application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maher, A.; Lamptey, J.C.; Kennel, N.D.

    1994-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of soils and groundwater associated with Underground Storage Tanks (UST) and aboveground fuel spills has become the focus of many bioremediation efforts. Two case studies in the application of in situ bioremediation to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons are presented. Site A has a history of fuel-handling practices associated with bulk petroleum storage and railroad yard activities. The majority of the hydrocarbon contamination appeared to be the result of past surface spills. Pre-treatment investigation indicated the presence of both volatile and semi- or non-volatile hydrocarbons in the soil. About 3,000 cubic yards of highly contaminated soils was excavated and is being treated in 2, lined, closed loop treatment cells. Groundwater is treated in situ with addition of nutritional cofactors and oxygen introduced through 3 infiltration galleries that are placed 6 feet deep and are each 100 feet in length. Groundwater is also recovered from 3 extraction wells placed 80 to 100 feet from each other, and subsequently treated in a bioreactor. Site B has a history of leaking underground gasoline storage tanks and spills from aboveground diesel fuel associated with county maintenance shed activities. One hundred cubic yards of soil contaminated with diesel components were excavated and treated aboveground in a lined cell. Gasoline contaminated groundwater and soil is being treated in situ by the addition of nutritional cofactors and oxygen through an infiltration gallery 4 feet below surface. The groundwater is recovered from an extraction gallery 92.5 feet down gradient of the infiltration gallery. Nutritional cofactors are introduced on a daily basis with on-site controls. Hydrocarbon reduction, up to 76%, was observed within 3 months of treatment startup in monitoring wells