WorldWideScience

Sample records for situ leach mining

  1. To accelerate technology of in situ leaching and heap leaching for mining mineral resources of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Mei

    1999-01-01

    Recently, in situ leaching and heap leaching are the most advanced technology for mining low-grade mineral resources in the world. The author briefly expounds the basic concept and advantages of in situ leaching and heap leaching and deals with the main research content of the hydrometallurgical technology of in situ leaching and heap leaching, its development and present application at home and abroad. Having expounded the gap existing between China's technology of in situ leaching and heap leaching and the foreign technology, the author forecasts the prospects of accelerating the mining of China's mineral resources by using the technology of in situ leaching and heap leaching

  2. Manual of acid in situ leach uranium mining technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-08-01

    In situ leaching (ISL) technology recovers uranium using two alternative chemical leaching systems - acid and alkaline. This report brings together information from several technical disciplines that are an essential part of ISL technology. They include uranium geology, geohydrology, chemistry as well as reservoir engineering and process engineering. This report provides an extensive description of acid ISL uranium mining technology

  3. Manual of acid in situ leach uranium mining technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-08-01

    In situ leaching (ISL) technology recovers uranium using two alternative chemical leaching systems - acid and alkaline. This report brings together information from several technical disciplines that are an essential part of ISL technology. They include uranium geology, geohydrology, chemistry as well as reservoir engineering and process engineering. This report provides an extensive description of acid ISL uranium mining technology.

  4. Aquifer restoration techniques for in-situ leach uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, W.J.; Bell, N.E.; Mercer, B.W.; Serne, R.J.; Shade, J.W.; Tweeton, D.R.

    1984-02-01

    In-situ leach uranium mines and pilot-scale test facilities are currently operating in the states of Wyoming, Texas, New Mexico and Colorado. This report summarizes the technical considerations involved in restoring a leached ore zone and its aquifer to the required level. Background information is provided on the geology and geochemistry of mineralized roll-front deposits and on the leaching techniques used to extract the uranium. 13 references, 13 figures, 4 tables

  5. Groundwater restoration with in situ uranium leach mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbeneau, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    In situ leach mining of uranium has developed into a major mining technology. Since 1975, when the first commercial mine was licensed in the United States, the percentage or uranium produced by in situ mining has steadily grown from 0.6 to 10 percent in 1980. Part of the reason for this growth is that in situ mining offers less initial capital investment, shorter start-up times, greater safety, and less labor than conventional mining methods. There is little disturbance of the surface terrain or surface waters, no mill tailings piles, and no large open pits, but in situ leaching mining does have environmental disadvantages. During the mining, large amounts of ground water are cirulated and there is some withdrawal from an area where aquifers constitute a major portion of the water supply for other purposes. When an ammonia-based leach system is used, the ammonium ion is introduced into an area where cation exchange on clays (and some production of nitrate) may occur. Also, injection of an oxidant with the leach solution causes valence and phase changes of indigenous elements such as As, Cu, Fe, Mo, Se, S, and V as well as U. Furthermore, the surrounding ground water can become contaminated by escape of the leach solution from the mining zone. This chapter presents an overview of the in situ mining technology, including uranium deposition, mining techniques, and ground water restoration alternatives. The latter part of the chapter covers the situation in South Texas. Economics and development of the industry, groundwater resources, regulation, and restoration activities are also reviewed

  6. In-situ leach mining: the next quantum leap?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, S.

    1988-01-01

    The opportunities and problems which in-situ leach mining technology presents to the mining industry are considered. These are exemplified by concerns addressed in the development of a proposal to mine uranium by in-situ leach techniques at Beverley in South Australia. The technique proposed at Beverley will use sulphuric acid with hydrogen peroxide or dissolved oxygen as the lixivient. Pre-treatment of the aquifer will be necessary to remove excess calcium carbonate, and the system will employ a slightly overpumped output of fluid through the wellfield to reduce the risk of excursions of mining solutions. The input and output patterns will also be varied to take account of the hydrogeological conditions such as confining bed thickness and permeability. Much study has been directed towards the post mining condition of the ore zone and the threat it may pose to the water resources of the region. 10 refs., 1 fig

  7. Cost accounting method for in-situ leaching mines and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Zongfang; Yang Yihan; Liu Zhanxiang; Lai Yongchun

    2008-01-01

    Cost structures and accounting method for in-situ leaching mines are studied according to the technical characteeristics of in-situ leaching. A method of cost forecast for in-situ leaching deposit or mine area is presented, and the application of this method is illustrated with examples. (authors)

  8. Uranium in situ leach mining in the United States. Information circular

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, W.C.

    1978-01-01

    This report discusses uranium in situ leach mining in the United States; the purpose of which is to acquaint the reader with an overview of this emerging mining technology. This report is not a technical discussion of the subject matter, but rather should be used as a reference source for information on in situ leaching. An in situ leaching bibliography is included as well as engineering data tables for almost all of the active pilot-scale and commercial uranium in situ leaching operators. These tables represent a first attempt at consolidating operational data in one source, on a regional scale. Additional information is given which discusses the current Bureau of Mines uranium in situ leaching research program. Also included is a listing of various State and Federal permitting agencies, and a summary of the current uranium in situ leaching operators. Finally, a glossary of terms has been added, listing some of the more common terms used in uranium in situ leach mining

  9. Application of microorganism to in-situ leaching mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Runlan; Sato, Kazuhiko; Nagara, Shuichi; Yamana, Satoshi

    1998-01-01

    In-situ leaching (ISL) technique has come into the spotlight recently because of its low production costs and low environmental impact. In China, development and application of economical ISL techniques are also being studied. To design a pilot scale ISL 'bioreactor' in China, applicability of microorganisms to ISL mining was evaluated at Ningyo Toge Works as a part of Scientist Exchange Program of the Science and Technology Agency. An overview of the indirect bio-ISL method with iron oxidizing bacteria, Thiobacillus ferroxidans (TF), and results from experiment to determine factors for the ISL 'bioreactor' are discussed. (author)

  10. Solution (in situ leach) mining of uranium: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhaida, A.J. Jr.; Kelly, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    Increases in the demand for and price of uranium have made in-situ mining an attractive alternative to the open-pit and underground U mining methods. Up to 50% of the known ore-bearing sandstone in the western U.S. can be mined using the in-situ mining method. In-situ mining also offers a significant environmental advantage. Restoration of the contaminated groundwater is discussed

  11. Evaluation and selection of in-situ leaching mining method using analytic hierarchy process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Heyong; Tan Kaixuan; Liu Huizhen

    2007-01-01

    According to the complicated conditions and main influence factors of in-situ leaching min- ing, a model and processes of analytic hierarchy are established for evaluation and selection of in-situ leaching mining methods based on analytic hierarchy process. Taking a uranium mine in Xinjiang of China for example, the application of this model is presented. The results of analyses and calculation indicate that the acid leaching is the optimum project. (authors)

  12. The method for the in-situ leaching of a uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhen; Xu Xianyi; Wang Xuemin

    2011-01-01

    The paper reviews the main factors of in-situ leaching for uranium mining. A kind of technique called dilution with few reagent is put forward to the in-situ leaching of sandstone-type uranium deposit with high TDS. This technique can not only effectively prevent the pipe plug, but also can improve the economic benefits. (authors)

  13. The application of geophysical logging at in-situ leaching uranium mine in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zeyao; Xu Shusheng; Li Zhongqiu

    1999-01-01

    The status of work, instrument and method employed for geophysical logging in different stages at in-situ leaching uranium mine are discussed and the development of software, electrical current logging and gamma ray logging are presented based on the requirement of in-situ leaching of uranium. In addition, new function and method with regard to home instrument are proposed for future work

  14. Situ leaching uranium mining conditions of the pilot phase of the safety management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenyuan

    2014-01-01

    With China's large, very large sandstone type uranium deposits have been discovered in the Ordos Basin, Inner Mongolia and its surrounding for uranium mining in the region has been carried out. Sandstone-type uranium mining, mainly used in China is 'to dip' and the technology is relatively mature. Situ leaching mining process, the deposit conditions Test conditions pilot phase, however, limited by cost control and field conditions, equipment shabby, out in the conditions of the pilot phase of security issues in the larger securityrisks. This will be Ordos ongoing test conditions situ leaching uranium mines, for example, raised situ leaching uranium mining conditions of the pilot phase a few safety measures recommended. (author)

  15. Experience with restoration of ore-bearing aquifers after in situ leach uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazikov, V.G.; Zabaznov, V.U.

    2002-01-01

    In many cases the most important environmental issue for in situ leach uranium mining technology is the impact on groundwater. Usually the greatest issue is the chemical condition of the ore bearing aquifer following the completion of leaching. Based on experience gained during post leach monitoring, it has been found that in properly selected sites the impact following leaching is greatly reduced because of the process of self restoration, otherwise known as natural attenuation. This paper provides ground water monitoring data from 1985 to 1997 following completion of leaching at the Irkol uranium deposit, Kazakhstan. It shows the evolution of the pH, and other chemical parameters over this period. The monitoring results demonstrate that at this site the process of natural attenuation appears to have effectively reduced the impact on groundwater at the site, as well as to keep contaminated leaching fluids from moving more than a few hundreds of metres from the wellfield. (author)

  16. On bacteria oxidizing enlargement scale test for uranium in-situ leaching at. 381 mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Kaiguang; Wang Qingliang; Liu Yingjiu; Shi Wenge; Hu Shihe; Hu Yincai; Fang Qiu

    1999-01-01

    The results of enlarged scale test of bacteria as oxidizer for uranium in-situ leaching at No 381 mine showed that redox potential of the oxidized absorbed tailing water by bacteria is more than 510 mV, without any effects on after treatments by using bacteria as oxidizer and reduce oxidizer costs 70% compared with H 2 O 2 as oxidizer

  17. Laboratory studies on natural restoration of ground water after in-situ leach uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, N.E.; Deutsch, W.J.; Serne, R.J.

    1983-05-01

    When uranium is mined using in-situ leach techniques, the chemical quality of the ground water in the ore-zone aquifer is affected. This could lead to long-term degradation of the ground water if restoration techniques are not applied after the leaching is completed. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is conducting an NRC-sponsored research project on natural restoration and induced-restoration techniques. Laboratory studies were designed to evaluate the ability of the natural system (ore-zone sediments and groundwater) to mitigate the effects of mining on aquifer chemistry. Using batch and flow-through column experiments [performed with lixiviant (leaching solution) and sediments from the reduced zone of an ore-zone aquifer], we found that the natural system can lower uranium and bicarbonate concentrations in solutions and reduce the lixiviant redox potential (Eh). The change in redox potential could cause some of the contaminants that were dissolved during the uranium leaching operation to precipitate, thereby lowering their solution concentration. The concentrations of other species such as calcium, potassium, and sulfate increased, possibly as a result of mineral dissolution and ion exchange. In this paper, we describe the experimentally determined mobility of contaminants after in-situ leach mining, and discuss the possible chemical process affecting mobility

  18. Laboratory studies on natural restoration of ground water after in-situ leach uranium mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, N.E.; Deutsch, W.J.; Serne, R.J.

    1983-05-01

    When uranium is mined using in-situ leach techniques, the chemical quality of the ground water in the ore-zone aquifer is affected. This could lead to long-term degradation of the ground water if restoration techniques are not applied after the leaching is completed. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is conducting an NRC-sponsored research project on natural restoration and induced-restoration techniques. Laboratory studies were designed to evaluate the ability of the natural system (ore-zone sediments and groundwater) to mitigate the effects of mining on aquifer chemistry. Using batch and flow-through column experiments (performed with lixiviant (leaching solution) and sediments from the reduced zone of an ore-zone aquifer), we found that the natural system can lower uranium and bicarbonate concentrations in solutions and reduce the lixiviant redox potential (Eh). The change in redox potential could cause some of the contaminants that were dissolved during the uranium leaching operation to precipitate, thereby lowering their solution concentration. The concentrations of other species such as calcium, potassium, and sulfate increased, possibly as a result of mineral dissolution and ion exchange. In this paper, we describe the experimentally determined mobility of contaminants after in-situ leach mining, and discuss the possible chemical process affecting mobility.

  19. A economic evaluation system software on in-situ leaching mining sandstone uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yixuan; Su Xuebin; Xie Weixing; Que Weimin

    2001-01-01

    The author presents the study results of applying computer technology to evaluate quantitatively the technical-economic feasibility of in-situ leaching mining sandstone uranium deposits. A computer system software have been developed. Under specifying deposit conditions and given production size per year, the application of the software will generate total capital and mine life operating costs as well as solve for the movable and static financial assessment targets through discounted cash flow analysis. According to the characters of two kinds of sandstone uranium deposits, a data bases of economic and technique parameters of in-situ leaching have been designed. Also the system software can be used to study the economic value of deposits and to optimize the key project parameters. Its features, data input method and demand, main functions, structure and operating environments are described

  20. Modeling the migration of radioactive contaminants in groundwater of in situ leaching uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chunguang; Tai Kaixuan

    2011-01-01

    The radioactive contamination of groundwater from in situ leaching (ISL) of uranium mining is a widespread environmental problem. This paper analyzed the monitor results of groundwater contaminations for a in situ leaching uranium mine. A dynamic model of contaminants transport in groundwater in ISL well field was established. The processes and mechanisms of contaminant transport in groundwater were simulated numerically for a ISL well field. A small quantity of U and SO 4 2- migrate to outside of well field during ISL production stage. But the migration velocity and distance of contaminations is small, and the concentration is low. Contaminants migrate as anomalistic tooth-shape. The migration trend of U and SO 4 2- is consistent. Numerical modeling can provide an effective approach to analyse the transport mechanism, and forecast and control the migration of contaminants in groundwater in ISL well field. (authors)

  1. Aquifer restoration at in-situ leach uranium mines: evidence for natural restoration processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, W.J.; Serne, R.J.; Bell, N.E.; Martin, W.J.

    1983-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted experiments with aquifer sediments and leaching solution (lixiviant) from an in-situ leach uranium mine. The data from these laboratory experiments and information on the normal distribution of elements associated with roll-front uranium deposits provide evidence that natural processes can enhance restoration of aquifers affected by leach mining. Our experiments show that the concentration of uranium (U) in solution can decrease at least an order of magnitude (from 50 to less than 5 ppM U) due to reactions between the lixiviant and sediment, and that a uranium solid, possibly amorphous uranium dioxide, (UO 2 ), can limit the concentration of uranium in a solution in contact with reduced sediment. The concentrations of As, Se, and Mo in an oxidizing lixiviant should also decrease as a result of redox and precipitation reactions between the solution and sediment. The lixiviant concentrations of major anions (chloride and sulfate) other than carbonate were not affected by short-term (less than one week) contact with the aquifer sediments. This is also true of the total dissolved solids level of the solution. Consequently, we recommend that these solution parameters be used as indicators of an excursion of leaching solution from the leach field. Our experiments have shown that natural aquifer processes can affect the solution concentration of certain constituents. This effect should be considered when guidelines for aquifer restoration are established

  2. In-situ uranium mining: reservoir engineering aspects of leaching and restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, M.I.

    1982-01-01

    To establish the feasibility of in-situ mining of uranium, a push-pull test of an in-situ uranium leaching process, which consists of a single injection/production test well and two observation wells, was designed to evaluate the parameters which govern the uranium production and restorability of a solution mined zone. The test procedure itself consists of injection (push cycle) of a preflush followed by lixiviant, a brief soak period (soak cycle), and subsequent production (pull cycle) into the same well. Based on computer modeling, procedures are defined which permit, for a properly designed test, the determination of both restoration and leaching parameters. The test procedure and design recommendations are also outlined. Two numerical simulators which model field scale uranium production and restoration operations are presented. These simulators are able to accommodate various well patterns and irregular reservoir boundaries, physical dispersion, directional permeability variations (if present), and a variety of injection/production strategies. A streamline-concentration balance technique has been used to develop the models. The assumption of time invariant boundary conditions and no transverse dispersion between the streamlines reduces the two dimensional problem to a bundle of one dimensional ones. It has been further shown that the production well effluent histories can easily be obtained by superposing the solution of the concentration balance equations for a single streamline, and thus reducing computation time significantly. Finally, the simulators have been used to study various reservoir engineering aspects to optimize in-situ uranium production from field scale operations

  3. In-situ uranium mining: reservoir engineering aspects of leaching and restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabir, M.I.

    1982-01-01

    To establish the feasibility of in-situ mining of uranium, a push-pull test of an in-situ uranium leaching process, which consists of a single injection/production test well and two observation wells, was designed to evaluate the parameters which govern the uranium production and restorability of a solution mined zone. The test procedure itself consists of injection (push cycle) of a preflush followed by lixiviant, a brief soak period (soak cycle), and subsequent production (pull cycle) into the same well. Based on computer modeling, procedures are defined which permit, for a properly designed test, the determination of both restoration and leaching parameters. The test procedure and design recommendations are also outlined. Two numerical simulators which model field scale uranium production and restoration operations are presented. These simulators are able to accommodate various well patterns and irregular reservoir boundaries, physical dispersion, directional permeability variations (if present), and a variety of injection/production strategies. A streamline-concentration balance technique has been used to develop the models. The assumption of time invariant boundary conditions and no transverse dispersion between the streamlines reduces the two dimensional problem to a bundle of one dimensional ones. It has been further shown that the production well effluent histories can easily be obtained by superposing the solution of the concentration balance equations for a single streamline, and thus reducing computation time significantly. Finally, the simulators have been used to study various reservoir engineering aspects to optimize in-situ uranium production from field scale operations.

  4. Multi-coupling dynamic model and 3d simulation program for in-situ leaching of uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Kaixuan; Zeng Sheng; Sang Xiao; Sun Bing

    2010-01-01

    The in-situ leaching of uranium mining is a very complicated non-linear dynamic system, which involves couplings and positive/negative feedback among many factors and processes. A comprehensive, coupled multi-factors and processes dynamic model and simulation method was established to study the in-situ leaching of uranium mining. The model accounts for most coupling among various processes as following: (1) rock texture mechanics and its evolution, (2)the incremental stress rheology of rock deformation, (3) 3-D viscoelastic/ plastic multi-deformation processes, (4) hydrofracturing, (5) tensorial (anisotropic) fracture and rock permeability, (6) water-rock interactions and mass-transport (both advective and diffusive), (7) dissolution-induced chemical compaction, (8) multi-phase fluid flow. A 3-D simulation program was compiled based on Fortran and C++. An example illustrating the application of this model to simulating acidification, production and terminal stage of in situ leaching of uranium mining is presented for the some mine in Xinjiang, China. This model and program can be used for theoretical study, mine design, production management, the study of contaminant transport and restoration in groundwater of in-situ leaching of uranium mining. (authors)

  5. Four innovations for building a modern in-situ leaching mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Xuebin; Tang Qingsi; Wang Shunli

    2014-01-01

    The connotation and signification of four innovations carried out by Tongliao Uranium Co., Ltd., CNNC, were introduced. The four innovations involved science and technology progress, system and mechanism, safety and environmental protection, and cooperation mode. Through innovations, key technical problems were solved, a project management mode of 'small core with big cooperation' was established, a high-efficient talent team was set up on the basis of 'new project with new mechanism', the first uranium mining enterprise by CO 2 + O 2 in-situ leaching process was set up in accordance with advanced safety and environmental protection concept, and the corporation between Tongliao Uranium Co., Ltd. (CNNC) and Liaohe Petroleum Exploration Co., Ltd., was promoted. (authors)

  6. Filter construction technology in mining drilling hole for in-situ leaching of multilayer deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yan; Hu Baishi; Tan Yahui; Yang Lizhi; Li Xiaojian; Wang Xiaodong; Chang Jingtao; Qin Hao

    2014-01-01

    Taking a typical multilayer sandstone uranium deposit as example, study was carried out on filter construction technology in mining drilling hole for in-situ leaching of multilayer deposit. According to the character of multilayer sandstone, four injecting holes and one drawning hole were designed between the P13-P15 exploration lines, five different methods were used to construct filter. Construction technology by different methods was introduced and the advantages and disadvantages of the construction filter with five methods were analysed. As far as five experimental drilling holes, layered gravel-filling hole construction technology is a suitable method for construction multilayer filter with continuous construction, simple operation and good effect of well completion. (authors)

  7. Environmental impact assessment for uranium mine, mill and in situ leach projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    Environmental impact assessments and/or statements are an inherent part of any uranium mining project and are a prerequisite for the future opening of an exploitation and its final closure and decommissioning. Since they contain all information related to the physical, biological, chemical and economic condition of the areas where industrial projects are proposed or planned, they present invaluable guidance for the planning and implementation of environmental mitigation as well as environmental restoration after the mine is closed. They further yield relevant data on the socio-economic impacts of a project. The present report provides guidance on the environmental impact assessment of uranium mining and milling projects, including in situ leach projects which will be useful for companies in the process of planning uranium developments as well as for the regional or national authorities who will assess such developments. Additional information and advice is given through environmental case histories from five different countries. Those case histories are not meant to be prescriptions for conducting assessments nor even firm recommendations, but should serve as examples for the type and extent of work involved in assessments. A model assessment and licensing process is recommended based on the experience of the five countries

  8. Factoring uncertainty into restoration modeling of in-situ leach uranium mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Friedel, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Postmining restoration is one of the greatest concerns for uranium in-situ leach (ISL) mining operations. The ISL-affected aquifer needs to be returned to conditions specified in the mining permit (either premining or other specified conditions). When uranium ISL operations are completed, postmining restoration is usually achieved by injecting reducing agents into the mined zone. The objective of this process is to restore the aquifer to premining conditions by reducing the solubility of uranium and other metals in the ground water. Reactive transport modeling is a potentially useful method for simulating the effectiveness of proposed restoration techniques. While reactive transport models can be useful, they are a simplification of reality that introduces uncertainty through the model conceptualization, parameterization, and calibration processes. For this reason, quantifying the uncertainty in simulated temporal and spatial hydrogeochemistry is important for postremedial risk evaluation of metal concentrations and mobility. Quantifying the range of uncertainty in key predictions (such as uranium concentrations at a specific location) can be achieved using forward Monte Carlo or other inverse modeling techniques (trial-and-error parameter sensitivity, calibration constrained Monte Carlo). These techniques provide simulated values of metal concentrations at specified locations that can be presented as nonlinear uncertainty limits or probability density functions. Decisionmakers can use these results to better evaluate environmental risk as future metal concentrations with a limited range of possibilities, based on a scientific evaluation of uncertainty.

  9. Environmental impact assessment for uranium mine, mill and in situ leach projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    Environmental impact assessments and/or statements are an inherent part of any uranium mining project and are a prerequisite for the future opening of an exploitation and its final closure and decommissioning. Since they contain all information related to the physical, biological, chemical and economic condition of the areas where industrial projects are proposed or planned, they present invaluable guidance for the planning and implementation of environmental mitigation as well as environmental restoration after the mine is closed. They further yield relevant data on the socio-economic impacts of a project. The present report provides guidance on the environmental impact assessment of uranium mining and milling projects, including in situ leach projects which will be useful for companies in the process of planning uranium developments as well as for the regional or national authorities who will assess such developments. Additional information and advice is given through environmental case histories from five different countries. Those case histories are not meant to be prescriptions for conducting assessments nor even firm recommendations, but should serve as examples for the type and extent of work involved in assessments. A model assessment and licensing process is recommended based on the experience of the five countries. 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  10. Problem-oriented software for the managing of uranium mining by in-situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noskov, M.D.; Gutsul, M.V.; Istomin, A.D.; Kesler, A.G.; Noskova, S.N.; Cheglokov, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    The problem-oriented software consisting of interconnected geological geoinformation, technological information, geotechnological modeling and expert-analytical systems is presented. The software application procedure for the managing of uranium field development by in-situ leaching is considered [ru

  11. In situ leach uranium mining. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    At the beginning of 1996 there were 437 nuclear power plants in operation with a combined electricity generating capacity of 344 GWe (net gigawatts electric). This represents nearly a 100% increase over the last decade. In 1995 over 2228 TWh (terawatt hours) electricity were generated, equivalent to about 17% of the world's total electricity. To achieve this, about 61 400 tonnes U were required as nuclear fuel. The 15 year decline of the spot uranium price, as indicated by Nuexco Exchange Value (NEV) and other indices, which reached an all time low annual average in 1994 of $18.33/kg U ($7.05/pound U 3 O 8 ), has had a profound impact on uranium related activities. This led to the massive reduction and realignment of all uranium related activities as the worldwide uranium market adjusted from over-production. Because of the economic advantages of properly run in situ leach technology on carefully selected uranium orebodies, relatively more ISL mining facilities have been kept in operation than conventional mining operations. In 1995 world uranium production of about 34 000 t uranium met only about 55% of world requirements. An estimated 16% of production came from ISL mining. In 1996 ISL mining was estimated to have produced over 5600 tU, or over 15% of estimated world production of 36 400 tU. The importance of ISL mining is expected to increase, as the technology has economic and environmental advantages for producing uranium from carefully selected deposits when projects are properly designed and operated by experienced personnel. Several countries host sandstone type uranium deposits, the only type where commercial ISL projects have been developed. ISL uranium mining technology was developed independently in the USA and the former Soviet Union and associated non-WOCA (world outside centrally planned economic areas) countries starting in the 1960s and 1970s. Since the opening of relations between the two areas in the early 1990s there has been a high level of

  12. Recent developments in uranium resources and production with emphasis on in situ leach mining. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    An important role of the International Atomic Energy Agency is establishing contacts between Member States in order to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information on uranium production technologies. In situ leach (ISL) mining is defined as, the extraction of uranium from the host sandstone by chemical solutions and the recovery of uranium at the surface. ISL extraction is conducted by injecting a suitable leach solution into the ore zone below the water table; oxidizing, complexing, and mobilizing the uranium; recovering the pregnant solutions through production wells; and, finally, pumping the uranium bearing solution to the surface for further processing. As compared with conventional mining, in situ leach is recognized as having economic and environmental advantages when properly employed by knowledgeable specialists to extract uranium from suitable sandstone type deposits. Despite its limited applicability to specific types of uranium deposits, in recent years ISL uranium mining has been producing 15 to 21 per cent of world output. In 2002, ISL production was achieved in Australia, China, Kazakhstan, the United States of America and Uzbekistan. Its importance is expected to increase with new projects in Australia, China, Kazakhstan and the Russian Federation. The Technical Meeting on Recent Development in Uranium Resources and Production with Special Emphasis on In Situ Leach Mining, was held in Beijing from 18 to 20 September 2002, followed by the visit of the Yili ISL mine, Xinjiang Autonomous Region, China, from 21 to 23 September 2002. The meeting, held in cooperation with the Bureau of Geology, China National Nuclear Cooperation, was successful in bringing together 59 specialists representing 18 member states and one international organization (OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency). The papers describe a wide variety of activities related to the theme of the meeting. Subjects such as geology, resources evaluation, licensing, and mine restoration were

  13. Guidebook on environmental impact assessment for in situ leach mining projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-05-01

    Assessment of the potential environmental impact of an in situ leach (ISL) project is the first step in the permission and licensing process. An Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) serves as the basis for preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), which in turn identifies the potential environmental and socioeconomic impact of a proposed project and outlines measures to mitigate the impact. The EIS review process serves to inform the public about a proposed project as well as provide regulatory agencies with assurance that ISL technology will comply with environmental standards, and that project sites can be rehabilitated to pre-mining use. This publication provides a step-by-step description of project parameters that must be addressed in conducting an EIA and preparing an EIS. It also includes EIA/EIS case histories for current operations in Australia, the Czech Republic, Kazakhstan and the United States of America. The publication will be useful to companies considering development of ISL projects and to regulatory personnel who are responsible for writing environmental regulations and licensing ISL projects

  14. Zero-valent iron nanoparticles in treatment of acid mine water from in situ uranium leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimkova, Stepanka; Cernik, Miroslav; Lacinova, Lenka; Filip, Jan; Jancik, Dalibor; Zboril, Radek

    2011-02-01

    Acid mine water from in situ chemical leaching of uranium (Straz pod Ralskem, Czech Republic) was treated in laboratory scale experiments by zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI). For the first time, nZVI were applied for the treatment of the real acid water system containing the miscellaneous mixture of pollutants, where the various removal mechanisms occur simultaneously. Toxicity of the treated saline acid water is caused by major contaminants represented by aluminum and sulphates in a high concentration, as well as by microcontaminants like As, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, U, V, and Zn. Laboratory batch experiments proved a significant decrease in concentrations of all the monitored pollutants due to an increase in pH and a decrease in oxidation-reduction potential related to an application of nZVI. The assumed mechanisms of contaminants removal include precipitation of cations in a lower oxidation state, precipitation caused by a simple pH increase and co-precipitation with the formed iron oxyhydroxides. The possibility to control the reaction kinetics through the nature of the surface stabilizing shell (polymer vs. FeO nanolayer) is discussed as an important practical aspect. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A feasibility study on geological and hydrogeological setting or in-situ leaching mining in a sandstone-type uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Sanmin.

    1992-01-01

    A comparative study is made of various conditions for in-situ leaching mining in a sandstone-type uranium deposit in Inner Mongolia with those of same types at home and abroad based on a large number of practical information. It is concluded that the deposit basically exhibits the geological conditions for in-situ leaching mining, and tentative plan and suggestion for further work are presented

  16. Ground-water elements of in situ leach mining of uranium. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.E.; Swarzenski, W.V.; Warner, D.L.; Rouse, G.E.; Carrington, O.F.; Pyrih, R.Z.

    1978-07-01

    This report provides methods to collect data and evaluates impacts concerning ground-water elements of production-scale leach mining of uranium. Two overlapping networks of monitor wells are designed to collect premining hydrogeologic and baseline water-quality data and to detect excursions of leaching fluids. The pre-mining data collection network consists of 24 wells completed into the ore-zone aquifer and the water-bearing units above and below it. The excursion-monitor network utilizes two rings of wells encircling the ore body and other wells strategically placed into other water-bearing units. The lateral excursion detection system is keyed to changes in water levels whereas the vertical excursion detection system is keyed to changes in water quality. Several ground-water restoration methods are evaluated. Mechanical and chemical restoration methods can significantly remove most introduced and mobilized chemicals. Natural geochemical mechanisms should be capable of causing water-quality improvement. Several water-quality constituents, i.e., ammonia, chloride, sulfate, may not be greatly affected by restoration efforts. Most mining and restoration activities should not greatly affect the availability or usefulness of ground water unless uncontrolled withdrawals from many sources occur. Disposal of leach mining wastes may prove a greater threat to the environment than the mining. Natural conditions and/or current state and Federal regulations limit the types of disposal methods that may be used

  17. In situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, B.

    1980-01-01

    A process is described for the in-situ leaching of uranium-containing ores employing an acidic leach liquor containing peroxymonosulphuric acid. Preferably, additionally, sulphuric acid is present in the leach liquor. (author)

  18. Cost and sensitivity analysis for uranium in situ leach mining. Open file report Oct 79-Mar 81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, G.W.; Annett, J.R.

    1981-03-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of uranium in situ leach mining costs through the application of process engineering and discounted cash flow analysis procedures. A computerized costing technique was developed to facilitate rapid cost analyses. Applications of the cost model will generate mine life capital and operating costs as well as solve for economic production cost per pound U 3 O 8 . Conversely, rate of return may be determined subject to a known selling price. The data bases of the cost model were designed to reflect variations in Texas versus Wyoming site applications. The results of applying the model under numerous ore deposit, operating, well field, and extraction plant conditions for Texas and Wyoming are summarized in the report. Sensitivity analysis of changes in key project parameters have also been tested and are included

  19. In-situ uranium leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dotson, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    This invention provides a method for improving the recovery of mineral values from ore bodies subjected to in-situ leaching by controlling the flow behaviour of the leaching solution. In particular, the invention relates to an in-situ leaching operation employing a foam for mobility control of the leaching solution. A foam bank is either introduced into the ore bed or developed in-situ in the ore bed. The foam then becomes a diverting agent forcing the leaching fluid through the previously non-contacted regions of the deposit

  20. In situ solution mining technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Learmont, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    A method of in situ solution mining is disclosed in which a primary leaching process employing an array of 5-spot leaching patterns of production and injection wells is converted to a different pattern by converting to injection wells all the production wells in alternate rows

  1. A preliminary analysis and assessment of hydrogeological conditions for in-situ leach mining of sandstone-type uranium deposit in northern Ordos basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fazheng; Zhao Jinfeng; Chang Baocheng; Gao Junyi

    2006-01-01

    A systematic analysis and assessment on hydrogeologic condition, the lithology and hydrogeologic structure of ore-hosting aquitfers, hydrodynamic condition, hydrochemical characteristics at a sandstone-type uranium deposit in northern Ordos basin is made in this paper. It has been concluded, that hydrogeologic condition in the study area is favorable, meeting the requirements for in-situ leach mining of the deposit. Aimed at the low artesian pressure head and low water output and based on the results of pumping-injection tests which led to the significant increase of water output, a technical scheme of pressured water injection has been proposed to artificially raise the artesian pressure head and increase the output of groundwater to satisfy the requirements of in-situ leach mining. (authors)

  2. Discussion of push-pull equilibrium in well field at Yining in-situ leaching mine, Xinjiang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haifeng; Su Xuebin

    1999-01-01

    Combined with a case of in-situ leaching project, the author discusses the principle and approaches for push-pull equilibrium controlling, and gives the suggestions solving the un-equilibrium problems of push-pull in well field during operation

  3. The design and construction of the bottom working for in-situ leaching of fragmented uranium ore by blasting in No. 745 mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Dexin; Yang Shijiao; Li Ming

    1998-11-01

    Bottom working is a very important structure for in-situ leaching of fragmented uranium ore by blasting. Its design and construction should simultaneously satisfy the requirements for receiving fragmented ore, transporting the ore, providing relief space for blast operation, passage for workers and fresh air for the slope and collecting the pregnant solution from spraying over the fragmented ore. The author deals with the design and construction of the complete water cutoff bottom working for collecting the pregnant solution for in-situ leaching of fragmented uranium ore by long hole blast in No. 745 mine in Guangdong Province. The preparation system for the block, the undercutting, the construction process and method of the bottom working and the measures to guide the solution leaked into the surrounding rock mass to the bottom of the block are described in detail

  4. Environmental aspects of sulphuric acid in situ leach uranium mining in the permafrost zone (Vitim District, Russian Federation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazlullin, M.I.; Boitsov, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    Currently in situ leaching pilot tests are in progress at the Khiagda deposit, Vitim District, Russian Federation. The deposit is of the sandstone basal channel type, or paleovalley type in the Russian classification. It contains about 15 000 mt U at an ore grade averaging 0.05% U. Mineralization occurs in permeable unconsolidated Neogene fluvial sediments located below the permafrost which extends to 100 m deep. The basement rock is Paleozoic granite. Neogene-Quaternary basalts overlap the ore hosting sediments. The thickness of the ore host horizon varies from a few meters to 120 m. The depth of mineralization averages 170 m. Ore bodies are of lens and strataform shape. The following types of underground waters have been identified: groundwaters of the near surface or active layer, the aquifer in the Neogene volcanics, the ore host aquifer of the Neogene permeable sediments and fault related waters. The permeability in the ore bearing horizon varies from 0.1 to 20 m/day (averages 2 to 3 m/day). The waters of the productive aquifer are not suitable for industrial nor potable water supply due to their initial chemical composition. The ore host horizons occur between two impermeable horizons, which confine leaching solutions. Using sulphuric acid solutions as leaching reagent decreases the pH and increases Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) of the groundwaters within the leaching area due to concentration of sulphate-ion and other dissolved components. Principal components contaminating the underground waters are sulphates of aluminium, manganese, nickel and chrome. Their content during leaching significantly exceeds initial values. The available information on residual acid migration with the ground water shows that the concentration of contaminants significantly decreases away from the leaching contour. This occurs due to precipitation of contaminants during migration of the underground water from ISL sites. The external contour of the contamination aureole is defined

  5. Application of a new technology for reprocessing of wastes within the framework of rehabilitation of uranium mines operated by in situ leaching - 59403

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martoyan, Gagik; Nalbandyan, Garik; Gagiyan, Lavrenti; Karamyan, Gagik; Barseghyan, Artak; Brutyan, Gagik

    2012-01-01

    It is essential the environmentally safe industrial production of nuclear fuel especially in the case of uranium extraction by In Situ Leaching, when the environment and the deep extraction of uranium are important problems. In the presented paper it is studied the feasibility of the application of an electro-dialysis method for the deep extraction of uranium and radium from liquid (acid) streams. It is proposed to apply a new electro-hydro-metallurgical [1] extraction and refining method to ensure the necessary extraction level of elements. In the same time the new method ensures the recycling of acids used in the process. The above mentioned two different demonstrations of the new electro-hydro-metallurgical technology show that important environmental problems, such as the removal of harmful liquid-radioactive wastes, are solved in the most economical and energy efficient manner, while a new avenue has also opened for its large-scale use in mining industry. In particular, we offer this method to reprocess the huge quantity of wastes accumulated on uranium mines sites within the rehabilitation work of uranium mines operated by In Situ Leaching. A corresponding electro-hydro-metallurgical plant (mobile and stationary units) is designed for the large-scale extraction and refining of all elements from the wastes of uranium mines, which has a very high level of environmental safety, for an industry that so far has caused considerable environmental harm. The new plant design has no smokestacks, nor the emission of environmentally hazardous elements and its operation is characterized by high energy efficiency, which translates to high economy, while all materials used in the processing stages are fully reconstituted and recycled. (authors)

  6. Technique for in situ leach simulation of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, D.C.; Seidel, D.C.; Nichols, I.L.

    1985-01-01

    In situ uranium mining offers the advantages of minimal environmental disturbance, low capital and operating costs, and reduced mining development time. It is becoming an increasingly attractive mining method for the recovery of uranium from secondary ore deposits. In order to better understand the process, a laboratory technique was developed and used to study and simulate both the chemical and physical phenomena occurring in ore bodies during in situ leaching. The laboratory simulation technique has been used to determine effects of leaching variables on permeability, uranium recovery, and post-leach aquifer restoration. This report describes the simulation system and testing procedure in sufficient detail to allow the construction of the system, and to perform the desired leaching tests. With construction of such a system, in situ leaching of a given ore using various leach conditions can be evaluated relatively rapidly in the laboratory. Not only could optimum leach conditions be selected for existing ore bodies, but also exploitation of new ore bodies could be accelerated. 8 references, 8 figures, 2 tables

  7. In situ leaching of uranium in South Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, D.

    1998-01-01

    The proposed two new uranium mines at Beverley and Honeymoon, South Australia plan to use the cheap but potentially polluting process of in situ leaching (ISL) and permission has already been given for experimental underground leaching at Beverley. The mining industry describes ISL as environmentally benign because, instead of excavating, a corrosive liquid such as sulphuric acid is used. The liquid, sometimes 10000 times more acid than the aquifer water, is pumped into the ground in order to leach out the uranium and the resulting solution is then pumped to the surface where the uranium is extracted. Because the groundwater is salty and radioactive, the mining companies regard it as useless, so its contamination by ISL is considered of no concern. Salty radioactive water can be purified or desalinated and such processes are commonly used by mining companies such as Western Mining Corporation at Roxby Downs. (author)

  8. Aluminum chloride restoration of in situ leached uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, D.C.; Burgman, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    During in situ uranium mining using ammonium bicarbonate lixiviant, the ammonium exchanges with cations on the ore's clay. After mining is complete, the ammonium may desorb into post-leach ground water. For the particular ore studied, other chemicals (i.e., uranium and selenium) which are mobilized during the leach process, have also been found in the post-leach ground water. Laboratory column tests, used to simulate the leaching process, have shown that aluminum chloride can rapidly remove ammonium from the ore and thus greatly reduce the subsequent ammonium leakage level into ground water. The aluminum chloride has also been found to reduce the leakage levels of uranium and selenium. In addition, the aluminum chloride treatment produces a rapid improvement in permeability

  9. Exploration on feasibility of using in-situ leaching after explosion on the bottom of Huangfengling open pit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Zuyuan

    1992-01-01

    According to the situation of mining and the faced problems in Huangfengling open pit, it was proposed to use in-situ leaching after explosion to recover uranium in order to overcome the difficulties with open mining of the deposit and high mining cost. The feasibility and necessity of using in-situ leaching after explosion in Huangfengling open pit was explored

  10. In situ leaching of uranium: Technical, environmental and economic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Within the framework of its activities in nuclear raw materials the International Atomic Energy Agency has convened a series of meetings to discuss various aspects of uranium ore processing technology, recovery of uranium from non-conventional resources and development of projects for the production of uranium concentrates including economic aspects. As part of this continuing effort to discuss and document important aspects of uranium production the IAEA convened a Technical Committee Meeting on Technical, Economic and Environmental Aspects of In-Situ Leaching. Although the use of this technique is limited by geological and economic constraints, it has a significant potential to produce uranium at competitive prices. This is especially important in the current uranium market which is mainly characterised by large inventories, excess production capability and low prices. This situation is not expected to last indefinitely but it is unlikely to change drastically in the next ten years or so. This Technical Committee Meeting was held in Vienna from 3 to 6 November 1987 with the attendance of 24 participants from 12 countries. Eight papers were presented. Technical sessions covered in-situ mining research, environmental and licensing aspects and restoration of leached orebodies; the technological status of in-situ leaching, the current status and future prospects of in-situ leaching of uranium in Member States, general aspects of planning and implementation of in-situ projects and the economics of in-situ leaching. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Evaluation and analysis of geological condition of in-situ fragmentation leaching uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jianming; Tan Kaixuan; Huang Xiaonai

    2003-01-01

    The ore geological condition, hydrogeological condition, engineering geological condition and technological mineralogical character of in-situ fragmentation leaching uranium are analyzed, and it is considered that the implementation of in-situ fragmentation leaching uranium technology is decided by different geological factor. Previously prospecting and geological condition evaluation of uranium ore is based on traditional mining method. If in-situ fragmentation leaching uranium method is adopted, one must re-evaluate previously prospected deposits before they are mined, or one must evaluate new prospecting deposits according to geological conditions of in-situ fragmentation leaching uranium method. The feasibility evaluation method of uranium deposit by in-situ fragmentation leaching uranium put forward by B. N. Mociniets is introducd, and it is considered that B. N. Mociniets method has guidable significance for geological condition evaluation before uranium deposits are mined. A feasibility study is done by applying B. N. Mociniets method to a uranium deposit. (authors)

  12. Selection of lixiviants for in situ uranium leaching. Information circular

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tweeton, D.R.; Peterson, K.A.

    1981-10-01

    This Bureau of Mines publication provides information to assist in selecting a lixiviant (leach solution) for in situ uranium leaching. The cost, advantages, and disadvantages of lixiviants currently used and proposed are presented. Laboratory and field tests are described, and applications of geochemical models are discussed. Environmental, economic, and technical factors should all be considered. Satisfying environmental regulations on restoring groundwater quality is becoming an overriding factor, favoring sodium bicarbonate or dissolved carbon dioxide over ammonium carbonate. The cheapest lixiviant is dissolved carbon dioxide, but it is not effective in all deposits. Technical factors include clay swelling by sodium, acid consumption by calcite, and the low solubility of oxygen in shallow deposits

  13. Restoration of uranium in-situ leaching sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, A.D.; Silberberg, I.H.; Walsh, M.P.; Breland, W.M.; Humenick, M.J.; Schechter, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    Ammonium ions introduced into the formation during in-situ uranium leach mining must be removed by a restoration process. Ion exchange processes to strip sorbed ammonium cation from the clays have been modeled and studied experimentally. It is concluded that ammonium removal can be accomplished best by a high-ionic-strength flush. The migration of uncovered ammonium cation in groundwater also is studied. 19 refs

  14. Aquifer restoration at uranium in situ leach sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastasi, F.S.; Williams, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    In situ mining of uranium involves injection of a leaching solution (lixiviant) into an ore-bearing aquifer. Frequently, the ground water in the mined aquifer is a domestic or livestock water supply. As the lixiviant migrates through the ore body, uranium and various associated elements such as arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, vanadium and radium-226 are mobilized in the ground water. Aquifer restoration after in situ mining is not fully understood. Several methods have been developed to restore mined aquifers to pre-mining (baseline) quality. Commonly used methods include ground water sweeping, clean water injection, and treatment by ion exchange and reverse osmosis technologies. Ammonium carbonate lixiviant was used at one RandD in situ mine. Attempts were made to restore the aquifer using a variety of methods. Efforts were successful in reducing concentrations of the majority of contaminants to baseline levels. Concentrations of certain parameters, however, remained at levels above baseline six months after restoration ceased. Relatively large quantities of ground water were processed in the restoration attempt considering the small size of the project (1.25 acre). More thorough characterization of the hydrogeology of the site may have enhanced the effectiveness of restoration and reduced potential environmental impacts associated with the project. This paper presents some of the findings of a research project conducted by the Mineral Resources Waste Management Team at the University of Idaho in Moscow, Idaho. Views contained herein do not reflect U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission policy

  15. Numerical simulation of vertical infiltration for leaching fluid in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jinxuan; Shi Weijun; Zhang Weimin

    1998-01-01

    Based on the analysis of movement law of leaching fluid in breaking and leaching experiment in situ, the movement of leaching fluid can be divided into two main stages in the leaching process in situ: Vertical Infiltration in unsaturation zone and horizontal runoff in saturation zone. The corresponding mathematics models are sep up, and the process of vertical infiltration of leaching fluid is numerically simulated

  16. Uranium in situ leaching: its advantages, practice, problems and computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, B.A.

    1977-01-01

    In situ leaching for the recovery of uranium from low grade sandstone deposits is one of the newest technological advances in the mineral industry. It is rapidly developing into a commercially feasible mining system which has economic, environmental, and social advantages over conventional mining systems. Because of the current uranium shortage, development of in situ leaching into a sophisticated system has gained new impetus. In situ leaching will become an important mining technique in the future, which will greatly help to supply uranium for the United States' energy needs. In this paper, the author gives an overview of the merits of the system, as well as the technology problems, and research in solution mining of uranium. 17 references

  17. In-situ leaching opens new uranium reserves in Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, L.

    1975-01-01

    A commercial in-situ uranium leaching operation that is quite probably the largest ever built started up in April, 10 mi southwest of George West, Tex. Producing from a pattern of 66 injection wells and 46 extraction wells occupying an area of less than 3 acres, the Clay West mine and plant are expected to reach design capacity of 250,000 lb per year of yellowcake by the end of the summer. By late May, results were sufficiently favorable to make the owners think seriously about an early expansion. Built at a cost of $7 million by joint ventures Atlantic Richfield (50 percent owner and operator), Dalco (25 percent), and US Steel (25 percent), the Clay West mine may be only the first of several mines to extract U 3 O 8 from a uranium province that stretches from north of Houston to Brownsville, at the southernmost tip of the state. Westinghouse subsidiary Wyoming Minerals is building a 250,000-lb-per-year plant near Bruni, with startup planned before the end of 1975, and Mobil Oil is setting up a pilot-scale plant in the same area. A number of other companies are reported to be actively interested in development of in-situ uranium leaching in Texas. (U.S.)

  18. Investigation of disposal of nitrate-bearing effluent from in-situ leaching process by natural evaporation in Yining uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Chongyuan; Li Weicai; Zhang Yutai; Gao Xizhen

    2000-01-01

    Experiments indicated, after lime neutralization and precipitation of nitrate-bearing effluent from in-situ leaching process, uranium concentration increase with the increasing of nitrate concentration. Only when nitrate concentration is <0.5 mg/L, uranium concentration can drop from 1.5-2.0 mg/L to about 1.0 mg/L. The permeability coefficient of soil is about 1.0-1.1 m/d in the place which is scheduled for building natural evaporation pool. After lime neutralization of nitrate-bearing effluent, it can drop to 0.03-0.01 m/d. Setting up water-proof layer in natural evaporation pool can reduce pollution of underground water by uranium, nitrate and ammonium

  19. Waste water treatment of CO2+O2 in-situ leaching uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lechang; Liu Naizhong; Du Zhiming; Wang Hongying

    2012-01-01

    An in-situ leaching uranium mine located in Northern China uses CO 2 +O 2 leaching process to leach uranium. The consumption of industrial reagent and water, and generation and discharge of waste water are minimized by comprehensive waste water treatment technology with process water recycle, reverse osmosis and natural evaporation. The process water of the mine that can be recycled and reused includes barren fluid, solution washing loaded resin, precipitating mother solution and filtered liquor of yellow cake. Solution regenerating barren resin is treated by reverse osmosis. Concentrated water from reverse osmosis and solution washing barren resin are naturally evaporated. (authors)

  20. The Honeymoon project: Australia's first in situ leach uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackland, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Honeymoon uranium deposit is one of several roll front uranium deposits in South Australia. It was discovered in 1971, the project developed in the 1970's, and was ready for demonstration of the In Situ Leaching (ISL) production techniques by January 1983, when the project was stopped, despite it having met the environmental approvals to proceed, due to the Australian Labour Party's 'three mines policy'. From 1983 until March 1996 the project was mothballed. In late 1996 Southern Cross Resources Inc. (SCRI) reached agreement with Mount Isa Mining (MIM) to purchase its uranium interests in Honeymoon, Goulds Dam and EL 2310 whilst simultaneously acquiring Sedimentary Holdings NL's interests in EL 2310. By April 1997 these interests were consolidated in SCRI's wholly owned subsidiary, Southern Cross Resources Australia Ply Ltd which is the operating company. Activities are presently underway to rehabilitate the existing treatment plant and continue the program that was outlined in the approved 1981 Honeymoon Environmental Impact Statement

  1. Application of mine water leaching protocol on coal fly ash to assess leaching characteristics for suitability as a mine backfill material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzivire, Godfrey; Ramasenya, Koena; Tlowana, Supi; Coetzee, Henk; Vadapalli, Viswanath R K

    2018-04-16

    Over the years, coal mining in the Mpumalanga Province of South Africa has negatively affected the environment by causing pollution of water resources, land subsidence and spontaneous coal combustion. Previous studies show that in-situ treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) using coal fly ash (CFA) from local power stations was possible and sludge recovered out of such treatment can be used to backfill mines. In this article, the authors have attempted to understand the leaching characteristics of CFA when placed underground as a backfill material using the mine water leaching protocol (MWLP). The results show that the migration of contaminants between the coal fly ash and the AMD in the mine voids depends on the pH and quality of the mine water. While backfilling mine voids with CFA can neutralize and scavenge between 50% and 95% of certain environmentally sensitive elements from AMD such as Fe, Al, Zn, Cu, Ni, Co and Mn. At this moment, it is also important to point out that certain scavenged/removed contaminants from the AMD during initial phases of backfilling can be remobilized by the influx of acidic water into the mine voids. It has therefore been concluded that, while CFA can be used to backfill mine voids, the influx of fresh acidic mine water should be avoided to minimize the remobilization of trapped contaminants such as Fe, Al, Mn and As. However, the pozzolanic material resulting from the CFA-AMD interaction could prevent such influx.

  2. Commercial application of bacterial heap leaching in Ganzhou uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jian; Fan Baotuan; Meng Yunsheng; Xiao Jinfeng; Chen Sencai; Wu Jinjing; Liu Chengwu; Wu Yichang; Zeng Ruilong

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the situation of commercial application on bacterial heap leaching in Ganzhou Uranium Mine is introduced, and the construction of biomembrane oxidizing tank, regeneration and recycled utilization of barren solution are summarized. Total five heaps, 18436 t, uranium ore are leached by bacteria during the half of a year. The result is consistent with that of commercial experiment. The technology of bacterial heap leaching is more perfected

  3. Pilot test of bacterial percolation leaching at Fuzhou uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Baotuan; Liu Jian; Jiang Yngqiong; Cai Chunhui; Jiang Lang; Zhou Renhua; Tong Changning; Zhang Hongli

    2006-01-01

    Total 18 t uranium ores of Fuzhou Uranium Mine packed in three or four columns in series were leached by bacterial percolation. The results show that without adding any other chemical oxidant such as sodium chlorate, the leaching rate measured by residue is 91.45%-94.48%, leaching time is 50-60 d, acid consumption is 6.17%-7.75%, and residue grade is 0.0149%-0.0208%. Compared with conventional percolation leaching process, the leaching rate is improved by 3%, leaching time is shorted by 26%, and acid consumption is saved by 34%. Accumulation pattern of ΣFe and F - in the process of leaching is discussed. Influence of F - on bacterial growth, regeneration of barren solution as well as correlative techniques are reviewed. (authors)

  4. Heavy metal leaching from mine tailings as affected by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, D.; Schwab, A.P.; Banks, M.K.

    1999-12-01

    A column experiment was conducted to determine the impact of soil cover and plants on heavy metal leaching from mine tailings and heavy metal contaminated soil. Columns made of PVC were constructed with 30 cm subsoil covered by 30 cm of mine tailings followed by 0, 30, or 60 cm subsoil covered by 30 cm of mine tailings followed by 0, 30, or 60 cm of clean topsoil. Two grasses, tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) and big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii), were grown in the columns. The columns were leached at a slow rate for 1 yr with a 0.001 M CaCl{sub 2} solution under unsaturated conditions. The presence of both tall fescue and big bluestem increased Zn and Cd concentrations in the leachate. Lead concentrations in leachates were not affected by the presence of plants. Although plants generally reduced the total amount of water leached, total mass of Zn and Cd leached generally was not impacted by plants. Total mass of Pb leached was positively correlated with total leachate collected from each column. Covering the mine tailings with 60 cm of topsoil increased the mass of Zn and Cd leached relative to no topsoil. When the subsoil was absent, Zn and Cd leaching increased by as much as 20-fold, verifying the ability of soil to act as a sink for metals. Mine tailing remediation by establishing vegetation can reduce Pb movement but may enhance short-term Cd and Zn leaching. However, the changes were relatively small and do not outweigh the benefits of using vegetation in mine tailings reclamation.

  5. Some factors affecting agitation leach test during in-situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Wensheng; Jiang Yan; Wang Limin; Shi Zhenfeng; Zhao Qiaofu; MARMAR

    2014-01-01

    The agitation leaching test is one of the most fundamental research works in in-situ leaching of uranium. Some factors affecting the test results were analyzed including stirring, leaching time, oxidizer used in alkaline leach, washing solution, the amount and size of ore samples. The results indicate that stirring can enhance diffusion velocity. The leach time l or 2 days is suitable for the samples containing accessible uranium and low acid consumption minerals; whereas 3 or 4 days for those containing refractory ore to leach and slowly acid consuming minerals. For the oxidizer used in alkaline leach, potassium permanganate is better than hydrogen peroxide. Recovery calculated by the leach solution can be directly obtained by its uranium level and the original volume of lixiviant without analyzing and calculating the washing solution. The appropriate amount and size of ore samples for the agitation leaching test are 60 g and <1 mm. By controlling the above factors, the agitation leach test can improve the applicability of the different ore samples and give the more reliable data. (authors)

  6. Wismut sites regeneration: Flooding of the former leaching mine 'Koenigstein'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runge, W.

    2001-01-01

    Flooding of abandoned mines was part of the regeneration programme for the Wismut sites. In January 2001, flooding was started at the Koenigstein mine, the easternmost site of the Wismut in Sachsen. The operations are scheduled for 5 - 6 years. Since 1984, this mine was operated in a leaching process involving sulphuric acid, so that a number of measures had to be taken to ensure that polluted flooding water will not contaminate the groundwater in this area [de

  7. Supplementary recovery of uranium by in-situ leaching at the Brugeaud deposit (Limousin, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyaudet, G.

    1980-01-01

    The actual mining operations at the Brugeaud Deposit (West Brugeaud and East Brugeaud) were followed by supplementary recoveries of uranium by means of in-situ leaching. There were a number of factors which favoured consideration of these operations: the amounts of uranium present at the edge of the stoped areas; the underground mining infrastructure, which did not require supplementary operations for the recovery of solutions; the nature of the rock, which presented a dense network of fractures and micro-fractures conducive to impregnation by the acid solutions; and the immediate proximity of a concentration plant. The amount of uranium recovered by in-situ leaching is close to 200 t. This production is approximately nine per cent of all the uranium extracted from the deposit. The cost of the metal obtained in this way was always less than FF 100 (FF of 1978) per kilogram of uranium. (author)

  8. Process for the in-situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, E.T.; Vogt, T.C.

    1982-01-01

    Process for the in-situ leaching of uranium employing an alkaline lixiviant and an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent. The use of the hypochlorite oxidant results in significantly higher uranium recoveries and leaching rates than those attained by the use of conventional oxidants. The invention is particularly suitable for use in subterranean deposits in which the uranium mineral is associated with carbonaceous material which retards access to the uranium by the lixiviant

  9. Study of hydraulic parameters in leach mining using radioactive tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Tariq, J.A.; Iqbal, N.; Rafiq, M.

    2002-01-01

    Six radioactive tracer (/sup 131/I) experiments were carried out at in-situ leach mining site to study transit time of injected fluid from the injection wells to the production well along the dip, against the dip, along the diagonals and the strike. It was found that the dip of the host sandstone does not affect the movement of fluid as the same velocity was found along the dip (0.23 m/h) and against the dip (0.22 m/h). Along the diagonals, the breakthrough times for 13.75 m and 16.25 m were 54 hours and 155 hours respectively yielding velocities of 0.26 m/h and 0.1 m/h. The higher velocity is not only due to shorter distance but also due to higher porosity / injection rate. Along the strike, the breakthrough time was 29 hours (very short) for 9.25 m distance and 147 hours for 16.25 m distance. The unexpectedly high velocity along the strike for shorter distance was also due to higher injection rate in the well as the other well was accepting only small fraction of the total injection. At higher injection/production rate or higher hydraulic gradient, the breakthrough time is shorter and also the dispersion of fluid is less, consequently the leach area would be relatively small. Fluctuations of activity in some cases show the presence of fractures/cracks at certain places in the strata. The estimated porosity and hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer are 28% and 1.23 x 10-5 m/s respectively. (author)

  10. Identification of chemical processes influencing constituent mobility during in-situ uranium leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.R.; Hostetler, C.J.; Deutsch, W.J.

    1984-07-01

    In-situ leaching of uranium has become a widely accepted method for production of uranium concentrate from ore zones that are too small, too deep, and/or too low in grade to be mined by conventional techniques. One major environmental concern that exists with in-situ leaching of uranium is the possible adverse effects mining might have on regional ground water quality. The leaching solution (lixiviant), which extracts uranium from the ore zone, might also mobilize other potential contaminants (As, Se, Mo, and SO 4 ) associated with uranium ore. Column experiments were performed to investigate the geochemical interactions between a lixiviant and a uranium ore during in-situ leaching and to identify chemical processes that might influence contaminant mobility. The analytical composition data for selected column effluents were used with the MINTEQ code to develop a computerized geochemical model of the system. MINTEQ was used to calculate saturation indices for solid phases based on the composition of the solution. A potential constraint on uranium leaching efficiency appears to be the solubility control of schoepite. Gypsum and powellite solubilities may limit the mobilities of sulfate and molybdenum, respectively. In contrast, the mobilities of arsenic and selenium were not limited by solubility constraints, but were influenced by other chemical interaction between the solution and sediment, perhaps adsorption. Bulk chemical and mineralogical analyses were performed on both the original and leached ores. Using these analyses together with the column effluent data, mass balance calculations were performed on five constituents based on solution chemical analysis and bulk chemical and γ-spectroscopy analysis for the sediment. 6 references, 10 figures, 10 tables

  11. Groundwater restoration of in-situ uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    In-situ leaching is a relatively new uranium production technology that is expected to account for a growing share of future output. Depending upon the leaching solution used, the process may have considerable impact on the ground water. Since restoration of ground water quality is required in most countries and since this restoration is by far the most costly aspect of reclamation of an in-situ mine, it is necessary to utilize a process that lends itself both to the efficiency of the leaching process and the restoration process. This article examines a number of techniques that may be used in the restoration efforts. These include: (1) groundwater sweep, (2) reverse osmosis, (3) chemical restoration, and (4) electrodialysis. The article also discusses disposal of the excess fluids used in the restoration process

  12. Taoshan uranium ore fields in situ blasting heap leaching rate influence factors to investigate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Wangnan; Dong Chunming

    2014-01-01

    Taoshan ore field ore in situ blasting heap leaching out build industrial test and production process, stope leaching rate and leaching cycle is large than that, after analysis, blasting method and cloth liquid way is to affect leaching rate and leaching cycle of the main factors. This paper holds that as far as possible using stratified deep hole blasting of squeezing up ways to reduce the building pile of in-situ leaching ore block rate; Adopting effective cloth tube way, increase the leaching agent and ore contact comprehensive; Introduction of bacterial leaching, and other means to improve leaching rate, shorten production cycle, etc to solve it. (authors)

  13. Process for in-situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espenscheid, W.F.; Yan, F.Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention relates to the recovery of uranium from subterranean ore deposits, and more particularly to an in-situ leaching operation employing an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid and carbon dioxide as the lixiviant. Uranium is solubilized in the lixiviant as it traverses the subterranean uranium deposit. The lixiviant is subsequently recovered and treated to remove the uranium

  14. An analysis of the heap construction by long hole blasting for in-situ leaching of blasted ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Shijiao

    1999-01-01

    The author establishes specific requirements for heap construction by blasting on the basis of the mechanism for in situ leaching of blasted ore, analyses the feasibility of heap construction by long hole blasting, selection of the blast plan and the relevant technological problems, and gives a case of heap construction by long hole blasting in Renhua uranium mine

  15. Laboratory study on leaching of a sandstone-type uranium deposit for acid in-situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Zhenqian; Yao Yixuan; Zheng Jianping; Jiang Yan; Cui Xin; Xing Yongguo; Hao Jinting; Tang Huazhang

    2013-01-01

    Ore samples were took from in-situ leaching experiment boreholes in a sandstone-type uranium deposit. Technological mineralogy study, agitating leaching and column leaching experiments were carried. The results show that the content of minerals consuming acid and deoxidized minerals is low. When sulfuric acid concentration was 1O g/L, initial uranium content was 0.0224%, and liquid-to-solid ratio was l.91, leaching rate of column leaching experiments is 89.19%, acid consumption is 8.2 kg/t ore, acid consumption is 41.88 t/tU. Acid leaching, technology is recommend for field in-situ leaching experiment, sulfuric acid concentration in confecting solution is 10 g/L, and oxidizing agent is needless during leaching process. (authors)

  16. Study on underground-water restoration of acid in-situ leaching process with electrodialytic desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Chongyuan; Meng Jin; Li Weicai

    2003-01-01

    The study focus undergrounder water restoration of acid in-situ leaching process with electrodialysis desalination in Yining Uranium Mine. It is shown in field test that electrodialysis desalination is an effective method for underground water restoration of acid in-situ leaching process. When TDS of underground-water at the decommissioning scope is 10-12 g/L, and TDS will be less than 1 g/L after the desalination process, the desalination rate is more than 90%, freshwater recovery 60%-70%, power consumption for freshwater recovery 5 kW·h/m 3 , the distance of the desalination flow 12-13 m, current efficiency 80%, and the throughput of the twin membrane 0.22-0.24 m 3 /(m 2 ·d)

  17. Improvement on LEACH Agreement of Mine Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-xiang Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on the characteristics of wireless sensor network communication in mine, LEACH protocol clustering is optimized, and the factors of energy and distance are considered fully. The selection of cluster head nodes is optimized, and a routing algorithm based on K-means ++ clustering is proposed. The problem of uneven distribution of cluster head nodes, uneven energy consumption and network stability in LEACH algorithm is improved effectively. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can improve the energy consumption of the whole network and improve the energy utilization rate, extending the network life cycle effectively.

  18. Leaching characteristics of vanadium in mine tailings and soils near a vanadium titanomagnetite mining site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jinyan; Tang, Ya; Yang, Kai [College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Rouff, Ashaki A. [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Queens College City University of New York, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Flushing, NY 11367 (United States); Elzinga, Evert J. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ (United States); Huang, Jen-How, E-mail: jen-how.huang@unibas.ch [Institute of Environmental Geosciences, University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Vanadium in the soil and mine tailings has low solubility. • The leachability of vanadium in the mine tailings is lower than in the soil. • Low risk of vanadium migrating from the soil and mine tailings into the surrounding environment. • Drought and rewetting increase vanadium release from the soil and mine tailings. • Soil leaching processes control vanadium transport in soils overlain with mine tailings. -- Abstract: A series of column leaching experiments were performed to understand the leaching behaviour and the potential environmental risk of vanadium in a Panzhihua soil and vanadium titanomagnetite mine tailings. Results from sequential extraction experiments indicated that the mobility of vanadium in both the soil and the mine tailings was low, with <1% of the total vanadium readily mobilised. Column experiments revealed that only <0.1% of vanadium in the soil and mine tailing was leachable. The vanadium concentrations in the soil leachates did not vary considerably, but decreased with the leachate volume in the mine tailing leachates. This suggests that there was a smaller pool of leachable vanadium in the mine tailings compared to that in the soil. Drought and rewetting increased the vanadium concentrations in the soil and mine tailing leachates from 20 μg L{sup −1} to 50–90 μg L{sup −1}, indicating the potential for high vanadium release following periods of drought. Experiments with soil columns overlain with 4, 8 and 20% volume mine tailings/volume soil exhibited very similar vanadium leaching behaviour. These results suggest that the transport of vanadium to the subsurface is controlled primarily by the leaching processes occurring in soils.

  19. Technology assessment of in situ uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of the PNL portion of the Technology Assessment project is to provide a description of the current in situ uranium mining technology; to evaluate, based on available data, the environmental impacts and, in a limited fashion, the health effects; and to explore the impediments to development and deployment of the in situ uranium mining technology

  20. Leaching of metals from soil contaminated by mining activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukselen, M A; Alpaslan, B

    2001-10-12

    Stabilization/solidification (s/s) is one of the most effective methods of dealing with heavy metal contaminated sites. The ability of lime and cement stabilization to immobilize Pb, Cu and Fe contained in a contaminated soil originating from an old mining and smelting area located along the Mediterranean Sea shore in northern Cyprus was investigated. The stabilization was evaluated by applying leaching tests. A series of tests were conducted to optimize the additive soil ratio for the best immobilization process. Additive/soil=1/15 (m/m) ratio was found to be the optimum for both lime and cement. Application of the US EPA toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) on the soil samples treated with lime at additive/soil=1/15 (m/m) mixing ratios showed that Cu and Fe solubility was reduced at 94 and 90%, respectively. The results of cement treatment using the same ratio, reduced the solubility 48 and 71% for Cu and Fe, respectively. The Pb solubility was found to be below the regulatory limit of 5mg/l so no additive treatment was needed. The optimum additive/soil amount (1/15) was selected for more detailed column studies, that were carried out in the acidic pH range. According to the results of column leaching tests, it was found that, the degree of heavy metal leaching is highly dependent on pH.

  1. Analysis of groundwater criteria and recent restoration attempts after in situ uranium leaching. Open file report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buma, G.; Johnson, P.H.; Bienek, G.K.; Watson, C.G.; Noyes, H.J.

    1981-10-01

    Groundwater restoration is an important aspect of in situ uranium leaching. Information on the effectiveness of the current technology, costs, and the current State and Federal Government permitting regulations is of vital importance to in situ leach operators and firms considering in situ leaching. This study describes (1) all recent restoration attempts at commercial in situ leaching operations, (2) restoration costs reported by the industry, (3) empirical equations that predict the amount of groundwater flushing required to meet the current restoration criteria, and (4) in situ uranium permit requirements for the States of Texas, Wyoming, New Mexico, Utah, Montana, Colorado, and South Dakota, and Federal requirements

  2. Reverse osmosis treatment in CO_2 + O_2 to the application of the in-situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan Zhilong; Li Xilong; Yang Shaowu

    2014-01-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of various groundwater management methods, combined with CO_2 + O_2 characteristics of in situ leaching uranium mining process, use reverse osmosis wastewater treatment technology, has carried on the laboratory test, field condition test and industrial test. Obtained by indoor experiment and field conditions for Cl"- ion concentration variation characteristics; Reverse osmosis treatment effect of wastewater is verified by industrial test, obtained the technical parameters and consumption data, as well as the leaching liquid and adsorption tail liquid pH, SO_4"2"-; Cl"- in the plasma concentration monitoring, and further prove that the reverse osmosis treatment technology is suitable for in-situ leaching of uranium in CO_2 + O_2 in wastewater treatment. (authors)

  3. Remediation of contaminated soil using heap leach mining technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    York, D.A.; Aamodt, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is evaluating the systems technology for heap treatment of excavated soils to remove and treat hazardous chemical and radioactive wastes. This new technology would be an extrapolation of current heap leach mining technology. The candidate wastes for treatment are those organic or inorganic (including radioactive) compounds that will chemically, physically, or biologically react with selected reagents. The project would start with bench-scale testing, followed by pilot-scale testing, and eventually by field-scale testing. Various reagents would be tried in various combinations and sequences to obtain and optimize the desired treatment results. The field-scale testing would be preceded by site characterization, process design, and equipment selection. The final step in this project is to transfer the systems technology to the private sector, probably to the mining industry. 6 refs., 1 fig

  4. Use of tensiometer for in situ measurement of nitrate leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, K.; Reddy, M.R.

    1999-07-01

    In order to monitor nitrate leaching from non-point source pollution, this study used tensiometers to measure in situ nitrate concentration and soil-moisture potential. Instead of filling the tensiometers with pure water, the study filled the tensiometers with nitrate ionic strength adjuster (ISA, 1 M (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}). After the installation of the tensiometers at various depths along soil profiles, a portable pressure transducer was used to measure the soil moisture potential, and a nitrate electrode attached to an ion analyzer was used to measure the nitrate concentration in situ. The measurement was continuous and non-destructive. To test this method in the laboratory, eight bottles filled with pure sand were treated with known nitrate solutions, and a tensiometer was placed in each bottle. Measurements were taken every day for 30 days. Laboratory test showed a linear relationship between the known nitrate concentration and the tensiometer readings (R{sup 2} = 0.9990). Then a field test was conducted in a watermelon field with green manure mulch. Field data indicated a potential of nitrate leaching below the soil depth of 100 cm when crop uptake of nutrients was low.

  5. Restoration of groundwater quality after in situ uranium leaching. Open file report (final) October 1977-August 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riding, J.R.; Rosswog, F.J.

    1979-08-01

    In situ solution mining of uranium has several environmental advantages over other mining techniques. The leaching of uranium, however, alters the ground water in the aquifer where the leaching occurs. A requirement of the mining technique is the control of objectionable materials that are introduced into the water. This report reviews the state of the art in restoring ground water quality. Current restoration practices discussed include disposal wells and solar evaporation ponds. Sweeping techniques by producing water flow from all wells during restoration and recirculating techniques by recharging water from a surface purification plant are evaluated. Methods for predicting the effectiveness and costs of current methods are presented. Possible alternatives for restoration of the ground water quality are described

  6. Commercial test on uranium ore percolation leaching in Fuzhou uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Chunhui

    2002-01-01

    Commercial test on uranium ore percolation leaching was carried out according to ore characteristics of Fuzhou Uranium Mine and results from small test. Technological and economic indexes, such as leaching rate, acid consumption, leaching cycle, etc. are discussed. The general idea applying the test results to commercial production is presented, too

  7. Experimental study and numerical modelling of geochemical reactions occurring during uranium in situ recovery (ISR) mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Simon, R.

    2011-09-01

    The in situ Recovery (ISR) method consists of ore mining by in situ chemical leaching with acid or alkaline solutions. ISR takes place underground and is therefore limited to the analysis of the pumped solutions, hence ISR mine management is still empirical. Numerical modelling has been considered to achieve more efficient management of this process. Three different phenomena have to be taken into account for numerical simulations of uranium ISR mining: (1) geochemical reactions; (2) the kinetics of these reactions, and (3) hydrodynamic transport with respect to the reaction kinetics. Leaching tests have been conducted on ore samples from an uranium mine in Tortkuduk (Kazakhstan) where ISR is conducted by acid leaching. Two types of leaching experiments were performed: (1) tests in batch reactors; and (2) extraction in flow through columns. The assumptions deduced from the leaching tests were tested and validated by modelling the laboratory experiments with the numerical codes CHESS and HYTEC, both developed at the Geosciences research center of Mines ParisTech. A well-constrained 1D hydrogeochemical transport model of the ISR process at laboratory-scale was proposed. It enables to translate the chemical release sequence that is observed during experiments into a geochemical reaction sequence. It was possible to highlight the controlling factors of uranium dissolution, and the precipitation of secondary mineral phase in the deposit, as well as the determination of the relative importance of these factors. (author)

  8. Application of percolation leaching in Fuzhou uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Lang; Wang Haita; He Jiangming

    2006-01-01

    In order to solve these problems such as high cost by conventional agitation leaching, low permeability and low leaching rate by heap leach, a percolation leaching method was developed. Two-year's production results show that leaching rate of uranium is up to 90% by this method. Compared with conventional agitation leaching, the power, sulfuric acid and lime consumption by the percolation leaching decreased by 60%, 27% and 77% respectively. (authors)

  9. Multiphase simulation of mine waters and aqueous leaching processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajarre Risto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Managing of large amounts of water in mining and mineral processing sites remains a concern in both actively operated and closed mining areas. When the mining site with its metal or concentrate producing units is operational, the challenge is to find either ways for economical processing with maximum yields, while minimizing the environmental impact of the water usage and waste salt treatments. For safe closure of the site, the environmental control of possible drainage will be needed. For both challenges, the present-day multiphase process simulations tools can be used to provide improved accuracy and better economy in controlling the smooth and environmentally sound operation of the plant. One of the pioneering studies in using the multiphase thermodynamic software in simulation of hydrometallurgical processes was that of Koukkari et al. [1]. The study covered the use of Solgasmix equilibrium software for a number of practical acid digesters. The models were made for sulfuric acid treatments in titania pigment production and in NPK fertilizer manufacturing. During the past two decades the extensive data assessment has taken place particularly in geochemistry and a new versions of geochemical multiphase equilibrium software has been developed. On the other hand, there has been some progress in development of the process simulation software in all the aforementioned fields. Thus, the thermodynamic simulation has become a tool of great importance in development of hydrometallurgical processes. The presentation will cover three example cases of either true pilot or industrial systems including a South African acid mine water drainage treatment, hydrometallurgical extraction of rare earths from uranium leachate in Russia and a multistage process simulation of a Finnish heap leaching mine with its subsequent water treatment system.

  10. Commercial experimental on bacteria heap leaching of uranium ore from Caotaobei mining area in Ganzhou uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Baotuan; Meng Yunsheng; Liu Jian; Xiao Jinfeng; Chen Sencai; Cao Jianbo; Wu Yichang; Liu Chengwu

    2002-01-01

    The author presents the result of commercial experiment on bacteria heap leaching of uranium ore from Caotaobei mining area in Ganzhou Uranium Mine and summarizes the heap situation, installation of spraying and sprinkling devices, and operation management of continuous oxidizing tank of bio-membrane. The leaching rate is 92.95% and 91.88% respectively by liquid and residue measurement during 85 d bacterial leaching experiment. The acid consumption is 2.1% and the total liquid-solid ratio is 2.9 m 3 /t. Compared with conventional heap leaching, the time of bacteria heap leaching shorted about 75 d, the acid consumption reduced by 0.35% and the leaching rate improved by 2%. It is an optimize plan to reform the heap leaching technology for Caotaobei ore

  11. Study of lixiviant damage of a sandstone deposit during in-situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Wensheng; Wang Limin; Jiang Yan; Jiang Guoping; Tan Yahui

    2014-01-01

    The permeability of sandstone deposit is a key factor for economical uranium recovery during in-situ leaching uranium. Low permeability sandstone uranium deposits behave low push-pull capacity, and show formation damage in leaching operations. It is important to study formation damage of permeability, therefore, and to stabilize even improve the push-pull power of drillholes during in-situ leaching. In this paper, formation damage caused by lixiviants was investigated based on a low permeability sandstone uranium deposit. The resulted showed that, under the conditions of in-situ leaching, the salinity of leaching fluid has no harm to formation permeability, on the contrary, the increment of salinity of lixiviant during in-situ leaching improve the permeability of the deposit. The alkalinity, hydrogen peroxide and productivity of the lixiviant cause no significant formation damage. But the fine particles in the lixiviant shows formation damage significantly, and the quantity of the particles should be controlled during production. (authors)

  12. Introduction to in situ leaching technique and facility at Smith Ranch uranium project in USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lechang; Wang Delin; Sun Xianrong; Gao Shangxiong

    2005-01-01

    The history of in situ leaching of uranium in USA is reviewed. Some techniques and parameters of alkaline in situ leach at Smith Ranch uranium project are introduced, including well field, sorption, elution, precipitation, filter and drying, automatic control, radiation protection, safety and environmental protection. (authors)

  13. In situ leach method for recovering uranium and related values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, T.Y.

    1981-01-01

    A process is provided for in-situ leaching of uranium from a calcium-containing clay which does not result in contamination of the clay formation by any cations not already present. A lixiviant is prepared by dissolving carbon dioxide into water having essentially the same cationic composition as that of the formation connate water. The solution is injected along with an oxidant, for example oxygen, into the formation. Calcium that has become dissolved in the lixiviant must be removed to control the pH, preferably by the addition of lime in a calcium precipitator. After calcium removal the lixiviant is filtered to remove suspended solids and is passed through an ion exchange resin or other uranium extraction means. The barren solution goes to a mix tank where carbon dioxide is added, and the fresh lixiviant is injected along with additional oxidant into the formation

  14. 77 FR 33782 - License Amendment To Construct and Operate New In Situ Leach Uranium Recovery Facility; Uranium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... and Operate New In Situ Leach Uranium Recovery Facility; Uranium One Americas; Ludeman AGENCY: Nuclear... provided the first time that a document is referenced. The Ludeman facility In Situ Leach Uranium Recovery... request to amend Source Material License SUA-1341 to construct and operate a new in situ leach uranium...

  15. Preparation of ore blocks for mine leaching by reagent explosion injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, YuS

    2017-02-01

    The current drilling-and-blasting operations fail to prepare intact ore body underlying a production horizon for subsequent mining and leaching. It is found that the required preparation quality is possible by means of advanced implementation of ore body discontinuity and filling of the resultant system of joints with active leaching solutions.

  16. The evaluation of in-situ leaching hydrological-geologic condition in a sandstone-type uranium deposits of a low-grade and thick ledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yan

    2014-01-01

    The ore aquifer of a sandstone-type uranium deposits is thick, the grade, and uranium amount per square meter is low. To demonstrate the economic rationality of the in-situ leaching deposit, the Pumping test on the spot, recovery of water levels test, Pumping test and Injection test, Injection test in a Drilling hole, the pumping and injection balance test are carried out. And the hydro geological parameters of mineral aquifer are acquired. The parameters includes coefficient of transmissibility, Coefficient of permeability, Specific discharge of a well and Water injection. Radius of influence etc. The relation between discharge of drilling and Drawdown is researched. The capability of pumping and injection by a drilling hole is determined. The Hydraulic between the aquifer with mineral and the upper and lower aquifer is researched. The reasonable Mining drawdown is testified, the hydrogeological conditions of in-Situ leaching of the mining deposit is found out, this provides necessary parameters and basis for this kind of Situ-leach uranium mining wells, the designing of Spacing of wells, and the economic evaluation of In-situ leaching technology. (author)

  17. In vitro studies evaluating leaching of mercury from mine waste calcine using simulated human body fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John E.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Morman, Suzette A.; Higueras, Pablo L.; Crock, James G.; Lowers, Heather A.; Witten, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro bioaccessibility (IVBA) studies were carried out on samples of mercury (Hg) mine-waste calcine (roasted Hg ore) by leaching with simulated human body fluids. The objective was to estimate potential human exposure to Hg due to inhalation of airborne calcine particulates and hand-to-mouth ingestion of Hg-bearing calcines. Mine waste calcines collected from Hg mines at Almadén, Spain, and Terlingua, Texas, contain Hg sulfide, elemental Hg, and soluble Hg compounds, which constitute primary ore or compounds formed during Hg retorting. Elevated leachate Hg concentrations were found during calcine leaching using a simulated gastric fluid (as much as 6200 μg of Hg leached/g sample). Elevated Hg concentrations were also found in calcine leachates using a simulated lung fluid (as much as 9200 μg of Hg leached/g), serum-based fluid (as much as 1600 μg of Hg leached/g), and water of pH 5 (as much as 880 μg of Hg leached/g). The leaching capacity of Hg is controlled by calcine mineralogy; thus, calcines containing soluble Hg compounds contain higher leachate Hg concentrations. Results indicate that ingestion or inhalation of Hg mine-waste calcine may lead to increased Hg concentrations in the human body, especially through the ingestion pathway.

  18. What's weathering? Mineralogy and field leach studies in mine waste, Leadville and Montezuma mining districts, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, S.F.; Hageman, Phil L.; Smith, Kathleen S.

    2006-01-01

    Weathering is important in the development of rock fabrics that control porosity in mine-waste materials, and in turn, porosity affects metal transport through and from mine-waste piles into watersheds. Mine-waste piles are dynamic physical and chemical systems as evidenced by remnant Fe-oxide boxwork structures after sulfide minerals, development of alteration rinds and etch pits on grains, and precipitation of secondary minerals under low temperature conditions. These microscale changes in the mine-waste materials are the result of partial to total dissolution of sulfide and other minerals. Mine-waste materials from the Dinero, Lower Chatauqua, and Saints John sites, Leadville and Montezuma mining districts, Colorado, exhibit rock fabrics that indicate that weathering products, e.g., Fe oxyhydroxides, jarosite, and clays, have been transported in suspension through the waste piles and deposited in voids and as coatings on rock fragments. Microscale characterization of weathered, partially dissolved minerals lends insight into the source of leachable metals in these mine-waste sites. Mineralogic studies show that galena in the Lower Chatauqua waste is enriched in Ag. Qualitative and semiquantitative microanalysis of weathered, altered galena grains from all three sites show that the Ag-bearing galena is more susceptible to dissolution. It is not surprising, then, that solutions experimentally leached from Lower Chatauqua waste are higher in Pb (2310 ppb) compared to leachates from the Dinero (31 ppb) and Saints John (1360 ppb) wastes. The mobility of metals is increased at acidic pH. Using the USGS Field Leach Test protocol, leachate derived from the Dinero waste has a pH of 3 and high concentrations of Al (443 ppb), Fe (441 ppb), and Zn (7970 ppb). Leachate from Sts. John tailings has a pH about 4 and high concentrations of Mn (1520 ppb), Zn (2240 ppb), and Pb (1360 ppb). Leachate from the Lower Chatauqua waste has an intermediate pH of 5, but in addition to the

  19. The Honeymoon project: Australia`s first in situ leach uranium project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackland, M.C. [Southern Cross Resources Inc. Toowond, QLD (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    The Honeymoon uranium deposit is one of several roll front uranium deposits in South Australia. It was discovered in 1971, the project developed in the 1970`s, and was ready for demonstration of the In Situ Leaching (ISL) production techniques by January 1983, when the project was stopped, despite it having met the environmental approvals to proceed, due to the Australian Labour Party`s `three mines policy`. From 1983 until March 1996 the project was mothballed. In late 1996 Southern Cross Resources Inc. (SCRI) reached agreement with Mount Isa Mining (MIM) to purchase its uranium interests in Honeymoon, Goulds Dam and EL 2310 whilst simultaneously acquiring Sedimentary Holdings NL`s interests in EL 2310. By April 1997 these interests were consolidated in SCRI`s wholly owned subsidiary, Southern Cross Resources Australia Ply Ltd which is the operating company. Activities are presently underway to rehabilitate the existing treatment plant and continue the program that was outlined in the approved 1981 Honeymoon Environmental Impact Statement. 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  20. In Vitro Studies Evaluating Leaching of Mercury from Mine Waste Calcine Using Simulated Human Body Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, John E.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Morman, Suzette A.; Higueras, Pablo L.; Crock, James G.; Lowers, Heather A.; Witten, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro bioaccessibility (IVBA) studies were carried out on samples of mercury (Hg) mine-waste calcine (roasted Hg ore) by leaching with simulated human body fluids. The objective was to estimate potential human exposure to Hg due to inhalation of airborne calcine particulates and hand-to-mouth ingestion of Hg-bearing calcines. Mine waste calcines collected from Hg mines at Almad?n, Spain, and Terlingua, Texas, contain Hg sulfide, elemental Hg, and soluble Hg compounds, which constitute prim...

  1. Remediation of uranium in-situ leaching area at Straz Pod Ralskem, Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vokal, Vojtech; Muzak, Jiri; Ekert, Vladimir [DIAMO, s. e., TUU, Pod Vinici 84, Straz pod Ralskem, 471 27 (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-01

    A large-scale development in exploration and production of uranium ores in the Czech Republic was done in the 2nd half of the 20. century. Many uranium deposits were discovered in the territory of the Czech Republic. One of the most considerable deposits in the Czech Republic is the site Hamr na Jezere - Straz pod Ralskem where both mining methods - the underground mining and the acidic in-situ leaching - were used. The extensive production of uranium led to widespread environmental impacts and contamination of ground waters. Over the period of 'chemical' leaching of uranium (ca. 32 years), a total of more than 4 million tons of sulphuric acid and other chemicals have been injected into the ground. Most of the products (approx. 99.5 %) of the acids reactions with the rocks are located in the Cenomanian aquifer. The contamination of Cenomanian aquifer covers the area larger then 27 km{sup 2}. The influenced volume of groundwater is more than 380 million m{sup 3}. The total amount of dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} is about 3.6 million tons. After 1990 a large-scale environmental program was established and the Czech government decided to liquidate the ISL Mine and start the remediation in 1996. The remediation consists of contaminated groundwater pumping, removing of the contaminants and discharging or reinjection of treated water. Nowadays four main remedial technological installations with sufficient capacity for reaching of the target values of remedial parameters in 2037 are used - the 'Station for Acid Solutions Liquidation No. One', the 'Mother liquor reprocessing' station, the 'Neutralization and Decontamination Station NDS 6' and the 'Neutralization and Decontamination Station NDS 10'. It is expected that the amount of withdrawn contaminants will vary from 80 000 to 120 000 tons per year. Total costs of all remediation activities are expected to be in excess of 2 billion EUR. (authors)

  2. Acid pre-treatment method for in situ ore leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallon, R.G.; Braun, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    An acid leaching method is described for the recovery of a desired element from a subterranean rubblized body of primary ore containing the element and also having associated therewith a carbonate mineral wherein the rubblized ore body is flooded with an aqueous acidic solution in order to release carbon dioxide from the associated carbonate mineral. After a substantial portion of the available carbon dioxide is released and removed from the ore body, as by venting to the atmosphere, an oxidizing gas is introduced into the flooded, rubblized ore to oxidize the ore and form an acid leach solution effective in the presence of the dissolved oxidizing gas to dissolve the ore and cause the desired element to go into solution. The leach solution is then circulated to the surface where the metal values are recovered therefrom

  3. Streamline-concentration balance model for in-situ uranium leaching and site restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bommer, P.M.; Schechter, R.S.; Humenick, M.J.

    1981-03-01

    This work presents two computer models. One describes in-situ uranium leaching and the other describes post leaching site restoration. Both models use a streamline generator to set up the flow field over the reservoir. The leaching model then uses the flow data in a concentration balance along each streamline coupled with the appropriate reaction kinetics to calculate uranium production. The restoration model uses the same procedure except that binary cation exchange is used as the restoring mechanism along each streamline and leaching cation clean up is simulated. The mathematical basis for each model is shown in detail along with the computational schemes used. Finally, the two models have been used with several data sets to point out their capabilities and to illustrate important leaching and restoration parameters and schemes

  4. Streamline-concentration balance model for in situ uranium leaching and site restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bommer, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    This work presents two computer models. One describes in situ uranium leaching and the other describes post leaching site restoration. Both models use a streamline generator to set up the flow field over the reservoir. The leaching model then uses the flow data in a concentration balance along each streamline coupled with the appropriate reaction kinetics to calculate uranium production. The restoration model uses the same procedure ecept that binary cation exchange is used as the restoring mechanism along each streamline and leaching cation clean up is stimulated. The mathematical basis for each model is shown in detail along with the computational schemes used. Finally, the two models have been used with several data sets to point out their capabilities and to illustrate important leaching and restoration parameters and schemes

  5. Process and equipment for in situ ore leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, J.

    1983-01-01

    A solution for the leaching of uranium, cobalt, copper, ... ores is injected then extracted in a recovery well after extraction of the metal the solution is pressurized and oxygenated. During injection the pressure is maintained constant for a maximum oxygenation without bubble formation [fr

  6. Leach-SX-EW copper revalorization from overburden of abandoned copper mine Cerovo, Eastern Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Z.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrometallurgical processes for copper revalorization from overburden of abandoned mine Cerovo in Eastern Serbia were studied. Paper contain results of percolation leaching tests, performed with acidic mine waters accumulated in the bottom of the former open pit, followed by solvent extraction (SX and electrowinning (EW processes on achieved copper pregnant leach solutions. Usage of accumulated waste waters was objected to minimizing the environmental hazard due to uncontrolled leaking of these waters in nearby creeks and rivers. Chemical composition of acidic mine waters used for leaching tests was: (g/dm3: Cu - 0.201; Fe - 0.095; Mn - 0.041; Zn - 0.026; Ni - 0.0004; pH value - 3.3. Copper content in overburden sample used for leaching tests was 0.21% from which 64% were oxide copper minerals. In scope of leaching tests were examined influence of leaching solution pH values and iron (III concentration on copper recovery. It was established that for 120 hours of leaching on pH=1.5 without oxidant agents, copper concentration in pregnant leach solutions enriched up to 1.08g/dm3 which was enough for copper extraction from solution with SX-EW treatment. As extraction reagent in SX circuit was used LIX-984N in a kerosene diluent. Cathode current density in electrowinning cell was 220Am-2 while electrolyte temperature was kept on 50±2oC. Produced cathode copper at the end of SX-EW process has purity of 99.95% Cu.

  7. Acid mine drainage simulated leaching behavior of goethite and cobalt substituted goethite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penprase, S. B.; Kimball, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Though most modern day mining aims to eliminate the seepage of acid mine drainage (AMD) to the local watershed, historical mines regularly receive little to no remediation, and often release acidic, metal-rich drainage and particles to the environment. Treatment of AMD often includes neutralizing pH to facilitate the precipitation of Fe-oxides and dissolved trace metals, thereby forming Trace Metal Substituted (TMS) forms of known minerals, such as goethite (α-FeOOH). The stability of TMS precipitates is not fully understood. As a result, we conducted a 20 day leach experiment using laboratory synthesized pure (Gt) and cobalt-substituted (CoGt) goethites with a dilute ultrapure HCl solution (pH = 3.61) at T = 23.3±2.5ºC. Leached solids were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy paired with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). Leach solutions were sampled for pH and conductivity, and dissolved chemistry was determined with Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Preliminary results indicate Gt and CoGt filtered leach solutions experienced constant pH (Gt = 3.9 ± 0.1, CoGt = 6.8 ± 0.2) and conductivity (Gt = 69 ± 6.6 μS/cm, CoGt = 81 ± 16 μS/cm) for t = 0-20 days. Micro-focused XRD results indicate that leached solids did not change in mineralogy throughout the experiment, and SEM images show minor disintegration along mineral grain edges, but little overall change in shape. Preliminary ICP-MS results show lower dissolved Fe concentrations for CoGt (1.1 ± 1.1 ppb) compared to Gt (17 ± 8.9 ppb) over time. Dissolved Co concentrations ranged from 560 - 830 ppb and increased over time. Compared to leaching of pure Gt, leaching of CoGt generated significantly higher pH, slightly higher conductivity, and significantly less dissolved Fe. During the CoGt leach, Co was preferentially leached over Fe. The differences in leaching behavior between pure and TMS goethite in the laboratory have implications for

  8. Leaching characteristics, ecotoxicity, and risk assessment based management of mine wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Ju, W. J.; Jho, E. H.; Nam, K.; Hong, J. K.

    2016-12-01

    Mine wastes generated during mining activities in metal mines generally contain high concentrations of metals that may impose toxic effects to surrounding environment. Thus, it is necessary to properly assess the mining-impacted landscapes for management. The study investigated leaching characteristics, potential environmental effects, and human health risk of mine wastes from three different metal mines in South Korea (molybdenum mine, lead-zinc mine, and magnetite mine). The heavy metal concentrations in the leachates obtained by using the Korean Standard Test Method for Solid Wastes (STM), Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure (SPLP) met the Korea Waste Control Act and the USEPA region 3 regulatory levels accordingly, even though the mine wastes contained high concentrations of metals. Assuming that the leachates may get into nearby water sources, the leachate toxicity was tested using Daphnia Magna. The toxic unit (TU) values after 24 h and 48 h exposure of all the mine wastes tested met the Korea Allowable Effluent Water Quality Standards (TUwaste may have long-term toxic effects (TU>1 for the eluent at L/S of 30) implying that the long-term effect of mine wastes left in mining areas need to be assessed. Considering reuse of mine wastes as a way of managing mine wastes, the human health risk assessment of reusing the lead-zinc mine waste in industrial areas was carried out using the bioavailable fraction of the heavy metals contained in the mine wastes, which was determined by using the Solubility/Bioavailability Research Consortium method. There may be potential carcinogenic risk (9.7E-05) and non-carcinogenic risk (HI, Hazard Index of 1.0E+00) as CR≧1.0E-05 has carcinogenic risk and HI≧1.0E+00 has non-carcinogenic risk. Overall, this study shows that not only the concentration-based assessment but ecological toxic effect and human health risk based assessments can be utilized for mining

  9. Cross-Comparison of Leaching Strains Isolated from Two Different Regions: Chambishi and Dexing Copper Mines

    OpenAIRE

    Ngom, Baba; Liang, Yili; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-01-01

    A cross-comparison of six strains isolated from two different regions, Chambishi copper mine (Zambia, Africa) and Dexing copper mine (China, Asia), was conducted to study the leaching efficiency of low grade copper ores. The strains belong to the three major species often encountered in bioleaching of copper sulfide ores under mesophilic conditions: Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, and Leptospirillum ferriphilum. Prior to their study in bioleaching, the different...

  10. Model for predicting the restoration of and ammonium migration from in situ mine sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    There are many uranium deposits which are too deep, too poor in quality or too small in extent to be economically strip mined. It now appears that this uranium can be mined using in situ leaching processes. One component of the lixiviant is necessarily a cation and, during the course of mining, the ion exchange sites of the minerals in the mine zone become saturated with this cation. Ammonium is the cation now commonly used. Clearly, any restoration procedure or question involving the rate of cation migration with the groundwater all necessarily involve the process of ion exchange coupled with flow in porous media. The equations describing this process are presented in this paper and numerical solutions obtained. 16 refs

  11. In situ carbonate leaching and recovery of uranium from ore deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunkin, G.G.; Fife, T.P.; Stano, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Uranium is leached from redox roll ore deposits by selective in-situ leaching with a solution of pH 7.4 to 9 (preferably 7.5 to 8.5) containing from about 0.5 to 5g/l of NH 4 HCO 3 and from about 0.1 to 3g/l of peroxide (preferably aqueous H 2 O 2 ), and sufficient NH 3 to maintain the desired pH. The leach solution is then withdrawn from the ore deposit and contacted with a strong base anion exchange material to strip the uranium from the leach solution. The uranium is eluted from the anion exchange material by an aqueous eluant, and the uranium is recovered from the eluate by first acidifying it and then treating it with ammonia to produce a precipitate of relatively pure ammonium diuranate. The content of the three components in the stripped leach solution is adjusted, and then the leach solution is recirculated through the ore deposit. After the uranium ore is removed to the extent economically practicable, the leach solution is replaced with an aqueous reducing solution which when passed into the ore deposit precipitates and renders insoluble any uranium and elements such as vanadium, molybdenum, and selenium. This process produces above ground a very low volume of impurities and waste solutions requiring disposal and does not cause material contamination of the underground deposit or any aquifer associated with the deposit

  12. A study on prediction of uranium concentration in pregnant solution from in-situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Weiping; Zhou Quan; Yu Yunzhen; Wang Shude; Yang Yihan; Lei Qifeng

    2005-01-01

    The modeling course on prediction of uranium concentration in pregnant solution from in-situ leaching of uranium is described, a mathematical model based on grey system theory is put forward, and a set of computer application software is correspondingly developed. (authors)

  13. Hazards and preventive measures of well deviation in well construction of in-situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Wenjie; Chen Shihe

    2006-01-01

    Whether the in-situ leaching method is successful depends on the quality of borehole engineering to a great extent. There are lots of factors that affect the quality, and the well deviation is one of notable problems. The hazards and causes of the well deviation are analyzed. The preventive measures and the methods of rectifying the deviation are put forward. (authors)

  14. New technology of bio-heap leaching uranium ore and its industrial application in Ganzhou uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Baotuan; Meng Yunsheng; Liu Jian; Meng Jin; Li Weicai; Xiao Jinfeng; Chen Sencai; Du Yuhai; Huang Bin

    2006-10-01

    Bioleaching mechanism of uranium ore is discussed. Incubation and selection of new strain, biomembrane oxidizing tank--a kind of new equipment for bacteria culture and oxidation regeneration of leaching agent are also introduced. The results of industrial experiment and industrial production are summarized. Compared with conventional heap leaching, bioleaching period and acid amount are reduced, oxidant and leaching agent are saved, and uranium concentration in leaching solution is increased. It is the first time to realize industrial production by bio-heap leaching in Chinese uranium mine. New equipment-biomembrane oxidizing tank give the basis of bio-heap leaching industrial application. Bio-heap leaching process is an effective technique to reform technique of uranium mine and extract massive low-content uranium ore in China. (authors)

  15. Bicarbonate leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, C.

    1998-01-01

    The alkaline leach process for extracting uranium from uranium ores is reviewed. This process is dependent on the chemistry of uranium and so is independent on the type of mining system (conventional, heap or in-situ) used. Particular reference is made to the geochemical conditions at Crownpoint. Some supporting data from studies using alkaline leach for remediation of uranium-contaminated sites is presented

  16. Bicarbonate leaching of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, C.

    1998-12-31

    The alkaline leach process for extracting uranium from uranium ores is reviewed. This process is dependent on the chemistry of uranium and so is independent on the type of mining system (conventional, heap or in-situ) used. Particular reference is made to the geochemical conditions at Crownpoint. Some supporting data from studies using alkaline leach for remediation of uranium-contaminated sites is presented.

  17. Acid leaching of uranium present in a residue from mining industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braulio, Walace S.; Ladeira, Ana C.Q. [Center for Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. of Mineral Technology

    2011-07-01

    The acid mine drainage is one of the most important environmental problems associated with mining of ores containing sulfides. The treatment of these acid effluents, which contains high concentrations of dissolved metals and anions, is generally by liming. The wastes generated in the liming process may present significant toxicity and their storage in inappropriate places waiting for treatment is a common issue that requires solution. Osamu Utsumi Mine located in the city of Caldas, Minas Gerais, has been facing this problem. The residue of this mine consists of an alkaline sludge generated from the neutralization of the pH of acid mine drainage and is rich in various metals, including uranium. The main concern is the long term stability of this residue, which is in permanent contact with the acid water in the open pit. The recovery of uranium by hydrometallurgical techniques, such as acid leaching, can be a viable alternative on the reuse of this material. This study aimed at establishing a specific leaching process for the recovery of uranium present in the sludge from Caldas uranium mine. Some parameters such as solid/liquid ratio (0.09 to 0.17), time of leaching (1 to 24 hours) and concentration of sulfuric acid (pH from 0 to 3.0) were assessed. The results showed that it is possible to extract 100% of uranium present in the sludge. The concentration of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in the residue was 0.25%, similar to the content of the vein ores which is around 0.20% to 1.0%. The best experimental leaching condition is solid/liquid ratio of 0.17, pH 1.0 and 2 hours of reaction at room temperature (25 deg C). The content of uranium in the liquor is around 440 mgL{sup -1}. The recovery of the uranium from the liquor is under investigation by ionic exchange. (author)

  18. Acid leaching of uranium present in a residue from mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braulio, Walace S.; Ladeira, Ana C.Q.

    2011-01-01

    The acid mine drainage is one of the most important environmental problems associated with mining of ores containing sulfides. The treatment of these acid effluents, which contains high concentrations of dissolved metals and anions, is generally by liming. The wastes generated in the liming process may present significant toxicity and their storage in inappropriate places waiting for treatment is a common issue that requires solution. Osamu Utsumi Mine located in the city of Caldas, Minas Gerais, has been facing this problem. The residue of this mine consists of an alkaline sludge generated from the neutralization of the pH of acid mine drainage and is rich in various metals, including uranium. The main concern is the long term stability of this residue, which is in permanent contact with the acid water in the open pit. The recovery of uranium by hydrometallurgical techniques, such as acid leaching, can be a viable alternative on the reuse of this material. This study aimed at establishing a specific leaching process for the recovery of uranium present in the sludge from Caldas uranium mine. Some parameters such as solid/liquid ratio (0.09 to 0.17), time of leaching (1 to 24 hours) and concentration of sulfuric acid (pH from 0 to 3.0) were assessed. The results showed that it is possible to extract 100% of uranium present in the sludge. The concentration of U 3 O 8 in the residue was 0.25%, similar to the content of the vein ores which is around 0.20% to 1.0%. The best experimental leaching condition is solid/liquid ratio of 0.17, pH 1.0 and 2 hours of reaction at room temperature (25 deg C). The content of uranium in the liquor is around 440 mgL -1 . The recovery of the uranium from the liquor is under investigation by ionic exchange. (author)

  19. A new approach for economic evaluation of in-situ mining ventures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, R.H.; Gray, Z.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a method for evaluating the economic feasibility of solution mining a hypothetical uranium roll-front deposit. It is assumed the wellfield will be operated in a prudent manner and that leaching tests were performed in depth in both lab and field (push-pull) prior to startup. Leach test results are reduced to two important parameters and used as the basis for solution mining a wellfield. This case study assumes a 10 million-lb uranium deposit with 40 possible small wellfields; four are kept in operation simultaneously until the deposit is depleted. The wellfields have different ore reserves and grades, lixiviant circulation rates, leach rates, and peak concentrations, and thus the daily uranium production will vary. Daily production is used to assess the profitability of a particular lixiviant and the mode of wellfield operation in light of realistic market price estimates. The mathematical procedure is simple and straightforward, based on reasonable in-situ leaching relationships as well as accepted accounting practices

  20. Best practice in situ recovery uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, I.B.; McKay, A.D.; Carson, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    The Australian Government policy is to ensure that uranium mining, milling and rehabilitation is based on world best practice standards. A best practice guide for in situ recovery (ISR) uranium mining has been developed to communicate the Australian Government's expectations with a view to achieving greater certainty that ISR mining projects meet Australian Government policy and consistency in the assessment of ISR mine proposals within multiple government regulatory processes. The guide focuses on the main perceived risks; impacts on groundwaters, disposal of mining residues, and radiation protection. World best practice does not amount to a universal template for ISR mining because the characteristics of individual ore bodies determine the best practice. (author)

  1. Small-scale and large-scale testing of photo-electrochemically activated leaching technology in Aprelkovo and Delmachik Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekisov, AG; Lavrov, AYu; Rubtsov, YuI

    2017-02-01

    The paper gives a description of tests and trials of the technology of heap gold leaching from rebellious ore in Aprelkovo and Delmachik Mines. Efficiency of leaching flowsheets with the stage-wise use of activated solutions of different reagents, including active forms of oxygen, is evaluated. Carbonate-peroxide solutions are used at the first stage of leaching to oxidize sulfide and sulfide-arsenide ore minerals to recover iron and copper from them. The second stage leaching uses active cyanide solutions to leach encapsulated and disperse gold and silver.

  2. Bioleaching combined brine leaching of heavy metals from lead-zinc mine tailings: Transformations during the leaching process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Maoyou; Yan, Pingfang; Sun, Shuiyu; Han, Dajian; Xiao, Xiao; Zheng, Li; Huang, Shaosong; Chen, Yun; Zhuang, Shengwei

    2017-02-01

    During the process of bioleaching, lead (Pb) recovery is low. This low recovery is caused by a problem with the bioleaching technique. This research investigated the bioleaching combination of bioleaching with brine leaching to remove heavy metals from lead-zinc mine tailings. The impact of different parameters were studied, including the effects of initial pH (1.5-3.0) and solid concentration (5-20%) for bioleaching, and the effects of sodium chloride (NaCl) concentration (10-200 g/L) and temperature (25 and 50 °C) for brine leaching. Complementary characterization experiments (Sequential extraction, X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electronic microscope (SEM)) were also conducted to explore the transformation of tailings during the leaching process. The results showed that bioleaching efficiency was significantly influenced by initial pH and solid concentration. Approximately 85.45% of iron (Fe), 4.12% of Pb, and 97.85% of zinc (Zn) were recovered through bioleaching in optimum conditions. Increasing the brine concentration and temperature promoted lead recovery. Lead was recovered from the bioleaching residues at a rate of 94.70% at 25 °C and at a rate of 99.46% at 50 °C when the NaCl concentration was 150 g/L. The study showed that bioleaching significantly changed the speciation of heavy metals and the formation and surface morphology of tailings. The metals were mainly bound in stable fractions after bioleaching. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The theory and method of two-well field test for in-situ leaching uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yixuan; Huo Jiandang; Xiang Qiulin; Tang Baobin

    2007-01-01

    Because leaching area in field test for in-situ leaching uranium is not accounted exactly, the reliability of obtaining parameters by calculating can not be ensured, and the whole test needs a long time and great investment. In two-well field test, lixiviant is injected from one well, pregnant solution is pumped out from the other, flow rate of the production well is more than that of the injection well, and uranium is not recoveried. In the case of keeping invariable ratio of pumping capacity to injecting capacity during the testing process, leaching area is not variable, can be exactly calculated. The full field test needs six months to one year. Two-well test is a scientific, rapid, minimal spending field test method, and is widely used in Commonwealth of Independent States. (authors)

  4. Cross-Comparison of Leaching Strains Isolated from Two Different Regions: Chambishi and Dexing Copper Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baba Ngom

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross-comparison of six strains isolated from two different regions, Chambishi copper mine (Zambia, Africa and Dexing copper mine (China, Asia, was conducted to study the leaching efficiency of low grade copper ores. The strains belong to the three major species often encountered in bioleaching of copper sulfide ores under mesophilic conditions: Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, and Leptospirillum ferriphilum. Prior to their study in bioleaching, the different strains were characterized and compared at physiological level. The results revealed that, except for copper tolerance, strains within species presented almost similar physiological traits with slight advantages of Chambishi strains. However, in terms of leaching efficiency, native strains always achieved higher cell density and greater iron and copper extraction rates than the foreign microorganisms. In addition, microbial community analysis revealed that the different mixed cultures shared almost the same profile, and At. ferrooxidans strains always outcompeted the other strains.

  5. Uranium mining and heap leaching in India and related safety measures - A case study of Jajawal mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, V.P.; Verma, S.C.

    2001-01-01

    Exploration and exploitation of uranium involves drilling, mining, milling and extraction processes including heap leaching in some cases. At the exploration stage, the country's laws related to statutory environmental clearance covering forest and sanctuaries or Coastal Regulatory Zones (CRZ) are equally applicable for atomic minerals. At the developmental mining or commercial exploitation stage in addition to the environmental impact assessment, the provisions of Atomic Energy (working of Mines, Minerals and handling of Prescribed Substances) Rules 1984 are also to be followed which covers radiation monitoring, pollution control and other safety measures which are enforced by licensing authorities and the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) of India. In India, Jaduguda, Bhatin, Narwapahar in Singhbhum Thrust Belt (STB), Asthota and Khiya in Siwaliks, Domiasiat in Cretaceous sandstones, Bodal and Jajawal in Precambrian crystallines, are some of the centres where mining has been carried out up to various underground levels. Substantial amount of dust and radon gas are generated during mining and milling operations. Though uranium mining is considered as hazardous for contamination by radionuclides, it is observed that many non-uranium mines have registered up to 100 mWL radon concentration, e.g. copper mines in STB area show up to 900 mewl in a few cases. Compared to this the Uranium mines in India have not shown any increase over the limits prescribed by AERB. Specific problems associated with mining include release of radon and other radioactive pollutants like Th-230, Ra-226, Pb-210 and Po-210, substantial dust generation, ground water contamination, proximity of population to working mines and environmental surveillance. These problems are adequately handled by periodical monitoring of various radiological parameters such as radon daughter working level, long lived alpha activity and concentration of radionuclides in gaseous, liquid and solid medium. Pre

  6. Multipass mining sequence room closures: In situ data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, D.E.; Jones, R.L.; Northrop-Salazar, C.L.; Woerner, S.J.

    1992-12-01

    During the construction of the Thermal/Structural In Situ Test Rooms at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility, measurements of the salt displacements were obtained at very early times, essentially concurrent with the mining activity. This was accomplished by emplacing manually read closure gage stations directly at the mining face, actually between the face and the mining machine, immediately upon mining of the intended gage location. Typically, these mining sequence closure measurements were taken within one hour of mining of the location and within one meter of the mining face. Readings were taken at these gage stations as the multipass mining continued, with the gage station reestablished as each successive mining pass destroyed the earlier gage points. Data reduction yields the displacement history during the mining operation. These early mining sequence closure data, when combined with the later data of the permanently emplaced closure gages, gives the total time-dependent closure displacements of the test rooms. This complete closure history is an essential part of assuring that the in situ test databases will provide an adequate basis for validation of the predictive technology of salt creep behavior, as required by the WIPP technology development program for disposal of radioactive waste in bedded salt

  7. Execution of pilot tests for an uranium in situ leaching project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Urangesellschaft is presently evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of an in situ leaching (ISL) project in Wyoming/USA. This report describes the basic technical principles for ISL-uranium projects and gives the reasons for conducting pilot tests prior to the construction of a commercial plant. It further describes the licensing requirements for an ISL-pilot plant and evaluates the results of the pilot tests. (orig.) [de

  8. Some implications of in situ uranium mining technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, C.E.; Parkhurst, M.A.; Cole, R.J.; Keller, D.; Mellinger, P.J.; Wallace, R.W.

    1980-09-01

    A technology assessment was initiated in March 1979 of the in-situ uranium mining technology. This report explores the impediments to development and deployment of this technology and evaluates the environmental impacts of a generic in-situ facility. The report is divided into the following sections: introduction, technology description, physical environment, institutional and socioeconomic environment, impact assessment, impediments, and conclusions

  9. Si-based technologies for reduction of the pollutant leaching from landfills and mine tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharnikova, E; Matichenkov, V; Jiang, J; Yuejin, C

    2017-07-01

    Monosilicic and polysilicic acids were shown to react with different types of the pollutants. The direction of these reactions can be managed by changing the monosilicic and polysilicic acid concentration in soil or water media. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of Si-treated calcium metallurgical slag and battery slag on the As, Se, Cd, Pb, Ni, Cr, and Hg mobility and bioavailability in mine tailings (Xikuangshan mine, Hunan, China). The results of column experiment showed that the Si-activated slags reduced leaching of As, Se, Cd, Pb, Ni, Cr, and Hg by 13-89% and transformed them into plant-unavailable forms. The greenhouse test has demonstrated that the Si-treated slags provided reinforced plant resistance to heavy metal toxicity and reduced pollutants in barley and pea leaves. Si-treated local solid slags could be used for creating the biogeochemical barriers on the pollutant streams from landfills or mine tailings sites.

  10. Assessment and control of the gold leaching parameters at Kiena Mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschenes, G.; Fulton, M. [CANMET, Mining and Mineral Sciences Labs., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Lafontaine, M. [Kiena Mines, McWatters Mines Inc., Operation Val d' Or, Val d' Or, PQ (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    Kiena Mines process a free milling gold ore containing 4.21 g/t Au, 3.1% pyrite and 0.4% pyrrhotite. The throughput has been increased by 40% by tight control of the leaching parameters. The limiting factor of the process is the retention time in the leach circuit. A study was initiated to evaluate the level of control of parameters (grinding size, dissolved oxygen, pH, free cyanide and lead nitrate) to optimize the circuit efficiency. It was found that oxygen and lead nitrate addition are important to maintain gold extraction, while decreasing processing costs. The results indicated that some control levels could be modified. Some results are discussed in relation to models developed. An implementation strategy was elaborated. A decrease of reagent costs is expected after implementation of these changes. (author)

  11. Assessment and control of the gold leaching parameters at Kiena Mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschenes, G.; Fulton, M.; Lafontaine, M.

    1999-01-01

    Kiena Mines process a free milling gold ore containing 4.21 g/t Au, 3.1% pyrite and 0.4% pyrrhotite. The throughput has been increased by 40% by tight control of the leaching parameters. The limiting factor of the process is the retention time in the leach circuit. A study was initiated to evaluate the level of control of parameters (grinding size, dissolved oxygen, pH, free cyanide and lead nitrate) to optimize the circuit efficiency. It was found that oxygen and lead nitrate addition are important to maintain gold extraction, while decreasing processing costs. The results indicated that some control levels could be modified. Some results are discussed in relation to models developed. An implementation strategy was elaborated. A decrease of reagent costs is expected after implementation of these changes. (author)

  12. Leaching of uranium from the Osamu Utsumi mine wastes, INB Caldas, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Elizangela A.; Ladeira, Ana Claudia Q.

    2009-01-01

    Mining is one of the leading sectors of the Brazilian economy and as any other anthropogenic activity it generates residues that impact the environment directly. The Osamu Utsumi Mine, which belongs to the Nuclear Industries of Brazil (INB), operated from 1982 to 1995 with the activities of mining and metallurgical treatment of the uranium ore. Since then the INB has as a main environmental problem, the generation of acid mine drainage from wastes having its pH around 3. The chemical treatment of this acid water incurs an extremely high cost and generates a precipitate that is rich in some metals, including uranium. This precipitate has been disposed of in the mine opening and has caused an overload of chemical pollutants and radioactive elements in a place that was not planned to receive this volume of residues and does not meet the necessary condition for the construction of a repository. The content of uranium in the precipitate is approximately 0.25% - similar to the content of the metal found in the ore in the Caetite Mine (BA) - around 0.29%. The recovery of this uranium from the precipitate would generate a total of 150 tons of U 3 O 8 . In the present study an alkaline leaching process was carried out aiming at recovering the uranium from sludge samples disposed of for over 20 years. Sodium carbonate and bicarbonate were used as the leaching agents. The experiments were carried out by varying the concentrations of the leaching agents, extraction time and the solid percentage. The other parameters such as temperature, particle size and agitation were kept constant. The results showed that the recovery of the uranium can reach 100% in 24 hours. The uranium concentration in the solutions is around 250 mg.L -1 when using 10% of solids. Preliminary results showed that the recovery of uranium from the sludge would be a feasible practice. The conversion of an environmental liability into a valuable product is one of the most important objectives of this work

  13. Recovery of tungsten from wolframite from the Igarape Manteiga mine (Rondonia - Brazil) via acidic leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulino, Jessica Frontino; Afonso, Julio Carlos; Mantovano, Jose Luiz; Vianna, Claudio Augusto; Cunha, Jose Waldemar Silva Dias da

    2012-01-01

    We report results of the efficiency of tungsten extraction from wolframite concentrate (containing 61.5 wt % WO 3 ) from the Igarape Manteiga mine (state of Rondonia, Brazil) through acid leaching with strong mineral acids at 100 deg C and 400 rpm for 2-4 h. HCl yielded insoluble matter containing the highest WO 3 content (90 wt %). This solid was dissolved in concentrated NH 3(aq) at 25 deg C and the insoluble matter filtrated. The filtrate was slowly evaporated. 70 wt % of the tungsten present in the starting concentrate material was recovered as ammonium paratungstate (APT). (author)

  14. Recovery of uranium from uranium mine waters and copper ore leaching solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, D R; Ross, J R [Salt Lake City Metallurgy Research Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1967-06-15

    Waters pumped from uranium mines in New Mexico are processed by ion exchange to recover uranium. Production is approximately 200 lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8}/d from waters containing 5 to 15 ppm U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Recoveries range from 80 to 90%. Processing plants are described. Uranium has been found in the solutions resulting from the leaching of copper-bearing waste rock at most of the major copper mines in western United States. These solutions, which are processed on a very large scale for recovery of copper, contain 2 to 12 ppm U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Currently, uranium is not being recovered, but a potential production of up to 6000 lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8}/d is indicated. Ion exchange and solvent extraction research studies are described. (author)

  15. Policy for metal leaching and acid rock drainage at mine sites in British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    One of the major environmental issues facing the provincial government of British Columbia is the prevention of environmental impacts from metal leaching and acid rock drainage (ML/ARD). The government's major challenge in regulating ML/ARD is to ensure that all mines are planned and operated in a manner that allows for effective problem detection and mitigation, and that the mines emphasize problem prevention at the outset. This paper reviews the legislated requirements regarding ML/ARD prevention and lists guiding principles for the regulation of ML/ARD in the province. Some of the measures to predict and to mitigate ML/ARD include underwater storage of problematic materials, engineered covers, blending of wastes and drainage collection and treatment. Requirements applicable to construction materials, backfill, geotechnical and hydrological considerations, and security of funds for ML/ARD measures are also discussed

  16. Method of repair of short circuits for in-situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baughman, D.R.; Bergeson, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    In an acidic in-situ leaching system, a short circuit passage through a subterranean formation between a fracture associated with an injection well and a fracture associated with a production well can be plugged by introducing a non-acidic liquid for displacing acidic leach liquid from the short circuit passage, introducing into the injection well a basic composition including a sealing material that gels under acidic conditions, and introducing sufficient liquid into the injection well to displace at least a portion of the basic composition containing sealing material from the injection well into the short circuit passage. Liquid flow between the injection well and the production well is then discontinued for a sufficient time for residual acid in the subterranean formation surrounding the short circuit passage to contact the sealing material and cause gelation of the sealing material in the short circuit passage. The introduction of acidic leach liquid to the formation can then continue. The sealing material may be a polymer or a water soluble silicate

  17. In-situ leaching of crownpoint, NM, uranium ore: Part 7 - Laboratory study of chemical agents for molybdenum restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, E.T.; Vogt, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    One possible drawback to the use of an in-situ leaching to recover uranium is the potential release of previously insoluble chemical species into the formation water. Before a pilot test of in-situ uranium leaching at Crownpoint, NM, was begun, extensive laboratory studies were undertaken to develop chemical methods for treating one possible contaminant, molybdenum (Mo). New Mexico regulations restrict the amount of Mo permissable in formation waters after leaching to less than 1 ppm. Two techniques to restore Mo after leaching were studied with core and pack tests. These studies suggest that if Mo restoration problems occur in the field, the use of precipitating agents such as Ca/sup 2+/ or reducing agents such as Fe/sup 2+/ may be helpful in ameliorating such problems

  18. Microbial communities associated with uranium in-situ recovery mining process are related to acid mine drainage assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coral, Thomas; Descostes, Michaël; De Boissezon, Hélène; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; de Alencastro, Luiz Felippe; Rossi, Pierre

    2018-07-01

    A large fraction (47%) of the world's uranium is mined by a technique called "In Situ Recovery" (ISR). This mining technique involves the injection of a leaching fluid (acidic or alkaline) into a uranium-bearing aquifer and the pumping of the resulting solution through cation exchange columns for the recovery of dissolved uranium. The present study reports the in-depth alterations brought to autochthonous microbial communities during acidic ISR activities. Water samples were collected from a uranium roll-front deposit that is part of an ISR mine in operation (Tortkuduk, Kazakhstan). Water samples were obtained at a depth of ca 500 m below ground level from several zones of the Uyuk aquifer following the natural redox zonation inherited from the roll front deposit, including the native mineralized orebody and both upstream and downstream adjacent locations. Samples were collected equally from both the entrance and the exit of the uranium concentration plant. Next-generation sequencing data showed that the redox gradient shaped the community structures, within the anaerobic, reduced, and oligotrophic habitats of the native aquifer zones. Acid injection induced drastic changes in the structures of these communities, with a large decrease in both cell numbers and diversity. Communities present in the acidified (pH values acid mine drainage, with the dominance of Sulfobacillus sp., Leptospirillum sp. and Acidithiobacillus sp., as well as the archaean Ferroplasma sp. Communities located up- and downstream of the mineralized zone under ISR and affected by acidic fluids were blended with additional facultative anaerobic and acidophilic microorganisms. These mixed biomes may be suitable communities for the natural attenuation of ISR mining-affected subsurface through the reduction of metals and sulfate. Assessing the effect of acidification on the microbial community is critical to evaluating the potential for natural attenuation or active bioremediation strategies

  19. Application of bacterial leaching technology to deep solution-mining conditions for uranium extraction. Final report, September 1, 1978-September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brierley, J.A.; Brierley, C.L.; Torma, A.E.

    1982-03-01

    Microorganisms were evaluated for use in recovery of uranium under conditions of in-situ solution mining. The cultures tested were Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, the faculative-thermophilic TH3 strain, and two Sulfolobus species. Growth of the organisms occurred in the presence of 0.34 to 5.0 mM uranyl ion with higher concentrations being inhibitory. Uranium ore from the Anaconda Minerals Co. Jackpile mine was not readily leachable by microorganisms. To support bacterial activity the ore was supplemented with pyrite or ferrous iron. The ore possessed some toxic properties. T. ferrooxidans was able to assist in leaching of uranium from the ore at a hydrostatic pressure of 10.3 MPa

  20. Metal leaching in mine tailings: short-term impact of biochar and wood ash amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchemin, Suzanne; Clemente, Joyce S; MacKinnon, Ted; Tisch, Bryan; Lastra, Rolando; Smith, Derek; Kwong, John

    2015-01-01

    Biochar is perceived as a promising amendment to reclaim degraded, metal-contaminated lands. The objective of this study was to compare the potential of biochar and wood ash amendments to reduce metal(loid) leaching in mine tailings. A 2-mo leaching experiment was conducted in duplicate on acidic and alkaline tailings, each mixed with 5 wt.% of one of the following amendments: three wood-derived, fast-pyrolysis biochars (OC > 57 wt.%) and two wood ash materials (organic carbon [OC] ≤ 16 wt.%); a control test with no carbon input was also added. The columns were leached with water after 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64 d, and the leachates were monitored for dissolved metals, OC, and pH. For the acidic and alkaline tailings, the most significant impact on metal mobility was observed with wood ash materials due to their greater neutralization potential (>15% CaCO eq.) compared with biochar (≤3.3% CaCO eq.). An increase of 1 pH unit in the wood ash-treated alkaline tailings led to an undesirable mobilization of As and Se. The addition of biochar did not significantly reduce the leaching of the main contaminants (Cu and Ni in the acidic tailings and As in the alkaline tailings) over 2 mo. The Se attenuation noted in some biochar-treated acid tailings may be mainly due to a slight alkaline effect rather than Se removal by biochar, given the low capacity for the fresh biochars to retain Se under acidic conditions (pH 4.5). The increased loss of dissolved OC in the biochar-amended systems was of short duration and was not associated with metal(loid) mobilization. Copyright © Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

  1. Some implications of in situ uranium mining technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, C.E.; Parkhurst, M.A.; Cole, R.J.; Keller, D.; Mellinger, P.J.; Wallace, R.W.

    1980-09-01

    The assessment indicates that there do not appear to be any significant demonstrated negative environmental impacts. Moreover, the impacts of in situ mining compare favorably with those impacts expected from conventional mining techniques. Exposure to radioactive elements is less, atmospheric emissions of radioactive and nonradioactive materials are generally less and socioeconomic impacts are decreased. In fact, because of the generally small and unskilled labor forces associated with in-situ mining, development has provided much needed economic stimulus to economically depressed areas of Texas. There are still, however, several areas of unknowns and several areas of inadequate information that will need to be addressed before a complete quantification evaluation of impacts can be made. These areas include levels of radon emissions and groundwater restoration methods and impacts. Several issues mostly relating to the interaction of industry with state and Federal regulators need to be addressed

  2. Performance of waste-based amendments to reduce metal release from mine tailings: One-year leaching behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Luis; Gómez, Rocío; Sánchez, Virtudes; Villaseñor, José; Alonso-Azcárate, Jacinto

    2018-03-01

    A one-year leaching experiment has been conducted in order to assess the effectiveness of several amendments on metal immobilization in mine tailings from an old Pb/Zn mining area of Central Spain (San Quintín mine). Demineralized water was used as leaching solution, selecting doses equivalent to the annual rainfall conditions of the studied area. Columns with mine tailings without any amendment and others treated with 10% of sugar foam (SF), 15% of drinking water treatment sludge (DWS), 30% of paper mill sludge (PMS) and 15% of olive mill waste (OMW) were used. SF, DWS and PMS amendments increased the pH of leachates from values of approximately 4 to around neutrality. Additionally, the release of sulfate ions from the oxidation of pyritic residues was decreased in some extent by SF and DWS amendments. Metal leaching was effectively reduced by the amendments reaching overall decreases with respect to the unamended columns of 79-96% for Pb, 36-100% for Zn, 50-99% for Cu and 44-100% for Cd. The effect of the amendments in leachate pH, sulfate concentration and metal release from mine tailings was kept throughout the whole experimental period. Our results showed that the application of different organic and inorganic amendments based on by-products and waste materials may be a feasible alternative for the restoration of soils around abandoned metal mines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cost of producing U3O8 from ammonium bicarbonate in situ leach solution by the multiple-compartment ion-exchange system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, M.; Dolezal, H.

    1979-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines estimated the cost for a uranium ion-exchange recovery system using five grades of U 3 O 8 leach solution producing 815,570 pounds of U 3 O 8 per year from an ammonium bicarbonate in situ leach solution. The system flowsheet consisted of four unit operations: (1) Multiple-compartment ion-exchange (MCIX) absorption; (2) MCIX elution; (3) precipitation of the uranium as yellow cake, filtering, calcining, and packaging; and (4) waste disposal. The total fixed capital cost of a system treating 2,000 gallons per minute of 0.1-gram-per-liter-U 3 O 8 leach solution was estimated as $6,888,000. For a basic case of an MCIX system depreciating in 9 years, unit production cost of U 3 O 8 was $3.51 per pound. A decrease in feed solution grade from 0.4 to 0.03 gram per liter increased the production cost exponentially. Shorter depreciating periods significantly increased the production cost particularly for the lower grade feed solutions

  4. The mathematical models of solution mining and case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, R.H.; Waskovsky, J.; Wang Xiwen; Wang Haifeng

    1991-01-01

    The mathematical model of parameters which describe solution mining and the principle of ore leaching are presented theoretically and thoroughly with the emphasis on in-situ leaching with a biolixiviant, furthermore, the example of bioleach mining, or biomining, in an abandoned underground copper mine is discussed

  5. Determination of Leacheability of U, Th and Heavy Metals of Water Leached Purification (WLP) Residue and Soil from Bauxite Mining Area using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Aminah Omar; Suhaimi Hamzah; Shamsiah Abdul Rahman

    2016-01-01

    The study was conducted to analyse the leachability of U, Th and heavy metals Cu, Cd, As, Pb, Mn, Zn, Ba, Se, Cr and Fe of water leached purification (WLP) residue gathered from Lynas Malaysia Sdn Bhd and soil from bauxite mining area, Kuantan. Their toxicity was assessed using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. The concentration of the elements studied was analysed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results from the analysis indicated that the concentrations for all the elements studied in this project are well below than the TCLP regulatory limit. The concentrations of U and Th in leached solution were between 0.01 - 0.20 Bq/ kg. The concentrations of the multi elements were mostly between 0.02 - 1471 μg/ l, but certain elements such as Fe had concentration as high as 4707 μg/ l. Hence, it can be concluded that the WLP residue from Lynas and soil from bauxite mining area are very stable in the environment and does not pose any environmental problem. (author)

  6. Geothermal in situ experiments in the Asse salt-mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopietz, J.; Jung, R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents design and results of in situ experiments carried out by the Bundesanstat fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, F.R. of Germany) in the Asse salt-mine. With reference to model calculations of the temperature field which is produced in salt formations by radioactive waste, temperature measurements in the area of electrical heating elements and in situ measurements of thermal conductivity have been performed. The measured temperatures are in good accordance with the theoretical prediction. Preliminary results of the thermal conductivity measurements correspond with the data of single NaCl crystals published by Birch and Clark. At present a heating experiment is being conducted in the Asse mine to investigate thermo-mechanical effects of a cylindrical heat source upon the surrounding rock salt. Possible thermal induced fractures monitored by permeability changes and seismoacoustical phenomena are the main objects of this experiment

  7. The fate of cyanide in leach wastes at gold mines: An environmental perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper reviews the fate of cyanide in mineral processing wastes at gold mines. • Ore leaching produces numerous cyanide-containing species besides the gold complex. • Many cyanide species are eliminated or sequestered naturally over time. • Sequestered cyanide can be remobilized if conditions change. • Toxicity of released solutions can be reduced by photolytic reactions or offgassing. - Abstract: This paper reviews the basic chemistry of cyanide, methods by which cyanide can be analyzed, and aspects of cyanide behavior that are most relevant to environmental considerations at mineral processing operations associated with gold mines. The emphasis is on research results reported since 1999 and on data gathered for a series of U.S. Geological Survey studies that began in the late 1990s. Cyanide is added to process solutions as the CN − anion, but ore leaching produces numerous other cyanide-containing and cyanide-related species in addition to the desired cyanocomplex of gold. These can include hydrogen cyanide (HCN); cyanometallic complexes of iron, copper, zinc, nickel, and many other metals; cyanate (CNO − ); and thiocyanate (SCN − ). The fate of these species in solid wastes and residual process solutions that remain once gold recovery activities are terminated and in any water that moves beyond the ore processing facility dictates the degree to which cyanide poses a risk to aquatic organisms and aquatic-dependent organisms in the local environment. Cyanide-containing and cyanide-related species are subject to attenuation mechanisms that lead to dispersal to the atmosphere, chemical transformation to other carbon and nitrogen species, or sequestration as cyanometallic precipitates or adsorbed species on mineral surfaces. Dispersal to the atmosphere and chemical transformation amount to permanent elimination of cyanide, whereas sequestration amounts to storage of cyanide in locations from which it can potentially be remobilized by

  8. A review on in situ phytoremediation of mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Ji, Bin; Hu, Yuehua; Liu, Runqing; Sun, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Mine tailings are detrimental to natural plant growth due to their physicochemical characteristics, such as high pH, high salinity, low water retention capacity, high heavy metal concentrations, and deficiencies in soil organic matter and fertility. Thus, the remediation of mine tailings has become a key issue in environmental science and engineering. Phytoremediation, an in situ cost-effective technology, is emerging as the most promising remediation method for mine tailings by introducing tolerant plant species. It is particularly effective in dealing with large-area mine tailings with shallow contamination of organic, nutrient and metal pollutants. In this review, the background, concepts and applications of phytoremediation are comprehensively discussed. Furthermore, proper amendments used to improve the physical, chemical and biological properties of mine tailings are systematically reviewed and compared. Emphasis is placed on the types and characteristics of tolerant plants and their role in phytoremediation. Moreover, the role of microorganisms and their mechanism in phytoremediation are also discussed in-depth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. In-situ leaching of Crownpoint, New Mexico, uranium ore: Part 7 - laboratory study of chemical agents for molybdenum restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, E.T.; Vogt, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    While in-situ leaching has significant advantages over conventional uranium recovery methods, one possible drawback to its use is the potential release of previously insoluble chemical species into the formation water. Before Mobil began a pilot test of in-situ uranium leaching at Crownpoint, New Mexico, extensive laboratory studies were undertaken to develop chemical methods for treating one possible contaminant, molybdenum (Mo). In-situ production of uranium entails oxidizing uranium from the insoluble +4 oxidation state to the soluble, readily complexed +6 state. However, this process also transforms insoluble Mo +4 compounds such as molybdenite or jordesite, MoS 2 , into the soluble T6 form, molybdate, Mo0 4 2- . New Mexico regulations restrict the amount of Mo permissible in formation waters after leaching to less than one ppm. Conceptually, Mo restoration after leaching can be dealt with in one of two ways. (1) The oxidizing environment can be left unchanged with something added to render the molybdate ion insoluble or (2) the environment can be changed to a reducing one, converting the Mo back to the less soluble +4 oxidation state

  10. A case study of shrinkage-in place leaching of low grade uranium ore deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Dexin; Zhou Guohe

    1998-09-01

    A case study of shrinkage-in place leaching of low grade uranium ore deposit is dealt with. A test block was selected, and the shrinkage mining method was employed to construct the in place heap for leaching. Blast parameters and operations were carefully tried in order to make sure that the fragment size composition was adequate for leaching. A leaching system was planned and the corresponding leaching parameters were tried, too. The results show that the shrinkage method and the parameters for blasting and leaching are all adequate for the in-situ leaching of the blasted ore. This shrinkage-in place leaching system combines the mining and metallurgy processes into one and produces a lot of profits and could be applicable to many low grade uranium ore deposits which are so hard and compact that they have to be fragmented before being leached

  11. Bio-chemical remediation of under-ground water contaminated by uranium in-situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qingliang; Li Qian; Zhang Hongcan; Hu Eming; Chen Yongbo

    2014-01-01

    In the process of uranium in-situ leaching, it was serious that strong acid, uranium and heavy metals, and SO_4"2"-, NO_3"- could contaminate underground water. To remedy these pollutants, conventional methods are high-cost and low-efficient, so a bio-chemical remediation method was proposed to cope with the under-ground water pollution in this study. The results showed, in the chemical treatment with Ca(OH)_2 neutralization, pH went up from 2.0 to 7.0, the removal rates of U, Mn"2"+, Zn"2"+, Pb"2"+, SO_4"2"-, NO_3"- were 91.5%, 78.3%, 85.1%, 100%, 71.4% and 2.6% respectively, SO_4"2"- and NO_3"- need to be treated again by bio-method. In the biological process, the Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) of bioreactor was controlled at 42 h, and 100% NO_3"- and 70% SO_4"2"- in the contaminated water were removed; Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. f) liquid to H_2S showed better absorption effect, can fully meet the process requirements of H_2S removal. (authors)

  12. The fate of cyanide in leach wastes at gold mines: an environmental perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the basic chemistry of cyanide, methods by which cyanide can be analyzed, and aspects of cyanide behavior that are most relevant to environmental considerations at mineral processing operations associated with gold mines. The emphasis is on research results reported since 1999 and on data gathered for a series of U.S. Geological Survey studies that began in the late 1990s. Cyanide is added to process solutions as the CN− anion, but ore leaching produces numerous other cyanide-containing and cyanide-related species in addition to the desired cyanocomplex of gold. These can include hydrogen cyanide (HCN); cyanometallic complexes of iron, copper, zinc, nickel, and many other metals; cyanate (CNO−); and thiocyanate (SCN−). The fate of these species in solid wastes and residual process solutions that remain once gold recovery activities are terminated and in any water that moves beyond the ore processing facility dictates the degree to which cyanide poses a risk to aquatic organisms and aquatic-dependent organisms in the local environment.

  13. Solution mining economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunkin, G.G.

    1980-01-01

    The field of application of in-situ solution mining of uranium is described and areas of competition with open pit and underground mining identified. The influence of high interest rates and dollar inflation on present values and rate of return is shown to be minimized by low capitalization and short construction lead times typical of in-situ leaching ventures. A scheme of three major project account divisions is presented and basic parameters necessary for mine planning are listed. 1979 cost ranges and useful methods of estimation of capital and operating costs are given for the in-situ uranium mining method

  14. Role of oxidizing agent in the chemistry of in-situ uranium leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.H.; Norris, R.D.; Schellinger, R.

    1982-01-01

    Synthetic two-component mixtures (uraninite and iron sulfide) as well as native uranium ores obtained from Texas and Wyoming have been examined. Physical/chemical ore properties are correlated with observed laboratory leach response. Data show a large inherent selectivity of oxidant for uranium in the early stages of a leach period. Uranium head grade was found to increase in a nearly linear fashion with hydrogen peroxide concentration in the leach solution. As uranium in the ore is depleted, uranium response decreases and the oxidant serves mainly to leach iron sulfide gangue material. 6 refs

  15. Exploration for in situ leach amenable sandstone uranium deposits and their impact on the environment in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weixing

    2002-01-01

    Taking the No. 512 uranium deposit in YiLi Basin, Xinjiang as an example, this paper describes the ore-forming geological settings of inter-layer oxidizing zone roll-front type of ISL amenable uranium deposits. It also summarizes the different exploration methods used during various stages of exploration. The paper also introduces the Dabu uranium deposit in Taoshan, Jiangxi, which is amenable to the in-place-leach mining method. It probes into the possibilities for transforming non-economic and sub-economic uranium deposits into economical and minable ones. In addition, the paper emphasizes that ISL uranium mining, when compared with conventional mining, plays an active role in reducing environmental contamination and restoring ecological balance. (author)

  16. Comparison of three-stage sequential extraction and toxicity characteristic leaching tests to evaluate metal mobility in mining wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margui, E.; Salvado, V.; Queralt, I.; Hidalgo, M.

    2004-01-01

    Abandoned mining sites contain residues from ore processing operations that are characterised by high concentrations of heavy metals. The form in which a metal exists strongly influences its mobility and, thus, the effects on the environment. Operational methods of speciation analysis, such as the use of sequential extraction procedures, are commonly applied. In this work, the modified three-stage sequential extraction procedure proposed by the BCR (now the Standards, Measurements and Testing Programme) was applied for the fractionation of Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd in mining wastes from old Pb-Zn mining areas located in the Val d'Aran (NE Spain) and Cartagena (SE Spain). Analyses of the extracts were performed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The procedure was evaluated by using a certified reference material, BCR-701. The results of the partitioning study indicate that more easily mobilised forms (acid exchangeable) were predominant for Cd and Zn, particularly in the sample from Cartagena. In contrast, the largest amount of lead was associated with the iron and manganese oxide fractions. On the other hand, the applicability of lixiviation tests commonly used to evaluate the leaching of toxic species from landfill disposal (US-EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and DIN 38414-S4) to mining wastes was also investigated and the obtained results compared with the information on metal mobility derivable from the application of the three-stage sequential extraction procedure

  17. Leaching of selected metals from a landfill of the closed down Siersza coal mine in Trzebinia (S Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kicińska Alicja

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Landfills of waste generated by coal mining could pose a serious environmental threat if not properly reclaimed. The study focuses on leaching select heavy metals from the waste disposed of by the closed down Siersza hard coal mine in Trzebinia (Silesian- Cracow area. The solid waste samples were analysed with the X-ray fluorescence (XRF method for Zn, Pb, Cd, Mn and Fe contents. The eluates were obtained by leaching the solid samples with distilled water at the ratio 1:10 and analysed with the atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS method. The most prone for leaching were Mn and Zn (78 and 73% of the total contents, the medium prone Pb and Cd (around 50% each, and the least prone Fe (30%. In the western part of the landfill, zinc occurs in unexpectedly high amounts (0.64-3.3 wt.%, which may be related to the presence of slag of unknown provenience. The concentrations of Zn, Pb and Cd (averages in mg∙kg−1: 6727, 2.3 and 10.3, respectively in the leachates exceed the limits of Polish environmental standards. The landfill should be properly monitored and fully reclaimed.

  18. Stabilization of fine fraction from landfill mining in anaerobic and aerobic laboratory leach bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönkäre, Tiina J; Palmroth, Marja R T; Rintala, Jukka A

    2015-11-01

    Fine fraction (FF, mined landfill was stabilized in four laboratory-scale leach bed reactors (LBR) over 180 days. The aim was to study feasibility of biotechnological methods to treat FF and if further stabilization of FF is possible. Four different stabilization methods were compared and their effects upon quality of FF were evaluated. Also during the stabilization experiment, leachate quality as well as gas composition and quantity were analyzed. The methods studied included three anaerobic LBRs (one without water addition, one with water addition, and one with leachate recirculation) and one aerobic LBR (with water addition). During the experiment, the most methane was produced in anaerobic LBR without water addition (18.0 L CH4/kg VS), while water addition and leachate recirculation depressed methane production slightly, to 16.1 and 16.4 L CH4/kg VS, respectively. Organic matter was also removed via the leachate and was measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD). Calculated removal of organic matter in gas and leachate was highest in LBR with water addition (59 g COD/kg VS), compared with LBR without water addition or with leachate recirculation (51 g COD/kg VS). Concentrations of COD, ammonium nitrogen and anions in leachate decreased during the experiment, indicating washout mechanism caused by water additions. Aeration increased sulfate and nitrate concentrations in leachate due to oxidized sulfide and ammonium. Molecular weight distributions of leachates showed that all the size categories decreased, especially low molecular weight compounds, which were reduced the most. Aerobic stabilization resulted in the lowest final VS/TS (13.1%), lowest respiration activity (0.9-1.2 mg O2/g TS), and lowest methane production after treatment (0.0-0.8 L CH4/kg VS), with 29% of VS being removed from FF. Anaerobic stabilization methods also reduced organic matter by 9-20% compared with the initial amount. Stabilization reduced the quantity of soluble nitrogen in FF and did

  19. Guide lines for control and supervision of dump leaching. Application to the inframarginal uranium ore of the Cellier mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineau, J.L.; Yvon, J.; Blazy, P.

    1984-01-01

    The Cellier mine processes inframarginal uranium ores by a slow dump leaching. Fragmentary information concerning the evolution of the chemical properties of the solutions (inflow-outflow) as a function of the time has been the object of an analysis of data. The latter, which was both descriptive and predictive, made it possible on the one hand to identify facts which have intervened at the time of leaching and on the other hand to pinpoint the influence of the time factor and of the associations of chemical elements (aluminium, phosphorus, etc.) on the passing into solution of the uranium. As this treatment gives only a global view of the problem, it was completed by a mineralogical analysis. The fine mineralogical analysis of the fractions, made soluble by sulphuric attack in a heap, shows that sulphated concretions isolate the uranium from the leaching liquor. A screen of sulphate is composed of a macroscopic web of gypsum (calcium sulphate) in which a microscopic web of hydrated magnesium sulphate is inserted. In the gypsum web are trapped phosphorus minerals and in the magnesium sulphate web manganese and aluminium minerals. As regards the uranium, it is either distributed in the form of fine inclusions of uranyl hydroxide, or associated to chlorinated forms, derived from the treatment aids [fr

  20. Reliable practical technique for in-situ rock stress measurements in deep gold mines.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stacey, TR

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The proposed primary output of this research project is the development of a set of equipment and method of in situ stress measurements in a high stress environment typical of the deep level gold mines....

  1. Research of leaching of disseminated copper-nickel ores in their interaction with mine waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlov A. V.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A great amount of mine waste creates serious problems for economy and ecology in mining regions. Keeping of dumps and tailings storages requires huge capital costs and material inputs. Removal of overburden volumes cause ecological disequilibrium, ingress of chemical agents and heavy metals in ground and surface water have an adverse influence on eco-systems and human health. These hazards are particularly high under extreme climatic conditions, when mines create vast desert lands around themselves. Foreign researchers use the terms "acid mine drainage" (AМD and "acid rock drainage" (ARD when speaking on mine water oxidation and contamination of the environment with heavy metals. AMD is induced by underground mine drainage, natural sulfide-bearing rock exposures, etc. The processes occurring in the interaction the mine water with fine dust particles, as well as water filtering through the thick sulfide rocks have been studied. It has been shown that the reduction in potential environmental hazard of mine water of JSC "Kola MMC" is achieved through precipitation of heavy metals by iron hydroxide and magnesium hydrosilicate. Preliminary assessment of the feasibility of hydrometallurgical processing of disseminated copper-nickel ores has been made

  2. Exploitation by in-situ leaching of an uranium deposit in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belieres, M.

    2006-01-01

    ISL is a process allowing recovery of valuable metal from a low grade deposit without mining operation. Geological and physical conditions are very strict. The reagent used may be alkaline (mixture of alkaline carbonate and bicarbonate) or acid (sulfuric acid).The paper describes such an operation in Kazakhstan, pointing out the preliminary studies, pilot operations and industrial operation starting up and explains the specific difficulties due to the environment and the remoteness of the mine site. (author)

  3. Recovery of uranium from copper leaching solutions from the South Chuquicamata mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andalaft, N.; Soto, R.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with the recovery of uranium from copper leaching solutions containing between 10 and 18 ppm U 3 O 8 . The study, which covers a laboratory stage and a pilot plant stage, has shown the technical feasibility of producing yellow cake with U 3 O 8 contents of between 13 and 20% by direct precipitation of eluates which, when purified in the laboratory, have contained up to some 85% U 3 O 8 . (author)

  4. Application of Response Surface Methodology on Leaching of Iron from Partially Laterised Khondalite Rocks: A Bauxite Mining Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Ranjita; Bhima Rao, R.

    2018-04-01

    In the present investigation, response surface methodology (RSM) is used for a quadratic model that continuously controls the process parameters. This model is used to optimize the removal of iron oxide from Partially Laterised Khondalite (PLK) rocks which is influenced by several independent variables namely acid concentration, time and temperature. Second order response functions are produced for leaching of iron oxide from PLK rocks-a bauxite mining waste. In RSM, Box-Behnken design is used for the process optimization to achieve maximum removal of iron oxide. The influence of the process variables of leaching of iron oxide is presented in the form of 3-D response graphs. The results of this investigation reveals that 3 M hydrochloric acid concentration, 240 min time and 373 K temperature are found to be the best conditions for removal of 99% Fe2O3. The product obtain at this condition contain 80% brightness which is suitable for ceramic and filler industry applications. The novelity of the work is that the waste can be a value added product after suitable physical beneficiation and chemical treatment.

  5. Application of Response Surface Methodology on Leaching of Iron from Partially Laterised Khondalite Rocks: A Bauxite Mining Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Ranjita; Bhima Rao, R.

    2017-08-01

    In the present investigation, response surface methodology (RSM) is used for a quadratic model that continuously controls the process parameters. This model is used to optimize the removal of iron oxide from Partially Laterised Khondalite (PLK) rocks which is influenced by several independent variables namely acid concentration, time and temperature. Second order response functions are produced for leaching of iron oxide from PLK rocks-a bauxite mining waste. In RSM, Box-Behnken design is used for the process optimization to achieve maximum removal of iron oxide. The influence of the process variables of leaching of iron oxide is presented in the form of 3-D response graphs. The results of this investigation reveals that 3 M hydrochloric acid concentration, 240 min time and 373 K temperature are found to be the best conditions for removal of 99% Fe2O3. The product obtain at this condition contain 80% brightness which is suitable for ceramic and filler industry applications. The novelity of the work is that the waste can be a value added product after suitable physical beneficiation and chemical treatment.

  6. Geochemical and petrographic studies and the relationships to durability and leach resistance of vitrified products from the in situ vitrification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmons, D.M.; Thompson, L.E.

    1996-01-01

    Soil and sludge contaminated with hazardous and radioactive materials from sites in the United States and Australia were vitrified using in situ vitrification. Some of the resulting products were subjected to detailed geochemical, leach and durability testing using a variety of analytical techniques. The leach resistance and durability performance was compared to that of vitrified high level waste with borosilicate composition. Particular attention was given to crystallization behavior, the effects of crystallization on residual melt chemistry and how crystallization influences the behavior of contaminant ions. The results of this work show that the vitrified material studied has superior chemical durability and leach resistance relative to typical borosilicate waste glasses. Crystallization behavior was variable depending upon melt chemistry and cooling history. Crystallization was not observed to adversely affect chemical durability or leach resistance

  7. Box-Behnken Design Application to Study Leaching of Pyrolusite from Manganese Mining Residue Using Olive Mill Wastewater as Reductant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaoui, Abdallah; El Kacemi, K.; El Ass, K.; Kitane, S.; El Bouzidi, S.

    2015-05-01

    The leaching capacity of olive mill wastewater (OMW) for pyrolusite mine tailings (MnO2) was evaluated using the Box-Behnken experimental design of response surface methodology. The selected test parameters include the concentration of sulfuric acid, the OMW dosage chemical oxygen demand (COD), the solid/liquid ratio S/ L, and particle size. It was determined that the MnO2 dissolution increased with an increase in the sulfuric acid concentration and the OMW dosage, and with a decrease in the solid/liquid ratio. The particle size does not have significant influence on the manganese recovery. A quadratic polynomial model has been developed to predict the amount of manganese extraction from pyrolusite for other operating conditions that were not directly tested. The leaching ability was evaluated based on manganese recovery (Mn%) and the removal capability of chemical oxygen demand (COD%). The predicted values for the responses agreed well with experimental values; R 2 (correlation coefficient) values for Mn% and COD% were 0.9602 and 0.9687, respectively. Within the design space, the optimum conditions for the lixiviation of MnO2 in terms of manganese recovery and COD removal were established and include [H2SO4] of 3 mol L-1, OMW in range of 23 g L-1 to 25 g L-1 COD, and pulp density in range of 90 g L-1 to 100 g L-1. Under these conditions, the response values generated by the model are Mn% ˜49% and COD% >40%. These values show good agreement with those obtained in the validation test. This study has demonstrated that it is possible to use the olive mill wastewater as a reductant agent to recover manganese from a pyrolusite mining residue.

  8. Retrogressively in-situ ore body chemical mining system and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacoby, C.H.

    1981-01-01

    A method is provided for mining a horizontal ore body lying underneath an overburden that precludes the use of other mining methods. Such an overburden may comprise a body of water, an inhabited area, or a geological formation that is difficult to penetrate. A vertical shaft is sunk in a convenient location, and at least two boreholes are drilled in a horizontal direction extending outwards from the shaft. The boreholes ae roughly parallel, but sloped in such a way as to facilitate the flow of a leaching solution along them. The formation lying between the boreholes is fractured to make it permeable to the leaching solution, and the solution is injected through one hole and recovered through the other. Different zones of the ore body may be fractured successively, starting with the most distant. It is desirable to backfill depleted zones with an inert waste material, cement, or other filler

  9. Chemical and isotopic tracing of underground water in relation with leaching of mine spoils, Nord-Pas-de-Calais Coal Basin (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denimal, S.; Tribovillard, N.; Meilliez, F.; Barbecot, F.; Dever, L.

    2001-01-01

    Coal mining activity in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region (Northern France) has generated many mine spoils. The oxidation of the pyrite content of such coal shales and their leaching can be a source of sulfate pollution for the underlying chalk aquifer, i.e. the main drinking water resource of the region. Two sites of study have been retained: one in the free water table zone and the other in the confined water table zone. Samples from both mine spoils have been analyzed with respect to their carbon and sulfur content and a superficial leaching of these elements has been evidenced. Water has been sampled in piezometers and boreholes close to the mine spoils and also along natural flux lines. The use of sulfur isotopes as markers of the different sulfate sources has confirmed the spoils source but has permitted to identify another source in the second site which is the Tertiary gypsum-bearing Ostricourt sands. This study has shown also that in the confined water table zone, part of the exported sulfates is reduced. This bacterial reduction of sulfates is due to a joint leaching of both carbon and sulfur in the mine spoils. A self-purification phenomenon occurs when the chalk aquifer is confined beneath the Cenozoic cover. (J.S.)

  10. Working and benefit project by the in-situ leaching of the copper-uranium ore of the deposit named Luz del Cobre, in the municipality of Soyopa, state of Sonora, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parga P, J.de J.

    1976-01-01

    This research was carried out with the object to recover the existing uranium in the copper-uranium deposit of Luz del Cobre located at 1300 Kms. approximately of the NW of Mexico City in the state of Sonora this deposit is geologically formed by a partially mineralized chimney which contains 572,732 tons of uranium ore with an average of 362.26g. of U 3 O 8 per ton, which represents 207,374 tons of U 3 O 8 in situ. To recover the uranium from this deposit, the only technical and economical possibility which presents a real interest is the system of leaching in situ. This operation will consist in the selective dissolution of the copper and uranium through leaching solution with a pH varying from 2.2 to 2.5, leaving the gangue on the ground and collecting the enriched solutions at the lower level of the mine, precipitating the copper subsequently through scrap iron and recovering the uranium from the tails of the copper precipitation plant through an ionic interchange process in counter current and its subsequent elution solvent extraction, reextraction and precipitation. This system makes possible to recover an uranium concentrate up to 98% of U 3 O 8 and practically free from impurities. The production cost would cost exceeding $300.00 Mexican currency per Kg of U 3 O 8 . (author)

  11. In situ leaching of a nuclear rubblized copper ore body. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    This volume contains detailed descriptions of technical and economical evaluations undertaken for the feasibility study. A summary of these results can be found in Vol. 1 along with the conclusions derived from the feasibility study and the recommendations tendered for future work. The sections of this study are presented in process order, and each section is complete in itself. The form of the presentation, hopefully, is logical and in a manner suitable for design purposes. As a further aid, each section has its own table of contents. The sections presented include method of attack, reference case, description of concept, nuclear rubblization, blasting plan, underground plumbing, fluid circulation, leaching technology, wellhead plant and pipeline, process plant, material and heat balance, hydrology, radioactivity, seismic, economics, sensitivity analysis, guide for environmental studies, exploration, and recommended experimental program. (U.S.)

  12. Main trends in scientific-research works during construction and operation of uranium mines and open cuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosinets, V.N.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to main trends in research works during construction and operation of uranium mines and open cuts of Priargunsky mine-chemical association. Develops and introduced principally new design solutions and technologies in the field of open mining, underground mining, as well as in-situ and heap leaching, are described

  13. Economic and environmental implications of leakage upon in situ uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popielak, R.S.; Siegel, J.

    1987-01-01

    A computer model was used to simulate the effect of leakage through confining beds on a hypothetical in situ leach operation in an aquifer with a thin mineralized section. The simulations were used to assess economic and potential environmental implications of leakage on an in situ leach operation. Four scenarios were modeled - three representing cases with different degrees of confinement, and the fourth representing a stratified ore zone under a low degree of confinement. The model simulated the travel path and travel time of lixiviant given the hydraulic conditions prescribed in each scenario. The results show that the travel path and travel times vary by about 10% for confinement ranging from nearly impermeable (essentially no leakage) to an extremely low level (thin confinement with a permeability about equal to that of the aquifer) for isotropic aquifer conditions. The aquifer thickness contacted by the lixiviant varied from 85% to 90%

  14. The modelling of the uranium-leaching and ion-exchange processes of the Hartebeestfontein Gold Mine and its role in economic plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broekman, B.R.; Ward, B.

    1985-01-01

    Computer facilities available in the Metallurgical Department at Hartebeestfontein Gold Mine have enabled the research staff to develope complex, practical mathematical models of their uranium hydrometallurgical processes. Empirical models of uranium leaching, uranium loading on resin and redox potential in leach liquors are discussed. These models, developed with non-linear regression techniques, form the basis of an over all mathematical model for a uranium plant. The most economic operating conditions can be predicted for specific prices of uranium and reagents. Substantial profit improvements have been achieved as a result of the changes in the process and equipment that have been made

  15. Leaching of radium from mine deposits - application for planning of ground reclamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalupnik, S.

    2002-01-01

    Saline waters occurring in underground coal mines in Poland often contain natural radioactive isotopes, mainly 226 Ra from uranium series and 228 Ra from thorium series. Approximately 40% of total amount of radium remains underground in a form of radioactive deposits, but 225 MBq of 226 Ra and 400 MBq of 228 Ra are released daily into the rivers with mine effluents through surface settling ponds. Very peculiar situation is observed in coal mines, where as a result of precipitation of radium from radium-bearing waters radioactive deposits are formed. Sometimes natural radioactivity of such materials is very high, in case of scaling from coal mines radium concentration may reach 400000 Bq/kg - similar activity as for 3% uranium ore. Usually such deposits can be found underground, but sometimes co-precipitation of radium and barium takes place on the surface, in settling pond and in rivers. Therefore maintenance of solid and liquid waste with technologically enhanced natural radioactivity (TENORM) is a very important subject. Lately another problem appeared - due to the decrease of the production in Poland coal industry and dismantling of several coal mines, also the ground reclamation should be done in their vicinity. But in several cases deposits in the ponds contain enhanced levels of radium concentration. Therefore laboratory tests were done to investigate a possibility of the re-entry of radium into ground water or river waters from such deposits. Results show, that in the case of insoluble barium and radium sulphates co-precipitated out from waters type A, re-entry ratio is very small. Different situation can be observed in case of radium, adsorbed on bottom of sediments from waters type B, because re-entry ratio is much higher. Nevertheless, this phenomenon seems to be not so important and significant for the further pollution of the adjacent areas of the settling ponds in the future. (author)

  16. Survey of active and inactive mines for possible use as in situ test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    A survey of active and inactive mines which might be useful for radioactive waste storage in situ test experiments was conducted. It was performed for Union Carbide Corporation, Nuclear Division, Office of Waste Isolation. The report covers available information gathered from literature, U.S. Bureau of Mines, the Mining Enforcement and Safety Agency, and a limited number of personal contacts with constructors or operators of facilities. This survey is preliminary in nature and the objective is to develop potential candidate facilities for in situ experiments which warrant further investigation. Included are descriptions of 244 facilities, with all the data about each one which was available within the time restraint of the study. These facility descriptions are additionally indexed by depth of mine, nature of the country rock, mineral mined, and type of entry. A total of 14 inactive mines and 34 active mines has been selected as those most worthy of further investigation for possible service as nuclear waste isolation test facilities. This investigation, being preliminary and having been performed in a very short time period, must be qualified, and the description of the qualification is presented in the body of this report. Qualifications deal primarily with the hazard of having omitted facilities and having incomplete data in some instances. Results indicate sedimentary rock mines of minerals of evaporite origin as a first ranking of preference for in situ testing, followed by other sedimentary rocks and then by mines producing minerals from any type rock where the mine is above the local water table. These are general rules and of course there can be exceptions to them

  17. Radiometric determination in situ of the face grades in Witwatersrand gold and uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, C.J.B.

    1985-01-01

    A prototype collimated radiometric face scanner was tested in the Harmony Gold Mine. The results obtained during the pilot study indicate that in situ radiometric uranium assays are statistically indistinguishable from those obtained conventionally from channel chip samples. In addition, the study demonstrated that reasonably reliable gold estimates can be deduced from the radiometric measurements, by use of the ratio of gold to uranium within a mine. The instrumentation, calibration procedures, and background determination are described briefly

  18. Nichols Ranch In-Sutu Leach Uranium Mine Wyoming, USA – A Case History

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catchpole, G.; Thomas, Glenda

    2014-01-01

    Company Incorporated in 1999 under the name Carleton Ventures Corp. In 2005 Changed name to Uranerz Energy Corporation and adopted the following Business Model: acquire quality uranium properties with the potential of being mined using the ISL extraction method with the objective of achieving uranium production as soon as practical. Focus on production; not grass roots exploration. Primary target area for property acquisition - western U.S.A., specifically Texas and Wyoming

  19. Reliable cost effective technique for in situ ground stress measurements in deep gold mines.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stacey, TR

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available on these requirements, an in situ stress measurement technique which will be practically applicable in the deep gold mines, has been developed conceptually. Referring to the figure on the following page, this method involves: • a borehole-based system, using... level mines have not been developed. 2 This is some of the background to the present SIMRAC research project, the title ofwhich is “Reliable cost effective technique for in-situ ground stress measurements in deep gold mines”. A copy of the research...

  20. Soil decontamination at the Montevecchio-Levante mine site with experimental washing and leaching techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessi, R. [Progemisa SpA, Cagliari (Italy); Fadda, S.; Peretti, R.; Zucca, A. [CSGM, Centro Studi Germinerari e Mineralurgici del CNR, Cagliari (Italy); Serci, A. [Digita, Dipt. di Geoingegneria e Tecnologie Ambientali, Cagliari (Italy)

    2000-12-01

    The soils in the neighbourhood of the Rio Montevecchio-Sitzerri, a stream that flows in the valley below the tailings pond of the Montevecchio-Levante mineral processing plant (SW Sardinia, Italy) are severely contaminated by heavy metals, to the extent that traditional land uses are compromised. Consequently urgent measures are needed both to abate the pollution at source and rehabilitate the contaminated land. This paper is concerned with the problem of soil decontamination using washing and leaching techniques. Laboratory experiments have been conducted in mechanically agitated reactors, using citric acid and acetic acid solutions and brine of hydrochloric acid and calcium chloride. The influence of both reagent concentration and solid-to-liquid ratio has been assessed, and in the most significant cases, the attack kinetics has been determined. The tests showed the brine to be the most effective for removing metals from the soils. Based on the findings of the investigations, the possibility of decontamination by heap leaching has been simulated in the laboratory using the column technique. [Italian] I suoi circostanti il Rio Montevecchio-Sitzerri, che scorre a valle del bacino di decantazione degli sterili dell'impianto di trattamento dei minerali di Montevecchio-Levante (Sardegna Centro-Occidentale), sono caratterizzati da un elevato contenuto di metalli pesanti, che ne pregiudicano gli usi tradizionali. Si rende percio' improrogabile sia la necessita' di intervenire sulle cause all'origine della contaminazione, sia di bonificare i suoli in questione al fine di recuperarli a nuovi usi. La memoria intende portare un contributo alle relative problematiche affrontando la possibilita' di decontaminazione mediante tecniche di lavaggio e lisciviazione. La sperimentazione di laboratorio e' stata condotta in reattori ad agitazione meccanica, utilizzando soluzioni con acido citrico, acido acetico ed una salamoia costituita da acido

  1. Nitrification and in-situ uranium solution mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.; Humenick, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the potential for conversion of ammonia to nitrate as a result of uranium solution mining operations. The work included literature evaluation and laboratory experimentation in both batch and continuous systems. Results indicate that a potential for nitrification could exist for some portions of the solution mining operating cycle. However, inhibition of nitrification was observed due to high ammonia and peroxide concentrations. Nitrification of ammonia also was observed to occur due to chemical oxidation by peroxide. 28 refs

  2. Development and prospect of china uranium mining and metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Que Weimin; Wang Haifeng; Niu Yuqing; Gu Wancheng; Zhang Feifeng

    2007-01-01

    The development of industry of uranium mining and metallurgy in China has been reviewed generally, emphasizing on investigation approaches and application levels of uranium mining technologies such as in-situ leaching, heap leaching, stope leaching: on the basis of analysis on status of uranium mining and metallurgy and problems existed, also considering the specific features of deposit resources, the development orientation of uranium mining and metallurgy in China is pointed out. The industry of China uranium mining and metallurgy is faced to new opportunity of development and challenge in 21st century, the only way to realize sustainable development of uranium mining and metallurgy and harmonious development between economy and environment is to develop new technology on mining, ore beneficiation and metallurgy, increase the utilization level of uranium resources, low down impact on environment caused by mining and metallurgy. (authors)

  3. THE CYANIDE LEACH TECHNOLOGY IN GOLD AND SILVER MINING HARMFUL EFFECTS AND SUGGESTIONS FOR REMEDYING

    OpenAIRE

    Judit PETRES

    2013-01-01

    The region named Roşia Montană became famous due to its rich mineral resources. The most precious treasure which has been found is the gold. A state-run gold mine functioned for many years and the continuous pollution due to the gold extraction became very dangerous. All these cyanide-containing waste are hazardous to wildlife, natural resources and human health if not properly managed. The consequences of cyanide hazards may be devastating, sometimes killing everything for several miles down...

  4. THE CYANIDE LEACH TECHNOLOGY IN GOLD AND SILVER MINING HARMFUL EFFECTS AND SUGGESTIONS FOR REMEDYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit PETRES

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The region named Roşia Montană became famous due to its rich mineral resources. The most precious treasure which has been found is the gold. A state-run gold mine functioned for many years and the continuous pollution due to the gold extraction became very dangerous. All these cyanide-containing waste are hazardous to wildlife, natural resources and human health if not properly managed. The consequences of cyanide hazards may be devastating, sometimes killing everything for several miles downstream. It has not yet been found a way of both taking advantages of the economic benefits of gold and maintaining a liveable habitat.

  5. Microbial leaching of chromite overburden from Sukinda mines, Orissa, India using Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Supratim; Samanta, Saikat; Dey, Rajib; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Banerjee, Pataki C.

    2013-08-01

    Leaching of nickel and cobalt from two physical grades (S1, 125-190 μm, coarser and S3, 53-75 μm, finer) of chromite overburden was achieved by treating the overburden (2% pulp density) with 21-d culture filtrate of an Aspergillus niger strain grown in sucrose medium. Metal dissolution increases with ore roasting at 600°C and decreasing particle size due to the alteration of microstructural properties involving the conversion of goethite to hematite and the increase in surface area and porosity as evident from X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (DT-TGA), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). About 65% Ni and 59% Co were recovered from the roasted S3 ore employing bioleaching against 26.87% Ni and 31.3% Co using an equivalent amount of synthetic oxalic acid under identical conditions. The results suggest that other fungal metabolites in the culture filtrate played a positive role in the bioleaching process, making it an efficient green approach in Ni and Co recovery from lateritic chromite overburden.

  6. Remote mining for in-situ waste containment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinelli, D.; Banta, L.; Peng, S. [and others

    1995-10-01

    This document presents the findings of a study conducted at West Virginia University to determine the feasibility of using a combination of longwall mining and standard landfill lining technologies to mitigate contamination of groundwater supplies by leachates from hazardous waste sites.

  7. Remote mining for in-situ waste containment. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinelli, D.; Banta, L.; Peng, S.

    1995-10-01

    This document presents the findings of a study conducted at West Virginia University to determine the feasibility of using a combination of longwall mining and standard landfill lining technologies to mitigate contamination of groundwater supplies by leachates from hazardous waste sites

  8. Precipitation-induced runoff and leaching from milled peat mining mires by peat types : a comparative method for estimating the loading of water bodies during peat pruduction

    OpenAIRE

    Svahnbäck, Lasse

    2007-01-01

    Precipitation-induced runoff and leaching from milled peat mining mires by peat types: a comparative method for estimating the loading of water bodies during peat production. This research project in environmental geology has arisen out of an observed need to be able to predict more accurately the loading of watercourses with detrimental organic substances and nutrients from already existing and planned peat production areas, since the authorities capacity for insisting on such predicti...

  9. Mine Waste Technology Program. In Situ Source Control Of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the results of the Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 3, In Situ Source Control of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S....

  10. 76 FR 21401 - Notice of Availability of the Draft EIS for the HB In-Situ Solution Mine Project, Eddy County, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ...] Notice of Availability of the Draft EIS for the HB In-Situ Solution Mine Project, Eddy County, NM AGENCY... prepared a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the HB In- Situ Solution Mine Project, and by... considered, the BLM must receive written comments on the HB In-Situ Solution Mine Project Draft EIS within 60...

  11. 77 FR 5566 - Notice of Availability of the Final EIS for the HB In-Situ Solution Mine Project, Eddy County...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ...] Notice of Availability of the Final EIS for the HB In-Situ Solution Mine Project, Eddy County, New Mexico... Statement (Final EIS) for the HB In-Situ Solution Mine Project, and by this notice is announcing its... the Federal Register. ADDRESSES: Copies of the HB In-Situ Solution Mining EIS are available for public...

  12. In Situ Test Study of Characteristics of Coal Mining Dynamic Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Combination of coal mining dynamic load and high static stress can easily induce such dynamic disasters as rock burst, coal and gas outburst, roof fall, and water inrush. In order to obtain the characteristic parameters of mining dynamic load and dynamic mechanism of coal and rock, the stress wave theory is applied to derive the relation of mining dynamic load strain rate and stress wave parameters. The in situ test was applied to study the stress wave propagation law of coal mine dynamic load by using the SOS microseismic monitoring system. An evaluation method for mining dynamic load strain rate was proposed, and the statistical evaluation was carried out for the range of strain rate. The research results show that the loading strain rate of mining dynamic load is in direct proportion to the seismic frequency of coal-rock mass and particle peak vibration velocity and is in inverse proportion to wave velocity. The high-frequency component damps faster than the low-frequency component in the shockwave propagating process; and the peak particle vibration velocity has a power functional relationship with the transmitting distance. The loading strain rate of mining dynamic load is generally less than class 10−1/s.

  13. In Situ Monitoring of Pb2+ Leaching from the Galvanic Joint Surface in a Prepared Chlorinated Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiangmeng; Armas, Stephanie M; Soliman, Mikhael; Lytle, Darren A; Chumbimuni-Torres, Karin; Tetard, Laurene; Lee, Woo Hyoung

    2018-02-20

    A novel method using a micro-ion-selective electrode (micro-ISE) technique was developed for in situ lead monitoring at the water-metal interface of a brass-leaded solder galvanic joint in a prepared chlorinated drinking water environment. The developed lead micro-ISE (100 μm tip diameter) showed excellent performance toward soluble lead (Pb 2+ ) with sensitivity of 22.2 ± 0.5 mV decade -1 and limit of detection (LOD) of 1.22 × 10 -6 M (0.25 mg L -1 ). The response time was less than 10 s with a working pH range of 2.0-7.0. Using the lead micro-ISE, lead concentration microprofiles were measured from the bulk to the metal surface (within 50 μm) over time. Combined with two-dimensional (2D) pH mapping, this work clearly demonstrated that Pb 2+ ions build-up across the lead anode surface was substantial, nonuniform, and dependent on local surface pH. A large pH gradient (ΔpH = 6.0) developed across the brass and leaded-tin solder joint coupon. Local pH decreases were observed above the leaded solder to a pH as low as 4.0, indicating it was anodic relative to the brass. The low pH above the leaded solder supported elevated lead levels where even small local pH differences of 0.6 units (ΔpH = 0.6) resulted in about four times higher surface lead concentrations (42.9 vs 11.6 mg L -1 ) and 5 times higher fluxes (18.5 × 10 -6 vs 3.5 × 10 -6 mg cm -2 s -1 ). Continuous surface lead leaching monitoring was also conducted for 16 h.

  14. Estimation of environmental mobility of heavy metals using a sequential leaching of particulate material emitted from an opencast chrome mine complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeykioe, R. [Meri-Lappi Institute, Centre for Environmental Technology, University of Oulu, Kemi (Finland); Peraemaeki, P.; Kuokkanen, T. [University of Oulu, Department of Chemistry, Oulu (Finland); Vaelimaeki, I. [Suomen Ympaeristoepalvelu Oy, Oulu (Finland)

    2002-06-01

    A four-stage sequential leaching procedure was applied to assess the bioavailability and environmental mobility of heavy metals (Cr, Fe, Cu, Ni and Cd) in total suspended particulate (TSP) material emitted from an opencast chrome mine complex (Kemi, Northern Finland). TSP material was collected on glass fibre filters by a high-volume sampler, and a sequential leaching procedure was used to determine the distribution of heavy metals between the water-soluble fraction (H{sub 2}O), environmentally mobile fraction (CH{sub 3}COONH{sub 4}), the fraction bound to carbonate and oxides (HONH{sub 3}Cl + CH{sub 3}COOH), and the fraction bound to silicates and organic matter, that is the environmentally immobile fraction (HNO{sub 3} + HF + HCl). The sequential leaching procedure was also applied to the certified reference materials VKI (QC Loam Soil A) and PACS-2 (Marine Sediment) to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of the leaching procedure. The heavy metals were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The concentrations of metals in the water-soluble fraction (H{sub 2}O) decreased in the order Fe >Cu >Cr >Ni >Cd, and in the environmentally mobile fraction (CH{sub 3}COONH{sub 4}) in the order Cu >Fe >Ni >Cr >Cd. (orig.)

  15. In situ brine migration experiments at the Avery Island salt mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, W.B.; Van Sambeek, L.L.; Stickney, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    An in situ brine movement study was conducted at the Avery Island Salt Mine of the International Salt Company in southwestern Louisiana. The objective of the in situ experiments was to relate field measurements to previously determined laboratory and analytical results for the purpose of determining the rate and amount of brine movement through dome salt when subjected to heating. The heating in the experiments was provided by electrical heaters emplaced in the salt mine floor. An understanding of thermally induced brine movement is essential from the standpoint of identifying conditions which may influence the physical integrity of the nuclear waste canisters or impede the functional performance of the waste package system in a nuclear waste repository in geologic salt. 28 refs

  16. Heap leaching for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Denison Mines Ltd. is using two bacterial leaching processes to combat the high cost of extracting uranium from low grade ore in thin reefs. Both processes use thiobacillus ferro-oxidans, a bacterium that employs the oxidation of ferrous iron and sulphur as its source of energy for growth. The first method is flood leaching, in which ore is subjected to successive flood, drain and rest cycles. The second, trickle leaching, uses sprinklers to douse the broken muck continuously with leaching solution. In areas where grades are too low to justify the expense of hauling the ore to the surface, the company is using this biological process underground to recover uranium. In 1987 Denison recovered 840 000 lb of uranium through bacterial heap leaching. It plans to have biological in-place leaching contribute 25% of the total uranium production by 1990. (fig.)

  17. Permeability restoration and lowering of uranium leakage from leached ore beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgman, H.A.; Grant, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The injection of an ammonium sulfite or bisulfite solution increases the permeability of an uranium ore bed that has suffered permeability losses during the in-situ mining of uranium with an alkaline leach solution containing a peroxide or dissolved oxygen oxidant. Such an injection recovers much of the lost formation permeability, thus decreasing costs and effort required to put needed restoration solutions or further leach solutions through the ore bed. In addition, uranium contamination of the ground water normally occurring after cessation of leaching is significantly lowered by such injection

  18. Field Testing of Downgradient Uranium Mobility at an In-Situ Recovery Uranium Mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimus, P. W.; Clay, J. T.; Rearick, M.; Perkins, G.; Brown, S. T.; Basu, A.; Chamberlain, K.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ recovery (ISR) mining of uranium involves the injection of O2 and CO2 (or NaHCO3) into saturated roll-front deposits to oxidize and solubilize the uranium, which is then removed by ion exchange at the surface and processed into U3O8. While ISR is economical and environmentally-friendly relative to conventional mining, one of the challenges of extracting uranium by this process is that it leaves behind a geochemically-altered aquifer that is exceedingly difficult to restore to pre-mining geochemical conditions, a regulatory objective. In this research, we evaluated the ability of the aquifer downgradient of an ISR mining area to attenuate the transport of uranium and other problem constituents that are mobilized by the mining process. Such an evaluation can help inform both regulators and the mining industry as to how much restoration of the mined ore zone is necessary to achieve regulatory compliance at various distances downgradient of the mining zone even if complete restoration of the ore zone proves to be difficult or impossible. Three single-well push-pull tests and one cross-well test were conducted in which water from an unrestored, previously-mined ore zone was injected into an unmined ore zone that served as a geochemical proxy for the downgradient aquifer. In all tests, non-reactive tracers were injected with the previously-mined ore zone water to allow the transport of uranium and other constituents to be compared to that of the nonreactive species. In the single-well tests, it was shown that the recovery of uranium relative to the nonreactive tracers ranged from 12-25%, suggesting significant attenuation capacity of the aquifer. In the cross-well test, selenate, molybdate and metavanadate were injected with the unrestored water to provide information on the transport of these potentially-problematic anionic constituents. In addition to the species-specific transport information, this test provided valuable constraints on redox conditions within

  19. An injection technique for in-situ remediation of abandoned underground coal mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canty, G.A.; Everett, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Remediation of underground mines can prove to be a difficult task, given the physical constraints associated with introducing amendments to a subterranean environment. An acid mine abatement project involving in-situ chemical treatment method was conducted by the University of Oklahoma. The treatment method involved the injection of an alkaline coal combustion by-product (CCB) slurry into a flooded mine void (pH 4.4) to create a buffered zone. Injection of the CCB slurry was possible through the use of equipment developed by the petroleum industry for grouting recovery wells. This technology was selected because the CCB slurry could be injected under significant pressure and at a high rate. With higher pressure and rates of injection, a large quantity of slurry can be introduced into the mine within a limited amount of time. Theoretically, the high pressure and rate would improve dispersal of the slurry within the void. In addition, the high pressure is advantageous in fracturing or breaking-down obstructions to injection. During the injection process, a total of 418 tons of CCB was introduced within 15 hours. The mine did not refuse any of the material, and it is likely that a much larger mass could have been added. One injection well was drilled into a pillar of coal. Normally this would pose a problem when introducing a slurry; however, the coal pillar was easily fractured during the injection process. Currently, the pH of the mine discharge is above 6.5 and the alkalinity is approximately 100 mg/L as CACO 3

  20. Development of the heap leaching of low-grade uranium ores for conditions of OJSC Priargunsky Mining and Chemical plant (PPGKhO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, A.; Litvinenko, V.

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of low-grade commercial uranium ores by heap leaching has been carried out at the enterprise since 1996. During the initial stage of development, the ore piles were formed of the raw ore having the run-of-mine coarseness with uranium content around 0.08%. Under such conditions, recovery of the metal to the solution is 60-65% in case of a pile treatment lasting 2 years. To intensify the process and to provide a stable concentration of uranium in the productive solutions transferred to sorption, the enterprise developed and implemented a method of percolation leaching of low-grade ores with re-circulation of productive solutions through the re-treated ore bulk (RF patent No. 2226564). The main peculiarity of such leaching is simultaneous moistening of the ore by productive solutions and by barren solutions that are sharpened with sulphuric acid; that gives the possibility to wet far bigger areas of piles under constant volume of productive solutions outputting to the sorption treatment. Such scheme enables to treat successively first the piles at the “re-treatment” (where the metal is mainly extracted), and then the piles at the “active leaching” stage (where the metal is mainly inside the ore bulk). The technical and economic indexes of the heap leaching of low-grade uranium ores were significantly increased in 2006, when the X-ray-radiometric treatment plant was commissioned. The technological scheme of ore treatment at the processing plant includes mould and grating of the raw material with delivery of undersized products enriched with uranium: -5 mm are transferred to the pulp process; fractions (-200+40) mm to the X-ray-radiometric separation; the material of size (-40+5) mm, washed-out from clayey and fine particles, are sent to the uranium heap leaching in piles. Delivery of the ore material having size (-40+5) mm to treatment by the acid leaching method excluded colmatage and creation of zones impermeable for water, and in combination

  1. Environmental protection at ISL uranium mining sites in Uzbekistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grutsynov, V.A.

    2002-01-01

    The ecological aspects of uranium mining with particular focus on in situ leaching (ISL) are addressed in the paper. As compared to conventional mining methods, from the ecological point of view, ISL has proved to be advantageous. Innovations developed and introduced in the Navoi Mining and Metallurgical Combinat (NMMC) with the purpose of reducing the impact of the uranium production cycle on the environment are described. (author)

  2. Literature review and preliminary analysis of inorganic ammonia pertinent to south Texas uranium in-situ leach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braswell, J.; Breland, M.; Chang, M.; Farley, J.; Hill, D.; Johnson, D.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to review existing literature to aid in the determination of the potential impact of ammonia-containing lixiviants on uranium solution mining aquifers, perform studies based on the available literature, to identify potential ways to protect the groundwaters from ammonia contamination, and to propose further work where data are lacking or needed. The review of the literature includes an analysis and interpretation of the literature as it relates to the solution mining activities. Results focus on the range of geologic and hydrologic conditions representative of South Texas solution minig areas. Other pertinent data sources such as soils and agricultural literature are also reviewed and conclusions extrapolated to the solution mining situation. Specific tasks were: evaluate the potential of natural occurrence and influx of ammonia and/or nitrate species in confined aquifers typical of uranium solution mining sites; find available data on the sorption characteristics of ammonia and nitrates on pure and mixed minerals representative of South Texas geology in solution mining areas; determine applicable selectivity coefficients and kinetic data on sorption and desorption of ammonia on clay minerals; evaluate the potential for natural inorganic ammonia conversion by chemical or other mechanisms in typical solution mining aquifers; review available monitoring data from solution mining operations as it pertains to ammonia adsorption or migration; analyze and provide calculational bases for determining the predicted fate of ammonia under solution mining conditions; recommend continuation programs that focus on areas of uncertainty; provide comprehensive bibliography and abstracts of all pertinent articles

  3. Assessment of environmental aspects of uranium mining and milling. Final report, 12 February--7 July 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, A.K.; Meeks, H.C.; Pomeroy, S.E.; Hale, V.Q.

    1976-12-01

    This research program was initiated with the basic objective of making a preliminary assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the mining and milling of domestic uranium ores. All forms of pollution except radiation were considered. The program included a review of the characteristics and locations of domestic uranium ore reserves and a review of the conventional methods for mining and milling these ores. Potential environmental impacts associated with the entire cycle from exploration and mining to recovery and production of yellowcake are identified and discussed. Land reclamation aspects are also discussed. The methods currently used for production of yellowcake were divided into four categories - open pit mining-acid leach process, underground mining-acid leach process, underground mining-alkaline leach process, and in-situ mining. These are discussed from the standpoint of typical active mills which were visited during the program. Flowsheets showing specific environmental impacts for each category are provided

  4. Bottle roll leach test for Temrezli uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Çetin, K.; Bayrak, M.; Turan, A. İsbir; Üçgül, E.

    2014-01-01

    The bottle roll leach test is one of the dynamic leaching procedure which can meet in-situ mining needs for determining suitable working conditions and helps to simulate one of the important parameter; injection well design. In this test, the most important parameters are pulp density, acidic or basic concentration of leach solution, time and temperature. In recent years, bottle roll test is used not only for uranium but also gold, silver, copper and nickel metals where in situ leach (ISL) mining is going to be applied. For this purpose for gold and silver metal cyanide bottle roll tests and for uranium metal; acidic and basic bottle roll tests could be applied. The new leach test procedure which is held in General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration (MTA) of Turkey is mostly suitable for determining metal extraction conditions and recovery values in uranium containing ore bodies. The tests were conducted with samples taken from Temrezli Uranium Ore located in approximately 200 km east of Turkey’s capital, Ankara. Mining rights of Temrezli Ore is controlled 100% by Anatolia Energy Ltd. The resource estimate includes an indicated mineral resource of 10.827 Mlbs U_3O_8 [~4160 t U] at an average grade of 1426 ppm [~1210 ppm U] and an additional inferred resource of 6.587 Mlbs of U_3O_8 [~2530 t U] at an average grade of 904 ppm [~767 ppm U]. In accordance with the demand from Anatolia Energy bottle roll leach tests have been initiated in MTA laboratories to investigate the recovery values of low-grade uranium ore under in-situ leach conditions. Bottle roll leaching tests are performed on pulverized samples with representative lixiviant solution at ambient pressure and provide an initial evaluation of ore leachability with a rough estimate of recovery value. At the end of the tests by using 2 g/L NaHCO_3 and 0.2 g/L H_2O_2 more than 90% of uranium can pass into leach solution in 12 days. (author)

  5. Synopsis of in situ testing for mined geologic disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnirk, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of mined geologic disposal of radioactive wastes was proposed about 25 years ago. Until the mid-1970's, research and development activities were directed essentially to the evaluation of the disposal concept fot salt formations. During the past 5 years, the waste disposal technology programs in the USA and other countries have been expanded substantially in effort and scope for evaluation of a broader range of geologic media beyond salt, including basalt, granite, shale, and tuff. From the outset, in situ testing has been an integral part of these programs, and has included activities concerned with rock mass characterization, the phenomenological response of rock to waste or simulated waste emplacement, model development and verification, and repository design. This paper provides a synopsis of in situ tests that have been or are being performed in geologic media in support of the waste disposal programs in the USA, the United Kingdom, Sweden, and the Federal Republic of Germany

  6. Geochemical barriers formed during in-situ leaching in ore-bearing horizons of hydrogenic uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solodov, E.N.

    1994-01-01

    The behaviour of major metallogenetic element and associated elements on the boundary of the leaching solution transiting to the unchanged natural water in a layered uranium deposit of infiltration origin is studied. Neutralization geochemical barrier and their relevant secondary barriers-degassing barrier and neutralization barrier are defined, and recent accumulation of uranium, rare earth elements and a series of other elements at these barriers are in progress. The action of underground microorganism during this process is pointed out; the neutralization capacity of the ore-hosting terrigenous rocks is determined and the dimension of the matter removal, migration and reprecipitation in the studied system is evaluated. The principal conclusion is that the studied geological media have sufficient protective nature to resist direct and strong leaching action of the solution

  7. Monitoring an in-situ uranium mining site with radio tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolarczyk, L.; Mondt, W.; Mays, W.

    1991-01-01

    A field test site has been developed to monitor ground water restoration in an in-situ uranium mining project. Uranium deposited in a shallow buried fluvial sandstone channel (aquifer) has been mined by the injection and recovery of ammonia carbonate leachant from a constellation of drillholes. Ground water restoration is accomplished by injecting clean water into a well and recovering contaminated water from companion wells. The restoration process exchanges clean water for contaminated water in the aquifer. The stratigraphic cross section of the aquifer and the hydro-dynamics of the ground water restoration process is currently being investigated with radio wave tomography. Crosshole continuous wave (CW) radio signals are propagated from a well to a second well in the constellation of drillholes. The magnitude and phase of the radio wave are measured in the second well with Radio Imaging Method (RIM) instruments. The acquired data is processed in tomography algorithms to determine the EM wave propagation constants (attenuation rate [α] and phase constant [β]) in each pixel that covers the image plane between wells. The in-situ electrical conductivity values are computed from the pixel propagation constants. Contaminated ground water causes the conductivity of the local zone of the aquifer to increase. This paper describes the initial radio tomography mapping of the deposit lithology and compares radio tomography and E log conductivity values

  8. Evaluation of human health risk from in situ recovery uranium mining, pre-and post-mining, and post-restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedig, E.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Borch, T.; Johnson, T. [Colorado State University (United States); Till, J. [Risk Assessment Corporation (United States)

    2014-07-01

    In the United States, the restoration of in situ recovery (ISR) uranium mines is aimed at returning sites to pre-mining conditions. While this may seem an appropriate goal, little or no scientific information is available to justify utilizing baseline conditions for regulatory compliance. The chemical and radiological contaminants monitored for restoration compliance have not been evaluated to ensure they are proper indicators of the mitigation of risk. Pre-mining aquifers do not meet minimum United States drinking water standards, and must have an aquifer exemption in place prior to mining. Under these conditions, returning groundwater to near the original concentrations of contaminants may be unnecessary. Post-mining groundwater is also unlikely to meet standards for drinking water, but may be depleted in at least some toxic species as a result of the mining process. Here, we examine the risk to representative person from the personal use of groundwater sourced from an Uranium ISR mine. Water samples were collected from Cameco Resource's Smith Ranch-Highlands ISR Uranium mine near Casper, Wyoming, USA. Samples were acquired pre-mining, post-mining, and post-restoration. Concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides were assessed by appropriate analytical techniques (e.g., mass spectroscopy or alpha spectroscopy) and these concentrations were used to estimate human health risk for three exposure scenarios: a scenario with high exposure, a scenario with medium exposure, and a scenario with low exposure. A simple biosphere transport model was constructed for each scenario to estimate the risk to humans from the use of contaminated waters for subsistence-related activities. Chemical and radiological risks were harmonized according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency's guidance for superfund sites. Each exposure scenario and its subsequent risk were evaluated individually for pre-mining, post-mining, and post-restoration aquifer waters

  9. Mobility of arsenic, cadmium and zinc in a multi-element contaminated soil profile assessed by in-situ soil pore water sampling, column leaching and sequential extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beesley, Luke; Moreno-Jimenez, Eduardo; Clemente, Rafael; Lepp, Nicholas; Dickinson, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Three methods for predicting element mobility in soils have been applied to an iron-rich soil, contaminated with arsenic, cadmium and zinc. Soils were collected from 0 to 30 cm, 30 to 70 cm and 70 to 100 cm depths in the field and soil pore water was collected at different depths from an adjacent 100 cm deep trench. Sequential extraction and a column leaching test in the laboratory were compared to element concentrations in pore water sampled directly from the field. Arsenic showed low extractability, low leachability and occurred at low concentrations in pore water samples. Cadmium and zinc were more labile and present in higher concentrations in pore water, increasing with soil depth. Pore water sampling gave the best indication of short term element mobility when field conditions were taken into account, but further extraction and leaching procedures produced a fuller picture of element dynamics, revealing highly labile Cd deep in the soil profile. - Mobility of arsenic, cadmium and zinc in a polluted soil can be realistically interpreted by in-situ soil pore water sampling.

  10. Study on U-Ra equilibrium coefficient of the in-situ leaching sandstone-type uranium deposits: A case study of Qianjiadian uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Yuliang; Xiu Qunye; Han Jun; Li Linqiang; Zheng Jiwei

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigated the U-Ra equilibrium coefficient (K-p) of mineralized sandstone and mudstone, and unmineralized sandstone and mudstone for the in-situ leaching sandstone-type uranium deposits. It is surprised that all of the mineralized sandstone and mudstone are both relatively to be partial to uranium, but all of the unmineralized sandstone and mudstone are both relatively to be partial to radium. Meanwhile the uranium in mineralized mudstone is relatively richer than that in mineralized sandstone, and the radium in unmineralized mudstone is relatively richer than that in unmineralized sandstone. It is suggested that mudstones were permeable at the uranium mineralized phase and the unmineralized mudstone and sandstone could serve as important mineralized uranium source. (authors)

  11. Leaching Process of Rare Earth Elements, Gallium and Niobium in a Coal-Bearing Strata-Hosted Rare Metal Deposit—A Case Study from the Late Permian Tuff in the Zhongliangshan Mine, Chongqing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The tuff, a part of coal-bearing strata, in the Zhongliangshan coal mine, Chongqing, southwestern China, hosts a rare metal deposit enriched in rare earth elements (REE, Ga and Nb. However, the extraction techniques directly related to the recovery of rare metals in coal-bearing strata have been little-studied in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extractability of REE, Ga and Nb in the tuff in the Zhongliangshan mine using the alkaline sintering-water immersion-acid leaching (ASWIAL method. The results show that ASWIAL can separate and extract REE, Ga and Nb effectively under the optimized conditions of calcining at 860 °C for 0.5 h with a sample to sintering agent ratio of 1:1.5, immersing at 90 °C for 2 h with 150 mL hot water dosage, and leaching using 4 mol/L HCl at 40 °C for 2 h with a liquid-solid ratio of 20:1 (mL:g. The final leaching efficiencies of REE and Ga are up to 85.81% and 93.37%, respectively, whereas the leaching efficiency of Nb is less than 1%, suggesting the high concentration of Nb in the leaching residue, which needs further extraction.

  12. Groundwater remediation in the Straz leaching operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, J.

    2001-01-01

    The locality affected by consequences of the chemical mining of the uranium during underground leaching 'in situ' is found in the area of the Czech Republic in the northeastern part of the Ceska Lipa district. In the contribution the complex groundwater remediation project is discussed. First, the risks of the current state are expressed. Then the alternatives of remediation of the both Cenomanian and Turonian aquifers are presented. Evaluation of the remediation alternatives with the view to the time-consumption, economy, ecology and the elimination of unacceptable risks for the population and environment is done. Finally, the present progress of remediation and the conception of remediation of chemical mining on deposit of Straz pod Ralskem are presented. (orig.)

  13. Questa baseline and pre-mining ground-water quality investigation. 19. Leaching characteristics of composited materials from mine waste-rock piles and naturally altered areas near Questa, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathleen S.; Hageman, Philip L.; Briggs, Paul H.; Sutley, Stephen J.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Livo, K. Eric; Verplanck, Philip L.; Adams, Monique G.; Gemery-Hill, Pamela A.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study is to compare and contrast the leachability of metals and the acidity from individual mine waste-rock piles and natural erosional scars in the study area near Questa, New Mexico. Surficial multi-increment (composite) samples less than 2 millimeters in diameter from five waste-rock piles, nine erosional-scar areas, a less-altered site, and a tailings slurry-pipe sample were analyzed for bulk chemistry and mineralogy and subjected to two back-to-back leaching procedures. The first leaching procedure, the U.S. Geological Survey Field Leach Test (FLT), is a short-duration leach (5-minute shaking and 10-minute settling) and is intended to leach readily soluble materials. The FLT was immediately followed by an 18-hour, end-over-end rotation leaching procedure. Comparison of results from the back-to-back leaching procedures can provide information about reactions that may take place upon migration of leachates through changing geochemical conditions (for example, pH changes), both within the waste-rock and scar materials and away from the source materials. For the scar leachates, the concentrations of leachable metals varied substantially between the scar areas sampled. The scar leachates have low pH (pH 3.2-4.1). Under these low-pH conditions, cationic metals are solubilized and mobile, but anionic species, such as molybdenum, are less soluble and less mobile. Generally, metal concentrations in the waste-rock leachates did not exceed the upper range of those metal concentrations in the erosional-scar leachates. One exception is molybdenum, which is notably higher in the waste-rock leachates compared with the scar leachates. Most of the waste-rock leachates were at least mildly acidic (pH 3.0-6.2). The pH values in the waste-rock leachates span a large pH range that includes some pH-dependent solubility and metal-attenuation reactions. An increase in pH with leaching time and agitation indicates that there is pH-buffering capacity in some of the

  14. Role of chemistry in uranium leaching from sand stone ore bodies by ISL technique (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, A.K.; Hanif, M.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of uranium for nuclear power generation is increasing day by day in the current energy requirement scenario. The energy sector is reverting to nuclear power generation in many countries. Keeping in view the limited availability of fossil fuels and the problems associated with its exploration. In situ leach mining of uranium is currently employed in many countries for extraction of uranium in soft rocks from subsurface where deposits are lying deeper and the cost of underground mining (UGM) are high. In situ leaching of uranium revolves around injection of leachant (usually bicarbonate) and oxidant into the host rock without disturbing the strata thereby solubilizing the uranium in solution form. The resultant leach is then pumped out and sent to processing plant for production of yellow cake. The Chemistry Division NMC-I, D. G. Khan plays a vital role in ISL Mining of uranium, starting from initial exploration of ore body, analysis of leach liquor and other liquid samples up to the final step of yellow cake formation. During all these analysis to ensure Quality control, Chemistry Division utilizes modern / updated analytical techniques e.g. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Spectrophotometry, Fluorimetry and Potentiometry. R and D studies are also being carried out to optimize and economize the operational parameters accordingly. This presentation basically encompasses the role of Chemistry at various levels and stages at Mining Projects to achieve this goal. (author)

  15. Ex-situ bioremediation of U(VI from contaminated mine water using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eRomero-Gonzalez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The ex-situ bioremoval of U(VI from contaminated water using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain 8455 and 13538 was studied under a range of pH and uranium concentrations. The effect of pH on the growth of bacteria was evaluated across the range 1.5 – 4.5 pH units. The respiration rate of At. ferrooxidans at different U(VI concentrations was quantified as a measure of the rate of metabolic activity over time using an oxygen electrode. The biosorption process was quantified using a uranyl nitrate solution, U-spiked growth media and U-contaminated mine water. The results showed that both strains of At. ferrooxidans are able to remove U(VI from solution at pH 2.5 – 4.5, exhibiting a buffering capacity at pH 3.5. The respiration rate of the micro-organism was affected at U(VI concentration of 30 mg L-1. The kinetics of the sorption fitted a pseudo-first order equation, and depended on the concentration of U(VI. The KD obtained from the biosorption experiments indicated that strain 8455 is more efficient for the removal of U(VI. A bioreactor designed to treat a solution of 100 mg U(VI L-1 removed at least 50% of the U(VI in water. The study demonstrated that At. ferrooxidans can be used for the ex-situ bioremediation of U(VI contaminated mine water.

  16. Technology of drill hole and well cleaning for in-situ leaching on the 16th section line ore body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiqi; Liu Jianxiang; Wang Haifeng

    2003-01-01

    The specific feature of the 16th section line ore body of a deposit is deep water table and low confined aquifer. It causes the most trouble for well cleaning during completion and recovering the ore-bearing aquifer to natural state after it is worsened. It is a key point mining the ore body to search for a suitable way for well cleaning at the deep water table

  17. Magnesium bicarbonate as an in situ uranium lixiviant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibert, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    In the subsurface solution mining of mineral values, especially uranium, in situ, magnesium bicarbonate leaching solution is used instead of sodium, potassium and ammonium carbonate and bicarbonates. The magnesium bicarbonate solution is formed by combining carbon dioxide with magnesium oxide and water. The magnesium bicarbonate lixivant has four major advantages over prior art sodium, potassium and ammonium bicarbonates

  18. The use of alkali-activated fly ash grouts for the remediation of AMD from underground mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaker, C.A.; Longley, R.D.; Michaud, L.H.; Silsbee, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    In preparation for a field demonstration, laboratory studies were conducted using several fly ash grout formulations to determine the optimum grout for an underground mine environment. This paper discusses the portion of the overall project designed to examine grout-acid mine drainage (AMD) interactions including neutralization, leaching and armoring of the grouts. Leaching tests were performed to study the effects of fly ash grout on AMD, including the effects of armoring. The goal of this project is to study the feasibility of in-situ acid mine drainage treatment by injecting alkali-activated fly ash grout into an underground mine

  19. RADIONUCLIDES DISTRIBUTION NEAR FORMER URANIUM MINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Zaredinov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows, that radionuclides from the stony rocks of uranium mines can be leached by atmospheric precipitations. In acid conditions, a degree of leaching is greater.Goal. The aim of this investigation was to study the distribution of radionuclides in uranium minings and their impact on the environmental contamination.Materials and methods. The study was carried out in two stages. In the first stage, a blade of rock was mixed with distilled water in proportions of 0,3 kg of gravel and 1 liter of water. After thirty days of soaking, water was sent to the gamma-spectrometric analysis to Canberra’s spectrometer (USA with a high-purity germanium detector. In the second stage, we carried out the similar experiment with water, wich was acidified to pH = 3. Contamination levels of areas near the in-situ leaching mine were determined. Intervention levels were used to estimate risk and possible water consumption by the population. Estimations were carried out taking into account the combined presence of several radionuclides in the water.Results. The results of these studies have shown that the distribution of radionuclides from the source of the contamination is about 360 meters during the 30 y period. The stream, along which samples of soil were collected and studied, was formed by the miner waters that flow along small ruts towards a village, thereby increasing the likelihood of water use by the public.Conclusions. The uranium mines are the source of radioactive contamination. Radionuclides are distributed due to the erosion of rocks and leached out of the stony rock by precipitations. The extent of leaching is significantly increased in an acidic environment, which takes place near the in-situ leaching mines.

  20. Field Evaluation of the Restorative Capacity of the Aquifer Downgradient of a Uranium In-Situ Recovery Mining Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-22

    A two-part field study was conducted in Smith Ranch-Highland in-situ recovery (ISR) near Douglas, Wyoming, to evaluate the restorative capacity of the aquifer downgradient (i.e., hydrologically downstream) of a Uranium ISR mining site with respect to the transport of uranium and other potential contaminants in groundwater after mining has ceased. The study was partially conducted by checking the Uranium content and the alkalinity of separate wells, some wells had been restored and others had not. A map and in-depth procedures of the study are included.

  1. Gamma ray fluorescence for in situ evaluation of ore in Witwatersrand gold mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolle, R.

    1979-01-01

    A system for quantitative in situ evaluation of ore in Witwatersrand gold mines was researched and subsequently developed. The principle of measurement is based on the excitation of gold K X-rays in rock face samples by the 88 keV gamma radiation from a Cadmium-109 radioisotope source. The X-rays and scattered radiation from the rock matrix are detected by a hyperpure germanium detector cooled by liquid nitrogen in a portable probe. In the fluorescence spectrum the intensity ratio of the gold Kβ peaks to their immediate scattered background is evaluated and quantitatively converted in the portable analyser to area concentration units. All aspects of the physical and instrumental measurement had to be investigated to arrive at a system capable of quantitative evaluation of trace concentrations in stope face ore samples. The parameters of spectrum evaluation were investigated from fundamental principles to allow quantitative assessment of different methods of peak evaluation for optimization of the method as a whole. The basic concepts of random signal processing times were developed together with new concepts of pileup parameters to allow a quantitative description of the data acquisition rate of a complete analog pulse processing system. With this foundation a practical measuring geometry and optimum values for signal processing time parameters, for detector size and for discriminator positions for spectrum evaluation could be determined. Parallel with the derivation of optimum measurement parameters went the development of instruments, their field testing and appraisal of the method. The development of the gamma ray fluorescence method has shown the potential of the method to serve as an ore valuation tool and to assist in the geological identification of strata in Witwatersrand gold mines

  2. Summarizing of new techniques in uranium mining and metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Delin; Zhang Fei; Su Yanru; Zeng Yijun; Meng Jin

    2010-01-01

    According to character of national resources and uranium mining and metallurgical science and technology members research achievements, new techniques in ten scientific research area of in-situ leaching, heap leaching, multi-metal comprehensive recovery, bio-metallurgy etc. for 10 years is introduced in this paper. The level of innovation ability is shown by technical index, resources recovery and reduction capital cost etc. datum. The application bound of natural uranium resource is enlarged and production ability of national uranium is increased. It is put forward renovation and development ideas for uranium mining and metallurgy. (authors)

  3. Study and application of new chelating resin to recovery uranium from in-situ leach solution with high content saline chloride ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianguo; Qiu Yueshuang; Feng Yu; Deng Huidong; Zhao Chaoya

    2014-01-01

    Research on the adsorption and elution property of D814 chelating resin was carried out aiming at the difficult separation of uranium from high content saline chloride ion in situ leach liquor and the adsorption mechanism is also discussed. Influence factors such as contact time, pH value, Ca"2"+, Mg"2"+ and Cl"- concentration etc. to the resin adsorption were studied. Experimental results show that adsorption rate is lowly which need 6h to arrive at the adsorption equilibrium. The resin adsorption uranium pH in the solution is from l.33 to 9. When total salinity is over 20 g/L, calcium ion, and magnesium ion is about 3 g/L, there are no big influence on resin adsorption capacity. The resin has good chloride ion resistance. When chloride ion is over 60 g/L, it is no influence on resin adsorption uranium. Column experiment results indicate that ratio of saturation volume to break-through point volume is l.82, resin saturation uranium capacity is 40.5 mg. U/_g_(_∓_)_R. When elution volume bed number is 23, the eluted solution uranium concentration is below 80 mg/L. The elution rate of the uranium is 96.2%. (authors)

  4. Application of in-situ stress measurement on bursts disasters of rock and CO{sub 2} in coal mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian-Jie Wang; Dong-Sheng Sun; Li-Rong Zhang; Guan-Wu Zhou [Ministry of Land and Resources, Beijing (China)

    2009-01-15

    For the purpose of reduction and prevention of rock burst disasters and CO{sub 2}, measurements were made of in-situ stress and mechanical parameters of rock in Yingcheng mine. Geological structure and gas measurements were studied and the stress field was simulated and distribution of stress field was obtained in this area. On the basis of the study, the danger areas of rockbursts and CO{sub 2} were predicted. Preventive measures were suggested to decrease gas pressure and in-situ stress in front of the working face with advance boreholes relieving blasting. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Decommissioning of facilities for mining and milling or radioactive ores and closeout of residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information to Member States in order to assist in planning and implementing the decommissioning/closeout of uranium mine/mill facilities, mines, tailings impoundments, mining debris piles, leach residues and unprocessed ore stockpiles. The report presents an overview of the factors involved in planning and implementing the decommissioning/closeout of uranium mine/mill facilities. The information applies to mines, mills, tailings piles, mining debris piles and leach residues that are present as operational, mothballed or abandoned projects, as well as to future mining and milling projects. The report identifies the major factors that need to be considered in the decommissioning/closeout activities, including regulatory considerations; decommissioning of the mine/mill buildings, structures and facilities; decommissioning/closeout of open pit and underground mines; decommissioning/closeout of tailings impoundments; decommissioning/closeout of mining debris piles, unprocessed ore and other contaminated material such as heap leach piles, in situe leach facilities and contaminated soils; restoration of the site, vicinity properties and groundwater; radiation protection and health and safety considerations; and an assessment of costs and post-decommissioning or post-closeout maintenance and monitoring needs. 55 refs, figs and tabs

  6. Discussion on well field technology for acid in-situ leaching of uranium at a deposit of Yining uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Shandong; Wu Yunhui; Yin Guifang

    2005-01-01

    The characteristics of geology and hydrogeology of a uranium deposit, the make-up and use of lixiviant, equilibrium control of push-pull, improvement of air lift efficiency, layout of well net, and management of well construction are described. (authors)

  7. In-situ performance evaluation of radon measurement techniques in Uranium mine exhausts of Jaduguda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patnaik, R.L.; Jha, V.N.; Singh, M.K.; Meena, J.S.; Rajesh Kumar; Srivastava, V.S.; Sethy, N.K.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Several techniques are used for the measurement of the activity concentration of radon in the work place and the environment. Devices like Scintillation cell, Alpha guard and Low Level Radon Detection System (LLRDS) are widely used for the estimation of radon. Some of the devices like scintillation cell is normally used in high activity concentration, whereas, device like LLRDS is used in low activity concentration range. All these above devices are used in ambient mode in which air sample is either collected in a cell or in a chamber and the alpha counts are recorded after a definite delay. In some device, air is allowed to be diffused through a filter and alpha activity is estimated using proper detection system. Passive radon dosimeters can effectively be used both in low and high activity concentration range. The cumulative radon exposure can be assessed using passive radon dosimeters. For in situ performance evaluation an area is required where both high and low level activity concentration of radon is anticipated. Uranium mines exhaust area is presumed to be an area where both these conditions can be found by mere variation in the placement of the device. Inter comparison exercise can also be done effectively at this location using various devices of radon estimation

  8. Data Mining of the Thermal Performance of Cool-Pipes in Massive Concrete via In Situ Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Zheng; Hu, Yu; Li, Qingbin; Zhang, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    Embedded cool-pipes are very important for massive concrete because their cooling effect can effectively avoid thermal cracks. In this study, a data mining approach to analyzing the thermal performance of cool-pipes via in situ monitoring is proposed. Delicate monitoring program is applied in a high arch dam project that provides a good and mass data source. The factors and relations related to the thermal performance of cool-pipes are obtained in a built theory thermal model. The supporting ...

  9. An evaluation of health risk to the public as a consequence of in situ uranium mining in Wyoming, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedig, Elizabeth; Johnson, Thomas E

    2015-12-01

    In the United States there is considerable public concern regarding the health effects of in situ recovery uranium mining. These concerns focus principally on exposure to contaminants mobilized in groundwater by the mining process. However, the risk arising as a result of mining must be viewed in light of the presence of naturally occurring uranium ore and other constituents which comprise a latent hazard. The United States Environmental Protection Agency recently proposed new guidelines for successful restoration of an in situ uranium mine by limiting concentrations of thirteen groundwater constituents: arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, silver, nitrate (as nitrogen), molybdenum, radium, total uranium, and gross α activity. We investigated the changes occurring to these constituents at an ISR uranium mine in Wyoming, USA by comparing groundwater quality at baseline measurement to that at stability (post-restoration) testing. Of the groundwater constituents considered, only uranium and radium-226 showed significant (p < 0.05) deviation from site-wide baseline conditions in matched-wells. Uranium concentrations increased by a factor of 5.6 (95% CI 3.6-8.9 times greater) while radium-226 decreased by a factor of about one half (95% CI 0.42-0.75 times less). Change in risk was calculated using the RESRAD (onsite) code for an individual exposed as a resident-farmer; total radiation dose to a resident farmer decreased from pre-to post-mining by about 5.2 mSv y(-1). Higher concentrations of uranium correspond to increased biomarkers of nephrotoxicity, however the clinical significance of this increase is unclear. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Biotechnological processes in the Canadian mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCready, R.G.L.

    1991-01-01

    Since the initiation of the Federal Government's National Strategy on Biotechnology in 1983, CANMET has coordinated the development of numerous biotechnological processes both for economical metal recovery and for the protection of the environment. This presentation will give a brief overview of the development of in-place, underground bacterial leaching of uranium, the development of in-situ bacterial leaching of copper and zinc, bio recovery of metallic selenium from smelter effluents, the degradation of an organic pollutant from a metal smelter and biological treatment of acidic mine drainage. (author)

  11. In situ gamma ray measurements of radionuclides at a disused phosphate mine on the West Coast of South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezuidenhout, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    High levels of uranium and its radioactive progeny like radium is normally associated with phosphate mining. In Situ gamma ray spectroscopy as a survey tool has been successfully applied to assess radionuclide concentrations in various geographical environments. A transportable and robust gamma ray detection system (GISPI) was therefore employed to determine the concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides at a disused phosphate mine on the West Coast of South Africa. The concentrations of radium, thorium and potassium were measured and plotted. The measurements showed fairly high concentrations with medians of 320 Bq/kg for "2"2"6Ra, 64 Bq/kg for "2"3"2Th and 390 Bq/kg for "4"0K. The highest concentrations were however confined to specific areas of the mine. The effective dose due to gamma irradiation for the various areas of the mine was also estimated and the highest estimated level was 0.45 mSv/y. The article finally draws conclusions as to the origins and impact of the radiation. - Highlights: • A self-developed transportable and robust gamma ray detection system (the GISPI) was employed in the measurements. • A different mathematical analysis method was used. • QGIS was used extensively. • The results is important for current developments in infrastructure and mining.

  12. Assessment of trace ground-water contaminants release from south Texas in-situ uranium solution-mining sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidwell, J.R.; Humenick, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    The future of uranium solution mining in south Texas depends heavily on the industry's ability to restore production zone ground water to acceptable standards. This study investigated the extent of trace contaminant solubilization during mining and subsequent restoration attempts, first through a literature search centered on uranium control mechanisms, and then by laboratory experiments simulating the mining process. The literature search indicated the complexity of the situation. The number of possible interactions between indigenous elements and materials pointed on the site specificity of the problem. The column studies evaluated three different production area ores. Uranium, molybdenum, arsenic, vanadium, and selenium were analyzed in column effluents. After simulated mining operations were completed, uranium was found to be the most persistent trace element. However, subsequent ground water flushing of the columns could restore in-situ water to EPA recommended drinking water concentrations. Limited data indicated that ground water flowing through mined areas may solubilize molybdenum present in down gradient areas adjacent to the production zone due to increased oxidation potential of ground water if adequate restoration procedures are not followed.

  13. In Situ Generated Colloid Transport of Cu and Zn in Reclaimed Mine Soil Profiles Associated with Bio solids Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.O.; Karathanasis, A.D.; Matocha, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Areas reclaimed for agricultural uses following coal mining often receive bio solids applications to increase organic matter and fertility. Transport of heavy metals within these soils may be enhanced by the additional presence of bio solids colloids. Intact monoliths from reclaimed and undisturbed soils in Virginia and Kentucky were leached to observe Cu and Zn mobility with and without bio solids application. Transport of Cu and Zn was observed in both solution and colloid associated phases in reclaimed and undisturbed forest soils, where the presence of unweathered spoil material and bio solids amendments contributed to higher metal release in solution fractions. Up to 81% of mobile Cu was associated with the colloid fraction, particularly when gabbiest was present, while only up to 18% of mobile Zn was associated with the colloid fraction. The colloid bound Cu was exchangeable by ammonium acetate, suggesting that it will release into groundwater resources.

  14. In Situ Generated Colloid Transport of Cu and Zn in Reclaimed Mine Soil Profiles Associated with Bio solids Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.O.; Karathanasis, A.D.; Matocha, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Areas reclaimed for agricultural uses following coal mining often receive bio solids applications to increase organic matter and fertility. Transport of heavy metals within these soils may be enhanced by the additional presence of bio solids colloids. Intact monoliths from reclaimed and undisturbed soils in Virginia and Kentucky were leached to observe Cu and Zn mobility with and without bio solids application. Transport of Cu and Zn was observed in both solution and colloid associated phases in reclaimed and undisturbed forest soils, where the presence of unweathered spoil material and bio solids amendments contributed to higher metal release in solution fractions. Up to 81% of mobile Cu was associated with the colloid fraction, particularly when gibbsite was present, while only up to 18% of mobile Zn was associated with the colloid fraction. The colloid bound Cu was exchangeable by ammonium acetate, suggesting that it will release into groundwater resources.

  15. Restoration of uranium solution mining deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVries, F.W.; Lawes, B.C.

    1981-01-01

    Ammonium carbonates are commonly used as the lixiviant for in-situ leaching of uranium ores. However this leads to the deposition of ammonium ions in the uranium ore formation and the problem of ammonia contamination of ground water which may find its way into the drinking water supply. The ammonia contamination of the ore deposit may be reduced by injecting an aqueous solution of a potassium salt (carbonate, bicarbonate, halide, sulfate, bisulfate, persulfate, or monopersulfate) into the deposit after mining has ceased

  16. Bacterial Leaching

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and studies microbial biotechnology and ... foundation for subsequent research into the role of microorgan- ... are more readily accesible, for example those in solution, rather .... Vat leaching as currently applied to oxide ores involves the.

  17. Resource impact evaluation of in-situ uranium groundwater restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbeneau, R.J.; Rohlich, G.A.

    1981-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of restoration on the groundwater following in-situ uranium solution mining in South Texas. Restoration is necessary in order to reduce the amounts of undesired chemical constituents left in solution after mining operations have ceased, and thus return the groundwater to a quality consistent with pre-mining use and potential use. Various restoration strategies have been proposed and are discussed. Of interest are the hydrologic, environmental, social, and economic impacts of these restoration alternatives. Much of the discussion concerning groundwater restoration is based on the use of an ammonium carbonate-bicarbonate leach solution in the mining process. This has been the principal leach solution used during the early period of mining in South Texas. Recently, because of apparent difficulties in restoring ammonium to proposed or required levels, many of the companies have changed to the use of other leach solutions. Because little is known about restoration with these other leach solutions they have not been specifically addressed in this report. Likewise, we have not addressed the question of the fate of heavy metals. Following a summary of the development of South Texas in-situ mining in Chapter Two, Chapter Three describes the surface and groundwater resources of the uranium mining district. Chapter Four addresses the economics of water use, and Chapter Five is concerned with regulation of the in-situ uranium industry in Texas. A discussion of groundwater restoration alternatives and impacts is presented in Chapter Six. Chapter Seven contains a summary and a discussion, and conclusions derived from this study. Two case histories are presented in Appendices A and B

  18. In situ monitoring of primary roofbolts at underground coal mines in the USA

    OpenAIRE

    Spearing, A.J.S.; Hyett, A.

    2014-01-01

    Primary roof support represents the first line of defence against rock-related falls of ground in underground mines, and improper utilization or misunderstanding of the applicability and behaviour of primary support can be costly from a safety standpoint. This is a major concern for underground mines, as roof support is the single most costly expense from a mining operational perspective. This is further backed by the evidence that, in the USA, hundreds of injuries and fatalities still occur ...

  19. Leaching behavior of simulated high-level waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamizono, Hiroshi

    1987-03-01

    The author's work in the study on the leaching behavior of simulated high-level waste (HLW) glass were summarized. The subjects described are (1) leach rates at high temperatures, (2) effects of cracks on leach rates, (3) effects of flow rate on leach rates, and (4) an in-situ burial test in natural groundwater. In the following section, the leach rates obtained by various experiments were summarized and discussed. (author)

  20. Data Mining of the Thermal Performance of Cool-Pipes in Massive Concrete via In Situ Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Embedded cool-pipes are very important for massive concrete because their cooling effect can effectively avoid thermal cracks. In this study, a data mining approach to analyzing the thermal performance of cool-pipes via in situ monitoring is proposed. Delicate monitoring program is applied in a high arch dam project that provides a good and mass data source. The factors and relations related to the thermal performance of cool-pipes are obtained in a built theory thermal model. The supporting vector machine (SVM technology is applied to mine the data. The thermal performances of iron pipes and high-density polyethylene (HDPE pipes are compared. The data mining result shows that iron pipe has a better heat removal performance when flow rate is lower than 50 L/min. It has revealed that a turning flow rate exists for iron pipe which is 80 L/min. The prediction and classification results obtained from the data mining model agree well with the monitored data, which illustrates the validness of the approach.

  1. Alternative waste residue materials for passive in situ prevention of sulfide-mine tailings oxidation: a field evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, Peter; Johnson, Raymond H; Neuschütz, Clara; Alakangas, Lena; Öhlander, Björn

    2014-02-28

    Novel solutions for sulfide-mine tailings remediation were evaluated in field-scale experiments on a former tailings repository in northern Sweden. Uncovered sulfide-tailings were compared to sewage-sludge biosolid amended tailings over 2 years. An application of a 0.2m single-layer sewage-sludge amendment was unsuccessful at preventing oxygen ingress to underlying tailings. It merely slowed the sulfide-oxidation rate by 20%. In addition, sludge-derived metals (Cu, Ni, Fe, and Zn) migrated and precipitated at the tailings-to-sludge interface. By using an additional 0.6m thick fly-ash sealing layer underlying the sewage sludge layer, a solution to mitigate oxygen transport to the underlying tailings and minimize sulfide-oxidation was found. The fly-ash acted as a hardened physical barrier that prevented oxygen diffusion and provided a trap for sludge-borne metals. Nevertheless, the biosolid application hampered the application, despite the advances in the effectiveness of the fly-ash layer, as sludge-borne nitrate leached through the cover system into the underlying tailings, oxidizing pyrite. This created a 0.3m deep oxidized zone in 6-years. This study highlights that using sewage sludge in unconventional cover systems is not always a practical solution for the remediation of sulfide-bearing mine tailings to mitigate against sulfide weathering and acid rock drainage formation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Selection of lixiviant System for the alkaline in-situ Leaching of uranium from an arkosic type of sandstone and measuring the dissolution behaviour of some metals and non-metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Y.; Shah, S.S.; Siddiq, M.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory simulation study was carried out to check the possibility of alkaline in-situ leaching of uranium from an arkosic type of sandstone recovered from a specific location at a depth of 300-500 m. The ore body was overlaying impervious clay shale below the water table. Different CO/sub 3/ containing soluble salts were tested as complexing agent of the UO/sup +2/ ions along with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ as oxidizing agent. The lixiviant system, comprising NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/ as complexing agent along with H/Sub 2/O/sub 2/ as oxidizing agent in concentrations of 5 g/L and 0.5 g/L respectively, was found to be the most efficient for the leaching of uranium among the 25 different compositions employed. Along with uranium, the dissolution behaviour of 15 other metals, non-metals and radicals, including eight transition metals, was also observed in the lixiviant employed. These were Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, SO/sub 4/, CO/sub 3/, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and Mo. It was found that the leaching of uranium compared to non-transition et als/radicals followed the trend Cl > SO > U > Na > K > Mg > Ca > CO. The comparison of uranium leaching to the transition metals was in the order U > Cr > Mo > V > Ti > Cu > Zn > Mn > Fe. Physical parameters like pH, oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and conductivity were also measured for the fresh and pregnant lixiviants. It was found that the leaching of uranium is directly related to the concentration of native soluble hexavalent uranium, contact time of the lixiviant and ore and to some extent with the total concentration of uranium as well as the porosity and permeability of the ore. (author)

  3. 222Rn levels in Kingsville, Texas, and vicinity near an in situ uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGehee, T.L.; Martino, M.R.; Harr, T.L.; Samudio, A.

    1994-01-01

    An investigation of the 222 Rn levels in ground water, soils, and indoor air has disclosed two 222 Rn ground-water anomalies in the Kingsville, Texas, area from uranium-enriched sandstones of the Evangeline aquifer. Indoor air 222 Rn levels were measured in summer 1991 (from undetectable to 3.2 pCi/l) and winter 1991-1992 (0.01 to 3.98 pCi/l) to determine seasonal extremes and risk to the public. Soil 222 Rn concentration maps ranging from undetectable to 75.4 pCi/l correlate to the low levels found in homes. Results of this study are based on analyses of 218 water samples, 52 in situ soil samples, and 104 indoor air samples. Water samples were injected into a scintillation mix (EPA/EERF-Manual-78-1) and analyzed by liquid scintillation techniques. Indoor air and soil samples were collected using passive charcoal canisters and analyzed by gamma-ray detection techniques (EPA 520/5-87-005). One ground-water 222 Rn anomaly lies near the permitted boundary of a large uranium deposit that is being mined. Private wells near the ore body yielded, 1,023 to 23,256 pCi/l at the well head. A second anomaly is located 2.5 mi (4 km) north of the uranium ore body near Naval Air Station, Kingsville. Private water wells in this area yielded 442 to 1,950 pCi/l 222 Rn at the well head. The radon anomalies are related to subsurface mineralization, which is one of the known natural geologic hazards of this area. Indoor air 222 Rn levels are well below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US/EPA) action limit of 4 pCi/l. However, the high levels of 222 RN in ground water should be mitigated before entry into the home environment. High 222 Rn levels in ground water were reduced to background levels in household waters by use of a pre-introduction large-capacity holding tank

  4. Recovery of tungsten from wolframite from the Igarape Manteiga mine (Rondonia - Brazil) via acidic leaching; Isolamento do tungstenio da volframita da mina de Igarape Manteiga (Rondonia - Brasil) por lixiviacao acida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulino, Jessica Frontino; Afonso, Julio Carlos [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mantovano, Jose Luiz; Vianna, Claudio Augusto; Cunha, Jose Waldemar Silva Dias da [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    We report results of the efficiency of tungsten extraction from wolframite concentrate (containing 61.5 wt % WO{sub 3}) from the Igarape Manteiga mine (state of Rondonia, Brazil) through acid leaching with strong mineral acids at 100 deg C and 400 rpm for 2-4 h. HCl yielded insoluble matter containing the highest WO{sub 3} content (90 wt %). This solid was dissolved in concentrated NH{sub 3(aq)} at 25 deg C and the insoluble matter filtrated. The filtrate was slowly evaporated. 70 wt % of the tungsten present in the starting concentrate material was recovered as ammonium paratungstate (APT). (author)

  5. Leaching mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.R.; Colombo, P.

    1984-01-01

    Sufficient data are lacking to provide a basis for adequately assessing the long term leaching behavior of solidified low level radioactive waste forms in their disposal environment. Although the release of radioactivity from a waste form to an aqueous environment is recognized to be due to one or more mechanisms such as diffusion, dissolution, corrosion or ion exchange, the leaching mechanisms and the factors which control the leaching behavior of waste forms are not fully understood. This study will determine the prevailing mechanisms for a variety of selected LLW solidification agents which are being considered for use by defense and commercial generators and which will cover the broadest possible number of mechanisms. The investigation will proceed by the postulation of mathematical models representative of the prevailing mechanism(s) and the use of statistically designed experiments to test the actual leaching behavior of laborattory samples against the postulated representations. Maximum use of existing leach data in the literature will be made by incorporating literature results into a computerized data base along with the experimental results generated in this task

  6. Some problems on target-area selection for searching interstratified infiltration sandstone-type uranium deposits suitable to in-situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Shaokang

    2005-01-01

    The sandstone-type uranium deposits are widely distributed in the world, but only 3 regions where deposits reach uranium province size and are suitable for in-situ leaching have been found. Deposits are all of the interstratified-oxidation type, and developed at the combination sites of the most recent orogenic belt with young or old platforms in form of 'branching, inclining and disappearing' of the former. Geomorphologically, these regions consist of 3 big 'steps' from high mountain regions through lower mountains or hills to the margins of the basin, which are in form of declining slope and form a good hydrodynamic conditions. Climatically, an arid climate was always required for the period of sandstone-type uranium ore formation, while annual evaporation is higher than the annual precipitation, the high mountain regions with high potential energy of water melted from glacier and snow which is thought to be a long-term and steady underground water supplier for lower mountains or hill regions and the margins of the basin. However, in orogenic belt there is a good number of inter-mountain basins with at least two big 'steps' indicating a good potential to discover interstratified-oxidation sandstone-type uranium deposits in coal-bearing basins. Many Chinese and foreign uranium geologists have noticed that there is an east-west oriented Hercynian uranium mineralization belt lying across the middle of Europe, the eastern section is superimposed on the Ural-Tianshan-Mongolian mobile belt and together with the latter it was infected by the Alpine-Himalayan movement in Meso-Cenozoic. This resulted in a complicated metallogenic scene with different ore-forming times, multiple types of deposits, and spatial concentration. In addition, a sub-meridional-oriented 'Vebris belt' running through the eastern part of Asia is considered as combination part of the Central Asian mobile belt with the Western Pacific mobile belt which reflects inhomogeneity in crustal construction of

  7. Optimization of uranium leach mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schecter, R.S.; Bommer, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of well pattern and well spacing on uranium recovery and oxidant utilization are considered. As expected, formation permeability heterogeneities and anisotropies are found to be important issues requiring careful consideration; however, it also is shown that the oxidant efficiency and the produced uranium solution concentrations are sensitive to the presence of other minerals competing with uranium for oxidant. If the Damkohler number for competing minerals, which measures the speed of the reaction, exceeds that for uranium, the competing mineral will have to be oxidized completely to recover a large proportion of the uranium. If the Damkohler number is smaller, it may be possible to achieve considerable selectivity for uranium by adjusting the well spacing. 9 refs

  8. Leaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinen, H.J.; McClelland, G.E.; Lindstrom, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    A gold and uranium ore is heap leached in accordance with the process comprising initial agglomeration of fines in the feed by means of a binding agent and cyanide solution. The lixiviant comprises a compatible mixture of sodium cyanide and sodium bicarbonate

  9. Leaching process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinen, H J; McClelland, G E; Lindstrom, R E

    1982-10-18

    A gold and uranium ore is heap leached in accordance with the process comprising initial agglomeration of fines in the feed by means of a binding agent and cyanide solution. The lixiviant comprises a compatible mixture of sodium cyanide and sodium bicarbonate.

  10. Report on the feasibility of the in situ radiometric determination of uranium grade in Witwatersrand gold and uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, C.J.B.; Wesolinski, E.S.; Corner, B.

    1982-08-01

    The chip-sampling technique currently employed by the South African gold and uranium-mining industry, for the prediction of face grade, has several drawbacks, namely: 1) it is labour-intensive; 2) sample volumes are often unrepresentative and prone to human error; and 3) the uranium mineralisation may be very erratic along the reef. In situ radiometric assaying for uranium along the reef, on the other hand, is a rapid, essentially one-man operation, enabling a much larger and hence a more representative sample volume to be measured. The high radiometric background inherent in any uranium mine necessitates some form of high-density shielding in order to facilitate quantitative in situ assaying. This report, therefore, briefly outlines the origin, nature, detection and shielding of gamma rays. Results obtained with a frontally shielded total-count instrument showed that radiometric estimates of uranium grade are comparable to those obtained by batch mining and can be used for the prediction of face grades, provided that the ore is in radiometric equilibrium and that thorium and potassium are either not present, or vary sympathetically with the uranium grade. Spectral analysis showed, however, that these circumstances will also permit the use of a collimated (side-shielded) detector of acceptable weight, provided that only the low-energy portion of the spectrum is measured. The advantages of a collimated detector over a frontally shielded detector are also noteworthy, viz.: 1) only one reading is taken per sample point rather than two, as is the case with the frontally shielded system, thus improving counting statistics; and 2) the shielding is permanently fixed to the detector. Comprehensive design considerations for a compact, portable instrument are suggested and methods for determining background radiation as applicable to a collimated detector are described

  11. A cost comparison study of open pit mining vs. in situ assisted gravity drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntosh, J.; Luhning, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    The twin-well steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) process has resulted in breakthrough technology to access previously uneconomical deep-seated oil sands reserves in Alberta, and to provide a very cost-effective and environmentally acceptable method for extracting bitumen from reserves having a minimum of 30 m overburden. In the evaluation of new or improved bitumen recovery technologies for its new North Mine, Syncrude Canada has recognized that SAGD was a potential alternate to the current open pit mining and hot water extraction process. A study was conducted to compare and evaluate bitumen recovery by the two schemes at the North Mine site, scheduled to begin operations in 1996, for the reserves under Syncrude's tailings pond, and at a new grassroots area. Study description and analysis of results are presented for the grassroots case. The assumptions and mining/recovery processes used for the mining or SAGD method are detailed and the advantages and drawbacks of each scheme are noted. Results show that the SAGD unit supply costs are projected to be proportionately lower than the corresponding open pit mining/hot water extraction (OP/X) cost, using a 20-y project life. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the SAGD process is more sensitive to natural gas costs, while the OP/X scheme is more sensitive to power costs. The SAGD process is much less labor-intensive than OP/X and has obvious advantages in terms of tailings disposal and post-mining reclamation. In addition, the underground nature of SAGD operation eliminates adverse effects of the weather on working conditions. 11 figs

  12. In-situ treatment of acid mine waters using fluidized bed ash: Field study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everett, J.W.; Canty, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    A slurry of mine water and fluidized bed ash (FBA) was injected into an abandoned coal mine in eastern Oklahoma in July 1997. Oil-field technology was used to inject 1.8 Gg (418 tons) of FBA through five wells in 15 hours. Prior to injection the seep water had a pH of 4.4, was net acidic (acidity over 400 mg/L as CaCO 3 ), and had relatively high metal concentrations (in mg/L: Fe-200; Mn-7; and Al-6). After injection, during the period of effective treatment, the seep water had a pH above 6.0, less net acidity, and had lower metals concentrations (in mg/L: Fe-120; Mn-5; and Al-< PQL). When the treated seep water exited the mine, the dissolved metals oxidized and hydrolyzed. As the metals precipitated, the alkalinity introduced by the FBA was consumed and the pH dropped. However, the seep water characteristics upon entering the receiving stream were improved, compared to pre-injection. The resulting seep water quality is such that it is more amenable to further treatment by passive treatment methods, such as anoxic limestone drains or wetlands. Alkaline injection is a finite treatment process. Eventually, the added alkalinity is exhausted, at which time the seep returns to pre-injection conditions, necessitating another injection of ash. For the study discussed in this paper, the treatment lasted approximately 15 months. While the amount of alkalinity added to the mine could have potentially treated much more than a year's volume of seep water, it is believed that much of the injected alkalinity was unavailable in backwater areas in the mine. This alkalinity contributed little, if any, to the treatment of water flowing through the mine. Mine hydrology, especially during injection are crucial to treatment longevity

  13. Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairullah Khan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Opinion mining is an interesting area of research because of its applications in various fields. Collecting opinions of people about products and about social and political events and problems through the Web is becoming increasingly popular every day. The opinions of users are helpful for the public and for stakeholders when making certain decisions. Opinion mining is a way to retrieve information through search engines, Web blogs and social networks. Because of the huge number of reviews in the form of unstructured text, it is impossible to summarize the information manually. Accordingly, efficient computational methods are needed for mining and summarizing the reviews from corpuses and Web documents. This study presents a systematic literature survey regarding the computational techniques, models and algorithms for mining opinion components from unstructured reviews.

  14. Economic evaluation of in situ extraction for copper, gold, and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, F.M.; Chase, C.K.; Bhappu, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    In situ extraction for copper, gold, and uranium, generally involves several common alternative processes and techniques. These include dump leaching, heap leaching, leaching of fractured ore in-place or bore hole mining and unit operations such as cementation, solvent extraction, ion-exchange, or carbon-in-pulp. Since the metallurgical effectiveness and economics of such processes and unit operations are well established, it would be possible to select the optimum alternative for extracting either copper, gold, or uranium from their ores using in situ extraction technology. Efforts made to provide metallurgical evaluation as well as capital and operating costs for the various processes and unit operations are reported. These costs are used in preparing feasibility studies for in situ extraction of these metals

  15. Uranium exploration, mining and ore enrichment techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, H.D.; Wentzlau, D.

    1985-01-01

    The paper describes the different types of uranium deposits and their importance. It is shown that during the present depressed uranium market situation, mainly high grade deposits such as unconformity-related deposits can be mined economically. The different successive exploration steps are outlined including methods used for uranium. Uranium mining does not greatly differ from normal mining, but the uranium metallurgy needs its own specialized but already classic technology. Only a relative small amount of uranium can be expected from projects where uranium is produced by in situ leach methods or by extraction from phosphoric acid. A short summary of investment costs and operating costs is given for an average uranium mine. The last chapter deals with the definition of different reserve categories and outlines the uranium reserves of the western world including the uranium production (1983) and the expected uranium production capacity for 1985 and 1990. (orig.) [de

  16. Bacterial leaching of waste uranium materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbic, F F; Bracilović, D M; Krajincanić, B V; Lucić, J L

    1976-01-01

    The effect of ferrobacteria and thiobacteria on the leaching of waste uranium materials from which 70-80% of uranium was previously leached by classical chemical hydrometallurgical procedure has been investigated. The bacteria used are found in the ore and the mine water of Zletovska River locality, Yugoslavia. Parameters of biological leaching were examined in the laboratory. Leaching conditions were changed with the aim of increasing the amount of uranium leached. The effect of pyrite added to the waste materials before the beginning of leaching has also been examined. Uranium leaching is directly proportional to the composition and number of ferrobacteria and thiobacteria, and increased by almost twice the value obtained from the same starting materials without using bacteria. Increased sulphuric acid concentrations stimulate considerably the rate of leaching. Uranium leaching is increased up to 20% while sulphuric acid consumption is simultaneously decreased by the addition of pyrite. Uranium concentrations in starting waste materials used for leaching were extremely low (0.0278 and 0.372% U) but about 60% recovery of uranium was obtained, with relatively low consumption of sulphuric acid.

  17. Bacterial leaching of waste uranium materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbic, F.F.; Bracilovic, D.M.; Krajincanic, B.V.; Lucic, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of ferrobacteria and thiobacteria on the leaching of waste uranium materials from which 70-80% of uranium was previously leached by classical chemical hydrometallurgical procedure has been investigated. The bacteria used are found in the ore and the mine water of Zletovska River locality, Yugoslavia. Parameters of biological leaching were examined in the laboratory. Leaching conditions were changed with the aim of increasing the amount of uranium leached. The effect of pyrite added to the waste materials before the beginning of leaching has also been examined. Uranium leaching is directly proportional to the composition and number of ferrobacteria and thiobacteria, and increased by almost twice the value obtained from the same starting materials without using bacteria. Increased sulphuric acid concentrations stimulate considerably the rate of leaching. Uranium leaching is increased up to 20% while sulphuric acid consumption is simultaneously decreased by the addition of pyrite. Uranium concentrations in starting waste materials used for leaching were extremely low (0.0278 and 0.0372% U) but about 60% recovery of uranium was obtained, with relatively low consumption of sulphuric acid. (author)

  18. Results from the large scale in situ drift sealing experiment in the salt mine Sondershausen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitz, P.; Koch, G. [Freiberg Univ. of Mining an Technology, Institute of Mining Engineering (Germany); Gruner, M. [Wilsnack and Partners Freiberg / Saxony (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of the research, which is supported by the Federal Ministry for Education and Research (Bundesministerium fur Bildung und Forschung) and the state of Thuringia from 1997 to 2003, are long term stable drift sealing systems for underground waste disposals. As a result of the material selection for the sealing element bricks from a mixture of bentonite and quartz-sand were produced. The static abutment was built with natural salt bricks. A real drift sealing system was built in the former potash mine Sondershausen in a depth of 700 m and then tested under a fluid pressure up to 80 bar with saturated salt-brine. The functionality of the bentonite sealing element was proved successfully. Since 1998 some 500 t of such bentonite blocks with sand have been produced and built-in in underground sealing elements in salt mines. (authors)

  19. Modelling the Small Throw Fault Effect on the Stability of a Mining Roadway and Its Verification by In Situ Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małkowski Piotr

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The small throw fault zones cause serious problems for mining engineers. The knowledge about the range of fractured zone around the roadway and about roadway’s contour deformations helps a lot with the right support design or its reinforcement. The paper presents the results of numerical analysis of the effect of a small throw fault zone on the convergence of the mining roadway and the extent of the fracturing induced around the roadway. The computations were performed on a dozen physical models featuring various parameters of rock mass and support for the purpose to select the settings that reflects most suitably the behavior of tectonically disturbed and undisturbed rocks around the roadway. Finally, the results of the calculations were verified by comparing them with in situ convergence measurements carried out in the maingate D-2 in the “Borynia-Zofiówka-Jastrzębie” coal mine. Based on the results of measurements it may be concluded that the rock mass displacements around a roadway section within a fault zone during a year were four times in average greater than in the section tectonically unaffected. The results of numerical calculations show that extent of the yielding zone in the roof reaches two times the throw of the fault, in the floor 3 times the throw, and horizontally approx. 1.5 to 1.8 times the width of modelled fault zone. Only a few elasto-plastic models or models with joints between the rock beds can be recommended for predicting the performance of a roadway which is within a fault zone. It is possible, using these models, to design the roadway support of sufficient load bearing capacity at the tectonically disturbed section.

  20. International overview of ISL uranium mining operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, P.; Slezak, J.; Pool, T.; Beneš, V.; Gorbatenko, O.; Jones, B.; Märten, H.; Solodov, I.

    2014-01-01

    In situ leach (ISL; also called in situ leaching or in situ recovery, ISR) mining has become one of the standard uranium production methods, following early experimentation and production in the 1960s. Its application to amenable uranium deposits (in certain sedimentary formations) has been growing in view of its competitive production costs and low surface impacts. In 1997 the ISL share in total uranium production was 13%; by 2009 it had grown to over 30%, reaching 46% in 2011. In the past, ISL technology was applied mainly in Ukraine, the Czech Republic, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Bulgaria and the United States of America (USA). Recently it has been used in Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, the USA, Australia, China and the Russian Federation, with small operations or experiments elsewhere. ISL mining is gaining widespread acceptance. The IAEA is preparing an overview document to show how ISL experience around the world can be used to direct the development of technical activities, taking into account environmental considerations and an emphasis on the economics of the process, including responsible mine closure. With this document Member States and interested parties will have more information to design and efficiently and safely regulate current and future projects, with a view to maximize economic performance and minimize negative environmental impact. Highlights of the report’s findings will be provided here with a summary of the IAEA’s involvement in ISL over recent decades. Many reference links are provided to allow access to voluminous additional information. (author)

  1. Heap leach cyanide irrigation and risk to wildlife: Ramifications for the international cyanide management code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, D B; Madden-Hallett, D M; Smith, G B; Gursansky, W

    2017-06-01

    Exposed cyanide-bearing solutions associated with gold and silver recovery processes in the mining industry pose a risk to wildlife that interact with these solutions. This has been documented with cyanide-bearing tailings storage facilities, however risks associated with heap leach facilities are poorly documented, monitored and audited. Gold and silver leaching heap leach facilities use cyanide, pH-stabilised, at concentrations deemed toxic to wildlife. Their design and management are known to result in exposed cyanide-bearing solutions that are accessible to and present a risk to wildlife. Monitoring of the presence of exposed solutions, wildlife interaction, interpretation of risks and associated wildlife deaths are poorly documented. This paper provides a list of critical monitoring criteria and attempts to predict wildlife guilds most at risk. Understanding the significance of risks to wildlife from exposed cyanide solutions is complex, involving seasonality, relative position of ponding, temporal nature of ponding, solution palatability, environmental conditions, in situ wildlife species inventory and provision of alternative drinking sources for wildlife. Although a number of heap leach operations are certified as complaint with the International Cyanide Management Code (Cyanide Code), these criteria are not considered by auditors nor has systematic monitoring regime data been published. Without systematic monitoring and further knowledge, wildlife deaths on heap leach facilities are likely to remain largely unrecorded. This has ramifications for those operations certified as compliance with the Cyanide Code. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Thermal model of in-situ experiment of 32nd level Mysore mine, KGF. Report No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, P.K.; Mathur, R.K.; Godse, V.B.; Sunder Rajan, N.S.

    1985-01-01

    Canisters with immobilised high level radioactive wastes require isolation from the biosphere and need to be disposed of in a deep geological media so that radionuclides in the waste are contained in the media for extended period of time. Several countries are evaluating various host rocks for their suitability for location of a geological respository for such work. One of the main thrust of the present work in these countries is in conducting in-situ heater experiment to study the behaviour of the host rock at elevated temperature. The main purpose of the experiment is to evalutate the integrity of the rock by observing the propagation of microfractures consequent to thermal loading. This type of study would lead to optimisation of the spacing and depth of the bore holes and thus the economic usage of space deep underground. In India such thermomechanical experiments have been planned in abandoned chamber of Mysore and Nundydoorg mines of Kolar Gold Fields at the depths of about 1000m-1500m. The scope of the work detailed in this report is to provide guidance to the in situ experiment by developing thermal and thermomechanical models and to generate field data base of various thermal properties of the host rock to facilitate validation of the model. In addition it is also intended to form a basis for developing other complex models which can predict stresses and displacements. (author)

  3. In situ proteo-metabolomics reveals metabolite secretion by the acid mine drainage bio-indicator, Euglena mutabilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halter, David; Goulhen-Chollet, Florence; Gallien, Sébastien; Casiot, Corinne; Hamelin, Jérôme; Gilard, Françoise; Heintz, Dimitri; Schaeffer, Christine; Carapito, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Bertin, Philippe N

    2012-01-01

    Euglena mutabilis is a photosynthetic protist found in acidic aquatic environments such as peat bogs, volcanic lakes and acid mine drainages (AMDs). Through its photosynthetic metabolism, this protist is supposed to have an important role in primary production in such oligotrophic ecosystems. Nevertheless, the exact contribution of E. mutabilis in organic matter synthesis remains unclear and no evidence of metabolite secretion by this protist has been established so far. Here we combined in situ proteo-metabolomic approaches to determine the nature of the metabolites accumulated by this protist or potentially secreted into an AMD. Our results revealed that the secreted metabolites are represented by a large number of amino acids, polyamine compounds, urea and some sugars but no fatty acids, suggesting a selective organic matter contribution in this ecosystem. Such a production may have a crucial impact on the bacterial community present on the study site, as it has been suggested previously that prokaryotes transport and recycle in situ most of the metabolites secreted by E. mutabilis. Consequently, this protist may have an indirect but important role in AMD ecosystems but also in other ecological niches often described as nitrogen-limited. PMID:22237547

  4. Numerical modeling to assess possible influence of the mine openings on far-field in-situ stress measurements at Stripa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, T.; Guvanasen, V.; Littlestone, N.

    1981-03-01

    Finite element analyses were carried out to assess the possible effects of the Stripa mine openings on the in-situ stress measured in a 400-m-deep borehole drilled from the surface. For this assessment, four 2-dimensional cases were modeled. These cases variously included two horizontal sections, and two separate, idealized vertical sections. An iron ore body in the mine was assumed to be completely extracted, thereby providing conservative estimates of stress concentration effects. Since no in-situ stress measurements were made before mining, overburden weight and horizontal stresses measured by hyrodfracturing were assumed to be the pre-mining state of stress. The stress state resulting from excavation of the mine was calculated by the finite element model. In the cases using horizontal sections, the model predicted a stress concentration factor at the borehole of approximately 1.15, which is negligible considering the difficulty of obtaining accurate stress measurements. For the vertical sections the model predicted higher stress concentration factors at depths less than 200 m. This was expected because the vertical sections chosen brought the borehole unrealistically close to the mine openings, thereby leading to overly conservative estimates. In general, deviations in the magnitudes and orientations of the calculated redistributed principal stresses from the assumed pre-mining state of stress were found to be comparable to the scatter of overcoring data. It is, therefore, recommended that, for near-field stress calculations, the vertical stress due to overburden weight and the horizontal stresses measured by hydrofracturing at the borehole be considered the unperturbed far-field in situ state of stress

  5. Ten years of the uranium mines at Hamr na Jezere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehlik, J.

    1976-01-01

    The ten-year long history of the uranium mine at Hamr na Jezere near Ceska Lipa (Czechoslovakia) is briefly discussed. The deposit is of the sedimentary-epigenetic origin and is located in complex hydrogeologic conditions in the so-called Lusatian Cretaceous system in the Bohemian Cretaceous Plateau. The deposit is characteristic of a considerable proportion of zirconium which forms complex minerals with uranium. The ore is exploited using two mining procedures. In areas with favourable geologic and hydrogeologic conditions it is the conventional mining method, in other parts chemical in-situ leaching is employed. The main demands placed on the two mining technologies include the undisturbed Turonian drinking water aquifer, minimum intrusion into the landscape and the treatment of radioactive waters before discharge into public water supplies. The importance of the Hamr deposit and the further development of the Uranium Mines Concern are indicated. (B.S.)

  6. Impacts of new environmental and safety regulations on uranium mining, milling and waste management in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongping; Zheng Yuhui; Shi Xiangjun

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power progress has triggered the development and innovation of nuclear fuel industries in China. At present the Chinese government has put more emphasis on industrial readjustment and technical innovation in uranium mining and milling in order to fuel the nuclear power development, satisfy environmental protection and improve economic efficiency of the industry. The current organizations and approval procedure for establishing regulations and the implementation and consequences of the regulations, technical polices and development strategies concerning uranium mining, milling, treatment of waste ores and mill tailings, and reduction of the workers' suffered exposure dose etc. in China are discussed and the economic, health and environmental impacts of the uranium mining and metallurgy with reformation achievement and the introduction of advanced technologies such as the in-situ leaching and heap leaching mining technologies are assessed in this paper. (author)

  7. Restoration of groundwater after solution mining at the Highland Uranium Project, Wyoming, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, J. [Waste Technology Group, British Nuclear Fuels PLC, Risley, Warrington (United Kingdom); Huffman, L. [Power Resources Inc., Highland Uranium Mine, Glenrock, Wyoming (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The Highland Project, located in Converse County, Wyoming, has had a successful 11 year history of in-situ leach mining of Tertiary roll-front uranium deposits. The uranium ore is oxidized and solubilized by circulating native groundwater, containing additional dissolved O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, within confined fluvial aquifers at depths of 200 - 250 m. The changing chemistry of this groundwater during leaching is discussed, as are the various treatment techniques that have been used to restore this fluid at the end of mining. Examples are provided which demonstrate the varying effectiveness of each technique for the reduction of elevated concentrations of different groundwater parameters. The complications arising from the proximity of the earliest wellfields to abandoned, conventional mine workings, as well as unexpected side effects from each restoration method, have combined to make an interesting case history from this long established mining operation. (author)

  8. Facile preparation of ZIF-8@Pd-CSS sandwich-type microspheres via in situ growth of ZIF-8 shells over Pd-loaded colloidal carbon spheres with aggregation-resistant and leach-proof properties for the Pd nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tong; Lin, Lu [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Zhang, Xiongfu, E-mail: xfzhang@dlut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Liu, Haiou; Yan, Xinjuan [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Liu, Zhang; Yeung, King Lun [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Uniform-sized colloidal carbon spheres were synthesized from low-cost glucose. • Pd nanoparticles were loaded onto the carbon spheres via self-reduction method. • A layer of ZIF-8 shell was in situ grown over the Pd-loaded carbon spheres. • The ZIF-8@Pd-CCS showed leach-proof and aggregation-resistant properties of Pd. - Abstract: Aiming to enhance the stability of noble metal nanoparticles that are anchored on the surface of colloidal carbon spheres (CCSs), we designed and prepared a new kind of sandwich-structured ZIF-8@Pd-CCS microsphere. Typically, uniform CCSs were first synthesized by the aromatization and carbonization of glucose under hydrothermal conditions. Subsequently, noble metal nanoparticles, herein Pd nanoparticles, were attached to the surface of CCSs via self-reduction route, followed by in situ assembly of a thin layer of ZIF-8 over the Pd nanoparticles to form the sandwich-type ZIF-8@Pd-CCS microspheres. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra confirmed the presence of crystalline ZIF-8, while TEM analysis revealed that the ZIF-8 shells were closely bound to the Pd-loaded CCSs. The shell thickness could be tuned by varying the ZIF-8 assembly cycles. Further, liquid-phase hydrogenation of 1-hexene as the probe reaction was carried out over the ZIF-8@Pd-CCS microspheres and results showed that the prepared microspheres exhibited excellent agglomeration-resistant and leach-proof properties for the Pd nanoparticles, thus leading to the good reusability of the ZIF-8@Pd-CCS microspheres.

  9. Chemical and isotopic tracing of underground water in relation with leaching of mine spoils, Nord-Pas-de-Calais Coal Basin (France); Tracage chimique et isotopique des eaux souterraines en relation avec les eaux de lixiviation de terrils, bassin minier du Nord-Pas-de-Calais (France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denimal, S.; Tribovillard, N.; Meilliez, F. [Lille-1 Univ., Lab. de Sedimentologie et Geodynamique, UMR 8577, 59 - Villeneuve-d' Ascq (France); Barbecot, F.; Dever, L. [Paris-11 Univ., Lab. d' Hydrologie et de Geochimie Isotopique, UMR 8616, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2001-07-01

    Coal mining activity in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region (Northern France) has generated many mine spoils. The oxidation of the pyrite content of such coal shales and their leaching can be a source of sulfate pollution for the underlying chalk aquifer, i.e. the main drinking water resource of the region. Two sites of study have been retained: one in the free water table zone and the other in the confined water table zone. Samples from both mine spoils have been analyzed with respect to their carbon and sulfur content and a superficial leaching of these elements has been evidenced. Water has been sampled in piezometers and boreholes close to the mine spoils and also along natural flux lines. The use of sulfur isotopes as markers of the different sulfate sources has confirmed the spoils source but has permitted to identify another source in the second site which is the Tertiary gypsum-bearing Ostricourt sands. This study has shown also that in the confined water table zone, part of the exported sulfates is reduced. This bacterial reduction of sulfates is due to a joint leaching of both carbon and sulfur in the mine spoils. A self-purification phenomenon occurs when the chalk aquifer is confined beneath the Cenozoic cover. (J.S.)

  10. Mine waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, I.P.G.; Ellison, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    This book reports on mine waste management. Topics covered include: Performance review of modern mine waste management units; Mine waste management requirements; Prediction of acid generation potential; Attenuation of chemical constituents; Climatic considerations; Liner system design; Closure requirements; Heap leaching; Ground water monitoring; and Economic impact evaluation

  11. In situ bioassays with Chironomus riparius larvae to biomonitor metal pollution in rivers and to evaluate the efficiency of restoration measures in mine areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Mafalda S. [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia da Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)], E-mail: mafaldafaria@sapo.pt; Lopes, Ricardo J. [CIBIO, Centro de Investigacao em Biodiversidade e Recursos Geneticos, Campus Agrario de Vairao, 4485-661 Vairao (Portugal); Malcato, Joao; Nogueira, Antonio J.A.; Soares, Amadeu M.V.M. [CESAM and Departamento de Biologia da Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2008-01-15

    In this study we evaluate the ability of an in situ bioassay with Chironomus riparius larvae, using larval development and growth as endpoints, to biomonitor water quality and to assess the biological recovery of metal contaminated freshwater ecosystems of mine areas that are subject of restoration measures. The bioassay was carried out in streams located near an abandoned goldmine in North Portugal, throughout an environmental rehabilitation of the mine (2002-2004). During this period, a decrease in the inhibition of larval growth in the metal contaminated stream was observed. The bioassay was also performed in streams located near an active tungsten mine in Central Portugal. Larval growth and development were highly inhibited in the stream that receives acid drainage from the tungsten mine and treated water from the AMD treatment station. The results indicate that the bioassay can be used to evaluate the efficiency of environmental restoration measures in mining areas. - In situ bioassays with Chironomus riparius larvae can be a suitable tool to monitor restoration efficiency after a long time of metallic sediment contamination.

  12. In situ bioassays with Chironomus riparius larvae to biomonitor metal pollution in rivers and to evaluate the efficiency of restoration measures in mine areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Mafalda S.; Lopes, Ricardo J.; Malcato, Joao; Nogueira, Antonio J.A.; Soares, Amadeu M.V.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the ability of an in situ bioassay with Chironomus riparius larvae, using larval development and growth as endpoints, to biomonitor water quality and to assess the biological recovery of metal contaminated freshwater ecosystems of mine areas that are subject of restoration measures. The bioassay was carried out in streams located near an abandoned goldmine in North Portugal, throughout an environmental rehabilitation of the mine (2002-2004). During this period, a decrease in the inhibition of larval growth in the metal contaminated stream was observed. The bioassay was also performed in streams located near an active tungsten mine in Central Portugal. Larval growth and development were highly inhibited in the stream that receives acid drainage from the tungsten mine and treated water from the AMD treatment station. The results indicate that the bioassay can be used to evaluate the efficiency of environmental restoration measures in mining areas. - In situ bioassays with Chironomus riparius larvae can be a suitable tool to monitor restoration efficiency after a long time of metallic sediment contamination

  13. Materials Characterization Center workshop on the leaching mechanisms of nuclear waste forms, December 7-8, 1982, Thousand Oaks, CA. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, J.E.; Harker, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Each of the six laboratories involved in the 3-yr leaching mechanism program presented a progress report on borosilicate glass studies. Presentations were made on various techniques for characterizing leached surfaces and on in situ characterization of leaching surfaces

  14. Geochemical model of uranium and selenium in an aquifer disturbed by in situ uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.; Neumann, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    Restoring ground water to baseline conditions proved to be very difficult, however, and led to the trial of a sodium carbonate/bicarbonate lixiviant. Results of this test indicated the basic lixiviant was unable to address uranium tied up in carbonaceous material. Subsequently, the decision was made to curtail development and restore all affected ground water to the extent achievable through the use of the best practicable technology, such as reverse osmosis. Restoration results, however, were not considered adequate for demonstration of commercial restoration feasibility. Following completion of the restoration effort, regulatory agencies expressed concern as to the long-term fate of certain parameters, such as uranium and selenium, remaining in solution at above baseline levels. Rocky Mountain Energy, through discussions with various consultants, determined that geochemical modeling would be the most appropriate tool for predicting the probable long-term effects. This paper summarizes the results of the subsequent evaluation which was conducted using the PHREEQE computer model. Significant conclusions of the investigation were: (1) the Eh in the ground water decreases regularly after mining activities, as shown by measured Eh values, and (2) the accompanying decrease in uranium and selenium can be predicted by thermodynamic modeling

  15. Experience with water treatment and restoration technologies during and after uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benes, V.; Mitas, J.; Rihak, I.

    2002-01-01

    DIAMO, state owned enterprise, has a wide experience in uranium mining with the use of classical deep mining, acid in situ leaching and uranium ore processing. The sandstone deposits in Straz block have been exploited since 1968. Geological and hydrogeological conditions of the deposits and the short distance between the deep mine and ISL wellfields requires pumping huge amounts of fresh and/or acid mine water, their treatment and subsequent discharge into streams. DIAMO developed and applied several technologies for different types of wastewater treatment from the start of mining. Practically all of these technologies are used in the current phase of uranium deposit restoration after mining. It is possible to apply these technologies both in the production phase and during the restoration of underground water. In some cases, it is very desirable to combine two or several of them. (author)

  16. Long-time leaching and corrosion tests on full-scale cemented waste forms in the Asse salt mine. Sampling and analyses 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzler, B.; Schlieker, M.; Bauer, A.; Metz, V.; Meyer, H.

    2004-10-01

    The paper presents the follow-up of experimental findings from full-scale leach tests performed on simulated cemented waste forms for more than 20 years in salt brines and water. Measurements cover pH, density, and the composition of leachates as well as the release of radionuclides such as Cs, U and Np. Indicators for waste form corrosion and radionuclide release is Cs and NO 3 . Corrosion of cemented waste forms depends on the pore volume of the hardened cement which is correlated to the water/cement ratio. The release of radionuclides is evaluated and compared to small-scale laboratory tests. Excellent interpretation of observed concentrations is obtained for uranium and neptunium by comparison with model calculations. (orig.)

  17. Supplying synthetic crude oil from Canadian oil sands: A comparative study of the costs and CO2 emissions of mining and in-situ recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Méjean, Aurélie; Hope, Chris

    2013-01-01

    High crude oil prices and the eventual decline of conventional oil production raise the issue of alternative fuels such as non-conventional oil. The paper describes a simple probabilistic model of the costs of synthetic crude oil produced from Canadian oil sands. Synthetic crude oil is obtained by upgrading bitumen that is first produced through mining or in-situ recovery techniques. This forward-looking analysis quantifies the effects of learning and production constraints on the costs of supplying synthetic crude oil. The sensitivity analysis shows that before 2035, the most influential parameters are the learning parameter in the case of in-situ bitumen and the depletion parameter in the case of mined bitumen. After 2035, depletion dominates in both cases. The results show that the social cost of CO 2 has a large impact on the total costs of synthetic crude oil, in particular in the case of synthetic crude oil from in-situ bitumen, due to the carbon intensity of the recovery techniques: taking into account the social cost of CO 2 adds more than half to the cost of producing synthetic crude oil from mined bitumen in 2050 (mean value), while the cost of producing synthetic crude oil from in-situ bitumen more than doubles. - Highlights: • We model the cost of Canadian synthetic crude oil (SCO) using Monte-Carlo techniques. • We reveal the uncertainty associated with each input parameter. • We quantify the effect of learning, depletion and CO 2 using sensitivity analyses. • Accounting for the social cost of CO 2 doubles the cost of SCO from in-situ bitumen. • CO 2 pricing could have a large effect on the economics of the oil sands

  18. Organic carbon amendments for passive in situ treatment of mine drainage: Field experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, Matthew B.J., E-mail: mbjlindsay@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Blowes, David W.; Condon, Peter D.; Ptacek, Carol J. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Organic carbon amendments can support passive treatment of mine drainage. > Decreased transport of sulfide-oxidation products under sulfate-reducing conditions. > Treatment effectiveness dependent on organic carbon source and amendment rate. - Abstract: A field-scale experiment was conducted to evaluate various organic C sources as amendments for passive treatment of tailings pore water. Varied mixtures of peat, spent-brewing grain (SBG) and municipal biosolids (MB) were assessed for the potential to promote dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR) and metal-sulfide precipitation. Five amended cells and one control were constructed in the vadose zone of a sulfide- and carbonate-rich tailings deposit, and the geochemistry, microbiology and mineralogy were monitored for 4 a. Increases in pore-water concentrations of dissolved organic C (DOC) and decreases in aqueous SO{sub 4} concentrations of >2500 mg L{sup -1} were observed in cells amended with peat + SBG and peat + SBG + MB. Removal of SO{sub 4} was accompanied by shifts in {delta}{sup 34}S-SO{sub 4} values of >+30 per mille, undersaturation of pore water with respect to gypsum [CaSO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O], and increased populations of SO{sub 4}-reducing bacteria (SRB). Decreases in aqueous concentrations of Zn, Mn, Ni, Sb and Tl were observed for these cells relative to the control. Organic C introduction also supported growth of Fe-reducing bacteria (IRB) and increases in Fe and As concentrations. Enhanced Fe and As mobility occurred in all cells; however, maximum concentrations were observed in cells amended with MB. Subsequent decreases in Fe and As concentrations were attributed to DSR and metal-sulfide precipitation. The common presence of secondary Zn-S and Fe-S phases was observed by field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) spectroscopy. Selective extractions indicated that large decreases in water-soluble SO{sub 4} occurred in cells that supported DSR

  19. Organic carbon amendments for passive in situ treatment of mine drainage: Field experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, Matthew B.J.; Blowes, David W.; Condon, Peter D.; Ptacek, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Organic carbon amendments can support passive treatment of mine drainage. → Decreased transport of sulfide-oxidation products under sulfate-reducing conditions. → Treatment effectiveness dependent on organic carbon source and amendment rate. - Abstract: A field-scale experiment was conducted to evaluate various organic C sources as amendments for passive treatment of tailings pore water. Varied mixtures of peat, spent-brewing grain (SBG) and municipal biosolids (MB) were assessed for the potential to promote dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR) and metal-sulfide precipitation. Five amended cells and one control were constructed in the vadose zone of a sulfide- and carbonate-rich tailings deposit, and the geochemistry, microbiology and mineralogy were monitored for 4 a. Increases in pore-water concentrations of dissolved organic C (DOC) and decreases in aqueous SO 4 concentrations of >2500 mg L -1 were observed in cells amended with peat + SBG and peat + SBG + MB. Removal of SO 4 was accompanied by shifts in δ 34 S-SO 4 values of >+30 per mille, undersaturation of pore water with respect to gypsum [CaSO 4 .2H 2 O], and increased populations of SO 4 -reducing bacteria (SRB). Decreases in aqueous concentrations of Zn, Mn, Ni, Sb and Tl were observed for these cells relative to the control. Organic C introduction also supported growth of Fe-reducing bacteria (IRB) and increases in Fe and As concentrations. Enhanced Fe and As mobility occurred in all cells; however, maximum concentrations were observed in cells amended with MB. Subsequent decreases in Fe and As concentrations were attributed to DSR and metal-sulfide precipitation. The common presence of secondary Zn-S and Fe-S phases was observed by field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) spectroscopy. Selective extractions indicated that large decreases in water-soluble SO 4 occurred in cells that supported DSR. Furthermore, amendments that supported

  20. Environmental problems relating to uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, F.B.

    1979-01-01

    The regulations of the mining and milling of uranium as they relate to the environment are discussed. The industry is primarily under the jurisdiction of the federal government and administered by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This authority can in some instances be relegated to the states. Certain areas of jurisdiction have been given over to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by the courts. The Safe Drinking Water Act is discussed as it relates to in situ leach mining. The role of the Department of Interior in the regulating of uranium mining, as described in the Federal Land Policy Management Act of 1976, is discussed. The requirement for environmental impact statements prior to licensing by the NRC or the individual states is also discussed. Air quality and radioactive waste disposal as they relate to uranium mining are also discussed

  1. Recovery of uranium in mine waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugier, P.

    1967-01-01

    In a brief introductory survey the author indicates the date on which leaching was first observed in the CEA mines and lists the main factors necessary for, or favourable to, the solubilization of uranium in mines. Information is given on the various sources of this type at present identified in France and the methods used to recover uranium in mines situated near ore-concentration plants. An explanation is given for the use of the calcium precipitation technique in connection with waters produced in mines not situated near ore-concentration plants. Data are given on the results of laboratory tests carried out on waters containing uranium, together with a description of an industrial-scale facility built in consequence of these tests. Details are given of the statistical results obtained. The author concludes by outlining the programme which will be implemented in the near future with a view to increasing the tonnage of uranium produced by in situ leaching and indicates that the CEA engineers are very optimistic about the prospects of this new low-cost method of producing uranium. (author) [fr

  2. Analysis of surface leaching processes in vitrified high-level nuclear wastes using in-situ raman imaging and atomistic modeling. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.E.; Simmons, J.H.

    1998-01-01

    'The research objective was to test and develop optical methods for real-time, remote and in-situ testing of corrosion processes on the surface of vitrified nuclear wastes. This report summarizes the research conducted in the first 1.5 years of a 3 year grant. At this point, the authors have identified the conditions for optimal tests and demonstrated that both IR reflection and Raman spectroscopies can be used to determine the dealkalization process in the surface of simple glasses in real time.'

  3. Trend towards reverse leach process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The South African gold mining industry is making notable strides in improving recovery methods for both gold and uranium with significant additions to profits because of higher efficiencies and reductions in costs in the recovery processes. The most notable step on the gold side recently is the adoption of the reverse leach process at Buffelsfontein and Western Deep Levels. This process was pioneered at Hartebeesfontein as far back as 1975 and when introduced there resulted in a two and a half per cent improvement in recovery efficiencies. The essence of reverse leaching under which the uranium is recovered before the gold is the fact that the gold partly coated with iron oxide or locked in uranite, is exposed to be recovered later by cyanidation

  4. Heap leaching of clay ish uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, E.; Sedano, A.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental facility, built near El Lobo mine. In it we study the beneficiation of low-grade uranium ore. The mineral has a great amount of clay and fines. The flow-sheet used has four steps: head leaching, ph-ajustement, ion-exchange and participation. We show, also, the most interesting results. (Author)

  5. Fact sheet on uranium exploration, mining production and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    During the last 3 years, there has been a dramatic revival and comeback of the uranium industry in the light of the expanding nuclear power programme all over the world. As a result, there has been a boom in uranium exploration, mining and production activities to meet the higher demand of uranium and reduce the gap between uranium demand and uranium supply from mines. In coming years, additional requests for TC, training/workshop and CRPs are expected in the areas of: 1) advanced aerial and ground geophysical techniques for discovery of new deposits which could be deeply buried; 2) investigations of uranium sources in sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic environments; 3) In-Situ leaching (ISL) of uranium deposits; 4) advanced acid/alkali leaching of low, medium and high grade uranium ores and purification of uranium; 5) reclamation of used uranium mines and related environmental protection issues; and 6) uranium supply, demand and market issues. Services provided by the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials Section could be workshops and hands-on field trainings at National and/or Regional levels in mines, mills and sites covering the following activities: uranium exploration involving conventional and advanced geophysical techniques and instruments, advanced drilling equipment and tools, etc.; uranium mining (open-cast and underground), recovery and purification by acid/alkali leaching, In-Situ leaching (ISL), purification by conventional and advanced solvent extraction and ion exchange techniques and concentration of uranium in the form of yellowcake (ammonium diuranate, magnesium diuranate and uranium peroxide); promoting best practices in uranium mining and milling (including tailing pond), covering environmental issues, reclamation of used uranium mines and chemistry of uranium production cycle and ground water and sustainability of uranium production. Member States interested in uranium geology, exploration, mining, milling, purification and environmental issues

  6. Groundwater restoration of uranium ISL mines in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catchpole, G.; Kuchelka, R.

    1993-01-01

    Although the in-situ leach (ISL) mining of uranium in the US started in the 1960's, the real expansion of this form of mining, which is also called solution mining, took place in the early to mid 1970's in Texas. Some of the early test work used an acid lixiviant but it was soon recognized that, because of environmental considerations, the use of alkaline lixiviants would be preferable to the regulatory agencies and the public. In the past, the two types of alkaline based lixiviants used at US ISL mines were ammonia bicarbonate and sodium bicarbonate. A few ISL mines get by with just adding carbon dioxide to the well field solution. Ammonia bicarbonate is no longer being used today in the US because of the difficulties and expense of restoring the water quality to acceptable standards following mining. This paper briefly describes ISL mining principles and then details procedures and techniques used at USA ISL uranium mines to restore water quality in the mined aquifer. The basic elements are fairly constant but there can be considerable variation in type of water treatment equipment, methods of waste water disposal and use of chemical reducing agents. Three case histories are also presented

  7. Hydrology of the Ferron sandstone aquifer and effects of proposed surface-coal mining in Castle Valley, Utah, with sections on stratigraphy and leaching of overburden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lines, Gregory C.; Morrissey, Daniel J.; Ryer, Thomas A.; Fuller, Richard H.

    1983-01-01

    Coal in the Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale of Cretaceous age has traditionally been mined by underground techniques in the Emery Coal Field in the southern end of Castle Valley in east-central Utah. However, approximately 99 million tons are recoverable by surface mining. Ground water in the Ferron is the sole source of supply for the town of Emery, but the aquifer is essentially untapped outside the Emery area.The Ferron Sandstone Member crops out along the eastern edge of Castle Valley and generally dips 2 ? to 10 ? to the northwest. Sandstones in the Ferron are enclosed between relatively impermeable shale in the Tununk and Blue Gate Members of the Mancos Shale. Along the outcrop, the Ferron ranges in thickness from about 80 feet in the northern part of Castle Valley to 850 feet in the southern part. The Ferron also generally thickens in the subsurface downdip from the outcrop. Records from wells and test holes indicate that the full thickness of the Ferron is saturated with water in most areas downdip from the outcrop area.Tests in the Emery area indicate that transmissivity of the Ferron sandstone aquifer ranges from about 200 to 700 feet squared per day where the Ferron is fully saturated. Aquifer transmissivity is greatest near the Paradise Valley-Joes Valley fault system where permeability has been increased by fracturing. Storage coefficient ranges from about 10 .6 to 10 -3 where the Ferron sandstone aquifer is confined and probably averages 5 x 10-2 where it is unconfined.

  8. Remediation of hazardous waste sites by heap leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samani, Z.; Hanson, A.; Dwyer, B.

    1994-01-01

    Efforts are being made to devise technologies and treatment systems to remediate contaminated soil-on site without generating significant wastes for off-site disposal. Heap leaching, a technique used extensively in the mining industry, has been investigated as a method for remediation of hazardous chemical contamination of the vadose zone. In the mining industry, metal-bearing ore is excavated and mounded on a pad. The metals are removed by passing a special leaching solution through the ore. In this study, the removal of chromium(VI) from the New Mexico soils (sand, sandy loam, and clay) using heap leaching was evaluated at a column scale. The heap leaching study demonstrated greater than 99% removal of Cr(VI) from all three soils using tap water as the leaching agent. (author) 13 figs., 5 tabs., 21 refs

  9. Analysis of Surface Leaching Processes in Vitrified High-Level Nuclear Wastes Using In-Situ Raman Imaging and Atomistic Modeling - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, Joseph H.

    2001-01-01

    The in situ analysis of surface conditions of vitrified nuclear wastes can provide an important check of the burial status of radioactive objects without risk of radiation exposure. Raman spectroscopy was initially chosen as the most promising method for testing the surface conditions of glasses undergoing chemical corrosion, and was used extensively during the first year. However, it was determined that infrared reflection spectroscopy was better suited to this particular need and was used for the remaining two years to investigate the surface corrosion behavior of model silicate glasses for extension to nuclear waste glasses. The developed methodology is consistent with the known theory of optical propagation of dielectric media and uses the Kramers-Kronig formalism. The results show that it is possible to study the corrosion of glass by analyzing the glass surface using reflection fast Fourier infrared measurements and the newly developed ''dispersion analysis method.'' The data show how this analysis can be used to monitor the corrosion behavior of vitrified waste glasses over extended periods of storage

  10. Persistent U(IV) and U(VI) following in-situ recovery (ISR) mining of a sandstone uranium deposit, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Tanya J.; Campbell, Kate M.; Zielinski, Robert A.; Reimus, P.W.; J.T. Clay,; N. Janot,; J. J. Bargar,; Benzel, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Drill-core samples from a sandstone-hosted uranium (U) deposit in Wyoming were characterized to determine the abundance and distribution of uranium following in-situ recovery (ISR) mining with oxygen- and carbon dioxide-enriched water. Concentrations of uranium, collected from ten depth intervals, ranged from 5 to 1920 ppm. A composite sample contained 750 ppm uranium with an average oxidation state of 54% U(VI) and 46% U(IV). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated rare high uranium (∼1000 ppm U) in spatial association with P/Ca and Si/O attributed to relict uranium minerals, possibly coffinite, uraninite, and autunite, trapped within low permeability layers bypassed during ISR mining. Fission track analysis revealed lower but still elevated concentrations of U in the clay/silica matrix and organic matter (several 10 s ppm) and yet higher concentrations associated with Fe-rich/S-poor sites, likely iron oxides, on altered chlorite or euhedral pyrite surfaces (but not on framboidal pyrite). Organic C (mining, the likely sequestration of uranium within labile iron oxides following mining and sensitivity to changes in redox conditions requires careful attention during groundwater restoration.

  11. Technical application of agglomerated acidic heap leaching of clay-bearing uranium ore in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yijun; Li Jianhua; Li Tieqiu; Zhong Pingru

    2002-01-01

    The permeability of ore mass has a great influence on the leaching period of heap leaching and the leaching efficiency, hence the uranium ores with high content of clay is difficult to acidic heap leaching. The Research Institute of Uranium Mining has engaged several years studies on the cementing agents of acidic agglomeration, agglomeration conditions, as well as the curing measures of agglomerated balls. On the basis of these studies, several types of clay-bearing ores have been tested with good results. The technique of agglomerated acidic heap leaching has been successfully applied in a uranium mine. Since agglomeration has effectively increased the permeability of ore heap, its leaching period is decreased from 200 days to 60 days, the leaching efficiency is increased to 96% from less than 40% comparing with direct heap leaching program

  12. Study of the sulfuric acid leaching and bacterial leaching of low grade uranium ore by orbital shaker experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guangyue; Liu Yulong; Wang Yongdong; Ding Dexin

    2009-01-01

    The sulphuric acid leaching and bacteria leaching by orbital shaker experiments were conducted for the low grade uranium ore from a uranium mine in Guangdong Province. The results show that, when the concentration of sulphuric acid and that of slurry were 30 g/L and 25%, respectively, the conditions were most favourable for sulphuric acid leaching and the rate of leaching reached 92.92%, that, when pH value was 1.5, inoculation amount, 10%, concentration of slurry, 10%, the conditions were most favourable for bacteria leaching and the rate of leaching reached 95.93%, that, compared with sulphuric acid leaching, bacteria leaching decreased sulphuric acid consumption by 17.2% and increased the rate of leaching by 3%, and that, under the most favourable conditions for suphuric acid leaching, if 1% natrium chlorate was added, the rate of leaching increased to 96.46%, but 10 kg of natrium chlorate was consumed for 1 ton of uranium ore. (authors)

  13. Environmental impacts of mining: monitoring, restoration and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, M.

    1993-01-01

    Contains 12 chapters with the following titles: mining and the environment; surface coal mining with reclamation; reclamation and revegetation of mined land; the acid mine drainage problem from coal mines; acid rock drainage and metal migration; hydrologic impact; erosion and sediment control; wetlands; blasting; mining subsidence; postmining land use; environmental effects of gold heap-leaching operations.

  14. Uranium leaching by fungal metabolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongdong; Li Guangyue; Ding Dexin; Hu Nan

    2012-01-01

    To explore new means of bioleaching, one strain of high-yielding fungi-Aspergillus niger which could produce organic acids was separated and purified from soil samples of uranium mine. The influence of cultural temperature, initial pH value, inoculum sizes on its growth characteristics were carried out. And the tests of uranium leaching of metabolin of Aspergillus niger were operated. On these tests, the effects of metabolin of Aspergillus niger with different pH value produced in the diverse culture temperature on uranium leaching were investigated. The results show that this strain of Aspergillus niger can grow best under the following conditions: the temperature is 37℃, the initial pH value is 7.0, the inoculum sizes is 2% (the OD value of the spores solution is 0.06). The uranium extraction effects relative to the final pH value of the cultures. and the maximum leaching rates is 83.05% when the pH value is 2.3. (authors)

  15. Uranium solution mining: comparison of New Mexico with South Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conine, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    In-situ uranium-leaching or solution-mining operations are currently underway in both south Texas and Wyoming. Mobil Oil Corporation is in the process of applying solution-mining technology, such as that developed at the O'Hern facility in south Texas, to uranium orebodies located near Crownpoint, New Mexico. The O'Hern facility uses an alkaline-leach process to bring the uranium to the surface, where it is removed from solution using ion-exchange resin and chemical precipitation. Line-drive and five-spot well field patterns are used to inject and recover the leach solutions. Although details of ore occurrence in New Mexico differ from those in south Texas, laboratory, engineering-design, and field-hydrology tests indicate that solution mining of uranium should be feasible in New Mexico. To determine the commercial feasibility, Mobil is proceeding with the construction of pilot-plant facilities for a 75-gallon-perminute (gpm) test at an orebody near Crownpoint. The pilot test will use five-spot patterns at various spacings for production of uranium-bearing leachate. Initial surface processing will be the same as that used in south Texas

  16. Microbial leaching of low grade sandstone uranium ores: column leaching studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, T.M.; Malik, K.A.; Khalid, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    Microbial leaching studies on a low-grade sandstone uranium ore from Baghalchur Ore Deposits, D. G. Khan, Pakistan, containing 0.027 % U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ for extraction of uranium, were conducted in columns. Baghalchur sandstone uranium ore which is alkaline in nature, contained 5.0% calcite [CaCo/sub 3/], 2-3 % Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and pyrite [FeS/sub 2/] less than 0.1 %. The ore amended with sulfur and/or sulfur slag as external energy source was found to leach with indigenous microflora mostly belonging to the genus Thiobacillus which are present in the uranium mine water. Column leaching studies revealed that when the ore was amended with elemental sulfur and irrigated with mine water (pH 3.5) 53 % U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ could be solubilized from it. However, when the natural mine water was used as such (pH 7.4) the solubilization of uranium was decreased to 41 % U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ in 90 days under similar conditions of percolation rate and temperature. The addition of (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (3.0 g/L) in mine water was found to enhance the uranium leaching to 70 % U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ from the columns containing ore amended with sulfur slag. (author)

  17. The environmental impact assessment of uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morvell, G.

    2002-01-01

    Federal environmental impact assessment legislation has existed in Australia since 1974. A number of uranium mines have been developed in this time, utilizing a range of mining techniques, including opencut, underground and in-situ leach. Projects have also been undertaken in a variety of geographical areas requiring consideration of diverse biodiversity, cultural heritage and social impact issues. Assessment of uranium mining proposals in Australia is also conducted in a climate of political opposition from a cross section of the Australian community. This paper outlines some of the key issues that arose during recent assessments and which provide a lead to the role of environmental impact assessment in environmental policy development. Issues are also relevant to recent assessments on a replacement nuclear reactor, shipments of waste for reprocessing and proposed assessments on proposals for low and intermediate level nuclear waste facilities. (author)

  18. Evaluation of growth, biochemical and bioaccumulation parameters in Pelophylax perezi tadpoles, following an in-situ acute exposure to three different effluent ponds from a uranium mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Sérgio M., E-mail: s.reis.marques@gmail.com [Departamento de Biologia da Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Chaves, Sandra [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, Centro de Biodiversidade, Genómica Integrativa e Funcional (BioFIG), Edifício ICAT, Campus da FCUL Campo Grande, Lisboa (Portugal); Gonçalves, Fernando [Departamento de Biologia da Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Pereira, Ruth [CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Departamento de Biologia da Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2013-02-15

    Mining activities invariably produce metal contaminated effluents. Depending on factors such as pH and metal concentration the toxicity of the effluent may vary. To assess the effects of three characteristically different effluent ponds from a deactivated uranium mine, with toxicologically relevant data, an in situ exposure with Pelophylax perezi tadpoles, was conducted. Tadpoles were exposed to the three effluent ponds, ranked by increasing order of metals concentrations (REF, M1, M2). Survival, growth, metal accumulation, antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were determined in tadpoles. As well, physical and chemical variables of the effluents were measured. Death percentage in the effluents was 3.17 (REF), 9.84 (M1) and 42.86% (M2) and was not coincident with metal accumulation which was highest in tadpoles exposed to M1, while metal contents in M2 tadpoles were quite similar to those recorded in REF tadpoles. However, high mortality in M2 was attributed to the extremely low pH (≈ 3.77). From the three effluents M2 tadpoles had the lowest growth and the antioxidant enzymatic activity was only affected in the case glutathione peroxidase (GPx) with significantly higher activity in M1, being in accordance with the highest accumulation of metals. LPO, usually associated with metal accumulation, had the following pattern M1 > REF > M2. Overall, effluent toxicity in tadpoles exposed to M2 effluent seems to be primarily an effect of pH while in M1 toxicity is mainly owed to high metal concentrations. The effluent acidity seems to reduce metal accumulation probably due to damage in the integument, affecting ion uptake. The results obtained bring a better understanding of the toxicological processes that local P. perezi population is subjected to, mainly in the early life stages. Furthermore this study highlights the influence of pH in the toxicity of metal rich effluents. - Highlights:

  19. Evaluation of growth, biochemical and bioaccumulation parameters in Pelophylax perezi tadpoles, following an in-situ acute exposure to three different effluent ponds from a uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Sérgio M.; Chaves, Sandra; Gonçalves, Fernando; Pereira, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Mining activities invariably produce metal contaminated effluents. Depending on factors such as pH and metal concentration the toxicity of the effluent may vary. To assess the effects of three characteristically different effluent ponds from a deactivated uranium mine, with toxicologically relevant data, an in situ exposure with Pelophylax perezi tadpoles, was conducted. Tadpoles were exposed to the three effluent ponds, ranked by increasing order of metals concentrations (REF, M1, M2). Survival, growth, metal accumulation, antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were determined in tadpoles. As well, physical and chemical variables of the effluents were measured. Death percentage in the effluents was 3.17 (REF), 9.84 (M1) and 42.86% (M2) and was not coincident with metal accumulation which was highest in tadpoles exposed to M1, while metal contents in M2 tadpoles were quite similar to those recorded in REF tadpoles. However, high mortality in M2 was attributed to the extremely low pH (≈ 3.77). From the three effluents M2 tadpoles had the lowest growth and the antioxidant enzymatic activity was only affected in the case glutathione peroxidase (GPx) with significantly higher activity in M1, being in accordance with the highest accumulation of metals. LPO, usually associated with metal accumulation, had the following pattern M1 > REF > M2. Overall, effluent toxicity in tadpoles exposed to M2 effluent seems to be primarily an effect of pH while in M1 toxicity is mainly owed to high metal concentrations. The effluent acidity seems to reduce metal accumulation probably due to damage in the integument, affecting ion uptake. The results obtained bring a better understanding of the toxicological processes that local P. perezi population is subjected to, mainly in the early life stages. Furthermore this study highlights the influence of pH in the toxicity of metal rich effluents. - Highlights:

  20. MiniSipper: a new in situ water sampler for high-resolution, long-duration acid mine drainage monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Thomas P; Todd, Andrew S

    2012-11-15

    Abandoned hard-rock mines can be a significant source of acid mine drainage (AMD) and toxic metal pollution to watersheds. In Colorado, USA, abandoned mines are often located in remote, high elevation areas that are snowbound for 7-8 months of the year. The difficulty in accessing these remote sites, especially during winter, creates challenging water sampling problems and major hydrologic and toxic metal loading events are often under sampled. Currently available automated water samplers are not well suited for sampling remote snowbound areas so the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed a new water sampler, the MiniSipper, to provide long-duration, high-resolution water sampling in remote areas. The MiniSipper is a small, portable sampler that uses gas bubbles to separate up to 250 five milliliter acidified samples in a long tubing coil. The MiniSipper operates for over 8 months unattended in water under snow/ice, reduces field work costs, and greatly increases sampling resolution, especially during inaccessible times. MiniSippers were deployed in support of an U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) project evaluating acid mine drainage inputs from the Pennsylvania Mine to the Snake River watershed in Summit County, CO, USA. MiniSipper metal results agree within 10% of EPA-USGS hand collected grab sample results. Our high-resolution results reveal very strong correlations (R(2)>0.9) between potentially toxic metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn) and specific conductivity at the Pennsylvania Mine site. The large number of samples collected by the MiniSipper over the entire water year provides a detailed look at the effects of major hydrologic events such as snowmelt runoff and rainstorms on metal loading from the Pennsylvania Mine. MiniSipper results will help guide EPA sampling strategy and remediation efforts in the Snake River watershed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. MiniSipper: A new in situ water sampler for high-resolution, long-duration acid mine drainage monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Thomas P.; Todd, Andrew S.

    2012-01-01

    Abandoned hard-rock mines can be a significant source of acid mine drainage (AMD) and toxic metal pollution to watersheds. In Colorado, USA, abandoned mines are often located in remote, high elevation areas that are snowbound for 7–8 months of the year. The difficulty in accessing these remote sites, especially during winter, creates challenging water sampling problems and major hydrologic and toxic metal loading events are often under sampled. Currently available automated water samplers are not well suited for sampling remote snowbound areas so the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed a new water sampler, the MiniSipper, to provide long-duration, high-resolution water sampling in remote areas. The MiniSipper is a small, portable sampler that uses gas bubbles to separate up to 250 five milliliter acidified samples in a long tubing coil. The MiniSipper operates for over 8 months unattended in water under snow/ice, reduces field work costs, and greatly increases sampling resolution, especially during inaccessible times. MiniSippers were deployed in support of an U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) project evaluating acid mine drainage inputs from the Pennsylvania Mine to the Snake River watershed in Summit County, CO, USA. MiniSipper metal results agree within 10% of EPA-USGS hand collected grab sample results. Our high-resolution results reveal very strong correlations (R2 > 0.9) between potentially toxic metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn) and specific conductivity at the Pennsylvania Mine site. The large number of samples collected by the MiniSipper over the entire water year provides a detailed look at the effects of major hydrologic events such as snowmelt runoff and rainstorms on metal loading from the Pennsylvania Mine. MiniSipper results will help guide EPA sampling strategy and remediation efforts in the Snake River watershed.

  2. Mechanistic study of lead desorption during the leaching process of ion-absorbed rare earths: pH effect and the column experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jie; Xue, Qiang; Chen, Honghan; Li, Wenting

    2017-05-01

    High concentrations of ammonium sulfate, often used in the in situ mining process, can result in a decrease of pH in the environment and dissolution of rare earth metals. Ammonium sulfate can also cause desorption of toxic heavy metals, leading to environmental and human health implications. In this study, the desorption behavior and fraction changes of lead in the ion-absorbed rare earth ore were studied using batch desorption experiments and column leaching tests. Results from batch desorption experiments showed that the desorption process of lead included fast and slow stages and followed an Elovich model well. The desorption rate and the proportion of lead content in the solution to the total lead in the soil were observed to increase with a decrease in the initial pH of the ammonium sulfate solution. The lead in soil included an acid-extractable fraction, reducible fraction, oxidizable fraction, and a residual fraction, with the predominant fractions being the reducible and acid-extractable fractions. Ninety-six percent of the extractable fraction in soil was desorbed into solution at pH = 3.0, and the content of the reducible fraction was observed to initially increase (when pH >4.0) and then decrease (when pH leaching tests indicated that the content of lead in the different fractions of soil followed the trend of reducible fraction > oxidizable fraction > acid-extractable fraction > residual fraction after the simulating leaching mining process. The change in pH was also found to have a larger influence on the acid-extractable and reducible fractions than the other two fractions. The proportion of the extractable fraction being leached was ca. 86%, and the reducible fraction was enriched along the migration direction of the leaching liquid. These results suggest that certain lead fractions may desorb again and contaminate the environment via acid rain, which provides significant information for environmental assessment and remediation after mining process

  3. Studies on the mechanism for in-place leaching of fragmented uranium ore by blasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hengshan; Wang Changhan

    2001-01-01

    The report is based on the locale test studies at No.745 Mine and Baifang Copper (Uranium) Mine. According to hydrokinetics of porous medium. The character of mining methods of in-place leaching of fragmented uranium are, the best application conditions, in-place leaching theory, the fittest composite of fragments of crashing uranium ore, the lowest velocity of flow in solution liquid, the reasonable parameter of stop structure, the technology of leaching, meaning, the equation of solution liquid, the name of solution mining and its classification are studied. Especially some creation in the theory of leaching in mud ore and the technology of strengthened leaching are given. It would be helpful to the design and production

  4. SF6 ventilation study at Agnew Lake Mines, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    In September 1978, James F. MacLaren Limited was awarded a contract by the Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology (CANMET) to undertake a ventilation study at an underground uranium mine using sulphur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) as a tracer gas. The mine selected for the study was that of Agnew Lake Mines Limited in Northern Ontario. This is a relatively new mine with the combined mine/mill facilities first operational in mid-1977. Uranium is recovered from broken ore by in-situ leaching. The ventilation study was divided into two phases. A laboratory study was undertaken to develop a practical sampling technique, provide an evaluation of the logistics of long range sample transport and develop a laboratory analytical technique. Field programmes demonstrated the SF 6 tracer gas technique for mine ventilation trouble-shooting with the intent of providing information which will lead to more efficient use of existing mine ventilation capacity. This report outlines the findings of the laboratory study and the two field programmes

  5. Nitrate Leaching Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrate (NO3) leaching is a significant nitrogen (N) loss process for agriculture that must be managed to minimize NO3 enrichment of groundwater and surface waters. Managing NO3 leaching should involve the application of basic principles of understanding the site’s hydrologic cycle, avoiding excess ...

  6. Nitrate leaching index

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nitrate Leaching Index is a rapid assessment tool that evaluates nitrate (NO3) leaching potential based on basic soil and climate information. It is the basis for many nutrient management planning efforts, but it has considerable limitations because of : 1) an oversimplification of the processes...

  7. Immobilized waste leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The main mechanism by which the immobilized radioactive materials can return to biosphere is the leaching due to the intrusion of water into the repositories. Some mathematical models and experiments utilized to evaluate the leaching rates in different immobilization matrices are described. (author) [pt

  8. Uranium mining in North Bohemia (Straz), Czech Republic and geological evaluation prior to remediation (two abstracts together)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopecky, P.; Slezak, J.

    2000-01-01

    This document presents a brief history of uranium mining in North Bohemia, Czech Republic; provides some data on the amount of uranium produced; and describes the impact of these mining activities on environment. It also outlines the results of geological surveys carried out in the area to evaluate the scope of needed restoration works. The results show the necessity of stabilization of contaminated ground water in the in-situ leaching area and give a forecast of ground water contamination distribution in thousand year future

  9. In situ studies with Asian clams (Carbacula fluminea) detect acid mine drainage and nutrient inputs in low-order streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soucek, D. J.; Schmidt, T. S.; Cherry, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluates the correlation between transplanted Asiatic clam and indigenous community responses to acid mine drainage and nutrient loading in first-to-third-order streams, by comparing the toxicological endpoints of clam survival and growth with benthic macro-invertebrate community indices as community responses to both acid mine drainage and nutrient loading. Clam survival was found to be positively correlated with water column pH and negatively correlated with conductivity and metal concentrations. There was also a positive correlation with the relative abundance of the macro-invertebrate Ephemeroptera, the most sensitive taxonomic group, to acid mine drainage in this watershed. No correlation was found between clam growth and acid mine drainage inputs, but there was evidence of positive correlation with nitrate concentrations and the relative abundance of collector-filterer functional feeding groups. These results suggest that clam growth is related to nutrient levels and accurately reflect benthic macro-invertebrate responses to nutrient loading. 28 refs., 5 tabs., 1 fig

  10. Chlorination leaching of cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lach, E.; Pajak, I.; Bojanowska, A.

    1978-01-01

    The results of the investigations on chlorination leaching of cadmium from dust coming from dry dust collector of sinter belt, that is leaching with water saturated with gaseous chlorine and leaching with solutions of ammonium chloride and sodium chloride were given. The optimum conditions for these processes were established. It was found, that the method of leaching in the presence of gaseous chlorine is more effective, as it allows to report into the solution over 90% cadmium contained in dust. Owing to technical difficulties, environmental protection and safety conditions more advantageous seems to be the use as leaching agent of the ammonium chloride solutions. When applying 20% NH 4 Cl and temperature of 60 0 C, the time of 2 hours and the ratio of solid to liquid of 1:5, 70% cadmium contained in the dust can be reported into the solution. (auth.)

  11. Recovery of uranium in mine waters; Recuperation de l'uranium dans les eaux des mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugier, P [Direction des Productions, CEA, Chatillon-Sur-Bagneux (France)

    1967-06-15

    In a brief introductory survey the author indicates the date on which leaching was first observed in the CEA mines and lists the main factors necessary for, or favourable to, the solubilization of uranium in mines. Information is given on the various sources of this type at present identified in France and the methods used to recover uranium in mines situated near ore-concentration plants. An explanation is given for the use of the calcium precipitation technique in connection with waters produced in mines not situated near ore-concentration plants. Data are given on the results of laboratory tests carried out on waters containing uranium, together with a description of an industrial-scale facility built in consequence of these tests. Details are given of the statistical results obtained. The author concludes by outlining the programme which will be implemented in the near future with a view to increasing the tonnage of uranium produced by in situ leaching and indicates that the CEA engineers are very optimistic about the prospects of this new low-cost method of producing uranium. (author) [French] Apres un bref rappel historique precisant la date de constatation du phenomene de lixiviation dans les mines d'uranium du Commissariat et un rapide inventaire des principales conditions necessaires ou favorisant la solubilisation de l'uranium dans les mines, auteur indique les differentes sources actuellement reconnues en France et les methodes utilisees pour recuperer l'uranium dans les mines situees pres d'une usine de concentration des minerais. Il donne ensuite les raisons motivant le choix du procede de precipitation calcique pour les eaux produites dans des mines eloignees des usines de concentration des minerais. Les resultats d'essais de laboratoire effectues sur des eaux chargees en uranium sont donnes et l'installation industrielle realisee a la suite de ces essais est decrite; les resultats statistiques obtenus sont detailles. En conclusion de son expose, l

  12. Studies of dynamic and static leaching of cemented and uncemented sorption material loaded with iodine-129

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furrer, J.

    1989-05-01

    Leaching tests with water and brines were conducted on AC 6120 iodine sorption material (12 wt.% Ag) in order to improve the assessment of the behaviour of radioactive waste stored in a repository mine (salt or iron ore). As a result of the dynamic and static leaching tests, the leached fraction of I-129 in the uncemented material was found to be -1 %, while that of the cemented iodine sorption material was found to be -2 %. After ordinary steel had been added to the cemented sorption material, the leached fractions found were identical to those measured in uncemented material. The addition of stainless steel had only little influence on the leached fraction. (author)

  13. Discussion on the impact of uranium ore heap leaching to environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Guoxiu; Liu Qingcheng; Chen Xin; Deng Shengshui; Yang Qinghua

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the impact of uranium ore heap leaching on the environment were studied with the case of two long production uranium mines. According to the basic requirements of the radiation environment assessment of the nuclear industry, the surface radon exhalation rate of the mine waste, the concentration of radionuclide of the waste water and the γ radiation level and concentration of radionuclide of the waste were investigated and compared to that of the early conventional hydrometallurgical production of the two uranium mines. The merits and disadvantage of the heap leaching was evaluated, and measures and suggestions were proposed for the improvement of heap leaching techniques. (authors)

  14. Environmental radioactivity assessment around old uranium mining sites near Mangualde (Viseu), Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Fernando P.; Torres, Lubelia M.; Oliveira, Joao M.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium ore was extracted in the surroundings of Mangualde city, North of Portugal, in the mines of Cunha Baixa, Quinta do Bispo and Espinho until a few years ago. Mining waste, milling tailings and acid mine waters are the on site remains of this extractive activity. Environmental radioactivity measurements were performed in and around these sites in order to assess the dispersal of radionuclides from uranium mining waste and the spread of acidic waters resulting from the in situ uranium leaching with sulphuric acid. Results show migration of acid waters into groundwater around the Cunha Baixa mine. This groundwater is tapped by irrigation wells in the agriculture area near the Cunha Baixa village. Water from wells displayed uranium ( 238 U) concentrations up to 19x10 3 mBq L -1 and sulphate ion concentrations up to 1070 mg L -1 . These enhanced concentrations are positively correlated with low water pH, pointing to a common origin for radioactivity, dissolved sulphate, and acidity in underground mining works. Radionuclide concentrations were determined in horticulture and farm products from this area also and results suggest low soil to plant transfer of radionuclides and low food chain transfer of radionuclides to man. Analysis of aerosols in surface air showed re suspension of dust from mining and milling waste heaps. Therefore, it is recommended to maintain mine water treatment and to plan remediation of these mine sites in order to prevent waste dispersal in the environment. (authors)

  15. Uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floeter, W.

    1976-01-01

    In this report uranium mining and milling are reviewed. The fuel cycle, different types of uranium geological deposits, blending of ores, open cast and underground mining, the mining cost and radiation protection in mines are treated in the first part of this report. In the second part, the milling of uranium ores is treated, including process technology, acid and alkaline leaching, process design for physical and chemical treatment of the ores, and the cost. Each chapter is clarified by added figures, diagrams, tables, and flowsheets. (HK) [de

  16. Geochemical data from groundwater at the proposed Dewey Burdock uranium in-situ recovery mine, Edgemont, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond H.

    2012-01-01

    This report releases groundwater geochemistry data from samples that were collected in June 2011 at the Dewey Burdock proposed uranium in-situ recovery site near Edgemont, South Dakota. The sampling and analytical methods are summarized, and all of the data, including quality assurance/quality control information are provided in data tables.

  17. In-situ stress measurements - results of experiments performed at the ASSE salt mine - Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feddersen, H.K.

    1989-01-01

    High-level nuclear wastes are heat generating wastes. Heat will be transferred to the surrounding salt formation. This heating of the host rock will result in an increased temperature and in stress changes. From 1983 through 1985 two underground tests were conducted in the Asse Salt Mine (Federal Republic of Germany) in which, among others, thermally induced stress changes were investigated. These tests are discussed in this paper

  18. NOVEL IN-SITU METAL AND MINERAL EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn O' Gorman; Hans von Michaelis; Gregory J. Olson

    2004-09-22

    This white paper summarizes the state of art of in-situ leaching of metals and minerals, and describes a new technology concept employing improved fragmentation of ores underground in order to prepare the ore for more efficient in-situ leaching, combined with technology to continuously improve solution flow patterns through the ore during the leaching process. The process parameters and economic benefits of combining the new concept with chemical and biological leaching are described. A summary is provided of the next steps required to demonstrate the technology with the goal of enabling more widespread use of in-situ leaching.

  19. Former uranium mine-induced effects in caged roach: a multiparametric approach for the evaluation of in situ metal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnaire, Béatrice; Bado-Nilles, Anne; Betoulle, Stéphane; Amara, Rachid; Camilleri, Virginie; Cavalié, Isabelle; Chadili, Edith; Delahaut, Laurence; Kerambrun, Elodie; Orjollet, Daniel; Palluel, Olivier; Sanchez, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    To characterize environmental risks linked to former uranium mines in the Limousin region of France, a study was conducted on fish health effects from uranium releases. Two private ponds were compared in this study, one with uranium contamination and one background site, upstream of the mining zone. Roach, Rutilus rutilus, were caged for 28 days in both ponds. Physico-chemical parameters of water and sediments and bioaccumulation of metals in several organs were determined. After 14 and 28 days of caging, immune, oxidative stress, biotransformation, neurotoxicity and physiological parameters were measured. Iron and aluminium were quantified in the water of both sites; however, barium and manganese were only present in the water of the uranium contaminated site. Uranium was present in both sites but at very different concentrations. The sediments from the uranium contaminated site contained high levels of radioactive elements coming from the disintegration chain of uranium. Results of biological parameters indicated stimulation of immune parameters and of oxidative stress and a decrease of AChE in fish caged in the uranium contaminated pond compared to the uranium-free pond. Overall, the results determined roach health status in the context of pollution from poly-metallic mining. The data strengthen our knowledge of the environmental risk assessment associated with radioactive substances in the environment.

  20. The Crownpoint and Churchrock uranium deposits, San Juan Basin, New Mexico: An ISL mining perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarn, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    The Crownpoint and Churchrock uranium deposits, San Juan Basin, New Mexico are currently being developed by Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI) and its subsidiary Hydro Resources, Inc. (HRI) with an anticipated start-up in 1998. Both deposits will be developed using advanced in situ leach (ISL) mining techniques. URI/HRI currently has about 14,583 t U (37.834 million pounds U 3 O 8 ) of estimated recoverable reserves at Crownpoint and Churchrock. at a cost less than $39/kg U ($15/lb U 3 O 8 ). The uranium endowment of the San Juan Basin is the largest of any province in the USA. In March, 1997, a Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Crownpoint and Churchrock sites was completed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission which recommends the issuance of an operating license. The FEIS is the culmination of a 9 year effort to license and develop the deposits. The Westwater Canyon Member of the Jurassic Morrison Formation is an arkosic, fine to coarse grained sandstone bounded by near basinwide confining clays deposited in a wet alluvial fan environment within the San Juan Basin. The primary, trend-ore deposits are hosted by the Westwater Canyon Member as humate-rich, syngenetic tabular deposits which were subsequently remobilized into roll fronts. Since deposition in the Jurassic, two phases of remobilization have occurred in the basin causing the formation of in situ leach amenable monometallic uranium rolls free of organic debris. Following in situ mining, ground water restoration of the Crownpoint and Churchrock mines is required to provide a water quality consistent with pre-mining baseline conditions. The development of in situ mining offers an environmentally sound and cost-effective method for uranium extraction. URI/HRI anticipates a production of 385-1,156 Tonnes U/year (1-3 million pounds U 3 O 8 ) from the New Mexico properties. (author)

  1. In situ-experiments on the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes (HAW) at the Asse salt mine Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, K.; Rothfuchs, T.

    1989-01-01

    Deep geological salt formations are considered as being the most suitable medium for the disposal of radioactive wastes in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). This paper reports how, in order to develop and to prove the necessary disposal techniques, the Asse Salt Mine in the northern part of Germany is being used as a national R and D facility for the execution of representative in situ-tests. Besides the test-wise disposal of low-and medium-level radioactive waste, a series of in situ experiments was performed on the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HAW). The so-called HAW repository is being performed from 1983 through 1994 will be the most important pilot test for the HAW repository in the FRG. During this experiment, 30 vitrified high-level radioactive heat and radiation sources will be emplaced in six underground boreholes. The duration of testing will be approximately five years. In addition to the investigations of the interactions of the heat and radiation sources and the host rock, a complete handling system for HAW-canisters is being developed and proved

  2. Recent developments in Australia's uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, A.D.

    2001-01-01

    . Heathgate Pty. Ltd. proposes to develop an in situ leach mining operation at the Beverley deposit with capacity to produce 900 tpa U 3 O 8 , commencing in the year 2000. Improved market conditions and recent changes to Commonwealth Government policies on uranium mining have encouraged Australian companies to commit to the expansion of existing operations and the development of new uranium mines. Australia's annual production is likely to increase from its present level of 5867 t U 3 O 8 (for 1996) to approximately 12,700 t U 3 O 8 by the year 2000. (author)

  3. Chattanooga shale: uranium recovery by in situ processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.D.

    1977-01-01

    The increasing demand for uranium as reactor fuel requires the addition of sizable new domestic reserves. One of the largest potential sources of low-grade uranium ore is the Chattanooga shale--a formation in Tennessee and neighboring states that has not been mined conventionally because it is expensive and environmentally disadvantageous to do so. An in situ process, on the other hand, might be used to extract uranium from this formation without the attendant problems of conventional mining. We have suggested developing such a process, in which fracturing, retorting, and pressure leaching might be used to extract the uranium. The potential advantages of such a process are that capital investment would be reduced, handling and disposing of the ore would be avoided, and leaching reagents would be self-generated from air and water. If successful, the cost reductions from these factors could make the uranium produced competitive with that from other sources, and substantially increase domestic reserves. A technical program to evaluate the processing problems has been outlined and a conceptual model of the extraction process has been developed. Preliminary cost estimates have been made, although it is recognized that their validity depends on how successfully the various processing steps are carried out. In view of the preliminary nature of this survey (and our growing need for uranium), we have urged a more detailed study on the feasibility of in situ methods for extracting uranium from the Chattanooga shale

  4. Aqueous-chlorine leaching of typical Canadian uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory-scale aqueous-chlorine leaches were conducted on quartz-pebble conglomerates, pegmatite and vein-type ores. Optimum leach temperatures, pulp density and retention times were determined. Uranium extraction of 98 per cent was obtained from the Elliot Lake, Madawaska Mines of Bancroft and Rabbit Lake ores, 96 per cent from the Key Lake ore and 86 per cent from the Agnew Lake ore. However, tailings containing 15-20 pCi g -1 of radium-226 were obtained only from the Elliot Lake and Agnew lake quartz-pebble conglomerates and Bancroft pegmatite-type ores by second-stage leaches with HCl. The second-stage leach results indicate that multistage (3 or 4) acid-chloride or salt-chloride leaches might be effective to obtain tailings containing 15-20 pCi 226 Ra g -1 from the high-grade vein-type ores. Comparative reagent-cost estimates show that the sulphuric-acid leach process is far less expensive than aqueous chlorine leaching. Nevertheless, only the aqueous chlorine and acid-chloride leaches in stages are effective in producing tailings containing 15-20 pCi 226 Ra g -1 from the typical Canadian uranium ores. (Auth.)

  5. Leaching Properties of Naturally Occurring Heavy Metals from Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Hoshino, M.; Yoshikawa, M.; Hara, J.; Sugita, H.

    2014-12-01

    The major threats to human health from heavy metals are associated with exposure to arsenic, lead, cadmium, chromium, mercury, as well as some other elements. The effects of such heavy metals on human health have been extensively studied and reviewed by international organizations such as WHO. Due to their toxicity, heavy metal contaminations have been regulated by national environmental standards in many countries, and/or laws such as the Soil Contamination Countermeasures Act in Japan. Leaching of naturally occurring heavy metals from the soils, especially those around abandoned metal mines into surrounding water systems, either groundwater or surface water systems, is one of the major pathways of exposure. Therefore, understanding the leaching properties of toxic heavy metals from naturally polluted soils is of fundamentally importance for effectively managing abandoned metal mines, excavated rocks discharged from infrastructure constructions such as tunneling, and/or selecting a pertinent countermeasure against pollution when it is necessary. In this study, soil samples taken from the surroundings of abandoned metal mines in different regions in Japan were collected and analyzed. The samples contained multiple heavy metals such as lead, arsenic and chromium. Standard leaching test and sequential leaching test considering different forms of contaminants, such as trivalent and pentavalent arsenics, and trivalent and hexavalent chromiums, together with standard test for evaluating total concentration, X-ray Fluorescence Analysis (XRF), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) tests were performed. In addition, sequential leaching tests were performed to evaluate long-term leaching properties of lead from representative samples. This presentation introduces the details of the above experimental study, discusses the relationships among leaching properties and chemical and mineral compositions, indicates the difficulties associated with

  6. Acid mine drainage: mining and water pollution issues in British Columbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The importance of protecting water quality and some of the problems associated with mineral development are described. Negative impacts of mining operations such as sedimentation, water disturbances, and water pollution from waste rock and tailings are considered. Mining wastes, types of water pollution from mining, the legacy of acid mine drainage, predicting acid mine drainage, preventing and mitigating acid mine drainage, examples from the past, and cyanide heap-leaching are discussed. The real costs of mining at the Telkwa open pit coal mine are assessed. British Columbia mines that are known for or are potentially acid generating are shown on a map. 32 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Statistical comparison of leaching behavior of incineration bottom ash using seawater and deionized water: Significant findings based on several leaching methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ke; Dou, Xiaomin; Ren, Fei; Chan, Wei-Ping; Chang, Victor Wei-Chung

    2018-02-15

    Bottom ashes generated from municipal solid waste incineration have gained increasing popularity as alternative construction materials, however, they contains elevated heavy metals posing a challenge for its free usage. Different leaching methods are developed to quantify leaching potential of incineration bottom ashes meanwhile guide its environmentally friendly application. Yet, there are diverse IBA applications while the in situ environment is always complicated, challenging its legislation. In this study, leaching tests were conveyed using batch and column leaching methods with seawater as opposed to deionized water, to unveil the metal leaching potential of IBA subjected to salty environment, which is commonly encountered when using IBA in land reclamation yet not well understood. Statistical analysis for different leaching methods suggested disparate performance between seawater and deionized water primarily ascribed to ionic strength. Impacts of leachant are metal-specific dependent on leaching methods and have a function of intrinsic characteristics of incineration bottom ashes. Leaching performances were further compared on additional perspectives, e.g. leaching approach and liquid to solid ratio, indicating sophisticated leaching potentials dominated by combined geochemistry. It is necessary to develop application-oriented leaching methods with corresponding leaching criteria to preclude discriminations between different applications, e.g., terrestrial applications vs. land reclamation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Biogenic catalysis in sulphide minerals' weathering processes and acid mine drainage genesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kušnierová, Mária; Praščáková, Mária; Nowak, Anna K; Gorazda, Katarzyna; Wzorek, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Bioleaching and biogenesis are the main outputs from a large group of environmental processes participating in the natural material cycle, used in raw materials processing. Bio-oxidation reactions are the main basis for bioleaching procedures, often participating in parallel leaching processes. During the leaching processes of polycomponent sulphide substrates, the factor of process selection also plays an important role, being in direct relation to the electric properties and galvanic effect occurring between the individual components of the leaching substrate. This work gives a summary of the results of a research focused on the possibilities of using biotechnological procedures for treatment of Slovak sulphide ores. The object of the research is extraction of valuable metals, undesirable admixtures and degradation of crystal lattice of sulphides for subsequent chemical leaching processing of precious metals. The results of experiments on the existence of biogenic processes in situ on waste dumps from exploitation containing residual sulphides are also presented. The processes result in acid mine drainage water generation. These waters are strongly mineralised (over 48 g/L) and of low pH; that is why they are very caustic. The arsenic content (2.558 mg/L) in outflowing waters from old mines is high and over the limits set by the law.

  9. Mechanistic study of lead desorption during the leaching process of ion-absorbed rare earths: pH effect and the column experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Q.; Tang, J., Sr.; Chen, H.

    2017-12-01

    High concentrations of ammonium sulfate, often used in the in-situ mining process, can result in a decrease of pH in the environment and dissolution of rare earth metals. Ammonium sulfate can also cause desorption of toxic heavy metals, leading to environmental and human health implications. In this study, the desorption behavior and fraction changes of lead in the ion-absorbed rare earth ore were studied using batch desorption experiments and column leaching tests. Results from batch desorption experiments showed that the desorption process of lead included fast and slow stages, and followed an Elovich model well. The desorption rate and the proportion of lead content in the solution to the total lead in the soil were observed to increase with a decrease in the initial pH of the ammonium sulfate solution. The lead in soil included an acid extractable fraction, reducible fraction, oxidizable fraction, and a residual fraction, with the predominant fractions being the reducible and acid extractable fractions. 96% of the extractable fraction in soil were desorbed into solution at pH=3.0, and the content of the reducible fraction was observed to initially increase (when pH>4.0) and then decrease (when pHleaching tests indicated that the content of lead in the different fractions of soil followed the trend of reducible fraction > oxidizable fraction > acid extractable fraction > residual fraction after the simulating leaching mining process. The change in pH was also found to have a larger influence on the acid extractable and reducible fractions than the other two fractions. The proportion of the extractable fraction being leached was ca. 86%, and the reducible fraction was enriched along the migration direction of the leaching liquid. These results suggest that certain lead fractions may desorb again and contaminate the environment via acid rain, which provides significant information for environmental assessment and remediation after mining process.

  10. Implementation of the Leaching Environmental Assessment ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEAF provides a uniform and integrated approach for evaluating leaching from solid materials (e.g., waste, treated wastes such as by solidification/stabilization, secondary materials such as blast furnace slags, energy residuals such as coal fly ash, soil, sediments, mining and mineral processing wastes). Assessment using LEAF applies a stepwise approach that considers the leaching behavior of COPCs in response to chemical and physical factors that control and material properties across a range of plausible field conditions (US EPA, 2010). The framework provides the flexibility to tailor testing to site conditions and select the extent of testing based on assessment objectives and the level of detailed information needed to support decision-making. The main focus will be to discuss the implementation of LEAF in the US and the How to Guide that has recently been completed. To present the How To Guide for the implementation of the leaching environmental assessment framework to an international audience already familiar with comparable leaching tests in use in Europe. Will be meeting with European colleagues on their interest in expanding methods to include organics.

  11. Glass leaching performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1983-05-01

    Current understanding of the leaching performance of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is summarized. The empirical model of waste glass leaching behavior developed shows that at high water flow rates the glass leach rate is kinetically limited to a maximum value. At intermediate water flow rates, leaching is limited by the solution concentration of silica and decreases with decreasing water flow rates. Release of soluble elements is controlled by silica dissolution because silica forms the binding network of the glass. At low water flow rates, mass loss rates reach values controlled by formation rates of alteration minerals, or by diffusion of dissolution products through essentially stagnant water. The parameters reviewed with respect to their quantifiable influence on leaching behavior include temperature, pH, leachant composition, glass composition, thermal history, and radiation. Of these, temperature is most important since the rate of mass loss approximately doubles with each 10 0 C increase in dilute solutions. The pH has small effects within the 4 to 10 range. The chemical composition of the leachant is most important with regard to its influence on alteration product formation. Glass composition exhibits the largest effects at high flow rates where improved glasses leach from ten to thirty times slower than glass 76 to 68. The effects of the thermal history (devitrification) of the glass are not likely to be significant. Radiation effects are important primarily in that radiolysis can potentially drive pH values to less than 4. Radiation damage to the glass causes insignificant changes in leaching performance

  12. Development of Uranium Mining by ISL in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demekhov, Yuriy; Gorbatenko, Olga

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 60s, feasibility of Uranium production from low-grade ores by in-situ leaching (ISL) was proved. This radically changed the situation in the raw material base in Kazakhstan. Rapid development of uranium mining by ISL in Kazakhstan caused by factor of availability of large sandstone type uranium deposits. Kazakhstan continuously carries out exploration and prospecting to expand the resource base of uranium. In 2011 and 2012 uranium resources increased by more than 110 thousand tU and 40690 tU was mined. Resource growth is 2.5 times higher than the depleting. Since 2012 Kazatomprom is prospecting for new uranium sandstone deposits in southern Kazakhstan by efforts of Volkovgeologia and at their own expense. The program lasts until 2030. Prior to 2015, allocated more than 20 mils. U.S. dollars in prospecting works. In near future the discovery of new deposits is expected.

  13. Highland Uranium Solution Mining Project. Draft environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    Exxon Minerals Co. proposes to conduct production-scale solution mining (in situ leaching) of uranium within the existing Highland Operation area in Converse County, Wyoming. The project would result in the temporary removal of 200 acres from grazing and the actual disturbance of 50 acres. About 4500 acre-ft of water will be withdrawn from the ore zone aquifer over the 10-year life of the project. There will be no discharge of liquid effluents from the project; atmospheric effluents will be within acceptable limits. Radiation doses at the nearest ranch resulting from solution mining activities were estimated. The project proposes the production and utilization of 1 to 3 million lb of uranium resources. It will not produce any significant socioeconomic impact on the local area. Alternatives to the project were considered, and conditions for issuing the source material license are listed

  14. Leaching and geochemical behavior of fired bricks containing coal wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Yassine; Benzaazoua, Mostafa; Edahbi, Mohamed; Mansori, Mohammed; Hakkou, Rachid

    2018-03-01

    High amounts of mine wastes are continuously produced by the mining industry all over the world. Recycling possibility of some wastes in fired brick making has been investigated and showed promising results. However, little attention is given to the leaching behavior of mine wastes based fired bricks. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the geochemical behavior of fired bricks containing different types of coal wastes. The leachates were analyzed for their concentration of As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Zn and sulfates using different leaching tests; namely Tank Leaching tests (NEN 7375), Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and pH dependence test (EPA, 1313). The results showed that the release of constituents of potential interest was highly reduced after thermal treatment and were immobilized within the glassy matrix of the fired bricks. Moreover, it was also highlighted that the final pH of all fired samples changed and stabilized around 8-8.5 when the initial pH of leaching solution was in the range 2.5-11.5. The release of heavy metals and metalloids (As) tended to decrease with the increase of pH from acidic to alkaline solutions while Mo displayed a different trend. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mining Pribram in science and technology. Proceedings of Session N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The proceedings contain 50 papers of which 15 have been inputted in INIS. They concern uranium ore leaching, leaching field designing, leaching process optimization, pressure leaching in autoclaves, obtaining zirconium compounds, scandium, rhenium and other elements as by-products in uranium mining, methods of waste solution and gas processing, reclamation of mined areas, experimental studies of interaction of other ores with leaching solutions, methods of processing uranium ores with increased arsenic content, and increasing corrosion resistance of reinforced concrete structures by the action of electric current. (M.D.). 36 figs., 16 tabs., 47 refs

  16. The dispersion of radon in the Straz-Hamr area of the Czech Republic as an effect of uranium mining and related activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetana, R.; Novak, J.

    1997-01-01

    Uranium is exploited in the deposit Straz pod Ralskem-Hamr since 1968. During all the time two mining methods have existed side by side - the deep mining and the ''in situ leaching'' technology using the sulphuric acid. The uranium mining culminated in the second half of 1980s in the deposit. Higher concentrations of radon is expected in the uranium mining area. It is caused for one thing by higher content of the mother elements in the crust of the earth, for another by the various mining and reprocessing processes. To evaluate a radon exposure in the Straz-Hamr area an analysis of radon distribution was worked out. The analysis was prepared in 1986 in the mining company Uranove doly Hamr (now DIAMO s.p.) and it described dispersion of radon emitted to the air in connection with the mining activities. The sources of radon could be divided into two groups - area sources (leaching fields, ore depots, water basins) and point sources (stacks, ventilation boreholes, ventilators). This paper describes the methodology of the radon dispersion calculation, based on the stationary Gaussian model of dispersion of the gaseous contaminants from the point source. Modification of the methodology for the area sources and extension for the radioactive decay are also presented. Results of the calculations are represented graphically in the contour maps of the ground-level concentrations of radon and an assessment of the doses for the critical group is presented. (author)

  17. Coal mine site reclamation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    Coal mine sites can have significant effects on local environments. In addition to the physical disruption of land forms and ecosystems, mining can also leave behind a legacy of secondary detrimental effects due to leaching of acid and trace elements from discarded materials. This report looks at the remediation of both deep mine and opencast mine sites, covering reclamation methods, back-filling issues, drainage and restoration. Examples of national variations in the applicable legislation and in the definition of rehabilitation are compared. Ultimately, mine site rehabilitation should return sites to conditions where land forms, soils, hydrology, and flora and fauna are self-sustaining and compatible with surrounding land uses. Case studies are given to show what can be achieved and how some landscapes can actually be improved as a result of mining activity.

  18. Measurement of leached hulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, T.D.

    1979-07-01

    Leached hulls are the short lengths of fuel rod cladding and fuel element hardware which constitute a major waste product of a reprocessing plant employing a chop-and-leach head-end process. The small, undissolved fuel residue (0.1 to 1.0% of original fuel content) which is discarded with this waste must be measured for safeguards, material accountability, and process control reasons. This report gives a critical analysis of hull measurement techniques involving the analysis of fission product gamma rays, spontaneous fission neutrons from curium, and delayed neutron activation. Major emphasis is given to the measurement of 2186-keV gamma rays from 144 Ce-- 144 Pr. A detailed description of typical leached hull characteristics is presented at the beginning of the report. An extensive review of experience gained from existing hull measurement systems in the United Kingdom, France, Japan, Germany, Italy, and the United States is presented

  19. The development and application of quantitative methods for the determination of in-situ radiometric uranium grade on the Witwatersrand gold and uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symons, G.

    1985-12-01

    A detailed investigation of background radiation levels near the reef zone in the uranium section of the Western Areas Mine was conducted using a collimated radiometric face scanner. This study demonstrated that these radiation levels can be high; 25% or more of the counts measured when sampling a reef face may originate from a background source, especially from uranium ore rubble on the footwall close to the reef face. A method using a 20mm frontal shield was devised to obtain an accurate background correction. Three calibration schemes, the Area method, the Gamlog method, and the Deconvolution method were implemented for the production of accurate in-situ radiometric uranium grades. This involved the construction of a step-response calibration pad at Pelindaba together with the establisment of appropriate software and underground radiometric sampling procedures. Radiometric grades generated by these calibration procedures from 60 channel sections were on average 10% below those procured from conventional chip sampling. A correlation between gold and uranium grades was also evident. Crushed rock samples were collected to investigate the thorium problem and are still undergoing analysis at the time of writing. Refinements in the design of the collimated face scanner are also described

  20. The US uranium mining industry: 1980 and today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stover, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    In 1980, 16 800 tonnes of uranium were produced in the United States, making it the largest producing nation with about 40% of Western World (WOCA) production. By 1990, US production had fallen to approximately 3500 tonnes U, representing only about 10% of WOCA production. Clearly the US uranium mining industry was strongly altered by the events of the intervening years. Widespread focus on declining prices overshadowed a second important set of events. Namely, the rapidly changing regulatory and environmental atmosphere in the United States which continues adversely to affect conventional uranium mining. As a result of these events, the size and structure of the US uranium mining industry was irrevocably changed. Within this altered industry is a rapidly maturing technology that provides a more efficient and lower-cost means of uranium production, in-situ leaching (ISL). By exploiting the advantages of relatively low capital investments, shorter development times, reduced labour costs, and increased production flexibility of ISL mining, the US uranium mining industry will be a competitive component of the world's uranium supply for the 1990s. (author)

  1. Accelerated leach test development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrmann, M.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Heiser, J.; Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1990-11-01

    In FY 1989, a draft accelerated leach test for solidified waste was written. Combined test conditions that accelerate leaching were validated through experimental and modeling efforts. A computer program was developed that calculates test results and models leaching mechanisms. This program allows the user to determine if diffusion controls leaching and, if this is the case, to make projections of releases. Leaching mechanisms other than diffusion (diffusion plus source term partitioning and solubility limited leaching) are included in the program is indicators of other processes that may control leaching. Leach test data are presented and modeling results are discussed for laboratory scale waste forms composed of portland cement containing sodium sulfate salt, portland cement containing incinerator ash, and vinyl ester-styrene containing sodium sulfate. 16 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs

  2. Leaching of Electronic Waste Using Biometabolised Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Saidan; B. Brown; M. Valix

    2012-01-01

    The revolution in information and communication technology has brought huge technical benefits and wealth, but has created a major global problem: the generation of vast amounts of electronic waste, or e-waste through product obsolesce. The challenge in managing e-waste will be in developing sustainable recycling tech- nologies that are able to address the volume and complexity of this waste using cost effective and ecologically sen-sitive methods. In this study, the capability or microorganism metabolic acids in dissolving the metallic tractions from waste printed circuit boards was examined. Several factors were considered in the examination of the activityof the acids-including secondary reactions, solution pH, temperature and the nature of ligands in solutions (or bioacid constituents). The leaching tests were cgnducted ex-situ, using synthetic organic acids. Leaching was performed for periods of up to 6 hat 70-90 ℃ and 1000 r-min-1.

  3. Urananite leaching: literature survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisham, G.F.; Bryant, E.A.; Williams, K.E.

    1979-04-01

    A literature survey was undertaken to provide background materials for a series of experiments involving the interaction of spent uranium dioxide fuel with various environments. Notes and references pertaining to the basic properties of UO/sub 2/ as produced and after reactor exposure are presented. The use of computerized literature searches is illustrated with specific topics related to leaching experiments. 57 references.

  4. Urananite leaching: literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, G.F.; Bryant, E.A.; Williams, K.E.

    1979-04-01

    A literature survey was undertaken to provide background materials for a series of experiments involving the interaction of spent uranium dioxide fuel with various environments. Notes and references pertaining to the basic properties of UO 2 as produced and after reactor exposure are presented. The use of computerized literature searches is illustrated with specific topics related to leaching experiments. 57 references

  5. Biogeochemical aspects of uranium mineralization, mining, milling, and remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kate M.; Gallegos, Tanya J.; Landa, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    Natural uranium (U) occurs as a mixture of three radioactive isotopes: 238U, 235U, and 234U. Only 235U is fissionable and makes up about 0.7% of natural U, while 238U is overwhelmingly the most abundant at greater than 99% of the total mass of U. Prior to the 1940s, U was predominantly used as a coloring agent, and U-bearing ores were mined mainly for their radium (Ra) and/or vanadium (V) content; the bulk of the U was discarded with the tailings (Finch et al., 1972). Once nuclear fission was discovered, the economic importance of U increased greatly. The mining and milling of U-bearing ores is the first step in the nuclear fuel cycle, and the contact of residual waste with natural water is a potential source of contamination of U and associated elements to the environment. Uranium is mined by three basic methods: surface (open pit), underground, and solution mining (in situ leaching or in situ recovery), depending on the deposit grade, size, location, geology and economic considerations (Abdelouas, 2006). Solid wastes at U mill tailings (UMT) sites can include both standard tailings (i.e., leached ore rock residues) and solids generated on site by waste treatment processes. The latter can include sludge or “mud” from neutralization of acidic mine/mill effluents, containing Fe and a range of coprecipitated constituents, or barium sulfate precipitates that selectively remove Ra (e.g., Carvalho et al., 2007). In this chapter, we review the hydrometallurgical processes by which U is extracted from ore, the biogeochemical processes that can affect the fate and transport of U and associated elements in the environment, and possible remediation strategies for site closure and aquifer restoration.This paper represents the fourth in a series of review papers from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on geochemical aspects of UMT management that span more than three decades. The first paper (Landa, 1980) in this series is a primer on the nature of tailings and radionuclide

  6. Solution mining process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showalter, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    A solution mining process which may be used for uranium, thorium, vanadium, copper, nickel, molybdenum, rhenium, and selenium is claimed. During a first injection-and-production phase of between 6 months and 5 years, a leaching solution is injected through at least one well into the formation to solubilize the mineral values and form a pregnant liquor. This liquor is recovered through another well. The leaching solution contains sulfuric acid, nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, carbonic acid, an alkali metal carbonate, an alkali metal bicarbonate, ammonium carbonate or ammonium bicarbonate. Subsequently during a first production-only phase of between about 2 weeks and one year, injection of the leaching solution is suspended but pregnant liquor is still recovered. This stage is followed by a second injection-and-production phase of between 6 months and 5 years and a second production-only phase. The mineral values are separated from the pregnant liquor to form a barren liquor. The leaching agent is introduced into this liquor, and the solution is recycled. In a second claim for the solution mining of uranium, dilute carbonic acid is used as the leaching solution. The solution has a pH less than 7 and a bicarbonate ion concentration between about 380 ppm and 1000 ppm. The injection-and-production phase lasts between one and two years and the production only phase takes between one and four months. Carbon dioxide is introduced into the barren liquor to form a dilute carbonic acid solution and the solution is recycled

  7. Elkon - development of new world class uranium mining center (v.2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boytsov, A., E-mail: boytsov@armz.ru [Atomredmetzoloto (ARMZ), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    The uranium deposits of Elkon district are located in the south of Republic of Sakha Yakutia. Deposits contain about 6% of the world known uranium resources: 342,409 tonnes of in situ or 288,768 tonnes of recoverable RAR + Inferred resources. Most significant uranium resources of Elkon district (261,768 tonnes) were identified within five deposits of Yuzhnaya zone. The uranium grade averages 0.15 %. Gold, silver and molybdenum are by-products. Principal resources are proposed to be mined by conventional underground method. Location, shape and dimensions of uranium orebodies are primarily controlled by NW-SE oriented and steeply SW dipping faults of Mesozoic age and surrounding pyrite-carbonate- potassium feldspar alteration zones. Country rocks are Archean gneisses. Deposits are of metasomatic geological type. Principal mineralization is represented by brannerite. The Yuzhnaya zone is about 20 km long. It was explored by underground workings and drill holes. Upper limit of orebodies is at a depth of between 200 m and 500 m. Depth persistence exceeds 2,000 m. Uranium mining enterprise Elkon was established in November 2007. It is a 100% Atomredmetzoloto (ARMZ) subsidiary. The planned producing capacity is up to 5,000 Mt U/year. It will perform the entire works related to uranium mining, milling, ore sorting, processing and uranium dioxide production. Technology of ore processing assumes primary radiometric sorting, thickening, sulphide flotation for gold concentrate extraction, subsequent autoclave sulphuric-acid uranium leaching from flotation tails and uranium adsorption onto resin, roasting and heap leaching for uranium from low grade ores, cyanide leaching of gold. Due to a considerable abundance of brannerite, the ore is classified as refractory. Elkon development include 4 main stages: feasibility study and infrastructure development (2009-2011), mine and mill construction (2012- 2015), pilot production (2013-2015), mine development and achieving full capacity

  8. Elkon - development of new world class uranium mining center (v.1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boytsov, A., E-mail: boytsov@armz.ru [Atomredmetzoloto (ARMZ), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    'Full text:' The uranium deposits of Elkon district are located in the south of Republic of Sakha Yakutia. Deposits contain about 6% of the world known uranium resources: 342 409 tonnes of in situ or 288 768 tonnes of recoverable RAR + Inferred resources. Most significant uranium resources of Elkon district (261 768 tonnes) were identified within five deposits of Yuzhnaya zone. The uranium grade averages 0.15 %. Gold, silver and molybdenum are by-products. Principal resources are proposed to be mined by conventional underground method. Location, shape and dimensions of uranium orebodies are primarily controlled by NW-SE oriented and steeply SW dipping faults of Mesozoic age and surrounding pyrite-carbonate- potassium feldspar alteration zones. Country rocks are Archean gneisses. Deposits are of metasomatic geological type. Principal mineralization is represented by brannerite. The Yuzhnaya zone is about 20 km long. It was explored by underground workings and drill holes. Upper limit of orebodies is at a depth of between 200 m and 500 m. Depth persistence exceeds 2,000 m. Uranium mining enterprise Elkon was established in November 2007. It is a 100% Atomredmetzoloto (ARMZ) subsidiary. The planned producing capacity is up to 5000 Mt U/year. It will perform the entire works related to uranium mining, milling, ore sorting, processing and uranium dioxide production. Technology of ore processing assumes primary radiometric sorting, thickening, sulphide flotation for gold concentrate extraction, subsequent autoclave sulphuric-acid uranium leaching from flotation tails and uranium adsorption onto resin, roasting and heap leaching for uranium from low grade ores, cyanide leaching of gold. Due to a considerable abundance of brannerite, the ore is classified as refractory. Elkon development include 4 main stages: feasibility study and infrastructure development (2009-2011), mine and mill construction (2012- 2015), pilot production (2013-2015), mine development and

  9. Elkon - development of new world class uranium mining center (v.1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boytsov, A.

    2010-01-01

    'Full text:' The uranium deposits of Elkon district are located in the south of Republic of Sakha Yakutia. Deposits contain about 6% of the world known uranium resources: 342 409 tonnes of in situ or 288 768 tonnes of recoverable RAR + Inferred resources. Most significant uranium resources of Elkon district (261 768 tonnes) were identified within five deposits of Yuzhnaya zone. The uranium grade averages 0.15 %. Gold, silver and molybdenum are by-products. Principal resources are proposed to be mined by conventional underground method. Location, shape and dimensions of uranium orebodies are primarily controlled by NW-SE oriented and steeply SW dipping faults of Mesozoic age and surrounding pyrite-carbonate- potassium feldspar alteration zones. Country rocks are Archean gneisses. Deposits are of metasomatic geological type. Principal mineralization is represented by brannerite. The Yuzhnaya zone is about 20 km long. It was explored by underground workings and drill holes. Upper limit of orebodies is at a depth of between 200 m and 500 m. Depth persistence exceeds 2,000 m. Uranium mining enterprise Elkon was established in November 2007. It is a 100% Atomredmetzoloto (ARMZ) subsidiary. The planned producing capacity is up to 5000 Mt U/year. It will perform the entire works related to uranium mining, milling, ore sorting, processing and uranium dioxide production. Technology of ore processing assumes primary radiometric sorting, thickening, sulphide flotation for gold concentrate extraction, subsequent autoclave sulphuric-acid uranium leaching from flotation tails and uranium adsorption onto resin, roasting and heap leaching for uranium from low grade ores, cyanide leaching of gold. Due to a considerable abundance of brannerite, the ore is classified as refractory. Elkon development include 4 main stages: feasibility study and infrastructure development (2009-2011), mine and mill construction (2012- 2015), pilot production (2013-2015), mine development and achieving

  10. Elkon - development of new world class uranium mining center (v.2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boytsov, A.

    2010-01-01

    The uranium deposits of Elkon district are located in the south of Republic of Sakha Yakutia. Deposits contain about 6% of the world known uranium resources: 342,409 tonnes of in situ or 288,768 tonnes of recoverable RAR + Inferred resources. Most significant uranium resources of Elkon district (261,768 tonnes) were identified within five deposits of Yuzhnaya zone. The uranium grade averages 0.15 %. Gold, silver and molybdenum are by-products. Principal resources are proposed to be mined by conventional underground method. Location, shape and dimensions of uranium orebodies are primarily controlled by NW-SE oriented and steeply SW dipping faults of Mesozoic age and surrounding pyrite-carbonate- potassium feldspar alteration zones. Country rocks are Archean gneisses. Deposits are of metasomatic geological type. Principal mineralization is represented by brannerite. The Yuzhnaya zone is about 20 km long. It was explored by underground workings and drill holes. Upper limit of orebodies is at a depth of between 200 m and 500 m. Depth persistence exceeds 2,000 m. Uranium mining enterprise Elkon was established in November 2007. It is a 100% Atomredmetzoloto (ARMZ) subsidiary. The planned producing capacity is up to 5,000 Mt U/year. It will perform the entire works related to uranium mining, milling, ore sorting, processing and uranium dioxide production. Technology of ore processing assumes primary radiometric sorting, thickening, sulphide flotation for gold concentrate extraction, subsequent autoclave sulphuric-acid uranium leaching from flotation tails and uranium adsorption onto resin, roasting and heap leaching for uranium from low grade ores, cyanide leaching of gold. Due to a considerable abundance of brannerite, the ore is classified as refractory. Elkon development include 4 main stages: feasibility study and infrastructure development (2009-2011), mine and mill construction (2012- 2015), pilot production (2013-2015), mine development and achieving full capacity

  11. Effects of Pregnant Leach Solution Temperature on the Permeability of Gravelly Drainage Layer of Heap Leaching Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mehdi amini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In copper heap leaching structures, the ore is leached by an acidic solution. After dissolving the ore mineral, the heap is drained off in the acidic solution using a drainage system (consisting of a network of perforated polyethylene pipes and gravelly drainage layers and is, then, transferred to the leaching plant for copper extraction where the copper is extracted and the remaining solution is dripped over the ore heap for re-leaching. In this process, the reaction between the acidic solution and copper oxide ore is exothermal and the pregnant leach solution (PLS, which is drained off the leaching heap, has a higher temperature than the dripped acidic solution. The PLS temperature variations cause some changes in the viscosity and density which affect the gravelly drainage layer's permeability. In this research, a special permeability measuring system was devised for determining the effects of the PLS temperature variations on the permeability coefficient of the gravelly drainage layer of heap leaching structures. The system, consisting of a thermal acid resistant element and a thermocouple, controls the PLS temperature, which helps measure the permeability coefficient of the gravelly drainage layer. The PLS and gravelly drainage layer of Sarcheshmeh copper mine heap leaching structure No. 1 were used in this study. The permeability coefficient of the gravelly soil was measured against the PLS and pure water at temperatures varying between 3°C to 60°C. Also, the viscosity and density of the PLS and pure water were measured at these temperatures and, using existing theoretical relations, the permeability coefficient of the gravel was computed. A comparison between the experimental and theoretical results revealed a good conformity between the two sets of results. Finally, a case (Taft heap leaching structure, Yazd, Iran was studied and its gravelly drainage layer was designed based on the results of the present research.

  12. Radiological aspects of in situ uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BROWN, STEVEN H.

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium in situ leaching in situ recovery (ISL / ISR), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and may make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since 1975. Solution mining involves the pumping of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing and complexing agents into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant. Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which Radon gas is evolved in

  13. Leaching Mechanisms Program. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.; Colombo, P.; Doty, R.; Fuhrmann, M.

    1984-09-01

    The primary goal of this work is to determine the leaching mechanisms of a variety of matrix materials either in use or being considered for the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes by defense and commercial waste generators. Since this program is new and did not formally begin until May of FY 84, the results reported here are few and preliminary. Efforts were concentrated in the following activities: (1) The literature search for leaching data and proposed leaching models and mechanisms for low-level waste. (2) Data base development for leaching data being compiled from the literature and from the leaching experiments in this program. (3) The selection of solidification agents for the experimental part of the program. (4) Fabrication of leach samples and initiation of leach testing. 28 references, 9 figures, 4 tables

  14. Flotation-nitric acid leach procedure for increasing uranium recovery from a refractory ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnahan, T.G.; Lei, K.P.V.

    1979-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines investigated a flotation-nitric acid leach procedure as part of the goal to maximize minerals and metals recovered from primary and secondary domestic resources. Studies were conducted on an ore that contained carbon-bearing and sulfide mineralization that rendered a portion of the ore refractory (resistant) to conventional leaching technology. The procedure investigated for treating the ore consisted of the following: (1) separation by flotation of the carbonaceous and sulfidic components from the ore, (2) leaching the flotation concentrate with nitric acid at 100 0 to 110 0 C, (3) leaching the flotation tailings with sulfuric acid, and (4) processing the combined leached slurries in a conventional manner to recover yellow cake. In step 2, HNO 3 is converted to gaseous products from which it is regenerated by reacting these products with air and water for further leaching. An overall uranium extraction of 96% was achieved by this procedure

  15. Leaching materials from cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, T.D.; Jordan, T.W.J.

    1980-01-01

    A material is leached from a cavity by contacting the material with a liquid and subjecting the liquid to a number of pressure cycles, each pressure cycle involving a decrease in pressure to cause boiling of the liquid, followed by a rise in pressure to inhibit the boiling. The method may include the step of heating the liquid to a temperature near to its boiling point. The material may be nuclear fuel pellets or calcium carbonate pellets. (author)

  16. The effects of ex-situ oil shale mining on groundwater resources in Siwaqa area, southern Jordan, using DRASTIC index and hydrochemical water assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsharifa Hind Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy resources in addition to water resources are the most limited resources in Jordan, being one of the fourth poorest countries in water resources, and limitation of surface water resources put huge pressure on groundwater which is the main resource there. High expenses and the increasing prices of oil over all worlds increase the feasibility to mining the oil shale that exists in southern Jordan area, Siwaqa. This study took place to clarify the possible effects of mining and energy production activities on the water resources in that area. Groundwater vulnerability mapping was done for many areas all over the country, including this part. The initiative of this work is to determine the vulnerability under the conditions of removing the bedrock of the oil shale which is described as a con ning layer. Results that are obtained by this work conclude that the oil shale area becomes highly vulnerable to the human activities because of the existing geological structures while it is small and medium vulnerable in the elds in which there are no geological structures. In addition to the structural features and adding the possibility of the oil shale mining from the outcropped areas which will decrease the depth to water table and hence will affect the vulnerability values.  Efectos en las fuentes de agua subterránea de la minería ex situ de esquistos bituminosos, en el área de Siwaqa, al sur de Jordania, a través del índice DRASTIC y la evaluación hidroquímica del agua  Resumen Las fuentes de energía y agua son las más limitadas en Jordania, uno de los cuatro países más pobres en recursos hídricos; además, las limitadas fuentes super ciales hacen de las aguas subterráneas las más importantes. Las ganancias y el precio del petróleo, por su parte, incrementan la viabilidad de la minería de esquistos bituminosos en el sur de Jordania, en la región de Siwaqa. Este estudio se realiza con el  n de establecer los

  17. Leaching Process of Rare Earth Elements, Gallium and Niobium in a Coal-Bearing Strata-Hosted Rare Metal Deposit—A Case Study from the Late Permian Tuff in the Zhongliangshan Mine, Chongqing

    OpenAIRE

    Jianhua Zou; Heming Tian; Zhen Wang

    2017-01-01

    The tuff, a part of coal-bearing strata, in the Zhongliangshan coal mine, Chongqing, southwestern China, hosts a rare metal deposit enriched in rare earth elements (REE), Ga and Nb. However, the extraction techniques directly related to the recovery of rare metals in coal-bearing strata have been little-studied in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extractability of REE, Ga and Nb in the tuff in the Zhongliangshan mine using the alkaline sintering-water immersion-...

  18. Final environmental statement related to the Wyoming Mineral Corporation Irigaray uranium solution mining project (Johnson County, Wyoming)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The Irigaray project consists of solution mining (in situ leaching) operations involving uranium ore deposits in Johnson County, Wyoming. Solution mining activities will include a processing facility with an annual production of 500,000 lb of U 3 O 8 from up to 50 acres of well fields through the initial license authorization. The Irigaray project has an estimated lifetime of up to 10 to 20 years with known ore deposits and the current level of solution mining technology. The site is mostly used as grazing land for cattle and sheep. Initiation of the Irigaray project would result in the temporary removal from grazing and the disturbance of approximately 60 acres during operation as proposed by the staff. All disturbed surface areas will be reclaimed and returned to their original use. Approximately 1.2 x 10 6 m 3 of water will be withdrawn from the ore zone aquifer. 43 figs, 52 tables

  19. Queensland Mines plant trials with Caro's acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, G.C.; Fulton, E.J.; Vautier, F.E.; Waters, D.J.; Ring, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory leach tests have been carried out to compare the effectiveness of Caro's acid (permonosulphuric acid) as an alternative oxidant to pyrolusite in the leaching of uranium ores. Results demonstrated that Caro's acid reduced acid consumption in leaching and the time required for neutralisation of tailings liquor. The uranium extraction was unaffected by choice of oxidant. A plant trial confirmed that significant savings in acid and lime usage can be achieved under plant conditions. Plant operations also demonstrated that Caro's acid has a number of significant operating advantages over pyrolusite. Queensland Mines Ltd. have recently decided to convert their leaching process from pyrolusite to Caro's acid

  20. Applied Geochemistry Special Issue on Environmental geochemistry of modern mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Robert R.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    -study examples. Subaqueous disposal of tailings is another option described by Moncur et al. Cyanide leaching for gold extraction is a common method throughout the world. Johnson describes environmental aspects of cyanidation. Uranium mining presents unique environmental challenges, particularly since in-situ recovery has seen widespread use. Campbell et al. review the environmental geochemistry of uranium mining and current research on bioremediation. Ore concentrates from many types of metal mining undergo a pyrometallurgical technique known as smelting to extract the metal. Slag is the result of smelting, and it may be an environmental liability or a valuable byproduct, as described by Piatak et al. Finally, the open pits that result from surface mining commonly reach below the water table. At the end of mining, these pits may fill to form lakes that become part of the legacy of the mine. Castendyk et al., in two papers, review theoretical aspects of the environmental limnology of pit lakes. They also describe approaches that have been used to model pit lake water balance, wall-rock contributions to pit lake chemistry, pit lake water quality, and limnological processes, such as vertical mixing, through the use of three case studies.

  1. Carbonate heap leach of uranium-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turney, W.R.; Mason, C.F.V.; Longmire, P.

    1994-01-01

    A new approach to removal of uranium from soils based on existing heap leach mining technologies proved highly effective for remediation of soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) near Cincinnati, Ohio. In laboratory tests, remediation of uranium-contaminated soils by heap leaching with carbonate salt solutions was demonstrated in column experiments. An understanding of the chemical processes that occur during carbonate leach of uranium from soils may lead to enhancement of uranium removal. Carbonate leaching requires the use of an integrated and closed circuit process, wherein the leach solutions are recycled and the reagents are reused, resulting in a minimum secondary waste stream. Carbonate salt leach solution has two important roles. Primarily, the formation of highly soluble anionic carbonate uranyl species, including uranyl dicarbonate (UO 2 CO 32 = ) and uranyl tricarbonate (UO 2 CO 33 4- ), allows for high concentration of uranium in a leachate solution. Secondly, carbonate salts are nearly selective for dissolution of uranium from uranium contaminated soils. Other advantages of the carbonate leaching process include (1) the high solubility, (2) the selectivity, (3) the purity of the solution produced, (4) the relative ease with which a uranium product can be precipitated directly from the leachate solution, and (5) the relatively non-corrosive and safe handling characteristics of carbonate solutions. Experiments conducted in the laboratory have demonstrated the effectiveness of carbonate leach. Efficiencies of uranium removal from the soils have been as high as 92 percent. Higher molar strength carbonate solutions (∼0.5M) proved more effective than lower molar strength solutions (∼ 0.1M). Uranium removal is also a function of lixiviant loading rate. Furthermore, agglomeration of the soils with cement resulted in less effective uranium removal

  2. Mining with microbes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlings., D.E.; Silver, S.

    1995-01-01

    Microbes are playing increasingly important roles in commercial mining operations, where they are being used in the open-quotes bioleachingclose quotes of copper, uranium, and gold ores. Direct leaching is when microbial metabolism changes the redox state of the metal being harvested, rendering it more soluble. Indirect leaching includes redox chemistry of other metal cations that are then coupled in chemical oxidation or reduction of the harvested metal ion and microbial attack upon and solubilization of the mineral matrix in which the metal is physically embedded. In addition, bacterial cells are used to detoxify the waste cyanide solution from gold-mining operations and as open-quotes absorbantsclose quotes of the mineral cations. Bacterial cells may replace activated carbon or alternative biomass. With an increasing understanding of microbial physiology, biochemistry and molecular genetics, rational approaches to improving these microbial activities become possible. 40 refs., 3 figs

  3. Leaching From Biomass Gasification Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Boldrin, Alessio; Polletini, A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled with geoche......The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled...

  4. Acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, Jerry M.; Cravotta, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) consists of metal-laden solutions produced by the oxidative dissolution of iron sulfide minerals exposed to air, moisture, and acidophilic microbes during the mining of coal and metal deposits. The pH of AMD is usually in the range of 2–6, but mine-impacted waters at circumneutral pH (5–8) are also common. Mine drainage usually contains elevated concentrations of sulfate, iron, aluminum, and other potentially toxic metals leached from rock that hydrolyze and coprecipitate to form rust-colored encrustations or sediments. When AMD is discharged into surface waters or groundwaters, degradation of water quality, injury to aquatic life, and corrosion or encrustation of engineered structures can occur for substantial distances. Prevention and remediation strategies should consider the biogeochemical complexity of the system, the longevity of AMD pollution, the predictive power of geochemical modeling, and the full range of available field technologies for problem mitigation.

  5. Leaching Test Relationships, Laboratory-to-Field Comparisons and Recommendations for Leaching Evaluation using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report presents examples of the relationships between the results of laboratory leaching tests, as defined by the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) or analogous international test methods, and leaching of constituents from a broad range of materials under di...

  6. Site selection and general layout of heap leaching uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunmao; Rongfeng

    2011-01-01

    The site selection and general layout of uranium mill is an important work in the design and consultation stage of uranium mining and metallurgy's engineering construction. Based on the design practices, the principles and methods for the site selection and general layout of heap leaching uranium mill are analyzed and studied. Some problems which should be paid much attention to in the design are discussed in hopes of providing a useful reference for the design and consultation of similar projects. (authors)

  7. Mobility of Ra-226 and Heavy Metals (U, Th and Pb) from Pyritic Uranium Mine Tailings under Sub-aqueous Disposal Conditions - 59283

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, Nand K.

    2012-01-01

    All uranium mines in the Elliot Lake uranium mining district of north-central Ontario, Canada, have been closed due to low ore grade and prevailing market conditions. A majority of the waste management facilities have been rehabilitated and decommissioned with in-situ shallow water covers to minimize sulphide oxidation, and hence acid generation and release of metal enriched effluents. Laboratory lysimeter studies were undertaken to evaluate the leaching characteristics and mobility of Ra-226 and other heavy metals (U, Th and Pb) from pyritic uranium mine tailings under sub-aqueous disposal conditions for assessing the long-term radiological stability of such waste repositories. The experiments were conducted using three types of un-oxidized tailings: fine, coarse and gypsum depleted mill total tailings. Shallow water covers of depth ∼ 0.3 m were established using natural lake water. The leaching characteristics of radium and other major and trace metals were determined by monitoring both surface and pore water qualities as a function of time. The results showed that Ra-226 was leached from surface of the submerged tailings and released to both surface water and shallow zone pore water during initial low sulphate ion concentration of the surface water cover in all three cases. The release of Ra-226 was further enhanced with the onset of weak acidic conditions in the surface water covers of both coarse and gypsum depleted mill total tailings. With additional acid generation and increasing sulphate and iron concentrations, the dissolved Ra-226 concentrations in the water covers of these tailings gradually decreased back to low levels. Pb was also leached and mobilized with the development of moderate acidic conditions at the surface of the submerged coarse and gypsum deplete tailings. No leaching of U and Th was observed. (authors)

  8. Vat leaching of gold ores and utilization of the tailings; Kinkoseki no vat leaching to koshi no yuko riyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosooka, T. [Nippon Clay Mining Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Miyagawa, H. [Mitsui Mining and Smelting Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-01-25

    Mitsui Kushikino Mine previously processed two gold ores from Kushikino and Iwato ore deposits by the all slime cyanidation method, where the ores were ground to fine size smaller than 75 {mu}m and leached with sodium, cyanide. A large amount of slimes were produced as waste and discarded in tailings ponds. To save the costs of grinding and waste treatment it is desirable to process coarse sized ores. The Iwato ore is gold and silver bearing silicified porous rock. As most gold and silver in the Iwato ore are concentrated in the pores, leaching of coarse sized ore is expected to be possible. Laboratory tests and pilot plant tests of vat leaching for the Iwato ore were carried out using 0.15-8.0 mm feed. These results showed that the gold dissolution rate was similar to that by the all slime cyanidation and the decrease in gold recovery was a few %. The properties of these tailings can be used in fine aggregate of concrete. Based on the results vat leaching of the Iwato ore was adopted in the plant. The tailings are sold and used as fine aggregate. Utilization of slime tailings from the other ores was also developed and they are used as flux in copper smelters. Now, there is no tailings pond at Mitsui Kushikino Mine. 9 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Increasing flux rate to shorten leaching period and ramp-up production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngantung, Billy; Agustin, Riska; Ravi'i

    2017-01-01

    J Resources Bolaang Mongondow (JBRM) has operated a dynamic heap leach in its Bakan Gold Mine since late 2013. After successfully surpassing its name plate capacity of 2.6 MT/annum in 2014, the clayey and transition ore become the next operational challenge. The presence of transition and clayey ore requires longer leaching period, hence reducing the leach pad capacity which then caused reduced production. Maintaining or even increasing production with such longer leaching ore types can be done by expanding the leach pad area which means an additional capital investment, and/or shortening the leaching cycle which compromise a portion of gold extraction. JBRM has been successfully increasing the leach pad production from 2.6 MT/annum to 3.8 MT/annum, whilst improving the gold extraction from around 70% to around 80%. This was achieved by managing the operation of the leach pad which is shortening the leach cycle by identifying and combining the optimal flux rate application versus the tonne processed in each cell, at no capital investment for expanding the cell capacity.

  10. Defining Effective Salt Leaching Regions Between Drains

    OpenAIRE

    ANAPALI, Ömer; ŞAHİN, Üstün; ÖZTAŞ, Taşkın; HANAY, Abdurrahman

    2014-01-01

    The application of sufficient amounts of leaching water by means of an effective method is very important in the management and reclamation of saline and sodic soils. Reclamation cannot be achieved with insufficient leaching water application, while excess water application may cause severe problems in soil. Knowledge of the leaching regions and intensities may help to control the amounts of leaching water through effective leaching methods in areas of limited leaching. This study was und...

  11. Nitric acid leaching of radium and other significant radionuclides from uranium ores and tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryon, A.D.; Hurst, F.J.; Seeley, F.G.

    1977-08-01

    Nitric acid leaching of representative uranium ores and mill tailings from the western U.S. mining districts removes up to 98% of the 226 Ra and 230 Th, yielding a residue containing 17 to 60 pCi of radium per gram. At best, this is an order of magnitude greater than that in surrounding soils, but about the same level as a standard proposed for building materials in the United Kingdom. Data are also presented on the water penetration and leaching of tailings, the solubility of BaSO 4 , and radon emanation coefficients of ores, tailings, and nitric acid-leached residues

  12. Numerical simulation of roadway support in a sandstone-type uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Huipeng; Li Yu; Song Lixia

    2009-01-01

    At present, the most surrounding rocks of sandstone-type uranium mines in China are mudstone, sandstone, pelitic siltstone, and so on. They show the characteristics of soft rock. Such uranium deposit is not fit for in-situ leaching. If the uranium ores are mined by conventional mining method, one of the problems to be solved is the support technique in the soft rock roadway. So, taking a uranium mine in Inner Mongolia as the research object, the support technique in the soft rock roadway of the sandstone-type uranium deposits is studied. Through on-site engineering geological investigation and laboratory test, the main reasons for roadway damage are analyzed. A technique of support in the soft rock roadway of sandstone-type uranium deposits is put forward by drawing on the expericnce of soft rock roadway support in coal mines. The roadway shape and support parameters are optimized by using a numerical simulation method. The results verified the feasibility of the supporting technique. (authors)

  13. Disposal of leached residual in heap leaching by neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jingmin

    1993-01-01

    The disposal results of leached residual with lime are described. Using the ratio of residual to lime being 100 : 1 the ideal disposal results were obtained with the effluent of the neutralized residual close to neutral

  14. The geography, geology and mining history of Rum Jungle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowson, R.T.

    1975-01-01

    The geology and geography of the Rum Jungle region are described. A description is given of the effect on the environment of mining operations such as ore processing, effluent disposal and the leaching of stockpiles and overburden heaps. (author)

  15. Mechanism for elevated temperature leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenna, B.T.; Murphy, K.D.

    1979-01-01

    Long-term, elevated temperature leaching and subsequent electron microprobe analysis of simulated waste glass and ceramic materials have been completed. A cyclic leaching pattern was found in all systems over a 20-month period. It appears that the leaching of mobile ions by simple diffusional processes is modified by more complex chemical interactions. The release of immobile ions is primarily a function of their chemical interactions in the matrix which suggests that these ions may be complex species when released into solution. A mechanism is proposed which incorporates these ideas and the cyclic phenomenon observed

  16. Leaching of concrete : the leaching process : extrapolation of deterioration : effect on the structural stability

    OpenAIRE

    Fagerlund, Göran

    2000-01-01

    The leaching process when water attacks concrete, and the effect of leaching on the strength and durability of a concrete structure, is analysed theoretically. Technique for prediction of the future leaching and structural stability is outlined. The analysis is to a certain extent supported by data from literature. The leaching process is divided in five different types: 1: Pure surface leaching 2: Surface leaching involving erosion 3: Homogeneous leaching over the entire structure 4...

  17. Composition and method for solution mining of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawes, B.C.; Watts, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    It has been found that, in the solution mining of uranium ores using ammonium carbonate solutions containing hydrogen peroxide or ozone as an oxidant, the tendency of the formation being treated to become less permeable during the leaching process can be overcome by including in the leaching solution a very small concentration of sodium silicate

  18. Comparison of leaching tests and study of leaching mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarantos, S.G.; Papadokostaki, K.G.; Petropoulos, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    The present work is concerned first with the study of certain aspects of the leaching kinetics of Cs + and Sr ++ embedded in cement, as Cs 2 SO 4 and SrSO 4 , and in particular: (a) the comparative evaluation of leaching in (i) stagnant, (ii) stirred and (iii) continuously flowing (modified Soxhlet) water, (b) the effect of atmospheric CO 2 on elution, (c) the effect of temperature changes during leaching. Secondly, model kinetic studies were carried out using cellulose acetate incorporating SrSO 4 , CaSO 4 or NaCl. The main results obtained were: (1) Cs leaching rates were not significantly affected by the leaching method or by the presence of atmospheric CO 2 . The embedded Cs exists in relatively easily leachable and less rapidly leachable (most probably located within the gel regions) forms. (2) Elution of Sr is retarded by stagnant and infrequently renewed leachant (method (i)) and by the presence of atmospheric CO 2 ; leaching method (iii), which tends to minimize both of these effects, gave the highest elution rates. (3) The observed elution kinetics in the case of cellulose acetate-CaSO 4 or SrSO 4 conform to the Higuchi model, but a more elaborate theory is needed for the cellulose acetate-NaCl system. (author)

  19. LEACH-A: An Adaptive Method for Improving LEACH Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianli ZHAO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy has become one of the most important constraints on wireless sensor networks. Hence, many researchers in this field focus on how to design a routing protocol to prolong the lifetime of the network. The classical hierarchical protocols such as LEACH and LEACH-C have better performance in saving the energy consumption. However, the choosing strategy only based on the largest residue energy or shortest distance will still consume more energy. In this paper an adaptive routing protocol named “LEACH-A” which has an energy threshold E0 is proposed. If there are cluster nodes whose residual energy are greater than E0, the node of largest residual energy is selected to communicated with the base station; When all the cluster nodes energy are less than E0, the node nearest to the base station is select to communication with the base station. Simulations show that our improved protocol LEACH-A performs better than the LEACH and the LEACH-C.

  20. In situ effects of metal contamination from former uranium mining sites on the health of the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus, L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guernic, Antoine; Sanchez, Wilfried; Bado-Nilles, Anne; Palluel, Olivier; Turies, Cyril; Chadili, Edith; Cavalié, Isabelle; Delahaut, Laurence; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Porcher, Jean-Marc; Geffard, Alain; Betoulle, Stéphane; Gagnaire, Béatrice

    2016-08-01

    Human activities have led to increased levels of various pollutants including metals in aquatic ecosystems. Increase of metallic concentrations in aquatic environments represents a potential risk to exposed organisms, including fish. The aim of this study was to characterize the environmental risk to fish health linked to a polymetallic contamination from former uranium mines in France. This contamination is characterized by metals naturally present in the areas (manganese and iron), uranium, and metals (aluminum and barium) added to precipitate uranium and its decay products. Effects from mine releases in two contaminated ponds (Pontabrier for Haute-Vienne Department and Saint-Pierre for Cantal Department) were compared to those assessed at four other ponds outside the influence of mine tailings (two reference ponds/department). In this way, 360 adult three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) were caged for 28 days in these six ponds before biomarker analyses (immune system, antioxidant system, biometry, histology, DNA integrity, etc.). Ponds receiving uranium mine tailings presented higher concentrations of uranium, manganese and aluminum, especially for the Haute-Vienne Department. This uranium contamination could explain the higher bioaccumulation of this metal in fish caged in Pontabrier and Saint-Pierre Ponds. In the same way, many fish biomarkers (antioxidant and immune systems, acetylcholinesterase activity and biometric parameters) were impacted by this environmental exposure to mine tailings. This study shows the interest of caging and the use of a multi-biomarker approach in the study of a complex metallic contamination.

  1. Mining and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janecka, V.; Nemec, V.; Bradka, S.; Placek, V.; Sulovsky, P.

    1992-01-01

    The proceedings contain 30 contributions, out of which 9 have been inputted in INIS. They are concerned with uranium mines and mills in the Czech Republic. The impacts of the mining activities and of the mill tailings on the environment and the population are assessed, and it is concluded that the radiation hazard does not exceed that from natural background. Considerable attention is paid to the monitoring of the surroundings of mines and mills and to landscaping activities. Proposed technologies for the purification of waste waters from the chemical leaching process are described. Ways to eliminate environmental damage from abandoned tailings settling ponds are suggested. (M.D.). 18 tabs., 21 figs., 43 refs

  2. Next Generation of Leaching Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    A corresponding abstract has been cleared for this presentation. The four methods comprising the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework are described along with the tools to support implementation of the more rigorous and accurate source terms that are developed using LEAF ...

  3. Pressure leaching of chalcopyrite concentrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksei, Kritskii; Kirill, Karimov; Stanislav, Naboichenko

    2018-05-01

    The results of chalcopyrite concentrate processing using low-temperature and high-temperature sulfuric acid pressure leaching are presented. A material of the following composition was used, 21.5 Cu, 0.1 Zn, 0.05 Pb, 0.04 Ni, 26.59 S, 24.52 Fe, 16.28 SiO2 (in wt.%). The influence of technological parameters on the degree of copper and iron extraction into the leach solution was studied in the wide range of values. The following conditions were suggested as the optimal for the high-temperature pressure leaching: t = 190 °C, PO2 = 0.5 MPa, CH2SO4 = 15 g/L, L:S = 6:1. At the mentioned parameters, it is possible to extract at least 98% Cu from concentrate into the leaching solution during 100 minutes. The following conditions were suggested as optimal for the low-temperature pressure leaching: t = 105 °C, PO2 = 1.3-1.5 MPa, CH2SO4 = 90 g/L, L:S = 10:1. At the mentioned parameters, it is possible to extract up to 83% Cu from the concentrate into the leach solution during 300-360 minutes.

  4. Bacterial leaching of pyritic gold ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagliardi, F.M.; Cashion, J.D.; Brown, J.; Jay, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Pyritic ores (pyrite and arsenopyrite) containing gold concentrations in excess of 50g Au/t can be processed to recover the gold by the removal of the sulphur from the ore. This may be achieved by roasting (producing sulphur dioxide emissions), pressure oxidation (expensive and suitable for large high grade deposits), pressure leaching (still currently being developed) or bacterial oxidation. The bacterial oxidation process is a well known process in nature but has only recently come under investigation as a economically viable and relatively clean method of gold recovery from deep low grade sulphidic ores. Samples were obtained from the Wiluna Gold Mine in Western Australia consisting of the original ore, six successive bacterial reactors and the final products. Moessbauer experiments have been performed at room temperature, liquid nitrogen and liquid helium temperatures, and in applied magnetic fields. The main components of the iron phases which were present during the bacterial treatment were pyrite and arsenopyrite which were readily oxidised by the bacteria. Ferric sulfates and ferric arsenates were identified as by-products of the process with a small amount of the oxyhydroxide goethite. These results are in contrast to the similar study of the Fairview Mine in South Africa where principally Fe(II) species were observed

  5. Cross-current leaching of indium from end-of-life LCD panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchetti, Laura; Amato, Alessia; Fonti, Viviana; Ubaldini, Stefano; De Michelis, Ida; Kopacek, Bernd; Vegliò, Francesco; Beolchini, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    Indium is a critical element mainly produced as a by-product of zinc mining, and it is largely used in the production process of liquid crystal display (LCD) panels. End-of-life LCDs represent a possible source of indium in the field of urban mining. In the present paper, we apply, for the first time, cross-current leaching to mobilize indium from end-of-life LCD panels. We carried out a series of treatments to leach indium. The best leaching conditions for indium were 2M sulfuric acid at 80°C for 10min, which allowed us to completely mobilize indium. Taking into account the low content of indium in end-of-life LCDs, of about 100ppm, a single step of leaching is not cost-effective. We tested 6 steps of cross-current leaching: in the first step indium leaching was complete, whereas in the second step it was in the range of 85-90%, and with 6 steps it was about 50-55%. Indium concentration in the leachate was about 35mg/L after the first step of leaching, almost 2-fold at the second step and about 3-fold at the fifth step. Then, we hypothesized to scale up the process of cross-current leaching up to 10 steps, followed by cementation with zinc to recover indium. In this simulation, the process of indium recovery was advantageous from an economic and environmental point of view. Indeed, cross-current leaching allowed to concentrate indium, save reagents, and reduce the emission of CO2 (with 10 steps we assessed that the emission of about 90kg CO2-Eq. could be avoided) thanks to the recovery of indium. This new strategy represents a useful approach for secondary production of indium from waste LCD panels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Estimated water requirements for gold heap-leach operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiwas, Donald I.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a perspective on the amount of water necessary for conventional gold heap-leach operations. Water is required for drilling and dust suppression during mining, for agglomeration and as leachate during ore processing, to support the workforce (requires water in potable form and for sanitation), for minesite reclamation, and to compensate for water lost to evaporation and leakage. Maintaining an adequate water balance is especially critical in areas where surface and groundwater are difficult to acquire because of unfavorable climatic conditions [arid conditions and (or) a high evaporation rate]; where there is competition with other uses, such as for agriculture, industry, and use by municipalities; and where compliance with regulatory requirements may restrict water usage. Estimating the water consumption of heap-leach operations requires an understanding of the heap-leach process itself. The task is fairly complex because, although they all share some common features, each gold heap-leach operation is unique. Also, estimating the water consumption requires a synthesis of several fields of science, including chemistry, ecology, geology, hydrology, and meteorology, as well as consideration of economic factors.

  7. Mining and processing of uranium ores in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskorin, B.N.; Mamilov, V.A.; Korejsho, Yu.A.

    1983-01-01

    Experience gained in uranium ore mining by modern methods in combination with underground and heap leaching is summarized. More intensive processing of low-grade ores has been achieved through the use of autoclave leaching, sorptive treatment of thick pulps, extractive separation of pure uranium compounds, automated continuous sorption devices of high efficiency for processing the underground- and heap-leaching liquors, natural and mine water, and recovery of molybdenum, vanadium, scandium, rare earths and phosphate fertilizers from low-grade ores. Production of ion-exchangers and extractants has been developed and processes for concomitant recovery of copper, gold, ionium, tungsten, caesium, zirconium, tantalum, nickel and cobalt have been designed. (author)

  8. Studies on feasibility of recovering uranium from Dongkeng second class submarginal ore by heap leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Qingyi

    1994-01-01

    It was proved that it is feasible in economy and in technology to recover uranium from Dongkeng second class submarginal ore by heap leaching, on the basis of analysing the conditions of Mine No. 743 and the tests conducted. Moreover, the social and environmental effects are good. Two valuable suggestions are presented

  9. Implementation of the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEAF provides a uniform and integrated approach for evaluating leaching from solid materials (e.g., waste, treated wastes such as by solidification/stabilization, secondary materials such as blast furnace slags, energy residuals such as coal fly ash, soil, sediments, mining and m...

  10. An instrumented leach column for the study of sulphide oxidation in waste heaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowson, R.T.; Sarbutt, J.V.

    1985-05-01

    The construction, commissioning and first year of operation of a large scale, instrumented leach column are described. The column material was sulphidic mine overburden. Monitored parameters included matrix potential, temperature, redox potential, dissolved oxygen, pore space gas, water addition and drainage, together with pH, Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Zn, Cl - , F - , SO 4 2- and PO 4 3- in the effluent

  11. Heap leaching of clay ish uranium ores; Lixiviacion estatica de minerales arcillosos de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, E; Sedano, A

    1973-07-01

    This paper describes an experimental facility, built near El Lobo mine. In it we study the beneficiation of low-grade uranium ore. The mineral has a great amount of clay and fines. The flow-sheet used has four steps: head leaching, ph-ajustement, ion-exchange and participation. We show, also, the most interesting results. (Author)

  12. NEXT GENERATION LEACHING TESTS FOR EVALUATING LEACHING OF INORGANIC CONSTITUENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the U.S. as in other countries, there is increased interest in using industrial by-products as alternative or secondary materials, helping to conserve virgin or raw materials. The LEAF and associated test methods are being used to develop the source term for leaching or any i...

  13. Leachability of Arsenic and Heavy Metals from Mine Tailings of Abandoned Metal Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mihee; Han, Gi-Chun; Ahn, Ji-Whan; You, Kwang-Suk; Kim, Hyung-Seok

    2009-01-01

    Mine tailings from an abandoned metal mine in Korea contained high concentrations of arsenic (As) and heavy metals [e.g., As: 67,336, Fe: 137,180, Cu: 764, Pb: 3,572, and Zn: 12,420 (mg/kg)]. US EPA method 6010 was an effective method for analyzing total arsenic and heavy metals concentrations. Arsenic in the mine tailings showed a high residual fraction of 89% by a sequential extraction. In Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and Korean Standard Leaching Test (KSLT), leaching concentrations of arsenic and heavy metals were very low [e.g., As (mg/L): 0.4 for TCLP and 0.2 for KSLT; cf. As criteria (mg/L): 5.0 for TCLP and 1.5 for KSLT]. PMID:20049231

  14. Extraction of metals from ores by bacterial leaching: present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.P.

    1977-01-01

    The principal organism effecting bacterial leaching of ferrous and sulfide ores is Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, though other thiobacilli and other bacteria may be involved. The process depends on (a) direct solubilization of metal sulfides by bacterial oxidation; (b) dissolution of metal sulfides or oxides by ferric iron produced by bacterial pyrite oxidation. Mining spoil dumps and low grade ores can be leached for copper or uranium by cheap low-level technology. Dump leaching enables maximum recovery of valuable metal from any ore, but makes possible exploitation of very low grade Cu and U ores. Continuous extraction processes are possible where a continuously growing bacterial culture is fed with pyritic ores (or FeSO 4 or other sulfide) and continuous metal solubilization proceeds. Intimate contact between the bacteria and the ore to be leached (especially with uranium oxide ores) is not always necessary: leaching of UO 2 ores probably depends only on ferric iron reaction with the ore. Degradation of pyrite-containing rocks may also be developed as part of future recovery processes for petroleum from oil shales. Two-stage leaching systems present the best prospect for developing a higher-level technology for metal extraction. State 1: bacterial generation of Fe 3+ from pyrite or a Fe 2+ source; Stage 2: chemical leaching of ore by Fe 3+ in acid solution. Two-stage processes can be surface processes using crushed or milled ores or can be applied to underground solution mining, when an ore (e.g. uranium) can be leached by pumping Fe 3+ solutions through shattered underground deposits, metal recovered (e.g. solvent extraction) and Fe 3+ regenerated by bacterial oxidation at the surface. The use of controlled continuous microbial cultures to generate either bacteria or ferric iron is outlined

  15. Ultrasound-assisted leaching of rare earths from the weathered crust elution-deposited ore using magnesium sulfate without ammonia-nitrogen pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shaohua; Pei, Jiannan; Jiang, Feng; Li, Shiwei; Peng, Jinhui; Zhang, Libo; Ju, Shaohua; Srinivasakannan, Chandrasekar

    2018-03-01

    The in situ leaching process of China's unique ion-adsorption rare earth ores has caused severe environmental damages due to the use of (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 solution. This study reports that magnesium sulfate (MgSO 4 ) as a leaching agent would replace (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 by ultrasonically assisted leaching to deal with the ammonia-nitrogen pollution problem and enhance leaching process. At leaching conditions of 3wt% MgSO 4 concentration, 3:1L/S ratio and 30min, the total rare earth leaching efficiency reaches 75.5%. Ultrasound-assisted leaching experiments show that the leaching efficiency of rare earths is substantially increased by introducing ultrasound, and nearly completely leached out after two stage leaching process. Thus, ultrasonic-assisted leaching process with MgSO 4 is not only effective but also environmentally friendly, and beneficial to leach rare earths at laboratory scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Leach behavior of high-level borosilicate glasses under deep geological environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo

    1998-02-01

    This report presents an overview of the activities in high-level radioactive waste glass which is considered as the most practicable form of waste, and also is intended to be used in the disposal of national high-level radioactive waste in future. Leach theory of waste glass and the leach effects of ground water, metal barrier, buffer materials and rocks on the waste glass were reviewed. The leach of waste glass was affected by various factors such as composition, pH and Eh of ground water, temperature, pressure, radiation and humic acid. The crystallization, crack, weathering and the formation of altered phases of waste glass which is expected to occur in real disposal site were reviewed. The results of leaching in laboratory and in-situ were compared. The behaviors of radioactive elements leached from waste glass and the use of basalt glass for the long-term natural analogue of waste glass were also written in this report. The appraisal of durability of borosilicate waste glass as a waste media was performed from the known results of leach test and international in-situ tests were introduced. (author). 134 refs., 15 tabs., 24 figs

  17. In-situ bioremediation of contaminated soils from Rodna mining areas from Bistrița-Năsăud county

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Negrusier

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil ecosystems contaminated with heavy metals can cause significant damages to the environment and human health due to the mobility and solubility capacity of the contaminants. This research was carried out to set up a suitable bioremediation scheme for cleaning up the soil from the mining sites of Anieș and Glod Valley from Bistrița-Năsăud county. Based on the investigations that have been made (soil colour, pH, organic content of the soil, plant inventory phytoremediation seemed to be the most effective and environmentally-friendly method that could be used to neutralize or remove heavy metals from the soil.

  18. Uranium evaluation and mining techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    accurate, comprehensive, and understandable appraisal of the world's potential uranium resources, and the ability to discover, develop and produce these resources within an acceptable time frame are absolutely essential to making meaningful decisions in relation to the future supply of nuclear fuel. Therefore, the methods used to appraise undiscovered uranium resources were examined and compared in the light of the needs of the world nuclear power industry as a whole. Notable among these methods is one based on interactive genetic models. It is currently being developed to reduce the amount of subjectivity inherent in most of the currently used appraisal techniques The goal is to use more geologic data and depend less on the intuition and experience of the estimator. The more esoteric statistical techniques based on past production rates, prices, rates of increase or decrease in reported reserves or resources, etc., while of unknown or unproved value, were not discussed at the symposium. The symposium provided a forum for discussion of closely related subjects as well. One of the major problems in reporting internationally in uranium resources is classification of the resources into various categories and defining those categories. Conceptually, among earth scientists, there is general agreement, but defining these concepts is a difficult task. At least three organizations have undertaken to develop classifications and definitions to satisfy the needs of international reporting. Two of these were described at the symposium. (The third has been used by the joint NEA/IAEA Working Party on Uranium Resources but was not described.) The techniques of winning uranium from its several sources include, besides mining by conventional open pit or underground methods, in situ leaching of low-grade ores in special environments, and from ores left in mines In addition, virtually all marine phosphates contain some uranium that can be recovered as a by-product in the manufacture of

  19. Measurement and control in solution mining of copper and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, D.H.; Huff, R.V.; Sonstelie, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    The solution mining of deep-lying mineral deposits requires an integration of oilfield and extractive mineral technology. Although instrumentation is available to measure parameters relating to the oilfield components such as permeability, porosity and flow-logging, only limited services exist for monitoring leaching performance. This paper discusses the history of copper leaching, the need for solution mining development, and solution mining process descriptions. It discusses measurement requirements for deposit evaluation and the injection and production wellfields. It is concluded with a listing of desirable but unavailable instrumentation for further development of this technology

  20. Information Management of Health and Safety at the Tarkwa Mine of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Tarkwa Mine (TM) of Goldfields Ghana Limited (GGL) undertakes open pit mining operations with gold recovery by heap leach technology. As a mine, it is susceptible to health and safety risks in its operations. In spite of health and safety policy and regulations put in place at the TM, there have been reported cases of ...

  1. Implementation of the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    New leaching tests are available in the U.S. for developing more accurate source terms for use in fate and transport models. For beneficial use or disposal, the use of the leaching environmental assessment framework (LEAF) will provide leaching results that reflect field condit...

  2. Standard leach tests for nuclear waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, D.M.; Barnes, B.O.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    Five leach tests were conducted to study time-dependent leaching of waste forms (glass). The first four tests include temperature as a variable and the use of three standard leachants. Three of the tests are static and two are dynamic (flow). This paper discusses the waste-form leach tests and presents some representative data. 4 figures

  3. Trust Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States and the Navajo Nation entered into settlement agreements that provide funds to conduct investigations and any needed cleanup at 16 of the 46 priority mines, including six mines in the Northern Abandoned Uranium Mine Region.

  4. Solid-phase data from cores at the proposed Dewey Burdock uranium in-situ recovery mine, near Edgemont, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Benzel, William M.

    2013-01-01

    This report releases solid-phase data from cores at the proposed Dewey Burdock uranium in-situ recovery site near Edgemont, South Dakota. These cores were collected by Powertech Uranium Corporation, and material not used for their analyses were given to the U.S. Geological Survey for additional sampling and analyses. These additional analyses included total carbon and sulfur, whole rock acid digestion for major and trace elements, 234U/238U activity ratios, X-ray diffraction, thin sections, scanning electron microscopy analyses, and cathodoluminescence. This report provides the methods and data results from these analyses along with a short summary of observations.

  5. Lead immobilization and phosphorus availability in phosphate-amended, mine-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Lydia R; Baker, Leslie L; Strawn, Daniel G

    2015-01-01

    Over a century of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene mining district in Idaho have contaminated soils of the downstream basin with lead, arsenic, zinc, and cadmium. Elevated soil-Pb levels are a significant hazard to the health of humans and wildlife in the region. One in situ treatment approach for remediating Pb-contaminated soils is application of phosphorus to promote the formation of lead phosphate minerals that have low solubility. However, this remediation strategy may result in excess P runoff to surface waters, which can lead to eutrophication, particularly when used in riparian areas. Research presented in this paper describes experiments in which monopotassium phosphate (KHPO) solution was applied to two Pb-contaminated soils from the Coeur d'Alene River valley to determine how P loading rates affect both Pb immobilization and P mobility and to determine if an optimal P amendment rate can be predicted. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure extractions were used to assess changes in Pb availability for uptake by an organism or mobilization through the soil, and Bray extractions were used to assess P availability for leaching out of the soil system. For the two soils tested, increasing phosphate amendment caused decreasing Pb extractability. Phosphorus amendment rates above approximately 70 mg kg, however, did not provide any additional Pb immobilization. Phosphorus availability increased with increasing phosphate application rate. An empirical relationship is presented that predicts extractable Pb as a function of extractable P. This relationship allows for prediction of the amount of Pb that can be immobilized at specified P leaching amounts, such as regulatory levels that have been established to minimize risks for surface water degradation. Results suggest that phosphate can be used to immobilize Pb in contaminated wetland or riparian areas without posing risks of P loading to surface waters. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy

  6. Mining and milling of uranium ore: Indian scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhasin, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The occurrence of uranium minerals in Singhbhum Thrust belt of Eastern India has been known since 1937. In 1950, a team of geologists of the Atomic Minerals Division was assigned to closely examine this 160 km long belt. Since then, several occurrences of uranium have been found and a few of them have sufficient grade and tonnage for commercial exploitation. In 1967, the Government of India formed Uranium Corporation of India Ltd., under the administrative control of the Department of Atomic Energy, with the specific objective of mining and processing of uranium ore and produce uranium concentrates. At present the Corporation operates three underground uranium mines, one ore processing plant with expanded capacity, and two uranium recovery plants. Continuing investigations by the Atomic Mineral Division has discovered several new deposits and favourable areas. The most notable is the large Domiasiat deposit of the sandstone type found in the State of Meghalaya. This deposit is now being considered for commercial exploitation using the in-situ leaching technology. (author)

  7. A study on the selection of indigenous leaching-bacteria for effective bioleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S. J.; Cho, K. H.; Kim, B. J.; Choi, N. C.; Park, C. Y.

    2012-04-01

    Bioleaching technology, which is based on the ability of microorganisms to transform solid compounds into soluble and extractable valuable elements that can be recovered, has been rapidly developed in recent decades for its advantages, which include mild reaction condition, low energy consumption, simple process, low environmental impact and being suitable for low grade mine tailings and residues. The bacteria activities (survival, adaptation of toxically environments etc.) in the bioleaching technology play a key role in the solubilization of metals. The purpose of this study was to selection of optimal leaching-bacteria through changed pH and redox potential on bio-oxidation in batch experiments for successful bioleaching technology. Twenty three indigenous bacteria used throughout this study, leaching-bacteria were obtained from various geochemical conditions; bacteria inhabitation type (acid mine drainage, mine wastes leachate and sulfur hot springs) and base-metal type (sulfur, sulfide, iron and coal). Bio-oxidation experiment result was showed that 9 cycles (1 cycle - 28days) after the leaching-bacteria were inoculated to a leaching medium, pH was observed decreasing and redox potential increased. In the bacteria inhabitation type, bio-oxidation of sulfur hot springs bacteria was greater than other types (acid mine drainage and mine wastes leachate). In addition, bio-oxidation on base-metal type was appeared sulfur was greater than other types (sulfide, iron and coal). This study informs basic knowledge when bacteria apply to eco-/economic resources utilization studies including the biomining and the recycling of mine waste system.

  8. Cross-current leaching of indium from end-of-life LCD panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocchetti, Laura; Amato, Alessia; Fonti, Viviana [Department of Life and Environmental Sciences, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Ubaldini, Stefano [Institute of Environmental Geology and Geoengineering IGAG, National Research Council, Via Salaria km 29300, 00015 Montelibretti, Rome (Italy); De Michelis, Ida [Department of Industrial Engineering, Information and Economy, University of L’Aquila, Via Giovanni Gronchi 18, 67100, Zona industriale di Pile, L’Aquila (Italy); Kopacek, Bernd [ISL Kopacek KG, Beckmanngasse 51, 1140 Wien (Austria); Vegliò, Francesco [Department of Industrial Engineering, Information and Economy, University of L’Aquila, Via Giovanni Gronchi 18, 67100, Zona industriale di Pile, L’Aquila (Italy); Beolchini, Francesca, E-mail: f.beolchini@univpm.it [Department of Life and Environmental Sciences, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • End-of-life LCD panels represent a source of indium. • Several experimental conditions for indium leaching have been assessed. • Indium is completely extracted with 2 M sulfuric acid at 80 °C for 10 min. • Cross-current leaching improves indium extraction and operating costs are lowered. • Benefits to the environment come from reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions and reagents use. - Abstract: Indium is a critical element mainly produced as a by-product of zinc mining, and it is largely used in the production process of liquid crystal display (LCD) panels. End-of-life LCDs represent a possible source of indium in the field of urban mining. In the present paper, we apply, for the first time, cross-current leaching to mobilize indium from end-of-life LCD panels. We carried out a series of treatments to leach indium. The best leaching conditions for indium were 2 M sulfuric acid at 80 °C for 10 min, which allowed us to completely mobilize indium. Taking into account the low content of indium in end-of-life LCDs, of about 100 ppm, a single step of leaching is not cost-effective. We tested 6 steps of cross-current leaching: in the first step indium leaching was complete, whereas in the second step it was in the range of 85–90%, and with 6 steps it was about 50–55%. Indium concentration in the leachate was about 35 mg/L after the first step of leaching, almost 2-fold at the second step and about 3-fold at the fifth step. Then, we hypothesized to scale up the process of cross-current leaching up to 10 steps, followed by cementation with zinc to recover indium. In this simulation, the process of indium recovery was advantageous from an economic and environmental point of view. Indeed, cross-current leaching allowed to concentrate indium, save reagents, and reduce the emission of CO{sub 2} (with 10 steps we assessed that the emission of about 90 kg CO{sub 2}-Eq. could be avoided) thanks to the recovery of indium

  9. Restoration of uranium solution mining deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devries, F.W.; Lawes, B.C.

    1982-01-01

    A process is provided for restoring an ore deposit after uranium solution mining using ammonium carbonate leaching solutions has ceased. The process involves flushing the deposit with an aqueous solution of a potassium salt during which potassium ions exchange with ammonium ions remaining in the deposit. The ammonium containing flushing solution is withdrawn from the deposit for disposal

  10. Restoration of uranium solution mining deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devries, F.W.; Lawes, B.C.

    1982-01-19

    A process is provided for restoring an ore deposit after uranium solution mining using ammonium carbonate leaching solutions has ceased. The process involves flushing the deposit with an aqueous solution of a potassium salt during which potassium ions exchange with ammonium ions remaining in the deposit. The ammonium containing flushing solution is withdrawn from the deposit for disposal.

  11. In situ leaching process for recording uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, W.M.; Timmins, T.H.; Sherry, H.S.

    1977-01-01

    A method of recovering uranium values from a subterranean deposit comprising: injecting an alkaline carbonate lixiviant into said deposit; flowing said alkaline carbonate lixiviant through said deposit to dissolve said uranium values into said lixiviant; producing said lixiviant and said dissolved uranium values from said deposit; flowing said lixiviant and said dissolved uranium values through an adsorption material to adsorp said uranium values from said lixiviant; eluting said adsorption material with an eluant of ammonium carbonate to desorb said uranium values from said adsorption material into said eluate in a concentration greater than in said lixiviant; heating said eluate and said desorbed uranium values to vaporize off ammonia and carbon dioxide therefrom, thereby causing uranium values to crystallize from the eluate; and recovering said solid uranium values

  12. Bacterial leaching of pyritic gold ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagliardi, F.M.; Cashion, J.D.; Brown, L.J. [Monash Univ., Clayton, VIC (Australia). Dept. of Physics; Jay, W.H. [Monash Univ., Clayton, VIC (Australia). Chemical Engineering Department

    1996-12-31

    The bacterial oxidation process is well known in nature but has only recently come under investigation as a viable and relatively clean method of gold recovery from ores. However there is currently little information about the process at an atomic scale. It is known that the bacterial attack progresses preferentially along grain boundaries which is precisely where the gold has been deposited from aqueous infiltration. Samples have been obtained from the Wiluna mine in Western Australia consisting of the original ore, 2 pre-treatments, and from six successive bacterial reactors. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectra taken at room temperature show only two quadrupole split doublets which can be ascribed to pyrite, FeS{sub 2}, and arsenopyrite, FeAsS. However, the presence of any superparamagnetic oxide or oxyhydroxide species would be expected to give a spectrum very similar to that of pyrite and would be undetectable in small quantities. At a temperature of 5K, a broad magnetically split sextet is observable with a mean hyperfine field of approximately 50T. This field is characteristic of magnetically ordered ferric iron surrounded by an octahedron of oxygens. The intensity and characteristics of this subspectrum alters through the series and interpretations will be given on the oxidation products of the bacterial leaching

  13. Bacterial leaching of pyritic gold ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagliardi, F.M.; Cashion, J.D.; Brown, L.J.; Jay, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    The bacterial oxidation process is well known in nature but has only recently come under investigation as a viable and relatively clean method of gold recovery from ores. However there is currently little information about the process at an atomic scale. It is known that the bacterial attack progresses preferentially along grain boundaries which is precisely where the gold has been deposited from aqueous infiltration. Samples have been obtained from the Wiluna mine in Western Australia consisting of the original ore, 2 pre-treatments, and from six successive bacterial reactors. 57 Fe Moessbauer spectra taken at room temperature show only two quadrupole split doublets which can be ascribed to pyrite, FeS 2 , and arsenopyrite, FeAsS. However, the presence of any superparamagnetic oxide or oxyhydroxide species would be expected to give a spectrum very similar to that of pyrite and would be undetectable in small quantities. At a temperature of 5K, a broad magnetically split sextet is observable with a mean hyperfine field of approximately 50T. This field is characteristic of magnetically ordered ferric iron surrounded by an octahedron of oxygens. The intensity and characteristics of this subspectrum alters through the series and interpretations will be given on the oxidation products of the bacterial leaching

  14. Mesophilic leaching of copper sulphide sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR B. CVETKOVSKI

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Copper was precipitated using a sodium sulphide solution as the precipitation agent from an acid solution containing 17 g/l copper and 350 g/l sulphuric acid. The particle size of nearly 1 µm in the sulphide sludge sample was detected by optical microscopy. Based on chemical and X-ray diffraction analyses, covellite was detected as the major sulphide mineral. The batch bioleach amenability test was performed at 32 °C on the Tk31 mine mesophilic mixed culture using a residence time of 28 days. The dissolution of copper sulphide by direct catalytic leaching of the sulphides with bacteria attached to the particles was found to be worthy, although a small quantity of ferrous ions had to be added to raise the activity of the bacteria and the redox potential of the culture medium. Throughout the 22-day period of the bioleach test, copper recovery based on residue analysis indicated a copper extraction of 95 %, with copper concentration in the bioleach solution of 15 g/l. The slope of the straight line tangential to the exponential part of the extraction curve gave a copper solubilisation rate of 1.1 g/l per day. This suggests that a copper extraction of 95 % for the period of bioleach test of 13.6 days may be attained in a three-stage bioreactor system.

  15. Management of wastes from the mining and milling of uranium and thorium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The first part is the Code of Practice approved by the Board of Governors of the IAEA in June 1976 as part of the Agency's safety standards, which are applied to those operations undertaken by Member States with the assistance of the Agency. The following topics are concerned: 1) Responsibilities. 2) Environmental considerations affecting siting and discharge limits. 3) Wastes requiring management. 4) Mine wastes. 5) Mill wastes. 6) In-situ leaching wastes. 7) Decommissioning requirements. 8) Financial arrangements. 9) Periodic inspections of wastes and the environment. 10) Transfer of ownership. The second part, the Guide to the Code, indicates ways in which the requirements of the Code may be met. The information reflects current best available technology. This technology was considered to provide an acceptable degree of safety

  16. Measurement of leach rates: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    A historical perspective of the techniques that can be used to measure the leach rate of radioactive waste forms is presented. The achievement of leach rates that are as low as possible has been an important goal ever since the development of solidification processes for liquid radioactive wastes began in the 1950's. Leach tests can be divided into two major categories, dynamic and static, based on whether or not the leachant in contact with the test specimen is changed during the course of the test. Both types of tests have been used extensively. The results of leach tests can be used to compare waste forms, and that has been a major purpose of leach data heretofore; increasingly, however, the data now are needed for predicting long-term leaching behavior during geologic disposal. This requirement is introducing new complexities into leach testing methodology. 3 figures, 2 tables

  17. In-situ remediation strategy for enhanced microbial de-acidification of geogenic sulphuric acid mining lakes - mesocosmic studies; In situ-Sanierungsstrategie zur Foerderung der mikrobiellen Entsaeuerung von geogen schwefelsauren Bergbaurestseen - Mesokosmosstudien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froemmichen, R.

    2001-07-01

    The author investigated whether neutralisation of acid mining lakes can be enhanced by adding low-cost, complex organic carbon sources. Subjects: Selection of a complex carbon source suited for stimulation of dissimilatory iron and sulfate reduction; design and observation of a near-natural landscape compartment (mesocosmos) at different scales as a preparation for the field study; Description of reactions in the mesocosmic lake water and sediment; Assessment of neutralisation equivalents and neutralisation rates on the basis of an identification of reduced iron and sulphur compounds. [German] Die Hypothese, dass durch Zugabe kostenguenstiger komplexer organischer Kohlenstoffquellen in die sedimentnahe Wasserzone eines sauren Tagebaurestsees seeinterne Neutralisierungsprozesse gefoerdert werden, liegt dieser Arbeit zu Grunde. Seeinterne Neutralisationsprozesse, wie die dissimilatorische Eisen- und Sulfatreduktion, fuehren ueber die Akkumulierung von reduzierten Eisen- und Schwefelverbindungen im Sediment zur Alkalinitaetsbildung im Gewaessersystem und im Seewasser zu hoeheren pH-Werten. Daher leiten sich folgende Ziele fuer diese Arbeit ab: - Auswahl einer geeigneten komplexen Kohlenstoffquelle zur Stimulierung der dissimilatorischen Eisen- und Sulfatreduktion - Design und Beobachtung eines naturnahen Landschaftsausschnittes (Mesokosmos) unterschiedlicher Massstabsebenen in Vorbereitung fuer die Fallstudie im Freiland - Beschreibung von Stoffumsetzungen im Seewasser und -sediment der Mesokosmen - Abschaetzung von Neutralisationsaequivalenten und Bestimmung von Neutralisationsraten anhand der Identifizierung reduzierter Eisen- und Schwefelverbindungen. (orig.)

  18. Recent Pilot Plant Experience on Alkaline Leaching of Low Grade Uranium Ore in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suri, A. K; Ghosh, S. K.; Padmanabhan, N. P.H., [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2014-05-15

    Uranium deposits in India are low grade and are relatively smaller in extent as compared to present worldwide commercial practice. So far, the vein type deposits of Singhbhum Thrust Belt (STB) are being exploited for meeting the Indian requirements of uranium. The deposits are currently processed by acid leaching in the mills located at Jaduguda and Turamdih near Jamshedpur in Jharkhand State of India. The deposits at Jaduguda and Narwapahar are being mined by underground mining and are processed in Jaduguda mill using airagitated Pachucas. The deposits at Banduhurang and Turamdih are being mined by open cast and underground mining respectively and are processed at Turamdih by acid leaching in mechanically agitated reactors. The occurrences of uranium in North East and Northern part of Kadapa basin are relatively moderate in size and are expected to be processed in the near future by acid leaching. Uranium is also found to occur near Tummalapalle in granitic and limestone host rocks in Southern part of Kadapa basin (Andhra Pradesh) and in Gogi in Bhima basin (Karnataka). The deposit in Tummalapalle is relatively lower in grade (≈ 0.042% U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) but is a reasonably large reserve, whereas that in Gogi is rich in uranium content (≈0.18% U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) but is relatively small reserve. Laboratory tests based on alkaline leaching have been carried out on both types of deposits. Studies for Tummalapalle deposits have been extended to pilot plant level and a complete flow sheet has been established with the regeneration and recirculation of lixiviants and recovery of sodium sulphate as a by-product. The process involves alkaline leaching under oxygen pressure in batch type and/or continuous leach reactor using sodium carbonate/bicarbonate as a leaching media and uranium is recovered as sodium diuranate. Based on the techno-economic evaluation of the process, an industrial scale mill (3 000 tonnes ore/day) is being set up at Tummalapalle in Andhra Pradesh

  19. Determination of internal exposure doses of the personnel of uranium-mining company due to radon isotopes decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevostyanov, V.N.

    2004-01-01

    This work carries out a determination of individual doses of internal exposure of the staff of the uranium-mining company in Kazakhstan due to radon decay products. The company extracts uranium by in-situ leaching. After leaching, uranium is sorbed from a solution in facilities where the staff is located. The state of three uranium mines was analyzed. The dose determination was conducted in tune with the proposed method by using integral alpha-tracking detectors to identify the content of 222 Rn and express appliances to identify the content of radio-active aerosols in air of the working area for determination the equilibrium coefficient. The measurements were performed within one year. The work produced the results in average annual values of radon and thoron decay products activity concentration and variation, equilibrium coefficient variation, and so-called expressive-to-integral value conversion factor. The obtained personnel's individual radiation doses due to radon exposure for this period lie within the range of < 1 mSv/year. (author)

  20. The pH-dependent leaching behavior of slags from various stages of a copper smelting process: Environmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarošíková, Alice; Ettler, Vojtěch; Mihaljevič, Martin; Kříbek, Bohdan; Mapani, Ben

    2017-02-01

    The leaching behaviors of primary copper (Cu) slags originating from Ausmelt, reverbatory, and converter furnaces operating under a single technological process were compared to a residual slag tailing obtained by slag re-processing via flotation and metal recovery. The EN 12457-2 leaching test, used for assessment of the hazardous properties, was followed by the CEN/TS 14997 pH-static leaching test (pH range 3-12). Both leaching experiments were coupled with a mineralogical investigation of the primary and secondary phases as well as geochemical modeling. Metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) exhibit the highest leaching at low pH. Under acidic conditions (pH 3-6), Ausmelt slag and slag tailing exhibited higher metal leaching compared to other slag types. Very low leaching of metals (far below EU limits for non-hazardous waste) was observed at natural pH (7.9-9.0) for all the studied slag samples. In contrast, relatively high leaching of As was observed over the entire pH range, especially for Ausmelt slag (exceeding the EU limit for hazardous waste by 1.7×). However, geochemical modeling and scanning electron microscopy indicated that formation of stable Ca-Cu-Pb arsenates and the binding of As to newly formed Fe (oxyhydr)oxides play an important role in efficient As immobilization at the slag-water interface. In contrast, no controls were predicted for Sb, whose leaching was almost pH-independent. Nevertheless Sb leached concentrations at natural pH were below EU limit for hazardous waste. Re-processing of primary Cu slags for metal recovery, and subsequent co-disposal of the resulting slag tailing with dolomite-rich mine tailing and local laterite is suitable for stabilizing the remaining contaminants (except Sb) and limiting their leaching into the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Uranium Mining and Norm in North America-Some Perspectives on Occupational Radiation Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven H; Chambers, Douglas B

    2017-07-01

    All soils and rocks contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). Many ores and raw materials contain relatively elevated levels of natural radionuclides, and processing such materials can further increase the concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides. In the U.S., these materials are sometimes referred to as technologically-enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM). Examples of NORM minerals include uranium ores, monazite (a source of rare earth minerals), and phosphate rock used to produce phosphate fertilizer. The processing of these materials has the potential to result in above-background radiation exposure to workers. Following a brief review of the sources and potential for worker exposure from NORM in these varied industries, this paper will then present an overview of uranium mining and recovery in North America, including discussion on the mining methods currently being used for both conventional (underground, open pit) and in situ leach (ISL), also referred to as In Situ Recovery (ISR), and the production of NORM materials and wastes associated with these uranium recovery methods. The radiological composition of the NORM products and wastes produced and recent data on radiological exposures received by workers in the North American uranium recovery industry are then described. The paper also identifies the responsible government agencies in the U.S. and Canada assigned the authority to regulate and control occupational exposure from these NORM materials.

  2. Recovering uranium from coal in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    An underground carbonaceous deposit containing other mineral values is burned in situ. The underground hot zone is cooled down to temperature below the boiling point of a leachig solution. The leaching solution is percolated through the residial ash, with the pregnant solution recovered for separation of the mineral values in surface facilities

  3. Uranium nanoparticle synthesis from leaching solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, Z.; Sklodowska, A.

    2014-01-01

    The removal of uranium from leaching and bioleaching solutions is of great significance for an environment protection. In comparison with conventional separation techniques, synthesis of uranium nanoparticles has a number of benefits. It has been demonstrated that the uranium nanoparticles show high catalytic activity. In the present studies a variety of synthesis systems have been used for reduction of uranium from bioleaching solution. Among various catalytical templates the hematite Fe_2O_3 nanoparticles are most interest It was presented the report on development of synthesis method to produce nano structured Fe_2O_3 particles. The efficiency of hematite nanoparticles for adsorption of uranium ions from bioleaching solutions was investigated. Bacterial leaching is alternate technique used to extract uranium from mining wastes. The bioleaching process is environment friendly and gives the extraction yield of over 90%. The bioleaching solutions were obtained from bioleaching experiments using waste materials from different places at Lower Silesia (Kowary, Grzmiaca, Kopaniec, Radoniow). Chemoautotrophic bacteria were used for bioleaching tests. The significant adsorption capacity of U(VI) onto iron oxide and hydroxides (goethite, hematite, and magnetite) was observed. The sorption of U(VI) onto the hematite surface was connected with the chemical reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by Fe"2"+ ions. The initial reaction system contained excess of Fe"2"+ ions which were used to reduce of U(VI). The reduction of U(VI) occurred at pH at the vicinity of pH=2.4. The colloid particles of hematite with UO_2 nanoparticles were obtained. The results of zeta potential measurements of hematite nanoparticles showed that at the ionic strength equals 10"-"3M NaCl, the average zeta potential was +32.4±3.5 mV at pH = 2.6. The interaction of hematite nanoparticles with the bioleaching solutions led to decrease of positive zeta potential to the value of 6.4± 2.7 mV. (author)

  4. Reduction of water consumption in the dynamic acid leaching process of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chocron, M.; Arias, M.J.; Avato, A.M.; Díaz, V.A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2006 the Argentine state announced a plan to reactivate the nuclear sector. As a result of this decision, the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) resumed its research in uranium mining for Argentine deposits. The first step was the study of the leaching process, mainly the dynamic leaching. In this work the influence of the reduction of the water content in the dynamic leaching process in acid medium, at laboratory scale and under batch operating conditions, on the main operating parameters (concentration of the leaching reagent, the oxidizing reagent and The reaction temperature). The percentages of pulp solids studied in the dynamic leaching were 53% and 66% w / w. For the tests uranium-molybdenum ores of the sandstone type were used. Two different working schemes were used to study the different operating parameters. In the tests carried out with 53% of solid in pulp, the parameters were studied individually (varying one parameter at a time), while working with a pulp of 66% solids, the study of the parameters was performed by a Factorial design of two levels of three variables, which in addition to studying the dependence of the different parameters allowed to analyze how they influence each other. During the leaching tests with 66% solids content in pulp, changes in the geometric and dynamic conditions of the system were necessary because of the poor mixing observed when using the same agitation conditions used in the leaching tests with 53% solids in pulp. When comparing the tests for both solids content conditions (53% and 66% w / w), similar extraction yields were observed for both uranium and molybdenum (more than 90% for uranium and more than 80% for The molybdenum). As a final result, the process water consumption (380 liters of water per ton of ore) is reduced by more than 50% by working with pulps of 66% w / w of solids, obtaining acceptable extraction yields and, as an additional, reducing The consumption of the leaching reagent. (author)

  5. Uranium mining in the North Bohemia, Straz, Czech Republic and geological evaluation prior to remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopecky, P.; Slezak, J.

    2002-01-01

    The Straz uranium deposits are located in sedimentary rocks and within important aquifers. One of these is of drinking water quality. The deposits were exploited by both conventional and in situ leach (ISL) methods in two mines: the Hamr-North underground and the Straz (ISL) mine. They are located in an aquifer within sedimentary Cenomanian formation. Between 1967 and 2000 the Straz ISL mine produced over 16 000 tonnes U by injecting a total of 4.1 million tonnes of sulphuric acid, 315 000 t of nitric acid, 112 000 of ammonia, 26 000 of hydrofluoric acid, and 1400 of hydrochloric acid. This enormous amount of acid is creating a major rehabilitation problem and a potential risk for another aquifer: the Turonian drinking water quality aquifer. The problem is now being addressed by completing a complete hydrogeological assessment. Contaminated water is being treated to reduce the present contamination levels of 5-110g/l TDS to less than 10g/l TDS. The rehabilitation will be influenced by economic factors, as well as the development of new technologies. (author)

  6. Uranium recovery from mine water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, K.M.

    1984-01-01

    In many plant trials it has been proven that very small amounts (10 to 20 ppm) of uranium dissolved in mine water can be effectively recovered by the use of ion exchange resins and this uranium recovery has many advantages. In this paper an economic analysis at different levels of uranium contamination and at different market prices of uranium are described. For this study an operating mine-mill complex with a sulphuric acid leach circuit, followed by solvent extraction (SX) process, is considered, where contaminated mine water is available in excess of process requirements. It is further assumed that the sulphuric acid eluant containing uranium would be mixed with the mill pregnant liquor stream that proceeds to the SX plant for final uranium recovery

  7. The structure of leached sodium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunker, B.C.; Tallant, D.R.; Headley, T.J.; Turner, G.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy, solid state 29 Si, 11 B, 17 O, and 23 Na nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy have been used to investigate how the structures of sodium borosilicate glasses change during leaching in water at pH 1, 9, and 12. Results show that the random network structure present prior to leaching is transformed into a network of small condensed ring structures and/or colloidal silica particles. The restructuring of leached glass can be rationalised on the basis of simple hydrolysis (depolymerisation) and condensation (repolymerisation) reactions involving Si-O-Si and Si-O-B bonds. The structural changes that occur during leaching influence the properties of the leached layer, including leaching kinetics, crazing and spalling, and slow crack growth. (author)

  8. The Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth; Brüsch, Walter Michael; Juhler, Rene K.

    In 1998, the Danish Parliament initiated the Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme (PLAP), an intensive monitoring programme aimed at evaluating the leaching risk of pesticides under field conditions. The objective of the PLAP is to improve the scientific foundation for decision......-making in the Danish regulation of pesticides. The specific aim is to analyse whether pesticides applied in accordance with current regulations leach to groundwater in unacceptable concentrations. The programme currently evaluates the leaching risk of 41 pesticides and 40 degradation products at five agricultural......, thiamethoxam, tribenuronmethyl, and triasulfuron) did not leach during the 1999-2009 monitoring period. 13 of the applied pesticides exhibited pronounced leaching of the pesticide and/or their degradation product(-s) 1 m b.g.s. in yearly average concentrations exceeding 0.1 μg/l (maximum allowable...

  9. Green remediation of tailings from the mine using inorganic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Došić Aleksandar D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing amounts of residues and waste materials coming from industrial activities in different processes have become an increasingly urgent problem for the future. The paper presents the problem of mine tailings generated in mine “Sase” (Republic of Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina with high metal content (Pb, Cu and Zn. Dumpsite of this tailing represents potential risk for water bodies in the vicinity of this location. Chosen treatment process was stabilization/solidification (S/S. Inorganic agents used in this study were fly ash and red mud that represent secondary industrial waste generated on locations relatively near the mine. Therefore, their application can be used as an example of a sustainable solution of regional environmental problem. Further investigations are related to the impact of various factors on metals leaching from mine tailings solidified/stabilized material using the above mentioned immobilization agents. The performance of the immobilizing procedures was examined using several leaching tests: ANS 16.1, TCLP, DIN, MWLP. The results indicated that all S/S samples can be considered as non-hazardous waste, as all leached metal concentrations met the set criteria. These results will further enable the modelling of metals behaviour during long-term leaching from treated mine tailing. The data are invaluable in terms of economically and environmentally sound management of mine tailing.

  10. Practice of the counter-current trickle leaching of uranium ore by refreshed liquor of bacterial oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shian; Huang Xiangfu; Fan Baotuan

    1995-01-01

    The uranium ore of the Mine No. 753 is a high-silicate type primary one, in which the tetravalent uranium accounts for 85%, and the uranium grade is in the range of 0.36% to 0.442%. To reduce the engineering investment and the operating cost a four-stage counter-current trickle leaching pilot-plant test was carried out with the leaching time 50 days and acid consumption 38 kg per ton of ore, and the recovery of more than 95% was obtained. Using the counter-current trickle leaching mode and controlling the limit concentration of the harmful matters in the bacterial leaching liquor, the latter can be effectively oxidized by the synchronical regeneration. A trickle leaching comparative test of 25 ton ore single heap also gave a good result of more than 95% in extraction rate, and 30% acid consumption was saved and the 2.0% pyrolusite (containing MnO 2 40%) was eliminated. This process is feasible in technology and worth-while in economy for treating the uranium ore of Mine No. 753, and provides a new method of uranium ore trickle leaching

  11. The leaching characteristics of vitrified slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jinlong; Li, Yaojian; Tian, Junguo; Sheng, Hongzhi; Xu, Yongxiang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text: Plasma-arc technology was developed to fix the heavy metal of flying ash by the Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS-IMECH). A direct current (DC) experimental facility of 30 kW with plasma-arc technology was setup to form vitrified slag. The additives (CaO, SiO 2 ) were added into the reactor to form vitrified slag and fix the heavy metal (Cr, Pb), under dissimilar condition (long and short heating-up time, natural and water cooling). Vitrified slag was broken into different particle size, from 0.1 mm to 1 cm. The particles with different specific surface area were used to study the leaching of heavy metals in vitrified slag rate of speed. The pH value of leaching solution are from 2 to 12, the experiment was kept at different external temperature, from 4 degree Celsius to 70 degree celsius, for 1 week to 1 month. Heavy metal leaching concentration was used to measure the chemical stability of vitrified slag. The results show that the higher specific surface area, the higher heavy metal leaching concentration, but when the specific surface area reaches a certain value, little change in leaching concentration. The impact of temperature on leaching concentration was not significant, from 4 degree Celsius to 70 degree Celsius. The leaching concentration increases with decreasing of the pH value of leaching solution when the pH value of leaching solution less than 7, and little change in concentration increases with pH value when the pH value of leaching solution more than 7. Compared with the leaching concentration after 1 month, the leaching concentration after 1 week has not changed significantly. (Author)

  12. Selenium transformation in coal mine spoils: Its environmental impact assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harness, J.; Atalay, A.; Koll, K.J.; Zhang, H.; Maggon, D.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this program was to conduct an environmental impact assessment study for selenium from coal mine spoils. The use of in-situ lysimetry to predict selenium speciation, transformation, and mobility under natural conditions was evaluated. The scope of the study was to construct and test field-scale lysimeter and laboratory mini-column to assess mobility and speciation of selenium in coal mine overburden and soil systems; to conduct soil and groundwater sampling throughout the state of Oklahoma for an overall environmental impact assessment of selenium; and to conduct an in-depth literature review on the solubility, speciation, mobility, and toxicity of selenium from various sources. Groundwater and surface soil samples were also collected from each county in Oklahoma. Data collected from the lysimeter study indicated that selenium in the overburden of the abandoned mine site was mainly found in the selenite form. The amount of selenite found was too low and immobile to be of concern to the environment. The spoil had equilibrated long enough (over 50 years) that most of the soluble forms of selenium have already been lost. Examination of the overburden indicated the presence of pyrite crystals that precipitated over time. The laboratory mini-column study indicated that selenite is quite immobile and remained on the overburden material even after leaching with dilute acid. Data from groundwater samples indicated that based on the current permissible level for selenium in groundwater (0.01 mg Se/L), Oklahoma groundwater is widely contaminated with the element. However, according to the new regulation (0.05 mg Se/L), which is to be promulgated in 1992, only 9 of the 77 counties in the state exceed the limit.

  13. A New Generation of Leaching Tests – The Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides an overview of newly released leaching tests that provide a more accurate source term when estimating environmental release of metals and other constituents of potential concern (COPCs). The Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) methods have been (1) develo...

  14. URANIUM LEACHING AND RECOVERY PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClaine, L.A.

    1959-08-18

    A process is described for recovering uranium from carbonate leach solutions by precipitating uranium as a mixed oxidation state compound. Uranium is recovered by adding a quadrivalent uranium carbon;te solution to the carbonate solution, adjusting the pH to 13 or greater, and precipitating the uranium as a filterable mixed oxidation state compound. In the event vanadium occurs with the uranium, the vanadium is unaffected by the uranium precipitation step and remains in the carbonate solution. The uranium-free solution is electrolyzed in the cathode compartment of a mercury cathode diaphragm cell to reduce and precipitate the vanadium.

  15. Uranium extraction history using pressure leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, K.S.; Thomas, K.G.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 60 years of uranium process development only a few commercial uranium plants have adopted a pressure leaching process in their flowsheet. The selection of acid versus alkaline pressure leaching is related to the uranium and gangue mineralogy. Tetravalent (U"+"4) uranium has to be oxidized to hexavalent (U"+"6) uranium to be soluble. Refractory tetravalent uranium requires higher temperature and pressure, as practised in pressure leaching, for conversation to soluble hexavalent uranium. This paper chronicles the history of these uranium pressure leaching facilities over the past 60 years, with specific details of each design and operation. (author)

  16. A new Leaching System, Sheta Extractor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheta, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    Moving of crushed solid ores against leaching solution in a continuous countercurrent arises a true technical problem. This invented system introduces a practical solution for such problem. Inside the system, the crushed ore is driving against gravity, whereas the leaching solution moves in the opposite direction. Contact between the two phases occurs with gentle stirring. After contact, discharging of the processed phases takes place automatically out the system. The system was investigated for uranium leaching from a coarse grained fraction (+2 --- -- -30 mm) of uranium mineralized granite sample. Uranium leaching percent reached to nearly 50% using sulfuric acid

  17. Heap leaching procedure for the Uranium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishahbore, M. R.

    2002-01-01

    Heap leaching of Uranium ores is currently in use in several countries. Before taking any decision for construction of heap in industrial scale, it is necessary to obtain the main factors that influence the heap leaching process, such as acid construction, acid solution flowrate, temperature of reaction, or size, ration of liquid to solid, permeability and suitable oxidant. To achieve the above parameters, small scale column leaching is usually recommended. In this project column leaching were carried out in 6 plexiglass column with 43.5 cm an height and 7.4 cm inner diameter. In each column closely 2.00 kg Uranium ore were leached by sulfuric acid. Leaching operation on Iranian ores from two different anomalies from the same area were investigated. In this project, six column were leached at different flowrate of eluent and effect of oxidant were investigated. Acid consumption were in the range of 60 - 144 kg per ton ore and recovery between 73.07% - 99.97%. Finally according to the results obtained, investigated that over are suitable to heap leaching technique. Al tough, to enforce of heap leaching project need to more experiments

  18. Method of continuous pressure leaching of ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiala, P.; Baloun, S.; Polansky, M.

    1987-01-01

    Ore leaching, especially suspensions of ground ore or fine ore fractions from physical treatment was divided into two operations. The former, i.e., ore mixing with technical grade concentrated sulfuric acid proceeded in a separate mixer. The mixture was then transported into an autoclave where the actual leaching proceeded for 2 to 4 hours. The extracted mixture was discharged through the autoclave bottom. The leaching autoclave used can be without any inner structures. The separation of mixing from the actual leaching allows processing ores with high levels of clay components, increasing operating reliability of the facility, reducing consumption of special structural materials and energy, and increasing process efficiency. (E.S.)

  19. Towards "Precision Mining" of wastewater: Selective recovery of Cu from acid mine drainage onto diatomite supported nanoscale zerovalent iron particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, R A; Sapsford, D J

    2018-07-01

    This paper introduces the concept of 'Precision Mining' of metals which can be defined as a process for the selective in situ uptake of a metal from a material or media, with subsequent retrieval and recovery of the target metal. In order to demonstrate this concept nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) was loaded onto diatomaceous earth (DE) and tested for the selective uptake of Cu from acid mine drainage (AMD) and subsequent release. Batch experiments were conducted using the AMD and nZVI-DE at 4.0-16.0 g/L. Results demonstrate nZVI-DE as highly selective for Cu removal with >99% uptake recorded after 0.25 h when using nZVI-DE concentrations ≥12.0 g/L, despite appreciable concentrations of numerous other metals in the AMD, namely: Co, Ni, Mn and Zn. Cu uptake was maintained in excess of 4 and 24 h when using nZVI-DE concentrations of 12.0 and 16.0 g/L respectively. Near-total Cu release from the nZVI-DE was then recorded and attributed to the depletion of the nZVI component and the subsequent Eh, DO and pH recovery. This novel Cu uptake and release mechanism, once appropriately engineered, holds great promise as a novel 'Precision Mining' process for the rapid and selective Cu recovery from acidic wastewater, process effluents and leach liquors. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Mine drivage in hydraulic mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehkber, B Ya

    1983-09-01

    From 20 to 25% of labor cost in hydraulic coal mines falls on mine drivage. Range of mine drivage is high due to the large number of shortwalls mined by hydraulic monitors. Reducing mining cost in hydraulic mines depends on lowering drivage cost by use of new drivage systems or by increasing efficiency of drivage systems used at present. The following drivage methods used in hydraulic mines are compared: heading machines with hydraulic haulage of cut rocks and coal, hydraulic monitors with hydraulic haulage, drilling and blasting with hydraulic haulage of blasted rocks. Mining and geologic conditions which influence selection of the optimum mine drivage system are analyzed. Standardized cross sections of mine roadways driven by the 3 methods are shown in schemes. Support systems used in mine roadways are compared: timber supports, roof bolts, roof bolts with steel elements, and roadways driven in rocks without a support system. Heading machines (K-56MG, GPKG, 4PU, PK-3M) and hydraulic monitors (GMDTs-3M, 12GD-2) used for mine drivage are described. Data on mine drivage in hydraulic coal mines in the Kuzbass are discussed. From 40 to 46% of roadways are driven by heading machines with hydraulic haulage and from 12 to 15% by hydraulic monitors with hydraulic haulage.

  1. Study of uranium leaching from industrial residues of Industrias Nucleares do Brazil S.A. (INB), Caetite, Bahia, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formiga, Thiago S.; Morais, Carlos A.; Gomiero, Luiz A.

    2011-01-01

    The uraniferous district of Lagoa Real, located in the south-central region of the state of Bahia, has reserves estimated at 100,000 tons of uranium, which is enough to supply Angra I, II and III for 100 more years. The process adopted for the beneficiation of the uranium ore from Lagoa Real is heap leaching, a static process in which the ore is crushed, disposed in heaps and irrigated with a sulfuric acid solution to remove the uranium. This technique has a relatively low cost of implementation, although the yield of uranium recovery is low, with an uranium content in the leached residue of 700 μg/g U 3 O 8 for ores with an initial content of 2,700 μg/g U 3 O 8 . With the deepening of the mine pit, an increase in the carbonate content in the ore was noted, which required a higher acid consumption in the leaching. In order to reduce the concentration of carbonates, a study of the ore concentration by flotation column was accomplished. The flotation reject had high carbonate content, with a uranium content of about 2,300 μg/g U 3 O 8 for flotation in one column and 1,100 μg/g U 3 O 8 for flotation in two columns. This paper presents the study of the leaching process for the recovery of the uranium present in the residue of the heap leaching and in the carbonated residue from the flotation of the anomaly 13 ore. The results indicate the feasibility of treating the waste of the heap leaching through dynamic leaching. The study of the uranium leaching from the flotation residue through acid leaching technique indicated a recovery of 96% of uranium, however with a high consumption of acid, around 450 kg/t, showing that for this case, the most suitable technique for the process is alkaline leaching. (author)

  2. Microbiological Leaching; an Environmentally Friendly and Cost Effective Method for Extraction of Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghobeiti-Hasab Mehdi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Finding a cleaner, environmentally friendly and cost-effective way of metal and mineral extraction has a great importance in today’s world. Using microorganisms in bio-leaching and bio-oxidation process is of great value. From Archaea to bacteria and fungi, microorganisms can play an important role in extraction of metals from mine drainage and un-accessible sources, both in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Optimization of environmental factors such as the temperature, pH and substrate concentration is crucially important to access the optimum extraction of selected metals from an ore or mine drainage. The present paper will review the bio-leaching and bio-oxidation process of minerals with emphasis on the most well-known species of bacterial communities of such ability, through the literature.

  3. Acid-curing and ferric-trickle leaching effluent used in closed circuit uranium extractive process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Suoqing; Xiang Qinfang; Guo Jianzheng; Lu Guizhu; Su Yanru

    1998-01-01

    The new uranium ore process consists of crushing ore, mixing crushed ore with strong acid in rotating drums and curing the mixture in piles, trickle-leaching the ore beds with ferric solution, extracting uranium from pregnant solution with tertiary amine, precipitating product and disposing residue tailings. All the process effluent is used in closed circuit. There will be no process water to be discharged in the flowsheet except the tailings carrying off 15% water because during leaching moisture content of the ore rises to 15%. Tailings produced by the process are moist and friable, and can be disposed of on a pile or returned to the mine. Main technical parameters of the process: (a) water consumption is 0.2∼0.3 m 3 /t ore, electric power consumption is 20∼30 kW·h/t ore; (b) ore crushing up to -5∼-7 mm, leaching period is 12∼45 d, U content of residue is 0.01%∼0.02%, producing pregnant solution is 0.3∼0.5 m 3 /t ore, which is 1/5∼1/8 that of conventional agitation leaching process; (c) organic agent consumption is 1/5∼1/8 that of the conventional agitation process. All the research results above are tested by the pilot-plant test and industrial test. The new process has been applied to recovery of uranium in the mine located at northeast of China

  4. Rapid Evaluation of Radioactive Contamination in Rare Earth Mine Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.

    2017-12-01

    In order to estimate the current levels of environmental radioactivity in Bayan Obo rare earth mine and to study the rapid evaluation methods of radioactivity contamination in the rare earth mine, the surveys of the in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry and gamma dose rate measurement were carried out around the mining area and living area. The in-situ gamma-ray spectrometer was composed of a scintillation detector of NaI(Tl) (Φ75mm×75mm) and a multichannel analyzer. Our survey results in Bayan Obo Mine display: (1) Thorium-232 is the radioactive contamination source of this region, and uranium-238 and potassium - 40 is at the background level. (2) The average content of thorium-232 in the slag of the tailings dam in Bayan Obo is as high as 276 mg/kg, which is 37 times as the global average value of thorium content. (3) We found that the thorium-232 content in the soil in the living area near the mining is higher than that in the local soil in Guyang County. The average thorium-232 concentrations in the mining areas of the Bayan Obo Mine and the living areas of the Bayan Obo Town were 18.7±7.5 and 26.2±9.1 mg/kg, respectively. (4) It was observed that thorium-232 was abnormal distributed in the contaminated area near the tailings dam. Our preliminary research results show that the in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry is an effective approach of fast evaluating rare earths radioactive pollution, not only can the scene to determine the types of radioactive contamination source, but also to measure the radioactivity concentration of thorium and uranium in soil. The environmental radioactive evaluation of rare earth ore and tailings dam in open-pit mining is also needed. The research was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41674111).

  5. Web Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürnkranz, Johannes

    The World-Wide Web provides every internet citizen with access to an abundance of information, but it becomes increasingly difficult to identify the relevant pieces of information. Research in web mining tries to address this problem by applying techniques from data mining and machine learning to Web data and documents. This chapter provides a brief overview of web mining techniques and research areas, most notably hypertext classification, wrapper induction, recommender systems and web usage mining.

  6. Success with high pressure leaching technique means ... Afrikander Lease lives again

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Put onto a care and maintenance basis 15 years ago, Anglo American's Afrikander Lease property is to be re-opened at a cost of R84 million. The reason is the successful development of the high pressure leaching process of uranium production initially investigated at a pilot plant at Western Deep Levels. Now an average annual production of 385 t of uranium and 460 kg gold is confidently expected from the old mine

  7. Geological and technological evaluation of gold-bearing mineral material after photo-electrochemical activation leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzyrev, DV

    2017-02-01

    The paper reports the lab test results on simulation of heap leaching of unoxidized rebellious ore extracted from deep levels of Pogromnoe open pit mine, with different flowsheets and photo-electrochemically activated solutions. It has been found that pre-treatment of rebellious ore particles -10 mm in size by photo-electrochemically activated solutions at the stage preceding agglomeration with the use of rich cyanide solutions enhances gold recovery by 6%.

  8. Text Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trybula, Walter J.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the state of research in text mining, focusing on newer developments. The intent is to describe the disparate investigations currently included under the term text mining and provide a cohesive structure for these efforts. A summary of research identifies key organizations responsible for pushing the development of text mining. A section…

  9. Surface mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Leopold; Bruce Rowland; Reed Stalder

    1979-01-01

    The surface mining process consists of four phases: (1) exploration; (2) development; (3) production; and (4) reclamation. A variety of surface mining methods has been developed, including strip mining, auger, area strip, open pit, dredging, and hydraulic. Sound planning and design techniques are essential to implement alternatives to meet the myriad of laws,...

  10. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, G.

    1975-01-01

    The winning of uranium ore is the first stage of the fuel cycle. The whole complex of questions to be considered when evaluating the profitability of an ore mine is shortly outlined, and the possible mining techniques are described. Some data on uranium mining in the western world are also given. (RB) [de

  11. Contribution for tier 1 of the ecological risk assessment of Cunha Baixa uranium mine (Central Portugal): I Soil chemical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, R.; Antunes, S.C.; Marques, S.M.; Goncalves, F.

    2008-01-01

    Within the tier 1 of a site specific risk assessment, the pseudo-total concentrations (extracted with aqua regia) and the potential mobile fractions of metals were determined to perform a preliminary evaluation of risks posed by contaminated soils from an abandoned uranium mine (Mangualde, Central Portugal). Considering the mobile fractions of metals, extracted with artificial rain water, aluminium and uranium were the most concerning elements, since their concentrations were above soil quality criteria values (SQGVs) established for both elements. However, according to the evaluation based on potential mobile fractions of elements, rather than on pseudo-total metal concentrations the risks were limited to sites within the exploitation area, where contamination derives mainly from past in-situ leaching activities of pore ore as well as from the deposition of sludge from the effluent pond. The exclusion of other sites under evaluation, from the risk assessment process, requires additional data provided by soil screening ecotoxicological assays

  12. Study on Leaching of Hexavalent Chromium from Hardened Concretes Using Tank Leaching Test

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Shigeru; Sakai, Etsuo; Sugiyama, Takafumi

    2007-01-01

    Tank leaching tests were carried out to investigate the behavior of leaching trace elements from monolith samples. This study consists of two series, and the trace element used was hexavalent chromium. In Series I, the influence of the leachant/surface area of the specimen (L/S ratio) on the leaching amount was investigated. The leaching amount was found to increase with the amount of worked water. This shows that any L/S ratio can be selected in the tank leaching test. In Series II, th...

  13. Successful trials on pressure leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendreigh, R.

    1978-01-01

    High pressure leaching can increase uranium extraction from some low grade ores by ten per cent, and Anglo American Corporation's eighteen months of pilot plant tests point the way to commercial application. Interest in pressure leaching of uranium has been renewed with the recent increase in uranium and gold prices and costs of reagents

  14. Optimizing conditions for an accelerated leach test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak, R.F.; Fuhrmann, M.; Heiser, J.; Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1988-01-01

    An accelerated leach test for low-level radioactive waste forms is being developed to provide, in a short time, data that can be extrapolated to long time periods. The approach is to provide experimental conditions that will accelerate leaching without changing the dominant release mechanism. Experimental efforts have focused on combining individual factors that have been observed to accelerate leaching. These include elevated temperature, increased leachant volume, and reduced specimen size. The response of diffusion coefficients to various acceleration factors have been evaluated and provide information on experimental parameters that need to be optimized to increase leach rates. Preliminary modeling using a diffusion mechanism (allowing for depletion) of a finite cylinder geometry indicates that during early portions of experiments (daily sampling intervals), leaching is diffusion controlled and more rapid than later in the same experiments (weekly or greater sampling intervals). For cement waste forms, this reduction in rate may be partially controlled by changes in physical structure and chemistry (sometimes related to environmental influences such as CO 2 ), but it is more likely associated with the duration of the sampling interval. By using a combination of mathematical modeling and by experimentally investigating various leach rate controlling factors, a more complete understanding of leaching processes is being developed. This, in turn, is leading to optimized accelerating conditions for a leach test

  15. Optimizing conditions for an accelerated leach test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak, R.F.; Fuhrmann, M.; Heiser, J.; Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1988-01-01

    An accelerated leach test for low-level radioactive waste forms is being developed to provide, in a short time, data that can be extrapolated to long time periods. The approach is to provide experimental conditions that will accelerate leaching without changing the dominant release mechanism. Experimental efforts have focused on combining individual factors that have been observed to accelerate leaching. These include elevated temperature, increased leachant volume, and reduced specimen size. The response of diffusion coefficients to various acceleration factors have been evaluated and provide information on experimental parameters that need to be optimized to increase leach rates. For example, these data show that large volumes of leachant are required when leaching portland cement waste forms at elevated temperatures because of high concentrations of dissolved species. Sr-85 leaching is particularly susceptible to suppression due to concentration effects while Cs-137 leaching is less so. Preliminary modeling using a diffusion mechanism (allowing for depletion) of a finite cylinder geometry indicates that during early portions of experiments (daily sampling intervals), leaching is diffusion controlled and more rapid than later in the same experiments (weekly or greater sampling intervals). For cement waste forms, this reduction in rate may be partially controlled by changes in physical structure and chemistry (sometimes related to environmental influences such as CO 2 ), but it is more likely associated with the duration of the sampling interval. 9 refs., 6 figs

  16. PRESERVATIVE LEACHING FROM WEATHERED CCA-TREATED WOOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disposal of discarded CCA-treated wood in landfills raises concerns with respect to leaching of preservative compounds. When unweathered CCA-treated wood is leached using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), arsenic concentrations exceed the toxicity characteris...

  17. Leaching of vitrified high-level-active-waste in a near reality simulated repository system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froeschen, W.; Wolf, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    In the FRG it is planned to vitrify the high level waste from spent fuel reprocessing and to dispose of in a salt-mine. If water penetrates into the repository a highly corrosive brine (Q-brine) will be formed and radioactive material may be leached from the glasses and transported to human environment. The corrosion system of brine, corroded steel containers of the vitrified waste, and waste-glasses was investigated under near reality conditions. Experiments in hydrothermal environment were carried out including gamma radiation of the waste-glasses and ceramic In Can Lining between glasses and metallic containments. Screening experiments by application of external cobalt-gamma-radiation showed no principal changes in leaching behaviour of simulate glasses compared to leaching without radiation. Radiation effects result in pH changes mainly which are diminished by buffer capacity of Q-brine. Lining of steel containments with ceramic fleece does not reduce leaching but retards solution of Mo and Sr into brine. Decreasing of elements Sr, Cs and Mo in the near surface area of the glass and increasing of Zr and Ti has been found to be enhanced considerably in presence of canister corrosion products in Q-brine as well as in NaCl-leaching solution. (orig.) With 13 refs., 22 figs [de

  18. Leaching of copper concentrates using NaCl and soluble copper contributed by the own concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrero, O.; Bernal, N.; Quiroz, R.; Fuentes, G.; Vinals, J.

    2005-01-01

    Leaching of copper concentrates using cupric chloro complexes, generated in situ by the reaction between Cu(II), aported by the soluble copper content of the concentrate, and sodium chloride in acid media was studied. The concentrate samples were obtained from mineral processing plants from Antofagasta, Chile. Chemical and mineralogical characterization from original concentrates was made. Typical variable such as a chloride concentration, soluble copper concentration, leaching time, solid percentage and temperature were studied. DRX and EDS analyzed some of the residues. the experimental results indicated that it is possible to obtain solutions having high copper content (15 to 35 g/L) and 2 to 5 g/L free acid in order to submit this solution directly to a solvent extraction stage. The leaching tests use common reactive and low cost such as sodium chloride and sulfuric acid. (Author) 16 refs

  19. Uranium mining operations in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, J.-M.; Arnaiz, J.; Criado, M.; Lopez, A.

    1995-01-01

    The Empresa Nacional del Uranio, SA (ENUSA) was founded in 1972 to undertake and develop the industrial and procurement activities of the nuclear fuel cycle in Spain. Within the organisation of ENUSA, the Uranium Division is directly responsible for the uranium mining and production operations that have been carried out since 1973 in the area of Ciudad Rodrigo in the province of Salamanca. These activities are based on open pit mining, heap leaching and a hydrometallurgical plant (Elefante) for extracting uranium concentrates from the ore. This plant was shut down in 1993 and a new plant was started up on the same site (Quercus) with a dynamic leaching process. The nominal capacity of the new plant is 950 t U 3 O 8 per year. Because of the historically low uranium prices which have recently prevailed, the plant is currently running at a strategic production rate of 300 t U 3 O 8 per year. From 1981 to 1990, in the area of La Haba (Badajoz province), ENUSA also operated a uranium production site, based on open pit mining, and an experimental extraction plant (Lobo-G). ENUSA is currently decommissioning these installations. This paper describes innovations and improvements that ENUSA has recently introduced in the field of uranium concentrates production with a view to cutting production costs, and to improving the decommissioning and site restoration processes in those sites where production is being shut down or resources have been worked out. (author)

  20. Leaching of heavy metals from steelmaking slags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, J. F. P.; Pino, C. G.

    2006-01-01

    Leaching tests with EAF and Ladle slags were performed, using a flow through tests and the standard batch test DIN 38414-S4. The previous method was used to simulate the leaching behaviour of steel slags under landfill. the chemical analysis of the leachates during this period shows, in general, for both types of slag, and increase of heavy metal releases with ageing. Standard test method DIN 38414-S4 was used to evaluate leachability of heavy metals by water in unprocessed slags. After more than one year of trials, slang samples submitted to these trials presented very low total leaching levels. The most extracted elements are calcium and magnesium. Nevertheless, in flow-though test, calcium and magnesium leached from solid slags are below 0.5% and all other metals below 0.1%. Leachates obtained with DIN 38414-S4 present, as expected, higher leaching values; however, these are inferior to 5% (Ca) and 1% (other elements). (Author) 12 refs

  1. Leaching behavior of solidified plastics radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yook, Chong Chul; Lee, Byung Hun; Jae, Won Mok; Kim, Kyung Eung

    1986-01-01

    It is highly needed to develope the solidification process to dispose safely the radioactive wastes increasing with the growth of the nuclear industry. The leaching mechanisms of the solidified plastic wastes were investigated and the leaching rates of the plastic wastes were also measured among the many solidification processes. In addition, the transport equation based on the diffusion or the diffusion-dissolution was compared with the empirical equation derived from the experimental data by graphical method. Consequently, leaching process of the solidified plastic wastes is quite well agreed with the mass transport theory, but it may be difficult to simulate leaching process by diffusion dissolution mechanism. But the theoretical equation could be applicable to the cumulative amount of radionuclides leached form the plastic wastes disposed into the environment. (Author)

  2. Leaching of tritium from a cement composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzuru, Hideo; Ito, Akihiko

    1978-10-01

    Leaching of tritium from cement composites into an aqueous phase has been studied to evaluate the safety of incorporation of the tritiated liquid waste into cement. Leaching tests were performed by the method recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Leaching fraction was measured as functions of waste-cement ratio (Wa/C), temperature of leachant and curing time. The tritium leachability of cement in the long term test follows the order: alumina cement portland cement slag cement. The fraction of tritium leached increases with increasing Wa/C and temperature and decreasing curing period. A deionized water as a leachant gives a slightly higher leachability than synthetic sea water. The amount leached of tritium from a 200 l drum size specimen was estimated on the basis of the above results. (author)

  3. Two-stage fungal leaching of vanadium from uranium ore residue of the leaching stage using statistical experimental design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharehbagheri, Hassan; Safdari, Jaber; Roostaazad, Reza; Rashidi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► In this work, the percent of vanadium recovery from uranium mine waste was 44.8. ► Unlike autotrophs, Aspergillus niger is a suitable microorganism to deal with such a resource. ► In the first step of the present work, citric acid was produced more than the other acids. ► When sterilization of uranium ore waste is not economic, two-step bioleaching is an appropriate method. - Abstract: In this investigation, bioleaching of vanadium from uranium ore residue of the leaching stage was studied by Aspergillus niger in a two-step process at 30 °C and 150 rpm. The first step was initiated by growth of fungi in the absence of mine waste. Using response surface methodology, three factors were surveyed for fungal growth: initial pH, sucrose concentration and spore population. Also concentrations of oxalic, citric, and gluconic acids were measured as response in this step. During 30 days, maximum productions of these acids were 3265, 11578, and 7988 mg/l, respectively. Initial pH and sucrose concentration were significant factors for oxalic and citric acid production; however, for gluconic acid production sucrose concentration and spore population were significant. Then, the content of each flask was filtered and mine waste was added to liquor with pulp density of 3%. During 3 days, in the second step, vanadium recovered about 44.8% in the liquor

  4. Bacteria heap leaching test of a uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Liu Jinhui; Wu Weirong; Han Wei

    2008-01-01

    Column bioleaching test of a uranium ore was carried out. The optimum acidity, spraying intensity, spray-pause time ratio were determined. The potential, Fe and U concentrations in the leaching process were investigated. The effect of bacteria column leaching was compared with that of acid column leaching. The results show that bacteria column leaching can shorten leaching cycle, and the leaching rate of uranium increases by 9.7%. (authors)

  5. Long-term leach rates of glasses containing actual waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, J.R.; LeRoy, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Leach rates of borosilicate glasses that contained actual Savannah River Plant waste were measured. Leaching was done by water and by buffer solutions of pH 4, 7, and 9. Leach rates were then determined from the amount of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and Pu released into the leach solutions. The cumulative fractions leached were fit to a mathematical model that included leaching by diffusion and glass dissolution

  6. Long-term leach rates of glasses containing actual waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, J.R.; LeRoy, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Leach rates of borosilicate glasses that contained actual Savannah River Plant waste were measured. Leaching was done by water and by buffer solutions of pH 4, 7, and 9. Leach rates were then determined from the amount of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and plutonium released into the leach solutions. The cumulative fractions leached were fit to a mathematical model that included leaching by diffusion and glass dissolution. 5 figures, 3 tables

  7. Dynamic leaching test of personal computer components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yadong; Richardson, Jay B; Niu, Xiaojun; Jackson, Ollie J; Laster, Jeremy D; Walker, Aaron K

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic leaching test (DLT) was developed and used to evaluate the leaching of toxic substances for electronic waste in the environment. The major components in personal computers (PCs) including motherboards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, and compact disc drives were tested. The tests lasted for 2 years for motherboards and 1.5 year for the disc drives. The extraction fluids for the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were used as the DLT leaching solutions. A total of 18 elements including Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ni, Pd, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn were analyzed in the DLT leachates. Only Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were commonly found in the DLT leachates of the PC components. Their leaching levels were much higher in TCLP extraction fluid than in SPLP extraction fluid. The toxic heavy metal Pb was found to continuously leach out of the components over the entire test periods. The cumulative amounts of Pb leached out of the motherboards in TCLP extraction fluid reached 2.0 g per motherboard over the 2-year test period, and that in SPLP extraction fluid were 75-90% less. The leaching rates or levels of Pb were largely affected by the content of galvanized steel in the PC components. The higher was the steel content, the lower the Pb leaching rate would be. The findings suggest that the obsolete PCs disposed of in landfills or discarded in the environment continuously release Pb for years when subjected to landfill leachate or rains.

  8. In situ recovery of copper from sulfide ore bodies following nuclear fracturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, Joe B.; McKinney, W.A.

    1970-01-01

    Leaching now yields about 12 percent of the Nation's annual new copper production. About 200,000 tons of copper a year is being won by heap and vat leaching of ore, dump leaching of waste, and in-place leaching of caved underground workings. Although in-place leaching was practiced as long ago as the 15th century, it is little used and contributes only a few percent of the total leach copper production. Current technology in this area is exemplified by practice at the Miami, Ariz., mine of the Miami Copper Co. Despite its limited use, the concept of extracting copper by in-place leaching without physically mining and transporting the ore continues to present intriguing cost saving possibilities. Project SLOOP has been proposed as an experiment to test the feasibility of nuclear fracturing and acid leaching the oxidized portion of a deep ore body near Safford, Ariz. However, the bulk of the copper in deep ore deposits occurs as sulfide minerals that are not easily soluble in acid solutions. This paper explores the concept of in-place leaching of nuclear fractured, deeply buried copper sulfide deposits. On the assumption that fracturing of rock and solution injection and collection would be feasible, an assessment is made of solution systems that might be employed for the different copper sulfide minerals in porphyry ore bodies. These include the conventional ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid systems and combinations of sulfide mineral oxidants and different acids. (author)

  9. In situ recovery of copper from sulfide ore bodies following nuclear fracturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, Joe B; McKinney, W A [Salt Lake City Metallurgy Research Center, Bureau of Mines, US Department of the Interior, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1970-05-15

    Leaching now yields about 12 percent of the Nation's annual new copper production. About 200,000 tons of copper a year is being won by heap and vat leaching of ore, dump leaching of waste, and in-place leaching of caved underground workings. Although in-place leaching was practiced as long ago as the 15th century, it is little used and contributes only a few percent of the total leach copper production. Current technology in this area is exemplified by practice at the Miami, Ariz., mine of the Miami Copper Co. Despite its limited use, the concept of extracting copper by in-place leaching without physically mining and transporting the ore continues to present intriguing cost saving possibilities. Project SLOOP has been proposed as an experiment to test the feasibility of nuclear fracturing and acid leaching the oxidized portion of a deep ore body near Safford, Ariz. However, the bulk of the copper in deep ore deposits occurs as sulfide minerals that are not easily soluble in acid solutions. This paper explores the concept of in-place leaching of nuclear fractured, deeply buried copper sulfide deposits. On the assumption that fracturing of rock and solution injection and collection would be feasible, an assessment is made of solution systems that might be employed for the different copper sulfide minerals in porphyry ore bodies. These include the conventional ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid systems and combinations of sulfide mineral oxidants and different acids. (author)

  10. Treatment of the acid mine drainage residue for uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.M.; Horta, D.G.; Fukuma, H.T.; Villegas, R.A.S.; Carvalho, C.H.T. de; Silva, A.C. da

    2017-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a process that occurs in many mining that have sulfide ores. With water and oxygen, several metals are oxidized, one example being uranium. At the mine pit of the Osamu Utsumi Mine located at INB - Caldas and in two other boot-wastes (mining waste pile), AMD is present and currently, without a technological solution. The acidic water present in the pit is treated with hydrated lime, generating water for disposal and an alkaline residue called calcium diuranate - DUCA. The DUCA has a concentration of approximately 0.32% U 3 O 8 , which makes interesting the development of a process for extracting that metal. One of the processes that can be used is leaching. For this study, it was decided to evaluate the alkaline leaching to extract the uranium present in the residue. It is necessary to optimize operational parameters for the process: percentage of solids, concentration of leaching agent in solution, temperature and reaction time. With these parameters, it is possible to improve the leaching so that the largest amount of uranium is extracted from the sample, to help solve the environmental impact caused by the wastewater from the treatment of acid waters and, in addition, to give an economical destination for this metal that is contained in the deposited DUCA

  11. Contract Mining versus Owner Mining

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    mining companies can concentrate on their core businesses while using specialists for ... 2 Definition of Contract and Owner. Mining ... equipment maintenance, scheduling and budgeting ..... No. Region. Amount Spent on. Contract Mining. ($ billion). Percent of. Total. 1 ... cost and productivity data based on a large range.

  12. Treatment of liquid effluent from uranium mines and mills. Report of a co-ordinated research project 1996-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    Treatment and control of liquid effluents produced during uranium mining and milling operations is an integral part of environmental project management. Research has continued to add to the large body of science that has been built up around the treatment of radioactive and non-radioactive effluents to minimize their long-term environmental impact. The objective of the meetings on which this publication is based was to exchange information on active effluent treatment technologies that have application during operations and passive treatment techniques such as constructed wetlands and use of micro-organisms that are applicable during project reclamation and long-term care and maintenance. Papers describe effluent treatment case histories from active uranium mining and processing operations as well as effluent treatment research on both active and passive systems that have potential application under a wide range of operating and post-operational conditions including new information on high-density sludge from effluent neutralization (Australia), aerated manganese hydroxide for removal of radium (China), nanofiltration and macropore resins to treat mine water (Australia and China), in situ microbial treatment and permeable reactive walls for treatment of contaminated groundwater (Germany), construction of wetlands to treat mine water runoff (Australia and Germany), biogenic granules to remove 226 Ra from mill effluent (India), self-remediation of acidic in situ leach aquifers (Kazakhstan) and sorption characteristics of soil for self-remediation of contaminated groundwater (Hungary). These and other topics presented in this publication will be of interest to technical personnel who deal with day-to-day practical aspects of liquid effluent control and treatment at uranium production facilities worldwide

  13. Seismic tomography for charaterization of an ore vein in the research and education mine Reiche Zeche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Sebastian; Schlüter, Ralf; Hlousek, Felix; Buske, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    A test site for the design, implementation and operation of an underground in-situ bioleaching unit has been installed by the „Biohydrometallurgical Center for Strategic Elements" at the research and education mine "Reiche Zeche" of Technical University Bergakademie Freiberg. For this purpose an ore vein block will be developed and mined with the bio-hydrometallurgical in-situ leaching technology. As a site survey an underground seismic tomography experiment has been performed to investigate the spatial distribution of the ore vein within this block consisting mainly of gneiss and with dimensions of about 30 x 10 meters. The experiment was performed with a sledgehammer as source and 76 three-component receivers with source and receiver point intervals of about 1 m surrounding the approximately rectangular block. High precision laser scanning was performed to obtain accurate source and receiver positions which was particularly necessary to obtain reliable results due to the generally high wave velocities of the gneiss. The resulting seismic data set showed a high signal-to-noise ratio with clear first arrivals which were picked for all source and receiver combinations and subsequently used as input to a first-arrival tomographic inversion scheme. The resulting velocity model has very good ray coverage and shows well resolved high- and low-velocity regions within the block. These regions can be clearly assigned to mapped outcrops of the ore vein along the galleries surrounding the block, including a correlation of low velocities to fractured rock parts as well as high velocities to the undisturbed ore vein core, respectively. In summary the obtained velocity model and the inferred spatial distribution of the ore vein provides a good basis for planning and implementing the actual ore mining step using the envisaged bioleaching technology.

  14. Pressure leaching of uranium-bearing Witwatersrand ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovey, H.J.; Stewart, L.N.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1955 extensive pressure-leaching testwork has been conducted by Anglo American Research Laboratories (AARL) in laboratory-scale batch autoclaves. In 1958 a small continuous pilot-plant of 45 kg of solids per hour was operated by AARL. In 1974, when high uranium prices were anticipated, Anglo American, encouraged by successful commercial-scale autoclave operations as practised by Outokumpu, Sherritt Gordon, and Impala Platinium, decided to install a continuous pilot plant at Western Deep Levels. At that time the proposed pilot plant was considered to be of prototype size. The project was funded by members of the Nuclear Fuels Corporation (Nufcor). Since its commissioning in February 1977, the pilot plant at Western Deep Levels, which can treat between 10 and 20 tons of dry solids per hour, has been used to test ores from four different mines. The paper compares the uranium extractions and pyrite oxidation obtained in laboratory batch autoclaves with those obtained in the continuous pilot plant. In general, differences in uranium extraction are not great and can be explained; the differences in pyrite oxidation are less well understood. The effect on plant design of the evolution of carbon dioxide during leaching is discussed. Evaluation of the equipment and materials of construction would have been almost impossible in a small-scale batch autoclave. It is doubtful whether such results would have generated the necessary confidence to permit decisions to install a commercial-size plant. The development and performance of the multistage pumps, instrumention, shaft seals and shaft-seal water treatment are discussed. It is concluded that the operation of a large-scale continuous pressure-leaching pilot plant to supplement laboratory batch autoclave tests has been a necessary part of the development of this process [af

  15. The Effect of Initial Irrigation Conditions on Heap Leaching Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briseño Arellano, A. D.; Milczarek, M.; Yao, M.; Brusseau, M. L. L.

    2017-12-01

    Heap leaching is an unsaturated flow metal recovery process, in which mined ore is irrigated with a lixiviant to dissolve metal contained in the ore. The metal is then extracted from solution. Large scale operations involve stacking ore to depths of 6 to 18 meters on pads that may be hundreds of hectares in area. Heterogeneities within the stacked ore can lead to uneven wetting and the formation of preferential flow pathways, which reduces solution contact and lowers metal recovery. Furthermore, mineral dissolution can cause alteration of the porous media structure and loss of ore permeability. Many mine operators believe that slow initial irrigation rates help minimize permeability loss and increase metal recovery rates. However, this phenomenon has not been studied in detail. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of varying initial irrigation rates on leach ore stability. These were conducted with large columns (1.5 m high, 0.5 m in diameter) packed with crushed ore samples that are known to have permeability constraints. The columns were highly instrumented to assess potential changes in material properties both spatially and temporally. Water content was measured with three different methods: capacitance soil moisture sensors placed at 20-cm intervals; a neutron probe to periodically log every 30 cm from four different directions; and electrical resistivity sensors to create a 2-dimensional tomography profile of water content over time. Tensiometers were paired with the soil moisture sensors to measure matric suction and characterize moisture retention characteristics. A non-reactive tracer was used to characterize advective-dispersive transport under unsaturated conditions. A dye solution was introduced at the end of each experiment to map preferential pathways. Continuous monitoring of settling at the surface assisted in measuring consolidation and loss in permeability.

  16. Characterizing the Leaching Behavior of Coal Combustion Residues using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) to Inform Future Management Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract for presentation on Characterizing the Leaching Behavior of Coal Combustion Residues using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) to Inform Future Management Decisions. The abstract is attached.

  17. [Monitoring of water and salt transport in silt and sandy soil during the leaching process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Teng-Fei; Jia, Yong-Gang; Guo, Lei; Liu, Xiao-Lei

    2012-11-01

    Water and salt transport in soil and its mechanism is the key point of the saline soil research. The dynamic rule of water and transport in soil during the leaching process is the theoretical basis of formation, flush, drainage and improvement of saline soil. In this study, a vertical infiltration experiment was conducted to monitor the variation in the resistivity of silt and sandy soil during the leaching process by the self-designed automatic monitoring device. The experimental results showed that the peaks in the resistivity of the two soils went down and faded away in the course of leaching. It took about 30 minutes for sandy soil to reach the water-salt balance, whereas the silt took about 70 minutes. With the increasing leaching times, the desalination depth remained basically the same, being 35 cm for sandy soil and 10 cm for the silt from the top to bottom of soil column. Therefore, 3 and 7 leaching processes were required respectively for the complete desalination of the soil column. The temporal and spatial resolution of this monitoring device can be adjusted according to the practical demand. This device can not only achieve the remote, in situ and dynamic monitoring data of water and salt transport, but also provide an effective method in monitoring, assessment and early warning of salinization.

  18. Environmental impact of solution mining for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunkin, G.G.

    1975-01-01

    Compared with most other mining systems, uranium solution mining has a negligible effect on such environmental factors as surface disturbance, interference with natural groundwater quality and distribution, and aerial discharge of radionuclides. The following topics are discussed: the process, personnel safety and health, tailings disposal, impact on groundwater, operating licenses and controls, legislation, and economics. It is concluded that engineered well systems and controlled input/production flow rates, combined with full recirculation systems that maintain constant fluid volumes in the mineralized formations, result in containment of leach solutions within the operating area. The very dilute leach solutions, compatible with natural groundwaters, ensure that no environmental damage results, even if a loss of control occurred. Reduction in the number of processing steps and virtual elimination of operator hazards, waste disposal and land rehabilitation costs help in reducing overall costs

  19. ESCA studies on leached glass forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawkins, B.G.

    1979-01-01

    Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) results for frit, obsidian, NBS standard, and Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) glass forms that have been subjected to cumulative water leachings of 36 hours show that [Na] exhibits the largest and fastest change of all the elements observed. Leaching of surface Na occurred within minutes. Surface Na depletion increased with leach time. Continuous x-ray irradiation and argon ion milling induced Na mobility, precluding semiquantitative ESCA analysis at normal operating temperatures. However, the sample stage has been equipped with a liquid nitrogen supply and alkali mobility should be eliminated in future work

  20. ALKALINE CARBONATE LEACHING PROCESS FOR URANIUM EXTRACTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Rabbitts, A.T.

    1957-11-12

    A process for the leaching of uranium from high carbonate ores is presented. According to the process, the ore is leached at a temperature of about 200 deg C and a pressure of about 200 p.s.i.g. with a solution containing alkali carbonate, alkali permanganate, and bicarbonate ion, the bicarbonate ion functionlng to prevent premature formation of alkali hydroxide and consequent precipitation of a diuranate. After the leaching is complete, the uranium present is recovered by precipitation with NaOH.

  1. Column leaching from biomass combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of biomass combustion ashes for forest soil liming and fertilizing has been addressed in literature. Though, a deep understanding of the ash chemical composition and leaching behavior is necessary to predict potential benefits and environmental risks related to this practice....... In this study, a fly ash sample from an operating Danish power plant based on wood biomass was collected, chemically characterized and investigated for its leaching release of nutrients and heavy metals. A column leaching test was employed. The strongly alkaline pH of all the collected eluates suggested...

  2. Leaching from municipal solid waste incineration residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyks, J.

    2008-02-15

    Leaching of pollutants from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) residues has been investigated combining a range of laboratory leaching experiments with geochemical modeling. Special attention was paid to assessing the applicability of laboratory data for subsequent modeling with respect to presumed full-scale conditions; both sample pretreatment and actual influence of leaching conditions on the results of laboratory experiments were considered. It was shown that sample pretreatment may have large impact on leaching test data. In particular, a significant fraction of Pb was shown mobile during the washing of residues with water. In addition, drying of residues (i.e. slow oxidation) prior to leaching experiments increased the leaching of Cr significantly. Significant differences regarding the leaching behavior of individual elements with respect to (non)equilibrium conditions in column percolation experiments were observed in the study. As a result, three groups of elements were identified based on the predominant leaching control and the influence of (non)equilibrium on the results of the laboratory column experiments: I. Predominantly availability-controlled elements (e.g. Na, K, Cl) II. Solubility-controlled elements (e.g. Ca, S, Si, Al, Ba, and Zn) III. Complexation-controlled elements (e.g. Cu and Ni) With respect to the above groups it was suggested that results of laboratory column experiments can, with consideration, be used to estimate full-scale leaching of elements from Group I and II. However, in order to avoid large underestimations in the assessment of leaching from Group III, it is imperative to describe the time-dependent transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the tested system or to minimize the physical non-equilibrium during laboratory experiments (e.g. bigger column, slower flow velocity). Forward geochemical modeling was applied to simulate long-term release of elements from a MSWI air-pollution-control residue. Leaching of a

  3. Bacterial leaching of uranium ores - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowson, R.T.

    1975-11-01

    The bacterial leaching of uranium ores involves the bacterially catalysed oxidation of associated pyrite to sulphuric acid and Fe 3+ by autotrophic bacteria and the leaching of the uranium by the resulting acidic, oxidising solution. Industrial application has been limited to Thiobacillus thiooxidans and Thiobacillus ferrooxidans at pH 2 to 3, and examples of these are described. The bacterial catalysis can be improved with nutrients or prevented with poisons. The kinetics of leaching are controlled by the bed depth, particle size, percolation rate, mineralogy and temperature. Current work is aimed at quantitatively defining the parameters controlling the kinetics and extending the method to alkaline conditions with other autotrophic bacteria. (author)

  4. Leaching properties of solidified TRU waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, P.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Safety analysis of waste forms requires an estimate of the ability of these forms to retain activity in the disposal environment. This program of leaching tests will determine the leaching properties of TRU contaminated incinerator ash waste forms using hydraulic cement, urea--formaldehyde, bitumen, and vinyl ester--styrene as solidification agents. Three types of leaching tests will be conducted, including both static and flow rate. Five generic groundwaters will be used. Equipment and procedures are described. Experiments have been conducted to determine plate out of 239 Pu, counter efficiency, and stability of counting samples

  5. Mining soil phosphorus by zero P-application: an effective method to reduce the risk of P loading to surface water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salm, van der C.; Chardon, W.J.; Koopmans, G.F.

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to find field evidence for the effectiveness of P-mining to reduce the risk of P leaching to surface water. In 2002, a P-mining was conducted on four grassland sites in the Netherlands on sand (two sites), peat and clay soils. The mining plots received no P and an annual N surplus of

  6. Acid leaching of oxide-sulphide copper ore prior the flotation: A way for an increased metal recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić Miroslav D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper mine "Cerovo"- East Serbia as well as the other ore bodies in its vicinity contain a significant amount of oxide copper minerals in their uper layers (>40%. Processing of such mixed ores by the existing concentration technologies leads to a substantial copper losses (<60%. Reduction of "oxide copper", by acid leaching prior the flotation concentration, can increase the overall copper efficiency up to more than 70% in the single-stage leaching, achieving an efficiency in the flotation concentration stage higher than 75%. Based on the performed experimental results the flow sheet for processing of the mixed oxide-sulphide copper ore is proposed.

  7. Alternative leaching processes for uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Laboratory studies have been carried out to compare the extraction of uranium from Australian ores by conventional leaching in sulphuric acid with that obtained using hydrochloric acid and acidified ferric sulphate solutions. Leaching with hydrochloric acid achieved higher extractions of radium-226 but the extraction of uranium was reduced considerably. The use of acidified ferric sulphate solution reduced acid consumption by 20-40% without any detrimental effect on uranium extraction. The ferric ion, which is reduced during leaching, can be reoxidized and recycled after the addition of acid makeup. Hydrogen peroxide was found to be an effective oxidant in conventional sulphuric acid leaching. It is more expensive than alternative oxidants, but it is non-polluting, lesser quantities are required and acid consumption is reduced

  8. Leaching of potassium in a lysimeter experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerzabek, M.H.

    1996-11-01

    Leaching of potassium was studied in the lysimeter plant in Seibersdorf/Austria (Pannonian climate). Averaged over three years, gravitational water amounted to 15.7% of the sum of precipitation (mean 485 mm) and irrigation (mean 138 mm). Differences between the four soils with respect to drainage were explained by the specific percentage of the soil skeleton. The average yearly potassium leaching ranged from 3.64 kg K/ha·yr (Dystric-Cambisol) to 22.7 kg K/ha·yr (drained Gleysol). Correlation between gravitational water volume and potassium leaching were only significant for one out of four soil types. No correlation was observed between extractable potassium in the soil profiles and potassium leaching. (author)

  9. Antimony leaching in plastics from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) with various acids and gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tostar, Sandra; Stenvall, Erik; Boldizar, Antal; Foreman, Mark R St J

    2013-06-01

    There has been a recent interest in antimony since the availability in readily mined areas is decreasing compared to the amounts used. It is important in many applications such as flame retardants and in the production of polyester, which can trigger an investigation of the leachability of antimony from plastics using different acids. In this paper, different types of acids are tested for their ability to leach antimony from a discarded computer housing, made of poly(acrylonitrile butadiene styrene), which is a common plastic type used in electrical and electronic equipment. The acid solutions included sodium hydrogen tartrate (0.5M) dissolved in either dimethyl sulfoxide or water (at ca. 23°C and heated to ca. 105°C). The metal content after leaching was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The most efficient leaching medium was the heated solution of sodium hydrogen tartrate in dimethyl sulfoxide, which leached almost half of the antimony from the poly(acrylonitrile butadiene styrene). Gamma irradiation, which is proposed to improve the mechanical properties in plastics, was used here to investigate the influence of antimony leaching ability. No significant change in the amount of leached antimony could be observed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Leaching methods for conditioned radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentiero, R.; Bienvenu, P.; Huebra, A. G. de la; Dale, C.; Grec, D.; Gallego, C.; Rodriguez, M.; Vanderlinden, F.; Voors, P. I.; Welbergen, J.; May, R.; Fays, J.

    2005-01-01

    The physico-chemical characterization of solidified, real or simulated, radioactive waste is essential in determining their long-term stability in conditions close to that which could be encountered during disposal. The evaluation or prediction of the performance of conditioned waste passes through many suitable studies and experiments, according to a documented qualification programme. In this respect the leaching test is among the first important techniques to evaluate the feasibility of a waste form and for comparing and selecting the best waste form. So the leaching behaviour of an immobilized radioactive waste is a relevant property to be studied. The objective of the present report is to collect and describe the most representative leaching methods used in international laboratories, mainly at European level, whether standard or standard-derived. In this instance the work is a summary of the Network knowledge and applications on leaching processes in order to exchange information and scientific and technical experiences in this respect. The focus is to express all the relevant parameters of the test and its field of application. all this background is the needed starting point to clarify the similarities and shortcomings of the methods used in the EN-TRAP laboratories and, subsequently, the possible equalities or differences which can be attributed to the characteristic parameters of the different type of wastes treated. In order to comprise the significance and the effects of the parameters involved in leaching phenomena, an initial discussion on leaching mechanisms and on achievable results is made in this document. The international standardised methods are summarised as being the origin for all the network leaching procedures. This work in a preliminary way represents a comparative review ordered to introduce an unique leaching procedure to be tested in an interlaboratory comparative exercise. Further the unique method would be a quick internal reference

  11. Leaching of irradiated CANDU UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandergraaf, T.T.; Johnson, L.H.; Lau, D.W.P.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiated fuel, leached at room temperature with distilled water and with slightly chlorinated river water, releases approx. 4% of its cesium inventory over a comparatively sort period of a few days but releases its actinides and rare earths more slowly. The matrix itself dissolves at a rate conservatively calculated to be less than approx. 2 x 10 -6 g UO 2 /cm 2 day and, with time, the leach rates of the various nuclides approach this value

  12. Leaching of nuclear power reactor wastes forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, L.S.; Villalobos, J.P.; Miyamoto, H.

    1986-01-01

    The leaching tests for power reactor wastes carried out at IPEN/CNEN-SP are described. These waste forms consist mainly of spent resins and boric acid concentrates solidified in ordinary Portland cement. All tests were conducted according to the ISO and IAEA recommendations. 3 years leaching results are reported, determining cesium and strontium diffusivity coefficients for boric acid waste form and ion-exchange resins. (Author) [pt

  13. A summary paper on nuclear mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaelson, S.D.

    1970-01-01

    Fifteen years ago a handful of men began to dream of the potentials of nuclear energy in peaceful applications. In 1957, AEC's Plowshare program was organized to promote and coordinate the work which might convert the dreams into realities. Then, some specific ideas for using nuclear energy in mining were set down in meaningful detail and with reasonable thought. In the 12 years of the Plowshare program nuclear energy concepts for mining have been developed in increasing detail and for a fairly broad range of possible applications. Although it may seem, at times, that progress is slow and month-to-month achievements almost nonexistent, a closer look throws a somewhat different light on the picture. In the first 7 years of Plowshare, from 1957 through 1964, the most obvious mining applications were delineated. These included the use of nuclear explosives to break ore for block caving, for in-situ leaching, and for stripping overburden from large low-grade deposits. Although numerous variations of these applications have been proposed in recent years, these three basic concepts still appear to hold the greatest potential. During those same seven years a number of DOD and Plowshare tests, involving both conventional and nuclear explosives, were conducted so that the phenomena and parameters bearing on mining applications could be evaluated in addition to acquiring other data. The tests, such as Projects Gnome, Sedan, Hard Hat and Danny Boy, have been discussed and reported at these and other meetings, and it would be redundant to review them now. Suffice it to say that from these tests and related work in AEC laboratories, scaling laws for relating yield, crater size, chimney size, fracture extent, and rock types were largely confirmed. Chimney rubble size distribution was determined and contamination problems were evaluated. Aside from these findings, however, the most important development during that 7-year period was the policy that relevant engineering data would

  14. A summary paper on nuclear mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelson, S D [Kennecott Copper Corporation, Metal Mining Division, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1970-05-15

    Fifteen years ago a handful of men began to dream of the potentials of nuclear energy in peaceful applications. In 1957, AEC's Plowshare program was organized to promote and coordinate the work which might convert the dreams into realities. Then, some specific ideas for using nuclear energy in mining were set down in meaningful detail and with reasonable thought. In the 12 years of the Plowshare program nuclear energy concepts for mining have been developed in increasing detail and for a fairly broad range of possible applications. Although it may seem, at times, that progress is slow and month-to-month achievements almost nonexistent, a closer look throws a somewhat different light on the picture. In the first 7 years of Plowshare, from 1957 through 1964, the most obvious mining applications were delineated. These included the use of nuclear explosives to break ore for block caving, for in-situ leaching, and for stripping overburden from large low-grade deposits. Although numerous variations of these applications have been proposed in recent years, these three basic concepts still appear to hold the greatest potential. During those same seven years a number of DOD and Plowshare tests, involving both conventional and nuclear explosives, were conducted so that the phenomena and parameters bearing on mining applications could be evaluated in addition to acquiring other data. The tests, such as Projects Gnome, Sedan, Hard Hat and Danny Boy, have been discussed and reported at these and other meetings, and it would be redundant to review them now. Suffice it to say that from these tests and related work in AEC laboratories, scaling laws for relating yield, crater size, chimney size, fracture extent, and rock types were largely confirmed. Chimney rubble size distribution was determined and contamination problems were evaluated. Aside from these findings, however, the most important development during that 7-year period was the policy that relevant engineering data would

  15. Method for accelerated leaching of solidified waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrmann, M.; Heiser, J.H.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1990-11-01

    An accelerated leach test method has been developed to determine the maximum leachability of solidified waste. The approach we have taken is to use a semi-dynamic leach test; that is, the leachant is sampled and replaced periodically. Parameters such as temperature, leachant volume, and specimen size are used to obtain releases that are accelerated relative to other standard leach tests and to the leaching of full-scale waste forms. The data obtained with this test can be used to model releases from waste forms, or to extrapolate from laboratory-scale to full-scale waste forms if diffusion is the dominant leaching mechanism. Diffusion can be confirmed as the leaching mechanism by using a computerized mathematical model for diffusion from a finite cylinder. We have written a computer program containing several models including diffusion to accompany this test. The program and a Users' Guide that gives screen-by-screen instructions on the use of the program are available from the authors. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. Optimization of the factors that accelerate leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrmann, M.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1989-03-01

    The prediction of long-term leachability of low-level radioactive waste forms is an essential element of disposal-site performance assessment. This report describes experiments and modeling techniques used to develop an accelerated leach test that meets this need. The acceleration in leaching rates caused by the combinations of two or more factors were experimentally determined. These factors were identified earlier as being able to individually accelerate leaching. They are: elevated temperature, the size of the waste form, the ratio of the volume of leachant to the surface area of the waste form, and the frequency of replacement of the leachant. The solidification agents employed were ones that are currently used to treat low-level radioactive wastes, namely portland type I cement, bitumen, and vinyl ester-styrene. The simulated wastes, sodium sulfate, sodium tetraborate, and incinerator ash, are simplified representatives of typical low-level waste streams. Experiments determined the leaching behavior of the radionuclides of cesium (Cs-137), strontium (Sr-85), and cobalt (Co-60 or Co-57) from several different formulations of solidification agents and waste types. Leaching results were based upon radiochemical and elemental analyses of aliquots of the leachate, and on its total alkalinity and pH at various times during the experiment (up to 120 days). Solid phase analyses were carried out by Scanning/Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy on the waste forms before and after some leaching experiments. 43 refs., 96 figs., 16 tabs

  17. Zinc Leaching from Tire Crumb Rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, E. P.; Ren, J.; Mays, D. C.

    2010-12-01

    Recent estimates indicate that more than 2 billion scrap tires are currently stockpiled in the United States and approximately 280 million more tires are added annually. Various engineering applications utilize recycled tires in the form of shredded tire crumb rubber. However, the use of tire crumb rubber may have negative environmental impacts, especially when the rubber comes into contact with water. A review of the literature indicates that leaching of zinc from tire crumb rubber is the most significant water quality concern associated with using this material. Zinc is generally used in tire manufacturing, representing approximately 1.3% of the final product by mass. This study will report results from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure, batch leaching tests, and column leaching tests performed to quantify the process by which zinc leaches from tire crumb rubber into water. Results are interpreted with a first-order kinetic attachment/detachment model, implemented with the U.S. Agricultural Research Service software HYDRUS-1D, in order to determine the circumstances when zinc leaching from tire crumb rubber would be expected to comply with the applicable discharge limits. One potential application for recycled tires is replacing sand with tire crumb rubber in granular media filters used for stormwater pollution control. For this to be a viable application, the total zinc in the stormwater discharge must be below the EPA’s benchmark value of 0.117 mg/L.

  18. Mining, ore preparation and niobium alloys production at Araxa, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraiso, O.S.; Fuccio Junior, R. de; Betz, E.W.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed description of the worlds major niobium producer is presented covering mining, concentration by froth flotation, leaching, and production of ferro-alloys. The present exploration of the Araxa deposit, its ore preparation and production of ferro-niobium is described. (E.G.) [pt

  19. Environmental impact assessment in an abandoned metal mine in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno-Jimenez, E.; Oropesa, A.; Esteban, E.; Haro, A.; Carpena, R. O.; Tarazona, J. V.; Penalosa, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    There is an increasing concern regarding the environmental effects of mine tailing sites. Tailing are produced during ore processing and are characterized by high levels of heavy metals. Toxic metals in the tailing can be released in the environment by erosion and leaching processes and they contaminate water, soil and plant ecosystems resulting in human health and ecological risk. (Author)

  20. Mine Water Treatment in Hongai Coal Mines

    OpenAIRE

    Dang Phuong Thao; Dang Vu Chi

    2018-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is recognized as one of the most serious environmental problem associated with mining industry. Acid water, also known as acid mine drainage forms when iron sulfide minerals found in the rock of coal seams are exposed to oxidizing conditions in coal mining. Until 2009, mine drainage in Hongai coal mines was not treated, leading to harmful effects on humans, animals and aquatic ecosystem. This report has examined acid mine drainage problem and techniques for acid mine ...