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Sample records for situ electron microscopy

  1. In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy of catalyst sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeLaRiva, Andrew T.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Challa, Sivakumar R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in the field of electron microscopy, such as aberration correctors, have now been integrated into Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEMs), making it possible to study the behavior of supported metal catalysts under operating conditions at atomic resolution. Here......, we focus on in situ electron microscopy studies of catalysts that shed light on the mechanistic aspects of catalyst sintering. Catalyst sintering is an important mechanism for activity loss, especially for catalysts that operate at elevated temperatures. Literature from the past decade is reviewed...... along with our recent in situ TEM studies on the sintering of Ni/MgAl2O4 catalysts. These results suggest that the rapid loss of catalyst activity in the earliest stages of catalyst sintering could result from Ostwald ripening rather than through particle migration and coalescence. The smallest...

  2. In situ transmission electron microscopy for magnetic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Duc-The; Kuhn, Luise Theil

    2016-01-01

    Nanomagnetism is a subject of great interest because of both application and fundamental aspects in which understanding of the physical and electromagnetic structure of magnetic nanostructures is essential to explore the magnetic properties. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a powerful tool...... that allows understanding of both physical structure and micromagnetic structure of the thin samples at nanoscale. Among TEM techniques, in situ TEM is the state-of-the-art approach for imaging such structures in dynamic experiments, reconstructing a real-time nanoscale picture of the properties......-structure correlation. This paper aims at reviewing and discussing in situ TEM magnetic imaging studies, including Lorentz microscopy and electron holography in TEM, applied to the research of magnetic nanostructures....

  3. Progress and applications of in situ transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rongming; Liu Jialong; Song Yuanjun

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the application of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is briefly reviewed. It is emphasized that the development of advanced in situ TEM techniques makes it possible to investigate the evolution of materials under heat, strain, magnetic field, electric field or chemical reaction environments on the atomic scale. The mechanism of the microstructure evolution under various conditions and the relationship between the atomic structures and their properties can be obtained, which is beneficial for the design of new materials with tailored properties. The clarification of the structure-property relationship will help to develop new materials and solve related basic problems in the field of condensed matter physics. (authors)

  4. In Situ Electron Microscopy of Lactomicroselenium Particles in Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Nagy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Electron microscopy was used to test whether or not (a in statu nascendi synthesized, and in situ measured, nanoparticle size does not differ significantly from the size of nanoparticles after their purification; and (b the generation of selenium is detrimental to the bacterial strains that produce them. Elemental nano-sized selenium produced by probiotic latic acid bacteria was used as a lactomicroselenium (lactomicroSel inhibitor of cell growth in the presence of lactomicroSel, and was followed by time-lapse microscopy. The size of lactomicroSel produced by probiotic bacteria was measured in situ and after isolation and purification. For these measurements the TESLA BS 540 transmission electron microscope was converted from analog (aTEM to digital processing (dTEM, and further to remote-access internet electron microscopy (iTEM. Lactobacillus acidophilus produced fewer, but larger, lactomicroSel nanoparticles (200–350 nm than Lactobacillus casei (L. casei, which generated many, smaller lactomicroSel particles (85–200 nm and grains as a cloudy, less electrodense material. Streptococcus thermophilus cells generated selenoparticles (60–280 nm in a suicidic manner. The size determined in situ in lactic acid bacteria was significantly lower than those measured by scanning electron microscopy after the isolation of lactomicroSel particles obtained from lactobacilli (100–500 nm, but higher relative to those isolated from Streptococcus thermopilus (50–100 nm. These differences indicate that smaller lactomicroSel particles could be more toxic to the producing bacteria themselves and discrepancies in size could have implications with respect to the applications of selenium nanoparticles as prebiotics.

  5. Time resolved electron microscopy for in situ experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Geoffrey H.; McKeown, Joseph T.; Santala, Melissa K.

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has functioned for decades as a platform for in situ observation of materials and processes with high spatial resolution. Yet, the dynamics often remain elusive, as they unfold too fast to discern at these small spatial scales under traditional imaging conditions. Simply shortening the exposure time in hopes of capturing the action has limitations, as the number of electrons will eventually be reduced to the point where noise overtakes the signal in the image. Pulsed electron sources with high instantaneous current have successfully shortened exposure times (thus increasing the temporal resolution) by about six orders of magnitude over conventional sources while providing the necessary signal-to-noise ratio for dynamic imaging. We describe here the development of this new class of microscope and the principles of its operation, with examples of its application to problems in materials science

  6. Time resolved electron microscopy for in situ experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Geoffrey H., E-mail: ghcampbell@llnl.gov; McKeown, Joseph T.; Santala, Melissa K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Transmission electron microscopy has functioned for decades as a platform for in situ observation of materials and processes with high spatial resolution. Yet, the dynamics often remain elusive, as they unfold too fast to discern at these small spatial scales under traditional imaging conditions. Simply shortening the exposure time in hopes of capturing the action has limitations, as the number of electrons will eventually be reduced to the point where noise overtakes the signal in the image. Pulsed electron sources with high instantaneous current have successfully shortened exposure times (thus increasing the temporal resolution) by about six orders of magnitude over conventional sources while providing the necessary signal-to-noise ratio for dynamic imaging. We describe here the development of this new class of microscope and the principles of its operation, with examples of its application to problems in materials science.

  7. In SITU Transmission Electron Microscopy on Operating Electrochemical CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gualandris, Fabrizio; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2016-01-01

    Solid oxide cells (SOC) have the potential of playing a significant role in the future efficient energy system scenario. In order to become widely commercially available, an improved performance and durability of the cells has to be achieved [1]. Conventional scanning and transmission SEM and TEM...... have been often used for ex-situ post mortem characterization of SOFCs and SOECs [2,3]. However, in order to get fundamental insight of the microstructural development of SOFC/SOEC during operation conditions in situ studies are necessary [4]....

  8. Quantifying Chemical and Electrochemical Reactions in Liquids by in situ Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canepa, Silvia

    and developing a robust imaging analysis method for quantitatively understand chemical and electrochemical process during in situ liquid electron microscopy. By using two custom-made liquid cells (an electrochemical scanning electron microscopy (EC-SEM) platform and Liquid Flow S/TEM holder) beam...... of electrochemical deposition of copper (Cu) by electrochemical liquid scanning electron microscopy (EC-SEM) was done in order to direct observe the formation of dendritic structures. Finally the shape evolution from solid to hollow structures through galvanic replacement reactions were observed for different silver...

  9. In situ and operando transmission electron microscopy of catalytic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crozier, Peter A.; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2015-01-01

    measurements of gas-phase catalytic products. To overcome this deficiency, operando TEM techniques are being developed that combine atomic characterization with the simultaneous measurement of catalytic products. This article provides a short review of the current status and major developments......) is a powerful technique for revealing the atomic structures of materials at elevated temperatures in the presence of reactive gases. This approach can allow the structure-reactivity relations underlying catalyst functionality to be investigated. Thus far, ETEM has been limited by the absence of in situ...... in the application of ETEM to gas-phase catalysis over the past 10 years....

  10. In situ transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy studies of sintering of Ag and Pt nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asoro, M.A.; Ferreira, P.J.; Kovar, D.

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy studies were conducted in situ on 2–5 nm Pt and 10–40 nm Ag nanoparticles to study mechanisms for sintering and to measure relevant sintering kinetics in nanoscale particles. Sintering between two separated particles was observed to initiate by either (1) diffusion of the particles on the sample support or (2) diffusion of atoms or small clusters of atoms to the neck region between the two particles. After particle contact, the rate of sintering was controlled by atomic surface diffusivity. The surface diffusivity was determined as a function of particle size and temperature from experimental measurements of the rate of neck growth of the particles. The surface diffusivities did not show a strong size effect for the range of particle sizes that were studied. The surface diffusivity for Pt nanoparticles exhibited the expected Arrhenius temperature dependence and did not appear to be sensitive to the presence of surface contaminants. In contrast, the surface diffusivity for Ag nanoparticles was affected by the presence of impurities such as carbon. The diffusivities for Ag nanoparticles were consistent with previous measurements of bulk surface diffusivities for Ag in the presence of C, but were significantly slower than those obtained from pristine Ag

  11. In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy on Operating Electrochemical Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gualandris, Fabrizio; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    have been often used for ex-situpost mortem characterization of SOFCs and SOECs [2,3]. However, in order to get fundamental insight of themicrostructural development of SOFC/SOEC during operation conditions in-situ studies are necessary [4]. Thedevelopment of advanced TEM chips and holders makes...... it possible to undertake analysis during exposure to theSOFC/SOEC sample of reactive gas flow, elevated temperatures and electrical biasing in combination. Thisallows the study of nanostructure development under temperature and electrode polarisation conditions similarto operation conditions.In this work, we...... with animage corrector and a differential pumping system.A symmetric cell was prepared by depositing a cell consisting of three thin films on a strontium titanate (STO)single crystal substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Lanthanum strontium cobaltite La0.6Sr0.4CoO3-δ (LSC)was chosen as electrode...

  12. In situ Electrical measurements in Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudneva, M.

    2013-01-01

    In the present thesis the combination of real-time electricalmeasurements on nano-sampleswith simultaneous examination by transmission electron microscope (TEM) is discussed. Application of an electrical current may lead to changes in the samples thus the possibility to correlate such changes with

  13. Current status and future directions for in situ transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taheri, Mitra L.; Stach, Eric A.; Arslan, Ilke

    2016-01-01

    This review article discusses the current and future possibilities for the application of in situ transmission electron microscopy to reveal synthesis pathways and functional mechanisms in complex and nanoscale materials. The findings of a group of scientists, representing academia, government labs...

  14. An electromechanical material testing system for in situ electron microscopy and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yong; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2005-01-01

    We report the development of a material testing system for in situ electron microscopy (EM) mechanical testing of nanostructures. The testing system consists of an actuator and a load sensor fabricated by means of surface micromachining. This previously undescribed nanoscale material testing system makes possible continuous observation of the specimen deformation and failure with subnanometer resolution, while simultaneously measuring the applied load electronically with nanonewton resolution...

  15. Advances in Transmission Electron Microscopy : In Situ Straining and In Situ Compression Experiments on Metallic Glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    In the field of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fundamental and practical reasons still remain that hamper a straightforward correlation between microscopic structural information and deformation mechanisms in materials. In this article, it is argued that one should focus in particular on in

  16. Studying the Kinetics of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation with In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    McDowell, Matthew T.

    2012-09-04

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to study the electrochemical lithiation of high-capacity crystalline Si nanoparticles for use in Li-ion battery anodes. The lithiation reaction slows down as it progresses into the particle interior, and analysis suggests that this behavior is due not to diffusion limitation but instead to the influence of mechanical stress on the driving force for reaction. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Studying the Kinetics of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation with In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    McDowell, Matthew T.; Ryu, Ill; Lee, Seok Woo; Wang, Chongmin; Nix, William D.; Cui, Yi

    2012-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to study the electrochemical lithiation of high-capacity crystalline Si nanoparticles for use in Li-ion battery anodes. The lithiation reaction slows down as it progresses into the particle interior, and analysis suggests that this behavior is due not to diffusion limitation but instead to the influence of mechanical stress on the driving force for reaction. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. A transmission electron microscopy procedure for in-situ straining of miniature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Olbricht, J.; Wagner, M. F- X.; Condó, A.; Dlouhý, Antonín; Grossman, Ch.; Kröger, A.; Somsen, Ch.; Eggeler, G.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 10 (2008), s. 1150-1156 ISSN 1862-5282 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/05/0918 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : transmission electron microscopy * in-situ straining * nano-crystalline NiTi Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.819, year: 2008

  19. An electromechanical material testing system for in situ electron microscopy and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2005-10-11

    We report the development of a material testing system for in situ electron microscopy (EM) mechanical testing of nanostructures. The testing system consists of an actuator and a load sensor fabricated by means of surface micromachining. This previously undescribed nanoscale material testing system makes possible continuous observation of the specimen deformation and failure with subnanometer resolution, while simultaneously measuring the applied load electronically with nanonewton resolution. This achievement was made possible by the integration of electromechanical and thermomechanical components based on microelectromechanical system technology. The system capabilities are demonstrated by the in situ EM testing of free-standing polysilicon films, metallic nanowires, and carbon nanotubes. In particular, a previously undescribed real-time instrumented in situ transmission EM observation of carbon nanotubes failure under tensile load is presented here.

  20. In situ measurements and transmission electron microscopy of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taekyung; Kim, Seongwon; Olson, Eric; Zuo Jianmin

    2008-01-01

    We present the design and operation of a transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-compatible carbon nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistor (FET). The device is configured with microfabricated slits, which allows direct observation of CNTs in a FET using TEM and measurement of electrical transport while inside the TEM. As demonstrations of the device architecture, two examples are presented. The first example is an in situ electrical transport measurement of a bundle of carbon nanotubes. The second example is a study of electron beam radiation effect on CNT bundles using a 200 keV electron beam. In situ electrical transport measurement during the beam irradiation shows a signature of wall- or tube-breakdown. Stepwise current drops were observed when a high intensity electron beam was used to cut individual CNT bundles in a device with multiple bundles

  1. In-situ transmission electron microscopy growth of nanoparticles under extreme conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luce, F. P.; Azevedo, G. de M.; Baptista, D. L.; Zawislak, F. C.; Oliviero, E.; Fichtner, P. F. P.

    2016-01-01

    The formation and time resolved behavior of individual Pb nanoparticles embedded in silica have been studied by in-situ transmission electron microscopy observations at high temperatures (400–1100 °C) and under 200 keV electron irradiation. It is shown that under such extreme conditions, nanoparticles can migrate at long distances presenting a Brownian-like behavior and eventually coalesce. The particle migration phenomenon is discussed considering the influence of the thermal energy and the electron irradiation effects on the atomic diffusion process which is shown to control particle migration. These results and comparison with ex-situ experiments tackle the stability and the microstructure evolution of nanoparticles systems under extreme conditions. It elucidates on the effects of energetic particle irradiation-annealing treatments either as a tool or as a detrimental issue that could hamper their long-term applications in radiation-harsh environments such as in space or nuclear sectors

  2. Bio-camouflage of anatase nanoparticles explored by in situ high-resolution electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ana R; Mukherjee, Arijita; Hu, Xuan; Shafien, Shayan; Ghodsi, Reza; He, Kun; Gemini-Piperni, Sara; Wang, Canhui; Klie, Robert F; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza; Borojevic, Radovan; Rocha, Luis A; Granjeiro, José M

    2017-08-03

    While titanium is the metal of choice for most prosthetics and inner body devices due to its superior biocompatibility, the discovery of Ti-containing species in the adjacent tissue as a result of wear and corrosion has been associated with autoimmune diseases and premature implant failures. Here, we utilize the in situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in a liquid flow holder and graphene liquid cells (GLCs) to investigate, for the first time, the in situ nano-bio interactions between titanium dioxide nanoparticles and biological medium. This imaging and spectroscopy methodology showed the process of formation of an ionic and proteic bio-camouflage surrounding Ti dioxide (anatase) nanoparticles that facilitates their internalization by bone cells. The in situ understanding of the mechanisms of the formation of the bio-camouflage of anatase nanoparticles may contribute to the definition of strategies aimed at the manipulation of these NPs for bone regenerative purposes.

  3. Current status and future directions for in situ transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taheri, Mitra L.; Stach, Eric A.; Arslan, Ilke; Crozier, P.A.; Kabius, Bernd C.; LaGrange, Thomas; Minor, Andrew M.; Takeda, Seiji; Tanase, Mihaela; Wagner, Jakob B.; Sharma, Renu

    2016-01-01

    This review article discusses the current and future possibilities for the application of in situ transmission electron microscopy to reveal synthesis pathways and functional mechanisms in complex and nanoscale materials. The findings of a group of scientists, representing academia, government labs and private sector entities (predominantly commercial vendors) during a workshop, held at the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology- National Institute of Science and Technology (CNST-NIST), are discussed. We provide a comprehensive review of the scientific needs and future instrument and technique developments required to meet them. - Highlights: • Evaluation of currently available technology for performing in situ experiments using transmission electron microscope. • Limitations of currently available instrumentation with respect to base TEM, specialty TEM holders, and data acquisition systems. • Guidelines and wish list for the areas of future development.

  4. Current status and future directions for in situ transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, Mitra L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University (United States); Stach, Eric A. [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, National Laboratory, Brookhaven (United States); Arslan, Ilke [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, 902 Battelle Blvd, Richland, WA (United States); Crozier, P.A. [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281 (United States); Kabius, Bernd C. [The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); LaGrange, Thomas [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Physical and Life Science Directorate, Condensed Matter and Materials Division, 7000 East Avenue, P.O. 808 L-356 (United States); Minor, Andrew M. [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of California, Berkeley and National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS 72, Berkeley, CA (United States); Takeda, Seiji [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research (ISIR), Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Tanase, Mihaela [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6203 (United States); Wagner, Jakob B. [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs, Lyngby (Denmark); Sharma, Renu, E-mail: renu.sharma@nist.gov [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6203 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    This review article discusses the current and future possibilities for the application of in situ transmission electron microscopy to reveal synthesis pathways and functional mechanisms in complex and nanoscale materials. The findings of a group of scientists, representing academia, government labs and private sector entities (predominantly commercial vendors) during a workshop, held at the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology- National Institute of Science and Technology (CNST-NIST), are discussed. We provide a comprehensive review of the scientific needs and future instrument and technique developments required to meet them. - Highlights: • Evaluation of currently available technology for performing in situ experiments using transmission electron microscope. • Limitations of currently available instrumentation with respect to base TEM, specialty TEM holders, and data acquisition systems. • Guidelines and wish list for the areas of future development.

  5. Investigating the use of in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguy, Amanda [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    Engineering nanoparticles with desired shape-dependent properties is the key to many applications in nanotechnology. Although many synthetic procedures exist to produce anisotropic gold nanoparticles, the dynamics of growth are typically unknown or hypothetical. In the case of seed-mediated growth in the presence of DNA into anisotropic nanoparticles, it is not known exactly how DNA directs growth into specific morphologies. A series of preliminary experiments were carried out to contribute to the investigation of the possible mechanism of DNA-mediated growth of gold nanoprisms into gold nanostars using liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Imaging in the liquid phase was achieved through the use of a liquid cell platform and liquid cell holder that allow the sample to be contained within a “chip sandwich” between two electron transparent windows. Ex situ growth experiments were performed using Au-T30 NPrisms (30-base thymine oligonucleotide-coated gold nanoprisms) that are expected to grow into gold nanostars. Growth to form these nanostars were imaged using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and liquid cell STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy). An attempt to perform in situ growth experiments with the same Au-T30 nanoprisms revealed challenges in obtaining desired morphology results due to the environmental differences within the liquid cell compared to the ex situ environment. Different parameters in the experimental method were explored including fluid line set up, simultaneous and alternating reagent addition, and the effect of different liquid cell volumes to ensure adequate flow of reagents into the liquid cell. Lastly, the binding affinities were compared for T30 and A30 DNA incubated with gold nanoparticles using zeta potential measurements, absorption spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was previously reported thymine bases have a lower binding affinity to gold surfaces than adenine

  6. In-situ environmental (scanning) transmission electron microscopy of catalysts at the atomic level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, P L; Boyes, E D

    2014-01-01

    Observing reacting single atoms on the solid catalyst surfaces under controlled reaction conditions is a key goal in understanding and controlling heterogeneous catalytic reactions. In-situ real time aberration corrected environmental (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (E(S)TEM permit the direct imaging of dynamic surface and sub-surface structures of reacting catalysts. In this paper in-situ AC ETEM and AC ESTEM studies under controlled reaction environments of oxide catalysts and supported metal nanocatalysts important in chemical industry are presented. They provide the direct evidence of dynamic processes at the oxide catalyst surface at the atomic scale and single atom dynamics in catalytic reactions. The ESTEM studies of single atom dynamics in controlled reaction environments show that nanoparticles act as reservoirs of ad-atoms. The results have important implications in catalysis and nanoparticle studies

  7. Method for local temperature measurement in a nanoreactor for in situ high-resolution electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendelbo, S B; Kooyman, P J; Creemer, J F; Morana, B; Mele, L; Dona, P; Nelissen, B J; Helveg, S

    2013-10-01

    In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of solids under reactive gas conditions can be facilitated by microelectromechanical system devices called nanoreactors. These nanoreactors are windowed cells containing nanoliter volumes of gas at ambient pressures and elevated temperatures. However, due to the high spatial confinement of the reaction environment, traditional methods for measuring process parameters, such as the local temperature, are difficult to apply. To address this issue, we devise an electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) method that probes the local temperature of the reaction volume under inspection by the electron beam. The local gas density, as measured using quantitative EELS, is combined with the inherent relation between gas density and temperature, as described by the ideal gas law, to obtain the local temperature. Using this method we determined the temperature gradient in a nanoreactor in situ, while the average, global temperature was monitored by a traditional measurement of the electrical resistivity of the heater. The local gas temperatures had a maximum of 56 °C deviation from the global heater values under the applied conditions. The local temperatures, obtained with the proposed method, are in good agreement with predictions from an analytical model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative in situ magnetization reversal studies in Lorentz microscopy and electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez, L.A.; Magén, C.; Snoeck, E.; Gatel, C.; Marín, L.; Serrano-Ramón, L.

    2013-01-01

    A generalized procedure for the in situ application of magnetic fields by means of the excitation of the objective lens for magnetic imaging experiments in Lorentz microscopy and electron holography is quantitatively described. A protocol for applying magnetic fields with arbitrary in-plane magnitude and orientation is presented, and a freeware script for Digital Micrograph ™ is provided to assist the operation of the microscope. Moreover, a method to accurately reconstruct hysteresis loops is detailed. We show that the out-of-plane component of the magnetic field cannot be always neglected when performing quantitative measurements of the local magnetization. Several examples are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and functionality of the methods. - Highlights: • Generalized procedure for application of magnetic fields with the TEM objective lens. • Arbitrary in-plane magnetic field magnitude and orientation can be applied. • Method to accurately reconstruct hysteresis loops by electron holography. • Out-of-plane field component should be considered in quantitative measurements. • Examples to illustrate the method in Lorentz microscopy and electron holography

  9. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Observation of Nanostructural Changes in Phase-Change Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Meister, Stefan

    2011-04-26

    Phase-change memory (PCM) has been researched extensively as a promising alternative to flash memory. Important studies have focused on its scalability, switching speed, endurance, and new materials. Still, reliability issues and inconsistent switching in PCM devices motivate the need to further study its fundamental properties. However, many investigations treat PCM cells as black boxes; nanostructural changes inside the devices remain hidden. Here, using in situ transmission electron microscopy, we observe real-time nanostructural changes in lateral Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) PCM bridges during switching. We find that PCM devices with similar resistances can exhibit distinct threshold switching behaviors due to the different initial distribution of nanocrystalline and amorphous domains, explaining variability of switching behaviors of PCM cells in the literature. Our findings show a direct correlation between nanostructure and switching behavior, providing important guidelines in the design and operation of future PCM devices with improved endurance and lower variability. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  10. Quantitative in situ magnetization reversal studies in Lorentz microscopy and electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, L A; Magén, C; Snoeck, E; Gatel, C; Marín, L; Serrano-Ramón, L; Prieto, J L; Muñoz, M; Algarabel, P A; Morellon, L; De Teresa, J M; Ibarra, M R

    2013-11-01

    A generalized procedure for the in situ application of magnetic fields by means of the excitation of the objective lens for magnetic imaging experiments in Lorentz microscopy and electron holography is quantitatively described. A protocol for applying magnetic fields with arbitrary in-plane magnitude and orientation is presented, and a freeware script for Digital Micrograph(™) is provided to assist the operation of the microscope. Moreover, a method to accurately reconstruct hysteresis loops is detailed. We show that the out-of-plane component of the magnetic field cannot be always neglected when performing quantitative measurements of the local magnetization. Several examples are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and functionality of the methods. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. In situ oxidation and reduction of triangular nickel nanoplates via environmental transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    LAGROW, A.P.; AlYami, Noktan; LLOYD, D.C.; Bakr, Osman; BOYES, E.D.; GAI, P.L.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the oxidation and reduction mechanisms of transition metals, such as nickel (Ni), is important for their use in industrial applications of catalysis. A powerful technique for investigating the redox reactive species is in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM), where oxidation and reduction can be tracked in real time. One particular difficulty in understanding the underlying reactions is understanding the underlying morphology of the starting structure in a reaction, in particular the defects contained in the material, and the exposed surface facets. Here-in, we use a colloidal nanoparticle synthesis in a continuous flow reactor to form nanoplates of nickel coated with oleylamine as a capping agent. We utilise an in situ heating procedure at 300 °C in vacuum to remove the oleylamine ligands, and then oxidise the Ni nanoparticles at 25 °C with 2 Pa oxygen, and follow the nanoparticles initial oxidation. After that, the nanoparticles are oxidised at 200 and 300 °C, making the size of the oxide shell increase to ∼4 nm. The oxide shell could be reduced under 2 Pa hydrogen at 500 °C to its initial size of ∼1 nm. High temperature oxidation encouraged the nanoparticles to form pure NiO nanoparticles, which occurred via the Kirkendall effect leading to hollowing and void formation.

  12. In situ oxidation and reduction of triangular nickel nanoplates via environmental transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    LAGROW, A.P.

    2017-08-29

    Understanding the oxidation and reduction mechanisms of transition metals, such as nickel (Ni), is important for their use in industrial applications of catalysis. A powerful technique for investigating the redox reactive species is in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM), where oxidation and reduction can be tracked in real time. One particular difficulty in understanding the underlying reactions is understanding the underlying morphology of the starting structure in a reaction, in particular the defects contained in the material, and the exposed surface facets. Here-in, we use a colloidal nanoparticle synthesis in a continuous flow reactor to form nanoplates of nickel coated with oleylamine as a capping agent. We utilise an in situ heating procedure at 300 °C in vacuum to remove the oleylamine ligands, and then oxidise the Ni nanoparticles at 25 °C with 2 Pa oxygen, and follow the nanoparticles initial oxidation. After that, the nanoparticles are oxidised at 200 and 300 °C, making the size of the oxide shell increase to ∼4 nm. The oxide shell could be reduced under 2 Pa hydrogen at 500 °C to its initial size of ∼1 nm. High temperature oxidation encouraged the nanoparticles to form pure NiO nanoparticles, which occurred via the Kirkendall effect leading to hollowing and void formation.

  13. Deformation of nanotubes in peeling contact with flat substrate: An in situ electron microscopy nanomechanical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zheng, Meng; Wei, Qing; Ke, Changhong, E-mail: cke@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902-6000 (United States); Signetti, Stefano [Laboratory of Bio-Inspired and Graphene Nanomechanics, Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Pugno, Nicola M. [Laboratory of Bio-Inspired and Graphene Nanomechanics, Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Centre for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Povo (Trento) (Italy); School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-21

    Peeling of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures from flat substrates is an essential technique in studying their adhesion properties. The mechanical deformation of the nanostructure in the peeling experiment is critical to the understanding of the peeling process and the interpretation of the peeling measurements, but it is challenging to measure directly and quantitatively at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate the peeling deformation of a bundled carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber by using an in situ scanning electron microscopy nanomechanical peeling technique. A pre-calibrated atomic force microscopy cantilever is utilized as the peeling force sensor, and its back surface acts as the peeling contact substrate. The nanomechanical peeling scheme enables a quantitative characterization of the deformational behaviors of the CNT fiber in both positive and negative peeling configurations with sub-10 nm spatial and sub-nN force resolutions. Nonlinear continuum mechanics models and finite element simulations are employed to interpret the peeling measurements. The measurements and analysis reveal that the structural imperfections in the CNT fiber may have a substantial influence on its peeling deformations and the corresponding peeling forces. The research findings reported in this work are useful to the study of mechanical and adhesion properties of 1D nanostructures by using nanomechanical peeling techniques.

  14. Plasticity mechanisms in ultrafine grained freestanding aluminum thin films revealed by in-situ transmission electron microscopy nanomechanical testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrissi, Hosni; Kobler, Aaron; Amin-Ahmadi, Behnam; Schryvers, Dominique; Coulombier, Michael; Pardoen, Thomas; Galceran, Montserrat; Godet, Stéphane; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Kübel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In-situ bright field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) nanomechanical tensile testing and in-situ automated crystallographic orientation mapping in TEM were combined to unravel the elementary mechanisms controlling the plasticity of ultrafine grained Aluminum freestanding thin films. The characterizations demonstrate that deformation proceeds with a transition from grain rotation to intragranular dislocation glide and starvation plasticity mechanism at about 1% deformation. The grain rotation is not affected by the character of the grain boundaries. No grain growth or twinning is detected

  15. Plasticity mechanisms in ultrafine grained freestanding aluminum thin films revealed by in-situ transmission electron microscopy nanomechanical testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idrissi, Hosni, E-mail: hosni.idrissi@ua.ac.be [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering, Université catholique de Louvain, Place Sainte Barbe 2, B-1348 Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium); Kobler, Aaron [Institute of Nanotechnology (INT) and Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - KIT, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Joint Research Laboratory Nanomaterials (KIT and TUD) at Technische Universität Darmstadt (TUD), Petersenstr. 32, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Amin-Ahmadi, Behnam; Schryvers, Dominique [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Coulombier, Michael; Pardoen, Thomas [Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering, Université catholique de Louvain, Place Sainte Barbe 2, B-1348 Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium); Galceran, Montserrat; Godet, Stéphane [Matters and Materials Department, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 50 Av. FD Roosevelt CP194/03, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Raskin, Jean-Pierre [Information and Communications Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics (ICTEAM), Microwave Laboratory, Université catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Kübel, Christian [Institute of Nanotechnology (INT) and Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - KIT, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-03-10

    In-situ bright field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) nanomechanical tensile testing and in-situ automated crystallographic orientation mapping in TEM were combined to unravel the elementary mechanisms controlling the plasticity of ultrafine grained Aluminum freestanding thin films. The characterizations demonstrate that deformation proceeds with a transition from grain rotation to intragranular dislocation glide and starvation plasticity mechanism at about 1% deformation. The grain rotation is not affected by the character of the grain boundaries. No grain growth or twinning is detected.

  16. Indium hydroxide to oxide decomposition observed in one nanocrystal during in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miehe, Gerhard; Lauterbach, Stefan; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Gurlo, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) is used to study, in situ, spatially resolved decomposition in individual nanocrystals of metal hydroxides and oxyhydroxides. This case study reports on the decomposition of indium hydroxide (c-In(OH) 3 ) to bixbyite-type indium oxide (c-In 2 O 3 ). The electron beam is focused onto a single cube-shaped In(OH) 3 crystal of {100} morphology with ca. 35 nm edge length and a sequence of HR-TEM images was recorded during electron beam irradiation. The frame-by-frame analysis of video sequences allows for the in situ, time-resolved observation of the shape and orientation of the transformed crystals, which in turn enables the evaluation of the kinetics of c-In 2 O 3 crystallization. Supplementary material (video of the transformation) related to this article can be found online at (10.1016/j.jssc.2012.09.022). After irradiation the shape of the parent cube-shaped crystal is preserved, however, its linear dimension (edge) is reduced by the factor 1.20. The corresponding spotted selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern representing zone [001] of c-In(OH) 3 is transformed to a diffuse strongly textured ring-like pattern of c-In 2 O 3 that indicates the transformed cube is no longer a single crystal but is disintegrated into individual c-In 2 O 3 domains with the size of about 5–10 nm. The induction time of approximately 15 s is estimated from the time-resolved Fourier transforms. The volume fraction of the transformed phase (c-In 2 O 3 ), calculated from the shrinkage of the parent c-In(OH) 3 crystal in the recorded HR-TEM images, is used as a measure of the kinetics of c-In 2 O 3 crystallization within the framework of Avrami–Erofeev formalism. The Avrami exponent of ∼3 is characteristic for a reaction mechanism with fast nucleation at the beginning of the reaction and subsequent three-dimensional growth of nuclei with a constant growth rate. The structural transformation path in reconstructive

  17. Growth Termination and Multiple Nucleation of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Evidenced by in Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lili; He, Maoshuai; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2017-01-01

    and successive growth of additional SWCNTs on Co catalyst particles supported on MgO by means of environmental transmission electron microscopy. Such in situ observations reveal the plethora of solid carbon formations at the local scale while it is happening and thereby elucidate the multitude of configurations...

  18. Indium hydroxide to oxide decomposition observed in one nanocrystal during in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miehe, Gerhard; Lauterbach, Stefan; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Gurlo, Aleksander

    2013-02-01

    The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) is used to study, in situ, spatially resolved decomposition in individual nanocrystals of metal hydroxides and oxyhydroxides. This case study reports on the decomposition of indium hydroxide (c-In(OH)3) to bixbyite-type indium oxide (c-In2O3). The electron beam is focused onto a single cube-shaped In(OH)3 crystal of {100} morphology with ca. 35 nm edge length and a sequence of HR-TEM images was recorded during electron beam irradiation. The frame-by-frame analysis of video sequences allows for the in situ, time-resolved observation of the shape and orientation of the transformed crystals, which in turn enables the evaluation of the kinetics of c-In2O3 crystallization. Supplementary material (video of the transformation) related to this article can be found online at 10.1016/j.jssc.2012.09.022. After irradiation the shape of the parent cube-shaped crystal is preserved, however, its linear dimension (edge) is reduced by the factor 1.20. The corresponding spotted selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern representing zone [001] of c-In(OH)3 is transformed to a diffuse strongly textured ring-like pattern of c-In2O3 that indicates the transformed cube is no longer a single crystal but is disintegrated into individual c-In2O3 domains with the size of about 5-10 nm. The induction time of approximately 15 s is estimated from the time-resolved Fourier transforms. The volume fraction of the transformed phase (c-In2O3), calculated from the shrinkage of the parent c-In(OH)3 crystal in the recorded HR-TEM images, is used as a measure of the kinetics of c-In2O3 crystallization within the framework of Avrami-Erofeev formalism. The Avrami exponent of ˜3 is characteristic for a reaction mechanism with fast nucleation at the beginning of the reaction and subsequent three-dimensional growth of nuclei with a constant growth rate. The structural transformation path in reconstructive decomposition of c-In(OH)3 to c

  19. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of redox molecules. Coherent electron transfer at large bias voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Theories of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) of molecules with redox levels near the substrate and tip Fermi levels point to 'spectroscopic' current-overpotential features. Prominent features require a narrow 'probing tip', i.e. a small bias voltage, eV(bias), compared...

  20. Angstrom analysis with dynamic in-situ aberration corrected electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, P L; Boyes, E D

    2010-01-01

    Following the pioneering development of atomic resolution in-situ environmental TEM (ETEM) for direct probing of gas-solid reactions, recent developments are presented of dynamic real time in-situ studies at the Angstrom level in an aberration corrected electron microscope. The in-situ data from Pt-Pd nanoparticles on carbon with the corresponding FFT/optical diffractogram (OD) illustrate an achieved resolution of 0 C and higher, in a double aberration corrected JEOL 2200 FS TEM/STEM employing a wider gap objective pole piece and gas tolerant TMP column pumping system. Direct observations of dynamic biofuel catalysts under controlled calcinations conditions and quantified with catalytic reactivity and physico-chemical studies show the benefits in-situ aberration correction in unveiling the evolution of surface active sites necessary for the development efficient heterogeneous catalysts. The new results open up opportunities for dynamic studies of materials in an aberration corrected environment and direct future development activities.

  1. In-situ reduction of promoted cobalt oxide supported on alumina by environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehghan, Roya; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2011-01-01

    the reactivity of the nanoparticles and the importance of controlling the gas composition and specimen temperature during this type of experiment. Similar behaviour was observed for a non-promoted catalyst. Imaging and analysis of the promoted sample before and after reduction indicated a uniform distribution...... resolution transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging. The cobalt particles were mainly face centred cubic while some hexagonal close packed particles were also found. Reoxidation of the sample upon cooling to room temperature, still under flowing H2, underlines...

  2. The application of in situ analytical transmission electron microscopy to the study of preferential intergranular oxidation in Alloy 600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, M.G., E-mail: m.g.burke@manchester.ac.uk; Bertali, G.; Prestat, E.; Scenini, F.; Haigh, S.J.

    2017-05-15

    In situ analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can provide a unique perspective on dynamic reactions in a variety of environments, including liquids and gases. In this study, in situ analytical TEM techniques have been applied to examine the localised oxidation reactions that occur in a Ni-Cr-Fe alloy, Alloy 600, using a gas environmental cell at elevated temperatures. The initial stages of preferential intergranular oxidation, shown to be an important precursor phenomenon for intergranular stress corrosion cracking in pressurized water reactors (PWRs), have been successfully identified using the in situ approach. Furthermore, the detailed observations correspond to the ex situ results obtained from bulk specimens tested in hydrogenated steam and in high temperature PWR primary water. The excellent agreement between the in situ and ex situ oxidation studies demonstrates that this approach can be used to investigate the initial stages of preferential intergranular oxidation relevant to nuclear power systems. - Highlights: • In situ analytical TEM has been performed in 1 bar H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O vapor at 360–480 °C. • Nanoscale GB migration and solute partitioning correlate with ex situ data for Alloy 600 in H{sub 2}-steam. • This technique can provide new insights into localised reactions associated with localised oxidation.

  3. Impact of Membrane-Induced Particle Immobilization on Seeded Growth Monitored by In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Rebecca G; Chen, Dennis P; Unocic, Raymond R; Skrabalak, Sara E

    2016-05-01

    In situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy probes seeded growth in real time. The growth of Pd on Au nanocubes is monitored as a model system to compare growth within a liquid cell and traditional colloidal synthesis. Different growth patterns are observed due to seed immobilization and the highly reducing environment within the liquid cell. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of redox molecules. Coherent electron transfer at large bias voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Theories of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) of molecules with redox levels near the substrate and tip Fermi levels point to 'spectroscopic' current-overpotential features. Prominent features require a narrow 'probing tip', i.e. a small bias voltage, eV(bias), compared...... a broad tunnelling current-overpotential range at a constant (large) bias voltage of +0.2 V. The current is found to be constant over a 0.25 V overpotential range, which covers roughly the range where the oxidised and reduced redox levels are located within the energy tip. STM contrast and apparent...... of previous theoretical work on in situ STM of redox molecules, to large bias voltages, \\eV(bias)\\ > E-r. Large bias voltages give tunnelling contrasts independent of the overpotential over a broad range, as both the oxidised and reduced redox levels are located within the 'energy tip' between the substrate...

  5. Fluorescence photooxidation with eosin: a method for high resolution immunolocalization and in situ hybridization detection for light and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A simple method is described for high-resolution light and electron microscopic immunolocalization of proteins in cells and tissues by immunofluorescence and subsequent photooxidation of diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride into an insoluble osmiophilic polymer. By using eosin as the fluorescent marker, a substantial improvement in sensitivity is achieved in the photooxidation process over other conventional fluorescent compounds. The technique allows for precise correlative immunolocalization studies on the same sample using fluorescence, transmitted light and electron microscopy. Furthermore, because eosin is smaller in size than other conventional markers, this method results in improved penetration of labeling reagents compared to gold or enzyme based procedures. The improved penetration allows for three-dimensional immunolocalization using high voltage electron microscopy. Fluorescence photooxidation can also be used for high resolution light and electron microscopic localization of specific nucleic acid sequences by in situ hybridization utilizing biotinylated probes followed by an eosin-streptavidin conjugate. PMID:7519623

  6. In-situ Isotopic Analysis at Nanoscale using Parallel Ion Electron Spectrometry: A Powerful New Paradigm for Correlative Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedra, Lluís; Eswara, Santhana; Dowsett, David; Wirtz, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic analysis is of paramount importance across the entire gamut of scientific research. To advance the frontiers of knowledge, a technique for nanoscale isotopic analysis is indispensable. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is a well-established technique for analyzing isotopes, but its spatial-resolution is fundamentally limited. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is a well-known method for high-resolution imaging down to the atomic scale. However, isotopic analysis in TEM is not possible. Here, we introduce a powerful new paradigm for in-situ correlative microscopy called the Parallel Ion Electron Spectrometry by synergizing SIMS with TEM. We demonstrate this technique by distinguishing lithium carbonate nanoparticles according to the isotopic label of lithium, viz. 6Li and 7Li and imaging them at high-resolution by TEM, adding a new dimension to correlative microscopy. PMID:27350565

  7. Sample Preparation Methodologies for In Situ Liquid and Gaseous Cell Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy of Electropolished Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiang Li; Schilling, Sibylle; Zaluzec, Nestor J; Burke, M Grace

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of studies utilizing in situ liquid and/or gaseous cell scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) have been reported. Because of the difficulty in the preparation of suitable specimens, these environmental S/TEM studies have been generally limited to studies of nanoscale structured materials such as nanoparticles, nanowires, or sputtered thin films. In this paper, we present two methodologies which have been developed to facilitate the preparation of electron-transparent samples from conventional bulk metals and alloys for in situ liquid/gaseous cell S/TEM experiments. These methods take advantage of combining sequential electrochemical jet polishing followed by focused ion beam extraction techniques to create large electron-transparent areas for site-specific observation. As an example, we illustrate the application of this methodology for the preparation of in situ specimens from a cold-rolled Type 304 austenitic stainless steel sample, which was subsequently examined in both 1 atm of air as well as fully immersed in a H2O environment in the S/TEM followed by hyperspectral imaging. These preparation techniques can be successfully applied as a general procedure for a wide range of metals and alloys, and are suitable for a variety of in situ analytical S/TEM studies in both aqueous and gaseous environments.

  8. In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of Interfaces in Li-ion Batteries: Challenges and Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chong M.; Xu, Wu; Liu, Jun; Choi, Daiwon; Arey, Bruce W.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Zhang, Jiguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Salmon, Norman

    2010-01-01

    The critical challenge facing the lithium ion battery development is the basic understanding of the structural evolution during the cyclic operation of the battery and the consequence of the structural evolution on the properties of the battery. Although transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and spectroscopy have been evolved to a stage such that it can be routinely used to probe into both the structural and chemical composition of the materials with a spatial resolution of a single atomic column, a direct in-situ TEM observation of structural evolution of the materials in lithium ion battery during the dynamic operation of the battery has never been reported. This is related to three factors: high vacuum operation of a TEM; electron transparency requirement of the region to be observed, and the difficulties dealing with the liquid electrolyte of lithium ion battery. In this paper, we report the results of exploring the in-situ TEM techniques for observation of the interface in lithium ion battery during the operation of the battery. A miniature battery was fabricated using a nanowire and an ionic liquid electrolyte. The structure and chemical composition of the interface across the anode and the electrolyte was studied using TEM imaging, electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. In addition, we also explored the possibilities of carrying out in-situ TEM studies of lithium ion batteries with a solid state electrolyte.

  9. The nanoaquarium: A nanofluidic platform for in situ transmission electron microscopy in liquid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Joseph M.

    There are many scientifically interesting and technologically relevant nanoscale phenomena that take place in liquid media. Examples include aggregation and assembly of nanoparticles; colloidal crystal formation; liquid phase growth of structures such as nanowires; electrochemical deposition and etching for fabrication processes and battery applications; interfacial phenomena; boiling and cavitation; and biological interactions. Understanding of these fields would benefit greatly from real-time, in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging with nanoscale resolution. Most liquids cannot be imaged by traditional TEM due to evaporation in the high vacuum environment and the requirement that samples be very thin. Liquid-cell in situ TEM has emerged as an exciting new experimental technique that hermetically seals a thin slice of liquid between two electron transparent membranes to enable TEM imaging of liquid-based processes. This work presents details of the fabrication of a custom-made liquid-cell in situ TEM device, dubbed the nanoaquarium. The nanoaquarium's highlights include an exceptionally thin sample cross section (10s to 100s of nm); wafer scale processing that enables high-yield mass production; robust hermetic sealing that provides leak-free operation without use of glue, epoxy, or any polymers; compatibility with lab-on-chip technology; and on-chip integrated electrodes for sensing and actuation. The fabrication process is described, with an emphasis on direct wafer bonding. Experimental results involving direct observation of colloid aggregation using an aqueous solution of gold nanoparticles are presented. Quantitative analysis of the growth process agrees with prior results and theory, indicating that the experimental technique does not radically alter the observed phenomenon. For the first time, in situ observations of nanoparticles at a contact line and in an evaporating thin film of liquid are reported, with applications for techniques such

  10. Switching behaviour of individual Ag-TCNQ nanowires: an in situ transmission electron microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Ke; Rösner, Benedikt; Butz, Benjamin; Fink, Rainer H.; Spiecker, Erdmann

    2016-10-01

    The organic semiconductor silver-tetracyanoquinodimethane (Ag-TCNQ) exhibits electrical switching and memory characteristics. Employing a scanning tunnelling microscopy setup inside a transmission electron microscope, the switching behaviour of individual Ag-TCNQ nanowires (NWs) is investigated in detail. For a large number of NWs, the switching between a high (OFF) and a low (ON) resistance state was successfully stimulated by negative bias sweeps. Fitting the experimental I-V curves with a Schottky emission function makes the switching features prominent and thus enables a direct evaluation of the switching process. A memory cycle including writing, reading and erasing features is demonstrated at an individual NW. Moreover, electronic failure mechanisms due to Joule heating are discussed. These findings have a significant impact on our understanding of the switching behaviour of Ag-TCNQ.

  11. Determination of redox reaction rates and orders by in situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Eli A; Sutter, Peter W

    2014-12-03

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important, as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles, among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments, the hydrated electrons e(-)aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e(-)aq generated by the electron beam during in situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e(-)aq]. By comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e(-)aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zerovalent metal atoms in solution.

  12. In situ and ex situ electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction characterization of the evolution of a catalytic system - from synthesis to deactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardini, Diego

    Heterogeneous catalysis represents a research field of undeniable importance for a multitude of technological and industrial processes. Supported catalysts are nowadays at the base of the large-scale production of most chemicals and are used for the removal of air pollutants from automotive engines...... the understanding of the structural properties and mechanisms at the origin of catalytic activity. This thesis presents the potential and uniqueness of ex situ and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques in the characterization of several supported material systems...... TEM (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) revealed the degradation of the supported carbide particles probably due to the formation of volatile molybdenum hydroxide species. The activity of silver nanoparticles as catalyst for soot oxidation was studied in operative conditions...

  13. Liquid-solid phase transition of Ge-Sb-Te alloy observed by in-situ transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlin, Katja; Trampert, Achim

    2017-01-01

    Melting and crystallization dynamics of the multi-component Ge-Sb-Te alloy have been investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Starting point of the phase transition study is an ordered hexagonal Ge 1 Sb 2 Te 4 thin film on Si(111) where the crystal structure and the chemical composition are verified by scanning TEM and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, respectively. The in-situ observation of the liquid phase at 600°C including the liquid-solid and liquid-vacuum interfaces and their movements was made possible due to an encapsulation of the TEM sample. The solid-liquid interface during melting displays a broad and diffuse transition zone characterized by a vacancy induced disordered state. Although the velocities of interface movements are measured to be in the nanometer per second scale, both, for crystallization and solidification, the underlying dynamic processes are considerably different. Melting reveals linear dependence on time, whereas crystallization exhibits a non-linear time-dependency featuring a superimposed start-stop motion. Our results may provide valuable insight into the atomic mechanisms at interfaces during the liquid-solid phase transition of Ge-Sb-Te alloys. - Highlights: • In-situ TEM observation of liquid Ge-Sb-Te phase transition due to encapsulation. • During melting: Observation of non-ordered interface transition due to premelting. • During solidification: Observation of non-linear time-dependent crystallization.

  14. Liquid-solid phase transition of Ge-Sb-Te alloy observed by in-situ transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlin, Katja, E-mail: katja.berlin@pdi-berlin.de; Trampert, Achim

    2017-07-15

    Melting and crystallization dynamics of the multi-component Ge-Sb-Te alloy have been investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Starting point of the phase transition study is an ordered hexagonal Ge{sub 1}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 4} thin film on Si(111) where the crystal structure and the chemical composition are verified by scanning TEM and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, respectively. The in-situ observation of the liquid phase at 600°C including the liquid-solid and liquid-vacuum interfaces and their movements was made possible due to an encapsulation of the TEM sample. The solid-liquid interface during melting displays a broad and diffuse transition zone characterized by a vacancy induced disordered state. Although the velocities of interface movements are measured to be in the nanometer per second scale, both, for crystallization and solidification, the underlying dynamic processes are considerably different. Melting reveals linear dependence on time, whereas crystallization exhibits a non-linear time-dependency featuring a superimposed start-stop motion. Our results may provide valuable insight into the atomic mechanisms at interfaces during the liquid-solid phase transition of Ge-Sb-Te alloys. - Highlights: • In-situ TEM observation of liquid Ge-Sb-Te phase transition due to encapsulation. • During melting: Observation of non-ordered interface transition due to premelting. • During solidification: Observation of non-linear time-dependent crystallization.

  15. Real time nanoscale structural evaluation of gold structures on Si (100) surface using in-situ transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rath, A.; Juluri, R. R.; Satyam, P. V.

    2014-01-01

    Transport behavior of gold nanostructures on Si(100) substrate during annealing under high vacuum has been investigated using in-situ real time transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A comparative study has been done on the morphological changes due to annealing under different vacuum environments. Au thin films of thickness ∼2.0 nm were deposited on native oxide covered silicon substrate by using thermal evaporation system. In-situ real time TEM measurements at 850 °C showed the isotropic growth of rectangular/square shaped gold-silicon alloy structures. During the growth, it is observed that the alloying occurs in liquid phase followed by transformation into the rectangular shapes. For similar system, ex-situ annealing in low vacuum (10 −2 millibars) at 850 °C showed the spherical gold nanostructures with no Au-Si alloy formation. Under low vacuum annealing conditions, the rate of formation of the oxide layer dominates the oxide desorption rate, resulting in the creation of a barrier layer between Au and Si, which restricts the inter diffusion of Au in to Si. This work demonstrates the important role of interfacial oxide layer on the growth of nanoscale Au-Si alloy structures during the initial growth. The time dependent TEM images are presented to offer a direct insight into the fundamental dynamics of the sintering process at the nanoscale

  16. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization of experimental Brachyspira (Serpulina) pilosicoli infection in growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre; Møller, Kristian; Boye, Mette

    2000-01-01

    Two groups of six 8-week-old pigs were challenged with 1X10(9) cfu Brachyspira (Serpulina) pilosicoli or Serpulina intermedia daily for 3 consecutive days to study the pathology of porcine colonic spirochetosis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH......; however, only two pigs developed transient watery diarrhea. S. intermedia was reisolated from four of the inoculated pigs, but clinical signs were not observed. Gross examination of the B. pilosicoli-infected pigs revealed dilated large intestines with a hyperemic mucosa, whereas the large intestines...... of the S. intermedia-inoculated pigs and the control pigs appeared normal. SEM examination of B. pilosicoli-infected pigs revealed degenerated epithelial cells and spirochetal colonization of the colonic mucosa in four pigs. By FISH, B. pilosicoli cells were found colonizing and invading the surface...

  17. Evaluation of environmental scanning electron microscopy for analysis of Proteus mirabilis crystalline biofilms in situ on urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holling, Nina; Dedi, Cinzia; Jones, Caroline E; Hawthorne, Joseph A; Hanlon, Geoffrey W; Salvage, Jonathan P; Patel, Bhavik A; Barnes, Lara M; Jones, Brian V

    2014-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infections and frequently leads to blockage of catheters due to crystalline biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has proven to be a valuable tool in the study of these unusual biofilms, but entails laborious sample preparation that can introduce artefacts, undermining the investigation of biofilm development. In contrast, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) permits imaging of unprocessed, fully hydrated samples, which may provide much insight into the development of P. mirabilis biofilms. Here, we evaluate the utility of ESEM for the study of P. mirabilis crystalline biofilms in situ, on urinary catheters. In doing so, we compare this to commonly used conventional SEM approaches for sample preparation and imaging. Overall, ESEM provided excellent resolution of biofilms formed on urinary catheters and revealed structures not observed in standard SEM imaging or previously described in other studies of these biofilms. In addition, we show that energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) may be employed in conjunction with ESEM to provide information regarding the elemental composition of crystalline structures and demonstrate the potential for ESEM in combination with EDS to constitute a useful tool in exploring the mechanisms underpinning crystalline biofilm formation. © 2014 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  18. Combining in situ transmission electron microscopy irradiation experiments with cluster dynamics modeling to study nanoscale defect agglomeration in structural metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Donghua; Wirth, Brian D.; Li Meimei; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a combinatorial approach that integrates state-of-the-art transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in situ irradiation experiments and high-performance computing techniques to study irradiation defect dynamics in metals. Here, we have studied the evolution of visible defect clusters in nanometer-thick molybdenum foils under 1 MeV krypton ion irradiation at 80 °C through both cluster dynamics modeling and in situ TEM experiments. The experimental details are reported elsewhere; we focus here on the details of model construction and comparing the model with the experiments. The model incorporates continuous production of point defects and/or small clusters, and the accompanying interactions, which include clustering, recombination and loss to the surfaces that result from the diffusion of the mobile defects. To account for the strong surface effect in thin TEM foils, the model includes one-dimensional spatial dependence along the foil depth, and explicitly treats the surfaces as black sinks. The rich amount of data (cluster number density and size distribution at a variety of foil thickness, irradiation dose and dose rate) offered by the advanced in situ experiments has allowed close comparisons with computer modeling and permitted significant validation and optimization of the model in terms of both physical model construct (damage production mode, identities of mobile defects) and parameterization (diffusivities of mobile defects). The optimized model exhibits good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the in situ TEM experiments. The combinatorial approach is expected to bring a unique opportunity for the study of radiation damage in structural materials.

  19. In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy synthesis observation of nanostructured carbon coated LiFePO 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, M. L.; Laul, D.; Veillette, R.; Serventi, A. M.; Mauger, A.; Julien, C. M.; Zaghib, K.

    In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies of the structural transformations that occur during the synthesis of carbon-coated LiFePO 4 (C-LiFePO 4) and heat treatment to elevated temperatures were conducted in two different electron microscopes. Both microscopes have sample holders that are capable of heating up to 1500 °C, with one working under high vacuum and the other capable of operating with the sample surrounded by a low gaseous environment. The C-LiFePO 4 samples were prepared using three different compositions of precursor materials with Fe(0), Fe(II) or Fe(III), a Li-containing salt and a polyethylene- block-poly(ethylene glycol)-50% ethylene oxide or lactose. The in situ TEM studies suggest that low-cost Fe(0) and a low-cost carbon-containing compound such as lactose are very attractive precursors for mass production of C-LiFePO 4, and that 700 °C is the optimum synthesis temperature. At temperatures higher than 800 °C, LiFePO 4 has a tendency to decompose. The same in situ measurements have been made on particles without carbon coat. The results show that the homogeneous deposit of the carbon deposit at 700 °C is the result of the annealing that cures the disorder of the surface layer of bare LiFePO 4. Electrochemical tests supported the conclusion that the C-LiFePO 4 derived from Fe(0) is the most attractive for mass production.

  20. Electron microscopy for Engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, I P

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of (mainly) Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) in an engineering context. The first two sections are TEM and chemical in nature; the final three sections are more general and include aspects of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

  1. In-situ Liquid Electron Microscopy Setups for Investigation of Nanoscale Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Eric; Møller-Nilsen, Rolf Erling Robberstad; Canepa, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    -situ electrochemistry and has achieved ~10 nm resolution. Such systems are important tools for developing sustainable technology and for understanding nanoscale phenomena. However, both systems suffer from interacting with theelectron beam, which is a high-voltage radiation source, and therefore initial experiments...

  2. Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those...

  3. Local stress modification during in situ transmission electron microscopy straining experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zárubová, Niva; Gemperle, Antonín; Gemperlová, Juliana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 462, - (2007), s. 407-411 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/2016 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : in situ TEM straining, Local stress in a strained foil * local stress in a strained foil Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.457, year: 2007

  4. In-situ transmission electron microscopy observation of slip propagation in ä3 bicrystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gemperlová, Juliana; Jacques, A.; Gemperle, Antonín; Vystavěl, Tomáš; Zárubová, Niva; Janecek, M.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 324, - (2002), s. 183-189 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/98/1281 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : in- situ TEM deformation * propagation of slip * plastic deformation * grain boundary * symmetrical ä3 bicrystal Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.107, year: 2002

  5. Size effect on compression properties of GaN nanocones examined using in situ transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Shao-Hui; Fang, Te-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Strain-induced structural variations of GaN nanocones are estimated using in situ TEM. • Young’s modulus of GaN nanocones with a diameter of 100–350 nm are 190–290 GPa. • The E 2 peak was red-shifted, indicated increased compressive stress. - Abstract: Mechanical property measurements of single nanocones are challenging because the small scale of the nanostructures. In this study, critical-stress- and strain-induced structural variations of GaN nanocones are estimated using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) compression experiments. For single GaN nanocones with a diameter of 100–350 nm, the Young’s modulus, plastic deformation energy (W p ), and elastic deformation energy (W e ) values were 190–290 GPa, 0.02–1.65 × 10 −11 J, and 0.04–3.85 × 10 −11 J, respectively. Raman spectra were used to measure GaN indentation. The E 2 peak was red-shifted, indicated increased compressive stress in the indented area

  6. Illuminating Electron Microscopy of Photocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalca, Filippo

    .1% of the surface of the planet with a device that converts solar energy into a useable form at 10% efficiency would give more than the present worldwide consumption of fossil energy. Photocatalysts are of fundamental interest for sustainable energy research because they provide a viable route for converting solar...... energy into chemical bonds. By means of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) it is possible to gain insight in the fundamentals of their reaction mechanisms, chemical behaviour, structure and morphology before, during and after reaction using in situ investigations. In particular, the environmental TEM...... the microscope that allows electron microscopy under nonconventional TEM conditions and new kinds of in situ spectroscopy....

  7. An in-situ analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigation of structure-property relationships in electronic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Andrew James

    As electronic and mechanical devices are scaled downward in size and upward in complexity, macroscopic principles no longer apply. Synthesis of three-dimensionally confined structures exhibit quantum confinement effects allowing, for example, silicon nanoparticles to luminesce. The reduction in size of classically brittle materials reveals a ductile-to-brittle transition. Such a transition, attributed to a reduction in defects, increases elasticity. In the case of silicon, elastic deformation can improve electronic carrier mobility by over 50%, a vital attribute of modern integrated circuits. The scalability of such principles and the changing atomistic processes which contribute to them presents a vitally important field of research. Beginning with the direct observation of dislocations and lattice planes in the 1950s, the transmission electron microscope has been a powerful tool in materials science. More recently, as nanoscale technologies have proliferated modern life, their unique ability to spatially resolve nano- and atomic-scale structures has become a critical component of materials research and characterization. Signals produced by an incident beam of high-energy electrons enables researchers to both image and chemically analyze materials at the atomic scale. Coherently and elastically-scattered electrons can be collected to produce atomic-scale images of a crystalline sample. New specimen stages have enabled routine investigation of samples heated up to 1000 °C and cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. MEMS-based transducers allow for sub-nm scale mechanical testing and ultrathin membranes allow study of liquids and gases. Investigation of a myriad of previously "unseeable" processes can now be observed within the TEM, and sometimes something new is found within the old. High-temperature annealing of pure a Si:H films leads to crystallization of the film. Such films provide higher carrier mobility compared to amorphous films, offering improved

  8. Electron microscopy of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venables, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Electron beam techniques used to study clean surfaces and surface processes on a microscopic scale are reviewed. Recent experimental examples and possible future developments are discussed. Special emphasis is given to (i) transmission diffraction and microscopy techniques, including atomic imaging; (ii) Auger microscopy on bulk and thin film samples; (iii) secondary electron microscopy, especially low energy secondaries for work-function imaging and photoelectron imaging; and (iv) reflection electron microscopy and diffraction. (orig.)

  9. In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy He{sup +} implantation and thermal aging of nanocrystalline iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muntifering, Brittany, E-mail: brmunti@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185 (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208 (United States); Fang, Youwu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208 (United States); Leff, Asher C. [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, 19104 (United States); Dunn, Aaron [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185 (United States); George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech CNRS, 57070, Metz (France); Qu, Jianmin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208 (United States); School of Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, MA, 02155 (United States); Taheri, Mitra L. [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, 19104 (United States); Dingreville, Remi; Hattar, Khalid [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The high density of interfaces in nanostructured materials are hypothesized to improve radiation tolerance compared to coarse-grained materials. In order to investigate the roles of vacancies, self-interstitials, and helium, both room temperature in situ TEM He{sup +} implantation and annealing, as well as high temperature He{sup +} implantation was performed on nanocrystalline iron. Dislocation loops are formed by the accumulation of mobile point defects rather than by displacement cascades at intermediate temperatures. Around 600 °C, loops disappeared through gradual shrinking, which is hypothesized to correspond to the annihilation of self-interstitial atoms by mobile vacancies that also resulted in cavity formation. The room temperature implantation resulted in cavities evenly distributed throughout the grain after annealing, whereas cavities were predominately observed at grain boundaries for the elevated temperature implantation. This difference is associated with the formation of stable helium-vacancy complexes in the grains during room temperature implantation, which is not present during high temperature implantation. - Highlights: • In situ TEM He{sup +} implantation and annealing was performed on nanocrystalline iron. • Small grains limited loop size and resulted in complete disappearance of loops by 600 °C. • Implantation followed by annealing resulted in cavities evenly distributed through grain. • Cavities predominately observed at grain boundaries after He{sup +} implantation at 600 °C.

  10. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies of the Magnetization Reversal Mechanism in Information Storage Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petford-Long; Portier; Bayle-Guillemaud; Anthony; Brug

    1998-05-01

    : The Foucault and Fresnel modes of Lorentz microscopy, together with a quantitative magnetization mapping technique, summed image differential phase-contrast imaging, were used to study the magnetization reversal mechanism of the sense layer in spin-valve structures exhibiting the giant magnetoresistance effect. In addition to studies of sheet film, lithographically defined spin-valve elements were investigated. A current can be passed through the element during magnetizing so that the effect of the applied current on the giant magnetoresistance and magnetization reversal mechanism can be studied. Results are presented for a number of different spin-valve structures.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy in situ investigation of dislocation mobility in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Vanderschaeve, G; Insa, P D T; Caillard, D

    2000-01-01

    TEM in situ straining experiments provide a unique way to investigate in real time the behaviour of individual dislocations under applied stress. The results obtained on a variety of semiconductors are presented: numerous dislocation sources are observed which makes it possible to measure the dislocation velocity as a function of different physical parameters (local shear stress, temperature, dislocation character, length of the moving dislocation, ...). The experimental results are consistent with a dislocation glide governed by the Peierls mechanism, even for II-VI compounds which have a significant degree of ionic character. For compounds, a linear dependence of the dislocation velocity on the length of the moving segment is noticed, whereas for elemental semiconductors a transition between a length-dependent and a length-independent velocity regime is observed. Analysed in the framework of the kink diffusion model (Hirth and Lothe theory), these results allow an estimation of the kink formation and migrat...

  12. Automated scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis for in situ quantification of gadolinium deposits in skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakral, Charu; Abraham, Jerrold L.

    2007-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) has been identified as a possible causative agent of an emerging cutaneous and systemic fibrosing disorder, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), which can cause serious disability and even death. To date, there are only two known associations with this disorder - renal insufficiency and Gd enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We developed an automated quantitative scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) method for Gd in tissue of NSF patients. Freshly cut paraffin block surfaces examined using the variable pressure mode under standardized conditions and random search of the tissue area allow in situ detection and semiquantitative morphometric (volumetric) analysis of insoluble higher atomic number features using backscattered electron imaging. We detected Gd ranging from 1 to 2270 cps/mm 2 in 57 cutaneous biopsies of NSF. Gd was associated with P, Ca, and usually Na in tissue deposits. Our method reproducibly determines the elemental composition, relative concentration, and spatial distribution of detected features within the tissue. However, we cannot detect features below our spatial resolution, nor concentrations below the detection limit of our SEM/EDS system. The findings confirm transmetallation and release of toxic Gd ions in NSF and allow dose-response analysis at the histologic level. (author)

  13. In situ electron microscopy studies of electromechanical behavior in metals at the nanoscale using a novel microdevice-based system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Wonmo, E-mail: wonmo.kang.ctr.ks@nrl.navy.mil; Beniam, Iyoel; Qidwai, Siddiq M. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Electrically assisted deformation (EAD) is an emerging technique to enhance formability of metals by applying an electric current through them. Despite its increasing importance in manufacturing applications, there is still an unresolved debate on the nature of the fundamental deformation mechanisms underlying EAD, mainly between electroplasticity (non-thermal effects) and resistive heating (thermal effects). This status is due to two critical challenges: (1) a lack of experimental techniques to directly observe fundamental mechanisms of material deformation during EAD, and (2) intrinsic coupling between electric current and Joule heating giving rise to unwanted thermally activated mechanisms. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a microdevice-based electromechanical testing system (MEMTS) to characterize nanoscale metal specimens in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our studies reveal that MEMTS eliminates the effect of Joule heating on material deformation, a critical advantage over macroscopic experiments, owing to its unique scale. For example, a negligible change in temperature (<0.02 °C) is predicted at ∼3500 A/mm{sup 2}. Utilizing the attractive features of MEMTS, we have directly investigated potential electron-dislocation interactions in single crystal copper (SCC) specimens that are simultaneously subjected to uniaxial loading and electric current density up to 5000 A/mm{sup 2}. Our in situ TEM studies indicate that for SCC, electroplasticity does not play a key role as no differences in dislocation activities, such as depinning and movement, are observed.

  14. Influence of gas atmospheres and ceria on the stability of nanoporous gold studied by environmental electron microscopy and In situ ptychography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baier, Sina; Wittstock, Arne; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad

    2016-01-01

    A novel complementary approach of electron microscopy/environmental TEM and in situ hard X-ray ptychography was used to study the thermally induced coarsening of nanoporous gold under different atmospheres, pressures and after ceria deposition. The temperature applied during ptychographic imaging...

  15. In situ transmission electron microscopy of individual carbon nanotetrahedron/ribbon structures in bending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohno, Hideo, E-mail: kohno.hideo@kochi-tech.ac.jp [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kochi University of Technology, Kami, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Masuda, Yusuke [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2015-05-11

    When the direction of flattening of a carbon nanotube changes during growth mediated by a metal nanoparticle, a carbon nanotetrahedron is formed in the middle of the carbon nanoribbon. We report the bending properties of the carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structure using a micro-manipulator system in a transmission electron microscope. In many cases, bending occurs at an edge of the carbon nanotetrahedron. No significant change is observed in the tetrahedron's shape during bending, and the bending is reversible and repeatable. Our results show that the carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structure has good durability against mechanical bending.

  16. In-situ observation of the alpha/beta cristobalite transition using high voltage electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meike, A.; Glassley, W.

    1989-10-01

    A high temperature water vapor phase is expected to persist in the vicinity of high level radioactive waste packages for several hundreds of years. The authors have begun an investigation of the structural and chemical effects of water on cristobalite because of its abundance in the near field environment. A high voltage transmission electron microscope (HVEM) investigation of bulk synthesized α-cristobalite to be used in single phase dissolution and precipitation kinetics experiments revealed the presence β-cristobalite, quartz and amorphous silica, in addition to α-cristobalite. Consequently, this apparent metastable persistence of β-cristobalite and amorphous silica during the synthesis of α-cristobalite was investigated using a heating stage and an environmental cell installed in the HVEM that allowed the introduction of either dry CO 2 or a CO 2 + H 2 O vapor. Preliminary electron diffraction evidence suggests that the presence of water vapor affected the α-β transition temperature. Water vapor may also be responsible for the development of an amorphous silica phase at the transition that may persist over an interval of several tens of degrees. The amorphous phase was not documented during the dry heating experiments. 20 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  17. In-situ observation of the alpha/beta cristobalite transition using high voltage electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meike, A.; Glassley, W.E.

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature water vapor phase is expected to persist in the vicinity of high level radioactive waste packages for several hundreds of years. The authors have begun an investigation of the structural and chemical effects of water on cristobalite because of its abundance in the near field environment. A high voltage transmission electron microscope (HVEM) investigation of bulk synthesized α-cristobalite to be used in single phase dissolution and precipitation kinetics experiments revealed the presence β-cristobalite, quartz and amorphous silica, in addition to α-cristobalite. Consequently, this apparent metastable persistence of β-cristobalite and amorphous silica during the synthesis of α-cristobalite was investigated using a heating stage and an environmental cell installed in the HVEM that allowed the introduction of either dry CO 2 or a CO 2 + H 2 O vapor. Preliminary electron diffraction evidence suggests that the presence of water vapor affected the α-β transition temperature. Water vapor may also be responsible for the development of an amorphous silica phase at the transition that may persist over an interval of several tens of degrees. The amorphous phase was not documented during the dry heating experiments

  18. In situ electron microscopy of Braille microsystems: photo-actuation of ethylene vinyl acetate/carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaniková, Klaudia; Krupa, Igor; Račko, Dušan; Šmatko, Vasilij; Campo, Eva M.; Pavlova, Ewa; Omastová, Mária

    2015-02-01

    The development of new types of tactile displays based on the actuation of composite materials can aid the visually impaired. Micro/nano systems based on ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) polymeric matrices enriched with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) can produce ensembles capable of light-induced actuation. In this report, we investigate two types of commercial EVA copolymers matrices containing 28 and 50 wt% vinyl-acetate (VA). Non-covalent modification of carbon nanotubes was achieved through a compatibilization technique that appends the pyrenenyl and cholesteryl groups on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) surface. EVA/MWCNT nanocomposites were prepared by casting from a solution. These composites were shaped into Braille elements using molds. The deformation of the Braille element (BE) under light-emitting diode (LED) illumination was observed for the first time by in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The superior actuation performance promoted by the EVA/MWCNT nanocomposites indicates that these materials will be useful in the future as light-driven micro/nano system actuators.

  19. In situ electron microscopy of Braille microsystems: photo-actuation of ethylene vinyl acetate/carbon nanotube composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czaniková, Klaudia; Krupa, Igor; Račko, Dušan; Omastová, Mária; Šmatko, Vasilij; Campo, Eva M; Pavlova, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The development of new types of tactile displays based on the actuation of composite materials can aid the visually impaired. Micro/nano systems based on ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) polymeric matrices enriched with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) can produce ensembles capable of light-induced actuation. In this report, we investigate two types of commercial EVA copolymers matrices containing 28 and 50 wt% vinyl-acetate (VA). Non-covalent modification of carbon nanotubes was achieved through a compatibilization technique that appends the pyrenenyl and cholesteryl groups on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) surface. EVA/MWCNT nanocomposites were prepared by casting from a solution. These composites were shaped into Braille elements using molds. The deformation of the Braille element (BE) under light-emitting diode (LED) illumination was observed for the first time by in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The superior actuation performance promoted by the EVA/MWCNT nanocomposites indicates that these materials will be useful in the future as light-driven micro/nano system actuators. (paper)

  20. In situ transmission electron microscopy study of the microstructural origins for the electric field-induced phenomena in ferroelectric perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hanzheng [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Ferroelectrics are important materials due to their extensive technological applications, such as non-volatile memories, field-effect transistors, ferroelectric tunneling junctions, dielectric capacitors, piezoelectric transducers, sensors and actuators. As is well known, the outstanding dielectric, piezoelectric, and ferroelectric properties of these functional oxides originate from their ferroelectric domain arrangements and the corresponding evolution under external stimuli (e.g. electric field, stress, and temperature). Electric field has been known as the most efficient stimulus to manipulate the ferroelectric domains through polarization switching and alignment. Therefore, direct observation of the dynamic process of electric field-induced domain evolution and crystal structure transformation is of significant importance to understand the microstructural mechanisms for the functional properties of ferroelectrics. In this dissertation, electric field in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique was employed to monitor the real-time evolution of the domain morphology and crystal structure during various electrical processes: (1) the initial poling process, (2) the electric field reversal process, and (3) the electrical cycling process. Two types of perovskite-structured ceramics, normal ferroelectrics and relaxor ferroelectrics, were used for this investigation. In addition to providing the microscopic insight for some wellaccepted phase transformation rules, discoveries of some new or even unexpected physical phenomena were also demonstrated.

  1. Annealing of hydrogen-induced defects in RF-plasma-treated Si wafers: ex situ and in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghica, C; Nistor, L C; Vizireanu, S; Dinescu, G

    2011-01-01

    The smart-cut(TM) process is based on inducing and processing structural defects below the free surface of semiconductor wafers. The necessary defects are currently induced by implantation of light elements such as hydrogen or helium. An alternative softer way to induce shallow subsurface defects is by RF-plasma hydrogenation. To facilitate the smart-cut process, the wafers containing the induced defects need to be subjected to an appropriate thermal treatment. In our experiments, (0 0 1) Si wafers are submitted to 200 and 50 W hydrogen RF-plasma and are subsequently annealed. The samples are studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), before and after annealing. The plasma-introduced defects are {1 1 1} and {1 0 0} planar-like defects and nanocavities, all of them involving hydrogen. Many nanocavities are aligned into strings almost parallel to the wafer surface. The annealing is performed either by furnace thermal treatment at 550 deg. C, or by in situ heating in the electron microscope at 450, 650 and 800 deg. C during the TEM observations. The TEM microstructural studies indicate a partial healing of the planar defects and a size increase of the nanometric cavities by a coalescence process of the small neighbouring nanocavities. By annealing, the lined up nanometric voids forming chains in the as-hydrogenated sample coalesced into well-defined cracks, mostly parallel to the wafer surface.

  2. Nanoparticle Metamorphosis: An in Situ High-Temperature Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of the Structural Evolution of Heterogeneous Au:Fe 2 O 3 Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgardner, William J.

    2014-05-27

    High-temperature in situ electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction have revealed that Au and Fe2O3 particles fuse in a fluid fashion at temperatures far below their size-reduced melting points. With increasing temperature, the fused particles undergo a sequence of complex structural transformations from surface alloy to phase segregated and ultimately core-shell structures. The combination of in situ electron microscopy and spectroscopy provides insights into fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic aspects governing the formation of heterogeneous nanostructures. The observed structural transformations present an interesting analogy to thin film growth on the curved surface of a nanoparticle. Using single-particle observations, we constructed a phase diagram illustrating the complex relationships among composition, morphology, temperature, and particle size. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  3. Nanoparticle Metamorphosis: An in Situ High-Temperature Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of the Structural Evolution of Heterogeneous Au:Fe 2 O 3 Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgardner, William J.; Yu, Yingchao; Hovden, Robert; Honrao, Shreyas; Hennig, Richard G.; Abruñ a, Hé ctor D.; Muller, David; Hanrath, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    High-temperature in situ electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction have revealed that Au and Fe2O3 particles fuse in a fluid fashion at temperatures far below their size-reduced melting points. With increasing temperature, the fused particles undergo a sequence of complex structural transformations from surface alloy to phase segregated and ultimately core-shell structures. The combination of in situ electron microscopy and spectroscopy provides insights into fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic aspects governing the formation of heterogeneous nanostructures. The observed structural transformations present an interesting analogy to thin film growth on the curved surface of a nanoparticle. Using single-particle observations, we constructed a phase diagram illustrating the complex relationships among composition, morphology, temperature, and particle size. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  4. Influence of Structural Defects on Biomineralized ZnS Nanoparticle Dissolution: An In-Situ Electron Microscopy Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskelsen, Jeremy R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Xu, Jie [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States). Geological Sciences; Chiu, Michelle Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Moon, Ji-Won [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division; Wilkins, Branford O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Graham, David E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division; Gu, Baohua [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; Pierce, Eric M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division

    2017-12-19

    The dissolution of metal sulfides, such as ZnS, plays an important role in the fate of metal contaminants in the environment. Here we have examined the dissolution behavior of ZnS nanoparticles synthesized via several abiotic and biological pathways. Specifically, the biogenic ZnS nanoparticles were produced by an anaerobic, metal-reducing bacterium Thermoanaerobacter sp. X513 in a Zn-amended, thiosulfate-containing growth medium, whereas the abiogenic ZnS nanoparticles were produced by mixing an aqueous Zn solution with either H2S-rich gas or Na2S solution. For biogenic synthesis, we prepared two types of samples, in the presence or absence of trace silver (Ag). The size distribution, crystal structure, aggregation behavior, and internal defects of the synthesized ZnS nanoparticles were primarily examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy coupled with X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The characterization results show that both the biogenic and abiogenic samples were dominantly composed of sphalerite. In the absence of Ag, the biogenic ZnS nanoparticles were significantly larger (i.e., ~10 nm) than the abiogenic ones (i.e., ~3–5 nm) and contained structural defects (e.g., twins and stacking faults). The presence of trace Ag showed a restraining effect on the particle size of the biogenic ZnS, resulting in quantum-dot-sized nanoparticles (i.e., ~3 nm). In situ dissolution experiments for the synthesized ZnS were conducted with a liquid-cell coupled to a transmission electron microscope (LCTEM), and the primary factors (i.e., the presence or absence structural defects) were evaluated for their effects on the dissolution behavior using the biogenic and abiogenic ZnS nanoparticle samples with the largest average particle size. Analysis of the dissolution results (i.e., change in particle radius with time) using the Kelvin equation shows that the defect-bearing biogenic ZnS nanoparticles (γ = 0.799 J/m2) have

  5. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Electron Beam-Induced Transformations in Colloidal Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have recently reported the rapid degradation of hybrid and all-inorganic lead halide perovskite nanocrystals under electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope, with the formation of nanometer size, high contrast particles. The nature of these nanoparticles and the involved transformations in the perovskite nanocrystals are still a matter of debate. Herein, we have studied the effects of high energy (80/200 keV) electron irradiation on colloidal cesium lead bromide (CsPbBr3) nanocrystals with different shapes and sizes, especially 3 nm thick nanosheets, a morphology that facilitated the analysis of the various ongoing processes. Our results show that the CsPbBr3 nanocrystals undergo a radiolysis process, with electron stimulated desorption of a fraction of bromine atoms and the reduction of a fraction of Pb2+ ions to Pb0. Subsequently Pb0 atoms diffuse and aggregate, giving rise to the high contrast particles, as previously reported by various groups. The diffusion is facilitated by both high temperature and electron beam irradiation. The early stage Pb nanoparticles are epitaxially bound to the parent CsPbBr3 lattice, and evolve into nonepitaxially bound Pb crystals upon further irradiation, leading to local amorphization and consequent dismantling of the CsPbBr3 lattice. The comparison among CsPbBr3 nanocrystals with various shapes and sizes evidences that the damage is particularly pronounced at the corners and edges of the surface, due to a lower diffusion barrier for Pb0 on the surface than inside the crystal and the presence of a larger fraction of under-coordinated atoms. PMID:28122188

  6. Combining nanocalorimetry and dynamic transmission electron microscopy for in situ characterization of materials processes under rapid heating and cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grapes, Michael D., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Materials Measurement Science Division, Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H. [Condensed Matter and Materials Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Friedman, Lawrence H.; LaVan, David A., E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov [Materials Measurement Science Division, Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Weihs, Timothy P., E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Nanocalorimetry is a chip-based thermal analysis technique capable of analyzing endothermic and exothermic reactions at very high heating and cooling rates. Here, we couple a nanocalorimeter with an extremely fast in situ microstructural characterization tool to identify the physical origin of rapid enthalpic signals. More specifically, we describe the development of a system to enable in situ nanocalorimetry experiments in the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM), a time-resolved TEM capable of generating images and electron diffraction patterns with exposure times of 30 ns–500 ns. The full experimental system consists of a modified nanocalorimeter sensor, a custom-built in situ nanocalorimetry holder, a data acquisition system, and the DTEM itself, and is capable of thermodynamic and microstructural characterization of reactions over a range of heating rates (10{sup 2} K/s–10{sup 5} K/s) accessible by conventional (DC) nanocalorimetry. To establish its ability to capture synchronized calorimetric and microstructural data during rapid transformations, this work describes measurements on the melting of an aluminum thin film. We were able to identify the phase transformation in both the nanocalorimetry traces and in electron diffraction patterns taken by the DTEM. Potential applications for the newly developed system are described and future system improvements are discussed.

  7. InAlN high electron mobility transistor Ti/Al/Ni/Au Ohmic contact optimisation assisted by in-situ high temperature transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M. D.; Parbrook, P. J.; O'Mahony, D.; Conroy, M.; Schmidt, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper correlates the micro-structural and electrical characteristics associated with annealing of metallic multi-layers typically used in the formation of Ohmic contacts to InAlN high electron mobility transistors. The multi-layers comprised Ti/Al/Ni/Au and were annealed via rapid thermal processing at temperatures up to 925 °C with electrical current-voltage analysis establishing the onset of Ohmic (linear IV) behaviour at 750–800 °C. In-situ temperature dependent transmission electron microscopy established that metallic diffusion and inter-mixing were initiated near a temperature of 500 °C. Around 800 °C, inter-diffusion of the metal and semiconductor (nitride) was observed, correlating with the onset of Ohmic electrical behaviour. The sheet resistance associated with the InAlN/AlN/GaN interface is highly sensitive to the anneal temperature, with the range depending on the Ti layer thickness. The relationship between contact resistivity and measurement temperature follow that predicted by thermionic field emission for contacts annealed below 850 °C, but deviated above this due to excessive metal-semiconductor inter-diffusion

  8. Electron microscopy and diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjoennes, J.; Olsen, A.

    1986-01-01

    This report is a description of research activities and plans at the electron microscopy laboratorium, Physics Department, University of Oslo. Since the first electron microscope was installed in 1968, the research has covered inorganic structures, physical metallurgy, as well as theory of electron scattering and the development of methods in this field. The current plans involve efforts in the development of crystallographic and spectroscopic methods

  9. In situ transmission electron microscopy analyses of thermally annealed self catalyzed GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrosini, S.; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Booth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Self catalyzed GaAs nanowires grown on Si-treated GaAs substrates were studied with a transmission electron microscope before and after annealing at 600◦C. At room temperature the nanowires have a zincblende structure and are locally characterized by a high density of rotational twins and stacking...... faults. Selected area diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that nanowires undergo structural modifications upon annealing, suggesting a decrease of defect density following the thermal treatment....

  10. In-situ transmission electron microscopy of the solid-phase epitaxial growth of GaAs: sample preparation and artifact characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llewellyn, D.J.; Llewellyn, D.J.; Belay, K.B.; Ridgway, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to characterize the solid phase epitaxial growth of amorphized GaAs at a temperature of 260 deg C. To maximize heat transfer from the heated holder to the sample and minimize electron-irradiation induced artifacts, non-conventional methodologies were utilized for the preparation of cross-sectional samples. GaAs 3x1 mm rectangular wafers were cleaved then glued face-to-face to form a wafer stack size of 3x3 mm while maintaining the TEM region at the center. This stack was subsequently polished on the cross-section to a thickness of ∼ 200 μm. A 3 mm disc was then cut perpendicular to the cross-section using a Gatan ultrasonic cutter. The disc was polished then dimpled on both sides to a thickness of ∼ 15 μm. This was ion-beam milled at liquid nitrogen temperature to an electron-transparent layer. From a comparison of in-situ and ex-situ measurements of the recrystallization rate, the actual sample temperature during in-situ characterization was estimated to deviate by ≤ 20 deg C from that of the heated holder. The influence of electron-irradiation was found to be negligible by comparing the recrystallization rate and microstructure of irradiated and unirradiated regions of comparable thickness. Similarly, the influence of the 'thin-foil effect' was found to be negligible by comparing the recrystallization rate and microstructure of thick and thin regions, the former determined after the removal of the sample from the microscope and further ion-beam milling of tens of microns of material. In conclusion, the potential influence of artifacts during in-situ TEM can be minimized by the appropriate choice of sample preparation procedures. (authors)

  11. NiO/YSZ Reduction for SOFC/SOEC Studied In Situ by Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Agersted, Karsten; Hansen, Karin Vels

    2014-01-01

    SOFCs/SOECs are typically composed of ceramic materials, which are highly complex at the nano-scale. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) are routinely applied for studying these nano-scaled structures post mortem, but only few SOFC/SOEC studies have applied environmental T...... and constant temperature ramping rate of 1°C/min. The NiO observed in the first image at 320°C is dense. From the lower left corner a front of porous Ni is progressing until full reduction at 340°C. [Formula]...

  12. Electron microscopy in metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loretto, M.H.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review briefly the contribution which (TEM) transmission electron microscopy (including high voltage electron microscopy (HVEM)) has made to metallurgy. Since it is straightforward with modern electron microscopes to extract the crystallographic information which provides the basis for any interpretation, the major problem in most metallurgical work lies in assessing how the structure (which TEM has characterised) has arisen and which properties of the specimen can be understood in terms of this structure. Radiation damage, quenching, phase transformations, grain boundaries and plastic deformation have been the main fields in which TEM has contributed significantly. After briefly summarising the role of TEM in each field, examples of recent work will be used to indicate current TEM activity in physical metallurgy. (author)

  13. Direct in situ transmission electron microscopy observation of Al push up during early stages of the Al-induced layer exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birajdar, B.I.; Antesberger, T.; Butz, B.; Stutzmann, M.; Spiecker, E.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of Al transport during Al-induced layer exchange and crystallization of amorphous Si (a-Si) has been investigated by in situ and analytical transmission electron microscopy. Significant grain boundary realignment and coarsening of Al grains close to the Si crystallization growth front as well as push up of excess Al into the a-Si layer at distances even a few micrometers away from the crystallization front were observed. Stress-mediated diffusion of Al is postulated to explain the experimental observations.

  14. In situ observation of the impact of surface oxidation on the crystallization mechanism of GeTe phase-change thin films by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, R.; Bernier, N.; Cooper, D.; Sabbione, C.; Hippert, F.; Noé, P.

    2017-09-01

    The crystallization mechanisms of prototypical GeTe phase-change material thin films have been investigated by in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy annealing experiments. A novel sample preparation method has been developed to improve sample quality and stability during in situ annealing, enabling quantitative analysis and live recording of phase change events. Results show that for an uncapped 100 nm thick GeTe layer, exposure to air after fabrication leads to composition changes which promote heterogeneous nucleation at the oxidized surface. We also demonstrate that protecting the GeTe layer with a 10 nm SiN capping layer prevents nucleation at the surface and allows volume nucleation at a temperature 50 °C higher than the onset of crystallization in the oxidized sample. Our results have important implications regarding the integration of these materials in confined memory cells.

  15. In situ transmission electron microscopy study of the microstructural origins for the electric field-induced phenomena in ferroelectric perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hanzheng

    Ferroelectrics are important materials due to their extensive technological applications, such as non-volatile memories, field-effect transistors, ferroelectric tunneling junctions, dielectric capacitors, piezoelectric transducers, sensors and actuators. As is well known, the outstanding dielectric, piezoelectric, and ferroelectric properties of these functional oxides originate from their ferroelectric domain arrangements and the corresponding evolution under external stimuli (e.g. electric field, stress, and temperature). Electric field has been known as the most efficient stimulus to manipulate the ferroelectric domains through polarization switching and alignment. Therefore, direct observation of the dynamic process of electric field-induced domain evolution and crystal structure transformation is of significant importance to understand the microstructural mechanisms for the functional properties of ferroelectrics. In this dissertation, electric field in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique was employed to monitor the real-time evolution of the domain morphology and crystal structure during various electrical processes: (1) the initial poling process, (2) the electric field reversal process, and (3) the electrical cycling process. Two types of perovskite-structured ceramics, normal ferroelectrics and relaxor ferroelectrics, were used for this investigation. In addition to providing the microscopic insight for some well-accepted phase transformation rules, discoveries of some new or even unexpected physical phenomena were also demonstrated. For the initial poling process, microstructural origins for the piezoelectricity development in the three most promising lead-free piezoceramic systems were investigated. For the non-ergodic relaxor ferroelectric compositions ( x = 6% - 9%) in the (1-x)(Bi1/2Na 1/2)TiO3-xBaTiO3 system, well-developed piezoelectricity was realized at poling fields far below the coercive field and phase transition field. Such

  16. In-situ investigation of crack propagation in {gamma}-TiAl alloys using atomic force, focus ion beam and scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Farasat; Goeken, Mathias [Lehrstuhl Allgemeine Werkstoffeigenschaften, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Pyczak, Florian [GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht, Geesthacht (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The present study is focused on crack propagation mechanism in Ti-45Al-1Cr and Ti-45Al-5Nb alloys with lamellar microstructure. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile technique to study the crack propagation in-situ. AFM was employed to investigate the local deformations near the crack tip. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) supplements the in-situ observations and was used to get a basic understanding of the crack propagation path over larger distances.A focused ion beam (FIB) was used to investigate the structures and deformation traces underneath the surface. It is concluded that the {gamma}/{alpha}2 interfaces act as favorable sites for new interfacial crack nucleation and also for interlamellar crack propagation. Nucleation of new cracks was often preceded by the interaction of deformation twins with interfaces and also by strong shear band activity in the {gamma}-TiAl lamellae visible as significant surface topography in AFM.Mostly the underneath crack path follows the {gamma}/{alpha}2 interface similar to the situation observed at the surface. The local misorientation measured with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) shows {gamma}-lamellae as the region of high deformation as compare to neighboring {alpha}2 -lamellae around the crack tip and its surroundings.

  17. In-situ transmission electron microscopy imaging of formation and evolution of LixWO3 during lithiation of WO3 nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Kuo; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Muhua; Huang, Qianming; Wei, Jiake; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong; Wang, Enge

    2016-01-01

    The phase transition from monoclinic WO 3 to cubic Li x WO 3 during lithiation of WO 3 is one of the key features for tungsten oxide as the most used electrochromic material. Conventionally, the lithium intercalation of WO 3 has been studied by building generic layered electrochromic device combining with structural characterization and electrochemistry measurement at macro scale. In-situ transmission electron microscopy (in-situ TEM) has been proposed as a method for revealing the detailed mechanism of structural, physical, and chemical properties. Here, we use in-situ TEM method to investigate the formation and evolution of Li x WO 3 in real-time during the electrochemical lithiation of WO 3 nanowires. The dynamic lithiation process is recorded by TEM imaging, diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The WO 3 -Li x WO 3 phase boundary of reaction front has been observed at high resolution. The timeliness of crystallinity of Li x WO 3 and the intercalation channels for Li ions are also identified. Moreover, the co-existence of both polycrystalline Li-poor area and amorphous Li-rich phases of Li x WO 3 was found. Our results provide an insight into the basic lithiation process of WO 3 , which is significantly important for understanding the electrochromic mechanism of tungsten oxide.

  18. National Center for Electron Microscopy users' guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) in the Materials and Molecular Research Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is a high voltage electron microscope facility for ultra-high resolution or dynamic in-situ studies. This guide describes the instruments and their specifications, support instrumentation, and user policies. Advice as to travel and accommodations is provided in the guide. (FI)

  19. Superconductivity and electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, P.W.; Valdre, U.

    1977-01-01

    In this review article, two aspects of the role of superconductivity in electron microscopy are examined: (i) the development of superconducting devices (mainly lenses) and their incorporation in electron microscopes; (ii) the development of electron microscope techniques for studying fundamental and technological problems associated with superconductivity. The first part opens with a brief account of the relevant properties of conventional lenses, after which the various types of superconducting lenses are described and their properties compared. The relative merits and inconveniences of superconducting and conventional lenses are examined, particular attention being paid to the spherical and chromatic aberration coefficients at accelerating voltages above a megavolt. This part closes with a survey of the various microscope designs that have been built or proposed, incorporating superconducting components. In the second part, some methods that have been or might be used in the study of superconductivity in the electron microscope are described. A brief account of the types of application for which they are suitable is given. (author)

  20. Electron microscopy (nonbiological)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The period 1982-1985, which is covered by this review, has seen major advances in the capabilities of the commercially available instruments. The new electron microscopes operating in the range of 300-400 keV have provided important improvements in the resolution available and in the possibilities for microanalysis of very small specimen areas. Correspondingly there has been a broadening in the range of possible applications of the techniques. Electron microscopy has become a much more powerful tool for studies of semiconductors and catalysts, for example, and offers promise of a major revolution in surface science. The major industrial laboratories, in particular, are investing in million-dollar instruments and in the highly skilled scientists needed to run them because the capabilities of the new instruments are seen to have immediate practical applications to current industrial research. Unfortunately all of the new instruments and most of the skilled users come from overseas. The American instrument industry, although showing some limited signs of life, is not yet in a position to compete in this lucrative market and the training of electron optics specialists in this country is far from meeting the demand. The increased sophistication required for both the operation of the instruments and the interpretation of the observation requires that the quality as well as the quantity of trainees must be improved. 62 references

  1. Microstructural changes in CdSe-coated ZnO nanowires evaluated by in situ annealing in transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majidi, Hasti; Baxter, Jason B; Winkler, Christopher R; Taheri, Mitra L

    2012-01-01

    We report on the crystallite growth and phase change of electrodeposited CdSe coatings on ZnO nanowires during annealing. Both in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal that the nanocrystal size increases from ∼3 to ∼10 nm upon annealing at 350 °C for 1 h and then to more than 30 nm during another 1 h at 400 °C, exhibiting two distinct growth regimes. Nanocrystal growth occurs together with a structural change from zinc blende to wurtzite. The structural transition begins at 350 °C, which results in the formation of stacking faults. Increased crystallite size, comparable to the coating thickness, can improve charge separation in extremely thin absorber solar cells. We demonstrate a nearly two-fold improvement in power conversion efficiency upon annealing. (paper)

  2. Microstructural changes in CdSe-coated ZnO nanowires evaluated by in situ annealing in transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Hasti; Winkler, Christopher R.; Taheri, Mitra L.; Baxter, Jason B.

    2012-07-01

    We report on the crystallite growth and phase change of electrodeposited CdSe coatings on ZnO nanowires during annealing. Both in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal that the nanocrystal size increases from ˜3 to ˜10 nm upon annealing at 350 °C for 1 h and then to more than 30 nm during another 1 h at 400 °C, exhibiting two distinct growth regimes. Nanocrystal growth occurs together with a structural change from zinc blende to wurtzite. The structural transition begins at 350 °C, which results in the formation of stacking faults. Increased crystallite size, comparable to the coating thickness, can improve charge separation in extremely thin absorber solar cells. We demonstrate a nearly two-fold improvement in power conversion efficiency upon annealing.

  3. Visualising reacting single atoms under controlled conditions: Advances in atomic resolution in situ Environmental (Scanning) Transmission Electron Microscopy (E(S)TEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyes, Edward D.; Gai, Pratibha L.

    2014-02-01

    Advances in atomic resolution Environmental (Scanning) Transmission Electron Microscopy (E(S)TEM) for probing gas-solid catalyst reactions in situ at the atomic level under controlled reaction conditions of gas environment and temperature are described. The recent development of the ESTEM extends the capability of the ETEM by providing the direct visualisation of single atoms and the atomic structure of selected solid state heterogeneous catalysts in their working states in real-time. Atomic resolution E(S)TEM provides a deeper understanding of the dynamic atomic processes at the surface of solids and their mechanisms of operation. The benefits of atomic resolution-E(S)TEM to science and technology include new knowledge leading to improved technological processes with substantial economic benefits, improved healthcare, reductions in energy needs and the management of environmental waste generation. xml:lang="fr"

  4. Determination of crystal growth rates during rapid solidification of polycrystalline aluminum by nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution in situ transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zweiacker, K., E-mail: Kai@zweiacker.org; Liu, C.; Wiezorek, J. M. K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, 648 Benedum Hall, 3700 OHara Street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States); McKeown, J. T.; LaGrange, T.; Reed, B. W.; Campbell, G. H. [Materials Science Division, Physical and Life Science Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2016-08-07

    In situ investigations of rapid solidification in polycrystalline Al thin films were conducted using nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Differences in crystal growth rates and asymmetries in melt pool development were observed as the heat extraction geometry was varied by controlling the proximity of the laser-pulse irradiation and the associated induced melt pools to the edge of the transmission electron microscopy support grid, which acts as a large heat sink. Experimental parameters have been established to maximize the reproducibility of the material response to the laser-pulse-related heating and to ensure that observations of the dynamical behavior of the metal are free from artifacts, leading to accurate interpretations and quantifiable measurements with improved precision. Interface migration rate measurements revealed solidification velocities that increased consistently from ∼1.3 m s{sup −1} to ∼2.5 m s{sup −1} during the rapid solidification process of the Al thin films. Under the influence of an additional large heat sink, increased crystal growth rates as high as 3.3 m s{sup −1} have been measured. The in situ experiments also provided evidence for development of a partially melted, two-phase region prior to the onset of rapid solidification facilitated crystal growth. Using the experimental observations and associated measurements as benchmarks, finite-element modeling based calculations of the melt pool evolution after pulsed laser irradiation have been performed to obtain estimates of the temperature evolution in the thin films.

  5. Pseudoelastic deformation and size effects during in situ transmission electron microscopy tensile testing of NiTi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Manchuraju, S.; Kroeger, A.; Somsen, C.; Dlouhý, Antonín; Eggeler, G.; Sarosi, P. M.; Anderson, P. M.; Mills, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 60, 6-7 (2012), s. 2770-2777 ISSN 1359-6454 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : martensitic phase transformation * In Situ TEM * Shape memory alloys * Crystallographic theory of martensite Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 3.941, year: 2012

  6. Direct visualization of initial SEI morphology and growth kinetics during lithium deposition by in situ electrochemical transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacci, Robert L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science adn Technology Division; Dudney, Nancy J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science adn Technology Division; More, Karren L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science; Parent, Lucas R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate; Arslan, Ilke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate; Browning, Nigel D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate; Unocic, Raymond R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science

    2013-12-20

    Deposition of Li is a major safety concern existing in Li-ion secondary batteries. We perform the first in situ high spatial resolution measurement coupled with real-time quantitative electrochemistry to characterize SEI formation on gold using a standard battery electrolyte. We also demonstrate that a dendritic SEI forms prior to Li deposition and that it remains on the surface after Li electrodissolution.

  7. Direct transmission electron microscopy observations of martensitic transformations in Ni-rich NiTi single crystals during in situ cooling and straining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, A.; Dziaszyk, S.; Frenzel, J.; Somsen, Ch.; Dlouhy, A.; Eggeler, G.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate martensitic transformations using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in compression aged Ni-rich NiTi single crystals with one family of Ni 4 Ti 3 precipitates. Small cylinders from a Ni-rich NiTi single crystal with a Ni content of 51.0 at.% were compression aged at 550 deg. C in the [1 1 1] B2 direction for different aging times. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) investigations show that a three-step martensitic transformation (three DSC peaks on cooling from the high temperature regime) can be observed for aging times of 4 ks. In situ cooling TEM investigations reveal that the first peak on cooling is associated with a transformation from B2 to R-phase, starting from all precipitate/matrix interfaces. On further cooling, the B19'-phase appears and grows along precipitate/matrix interfaces (second step). With further decreasing temperature, the remaining R-phase between the precipitates transforms to B19' (third peak). In situ TEM straining experiments of B2 above the martensitic start temperature reveal that first some microstructural regions directly transform in microscopic burst like events from B2 to B19'. On further straining, the B19'-phase grows along precipitate/matrix interfaces. However, no formation of R-phase precedes the formation of stress-induced B19'

  8. The Reactivity and Structural Dynamics of Supported Metal Nanoclusters Using Electron Microscopy, in situ X-Ray Spectroscopy, Electronic Structure Theories, and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Judith C.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Johnson, Duane; Frenkel, Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    The distinguishing feature of our collaborative program of study is the focus it brings to emergent phenomena originating from the unique structural/electronic environments found in nanoscale materials. We exploit and develop frontier methods of atomic-scale materials characterization based on electron microscopy (Yang) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (Frenkel) that are in turn coupled innately with advanced first principles theory and methods of computational modeling (Johnson). In the past year we have made significant experimental advances that have led to important new understandings of the structural dynamics of what are unquestionably the most important classes of heterogeneous catalysts-the materials used to both produce and mitigate the consequences of the use of liquid hydrocarbon fuels.

  9. Diffusion processes in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys studied by mechanical spectroscopy and in situ transmission electron microscopy at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, M.L.; Ibarra, A.; Lopez-Echarri, A.; Bocanegra, E.H.; San Juan, J.

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the mobility of defects in the frozen β phase of the Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys by mechanical spectroscopy as a function of temperature. In parallel, we have characterized the microstructure and their evolution with over-heating treatments. Thermal treatments have been performed in situ in a transmission electron microscope by using a heating stage. Internal friction and modulus defect measurements have been correlated with the microstructural observations by transmission electron microscopy. We discuss the behavior of the internal friction spectra, corresponding to over-heating in the β-phase, and propose microscopic mechanisms responsible for the evolution when the material is not in thermal equilibrium. In particular, the dislocations became mobile in the temperature range between 750 and 800 K where the L2 1 atomic order changes to the B2 order. A relaxation peak has been observed in the equilibrium β phase domain, which has been examined in detail by isothermal measurements as a function of frequency. The activation enthalpy of the peak has been determined to be 3.05 ± 0.1 eV, and possible microscopic mechanisms responsible for the peak are discussed

  10. In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the interfacial reaction between Ni and Al during rapid heating in a nanocalorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grapes, Michael D., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Material Measurement Laboratory, Materials Measurement Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Woll, Karsten [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Institute of Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); LaVan, David A., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Material Measurement Laboratory, Materials Measurement Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Weihs, Timothy P., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Al/Ni formation reaction is highly exothermic and of both scientific and technological significance. In this report, we study the evolution of intermetallic phases in this reaction at a heating rate of 830 K/s. 100-nm-thick Al/Ni bilayers were deposited onto nanocalorimeter sensors that enable the measurement of temperature and heat flow during rapid heating. Time-resolved transmission electron diffraction patterns captured simultaneously with thermal measurements allow us to identify the intermetallic phases present and reconstruct the phase transformation sequence as a function of time and temperature. The results show a mostly unaltered phase transformation sequence compared to lower heating rates.

  11. Understanding the Thermal Stability of Palladium-Platinum Core-Shell Nanocrystals by In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vara, Madeline; Roling, Luke T; Wang, Xue; Elnabawy, Ahmed O; Hood, Zachary D; Chi, Miaofang; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2017-05-23

    Core-shell nanocrystals offer many advantages for heterogeneous catalysis, including precise control over both the surface structure and composition, as well as reduction in loading for rare and costly metals. Although many catalytic processes are operated at elevated temperatures, the adverse impacts of heating on the shape and structure of core-shell nanocrystals are yet to be understood. In this work, we used ex situ heating experiments to demonstrate that Pd@Pt 4L core-shell nanoscale cubes and octahedra are promising for catalytic applications at temperatures up to 400 °C. We also used in situ transmission electron microscopy to monitor the thermal stability of the core-shell nanocrystals in real time. Our results demonstrate a facet dependence for the thermal stability in terms of shape and composition. Specifically, the cubes enclosed by {100} facets readily deform shape at a temperature 300 °C lower than that of the octahedral counterparts enclosed by {111} facets. A reversed trend is observed for composition, as alloying between the Pd core and the Pt shell of an octahedron occurs at a temperature 200 °C lower than that for the cubic counterpart. Density functional theory calculations provide atomic-level explanations for the experimentally observed behaviors, demonstrating that the barriers for edge reconstruction determine the relative ease of shape deformation for cubes compared to octahedra. The opposite trend for alloying of the core-shell structure can be attributed to a higher propensity for subsurface Pt vacancy formation in octahedra than in cubes.

  12. Coated Glass Slides TACAS Are Applicable to Heat-Assisted Immunostaining and In Situ Hybridization at the Electron Microscopy Level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Takahiro; Onouchi, Takanori; Shiogama, Kazuya; Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Inada, Ken-ichi; Yu, Fuxun; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Morita, Koichi; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Mahara, Fumihiko; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    We performed pre-embedding electron microscopic study for visualizing the antigen and genome of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) virus in the cytoplasm of macrophages of the human splenic red pulp, both requesting preheating treatment of sections. To pursue this, coated glass slides with unique characteristics are needed. Namely, during staining they must prevent detaching off sections, but after staining the sections must be transferred to epoxy resin. Aminopropyltriexoxysilane-coated glass slides, widely used for immunostaining, were resistant to transfer to epoxy resin. In contrast, coated glass slides designated as Thinlayer Advanced Cytology Assay System (TACAS) were suitable for this purpose. The technique is also applicable to the coated glass slide-requiring cytology practice, in which immunocytochemical evaluation is needed after cell transfer to another glass slide

  13. Intercalation-etching of graphene on Pt(111) in H2 and O2 observed by in-situ low energy electron microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei; Wei; Caixia; Meng; Qiang; Fu; Xinhe; Bao

    2017-01-01

    Graphene layers are often exposed to gaseous environments in their synthesis and application processes, and interactions of graphene surfaces with molecules particularly H2 and O2 are of great importance in their physico-chemical properties. In this work, etching of graphene overlayers on Pt(111) in H2 and O2 atmospheres were investigated by in-situ low energy electron microscopy. Significant graphene etching was observed in 10-5 Torr H2 above 1023 K, which occurs simultaneously at graphene island edges and interiors with a determined reaction barrier at 5.7 eV. The similar etching phenomena were found in 10.7 Torr O2 above 973 K, while only island edges were reacted between 823 and 923 K. We suggest that etching of graphene edges is facilitated by Pt-aided hydrogenation or oxidation of edge carbon atoms while intercalation-etching is attributed to etching at the interiors at high temperatures. The different findings with etching in O2 and H2 depend on competitive adsorption, desorption, and diffusion processes of O and H atoms on Pt surface, as well as intercalation at the graphene/Pt interface.

  14. In situ investigation of explosive crystallization in a-Ge: Experimental determination of the interface response function using dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolova, Liliya; MacLeod, Jennifer M.; Ibrahim, Heide; Stern, Mark J.; Siwick, Bradley J.; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; LaGrange, Thomas; Rosei, Federico

    2014-01-01

    The crystallization of amorphous semiconductors is a strongly exothermic process. Once initiated the release of latent heat can be sufficient to drive a self-sustaining crystallization front through the material in a manner that has been described as explosive. Here, we perform a quantitative in situ study of explosive crystallization in amorphous germanium using dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Direct observations of the speed of the explosive crystallization front as it evolves along a laser-imprinted temperature gradient are used to experimentally determine the complete interface response function (i.e., the temperature-dependent front propagation speed) for this process, which reaches a peak of 16 m/s. Fitting to the Frenkel-Wilson kinetic law demonstrates that the diffusivity of the material locally/immediately in advance of the explosive crystallization front is inconsistent with those of a liquid phase. This result suggests a modification to the liquid-mediated mechanism commonly used to describe this process that replaces the phase change at the leading amorphous-liquid interface with a change in bonding character (from covalent to metallic) occurring in the hot amorphous material

  15. Scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    1970-05-15

    The JSM-11 scanning electron microscope at CRNL has been used extensively for topographical studies of oxidized metals, fracture surfaces, entomological and biological specimens. A non-dispersive X-ray attachment permits the microanalysis of the surface features. Techniques for the production of electron channeling patterns have been developed. (author)

  16. Electronic Blending in Virtual Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybury, Terrence S.; Farah, Camile S.

    2010-01-01

    Virtual microscopy (VM) is a relatively new technology that transforms the computer into a microscope. In essence, VM allows for the scanning and transfer of glass slides from light microscopy technology to the digital environment of the computer. This transition is also a function of the change from print knowledge to electronic knowledge, or as…

  17. Investigation of the growth and in situ heating transmission electron microscopy analysis of Ag2S-catalyzed ZnS nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Jong Gu; Song, Junghyun; Bae, Tae-Sung; Kim, Kyou-Hyun; Lee, Young-Seak; Pang, Yoonsoo; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Chung, Hee-Suk

    2018-04-01

    We investigated the semiconductor-catalyzed formation of semiconductor nanowires (NWs) - silver sulfide (Ag2S)-catalyzed zinc sulfide (ZnS) NWs - based on a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism through metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with a Ag thin film. The Ag2S-catalyzed ZnS NWs were confirmed to have a wurtzite structure with a width and length in the range of ∼30 nm to ∼80 nm and ∼1 μm, respectively. Using extensive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses from plane and cross-sectional viewpoints, the ZnS NWs were determined to have a c-axis, [0001] growth direction. In addition, the catalyst at the top of the ZnS NWs was determined to consist of a Ag2S phase. To support the Ag2S-catalyzed growth of the ZnS NWs by a VLS reaction, an in situ heating TEM experiment was conducted from room temperature to 840 °C. During the experiment, the melting of the Ag2S catalyst in the direction of the ZnS NWs was first observed at approximately 480 °C along with the formation of a carbon (C) shell. Subsequently, the Ag2S catalyst melted completely into the ZnS NWs at approximately 825 °C. As the temperature further increased, the Ag2S and ZnS NWs continuously melted and vaporized up to 840 °C, leaving only the C shell behind. Finally, a possible growth mechanism was proposed based on the structural and chemical investigations.

  18. On some aspects of high voltage electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouffrey, B.; Trinquier, J.

    1987-01-01

    The present paper deals with high voltage electron microscopy (HVEM). It is an overview on this domain due to the pionneer work of G. Dupouy which has permitted to perform a new kind of electron microscopy. Since this time, HVEM has shown its interest in high resolution, irradiations, chemical analysis, in situ experiments

  19. High-resolution electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Spence, John C H

    2013-01-01

    This new fourth edition of the standard text on atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) retains previous material on the fundamentals of electron optics and aberration correction, linear imaging theory (including wave aberrations to fifth order) with partial coherence, and multiple-scattering theory. Also preserved are updated earlier sections on practical methods, with detailed step-by-step accounts of the procedures needed to obtain the highest quality images of atoms and molecules using a modern TEM or STEM electron microscope. Applications sections have been updated - these include the semiconductor industry, superconductor research, solid state chemistry and nanoscience, and metallurgy, mineralogy, condensed matter physics, materials science and material on cryo-electron microscopy for structural biology. New or expanded sections have been added on electron holography, aberration correction, field-emission guns, imaging filters, super-resolution methods, Ptychography, Ronchigrams, tomogr...

  20. Correlated Light Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjollema, Klaas A.; Schnell, Ulrike; Kuipers, Jeroen; Kalicharan, Ruby; Giepmans, Ben N. G.; MullerReichert, T; Verkade, P

    2012-01-01

    Understanding where, when, and how biomolecules (inter)act is crucial to uncover fundamental mechanisms in cell biology. Recent developments in fluorescence light microscopy (FLM) allow protein imaging in living cells and at the near molecular level. However, fluorescence microscopy only reveals

  1. In situ transmission electron microscopy studies of microstructure evolution in Ba(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3-x(Ba0.7Ca0.3)TiO3 piezoceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakhozheva, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to understand the microstructural features which contribute to the strong electromechanical properties of the lead-free Ba (Zr 0.2 Ti 0.8 )O 3 -x(Ba 0.7 Ca 0.3 )TiO 3 (BZT-xBCT) piezoelectric ceramic. Detailed conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies on a broad variety of BZT - xBCT were performed in order to demonstrate the composition dependent structural changes. Moreover, several in situ TEM techniques, including in situ hot- and cold-stage, in situ electric field and in situ electric field with simultaneous cooling, were successfully applied in order to monitor the domain morphology evolution in real time. By means of in situ temperature dependent TEM experiments it was shown that during rhombohedral → orthorhombic → tetragonal phase transition the domain morphology changed according to the crystal structure present. During in situ electric field investigations the displacement of the domain walls and changes in the domain configuration during electrical poling were observed, which indicates a high extrinsic contribution to the piezoelectric response in all BZT - xBCT compositions studied. From the results of in situ electric field TEM experiments with simultaneous cooling, we obtained experimental evidence that the further the composition deviates from the polymorphic phase boundary, the higher the electric field required to fully pole the material.

  2. Illuminating Electron Microscopy of Photocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalca, Filippo

    Photocatalysts are of fundamental interest for sustainable energy research because of their wide range of applications and great potential for state of the art and future usages [1]. By means of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) it is possible to give a deep insight in the structure, composi...

  3. Transmission electron microscopy of bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, Vincent; Niehof, Anneke; Tigchelaar-Gutter, Wikky; Beertsen, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes procedures to process mineralized tissues obtained from different sources for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Methods for fixation, resin embedding, staining of semi-thin sections and ultrathin sections are presented. In addition, attention will be paid to processing

  4. Structural characterization and gas reactions of small metal particles by high resolution in-situ TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and TED (Transmission Electron Diffraction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, K.

    1987-01-01

    The detection and size analysis of small metal particles supported on amorphous substrates becomes increasingly difficult when the particle size approaches that of the phase contrast background structures of the support. An approach of digital image analysis, involving Fourier transformation of the original image, filtering, and image reconstruction was studied with respect to the likelihood of unambiguously detecting particles of less than 1 nm diameter on amorphous substrates from a single electron micrograph.

  5. Structural Characterization and Gas Reactions of Small Metal Particles by High Resolution In-situ TEM and TED. [Transmission Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, K.

    1985-01-01

    A commercial electron microscope with flat-plate upper pole piece configuration of the objective lens and top entry specimen introduction was modified to obtain 5 x 10 to the minus 10th power mbar pressure at the site of the specimen while maintaining the convenience of a specimen airlock system that allows operation in the 10 to the 10th power mbar range within 15 minutes after specimen change. The specimen chamber contains three wire evaporation sources, a specimen heater, and facilities for oxygen or hydrogen plasma treatment to clean as-introduced specimens. Evacuation is achieved by dural differential pumping, with fine entrance and exit apertures for the electron beam. With the microscope operating at .000001 mbar, the first differential pumping stage features a high-speed cryopump operating in a stainless steel chamber that can be mildly baked and reaches 1 x 10 to the minus 8th power mbar. The second stage, containing the evaporation sources and a custom ionization gauge within 10 cm from the specimen, is a rigorously uncompromised all-metal uhv-system that is bakable to above 200 C throughout and is pumped with an 80-liter ion pump. Design operating pressures and image quality (resolution of metal particles smaller than 1 nm in size) was achieved.

  6. Bridging fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    Development of new fluorescent probes and fluorescence microscopes has led to new ways to study cell biology. With the emergence of specialized microscopy units at most universities and research centers, the use of these techniques is well within reach for a broad research community. A major

  7. CNNs for electron microscopy segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    García-Amorena García, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of Biomedicine, mitochondria are known to play an important role in neural function. Recent studies show mitochondrial morphology to be crucial to cellular physiology and synaptic function, and a link between mitochondrial defects and neuro-degenerative diseases is strongly suspected. Electron microscopy (EM), with its very high resolution in all three directions, is one of the key tools to look more closely into these tissues, but the huge amounts of data it produces m...

  8. In-situ realtime monitoring of nanoscale gold electroplating using micro-electro-mechanical systems liquid cell operating in transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egawa, Minoru; Fujita, Hiroyuki [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Ishida, Tadashi, E-mail: ishida.t.ai@m.titech.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 225-8503 (Japan); Jalabert, Laurent [LIMMS/CNRS-IIS (UMI 2820), Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); CNRS, LAAS, 7 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31400 Toulouse, France and University of Toulouse, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2016-01-11

    The dynamics of nanoscale electroplating between gold electrodes was investigated using a microfabricated liquid cell mounted on a scanning transmission electron microscope. The electroplating was recorded in-situ for 10 min with a spatial resolution higher than 6 nm. At the beginning of the electroplating, gold spike-like structures of about 50 nm in size grew from an electrode, connected gold nanoclusters around them, and form three dimensional nanoscale structures. We visualized the elementary process of the gold electroplating, and believe that the results lead to the deeper understanding of electroplating at the nanoscale.

  9. In-situ realtime monitoring of nanoscale gold electroplating using micro-electro-mechanical systems liquid cell operating in transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egawa, Minoru; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Ishida, Tadashi; Jalabert, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of nanoscale electroplating between gold electrodes was investigated using a microfabricated liquid cell mounted on a scanning transmission electron microscope. The electroplating was recorded in-situ for 10 min with a spatial resolution higher than 6 nm. At the beginning of the electroplating, gold spike-like structures of about 50 nm in size grew from an electrode, connected gold nanoclusters around them, and form three dimensional nanoscale structures. We visualized the elementary process of the gold electroplating, and believe that the results lead to the deeper understanding of electroplating at the nanoscale

  10. A Discovery of Strong Metal-Support Bonding in Nanoengineered Au-Fe3O4 Dumbbell-like Nanoparticles by in Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chang Wan; Choksi, Tej; Milligan, Cory; Majumdar, Paulami; Manto, Michael; Cui, Yanran; Sang, Xiahan; Unocic, Raymond R; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Wang, Chao; Ribeiro, Fabio H; Greeley, Jeffrey; Ortalan, Volkan

    2017-08-09

    The strength of metal-support bonding in heterogeneous catalysts determines their thermal stability, therefore, a tremendous amount of effort has been expended to understand metal-support interactions. Herein, we report the discovery of an anomalous "strong metal-support bonding" between gold nanoparticles and "nano-engineered" Fe 3 O 4 substrates by in situ microscopy. During in situ vacuum annealing of Au-Fe 3 O 4 dumbbell-like nanoparticles, synthesized by the epitaxial growth of nano-Fe 3 O 4 on Au nanoparticles, the gold nanoparticles transform into the gold thin films and wet the surface of nano-Fe 3 O 4 , as the surface reduction of nano-Fe 3 O 4 proceeds. This phenomenon results from a unique coupling of the size-and shape-dependent high surface reducibility of nano-Fe 3 O 4 and the extremely strong adhesion between Au and the reduced Fe 3 O 4 . This strong metal-support bonding reveals the significance of controlling the metal oxide support size and morphology for optimizing metal-support bonding and ultimately for the development of improved catalysts and functional nanostructures.

  11. Scanning electron microscopy and micro-analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisset, F.; Repoux, L.; Ruste, J.; Grillon, F.; Robaut, F.

    2008-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the related micro-analyses are involved in extremely various domains, from the academic environments to the industrial ones. The overall theoretical bases, the main technical characteristics, and some complements of information about practical usage and maintenance are developed in this book. high-vacuum and controlled-vacuum electron microscopes are thoroughly presented, as well as the last generation of EDS (energy dispersive spectrometer) and WDS (wavelength dispersive spectrometer) micro-analysers. Beside these main topics, other analysis or observation techniques are approached, such as EBSD (electron backscattering diffraction), 3-D imaging, FIB (focussed ion beams), Monte-Carlo simulations, in-situ tests etc.. This book, in French language, is the only one which treats of this subject in such an exhaustive way. It represents the actualized and totally updated version of a previous edition of 1979. It gathers the lectures given in 2006 at the summer school of Saint Martin d'Heres (France). Content: 1 - electron-matter interactions; 2 - characteristic X-radiation, Bremsstrahlung; 3 - electron guns in SEM; 4 - elements of electronic optics; 5 - vacuum techniques; 6 - detectors used in SEM; 7 - image formation and optimization in SEM; 7a - SEM practical instructions for use; 8 - controlled pressure microscopy; 8a - applications; 9 - energy selection X-spectrometers (energy dispersive spectrometers - EDS); 9a - EDS analysis; 9b - X-EDS mapping; 10 - technological aspects of WDS; 11 - processing of EDS and WDS spectra; 12 - X-microanalysis quantifying methods; 12a - quantitative WDS microanalysis of very light elements; 13 - statistics: precision and detection limits in microanalysis; 14 - analysis of stratified samples; 15 - crystallography applied to EBSD; 16 - EBSD: history, principle and applications; 16a - EBSD analysis; 17 - Monte Carlo simulation; 18 - insulating samples in SEM and X-ray microanalysis; 18a - insulating

  12. Electron holography for polymer microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    Electron holography provides a radically new approach to the problem of imaging objects such as macromolecules, which exhibit little or no contrast when viewed in the conventional transmission electron microscope (TEM). This is overcome in electron holography by using the macromolecule as a phase object. Computer reconstruction of the hologram then allows the phase to be viewed as an image, and amplified. Holography requires a TEM with a field emission gun, and with an electro-static biprism to produce the interference pattern. The hologram requires a similar radiation dose to conventional microscopy but many different images (e.g. a through focal series) can be extracted from the same hologram. Further developments of the technique promise to combine high contrast imaging of the bulk of the macromolecule together with high spatial resolution imaging of surface detail

  13. In Situ High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Observation of Sn Nanoparticles on SnO2 Nanotubes Under Lithiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Jun Young; Chang, Joon Ha; Kim, Sung Joo; Kim, Chanhoon; Seo, Hyeon Kook; Shin, Jae Won; Yuk, Jong Min; Lee, Jeong Yong; Kim, Il-Doo

    2017-12-01

    We trace Sn nanoparticles (NPs) produced from SnO2 nanotubes (NTs) during lithiation initialized by high energy e-beam irradiation. The growth dynamics of Sn NPs is visualized in liquid electrolytes by graphene liquid cell transmission electron microscopy. The observation reveals that Sn NPs grow on the surface of SnO2 NTs via coalescence and the final shape of agglomerated NPs is governed by surface energy of the Sn NPs and the interfacial energy between Sn NPs and SnO2 NTs. Our result will likely benefit more rational material design of the ideal interface for facile ion insertion.

  14. Electron Microscopy of Intracellular Protozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-20

    Classification) " ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF INTRACELLULAR PROTOZOA 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Aikawa, Masamichi 13a. TYPE OF REPORT I13b. TIME COVERED 114...authors suggest that anti-CS protein antibody is important in reducing the prevalence of malaria with increasing age among persons in such areas and... Hygine 33, 220-226. 0Giudice, G.D., Engers, H.D., Tougne, C., Biro, S.S., Weiss, N., Verdini, A.S., Pessi, A., Degremont, A.A., Freyvogel, T.A., Lambert

  15. In-situ study of cascade defects in silver by simultaneous transmission electron microscopy and electrical resistivity measurements at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haga, K.; King, W.E.; Merkle, K.L.; Meshii, M.

    1985-12-01

    A helium-cooled double-tilt specimen stage for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with the capability of simultaneous electrical resistivity measurements was constructed and used to study defect-production, migration, clustering and recovery processes in ion-irradiated silver. Vacuum-evaporated thin film specimens were irradiated with 1 MeV Kr + -ions up to a dose of 4.0 x 10 10 ions/cm 2 , at T = 10 0 K in the microscope, using the HVEM-tandem accelerator ion beam interface system in the Argonne National Laboratory Electron Microscopy Center. Cascade defect formation during ion bombardment at the low temperature was directly observed both by TEM and electrical resistivity measurements. Ion bombardment created groups of defect clusters with strong strain fields which gave rise to TEM contrast. The specimen resistivity was increased by 16% during the irradiation. Subsequent microstructural changes and resistivity recovery during isochronal annealing were monitored up to room temperature. 58.3% of the irradiation induced resistivity was recovered, while significant reduction in the size of black spot defect clusters was observed by TEM. A small fraction of clusters disappeared, while no nucleation of new defect clusters was observed

  16. Electron Microscopy Society of Southern Africa : proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyman, H.C.; Coetzee, J.; Coubrough, R.I.

    1987-01-01

    The proceedings of the 26th annual conference of the Electron Microscopy Society of Southern Africa are presented. Papers were presented on the following topics: techniques and instrumentation used in electron microscopy, and applications of electron microscopy in the life sciences, including applications in medicine, zoology, botany and microbiology. The use of electron microscopy in the physical sciences was also discussed. Separate abstracts were prepared for seven of the papers presented. The remaining papers were considered outside the subject scope of INIS

  17. In situ observation of Cu-Ni alloy nanoparticle formation by X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy: Influence of Cu/Ni ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard; Chiarello, Gian Luca

    2014-01-01

    Silica-supported, bimetallic Cu-Ni nanomaterials were prepared with different ratios of Cu to Ni by incipient wetness impregnation without a specific calcination step before reduction. Different in situ characterization techniques, in particular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray...... diffraction (XRD), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), were applied to follow the reduction and alloying process of Cu-Ni nanoparticles on silica. In situ reduction of Cu-Ni samples with structural characterization by combined synchrotron XRD and XAS reveals a strong interaction between Cu and Ni species......, which results in improved reducibility of the Ni species compared with monometallic Ni. At high Ni concentrations silica-supported Cu-Ni alloys form a homogeneous solid solution of Cu and Ni, whereas at lower Ni contents Cu and Ni are partly segregated and form metallic Cu and Cu-Ni alloy phases. Under...

  18. Quantitative analysis of stress-induced martensites by in situ transmission electron microscopy superelastic tests in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, M.L.; Ibarra, A.; Caillard, D.; San Juan, J.

    2010-01-01

    Stress-induced martensite nucleation and further growing, in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys, have been studied during in situ superelastic tests in the transmission electron microscope. Two kinds of martensite, β 3 ' and γ 3 ' , are induced and can coexist under stress, both exhibiting in a high density of stacking faults. The interface plane and the orientation relationships between the different variants of such martensites have been determined, and the atomic configurations of the lattices across the interface have been described. Finally, in light of the results, selection rules for the stress-induced promoted martensites at the nano-scale have been established, being determined by the shear direction and the basal plane of the martensite lattice.

  19. Correlative Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Doory; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Sigal, Yaron M.; Babcock, Hazen P.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence light microscopy and electron microscopy allows the imaging of spatial distributions of specific biomolecules in the context of cellular ultrastructure. Recent development of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows the location of molecules to be determined with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. However, correlative super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) still remains challenging because the optimal specimen preparation and imaging conditions for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and EM are often not compatible. Here, we have developed several experiment protocols for correlative stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and EM methods, both for un-embedded samples by applying EM-specific sample preparations after STORM imaging and for embedded and sectioned samples by optimizing the fluorescence under EM fixation, staining and embedding conditions. We demonstrated these methods using a variety of cellular targets. PMID:25874453

  20. Electron microscopy and forensic practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrlý, Marek; Turková, Ivana

    2013-05-01

    Electron microanalysis in forensic practice ranks among basic applications used in investigation of traces (latents, stains, etc.) from crime scenes. Applying electron microscope allows for rapid screening and receiving initial information for a wide range of traces. SEM with EDS/WDS makes it possible to observe topography surface and morphology samples and examination of chemical components. Physical laboratory of the Institute of Criminalistics Prague use SEM especially for examination of inorganic samples, rarely for biology and other material. Recently, possibilities of electron microscopy have been extended considerably using dual systems with focused ion beam. These systems are applied mainly in study of inner micro and nanoparticles , thin layers (intersecting lines in graphical forensic examinations, analysis of layers of functional glass, etc.), study of alloys microdefects, creating 3D particles and aggregates models, etc. Automated mineralogical analyses are a great asset to analysis of mineral phases, particularly soils, similarly it holds for cathode luminescence, predominantly colour one and precise quantitative measurement of their spectral characteristics. Among latest innovations that are becoming to appear also at ordinary laboratories are TOF - SIMS systems and micro Raman spectroscopy with a resolution comparable to EDS/WDS analysis (capable of achieving similar level as through EDS/WDS analysis).

  1. In situ transmission electron microscopy observation of pulverization of aluminum nanowires and evolution of the thin surface Al2O3 layers during lithiation-delithiation cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Hudak, Nicholas S; Huber, Dale L; Limmer, Steven J; Sullivan, John P; Huang, Jian Yu

    2011-10-12

    Lithiation-delithiation cycles of individual aluminum nanowires (NWs) with naturally oxidized Al(2)O(3) surface layers (thickness 4-5 nm) were conducted in situ in a transmission electron microscope. Surprisingly, the lithiation was always initiated from the surface Al(2)O(3) layer, forming a stable Li-Al-O glass tube with a thickness of about 6-10 nm wrapping around the NW core. After lithiation of the surface Al(2)O(3) layer, lithiation of the inner Al core took place, which converted the single crystal Al to a polycrystalline LiAl alloy, with a volume expansion of about 100%. The Li-Al-O glass tube survived the 100% volume expansion, by enlarging through elastic and plastic deformation, acting as a solid electrolyte with exceptional mechanical robustness and ion conduction. Voids were formed in the Al NWs during the initial delithiation step and grew continuously with each subsequent delithiation, leading to pulverization of the Al NWs to isolated nanoparticles confined inside the Li-Al-O tube. There was a corresponding loss of capacity with each delithiation step when arrays of NWs were galvonostatically cycled. The results provide important insight into the degradation mechanism of lithium-alloy electrodes and into recent reports about the performance improvement of lithium ion batteries by atomic layer deposition of Al(2)O(3) onto the active materials or electrodes.

  2. In situ investigation of ion-induced dewetting of a thin iron-oxide film on silicon by high resolution scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amirthapandian, S. [Institut fuer Halbleiteroptik und Funktionelle Grenzflaechen, Universitaet Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Material Physics Division, Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Schuchart, F.; Garmatter, D.; Bolse, W. [Institut fuer Halbleiteroptik und Funktionelle Grenzflaechen, Universitaet Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Using our new in situ high resolution scanning electron microscope, which is integrated into the UNILAC ion beamline at the Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany, we investigated the swift heavy ion induced dewetting of a thin iron oxide layer on Si. Besides heterogeneous hole nucleation at defects and spontaneous (homogeneous) hole nucleation, we could clearly identify a dewetting mechanism, which is similar to the spinodal dewetting observed for liquid films. Instead of being due to capillary waves, it is based on a stress induced surface instability. The latter results in the formation of a wavy surface with constant dominant wave-length and increasing amplitude during ion irradiation. Dewetting sets in as soon as the wave-troughs reach the film-substrate interface. Inspection of the hole radii and rim shapes indicates that removal of the material from the hole area occurs mainly by plastic deformation at the inner boundary and ion induced viscous flow in the peripheral zone due to surface tension.

  3. Electron microscopy of atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Po-Fu

    Electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EM/EDS) is a powerful tool for single particle analysis. However, the accuracy with which atmospheric particle compositions can be quantitatively determined by EDS is often hampered by substrate-particle interactions, volatilization losses in the low pressure microscope chamber, electron beam irradiation and use of inaccurate quantitation factors. A pseudo-analytical solution was derived to calculate the temperature rise due to the dissipation of the electron energy on a particle-substrate system. Evaporative mass loss for a spherical cap-shaped sulfuric acid particle resting on a thin film supported by a TEM grid during electron beam impingement has been studied. Measured volatilization rates were found to be in very good agreement with theoretical predictions. The method proposed can also be used to estimate the vapor pressure of a species by measuring the decay of X-ray intensities. Several types of substrates were studied. We found that silver-coated silicon monoxide substrates give carbon detection limits comparable to commercially available substrates. An advantage of these substrates is that the high thermal conductivity of the silver reduces heating due to electron beam impingement. In addition, exposure of sulfuric acid samples to ammonia overnight substantially reduces sulfur loss in the electron beam. Use of size-dependent k-factors determined from particles of known compositions shows promise for improving the accuracy of atmospheric particle compositions measured by EM/EDS. Knowledge accumulated during the course of this thesis has been used to analyze atmospheric particles (Minneapolis, MN) selected by the TDMA and collected by an aerodynamic focusing impactor. 'Less' hygroscopic particles, which do not grow to any measurable extent when humidified to ~90% relative humidity, included chain agglomerates, spheres, flakes, and irregular shapes. Carbon was the predominant element detected in

  4. Electron microscopy studies on MoS2 nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Pilsgaard

    Industrial-style MoS2-based hydrotreating catalysts are studied using electron microscopy. The MoS2 nanostructures are imaged with single-atom sensitivity to reveal the catalytically important edge structures. Furthermore, the in-situ formation of MoS2 crystals is imaged for the first time....

  5. Selected Energy Epitaxial Deposition and Low Energy Electron Microscopy of AlN, GaN and SiC Thin Films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, R

    1999-01-01

    The homoepitaxial growth of GaN(0001) layers was studied in situ and in real time using the low-energy electron microscope and ex situ using atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy...

  6. New developments in transmission electron microscopy for nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.L.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is one of the most powerful tools used for characterizing nanomaterials, and it is indispensable for nanotechnology. This paper reviews some of the most recent developments in electron microscopy techniques for characterizing nanomaterials. The review covers the following areas: in-situ microscopy for studying dynamic shape transformation of nanocrystals; in-situ nanoscale property measurements on the mechanical, electrical and field emission properties of nanotubes/nanowires; environmental microscopy for direct observation of surface reactions; aberration-free angstrom-resolution imaging of light elements (such as oxygen and lithium); high-angle annular-dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM); imaging of atom clusters with atomic resolution chemical information; electron holography of magnetic materials; and high-spatial resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) for nanoscale electronic and chemical analysis. It is demonstrated that the picometer-scale science provided by HRTEM is the foundation of nanometer-scale technology. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. An electron microscopy appraisal of tensile fracture in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, D.T.A.; Ocelik, V.; Bronsveld, P.M.; De Hosson, J.Th.M.

    2008-01-01

    Three glass-forming alloy compositions were chosen for ribbon production and subsequent electron microscopy studies. In situ tensile testing with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), followed by ex situ TEM and ex situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM), allowed the deformation processes in tensile fracture of metallic glasses to be analysed. In situ shear band propagation was found to be jump-like, with the jump sites correlating with the formation of secondary shear bands. The effect of structural relaxation by in situ heating is also discussed. Nanocrystallization near the fracture surface was observed; however, no crystallization was also reported in the same sample and the reasons for this are discussed. Both the TEM and the SEM observations confirmed the presence of a liquid-like layer on or near the fracture surface of the ribbons. The formation of a liquid-like layer was characterized by the vein geometries and vein densities on the fracture surfaces and its dependence on shear displacement, δ, is discussed. A simple model is adapted to relate the temperature rise during shear banding to the glass transition and melting temperatures and this is used to explain the variety of fracture surfaces which are developed for macroscopically identical tensile testing of metallic glasses together with features which exhibit local melting

  8. In-situ transmission electron microscopy study of ion-irradiated copper : comparison of the temperature dependence of cascade collapse in FCC- and BCC- metals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daulton, T. L.

    1998-10-23

    The kinetics which drive cascade formation and subsequent collapse into point-defect clusters is investigated by analyzing the microstructure produced in situ by low fluence 100 keV Kr ion irradiations of fcc-Cu over a wide temperature range (18-873 K). The yield of collapsed point-defect clusters is demonstrated unequivocally to be temperature dependent, remaining approximately constant up to lattice temperatures of 573 K and then abruptly decreasing with increasing temperature. This drop in yield is not caused by defect loss during or following ion irradiation. This temperature dependence can be explained by a thermal spike effect. These in-situ yield measurements are compared to previous ex-situ yield measurements in fcc-Ni and bcc-Mo.

  9. In situ transmission electron microscopy study of ion-irradiated copper: comparison of the temperature dependence of cascade collapse in fcc- and bcc-metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daulton, T.L.; Kirk, M.A.; Rehn, L.E.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics which drive cascade formation and subsequent collapse into point-defect clusters are investigated by analyzing the microstructure produced in situ by low fluence 100 keV Kr ion irradiations of fcc-Cu over a wide temperature range (18-873 K). The yield of collapsed point-defect clusters is demonstrated unequivocally to be temperature dependent, remaining approximately constant up to lattice temperatures of 573 K and then abruptly decreasing with increasing temperature. This drop in yield is not caused by defect loss during or following ion irradiation. In addition, this temperature dependence can be explained by a thermal spike effect. These in situ yield measurements are compared to previous ex situ yield measurements in fcc-Ni and bcc-Mo

  10. Direct transmission electron microscopy observations of martensitic transformations in Ni-rich NiTi single crystals during in situ cooling and straining

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kröger, A.; Dziaszyk, S.; Frenzel, J.; Somsen, Ch.; Dlouhý, Antonín; Eggeler, G.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 481, Sp. Iss. (2008), s. 452-456 ISSN 0921-5093. [ESOMAT 2006. Bochum, 10.09.2006-15.09.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : In situ TEM * NiTi single crystal * Martensitic transformations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2008

  11. Fast electron microscopy via compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kurt W; Anderson, Hyrum S; Wheeler, Jason W

    2014-12-09

    Various technologies described herein pertain to compressive sensing electron microscopy. A compressive sensing electron microscope includes a multi-beam generator and a detector. The multi-beam generator emits a sequence of electron patterns over time. Each of the electron patterns can include a plurality of electron beams, where the plurality of electron beams is configured to impart a spatially varying electron density on a sample. Further, the spatially varying electron density varies between each of the electron patterns in the sequence. Moreover, the detector collects signals respectively corresponding to interactions between the sample and each of the electron patterns in the sequence.

  12. Developmental changes in uncoupling protein 1 and F(1)-ATPase subunit levels in the golden hamster brown adipose tissue mitochondria as determined by electron microscopy in situ immunocytochemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednár, Jan; Soukup, Tomáš

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 22, - (2003), s. 477-486 ISSN 0231-5882 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/00/1653 Grant - others:NATO Research project(XX) 979876 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : immunoelectron microscopy * uncoupling protein 1 * mitochondrial ATP synthase Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.794, year: 2003

  13. In-situ transmission electron microscopy study of glissile grain boundary dislocation relaxation in a near Σ = 3 {1 1 1} grain boundary in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couzinie, J.P.; Decamps, B.; Boulanger, L.; Priester, L.

    2005-01-01

    An in-situ annealing experiment has been performed on an intergranular dislocation configuration composed only of glissile grain boundary dislocations observed in a near Σ = 3 {1 1 1} grain boundary in copper. Relaxation phenomena are not obvious than those predicted by theoretical models. Upon annealing, glissile intergranular dislocations are shown to overcome dislocation obstacles by node movement leading to a decrease of the total grain boundary energy

  14. Stress-induced martensitic transformations in a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zárubová, Niva; Gemperlová, Juliana; Gärtnerová, Viera; Gemperle, Antonín

    481-482, č. 5 (2008), s. 457-461 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/2016; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200100627 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : in situ TEM straining * CuAlNi shape memory alloy * stress -induced formation of martensite Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2008

  15. Transmission Electron Microscopy Physics of Image Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kohl, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy: Physics of Image Formation presents the theory of image and contrast formation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy. The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described. Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast. Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure analysis and imaging of lattices and their defects. X-ray microanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods. Specimen damage and contamination by electron irradiation limits the resolution for biological and some inorganic specimens. This fifth edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the area of aberration correction and energy filtering; moreover, the topics introduced in the fourth edition have been updated. Transmission Electron Microscopy: Physics of Image Formation is written f...

  16. Ultrafast Science Opportunities with Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DURR, HERMANN; Wang, X.J., ed.

    2016-04-28

    X-rays and electrons are two of the most fundamental probes of matter. When the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first x-ray free electron laser, began operation in 2009, it transformed ultrafast science with the ability to generate laser-like x-ray pulses from the manipulation of relativistic electron beams. This document describes a similar future transformation. In Transmission Electron Microscopy, ultrafast relativistic (MeV energy) electron pulses can achieve unsurpassed spatial and temporal resolution. Ultrafast temporal resolution will be the next frontier in electron microscopy and can ideally complement ultrafast x-ray science done with free electron lasers. This document describes the Grand Challenge science opportunities in chemistry, material science, physics and biology that arise from an MeV ultrafast electron diffraction & microscopy facility, especially when coupled with linac-based intense THz and X-ray pump capabilities.

  17. Oxygen-free in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy under full electrochemical potential control (in situ STM) has been used extensively as an efficient method to characterize microstructures at solid/liquid interfaces at the atomic and molecular levels. However, under ambient conditions oxygen may interfere in open i...

  18. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  19. Microscopy of electronic wave function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harb, M.

    2010-01-01

    This work of thesis aims to visualize, on a position sensitive detector, the spatial oscillations of slow electrons (∼ meV) emitted by a threshold photoionization in the presence of an external electric field. The interference figure obtained represents the square magnitude of electronic wavefunction. This fundamental work allows us to have access to the electronic dynamics and thus to highlight several quantum mechanisms that occur at the atomic scale (field Coulomb, electron/electron interaction..). Despite the presence an electronic core in Li atom, we have succeeded, experimentally and for the first time, in visualizing the wave function associated with the quasi-discrete Stark states coupled to the ionization continuum. Besides, using simulations of wave packet propagation, based on the 'Split-operator' method, we have conducted a comprehensive study of the H, Li and Cs atoms while revealing the significant effects of the Stark resonances. A very good agreement, on and off resonances, was obtained between simulated and experimental results. In addition, we have developed a generalized analytical model to understand deeply the function of VMI (Velocity-Map Imaging) spectrometer. This model is based on the paraxial approximation; it is based on matrix optics calculation by making an analogy between the electronic trajectory and the light beam. An excellent agreement was obtained between the model predictions and the experimental results. (author)

  20. Electron microscopy of nuclear zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versaci, R.A.; Ipohorski, Miguel

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy observations of the microstructure of zirconium alloys used in fuel sheaths of nuclear power reactors are reported. Specimens were observed after different thermal and mechanical treatment, similar to those actually used during fabrication of the sheaths. Electron micrographs and electron diffraction patterns of second phase particles present in zircaloy-2 and zircaloy-4 were also obtained, as well as some characteristic parameters. Images of oxides and hydrides most commonly present in zirconium alloys are also shown. Finally, the structure of a Zr-2,5Nb alloy used in CANDU reactors pressure tubes, is observed by electron microscopy. (Author) [es

  1. Contributed review: Review of integrated correlative light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, F J; Otto, C

    2015-01-01

    New developments in the field of microscopy enable to acquire increasing amounts of information from large sample areas and at an increased resolution. Depending on the nature of the technique, the information may reveal morphological, structural, chemical, and still other sample characteristics. In research fields, such as cell biology and materials science, there is an increasing demand to correlate these individual levels of information and in this way to obtain a better understanding of sample preparation and specific sample properties. To address this need, integrated systems were developed that combine nanometer resolution electron microscopes with optical microscopes, which produce chemically or label specific information through spectroscopy. The complementary information from electron microscopy and light microscopy presents an opportunity to investigate a broad range of sample properties in a correlated fashion. An important part of correlating the differences in information lies in bridging the different resolution and image contrast features. The trend to analyse samples using multiple correlated microscopes has resulted in a new research field. Current research is focused, for instance, on (a) the investigation of samples with nanometer scale distribution of inorganic and organic materials, (b) live cell analysis combined with electron microscopy, and (c) in situ spectroscopic and electron microscopy analysis of catalytic materials, but more areas will benefit from integrated correlative microscopy.

  2. Contributed Review: Review of integrated correlative light and electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmermans, F. J.; Otto, C.

    2015-01-01

    New developments in the field of microscopy enable to acquire increasing amounts of information from large sample areas and at an increased resolution. Depending on the nature of the technique, the information may reveal morphological, structural, chemical, and still other sample characteristics. In research fields, such as cell biology and materials science, there is an increasing demand to correlate these individual levels of information and in this way to obtain a better understanding of sample preparation and specific sample properties. To address this need, integrated systems were developed that combine nanometer resolution electron microscopes with optical microscopes, which produce chemically or label specific information through spectroscopy. The complementary information from electron microscopy and light microscopy presents an opportunity to investigate a broad range of sample properties in a correlated fashion. An important part of correlating the differences in information lies in bridging the different resolution and image contrast features. The trend to analyse samples using multiple correlated microscopes has resulted in a new research field. Current research is focused, for instance, on (a) the investigation of samples with nanometer scale distribution of inorganic and organic materials, (b) live cell analysis combined with electron microscopy, and (c) in situ spectroscopic and electron microscopy analysis of catalytic materials, but more areas will benefit from integrated correlative microscopy

  3. Advanced electron microscopy characterization of nanomaterials for catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Su

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Transmission electron microscopy (TEM has become one of the most powerful techniques in the fields of material science, inorganic chemistry and nanotechnology. In terms of resolutions, advanced TEM may reach a high spatial resolution of 0.05 nm, a high energy-resolution of 7 meV. In addition, in situ TEM can help researchers to image the process happened within 1 ms. This paper reviews the recent technical progresses of applying advanced TEM characterization on nanomaterials for catalysis. The text is organized based on the perspective of application: for example, size, composition, phase, strain, and morphology. The electron beam induced effect and in situ TEM are also introduced. I hope this review can help the scientists in related fields to take advantage of advanced TEM to their own researches. Keywords: Advanced TEM, Nanomaterials, Catalysts, In situ

  4. Electron transparent graphene windows for environmental scanning electron microscopy in liquids and dense gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Joshua D; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2012-12-21

    Due to its ultrahigh electron transmissivity in a wide electron energy range, molecular impermeability, high electrical conductivity and excellent mechanical stiffness, suspended graphene membranes appear to be a nearly ideal window material for in situ (in vivo) environmental electron microscopy of nano- and mesoscopic objects (including bio-medical samples) immersed in liquids and/or in dense gaseous media. In this paper, taking advantage of a small modification of the graphene transfer protocol onto metallic and SiN supporting orifices, reusable environmental cells with exchangeable graphene windows have been designed. Using colloidal gold nanoparticles (50 nm) dispersed in water as model objects for scanning electron microscopy in liquids as proof of concept, different conditions for imaging through the graphene membrane were tested. Limiting factors for electron microscopy in liquids, such as electron beam induced water radiolysis and damage of the graphene membrane at high electron doses, are discussed.

  5. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  6. Electron microscopy at atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronsky, R.

    1983-11-01

    The direct imaging of atomic structure in solids has become increasingly easier to accomplish with modern transmission electron microscopes, many of which have an information retrieval limit near 0.2 nm point resolution. Achieving better resolution, particularly with any useful range of specimen tilting, requires a major design effort. This presentation describes the new Atomic Resolution Microscope (ARM), recently put into operation at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Capable of 0.18 nm or better interpretable resolution over a voltage range of 400 kV to 1000 kV with +- 40/sup 0/ biaxial specimen tilting, the ARM features a number of new electron-optical and microprocessor-control designs. These are highlighted, and its atomic resolution performance demonstrated for a selection of inorganic crystals.

  7. Electron microscopy at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronsky, R.

    1983-11-01

    The direct imaging of atomic structure in solids has become increasingly easier to accomplish with modern transmission electron microscopes, many of which have an information retrieval limit near 0.2 nm point resolution. Achieving better resolution, particularly with any useful range of specimen tilting, requires a major design effort. This presentation describes the new Atomic Resolution Microscope (ARM), recently put into operation at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Capable of 0.18 nm or better interpretable resolution over a voltage range of 400 kV to 1000 kV with +- 40 0 biaxial specimen tilting, the ARM features a number of new electron-optical and microprocessor-control designs. These are highlighted, and its atomic resolution performance demonstrated for a selection of inorganic crystals

  8. Electron Microscopy of Intracellular Protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    often with disrupted plasma membranes and a matrix which was vacuolated and less electron- dense than normal (figure 7). The merozoites were covered...Plasmodium brasilianum. J. Infect. Dis., 75: 1-32. -~ ~.Clak, .A., Allison, A.C., Cox, F.E., 1976. Protection of mice against Babesia and Plasmodium with BCG ...binding trypanosome were observed in each case (Fig 6). Lack of enhanced uptake by cells of BCG -treated mice. BCG (Mycobacterium bovis) treatment of mice

  9. Scanning electron microscopy of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyde, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This chapter described methods for Scanning Electron Microscopical imaging of bone and bone cells. Backscattered electron (BSE) imaging is by far the most useful in the bone field, followed by secondary electrons (SE) and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analytical modes. This chapter considers preparing and imaging samples of unembedded bone having 3D detail in a 3D surface, topography-free, polished or micromilled, resin-embedded block surfaces, and resin casts of space in bone matrix. The chapter considers methods for fixation, drying, looking at undersides of bone cells, and coating. Maceration with alkaline bacterial pronase, hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium or potassium hydroxide to remove cells and unmineralised matrix is described in detail. Attention is given especially to methods for 3D BSE SEM imaging of bone samples and recommendations for the types of resin embedding of bone for BSE imaging are given. Correlated confocal and SEM imaging of PMMA-embedded bone requires the use of glycerol to coverslip. Cathodoluminescence (CL) mode SEM imaging is an alternative for visualising fluorescent mineralising front labels such as calcein and tetracyclines. Making spatial casts from PMMA or other resin embedded samples is an important use of this material. Correlation with other imaging means, including microradiography and microtomography is important. Shipping wet bone samples between labs is best done in glycerol. Environmental SEM (ESEM, controlled vacuum mode) is valuable in eliminating -"charging" problems which are common with complex, cancellous bone samples.

  10. Ultrathin sectioning for electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Jørgen; Qvortrup, K

    1989-01-01

    During an electron microscopical study of the localization of the nucleoside diphosphatase IDPase in Reissner's membrane of the inner ear, it was discovered that the distilled water in the knife trough produced an annoying artefact. It dissolved all the lead phosphate reaction product from...... the sections, and thus converted a positive phosphatase reactivity to a false negative one. The water in the knife trough had a pH of approximately 5.4. Calculations showed that this is an expected acidity, if CO2 in the air equilibrates with distilled water, and that there is 200,000 times more acid...

  11. Electron microscopy of boron carbide before and after electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoto, T.; Zuppiroli, L.; Beauvy, M.; Athanassiadis, T.

    1984-06-01

    The microstructure of boron carbide has been studied by electron microscopy and related to the composition of the material. After electron irradiations in an usual transmission electron microscope and in a high voltage electron microscope at different temperatures and fluxes no change of these microstructures have been observed but a sputtering of the surface of the samples, which has been studied quantitatively [fr

  12. Monochromated scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechberger, W.; Kothleitner, G.; Hofer, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) has developed into an established technique for chemical and structural analysis of thin specimens in the (scanning) transmission electron microscope (S)TEM. The energy resolution in EELS is largely limited by the stability of the high voltage supply, by the resolution of the spectrometer and by the energy spread of the source. To overcome this limitation a Wien filter monochromator was recently introduced with commercially available STEMs, offering the advantage to better resolve EELS fine structures, which contain valuable bonding information. The method of atomic resolution Z-contrast imaging within an STEM, utilizing a high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) detector can perfectly complement the excellent energy resolution, since EELS spectra can be collected simultaneously. In combination with a monochromator microscope not only high spatial resolution images can be recorded but also high energy resolution EELS spectra are attainable. In this work we investigated the STEM performance of a 200 kV monochromated Tecnai F20 with a high resolution Gatan Imaging Filter (HR-GIF). (author)

  13. Transmission electron microscopy of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Sally L; Waddington, Lynne J; Goldie, Kenneth N

    2011-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy of negatively stained and cryo-prepared specimens allows amyloid fibrils to be visualised at high resolution in a dried or a hydrated state, and is an essential method for characterising the morphology of fibrils and pre-fibrillar species. We outline the key steps involved in the preparation and observation of samples using negative staining and cryo-electron preservation. We also discuss methods to measure fibril characteristics, such as fibril width, from electron micrographs.

  14. Experiences with remote electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Parvin, Bahram

    2002-02-22

    With the advent of a rapidly proliferating international computer network, it became feasible to consider remote operation of instrumentation normally operated locally. For modern electron microscopes, the growing automation and computer control of many instrumental operations facilitated the task of providing remote operation. In order to provide use of NCEM TEMs by distant users, a project was instituted in 1995 to place a unique instrument, a Kratos EM-1500 operating at 1.5MeV, on-line for remote use. In 1996, the Materials Microcharacterization Collaboratory (MMC) was created as a pilot project within the US Department of Energy's DOE2000 program to establish national collaboratories to provide access via the Internet to unique or expensive DOE research facilities as well as to expertise for remote collaboration, experimentation, production, software development, modeling, and measurement. A major LBNL contribution to the MMC was construction of DeepView, a microscope-independent computer-control system that could be ported to other MMC members to provide a common graphical user-interface (GUI) for control of any MMC instrument over the wide area network.

  15. Advanced Electron Microscopy in Materials Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Y.; Jarausch, K.

    2009-01-01

    Aberration correction has opened a new frontier in electron microscopy by overcoming the limitations of conventional round lenses, providing sub-angstrom-sized probes and extending information limits. The imaging and analytical performance of these corrector-equipped microscopes affords an unprecedented opportunity to study structure-property relationships of matter at the atomic scale. This new generation of microscopes is able to retrieve high-quality structural information comparable to neutron and synchrotron x-ray experiments, but with local atomic resolution. These advances in instrumentation are accelerating the research and development of various functional materials ranging from those for energy generation, conversion, transportation and storage to those for catalysis and nano-device applications. The dramatic improvements in electron-beam illumination and detection also present a host of new challenges for the interpretation and optimization of experiments. During 7-9 November 2007, a workshop, entitled 'Aberration Corrected Electron Microscopy in Material Physics', was convened at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratories (BNL) to address these opportunities and challenges. The workshop was co-sponsored by Hitachi High Technologies, a leader in electron microscopy instrumentation, and BNL's Institute of Advanced Electron Microscopy, a leader in materials physics research using electron microscopy. The workshop featured presentations by internationally prominent scientists working at the frontiers of electron microscopy, both on developing instrumentation and applying it in materials physics. The meeting, structured to stimulate scientific exchanges and explore new capabilities, brought together ∼100 people from over 10 countries. This special issue complies many of the advances in instrument performance and materials physics reported by the invited speakers and attendees at the workshop.

  16. Electron microscopy at reduced levels of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, I.A.M.

    1975-05-01

    Specimen damage by electron radiation is one of the factors that limits high resolution electron microscopy of biological specimens. A method was developed to record images of periodic objects at a reduced electron exposure in order to preserve high resolution structural detail. The resulting image would tend to be a statistically noisy one, as the electron exposure is reduced to lower and lower values. Reconstruction of a statistically defined image from such data is possible by spatial averaging of the electron signals from a large number of identical unit cells. (U.S.)

  17. Quantitative transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L J; D'Alfonso, A J; Forbes, B D; Findlay, S D; LeBeau, J M; Stemmer, S

    2012-01-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) it is possible to operate the microscope in bright-field mode under conditions which, by the quantum mechanical principle of reciprocity, are equivalent to those in conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). The results of such an experiment will be presented which are in excellent quantitative agreement with theory for specimens up to 25 nm thick. This is at variance with the large contrast mismatch (typically between two and five) noted in equivalent CTEM experiments. The implications of this will be discussed.

  18. Active Pixel Sensors for electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denes, P. [Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: pdenes@lbl.gov; Bussat, J.-M. [Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lee, Z.; Radmillovic, V. [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2007-09-01

    The technology used for monolithic CMOS imagers, popular for cell phone cameras and other photographic applications, has been explored for charged particle tracking by the high-energy physics community for several years. This technology also lends itself to certain imaging detector applications in electron microscopy. We have been developing such detectors for several years at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and we and others have shown that this technology can offer excellent point-spread function, direct detection and high readout speed. In this paper, we describe some of the design constraints peculiar to electron microscopy and summarize where such detectors could play a useful role.

  19. Spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohashi, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    Spin-Polarized Scanning Electron Microscopy (Spin SEM) is one way for observing magnetic domain structures taking advantage of the spin polarization of the secondary electrons emitted from a ferromagnetic sample. This principle brings us several excellent capabilities such as high-spatial resolution better than 10 nm, and analysis of magnetization direction in three dimensions. In this paper, the principle and the structure of the spin SEM is briefly introduced, and some examples of the spin SEM measurements are shown. (author)

  20. The mechanism of borax crystallization using in situ optical microscopy and AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suharso, G.; Parkinson, M.; Ogden, M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The quality of high-purity borax depends both on the concentrations of the impurities and the product appearance, which are mainly determined by the size and morphology of the crystals. Thus, knowledge about crystallization of borax is of direct relevance to the industrial production of borax. In addition, fundamental studies of borax crystallization will provide results of relevance to the crystallization of other economically important materials. An investigation into the fundamental mechanism of crystal growth of borax from aqueous solution was carried out, as a model system. The investigation focussed on the growth mechanism, and the influence of factors such as solution supersaturation, temperature, crystal size and solution flow on the rate of crystal growth. In situ optical microscopy was used to determine growth rates of three different faces of borax crystals at 20, 25, 30, and 35 deg C, at various concentrations. It was found that the growth rate increases with increasing temperature and supersaturation. At low concentration , growth on the (010), (001), and (111) faces occurs via a spiral growth mechanism and at high concentration birth and spread is the principal mechanism operating. The activation energy for the different mechanisms was determined. Examination by ex situ Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) showed features suggesting that the (100), (010), (001) faces of borax crystals grow by spiral mechanism at low concentration and two dimensional nucleation at high concentration. These experiments support the data obtained from in situ optical microscopy. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  1. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  2. Scanning electron microscopy of primary bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, R.R.; Kerner, B.

    1975-01-01

    Critical-point-drying of tumor tissue fixed in a glutaraldehyde-paraformaldehyde solution and viewed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provides a 3-dimensional view of tumor cells and their matrices. This report describes the SEM appearance of three primary bone tumors: a canine osteosarcoma of the distal radius, a feline chondrosarcoma of the proximal tibia and a canine fibrosarcoma of the proximal humerus. The ultrastructural morphology is compared with the histologic appearance of each tumor

  3. Magnetic circular dichroism in electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rusz, Ján; Novák, Pavel; Rubino, S.; Hébert, C.; Schattschneider, P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 1 (2008), s. 599-604 ISSN 0587-4246. [CSMAG'07. Košice, 09.07.2007-12.07.2007] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 508971 - CHIRALTEM Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : magnetic circular dichroism * electron microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.321, year: 2008

  4. Electron microscopy of nanostructured semiconductor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    For various material systems of low dimensions, including multilayers, islands, and quantum dots, the potential applicability of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is demonstrated. Conventional TEM is applied to elucidate size, shape, and arrangement of nanostructures, whereas high-resolution imaging is used for visualizing their atomic structure. In addition, microchemical peculiarities of the nanoscopic objects are investigated by analytical TEM techniques (energy-filtered TEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy)

  5. Transmission electron microscopy in micro-nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Claverie, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Today, the availability of bright and highly coherent electron sources and sensitive detectors has radically changed the type and quality of the information which can be obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEMs are now present in large numbers not only in academia, but also in industrial research centers and fabs.This book presents in a simple and practical way the new quantitative techniques based on TEM which have recently been invented or developed to address most of the main challenging issues scientists and process engineers have to face to develop or optimize sem

  6. Scanning electron microscopy of semiconductor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresse, J.F.; Dupuy, M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of scanning electron microscopy in semiconductors opens up a large field of use. The operating modes lending themselves to the study of semiconductors are the induced current, cathodoluminescence and the use of the potential contrast which can also be applied very effectively to the study of the devices (planar in particular). However, a thorough knowledge of the mechanisms of the penetration of electrons, generation and recombination of generated carriers in a semiconductor is necessary in order to attain a better understanding of the operating modes peculiar to semiconductors [fr

  7. Transmission Electron Microscopy and Diffractometry of Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Fultz, Brent

    2013-01-01

    This book explains concepts of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) that are important for the characterization of materials. The fourth edition adds important new techniques of TEM such as electron tomography, nanobeam diffraction, and geometric phase analysis. A new chapter on neutron scattering completes the trio of x-ray, electron and neutron diffraction. All chapters were updated and revised for clarity. The book explains the fundamentals of how waves and wavefunctions interact with atoms in solids, and the similarities and differences of using x-rays, electrons, or neutrons for diffraction measurements. Diffraction effects of crystalline order, defects, and disorder in materials are explained in detail. Both practical and theoretical issues are covered. The book can be used in an introductory-level or advanced-level course, since sections are identified by difficulty. Each chapter includes a set of problems to illustrate principles, and the extensive Appendix includes la...

  8. In situ transmission electron microscopy studies of microstructure evolution in Ba(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3}-x(Ba{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3})TiO{sub 3} piezoceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakhozheva, Marina

    2016-10-21

    The purpose of this work is to understand the microstructural features which contribute to the strong electromechanical properties of the lead-free Ba (Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3}-x(Ba{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3})TiO{sub 3} (BZT-xBCT) piezoelectric ceramic. Detailed conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies on a broad variety of BZT - xBCT were performed in order to demonstrate the composition dependent structural changes. Moreover, several in situ TEM techniques, including in situ hot- and cold-stage, in situ electric field and in situ electric field with simultaneous cooling, were successfully applied in order to monitor the domain morphology evolution in real time. By means of in situ temperature dependent TEM experiments it was shown that during rhombohedral → orthorhombic → tetragonal phase transition the domain morphology changed according to the crystal structure present. During in situ electric field investigations the displacement of the domain walls and changes in the domain configuration during electrical poling were observed, which indicates a high extrinsic contribution to the piezoelectric response in all BZT - xBCT compositions studied. From the results of in situ electric field TEM experiments with simultaneous cooling, we obtained experimental evidence that the further the composition deviates from the polymorphic phase boundary, the higher the electric field required to fully pole the material.

  9. Elemental mapping in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L J; D'Alfonso, A J; Lugg, N R; Findlay, S D; LeBeau, J M; Stemmer, S

    2010-01-01

    We discuss atomic resolution chemical mapping in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and also on energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) imaging. Chemical mapping using EELS can yield counterintuitive results which, however, can be understood using first principles calculations. Experimental chemical maps based on EDX bear out the thesis that such maps are always likely to be directly interpretable. This can be explained in terms of the local nature of the effective optical potential for ionization under those imaging conditions. This is followed by an excursion into the complementary technique of elemental mapping using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) in a conventional transmission electron microscope. We will then consider the widely used technique of Z-contrast or high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, which is based on phonon excitation, where it has recently been shown that intensity variations can be placed on an absolute scale by normalizing the measured intensities to the incident beam. Results, showing excellent agreement between theory and experiment to within a few percent, are shown for Z-contrast imaging from a sample of PbWO 4 .

  10. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Minerals and Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Alex C.

    1991-04-01

    Of the many techniques that have been applied to the study of crystal defects, none has contributed more to our understanding of their nature and influence on the physical and chemical properties of crystalline materials than transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM is now used extensively by an increasing number of earth scientists for direct observation of defect microstructures in minerals and rocks. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Rocks and Minerals is an introduction to the principles of the technique and is the only book to date on the subject written specifically for geologists and mineralogists. The first part of the book deals with the essential physics of the transmission electron microscope and presents the basic theoretical background required for the interpretation of images and electron diffraction patterns. The final chapters are concerned with specific applications of TEM in mineralogy and deal with such topics as planar defects, intergrowths, radiation-induced defects, dislocations and deformation-induced microstructures. The examples cover a wide range of rock-forming minerals from crustal rocks to those in the lower mantle, and also take into account the role of defects in important mineralogical and geological processes.

  11. Atomic-resolution environmental TEM for quantitative in-situ microscopy in materials science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Seiji; Yoshida, Hideto

    2013-02-01

    We have compiled our recent in-situ quantitative environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) studies on typical gold nanoparticulate catalysts for the low-temperature oxidation of CO to describe the issues surrounding the application of ETEM, with a special regard to catalyst chemistry. Thanks to the recent development of high-resolution environmental transmission electron microscopes that can work robustly to accumulate observation data in controlled environments, we can deal with the electron irradiation effects and heterogeneity of real catalysts. We established a structural evolution diagram that summarizes the structure of catalysts under electron irradiation as a function of the electron current density ϕ and the electron dose, D. By extrapolating to ϕ = 0, D = 0, we could deduce the intrinsic catalysis structure (without electron irradiation) in various environments, including reaction environments. By numerically and statistically analyzing a substantial number of ETEM images of gold nanoparticles, we established a morphology phase diagram that summarizes how the majority of gold nanoparticles change their morphology systematically as a function of the partial pressures of CO and O(2). Similar diagrams will be helpful in elucidating the phenomena that directly correlate with the catalytic activity determined from ETEM observations. Using these quantitative analyses, we could analyze Cs-corrected ETEM images of the catalysts. The surfaces of gold nanoparticles were structurally reconstructed under reaction conditions, via interactions with CO molecules. CO molecules were observed on the surfaces of catalysts under reaction conditions using high-resolution ETEM. Finally, we discuss the potential of environmental transmission electron microscopy for quantitative in-situ microscopy at the atomic scale.

  12. Scanning electron microscopy of coal macerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.R.; White, A.; Deegan, M.D.

    1986-02-01

    Individual macerals separated from some United Kingdom coals of Carboniferous age and bituminous rank were examined by scanning electron microscopy. In each case a specific morphology characteristic of the macerals studied could be recognized. Collinite (a member of the vitrinite maceral group) was recognizable in all samples by its angular shape and characteristic fracture patterns, the particles (30-200 ..mu..m) frequently showing striated or laminated surface. Sporinite particles had no well defined shape and were associated with more detrital material than were the other macerals studied. This detritus was shown by conventional light microscopy to be the maceral micrinite. Fusinite was remarkable in having a chunky needle form, with lengths of up to 200 ..mu..m. 8 references.

  13. Mechanisms of decoherence in electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howie, A.

    2011-01-01

    The understanding and where possible the minimisation of decoherence mechanisms in electron microscopy were first studied in plasmon loss, diffraction contrast images but are of even more acute relevance in high resolution TEM phase contrast imaging and electron holography. With the development of phase retrieval techniques they merit further attention particularly when their effect cannot be eliminated by currently available energy filters. The roles of electronic excitation, thermal diffuse scattering, transition radiation and bremsstrahlung are examined here not only in the specimen but also in the electron optical column. Terahertz-range aloof beam electronic excitation appears to account satisfactorily for recent observations of decoherence in electron holography. An apparent low frequency divergence can emerge for the calculated classical bremsstrahlung event probability but can be ignored for photon wavelengths exceeding the required coherence distance or path lengths in the equipment. Most bremsstrahlung event probabilities are negligibly important except possibly in large-angle bending magnets or mandolin systems. A more reliable procedure for subtracting thermal diffuse scattering from diffraction pattern intensities is proposed.

  14. Mechanisms of decoherence in electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie, A

    2011-06-01

    The understanding and where possible the minimisation of decoherence mechanisms in electron microscopy were first studied in plasmon loss, diffraction contrast images but are of even more acute relevance in high resolution TEM phase contrast imaging and electron holography. With the development of phase retrieval techniques they merit further attention particularly when their effect cannot be eliminated by currently available energy filters. The roles of electronic excitation, thermal diffuse scattering, transition radiation and bremsstrahlung are examined here not only in the specimen but also in the electron optical column. Terahertz-range aloof beam electronic excitation appears to account satisfactorily for recent observations of decoherence in electron holography. An apparent low frequency divergence can emerge for the calculated classical bremsstrahlung event probability but can be ignored for photon wavelengths exceeding the required coherence distance or path lengths in the equipment. Most bremsstrahlung event probabilities are negligibly important except possibly in large-angle bending magnets or mandolin systems. A more reliable procedure for subtracting thermal diffuse scattering from diffraction pattern intensities is proposed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanisms of decoherence in electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howie, A., E-mail: ah30@cam.ac.uk [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    The understanding and where possible the minimisation of decoherence mechanisms in electron microscopy were first studied in plasmon loss, diffraction contrast images but are of even more acute relevance in high resolution TEM phase contrast imaging and electron holography. With the development of phase retrieval techniques they merit further attention particularly when their effect cannot be eliminated by currently available energy filters. The roles of electronic excitation, thermal diffuse scattering, transition radiation and bremsstrahlung are examined here not only in the specimen but also in the electron optical column. Terahertz-range aloof beam electronic excitation appears to account satisfactorily for recent observations of decoherence in electron holography. An apparent low frequency divergence can emerge for the calculated classical bremsstrahlung event probability but can be ignored for photon wavelengths exceeding the required coherence distance or path lengths in the equipment. Most bremsstrahlung event probabilities are negligibly important except possibly in large-angle bending magnets or mandolin systems. A more reliable procedure for subtracting thermal diffuse scattering from diffraction pattern intensities is proposed.

  16. Electron scattering cross sections pertinent to electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inokuti, M.

    1978-01-01

    Some elements of the physics that determine cross sections are discussed, and various sources of data are indicated that should be useful for analytical microscopy. Atoms, molecules, and to some extent, solids are considered. Inelastic and elastic scattering of electrons and some solid-state effects are treated. 30 references

  17. Anisotropic Shape Changes of Silica Nanoparticles Induced in Liquid with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecevic, J.; Hermannsdorfer, Justus; Schuh, Tobias; de Jong, Krijn P.; de Jonge, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used for in-situ imaging of nanoscale processes taking place in liquid, such as the evolution of nanoparticles during synthesis or structural changes of nanomaterials in liquid environment. Here, it is shown that the focused electron beam of

  18. Bright field electron microscopy of biological specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, B.V.

    1976-01-01

    A preirradiation procedure is described which preserves negatively stained morphological features in bright field electron micrographs to a resolution of about 1.2 nm. Prior to microscopy the pre-irradiation dose (1.6 x 10 -3 C cm -2 ) is given at low electron optical magnification at five different areas on the grid (the centre plus four 'corners'). This pre-irradiation can be measured either with a Faraday cage or through controlled exposure-developing conditions. Uranyl formate stained T2 bacteriophages and stacked disk aggregates of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) protein served as test objects. A comparative study was performed on specimens using either the pre-irradiation procedure or direct irradiation by the 'minimum beam exposure' technique. Changes in the electron diffraction pattern of the stain-protein complex and the disappearance of certain morphological features in the specimens were both used in order to compare the pre-irradiation method with the direct exposure technique. After identical electron exposures the pre-irradiation approach gave a far better preservation of specimen morphology. Consequently this procedure gives the microscopist more time to select and focus appropriate areas for imaging before deteriorations take place. The investigation also suggested that microscopy should be carried out between 60,000 and 100,000 times magnification. Within this magnification range, it is possible to take advantage of the phase contrast transfer characteristics of the objective lens while the electron load on the object is kept at a moderate level. Using the pre-irradiation procedure special features of the T2 bacteriophage morphology could be established. (author)

  19. Handling of biological specimens for electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, G.

    1987-01-01

    There are many different aspects of specimen preparation procedure which need to be considered in order to achieve good results. Whether using the scanning or transmission microscope, the initial handling procedures are very similar and are selected for the information required. Handling procedures and techniques described are: structural preservation; immuno-and histo-chemistry; x-ray microanalysis and autoradiography; dehydration and embedding; mounting and coating specimens for scanning electron microscopy; and sectioning of resin embedded material. With attention to detail and careful choice of the best available technique, excellent results should be obtainable whatever the specimen. 6 refs

  20. Electron microscopy - principles of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This 8 minute programme explains the nature of the possible radiation hazard in Electron Microscopy and outlines the ways in which modern equipment is designed and made so that in normal use the worker is not exposed to radiation. The interlock principle is explained and illustrated by an example from the field of X-ray crystallography. By filming machines while they were dismantled for servicing, details of several internal safety devices have been included. In this way workers who normally use the equipment as a 'black box' get some insight into the principles and practice of radiation protection in the field. (author)

  1. Nano, Queensland and cryo-electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowall, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In a recent review the authors, Wolfgang Baumeister and Alasdair Steven wrote, '....there is immense opportunity for Cryo-EM, especially as boosted by merging crystallographic structures of individual subunits into moderate resolution Cryo-EM density maps of whole complexes. Electron tomography has now advanced to the point where it is a realistic goal to glimpse molecular machines operating inside cells....' This statement gives testament to the advances made over the past 25 years by many labs around the world to the area of microscopy referred to as Cryo-EM and related 3-D computing technologies. Australian scientific societies have been eager followers of this progress and heard first hand of the new developments in the field at the 1984 ACEM-8 (2). Since those early days the ACEM and other Australian/NZ societies have sponsored numerous researchers and workshops in the field of Cryo-EM to their conferences, Helin Sabil, Wah Chiu, Ron Milligan, Richard Henderson and Werner Kuhlbrandt to name only a few. These visits have stimulated a desire from Australian/NZ researchers to establish collaborations and access to prominent labs in the USA and Europe, where the means and knowledge to provide Cryo EM and 3D reconstruction technology for studying macromolecular complexes is well established. However, Australia has not been backward in seeking to provide its home research community with access to a base in biological molecular microscopy and electron crystallography technology. Since the last ACEM we have seen the emergence of a number of crucial factors, which will make the establishment of a national research facility in this field an operational reality in early 2003. Well publicized is the development of Australia's newest and perhaps most unique research institute, the institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB) to open at the University of Queensland (UQ) in 2002. The IMB will be the platform for a new research group in advanced computational 3D

  2. Emission sources in scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkusch, W.

    1990-01-01

    Since the beginning of the commercial scanning electron microscopy, there are two kinds of emission sources generally used for generation of the electron beam. The first group covers the cathodes heated directly and indirectly (tungsten hair-needle cathodes and lanthanum hexaboride single crystals, LaB 6 cathode). The other group is the field emission cathodes. The advantages of the thermal sources are their low vacuum requirement and their high beam current which is necessary for the application of microanalysis units. Disadvantages are the short life and the low resolution. Advantages of the field emission cathode unambiguously are the possibilities of the very high resolution, especially in the case of low acceleration voltages. Disadvantages are the necessary ultra-high vacuum and the low beam current. An alternative source is the thermally induced ZrO/W field emission cathode which works stably as compared to the cold field emission and does not need periodic flashing for emitter tip cleaning. (orig.) [de

  3. Electron Microscopy of Nanostructures in Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købler, Carsten

    with cells is therefore increasingly more relevant from both an engineering and a toxicological viewpoint. My work involves developing and exploring electron microscopy (EM) for imaging nanostructures in cells, for the purpose of understanding nanostructure-cell interactions in terms of their possibilities...... in science and concerns in toxicology. In the present work, EM methods for imaging nanostructure-cell interactions have been explored, and the complex interactions documented and ordered. In particular the usability of the focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) was explored. Using EM...... in literature. Furthermore, EM proved valuable as it revealed an unnoticed CNT effect. FIB-SEM helped establish that the effect was linked to eosionophilic crystalline pneumonia (ECP)....

  4. Characterization of high Tc materials and devices by electron microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Browning, Nigel D; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2000-01-01

    ..., and microanalysis by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Ensuing chapters examine identi®cation of new superconducting compounds, imaging of superconducting properties by lowtemperature scanning electron microscopy, imaging of vortices by electron holography and electronic structure determination by electron energy loss spectro...

  5. Cryo-electron microscopy of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldie, Kenneth N; Abeyrathne, Priyanka; Kebbel, Fabian; Chami, Mohamed; Ringler, Philippe; Stahlberg, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Electron crystallography is used to study membrane proteins in the form of planar, two-dimensional (2D) crystals, or other crystalline arrays such as tubular crystals. This method has been used to determine the atomic resolution structures of bacteriorhodopsin, tubulin, aquaporins, and several other membrane proteins. In addition, a large number of membrane protein structures were studied at a slightly lower resolution, whereby at least secondary structure motifs could be identified.In order to conserve the structural details of delicate crystalline arrays, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) allows imaging and/or electron diffraction of membrane proteins in their close-to-native state within a lipid bilayer membrane.To achieve ultimate high-resolution structural information of 2D crystals, meticulous sample preparation for electron crystallography is of outmost importance. Beam-induced specimen drift and lack of specimen flatness can severely affect the attainable resolution of images for tilted samples. Sample preparations that sandwich the 2D crystals between symmetrical carbon films reduce the beam-induced specimen drift, and the flatness of the preparations can be optimized by the choice of the grid material and the preparation protocol.Data collection in the cryo-electron microscope using either the imaging or the electron diffraction mode has to be performed applying low-dose procedures. Spot-scanning further reduces the effects of beam-induced drift. Data collection using automated acquisition schemes, along with improved and user-friendlier data processing software, is increasingly being used and is likely to bring the technique to a wider user base.

  6. Optimized cobalt nanowires for domain wall manipulation imaged by in situ Lorentz microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez, L. A.; Magén, C.; Snoeck, E.; Gatel, C.; Serrano-Ramón, L.

    2013-01-01

    Direct observation of domain wall (DW) nucleation and propagation in focused electron beam induced deposited Co nanowires as a function of their dimensions was carried out by Lorentz microscopy (LTEM) upon in situ application of magnetic field. Optimal dimensions favoring the unambiguous DW nucleation/propagation required for applications were found in 500-nm-wide and 13-nm-thick Co nanowires, with a maximum nucleation field and the largest gap between nucleation and propagation fields. The internal DW structures were resolved using the transport-of-intensity equation formalism in LTEM images and showed that the optimal nanowire dimensions correspond to the crossover between the nucleation of transverse and vortex walls.

  7. Electron microscopy of primary cell cultures in solution and correlative optical microscopy using ASEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kinoshita, Takaaki; Uemura, Takeshi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Watanabe, Yohei; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Sato, Mari; Suga, Mitsuo; Maruyama, Yuusuke; Tsuji, Noriko M.; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Nishihara, Shoko; Sato, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy of cells in a natural environment of aqueous liquid facilitates high-throughput observation of protein complex formation. ASEM allows the inverted SEM to observe the wet sample from below, while an optical microscope observes it from above quasi-simultaneously. The disposable ASEM dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can be coated variously to realize the primary-culture of substrate-sensitive cells in a few milliliters of culture medium in a stable incubator environment. Neuron differentiation, neural networking, proplatelet-formation and phagocytosis were captured by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and imaged at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM with/without metal staining. Fas expression on the cell surface was visualized, correlated to the spatial distribution of F-actin. Axonal partitioning was studied using primary-culture neurons, and presynaptic induction by GluRδ2-N-terminus-linked fluorescent magnetic beads was correlated to the presynaptic-marker Bassoon. Further, megakaryocytes secreting proplatelets were captured, and P-selectins with adherence activity were localized to some of the granules present by immuno-ASEM. The phagocytosis of lactic acid bacteria by dendritic cells was also imaged. Based on these studies, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the study of various mesoscopic-scale dynamics in the near future. - Highlights: • In situ correlative light electron microscopy of samples in open solution by ASEM. • Primary cultures for in-solution CLEM by developing SiN-film coating methods • First visualization of fluorescent magnetic beads in aqueous solution by CLEM. • Presynaptic induction of neurons by GluRδ2-N-terminus-coated beads studied by CLEM. • Axonal partitioning, bacterial phagocytosis, platelet formation imaged by CLEM

  8. Electron microscopy of primary cell cultures in solution and correlative optical microscopy using ASEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kinoshita, Takaaki [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan); Uemura, Takeshi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology and Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Motohashi, Hozumi [Department of Gene Expression Regulation, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Watanabe, Yohei; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Nishiyama, Hidetoshi [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino 3-chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Sato, Mari [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Suga, Mitsuo [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino 3-chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Maruyama, Yuusuke; Tsuji, Noriko M. [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masayuki [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Nishihara, Shoko, E-mail: shoko@soka.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy of cells in a natural environment of aqueous liquid facilitates high-throughput observation of protein complex formation. ASEM allows the inverted SEM to observe the wet sample from below, while an optical microscope observes it from above quasi-simultaneously. The disposable ASEM dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can be coated variously to realize the primary-culture of substrate-sensitive cells in a few milliliters of culture medium in a stable incubator environment. Neuron differentiation, neural networking, proplatelet-formation and phagocytosis were captured by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and imaged at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM with/without metal staining. Fas expression on the cell surface was visualized, correlated to the spatial distribution of F-actin. Axonal partitioning was studied using primary-culture neurons, and presynaptic induction by GluRδ2-N-terminus-linked fluorescent magnetic beads was correlated to the presynaptic-marker Bassoon. Further, megakaryocytes secreting proplatelets were captured, and P-selectins with adherence activity were localized to some of the granules present by immuno-ASEM. The phagocytosis of lactic acid bacteria by dendritic cells was also imaged. Based on these studies, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the study of various mesoscopic-scale dynamics in the near future. - Highlights: • In situ correlative light electron microscopy of samples in open solution by ASEM. • Primary cultures for in-solution CLEM by developing SiN-film coating methods • First visualization of fluorescent magnetic beads in aqueous solution by CLEM. • Presynaptic induction of neurons by GluRδ2-N-terminus-coated beads studied by CLEM. • Axonal partitioning, bacterial phagocytosis, platelet formation imaged by CLEM.

  9. LORENTZ PHASE IMAGING AND IN-SITU LORENTZ MICROSCOPY OF PATTERNED CO-ARRAYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VOLKOV, V.V.; ZHU, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Understanding magnetic structures and properties of patterned and ordinary magnetic films at nanometer length-scale is the area of immense technological and fundamental scientific importance. The key feature to such success is the ability to achieve visual quantitative information on domain configurations with a maximum ''magnetic'' resolution. Several methods have been developed to meet these demands (Kerr and Faraday effects, differential phase contrast microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, SEMPA etc.). In particular, the modern off-axis electron holography allows retrieval of the electron-wave phase shifts down to 2π/N (with typical N = 10-20, approaching in the limit N ∼ 100) in TEM equipped with field emission gun, which is already successfully employed for studies of magnetic materials at nanometer scale. However, it remains technically demanding, sensitive to noise and needs highly coherent electron sources. As possible alternative we developed a new method of Lorentz phase microscopy [1,2] based on the Fourier solution [3] of magnetic transport-of-intensity (MTIE) equation. This approach has certain advantages, since it is less sensitive to noise and does not need high coherence of the source required by the holography. In addition, it can be realized in any TEM without basic hardware changes. Our approach considers the electron-wave refraction in magnetic materials (magnetic refraction) and became possible due to general progress in understanding of noninterferometric phase retrieval [4-6] dealing with optical refraction. This approach can also be treated as further development of Fresnel microscopy, used so far for imaging of in-situ magnetization process in magnetic materials studied by TEM. Figs. 1-3 show some examples of what kind information can be retrieved from the conventional Fresnel images using the new approach. Most of these results can be compared with electron-holographic data. Using this approach we can shed more light on fine details of

  10. Characterization of nanomaterials with transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2016-08-01

    The field of nanotechnology is about research and development on materials whose at least one dimension is in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. In recent years, the research activity for developing nano-materials has grown exponentially owing to the fact that they offer better solutions to the challenges faced by various fields such as energy, food, and environment. In this paper, the importance of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) based techniques is demonstrated for investigating the properties of nano-materials. Specifically the nano-materials that are investigated in this report include gold nano-particles (Au-NPs), silver atom-clusters (Ag-ACs), tantalum single-atoms (Ta-SAs), carbon materials functionalized with iron cobalt (Fe-Co) NPs and titania (TiO2) NPs, and platinum loaded Ceria (Pt-CeO2) Nano composite. TEM techniques that are employed to investigate nano-materials include aberration corrected bright-field TEM (BF-TEM), high-angle dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and BF-TEM electron tomography (ET). With the help presented of results in this report, it is proved herein that as many TEM techniques as available in a given instrument are essential for a comprehensive nano-scale analysis of nanomaterials.

  11. Electronic microscopy application in artificial minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, L E.

    1995-07-01

    One of the uses of electronic microscopy in combination with the analysis microprobe EDAX is to characterize the properties of the minerals. The technique consist of studying the chemical composition by elements or by oxides of particles which can be enlarged successfully up to 100000x. With the help of the optical microscope one is able to determine the textual characteristics, the form, cleavage and other cristallographic properties which, combined with microprobe analysis enable one to determine its classification. The industrial processes which use ovens usually have problems due to the formation of impurities, spots and abnormal aspects which are reflected in a lower quality of the final material produced. These types of defects appear in minerals which are made in laboratories; knowing the natural minerals one can exercise a better quality control since this permits to know the behaviour of the raw material at a particular temperature and its reactions depending on the additives used

  12. Transmission electron microscopy and diffractometry of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Fultz, Brent

    2001-01-01

    This book teaches graduate students the concepts of trans- mission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) that are important for the characterization of materi- als. It emphasizes themes common to both techniques, such as scattering from atoms and the formation and analysis of dif- fraction patterns. It also describes unique aspects of each technique, especially imaging and spectroscopy in the TEM. The textbook thoroughly develops both introductory and ad- vanced-level material, using over 400 accompanying illustra- tions. Problems are provided at the end of each chapter to reinforce key concepts. Simple citatioins of rules are avoi- ded as much as possible, and both practical and theoretical issues are explained in detail. The book can be used as both an introductory and advanced-level graduate text since sec- tions/chapters are sorted according to difficulty and grou- ped for use in quarter and semester courses on TEM and XRD.

  13. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  14. In situ high-resolution thermal microscopy on integrated circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Guan-Yu; Su, Hai-Ching; Wang, Hsien-Yi; Chan, Ming-Che

    2017-09-04

    The miniaturization of metal tracks in integrated circuits (ICs) can cause abnormal heat dissipation, resulting in electrostatic discharge, overvoltage breakdown, and other unwanted issues. Unfortunately, locating areas of abnormal heat dissipation is limited either by the spatial resolution or imaging acquisition speed of current thermal analytical techniques. A rapid, non-contact approach to the thermal imaging of ICs with sub-μm resolution could help to alleviate this issue. In this work, based on the intensity of the temperature-dependent two-photon fluorescence (TPF) of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) material, we developed a novel fast and non-invasive thermal microscopy with a sub-μm resolution. Its application to the location of hotspots that may evolve into thermally induced defects in ICs was also demonstrated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to present high-resolution 2D thermal microscopic images of ICs, showing the generation, propagation, and distribution of heat during its operation. According to the demonstrated results, this scheme has considerable potential for future in situ hotspot analysis during the optimization stage of IC development.

  15. Thermal diffuse scattering in transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, B.D.; D' Alfonso, A.J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Findlay, S.D. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Van Dyck, D. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); LeBeau, J.M. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States); Stemmer, S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5050 (United States); Allen, L.J., E-mail: lja@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    In conventional transmission electron microscopy, thermal scattering significantly affects the image contrast. It has been suggested that not accounting for this correctly is the main cause of the Stobbs factor, the ubiquitous, large contrast mismatch found between theory and experiment. In the case where a hard aperture is applied, we show that previous conclusions drawn from work using bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy and invoking the principle of reciprocity are reliable in the presence of thermal scattering. In the aperture-free case it has been suggested that even the most sophisticated mathematical models for thermal diffuse scattering lack in their numerical implementation, specifically that there may be issues in sampling, including that of the contrast transfer function of the objective lens. We show that these concerns can be satisfactorily overcome with modest computing resources; thermal scattering can be modelled accurately enough for the purpose of making quantitative comparison between simulation and experiment. Spatial incoherence of the source is also investigated. Neglect or inadequate handling of thermal scattering in simulation can have an appreciable effect on the predicted contrast and can be a significant contribution to the Stobbs factor problem. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We determine the numerical requirements for accurate simulation of TDS in CTEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TDS can be simulated to high precision using the Born-Oppenheimer model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Such calculations establish the contribution of TDS to the Stobbs factor problem. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treating spatial incoherence using envelope functions increases image contrast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rigorous treatment of spatial incoherence significantly reduces image contrast.

  16. Analyzing Lysosome-Related Organelles by Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Hurbain, Ilse

    2017-04-29

    Intracellular organelles have a particular morphological signature that can only be appreciated by ultrastructural analysis at the electron microscopy level. Optical imaging and associated methodologies allow to explore organelle localization and their dynamics at the cellular level. Deciphering the biogenesis and functions of lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles (LROs) and their dysfunctions requires their visualization and detailed characterization at high resolution by electron microscopy. Here, we provide detailed protocols for studying LROs by transmission electron microscopy. While conventional electron microscopy and its recent improvements is the method of choice to investigate organelle morphology, immunoelectron microscopy allows to localize organelle components and description of their molecular make up qualitatively and quantitatively.

  17. Proceedings of 10. Conference on Electron Microscopy of Solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The new technical solutions and methodical variants of electron microscopy i. e. transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy have been presented. Development of new methods and microscope constructions which became more and more sophisticated causes the progress in possible applications. The broad spectrum of such applications in metallurgy, materials science, chemical engineering, electronics, physical chemistry, solid state physics, mineralogy and other branches of science and technique have been performed and discussed at the conference

  18. Investigation of porous asphalt microstructure using optical and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulikakos, L D; Partl, M N

    2010-11-01

    Direct observations of porous asphalt concrete samples in their natural state using optical and electron microscopy techniques led to useful information regarding the microstructure of two mixes and indicated a relationship between microstructure and in situ performance. This paper presents evidence that suboptimal microstructure can lead to premature failure thus making a first step in defining well or suboptimal performing pavements with a bottom-up approach (microstructure). Laboratory and field compaction produce different samples in terms of the microstructure. Laboratory compaction using the gyratory method has produced more microcracks in mineral aggregates after the binder had cooled. Well-performing mixes used polymer-modified binders, had a more homogeneous void structure with fewer elongated voids and better interlocking of the aggregates. Furthermore, well-performing mixes showed better distribution of the mastic and better coverage of the aggregates with bitumen. Low vacuum scanning electron microscopy showed that styrene butadiene styrene polymer modification in binder exists in the form of discontinuous globules and not continuous networks. A reduction in the polymer phase was observed as a result of aging and in-service use. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. Ultrafast electron microscopy integrated with a direct electron detection camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Min Lee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, we have witnessed the rapid growth of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM, which provides intuitive means to watch atomic and molecular motions of matter. Yet, because of the limited current of the pulsed electron beam resulting from space-charge effects, observations have been mainly made to periodic motions of the crystalline structure of hundreds of nanometers or higher by stroboscopic imaging at high repetition rates. Here, we develop an advanced UEM with robust capabilities for circumventing the present limitations by integrating a direct electron detection camera for the first time which allows for imaging at low repetition rates. This approach is expected to promote UEM to a more powerful platform to visualize molecular and collective motions and dissect fundamental physical, chemical, and materials phenomena in space and time.

  20. Ultrafast electron microscopy integrated with a direct electron detection camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Min; Kim, Young Jae; Kim, Ye-Jin; Kwon, Oh-Hoon

    2017-07-01

    In the past decade, we have witnessed the rapid growth of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM), which provides intuitive means to watch atomic and molecular motions of matter. Yet, because of the limited current of the pulsed electron beam resulting from space-charge effects, observations have been mainly made to periodic motions of the crystalline structure of hundreds of nanometers or higher by stroboscopic imaging at high repetition rates. Here, we develop an advanced UEM with robust capabilities for circumventing the present limitations by integrating a direct electron detection camera for the first time which allows for imaging at low repetition rates. This approach is expected to promote UEM to a more powerful platform to visualize molecular and collective motions and dissect fundamental physical, chemical, and materials phenomena in space and time.

  1. Platinum replica electron microscopy: Imaging the cytoskeleton globally and locally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitkina, Tatyana M

    2017-05-01

    Structural studies reveal how smaller components of a system work together as a whole. However, combining high resolution of details with full coverage of the whole is challenging. In cell biology, light microscopy can image many cells in their entirety, but at a lower resolution, whereas electron microscopy affords very high resolution, but usually at the expense of the sample size and coverage. Structural analyses of the cytoskeleton are especially demanding, because cytoskeletal networks are unresolvable by light microscopy due to their density and intricacy, whereas their proper preservation is a challenge for electron microscopy. Platinum replica electron microscopy can uniquely bridge the gap between the "comfort zones" of light and electron microscopy by allowing high resolution imaging of the cytoskeleton throughout the entire cell and in many cells in the population. This review describes the principles and applications of platinum replica electron microscopy for studies of the cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The electron microscopy facility at the LNLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugarte, D.; Zanchet, D.; Silva, P.C.; Araujo, S.R. de; Bettini, J.; Gonzalez, J.C.; Nakabayashi, D.B.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The Electron Microscopy Laboratory (LME, Lab. Microscopia Eletronica) is one of the multi user facilities of the Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS). It has been in operation since the beginning of 1999 to provide spatial high resolution tools, making the LNLS a unique center for advanced characterization of materials. The equipment installed at the LME can be brie y described as: a) a Low Vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, JSM-5900LV) with microanalysis and crystallographic mapping capabilities; b) a Field Emission Gun SEM (JSM-6330F); c) a 300 kV High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM, JEM 3010 URP, 1.7 A Point Res.) with TV Camera, Multi-Scan CCD Camera and X-ray Si(Li) detector; and d) a complete sample preparation laboratory for EM studies A simple procedure allows access to the LME instruments, firstly a short research project must be submitted for evaluation of viability and relevance; subsequently the training microscope sessions are scheduled. It is important to remark that EM is a routine characterization tool and the researchers have to operate the microscope by themselves; for that a training period is necessary, which may vary from 1-2 weeks for a SEM to 2-4 months for the HRTEM. Our staff addresses a great effort to the formation of human resources in order to allow inexperienced Users to become capable of acquiring and interpreting data for their research projects. Since its installation, the LME has trained more than 300 Users in EM techniques. In 2003, the number of projects developed was: 36 in the HRTEM, 16 in the FEG-SEM and 48 in the LV-SEM. This means that just the HRTEM has operated 2157 hours. The constant increase of users in addition to the more exigent EM studies being proposed indicates the necessity of an expansion of the LME by the purchase of a 200 kV FEG-TEM oriented for nano-analysis and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy.. (author)

  3. Secondary electron spectroscopy and Auger microscopy at high spatial resolution. Application to scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gressus, Claude; Massignon, Daniel; Sopizet, Rene

    1979-01-01

    Secondary electron spectroscopy (SES), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (ELS) are combined with ultra high vacuum scanning microscopy (SEM) for surface analysis at high spatial resolution. Reliability tests for the optical column for the vacuum and for the spectrometer are discussed. Furthermore the sensitivity threshold in AES which is compatible with a non destructive surface analysis at high spatial resolution is evaluated. This combination of all spectroscopies is used in the study of the beam damage correlated with the well known secondary electron image (SEI) darkening still observed in ultra high vacuum. The darkening is explained as a bulk decontamination of the sample rather than as a surface contamination from the residual vacuum gas [fr

  4. Zeolites - a high resolution electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfredsson, V.

    1994-10-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has been used to investigate a number of zeolites (EMT, FAU, LTL, MFI and MOR) and a member of the mesoporous M41S family. The electron optical artefact, manifested as a dark spot in the projected centre of the large zeolite channels, caused by insufficient transfer of certain reflections in the objective lens has been explained. The artefact severely hinders observation of materials confined in the zeolite channels and cavities. It is shown how to circumvent the artefact problem and how to image confined materials in spite of disturbance caused by the artefact. Image processing by means of a Wiener filter has been applied for removal of the artefact. The detailed surface structure of FAU has been investigated. Comparison of experimental micrographs with images simulated using different surface models indicates that the surface can be terminated in different ways depending on synthesis methods. The dealuminated form of FAU (USY) is covered by an amorphous region. Platinum incorporated in FAU has a preponderance to aggregate in the (111) twin planes, probably due to a local difference in cage structure with more spacious cages. It is shown that platinum is intra-zeolitic as opposed to being located on the external surface of the zeolite crystal. This could be deduced from tomography of ultra-thin sections among observations. HRTEM studies of the mesoporous MCM-41 show that the pores have a hexagonal shape and also supports the mechanistic model proposed which involves a cooperative formation of a mesophase including the silicate species as well as the surfactant. 66 refs, 24 figs

  5. Imaging Cytoskeleton Components by Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitkina, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a complex of detergent-insoluble components of the cytoplasm playing critical roles in cell motility, shape generation, and mechanical properties of a cell. Fibrillar polymers-actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments-are major constituents of the cytoskeleton, which constantly change their organization during cellular activities. The actin cytoskeleton is especially polymorphic, as actin filaments can form multiple higher order assemblies performing different functions. Structural information about cytoskeleton organization is critical for understanding its functions and mechanisms underlying various forms of cellular activity. Because of the nanometer-scale thickness of cytoskeletal fibers, electron microscopy (EM) is a key tool to determine the structure of the cytoskeleton. This article describes application of rotary shadowing (or metal replica) EM for visualization of the cytoskeleton. The procedure is applicable to thin cultured cells growing on glass coverslips and consists of detergent extraction of cells to expose their cytoskeleton, chemical fixation to provide stability, ethanol dehydration and critical point drying to preserve three-dimensionality, rotary shadowing with platinum to create contrast, and carbon coating to stabilize replicas. This technique provides easily interpretable three-dimensional images, in which individual cytoskeletal fibers are clearly resolved, and individual proteins can be identified by immunogold labeling. More importantly, replica EM is easily compatible with live cell imaging, so that one can correlate the dynamics of a cell or its components, e.g., expressed fluorescent proteins, with high resolution structural organization of the cytoskeleton in the same cell.

  6. Correlative Microscopy of Vitreous Sections Provides Insights into BAR-Domain Organization In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Hoffmann, Patrick C; Kukulski, Wanda

    2018-04-10

    Electron microscopy imaging of macromolecular complexes in their native cellular context is limited by the inherent difficulty to acquire high-resolution tomographic data from thick cells and to specifically identify elusive structures within crowded cellular environments. Here, we combined cryo-fluorescence microscopy with electron cryo-tomography of vitreous sections into a coherent correlative microscopy workflow, ideal for detection and structural analysis of elusive protein assemblies in situ. We used this workflow to address an open question on BAR-domain coating of yeast plasma membrane compartments known as eisosomes. BAR domains can sense or induce membrane curvature, and form scaffold-like membrane coats in vitro. Our results demonstrate that in cells, the BAR protein Pil1 localizes to eisosomes of varying membrane curvature. Sub-tomogram analysis revealed a dense protein coat on curved eisosomes, which was not present on shallow eisosomes, indicating that while BAR domains can assemble at shallow membranes in vivo, scaffold formation is tightly coupled to curvature generation. Copyright © 2018 MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pennycook, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Provides the first comprehensive treatment of the physics and applications of this mainstream technique for imaging and analysis at the atomic level Presents applications of STEM in condensed matter physics, materials science, catalysis, and nanoscience Suitable for graduate students learning microscopy, researchers wishing to utilize STEM, as well as for specialists in other areas of microscopy Edited and written by leading researchers and practitioners

  8. Electron microscopy study of advanced heterostructures for optoelectronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katcki, J.; Ratajczak, J.; Phillipp, F.; Muszalski, J.; Bugajski, M.; Chen, J.X.; Fiore, A.

    2003-01-01

    The application of cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and SEM to the investigation of optoelectronic devices are reviewed. Special attention was paid to the electron microscopy assessment of the growth perfection of such crucial elements of the devices like quantum wells, quantum dots,

  9. In-situ observation of recrystallization in an AlMgScZr alloy using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taendl, J.; Nambu, S.; Orthacker, A.; Kothleitner, G.; Inoue, J.; Koseki, T.; Poletti, C.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a novel in-situ approach to study the recrystallization behavior of age hardening alloys. We use confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) at 400 °C to investigate the static recrystallization of an AlMg4Sc0.4Zr0.12 alloy in-situ. The results are combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. It was found that CLSM is a powerful tool to visualize both the local initiation and temporal sequence of recrystallization. After fast nucleation and initial growth, the grain growth rate decreases and the grain boundary migration stops after some minutes due to Zener pinning from Al 3 (Sc,Zr) precipitates produced during the heat treatment. EBSD and TEM analyses confirm both the boundary movements and the particle-boundary interactions. - Highlights: • First time that CLSM is used to study recrystallization in-situ. • The start and end of recrystallization can be directly observed. • The procedure is easy to apply and requires only simple data interpretation. • In-situ observations on the surface correlate to modifications inside the bulk. • In-situ observations correlate to EBSD and EFTEM analyses.

  10. In-situ observation of recrystallization in an AlMgScZr alloy using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taendl, J., E-mail: johannes.taendl@tugraz.atl [Institute of Materials Science and Welding, Graz University of Technology, Graz (Austria); Nambu, S. [Department of Materials Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Orthacker, A.; Kothleitner, G. [Institute of Electron Microscopy and Nanoanalysis, Graz University of Technology, Graz (Austria); Graz Center for Electron Microscopy, Graz (Austria); Inoue, J.; Koseki, T. [Department of Materials Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Poletti, C. [Institute of Materials Science and Welding, Graz University of Technology, Graz (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    In this work we present a novel in-situ approach to study the recrystallization behavior of age hardening alloys. We use confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) at 400 °C to investigate the static recrystallization of an AlMg4Sc0.4Zr0.12 alloy in-situ. The results are combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. It was found that CLSM is a powerful tool to visualize both the local initiation and temporal sequence of recrystallization. After fast nucleation and initial growth, the grain growth rate decreases and the grain boundary migration stops after some minutes due to Zener pinning from Al{sub 3}(Sc,Zr) precipitates produced during the heat treatment. EBSD and TEM analyses confirm both the boundary movements and the particle-boundary interactions. - Highlights: • First time that CLSM is used to study recrystallization in-situ. • The start and end of recrystallization can be directly observed. • The procedure is easy to apply and requires only simple data interpretation. • In-situ observations on the surface correlate to modifications inside the bulk. • In-situ observations correlate to EBSD and EFTEM analyses.

  11. Towards a more realistic picture of in situ biocide actions: Combining physiological and microscopy techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speranza, M., E-mail: speranzamariela@gmail.com [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, MNCN-CSIC, Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Wierzchos, J.; De Los Rios, A.; Perez-Ortega, S. [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, MNCN-CSIC, Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Souza-Egipsy, V. [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, ICA-CSIC, Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ascaso, C., E-mail: ascaso@mncn.csic.es [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, MNCN-CSIC, Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    In this study, we combined chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlaF) measurements, using pulse-amplitude-modulate (PAM) equipment, with scanning electron microscopy in backscattered electron mode (SEM-BSE) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images to evaluate the actions of Koretrel at lower concentrations on Verrucaria nigrescens colonising a dolostone. ChlaF measurements are good indicators of the damaging effects of biocides. However, these indicators only provide an incomplete view of the mechanism of biocides used to control biodeterioration agents. The death of the V. nigrescens photobiont at two biocide concentrations was revealed by PAM, SEM-BSE and TEM. Once Koretrel was applied, the Fv/Fm ratios markedly fell in the first few hours after the 1.5% treatment, and ratios for the 3% dilution remained close to zero throughout the study. The algal zone shows the plasmolysed appearance of the photobiont cells, and important aspects related to the action of the biocide on free and lichenised fungi were also detected using SEM-BSE. Many of the mycobiont cells had only their cell walls preserved; although, some fungal hyphae in lichen thalli and some microorganisms in endolithic clusters maintained lipid storage in their cytoplasm. These results indicated that the combination of physiological and microscopy techniques improves the assessment of biocide action in situ and this will help to optimize protocols in order to reduce the emission of these compounds to the environment. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We combined ChlaF measurements with EM images to analyses the biocides action on stone biodeterioration agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At lower biocide concentrations damage to photobiont and mycobiont cells integrity, ultrastructure and vitality were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The limited action of biocides on fungi and algae were detected using SEM-BSE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The combination of physiological and microscopy

  12. Particles and waves in electron optics and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzi, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics merges two long-running serials, Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical and Electron Microscopy. The series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science, digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. * Contains contributions from leading authorities on the subject matter* Informs and updates all the latest developments in the field of imaging and electron physics* Provides practitioners interested in microscopy, optics, image processing, mathematical morphology, electromagnetic fields, electron, and ion emission with a valuable resource* Features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science, and digital image pro...

  13. Graphene-enabled electron microscopy and correlated super-resolution microscopy of wet cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Michal; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Moon, Seonah; Xu, Ke

    2015-06-11

    The application of electron microscopy to hydrated biological samples has been limited by high-vacuum operating conditions. Traditional methods utilize harsh and laborious sample dehydration procedures, often leading to structural artefacts and creating difficulties for correlating results with high-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Here, we utilize graphene, a single-atom-thick carbon meshwork, as the thinnest possible impermeable and conductive membrane to protect animal cells from vacuum, thus enabling high-resolution electron microscopy of wet and untreated whole cells with exceptional ease. Our approach further allows for facile correlative super-resolution and electron microscopy of wet cells directly on the culturing substrate. In particular, individual cytoskeletal actin filaments are resolved in hydrated samples through electron microscopy and well correlated with super-resolution results.

  14. Transmission electron microscopy on live catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmer, G.M.

    2017-01-01

    The dissertation describes TEM experiments on heterogeneous catalysts. Starting with characterization of (Ni/Co)MoS2 on Alumina and the effect of oxidation, and sequential resulfidation. After that, Co-based catalysts are used for high-resolution (S)TEM/EDX caracterization studies, and in situ

  15. Quantitative Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.

    Electronic and nanostructured materials have been investigated using advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques. The first topic is the microstructure of Ga and Sb-doped ZnO. Ga-doped ZnO is a candidate transparent conducting oxide material. The microstructure of GZO thin films grown by MBE under different growth conditions and different substrates were examined using various electron microscopy (EM) techniques. The microstructure, prevalent defects, and polarity in these films strongly depend on the growth conditions and substrate. Sb-doped ZnO nanowires have been shown to be the first route to stable p-type ZnO. Using Z-contrast STEM, I have showed that an unusual microstructure of Sb-decorated head-to-head inversion domain boundaries and internal voids contain all the Sb in the nanowires and cause the p-type conduction. InGaN thin films and InGaN / GaN quantum wells (QW) for light emitting diodes are the second topic. Low-dose Z-contrast STEM, PACBED, and EDS on InGaN QW LED structures grown by MOCVD show no evidence for nanoscale composition variations, contradicting previous reports. In addition, a new extended defect in GaN and InGaN was discovered. The defect consists of a faceted pyramid-shaped void that produces a threading dislocation along the [0001] growth direction, and is likely caused by carbon contamination during growth. Non-rigid registration (NRR) and high-precision STEM of nanoparticles is the final topic. NRR is a new image processing technique that corrects distortions arising from the serial nature of STEM acquisition that previously limited the precision of locating atomic columns and counting the number of atoms in images. NRR was used to demonstrate sub-picometer precision in STEM images of single crystal Si and GaN, the best achieved in EM. NRR was used to measure the atomic surface structure of Pt nanoacatalysts and Au nanoparticles, which revealed new bond length variation phenomenon of surface atoms. In

  16. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1993-01-01

    "Transmission Electron Microscopy" presents the theory of image and contrastformation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy Theprinciples of particle and wave optics of electrons are described Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast Also analysed are the kinetical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure determination and imaging of lattices and their defects X-ray microanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods The third edition includes a brief discussionof Schottky emission guns, some clarification of minor details, and references to the recent literature

  17. Correlative cryo-fluorescence light microscopy and cryo-electron tomography of Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Roman I; Celler, Katherine; Willemse, Joost; Bos, Erik; van Wezel, Gilles P; Koster, Abraham J

    2014-01-01

    Light microscopy and electron microscopy are complementary techniques that in a correlative approach enable identification and targeting of fluorescently labeled structures in situ for three-dimensional imaging at nanometer resolution. Correlative imaging allows electron microscopic images to be positioned in a broader temporal and spatial context. We employed cryo-correlative light and electron microscopy (cryo-CLEM), combining cryo-fluorescence light microscopy and cryo-electron tomography, on vitrified Streptomyces bacteria to study cell division. Streptomycetes are mycelial bacteria that grow as long hyphae and reproduce via sporulation. On solid media, Streptomyces subsequently form distinct aerial mycelia where cell division leads to the formation of unigenomic spores which separate and disperse to form new colonies. In liquid media, only vegetative hyphae are present divided by noncell separating crosswalls. Their multicellular life style makes them exciting model systems for the study of bacterial development and cell division. Complex intracellular structures have been visualized with transmission electron microscopy. Here, we describe the methods for cryo-CLEM that we applied for studying Streptomyces. These methods include cell growth, fluorescent labeling, cryo-fixation by vitrification, cryo-light microscopy using a Linkam cryo-stage, image overlay and relocation, cryo-electron tomography using a Titan Krios, and tomographic reconstruction. Additionally, methods for segmentation, volume rendering, and visualization of the correlative data are described. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Time-Resolved Scanning Electron Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weber, Peter M

    2006-01-01

    .... The pulsed electron beam is obtained by rapidly switching the electron emission of a field emission tip using the AC electric field arising from exposure to the intense electromagnetic radiation...

  19. Near-infrared branding efficiently correlates light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Derron; Nikić, Ivana; Brinkoetter, Mary; Knecht, Sharmon; Potz, Stephanie; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Misgeld, Thomas

    2011-06-05

    The correlation of light and electron microscopy of complex tissues remains a major challenge. Here we report near-infrared branding (NIRB), which facilitates such correlation by using a pulsed, near-infrared laser to create defined fiducial marks in three dimensions in fixed tissue. As these marks are fluorescent and can be photo-oxidized to generate electron contrast, they can guide re-identification of previously imaged structures as small as dendritic spines by electron microscopy.

  20. Resolution Versus Error for Computational Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luzi, Lorenzo; Stevens, Andrew; Yang, Hao; Browning, Nigel D.

    2017-07-01

    Images that are collected via scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) can be undersampled to avoid damage to the specimen while maintaining resolution [1, 2]. We have used BPFA to impute missing data and reduce noise [3]. The reconstruction is typically evaluated using the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR). This measure is too conservative for STEM images and we propose that the Fourier ring correlation (FRC) is used instead to evaluate the reconstruction. We are not concerned with exact reconstruction of the truth image, and therefore PSNR is a conservative estimation of the quality of the reconstruction. Instead, we are concerned with the visual resolution of the image and whether atoms can be distinguished. We have evaluated the reconstruction of a simulated STEM image using the FRC and compared the results with the PSNR measurements. The FRC captures the resolution of the image and is not affected by a large MSE if the atom peaks are still distinguishable. The noisy and reconstructed images are shown in Figure 1. The simulated STEM image was sampled at 100%, 80%, 40%, and 20% of the original pixels to simulate an undersampled scan. The reconstruction was done using BPFA with a patch size of 10 x 10 and no overlapping patches. Not having overlapping patches produces inferior results but they are still acceptable. The dictionary size is 64 and 30 iterations were completed during each reconstruction. The 100% image was denoised instead of reconstructed. Poisson noise was applied to the simulated image with λ values of 500, 50, and 5 to simulate lower imaging dose. The original simulated STEM image was also included in our calculations and was generated using a dose of 1000. The simulated STEM image is 100 by 100 pixels and has essentially no high frequency components. The image reconstruction tends to smooth the data, also resulting in no high frequency components. This causes the FRC of the two images to be large at higher resolutions and may be

  1. Electron Microscopy of Ebola Virus-Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) replicates in host cells, where both viral and cellular components show morphological changes during the process of viral replication from entry to budding. These steps in the replication cycle can be studied using electron microscopy (EM), including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which is one of the most useful methods for visualizing EBOV particles and EBOV-infected cells at the ultrastructural level. This chapter describes conventional methods for EM sample preparation of cultured cells infected with EBOV.

  2. Submolecular Electronic Mapping of Single Cysteine Molecules by in Situ Scanning Tunneling Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Nazmutdinov, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    We have used L-Cysteine (Cys) as a model system to study the surface electronic structures of single molecules at the submolecular level in aqueous buffer solution by a combination of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM), electrochemistry including voltammetry and chronocou...

  3. Electrochemical activation of Li2MnO3 at elevated temperature investigated by in situ Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanz, Patrick; Villevieille, Claire; Novák, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Layered-layered oxides of the type xLi 2 MnO 3 ·(1 − x)LiMO 2 (M = Mn, Ni, Co) have been postulated to contain Li 2 MnO 3 domains which, upon electrochemical activation, give rise to a characteristic potential plateau at 4.5 V vs. Li + /Li. To improve our understanding of the complex reaction mechanisms at play, we applied in situ Raman microscopy to investigate the constituent Li 2 MnO 3 . Li 2 MnO 3 synthesised via a two-step solid-state reaction was characterised by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Preliminary electrochemical tests and ex situ Raman microscopy showed the need for elevated temperatures to achieve activation. For the first time, in situ Raman microscopy (at 50 °C) confirmed the activation of Li 2 MnO 3 . The main signal at 615 cm −1 shifted to higher wavenumbers upon charging. After reaching 4.4 V vs. Li + /Li, this shift grew significantly, which is in good agreement with the onset of the potential plateau in both Li 2 MnO 3 and xLi 2 MnO 3 ·(1 − x)LiMO 2 , and is assigned to the partial formation of a spinel-like phase

  4. Imaging of RNA in situ hybridization by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalle, W.H.J.; Macville, M.V.E.; van de Corput, M.P.C.; de Grooth, B.G.; Tanke, H.J.; Raap, A.K.

    In this study we investigated the possibility of imaging internal cellular molecules after cytochemical detection with atomic force microscopy (AFM). To this end, rat 9G and HeLa cells were hybridized with haptenized probes for 28S ribosomal RNA, human elongation factor mRNA and cytomegalovirus

  5. The principle of electron microscopy; SEM and TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauzi, S.H.

    1992-01-01

    The article reviews the principle of electron microscopy which is used in scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). These instruments are important for the examination and analysis of the microstructural properties of solid objects. Relevance physical concept lies behind the devices are given. The main components of each device are also discussed

  6. Growth and decay of a two-dimensional oxide quasicrystal: High-temperature in situ microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, Stefan [Physik-Institut, Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland); Institute of Physics, Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany); Flege, Jan Ingo; Falta, Jens [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen (Germany); MAPEX Center for Materials and Processes, University of Bremen (Germany); Zollner, Eva Maria; Schumann, Florian Otto; Hammer, Rene; Bayat, Alireza; Schindler, Karl-Michael [Institute of Physics, Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany); Widdra, Wolf [Institute of Physics, Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    The recently discovered two-dimensional oxide quasicrystal (OQC) derived from BaTiO{sub 3} on Pt(111) is the first material in which a spontaneous formation of an aperiodic structure at the interface to a periodic support has been observed. Herein, we report in situ low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) studies on the fundamental processes involved in the OQC growth. The OQC formation proceeds in two steps via of an amorphous two-dimensional wetting layer. At 1170 K the long-range aperiodic order of the OQC develops. Annealing in O{sub 2} induces the reverse process, the conversion of the OQC into BaTiO{sub 3} islands and bare Pt(111), which has been monitored by in situ LEEM. A quantitative analysis of the temporal decay of the OQC shows that oxygen adsorption on bare Pt patches is the rate limiting step of this dewetting process. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. In situ microscopy of the self-assembly of branched nanocrystals in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Eli; Sutter, Peter; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Krahne, Roman; de Graaf, Joost; Arciniegas, Milena; Manna, Liberato

    2016-04-01

    Solution-phase self-assembly of nanocrystals into mesoscale structures is a promising strategy for constructing functional materials from nanoscale components. Liquid environments are key to self-assembly since they allow suspended nanocrystals to diffuse and interact freely, but they also complicate experiments. Real-time observations with single-particle resolution could have transformative impact on our understanding of nanocrystal self-assembly. Here we use real-time in situ imaging by liquid-cell electron microscopy to elucidate the nucleation and growth mechanism and properties of linear chains of octapod-shaped nanocrystals in their native solution environment. Statistical mechanics modelling based on these observations and using the measured chain-length distribution clarifies the relative importance of dipolar and entropic forces in the assembly process and gives direct access to the interparticle interaction. Our results suggest that monomer-resolved in situ imaging combined with modelling can provide unprecedented quantitative insight into the microscopic processes and interactions that govern nanocrystal self-assembly in solution.

  8. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1997-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy presents the theory of image and contrast formation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy. The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described. Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast. Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure analysis and imaging of lattices and their defects. X-ray micronanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods. Specimen damage and contamination by electron irradiation limits the resolution for biological and some inorganic specimens. This fourth edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the area of Schottky emission guns, convergent-beam electron diffraction, electron tomography, holography and the high resolution of crystal lattices.

  9. A Comparative Scanning Electron Microscopy Evaluation of Smear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... scanning electron microscopy evaluation of smear layer removal with chitosan and .... this compound has considerably increased its concentration in rivers and .... of the images was done by three investigators who calibrated ...

  10. Analyzing Lysosome-Related Organelles by Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Hurbain, Ilse; Romao, Maryse; Bergam, Ptissam; Heiligenstein, Xavier; Raposo, Graç a

    2017-01-01

    and their dynamics at the cellular level. Deciphering the biogenesis and functions of lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles (LROs) and their dysfunctions requires their visualization and detailed characterization at high resolution by electron microscopy. Here

  11. Dysprosium disilicide nanostructures on silicon(001) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Gangfeng; Nogami, Jun; Crimp, Martin A.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure of self-assembled dysprosium silicide nanostructures on silicon(001) has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The studies focused on nanostructures that involve multiple atomic layers of the silicide. Cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy images and fast Fourier transform analysis showed that both hexagonal and orthorhombic/tetragonal silicide phases were present. Both the magnitude and the anisotropy of lattice mismatch between the silicide and the substrate play roles in the morphology and epitaxial growth of the nanostructures formed

  12. Atomic resolution three-dimensional electron diffraction microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Jianwei; Ohsuna, Tetsu; Terasaki, Osamu; Hodgson, Keith O.; O'Keefe, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    We report the development of a novel form of diffraction-based 3D microscopy to overcome resolution barriers inherent in high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography. By combining coherent electron diffraction with the oversampling phasing method, we show that the 3D structure of a nanocrystal can be determined ab initio at a resolution of 1 Angstrom from 29 simulated noisy diffraction patterns. This new form of microscopy can be used to image the 3D structures of nanocrystals and noncrystalline samples, with resolution limited only by the quality of sample diffraction

  13. Processing scarce biological samples for light and transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Taupin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Light microscopy (LM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM aim at understanding the relationship structure-function. With advances in biology, isolation and purification of scarce populations of cells or subcellular structures may not lead to enough biological material, for processing for LM and TEM. A protocol for preparation of scarce biological samples is presented. It is based on pre-embedding the biological samples, suspensions or pellets, in bovine serum albumin (BSA and bis-acrylamide (BA, cross-linked and polymerized. This preparation provides a simple and reproducible technique to process biological materials, present in limited quantities that can not be amplified, for light and transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope for correlative microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ian E G; Dennison, Clare L; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Sato, Chikara; Yarwood, Andrew; O'Toole, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    The JEOL ClairScope is the first truly correlative scanning electron and optical microscope. An inverted scanning electron microscope (SEM) column allows electron images of wet samples to be obtained in ambient conditions in a biological culture dish, via a silicon nitride film window in the base. A standard inverted optical microscope positioned above the dish holder can be used to take reflected light and epifluorescence images of the same sample, under atmospheric conditions that permit biochemical modifications. For SEM, the open dish allows successive staining operations to be performed without moving the holder. The standard optical color camera used for fluorescence imaging can be exchanged for a high-sensitivity monochrome camera to detect low-intensity fluorescence signals, and also cathodoluminescence emission from nanophosphor particles. If these particles are applied to the sample at a suitable density, they can greatly assist the task of perfecting the correlation between the optical and electron images. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Electron microscopy of cyanobacterial membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folea, Ioana Mihaela

    2008-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is photosynthetic protein complexes, and their organization within the membrane of cyanobacteria. In cyanobacteria large proteins catalyze the light reactions of photosynthesis. One of the key proteins is photosystem II. We have found for the first time by electron

  16. Scanning transmission low-energy electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Konvalina, Ivo; Unčovský, M.; Frank, Luděk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2011), 2:1-6 ISSN 0018-8646 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : TEM * STEM * SEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.723, year: 2011

  17. The role of electron irradiation history in liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Trevor H.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Park, Chiwoo; Kelly, Ryan T.; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Evans, James E.

    2018-04-20

    In situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LC-TEM) allows dynamic nanoscale characterization of systems in a hydrated state. Although powerful, this technique remains impaired by issues of repeatability that limit experimental fidelity and hinder the identification and control of some variables underlying observed dynamics. We detail new LC- TEM devices that improve experimental reproducibility by expanding available imaging area and providing a platform for investigating electron flux history on the sample. Irradiation history is an important factor influencing LC-TEM results that has, to this point, been largely qualitatively and not quantitatively described. We use these devices to highlight the role of cumulative electron flux history on samples from both nanoparticle growth and biological imaging experiments and demonstrate capture of time zero, low-dose images on beam-sensitive samples. In particular, the ability to capture pristine images of biological samples, where the acquired image is the first time that the cell experiences significant electron flux, allowed us to determine that nanoparticle movement compared to the cell membrane was a function of cell damage and therefore an artifact rather than visualizing cell dynamics in action. These results highlight just a subset of the new science that is accessible with LC-TEM through the new multiwindow devices with patterned focusing aides.

  18. Telocytes and putative stem cells in the lungs: electron microscopy, electron tomography and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Laurentiu M; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Suciu, Laura C; Manole, Catalin G; Hinescu, Mihail E

    2011-09-01

    This study describes a novel type of interstitial (stromal) cell - telocytes (TCs) - in the human and mouse respiratory tree (terminal and respiratory bronchioles, as well as alveolar ducts). TCs have recently been described in pleura, epicardium, myocardium, endocardium, intestine, uterus, pancreas, mammary gland, etc. (see www.telocytes.com ). TCs are cells with specific prolongations called telopodes (Tp), frequently two to three per cell. Tp are very long prolongations (tens up to hundreds of μm) built of alternating thin segments known as podomers (≤ 200 nm, below the resolving power of light microscope) and dilated segments called podoms, which accommodate mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum and caveolae. Tp ramify dichotomously, making a 3-dimensional network with complex homo- and heterocellular junctions. Confocal microscopy reveals that TCs are c-kit- and CD34-positive. Tp release shed vesicles or exosomes, sending macromolecular signals to neighboring cells and eventually modifying their transcriptional activity. At bronchoalveolar junctions, TCs have been observed in close association with putative stem cells (SCs) in the subepithelial stroma. SCs are recognized by their ultrastructure and Sca-1 positivity. Tp surround SCs, forming complex TC-SC niches (TC-SCNs). Electron tomography allows the identification of bridging nanostructures, which connect Tp with SCs. In conclusion, this study shows the presence of TCs in lungs and identifies a TC-SC tandem in subepithelial niches of the bronchiolar tree. In TC-SCNs, the synergy of TCs and SCs may be based on nanocontacts and shed vesicles.

  19. High Resolution Electron Microscopy in Materials Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amelinckx, S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper illustrates different operating modes of the electron microscope and shows the image formation in an ideal microscope. Diffraction contrast is used in the study of crystal defects, such as dislocations and planar interfaces. Methods are surveyed which give at least a rudimentary image of the lattice and therefore make use of at least two interfering beams. Special attention is given to images which also carry structural information and therefore imply the use of many beams. The underlying theory is discussed as are the theories of Van Dyck, Spence and Cowley. These are illustrated by means of a number of recent case studies

  20. Transmission electron microscopy of mercury metal

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2016-03-28

    Summary: Transmission electron microcopy (TEM) analysis of liquid metals, especially mercury (Hg), is difficult to carry out because their specimen preparation poses a daunting task due to the unique surface properties of these metals. This paper reports a cryoTEM study on Hg using a novel specimen preparation technique. Hg metal is mixed with water using sonication and quenched in liquid ethane cryogen. This technique permits research into the morphological, phase and structural properties of Hg at nanoscale dimensions. © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Study of Hydrated Lime in Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tihlaříková, Eva; Neděla, Vilém; Rovnaníková, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, S2 (2013), s. 1644-1645 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/10/1410; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Hydrated Lime * Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.757, year: 2013

  2. Characterization of Polycaprolactone Films Biodeterioration by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrubanová, Kamila; Voberková, S.; Hermanová, S.; Krzyžánek, Vladislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 20, S3 (2014), s. 1950-1951 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0103; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : polycaprolactone films * biodeterioration * scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.877, year: 2014

  3. A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempen, Paul J; Kircher, Moritz F; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigation of ceramic devices by analytical electron microscopy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiojiri, M.; Saijo, H.; Isshiki, T.; Kawasaki, M.; Yoshioka, T.; Sato, S.; Nomura, T.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramics are widely used as capacitors and varistors. Their electrical properties depend on the structure, which is deeply influenced not only by the composition of raw materials and additives but also by heating treatments in the production process. This paper reviews our investigations of SrTiO 3 ceramic devices, which have been performed using various microscopy techniques such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), cathodoluminescence scanning electron microscopy (CLSEM), field emission SEM (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging method in a FE-(scanning) transmission electron microscope(FE-(S)TEM). (author)

  5. Electron microscopy methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, A. L., E-mail: a.vasiliev56@gmail.com; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute” (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    The history of the development and application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXMA) in studies of cultural heritage sites is considered. In fact, investigations based on these methods began when electron microscopes became a commercial product. Currently, these methods, being developed and improved, help solve many historical enigmas. To date, electron microscopy combined with microanalysis makes it possible to investigate any object, from parchment and wooden articles to pigments, tools, and objects of art. Studies by these methods have revealed that some articles were made by ancient masters using ancient “nanotechnologies”; hence, their comprehensive analysis calls for the latest achievements in the corresponding instrumental methods and sample preparation techniques.

  6. Electron microscopy methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, A. L.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B.

    2016-11-01

    The history of the development and application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXMA) in studies of cultural heritage sites is considered. In fact, investigations based on these methods began when electron microscopes became a commercial product. Currently, these methods, being developed and improved, help solve many historical enigmas. To date, electron microscopy combined with microanalysis makes it possible to investigate any object, from parchment and wooden articles to pigments, tools, and objects of art. Studies by these methods have revealed that some articles were made by ancient masters using ancient "nanotechnologies"; hence, their comprehensive analysis calls for the latest achievements in the corresponding instrumental methods and sample preparation techniques.

  7. Electron microscopy methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, A. L.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B.

    2016-01-01

    The history of the development and application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXMA) in studies of cultural heritage sites is considered. In fact, investigations based on these methods began when electron microscopes became a commercial product. Currently, these methods, being developed and improved, help solve many historical enigmas. To date, electron microscopy combined with microanalysis makes it possible to investigate any object, from parchment and wooden articles to pigments, tools, and objects of art. Studies by these methods have revealed that some articles were made by ancient masters using ancient “nanotechnologies”; hence, their comprehensive analysis calls for the latest achievements in the corresponding instrumental methods and sample preparation techniques.

  8. Nanoparticle sizing: a comparative study using atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and ferromagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacava, L.M.; Lacava, B.M.; Azevedo, R.B.; Lacava, Z.G.M.; Buske, N.; Tronconi, A.L.; Morais, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) were used to unfold the nanoparticle size of a ferrofluid sample. Compared to TEM, the AFM method showed a nanoparticle diameter (D m ) reduction of 20% and standard deviation (σ) increase of 15%. The differences in D m and σ were associated with the AFM tip and the nanoparticle concentration on the substrate

  9. Electron beam effects in auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, J.M.; Duraud, J.P.; Le Gressus, C.

    1979-01-01

    Electron beam effects on Si(100) and 5% Fe/Cr alloy samples have been studied by measurements of the secondary electron yield delta, determination of the surface composition by Auger electron spectroscopy and imaging with scanning electron microscopy. Variations of delta as a function of the accelerating voltage Esub(p) (0.5 -9 Torr has no effect on technological samples covered with their reaction layers; the sensitivities to the beam depend rather on the earlier mechanical, thermal and chemical treatment of the surfaces. (author)

  10. In-situ piezoresponse force microscopy cantilever mode shape profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proksch, R.

    2015-01-01

    The frequency-dependent amplitude and phase in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements are shown to be a consequence of the Euler-Bernoulli (EB) dynamics of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beams used to make the measurements. Changes in the cantilever mode shape as a function of changes in the boundary conditions determine the sensitivity of cantilevers to forces between the tip and the sample. Conventional PFM and AFM measurements are made with the motion of the cantilever measured at one optical beam detector (OBD) spot location. A single OBD spot location provides a limited picture of the total cantilever motion, and in fact, experimentally observed cantilever amplitude and phase are shown to be strongly dependent on the OBD spot position for many measurements. In this work, the commonly observed frequency dependence of PFM response is explained through experimental measurements and analytic theoretical EB modeling of the PFM response as a function of both frequency and OBD spot location on a periodically poled lithium niobate sample. One notable conclusion is that a common choice of OBD spot location—at or near the tip of the cantilever—is particularly vulnerable to frequency dependent amplitude and phase variations stemming from dynamics of the cantilever sensor rather than from the piezoresponse of the sample

  11. In situ microscopy for on-line determination of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, C; Wehnert, G; Scheper, T

    1998-10-05

    A sensor is presented, which allows on-line microscopic observation of microorganisms during fermentations in bioreactors. This sensor, an In Situ Microscope (ISM) consists of a direct-light microscope with a measuring chamber, integrated in a 25 mm stainless steel tube, two CCD-cameras, and two frame-grabbers. The data obtained are processed by an automatic image analysis system. The ISM is connected with the bioreactor via a standard port, and it is immersed directly in the culture liquid-in our case Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a synthetic medium. The microscopic examination of the liquid is performed in the measuring chamber, which is situated near the front end of the sensor head. The measuring chamber is opened and closed periodically. In the open state, the liquid in the bioreactor flows unrestricted through the chamber. In closing, a defined volume of 2,2. 10(-8) mL of the liquid becomes enclosed. After a few seconds, when the movement of the cells in the enclosed culture has stopped, they are examined with the microscope. The microscopic images of the cells are registered with the CCD-cameras and are visualized on a monitor, allowing a direct view of the cell population. After detection, the measuring chamber reopens, and the enclosed liquid is released. The images obtained are evaluated as to cell concentration, cell size, cell volume, biomass, and other relevant parameters simultaneously by automatic image analysis. With a PC (486/33 MHz), image processing takes about 15 s per image. The detection range tested when measuring cells of S. cerevisiae is about 10(6) to 10(9) cells/mL (equivalent to a biomass of 0.01 g/L to 12 g/L). The calculated biomass values correlate very well with those obtained using dry weight analysis. Furthermore, histograms can be calculated, which are comparable to those obtained by flow cytometry. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of photocatalysts for water splitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalca, Filippo; Laursen, Anders Bo; Dahl, Søren

    , it is necessary to understand the fundamentals of their reaction mechanisms, chemical behavior, structure and morphology before, during and after reaction using in situ investigations. Here, we focus on the in situ characterization of photocatalysts [1] in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM......) [2]. Such fundamental insight can be used for further material optimization with respect to performance and stability [3]. In this work, we combine conventional TEM analysis of photocatalysts with environmental TEM (ETEM) and photoactivation using light. A novel type of TEM specimen holder...... that enables in situ illumination is developed to study light-induced phenomena in photoactive materials at the nanoscale under working conditions. Our experiments are aimed at exposing a specimen to light and detecting resulting microstructural and chemical changes using in situ TEM techniques...

  13. Scanning Electron Microscopy with Samples in an Electric Field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Hovorka, Miloš; Mikmeková, Šárka; Mikmeková, Eliška; Müllerová, Ilona; Pokorná, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 12 (2012), s. 2731-2756 ISSN 1996-1944 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/11/2270; GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * slow electrons * low energy SEM * low energy STEM * cathode lens Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.247, year: 2012

  14. Microstructure-Sensitive Investigation of Fracture Using Acoustic Emission Coupled With Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisner, Brian; Cabal, Mike; Vanniamparambiland, Prashanth A.; Leser, William; Hochhalter, Jacob; Kontsos, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    A novel technique using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring is proposed to investigate microstructure-sensitive fatigue and fracture of metals. The coupling between quasi in situ microscopy with actual in situ nondestructive evaluation falls into the ICME framework and the idea of quantitative data-driven characterization of material behavior. To validate the use of AE monitoring inside the SEM chamber, Aluminum 2024-B sharp notch specimen were tested both inside and outside the microscope using a small scale mechanical testing device. Subsequently, the same type of specimen was tested inside the SEM chamber. Load data were correlated with both AE information and observations of microcracks around grain boundaries as well as secondary cracks, voids, and slip bands. The preliminary results are in excellent agreement with similar findings at the mesoscale. Extensions of the application of this novel technique are discussed.

  15. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Itokawa Regolith Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Berger, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In a remarkable engineering achievement, the JAXA space agency successfully recovered the Hayabusa space-craft in June 2010, following a non-optimal encounter and sur-face sampling mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa. These are the first direct samples ever obtained and returned from the surface of an asteroid. The Hayabusa samples thus present a special op-portunity to directly investigate the evolution of asteroidal sur-faces, from the development of the regolith to the study of the effects of space weathering. Here we report on our preliminary TEM measurements on two Itokawa samples. Methods: We were allocated particles RA-QD02-0125 and RA-QD02-0211. Both particles were embedded in low viscosity epoxy and thin sections were prepared using ultramicrotomy. High resolution images and electron diffraction data were ob-tained using a JEOL 2500SE 200 kV field-emission scanning-transmission electron microscope. Quantitative maps and anal-yses were obtained using a Thermo thin-window energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectrometer. Results: Both particles are olivine-rich (Fo70) with µm-sized inclusions of FeS and have microstructurally complex rims. Par-ticle RA-QD02-0125 is rounded and has numerous sub-µm grains attached to its surface including FeS, albite, olivine, and rare melt droplets. Solar flare tracks have not been observed, but the particle is surrounded by a continuous 50 nm thick, stuctur-ally disordered rim that is compositionally similar to the core of the grain. One of the surface adhering grains is pyrrhotite show-ing a S-depleted rim (8-10 nm thick) with nanophase Fe metal grains (<5 nm) decorating the outermost surface. The pyrrhotite displays a complex superstructure in its core that is absent in the S-depleted rim. Particle RA-QD02-0211 contains solar flare particle tracks (2x109 cm-2) and shows a structurally disordered rim 100 nm thick. The track density corresponds to a surface exposure of 103-104 years based on the track production rate

  16. Electron microscopy studies of ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshan, K.

    1975-11-01

    The nature of defects resulting from the implantation of phosphorous ions into doped silicon and a model of how they form are reported. This involved an electron microscope study of the crystallographic defects (in the 300A size range in concentration of 10 15 /cm 3 ) that form upon annealing. Images formed by these crystallographic defects are complex and that nonconventional imaging techniques are required for their characterization. The images of these small defects (about 300A) are sensitive to various parameters, such as foil thickness, their position in the foil, and diffracting conditions. The defects were found to be mostly interstitial hexagonal Frank loops lying on the four [111] planes and a few perfect interstitial loops; these loops occurred in concentrations of about 10 16 /cm 3 . In addition, ''rod like'' linear defects that are shown to be interstitial are also found in concentrations of 10 13 /cm 3 . It was found that the linear defects require boron for their formation. A model is proposed to account for the interstitial defects. The number of point defects that make up the defects is of the same order as the number of implanted ions. The model predicts that only interstitial loops ought to be observed in agreement with several recent investigations. Dislocation models of the loops are examined and it is shown that phosphorous ions could segregate to the Frank loops, changing their displacement vectors to a/x[111]. (x greater than 3) thus explaining the contrast effects observed. It would also explain the relative electrical inactivity of P + ion implants

  17. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Kalle, W.H.J.; Kalle, W.H.J.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; Wiegant, J.C.A.G.; Raap, A.K.; Greve, Jan; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization o­n human metaphase chromosomes is detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy. This combination of cytochemical and scanning probe techniques enables the localization and identification of several fluorescently labelled genomic DNA fragments o­n a single

  18. Covalently Immobilised Cytochrome C Imaged by In Situ Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Olesen, Klaus G.; Danilov, Alexey I.

    1997-01-01

    In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging of cytochrome c (cyt c) on polycrystalline Pt surfaces and on Au(lll) was achieved first by covalent immobilisation of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTS) brought to react with oxide present on the Pt surfaces. Covalently bound 3-APTS forms...

  19. Cytochrome C Dynamics at Gold and Glassy Carbon Surfaces Monitored by in Situ Scanning Tunnel Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Møller, Per; Pedersen, Marianne Vind

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the absorption of cytochrome c on gold and glassy carbon substrates by in situ scanning tunnel microscopy under potentiostatic control of both substrate and tip. Low ionic strength and potential ranges where no Faradaic current flows were used. Cyt c aggregates into flat...

  20. In Situ Scanning Probe Microscopy and New Perspectives in Analytical Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin

    1999-01-01

    The resolution of scanning probe microscopies is unpresedented but the techniques are fraught with limitations as analytical tools. These limitations and their relationship to the physical mechanisms of image contrast are first discussed. Some new options based on in situ STM, which hold prospect...

  1. Medipix 2 detector applied to low energy electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastel, R. van; Sikharulidze, I.; Schramm, S.; Abrahams, J.P.; Poelsema, B.; Tromp, R.M.; Molen, S.J. van der

    2009-01-01

    Low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and photo-emission electron microscopy (PEEM) traditionally use microchannel plates (MCPs), a phosphor screen and a CCD-camera to record images and diffraction patterns. In recent years, however, MCPs have become a limiting factor for these types of microscopy. Here, we report on a successful test series using a solid state hybrid pixel detector, Medipix 2, in LEEM and PEEM. Medipix 2 is a background-free detector with an infinite dynamic range, making it very promising for both real-space imaging and spectroscopy. We demonstrate a significant enhancement of both image contrast and resolution, as compared to MCPs. Since aging of the Medipix 2 detector is negligible for the electron energies used in LEEM/PEEM, we expect Medipix to become the detector of choice for a new generation of systems.

  2. Medipix 2 detector applied to low energy electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastel, R. van, E-mail: R.vanGastel@utwente.nl [University of Twente, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, P.O. Box 217, NL-7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Sikharulidze, I. [Leiden University, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, P.O. Box 9502, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Schramm, S. [Leiden University, Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium, P.O. Box 9504, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Abrahams, J.P. [Leiden University, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, P.O. Box 9502, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Poelsema, B. [University of Twente, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, P.O. Box 217, NL-7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Tromp, R.M. [Leiden University, Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium, P.O. Box 9504, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Molen, S.J. van der [Leiden University, Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium, P.O. Box 9504, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2009-12-15

    Low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and photo-emission electron microscopy (PEEM) traditionally use microchannel plates (MCPs), a phosphor screen and a CCD-camera to record images and diffraction patterns. In recent years, however, MCPs have become a limiting factor for these types of microscopy. Here, we report on a successful test series using a solid state hybrid pixel detector, Medipix 2, in LEEM and PEEM. Medipix 2 is a background-free detector with an infinite dynamic range, making it very promising for both real-space imaging and spectroscopy. We demonstrate a significant enhancement of both image contrast and resolution, as compared to MCPs. Since aging of the Medipix 2 detector is negligible for the electron energies used in LEEM/PEEM, we expect Medipix to become the detector of choice for a new generation of systems.

  3. Biological applications of phase-contrast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    Here, I review the principles and applications of phase-contrast electron microscopy using phase plates. First, I develop the principle of phase contrast based on a minimal model of microscopy, introducing a double Fourier-transform process to mathematically formulate the image formation. Next, I explain four phase-contrast (PC) schemes, defocus PC, Zernike PC, Hilbert differential contrast, and schlieren optics, as image-filtering processes in the context of the minimal model, with particular emphases on the Zernike PC and corresponding Zernike phase plates. Finally, I review applications of Zernike PC cryo-electron microscopy to biological systems such as protein molecules, virus particles, and cells, including single-particle analysis to delineate three-dimensional (3D) structures of protein and virus particles and cryo-electron tomography to reconstruct 3D images of complex protein systems and cells.

  4. Bauxite and bauxite residue, characterization and electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, M.L.P.; Conceicao, F.T.; Toledo, S.P.; Kiyohara, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Through the Bayer process, bauxite is refined and alumina is produced. In this process, a highly alkaline residue, red mud is generated and its disposal represents an environmental problem. The aim of this paper is to present the characterization of Brazilian bauxite and Brazilian red mud by: X-ray diffraction, specific surface area, chemical composition analysis by ICP-MS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and discuss possible applications of this residue. The results identify as a constituent of both materials: Al 2 O 3 , Fe 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and SiO 2 and the presence of Na 2 O in residue. The analysis by electron microscopy of Bauxite shows particles with hexagonal shape and red mud shows small particles size. (author)

  5. Evaluations of carbon nanotube field emitters for electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, Hitoshi, E-mail: nakahara@nagoya-u.jp [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kusano, Yoshikazu; Kono, Takumi; Saito, Yahachi [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    Brightness of carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters was already reported elsewhere. However, brightness of electron emitter is affected by a virtual source size of the emitter, which strongly depends on electron optical configuration around the emitter. In this work, I-V characteristics and brightness of a CNT emitter are measured under a practical field emission electron gun (e-gun) configuration to investigate availability of CNT for electron microscopy. As a result, it is obtained that an emission area of MWNT is smaller than its tip surface area, and the emission area corresponds to a five-membered-ring with 2nd nearest six-membered-rings on the MWNT cap surface. Reduced brightness of MWNT is measured as at least 2.6x10{sup 9} A/m{sup 2} sr V. It is concluded that even a thick MWNT has enough brightness under a practical e-gun electrode configuration and suitable for electron microscopy.

  6. Evaluations of carbon nanotube field emitters for electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Hitoshi; Kusano, Yoshikazu; Kono, Takumi; Saito, Yahachi

    2009-11-01

    Brightness of carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters was already reported elsewhere. However, brightness of electron emitter is affected by a virtual source size of the emitter, which strongly depends on electron optical configuration around the emitter. In this work, I- V characteristics and brightness of a CNT emitter are measured under a practical field emission electron gun (e-gun) configuration to investigate availability of CNT for electron microscopy. As a result, it is obtained that an emission area of MWNT is smaller than its tip surface area, and the emission area corresponds to a five-membered-ring with 2nd nearest six-membered-rings on the MWNT cap surface. Reduced brightness of MWNT is measured as at least 2.6×109 A/m 2 sr V. It is concluded that even a thick MWNT has enough brightness under a practical e-gun electrode configuration and suitable for electron microscopy.

  7. Laboratory design for high-performance electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Turner, John H.; Hetherington, Crispin J.D.; Cullis, A.G.; Carragher, Bridget; Jenkins, Ron; Milgrim, Julie; Milligan,Ronald A.; Potter, Clinton S.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.; Degenhardt, Lynn; Sides, William H.

    2004-04-23

    Proliferation of electron microscopes with field emission guns, imaging filters and hardware spherical aberration correctors (giving higher spatial and energy resolution) has resulted in the need to construct special laboratories. As resolutions improve, transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) and scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) become more sensitive to ambient conditions. State-of-the-art electron microscopes require state-of-the-art environments, and this means careful design and implementation of microscope sites, from the microscope room to the building that surrounds it. Laboratories have been constructed to house high-sensitive instruments with resolutions ranging down to sub-Angstrom levels; we present the various design philosophies used for some of these laboratories and our experiences with them. Four facilities are described: the National Center for Electron Microscopy OAM Laboratory at LBNL; the FEGTEM Facility at the University of Sheffield; the Center for Integrative Molecular Biosciences at TSRI; and the Advanced Microscopy Laboratory at ORNL.

  8. Simultaneous correlative scanning electron and high-NA fluorescence microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalan Liv

    Full Text Available Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM is a unique method for investigating biological structure-function relations. With CLEM protein distributions visualized in fluorescence can be mapped onto the cellular ultrastructure measured with electron microscopy. Widespread application of correlative microscopy is hampered by elaborate experimental procedures related foremost to retrieving regions of interest in both modalities and/or compromises in integrated approaches. We present a novel approach to correlative microscopy, in which a high numerical aperture epi-fluorescence microscope and a scanning electron microscope illuminate the same area of a sample at the same time. This removes the need for retrieval of regions of interest leading to a drastic reduction of inspection times and the possibility for quantitative investigations of large areas and datasets with correlative microscopy. We demonstrate Simultaneous CLEM (SCLEM analyzing cell-cell connections and membrane protrusions in whole uncoated colon adenocarcinoma cell line cells stained for actin and cortactin with AlexaFluor488. SCLEM imaging of coverglass-mounted tissue sections with both electron-dense and fluorescence staining is also shown.

  9. Sample Preparation and Imaging of Exosomes by Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min Kyo; Mun, Ji Young

    2018-01-04

    Exosomes are nano-sized extracellular vesicles secreted by body fluids and are known to represent the characteristics of cells that secrete them. The contents and morphology of the secreted vesicles reflect cell behavior or physiological status, for example cell growth, migration, cleavage, and death. The exosomes' role may depend highly on size, and the size of exosomes varies from 30 to 300 nm. The most widely used method for exosome imaging is negative staining, while other results are based on Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy. The typical exosome's morphology assessed through negative staining is a cup-shape, but further details are not yet clear. An exosome well-characterized through structural study is necessary particular in medical and pharmaceutical fields. Therefore, function-dependent morphology should be verified by electron microscopy techniques such as labeling a specific protein in the detailed structure of exosome. To observe detailed structure, ultrathin sectioned images and negative stained images of exosomes were compared. In this protocol, we suggest transmission electron microscopy for the imaging of exosomes including negative staining, whole mount immuno-staining, block preparation, thin section, and immuno-gold labelling.

  10. Dynamics of soft Nanomaterials captured by transmission electron microscopy in liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proetto, Maria T.; Rush, Anthony M.; Chien, Miao-Ping; Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Patterson, Joseph P.; Thompson, Matthew P.; Olson, Norman H.; Moore, Curtis E.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Andolina, Christopher; Millstone, Jill; Howell, Stephen B.; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.

    2014-01-14

    In this paper we present in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of soft, synthetic nanoparticles with a comparative analysis using conventional TEM methods. This comparison is made with the simple aim of describing what is an unprecedented example of in situ imaging by TEM. However, we contend the technique will quickly become essential in the characterization of analogous systems, especially where dynamics are of interest in the solvated state. In this case, particles were studied which were obtained from the direct polymerization of an oxaliplatin analog, designed for an ongoing program in novel chemotherapeutic delivery systems. The resulting nanoparticles provided sufficient contrast for facile imaging in situ, and point toward key design parameters that enable this new characterization approach for organic nanomaterials. We describe the preparation of the synthetic micellar nanoparticles to- gether with their characterization in liquid water.

  11. Study of single-electron excitations by electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craven, A.J.; Gibson, J.M.; Howie, A.; Spalding, D.R.

    1978-01-01

    The inelastic scattering of fast electrons by the excitation of L-shell electrons at a stacking fault in silicon has been studied with a scanning transmission electron microscope. It was found that the bright-field stacking fault contrast is preserved in the filtered L-shell-loss signal at 100 eV. This result is discussed in terms of the delocalization of the excitation mechanism. It is concluded that localization effects will typically become significant only for energy transfers greater than 1 keV from a fast electron of energy 80 keV. (author)

  12. Helium ion microscopy and energy selective scanning electron microscopy - two advanced microscopy techniques with complementary applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenburg, C.; Jepson, M. A. E.; Boden, Stuart A.; Bagnall, Darren M.

    2014-06-01

    Both scanning electron microscopes (SEM) and helium ion microscopes (HeIM) are based on the same principle of a charged particle beam scanning across the surface and generating secondary electrons (SEs) to form images. However, there is a pronounced difference in the energy spectra of the emitted secondary electrons emitted as result of electron or helium ion impact. We have previously presented evidence that this also translates to differences in the information depth through the analysis of dopant contrast in doped silicon structures in both SEM and HeIM. Here, it is now shown how secondary electron emission spectra (SES) and their relation to depth of origin of SE can be experimentally exploited through the use of energy filtering (EF) in low voltage SEM (LV-SEM) to access bulk information from surfaces covered by damage or contamination layers. From the current understanding of the SES in HeIM it is not expected that EF will be as effective in HeIM but an alternative that can be used for some materials to access bulk information is presented.

  13. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy study of hot-deformed gamma-TiAl-based alloy microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrapoński, J; Rodak, K

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the changes in the microstructure of hot-deformed specimens made of alloys containing 46-50 at.% Al, 2 at.% Cr and 2 at.% Nb (and alloying additions such as carbon and boron) with the aid of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. After homogenization and heat treatment performed in order to make diverse lamellae thickness, the specimens were compressed at 1000 degrees C. Transmission electron microscopy examinations of specimens after the compression test revealed the presence of heavily deformed areas with a high density of dislocation. Deformation twins were also observed. Dynamically recrystallized grains were revealed. For alloys no. 2 and no. 3, the recovery and recrystallization processes were more extensive than for alloy no. 1.

  14. Optimising electron microscopy experiment through electron optics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Y. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France); Hitachi High-Technologies Corporation, 882, Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Gatel, C.; Snoeck, E. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France); Houdellier, F., E-mail: florent.houdellier@cemes.fr [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse France (France)

    2017-04-15

    We developed a new type of electron trajectories simulation inside a complete model of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our model incorporates the precise and real design of each element constituting a TEM, i.e. the field emission (FE) cathode, the extraction optic and acceleration stages of a 300 kV cold field emission gun, the illumination lenses, the objective lens, the intermediate and projection lenses. Full trajectories can be computed using magnetically saturated or non-saturated round lenses, magnetic deflectors and even non-cylindrical symmetry elements like electrostatic biprism. This multi-scale model gathers nanometer size components (FE tip) with parts of meter length (illumination and projection systems). We demonstrate that non-trivial TEM experiments requiring specific and complex optical configurations can be simulated and optimized prior to any experiment using such model. We show that all the currents set in all optical elements of the simulated column can be implemented in the real column (I2TEM in CEMES) and used as starting alignment for the requested experiment. We argue that the combination of such complete electron trajectory simulations in the whole TEM column with automatic optimization of the microscope parameters for optimal experimental data (images, diffraction, spectra) allows drastically simplifying the implementation of complex experiments in TEM and will facilitate the development of advanced use of the electron microscope in the near future. - Highlights: • Using dedicated electron optics software, we calculate full electrons trajectories inside a modern transmission electron microscope. • We have determined how to deal with multi-scale electron optics elements like high voltage cold field emission source. • W • e have succeed to model both weak and strong magnetic lenses whether in saturated or unsaturated conditions as well as electrostatic biprism and magnetic deflectors. • We have applied this model

  15. Optimising electron microscopy experiment through electron optics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Y.; Gatel, C.; Snoeck, E.; Houdellier, F.

    2017-01-01

    We developed a new type of electron trajectories simulation inside a complete model of a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our model incorporates the precise and real design of each element constituting a TEM, i.e. the field emission (FE) cathode, the extraction optic and acceleration stages of a 300 kV cold field emission gun, the illumination lenses, the objective lens, the intermediate and projection lenses. Full trajectories can be computed using magnetically saturated or non-saturated round lenses, magnetic deflectors and even non-cylindrical symmetry elements like electrostatic biprism. This multi-scale model gathers nanometer size components (FE tip) with parts of meter length (illumination and projection systems). We demonstrate that non-trivial TEM experiments requiring specific and complex optical configurations can be simulated and optimized prior to any experiment using such model. We show that all the currents set in all optical elements of the simulated column can be implemented in the real column (I2TEM in CEMES) and used as starting alignment for the requested experiment. We argue that the combination of such complete electron trajectory simulations in the whole TEM column with automatic optimization of the microscope parameters for optimal experimental data (images, diffraction, spectra) allows drastically simplifying the implementation of complex experiments in TEM and will facilitate the development of advanced use of the electron microscope in the near future. - Highlights: • Using dedicated electron optics software, we calculate full electrons trajectories inside a modern transmission electron microscope. • We have determined how to deal with multi-scale electron optics elements like high voltage cold field emission source. • W • e have succeed to model both weak and strong magnetic lenses whether in saturated or unsaturated conditions as well as electrostatic biprism and magnetic deflectors. • We have applied this model

  16. Ga droplet morphology on GaAs(001) studied by Lloyd's mirror photoemission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, W X; Jesson, D E; Pavlov, K M; Morgan, M J [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Usher, B F [Department of Electronic Engineering, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia)

    2009-08-05

    We apply Lloyd's mirror photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) to study the surface shape of Ga droplets on GaAs(001). An unusual rectangular-based droplet shape is identified and the contact angle is determined in situ. It is shown that quenching does not appreciably affect droplet shape and ex situ measurements of the contact angle by atomic force microscopy are in good agreement with Lloyd's mirror PEEM. Extension of Lloyd's mirror technique to reconstruct general three-dimensional (3D) surface shapes and the potential use of synchrotron radiation to improve vertical resolution is discussed.

  17. Study of the niobium dehydrogenation process by transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulhoes, I.A.M.; Akune, K.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of the micro-structure of Nb-H, during the dehydrogenation process through thermal treatment, has been studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy. The results are used in order to interpret the variation of the line resolution of Electron Channeling Pattern (ECP) of Nb-H as a function of isochronous annealing temperature. It is concluded that the improvement of the ECP line resolution is enhanced of β hydrate in Nb. (Author) [pt

  18. Surface properties and microporosity of polyhydroxybutyrate under scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raouf, A.A.; Samsudin, A.R.; Samian, R.; Akool, K.; Abdullah, N.

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the surface properties especially surface porosity of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) using scanning electron microscopy. PHB granules were sprinkled on the double-sided sticky tape attached on a SEM aluminium stub and sputtered with gold (10nm thickness) in a Polaron SC515 Coater, following which the samples were placed into the SEM specimen chamber for viewing and recording. Scanning electron micrographs with different magnification of PHB surface revealed multiple pores with different sizes. (Author)

  19. The structure of spinach Photosystem I studied by electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, Egbert J.; Wynn, R. Max; Malkin, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The structure of three types of Photosystem I (PS I) complex isolated from spinach chloroplasts was studied by electron microscopy and computer image analysis. Molecular projections (top views and side views) of a native PS I complex (PSI-200), an antenna-depleted PS I complex (PSI-100) and the PS I

  20. Collaboration at the Nanoscale: Exploring Viral Genetics with Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboise, S. Monroe; Moulton, Karen D.; Jamison, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    The Maine Science Corps is a project sponsored by the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Graduate Teaching Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12 ) program. Through this program, the University of Southern Maine's (USM) virology and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) research group provides high school teachers and students in rural areas with…

  1. Microstructure of lead zirconium titanate (PZT) by electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursill, L.A.; Peng JuLin

    1989-01-01

    Transmission and high-resolution electron microscopy reveal the microtexture of lead zirconium titanate ceramics. Fine scale (≤ 500 Aangstroem) ferroelastic and ferroelectric twin domains, as well as dislocations were found in a complex texture. Correlations between stoichiometry, microstructure and piezoelectric properties are discussed. 6 refs., 3 figs

  2. Ultrastructure of Proechinophthirus zumpti (Anoplura, Echinophthiriidae by scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores del Carmen Castro

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructure of Proechinophthirus zumpti Werneck, 1955, mainly the external chorionic features of the egg, is described through electronic microscopy techniques. This species was first cited in Argentina, infesting Arctocephalus australis (Zimmermann, 1873. The morphological adaptations of adults and nymphs are described in both species of Proechinophthirus parasitic on Otariidae: P. fluctus (Ferris, 1916 and P. zumpti.

  3. Automated data collection in single particle electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yong Zi; Cheng, Anchi; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Automated data collection is an integral part of modern workflows in single particle electron microscopy (EM) research. This review surveys the software packages available for automated single particle EM data collection. The degree of automation at each stage of data collection is evaluated, and the capabilities of the software packages are described. Finally, future trends in automation are discussed. PMID:26671944

  4. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibil, Helen R.; Grünewald, Kay; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a brief update on the use of cryo-electron microscopy for integrated structural biology, along with an overview of the plans for the UK national facility for electron microscopy being built at the Diamond synchrotron. Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback

  5. Ion source for thinning of specimen in transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, K.; Rothe, R.

    1983-01-01

    Thinning of specimen for transmission electron microscopy is carried out by means of sputtering. Construction, design, and operation parameters of an ion source are presented. Because the plasma is produced by means of hollow cathode glow discharges, no special focusing system is used

  6. Modeling of Image Formation in Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vulovic, M.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure of biological specimens is crucial for understanding life. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) permits structural studies of biological specimen at their near-native state. The research performed in this thesis represents one of two subprojects of the FOM industrial

  7. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The distribution of arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) in himematsutake was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX). The atomic percentage of the metals was confirmed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Results show that the accumulation of ...

  8. Head-facial hemangiomas studied with scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallotti, Carlo; Cavallotti, Chiara; Giovannetti, Filippo; Iannetti, Giorgio

    2009-11-01

    Hemangiomas of the head or face are a frequent vascular pathology, consisting in an embryonic dysplasia that involves the cranial-facial vascular network. Hemangiomas show clinical, morphological, developmental, and structural changes during their course. Morphological, structural, ultrastructural, and clinical characteristics of head-facial hemangiomas were studied in 28 patients admitted in our hospital. Nineteen of these patients underwent surgery for the removal of the hemangiomas, whereas 9 patients were not operated on. All the removed tissues were transferred in our laboratories for the morphological staining. Light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used for the observation of all microanatomical details. All patients were studied for a clinical diagnosis, and many were subjected to surgical therapy. The morphological results revealed numerous microanatomical characteristics of the hemangiomatous vessels. The observation by light microscopy shows the afferent and the efferent vessels for every microhemangioma. All the layers of the arterial wall are uneven. The lumen of the arteriole is entirely used by a blood clot. The observation by transmission electron microscopy shows that it was impossible to see the limits of the different layers (endothelium, medial layer, and adventitia) in the whole wall of the vessels. Moreover, both the muscular and elastic components are disarranged and replaced with connective tissue. The observation by scanning electron microscopy shows that the corrosion cast of the hemangioma offers 3 periods of filling: initially with partial filling of the arteriolar and of the whole cast, intermediate with the entire filling of the whole cast (including arteriole and venule), and a last period with a partial emptying of the arteriolar and whole cast while the venule remains totally injected with resin. Our morphological results can be useful to clinicians for a precise

  9. A direct electron detector for time-resolved MeV electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchione, T.; Denes, P.; Jobe, R. K.; Johnson, I. J.; Joseph, J. M.; Li, R. K.; Perazzo, A.; Shen, X.; Wang, X. J.; Weathersby, S. P.; Yang, J.; Zhang, D.

    2017-03-01

    The introduction of direct electron detectors enabled the structural biology revolution of cryogenic electron microscopy. Direct electron detectors are now expected to have a similarly dramatic impact on time-resolved MeV electron microscopy, particularly by enabling both spatial and temporal jitter correction. Here we report on the commissioning of a direct electron detector for time-resolved MeV electron microscopy. The direct electron detector demonstrated MeV single electron sensitivity and is capable of recording megapixel images at 180 Hz. The detector has a 15-bit dynamic range, better than 30-μmμm spatial resolution and less than 20 analogue-to-digital converter count RMS pixel noise. The unique capabilities of the direct electron detector and the data analysis required to take advantage of these capabilities are presented. The technical challenges associated with generating and processing large amounts of data are also discussed.

  10. Electron microscopy of intermediate filaments: teaming up with atomic force and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreplak, Laurent; Richter, Karsten; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald

    2008-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) were originally discovered and defined by electron microscopy in myoblasts. In the following it was demonstrated and confirmed that they constitute, in addition to microtubules and microfilaments, a third independent, general filament system in the cytoplasm of most metazoan cells. In contrast to the other two systems, IFs are present in cells in two principally distinct cytoskeletal forms: (i) extended and free-running filament arrays in the cytoplasm that are integrated into the cytoskeleton by associated proteins of the plakin type; and (ii) a membrane- and chromatin-bound thin 'lamina' of a more or less regular network of interconnected filaments made from nuclear IF proteins, the lamins, which differ in several important structural aspects from cytoplasmic IF proteins. In man, more than 65 genes code for distinct IF proteins that are expressed during embryogenesis in various routes of differentiation in a tightly controlled manner. IF proteins exhibit rather limited sequence identity implying that the different types of IFs have distinct biochemical properties. Hence, to characterize the structural properties of the various IFs, in vitro assembly regimes have been developed in combination with different visualization methods such as transmission electron microscopy of fixed and negatively stained samples as well as methods that do not use staining such as scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and cryoelectron microscopy as well as atomic force microscopy. Moreover, with the generation of both IF-type specific antibodies and chimeras of fluorescent proteins and IF proteins, it has become possible to investigate the subcellular organization of IFs by correlative fluorescence and electron microscopic methods. The combination of these powerful methods should help to further develop our understanding of nuclear architecture, in particular how nuclear subcompartments are organized and in which way lamins are involved.

  11. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions, imaging modes, the interpretation of micrographs and the use of quantitative modes "in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). lt forms a counterpart to Transmission Electron Microscopy (Vol. 36 of this Springer Series in Optical Sciences) . The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Münster and from a German text entitled Raster-Elektronenmikroskopie (Springer-Verlag), published in collaboration with my colleague Gerhard Pfefferkorn. In the introductory chapter, the principles of the SEM and of electron­ specimen interactions are described, the most important imaging modes and their associated contrast are summarized, and general aspects of eiemental analysis by x-ray and Auger electron emission are discussed. The electron gun and electron optics are discussed in Chap. 2 in order to show how an electron probe of small diameter can be formed, how the elec­ tron beam can be blanked at high fre...

  12. In situ fatigue loading stage inside scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Peter; Brewer, David

    1988-01-01

    A fatigue loading stage inside a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was developed. The stage allows dynamic and static high-magnification and high-resolution viewing of the fatigue crack initiation and crack propagation processes. The loading stage is controlled by a closed-loop servohydraulic system. Maximum load is 1000 lb (4450 N) with test frequencies ranging up to 30 Hz. The stage accommodates specimens up to 2 inches (50 mm) in length and tolerates substantial specimen translation to view the propagating crack. At room temperature, acceptable working resolution is obtainable for magnifications ranging up to 10,000X. The system is equipped with a high-temperature setup designed for temperatures up to 2000 F (1100 C). The signal can be videotaped for further analysis of the pertinent fatigue damage mechanisms. The design allows for quick and easy interchange and conversion of the SEM from a loading stage configuration to its normal operational configuration and vice versa. Tests are performed entirely in the in-situ mode. In contrast to other designs, the NASA design has greatly extended the life of the loading stage by not exposing the bellows to cyclic loading. The loading stage was used to investigate the fatigue crack growth mechanisms in the (100)-oriented PWA 1480 single-crystal, nickel-based supperalloy. The high-magnification observations revealed the details of the crack growth processes.

  13. In situ electron backscattered diffraction of individual GaAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prikhodko, S.V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)], E-mail: sergey@seas.ucla.edu; Sitzman, S. [Oxford Instruments America, Concord, MA 01742 (United States); Gambin, V. [Northrop Grumman Space Technology, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Kodambaka, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    We suggest and demonstrate that electron backscattered diffraction, a scanning electron microscope-based technique, can be used for non-destructive structural and morphological characterization of statistically significant number of nanowires in situ on their growth substrate. We obtain morphological, crystal phase, and crystal orientation information of individual GaAs nanowires in situ on the growth substrate GaAs(1 1 1) B. Our results, verified using transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction analyses of the same set of wires, indicate that most wires possess a wurtzite structure with a high density of thin structural defects aligned normal to the wire growth axis, while others grow defect-free with a zincblende structure. The demonstrated approach is general, applicable to other material systems, and is expected to provide important insights into the role of substrate structure on nanowire structure on nanowire crystallinity and growth orientation.

  14. Proceedings of 11. Conference on Electron Microscopy of Solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The conference is the cyclically organised discussion forum on problems connected with application of different electron microscopy techniques for the study of solid state materials. The main topics of 11 conference on Electron Microscopy of Solids held in Krynica (PL) in 2002 was: application of TEM in materials science; analytical techniques and orientation imaging in materials science; high resolution TEM in electronic materials; TEM and SEM application in ceramic and composites; advanced TEM techniques; advanced analytical and orientation imaging techniques; application of TEM in investigations of amorphous and nanocrystalline material; Intermetallic and superalloys; TEM application in martensite alloys; TEM and SEM application in research of iron base alloys; TEM studies of deformed alloys; TEM application in thin films and surface layer studies; TEM and SEM application in materials science

  15. Very low energy scanning electron microscopy in nanotechnology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Mika, Filip; Mikmeková, Eliška; Mikmeková, Šárka; Pokorná, Zuzana; Frank, Luděk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, 8/9 (2012), s. 695-716 ISSN 1475-7435 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OE08012; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA AV ČR IAA100650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * very low energy electrons * cathode lens * grain contrast * strain contrast * imaging of participates * dopant contrast * very low energy STEM * graphene Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.087, year: 2012

  16. Seeing in 4D with electrons: development of ultrafast electron microscopy at Caltech

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskin, J.S.; Zewail, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    The vision to develop 4D electron microscopy, a union of the capabilities of electron microscopy with ultrafast techniques to capture clearly defined images of the nano-scale structure of a material at each step in the course of its chemical or physical transformations, has been pursued at Caltech for the last decade. In this contribution, we will give a brief overview of the capabilities of three currently active Caltech 4D microscopy laboratories. Ongoing work is illustrated by a description of the most recent application of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM), a field made possible only by the development of the 4D ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM). An appendix gives the various applications made so far and the historic roots of the development at Caltech. (authors)

  17. Environmental high resolution electron microscopy and applications to chemical science

    OpenAIRE

    Boyes, Edward; Gai, Pratibha

    2017-01-01

    An environmental cell high resolution electron microscope (EHREM) has been developed for in situ studies of dynamic chemical reactions on the atomic scale. It allows access to metastable intermediate phases of catalysts and to sequences of reversible microstructural and chemical development associated with the activation, deactivation and poisoning of a catalyst. Materials transported through air can be restored or recreated and samples damaged, e.g. by dehydration, by the usual vacuum enviro...

  18. Correlative Light- and Electron Microscopy Using Quantum Dot Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, Murray C; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-08-07

    A method is described whereby quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles can be used for correlative immunocytochemical studies of human pathology tissue using widefield fluorescence light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To demonstrate the protocol we have immunolabeled ultrathin epoxy sections of human somatostatinoma tumor using a primary antibody to somatostatin, followed by a biotinylated secondary antibody and visualization with streptavidin conjugated 585 nm cadmium-selenium (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs). The sections are mounted on a TEM specimen grid then placed on a glass slide for observation by widefield fluorescence light microscopy. Light microscopy reveals 585 nm QD labeling as bright orange fluorescence forming a granular pattern within the tumor cell cytoplasm. At low to mid-range magnification by light microscopy the labeling pattern can be easily recognized and the level of non-specific or background labeling assessed. This is a critical step for subsequent interpretation of the immunolabeling pattern by TEM and evaluation of the morphological context. The same section is then blotted dry and viewed by TEM. QD probes are seen to be attached to amorphous material contained in individual secretory granules. Images are acquired from the same region of interest (ROI) seen by light microscopy for correlative analysis. Corresponding images from each modality may then be blended to overlay fluorescence data on TEM ultrastructure of the corresponding region.

  19. The art in science: electron microscopy and paintings conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, L.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: When examining a painting, a conservator uses many different and complementary methods of analysis to build an understanding of the materials and way the painting was constructed. Common methods of examination include x-radiography, infrared reflectography, ultraviolet fluorescence and optical microscopy of the surface of the painting. Minute samples of paint prepared as cross-sections are sometimes taken for optical examination under the microscope, and it is these that can, conveniently, be further analysed with electron microscopy to yield another level of information. Electron microscopy has a valuable role to play within the examination of paintings, be it for pigment identification alone, or at the other end of the spectrum, for informing issues around the attribution of works of art. This paper provides an overview of the use of electron microscopy in the conservation of paintings by discussing examples of work undertaken by the National Gallery of Victoria and the CSIRO. Work described includes the problem of distinguishing between restorers' original paint in a landscape by Arthur Streeton, and the examination of the ground or priming layer in a Rembrandt portrait which clarified its attribution to his studio. Copyright (2003) Australian Microbeam Analysis Society

  20. Use of atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy for correlative studies of bacterial capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukalov, Oleg; Korenevsky, Anton; Beveridge, Terry J; Dutcher, John R

    2008-09-01

    Bacteria can possess an outermost assembly of polysaccharide molecules, a capsule, which is attached to their cell wall. We have used two complementary, high-resolution microscopy techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to study bacterial capsules of four different gram-negative bacterial strains: Escherichia coli K30, Pseudomonas aeruginosa FRD1, Shewanella oneidensis MR-4, and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. TEM analysis of bacterial cells using different preparative techniques (whole-cell mounts, conventional embeddings, and freeze-substitution) revealed capsules for some but not all of the strains. In contrast, the use of AFM allowed the unambiguous identification of the presence of capsules on all strains used in the present study, including those that were shown by TEM to be not encapsulated. In addition, the use of AFM phase imaging allowed the visualization of the bacterial cell within the capsule, with a depth sensitivity that decreased with increasing tapping frequency.

  1. Composition quantification of electron-transparent samples by backscattered electron imaging in scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, E., E-mail: erich.mueller@kit.edu; Gerthsen, D.

    2017-02-15

    The contrast of backscattered electron (BSE) images in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) depends on material parameters which can be exploited for composition quantification if some information on the material system is available. As an example, the In-concentration in thin In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As layers embedded in a GaAs matrix is analyzed in this work. The spatial resolution of the technique is improved by using thin electron-transparent specimens instead of bulk samples. Although the BSEs are detected in a comparably small angular range by an annular semiconductor detector, the image intensity can be evaluated to determine the composition and local thickness of the specimen. The measured intensities are calibrated within one single image to eliminate the influence of the detection and amplification system. Quantification is performed by comparison of experimental and calculated data. Instead of using time-consuming Monte-Carlo simulations, an analytical model is applied for BSE-intensity calculations which considers single electron scattering and electron diffusion. - Highlights: • Sample thickness and composition are quantified by backscattered electron imaging. • A thin sample is used to achieve spatial resolution of few nanometers. • Calculations are carried out with a time-saving electron diffusion model. • Small differences in atomic number and density detected at low electron energies.

  2. In situ electron beam irradiated rapid growth of bismuth nanoparticles in bismuth-based glass dielectrics at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Shiv Prakash; Karmakar, Basudeb

    2011-01-01

    In this study, in situ control growth of bismuth nanoparticles (Bi 0 NPs) was demonstrated in bismuth-based glass dielectrics under an electron beam (EB) irradiation at room temperature. The effects of EB irradiation were investigated in situ using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The EB irradiation for 2–8 min enhanced the construction of bismuth nanoparticles with a rhombohedral structure and diameter of 4–9 nm. The average particle size was found to increase with the irradiation time. Bismuth metal has a melting point of 271 °C and this low melting temperature makes easy the progress of energy induced structural changes during in situ TEM observations. This is a very useful technique in nano-patterning for integrated optics and other applications.

  3. Human enamel structure studied by high resolution electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    Human enamel structural features are characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. The human enamel consists of polycrystals with a structure similar to Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. This article describes the structural features of human enamel crystal at atomic and nanometer level. Besides the structural description, a great number of high resolution images are included. Research into the carious process in human enamel is very important for human beings. This article firstly describes the initiation of caries in enamel crystal at atomic and unit-cell level and secondly describes the further steps of caries with structural and chemical demineralization. The demineralization in fact, is the origin of caries in human enamel. The remineralization of carious areas in human enamel has drawn more and more attention as its potential application is realized. This process has been revealed by high resolution electron microscopy in detail in this article. On the other hand, the radiation effects on the structure of human enamel are also characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. In order to reveal this phenomenon clearly, a great number of electron micrographs have been shown, and a physical mechanism is proposed. 26 references

  4. A Mobile Nanoscience and Electron Microscopy Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Tonya; Kelley, Kyle

    2013-03-01

    We have established a mobile nanoscience laboratory outreach program in Western NC that puts scanning electron microscopy (SEM) directly in the hands of K-12 students and the general public. There has been a recent push to develop new active learning materials to educate students at all levels about nanoscience and nanotechnology. Previous projects, such as Bugscope, nanoManipulator, or SPM Live! allowed remote access to advanced microscopies. However, placing SEM directly in schools has not often been possible because the cost and steep learning curve of these technologies were prohibitive, making this project quite novel. We have developed new learning modules for a microscopy outreach experience with a tabletop SEM (Hitachi TM3000). We present here an overview of our outreach and results of the assessment of our program to date.

  5. Diffraction and microscopy with attosecond electron pulse trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yuya; Baum, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Attosecond spectroscopy1-7 can resolve electronic processes directly in time, but a movie-like space-time recording is impeded by the too long wavelength ( 100 times larger than atomic distances) or the source-sample entanglement in re-collision techniques8-11. Here we advance attosecond metrology to picometre wavelength and sub-atomic resolution by using free-space electrons instead of higher-harmonic photons1-7 or re-colliding wavepackets8-11. A beam of 70-keV electrons at 4.5-pm de Broglie wavelength is modulated by the electric field of laser cycles into a sequence of electron pulses with sub-optical-cycle duration. Time-resolved diffraction from crystalline silicon reveals a propagates in space and time. This unification of attosecond science with electron microscopy and diffraction enables space-time imaging of light-driven processes in the entire range of sample morphologies that electron microscopy can access.

  6. 35 years of electron microscopy in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Chavarria, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Electron microscopy has celebrated in 2009 the XXXV anniversary in Costa Rica. The history of the electron microscopy was initiated with the donation of a microscope by Japan and the establishment of the Unidad de Microscopia Electronica (UME), which later, has been consolidated as the Centro de Investigacion en Estructuras Microscopicas (CIEMic) of the Universidad de Costa Rica (UCR). This center has realized its own research and has gave support to different units of the UCR, state universities and the private sector. Currently, the CIEMic has had two transmission electron microscopes (TEM) and two scanning electron microscopes (SEM), besides of optical microscopy equipment, including a laser confocal microscope. The two fundamental types of electron microscopes (TEM and SEM) have generated different images. While the first has had a resolution that has allowed to analyze virus, usually their images have been flat; however, with some special techniques can obtain three-dimensional images. The image in the TEM is generated by electrons that have passed through the sample, and to interact with its atoms have changed its energy and trajectory. This, at the end, has impacted on a photosensitive screen that has become in flashes, whose intensity has depended on its energy and form the image. Meanwhile, in the MER, the image has been normal type, although with less resolution. The electrons in the MER are focused on a small area of the sample in which have interacted with the atoms of this, and has generated a a series of signals, including the most used were the secondary electrons and characteristic X-rays. In both cases, an electron from beam has generated in the filament a collision against an electron of the sample and has given part of its energy to the degree of release of its atom and issued out of the sample; this has been called secondary electrons. X-rays have been generated when an electron of the same atom that has lost the secondary electron, but in an

  7. Imaging and Quantification of Extracellular Vesicles by Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Romain; Tan, Sisareuth; Gounou, Céline; Brisson, Alain R

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived vesicles that are present in blood and other body fluids. EVs raise major interest for their diverse physiopathological roles and their potential biomedical applications. However, the characterization and quantification of EVs constitute major challenges, mainly due to their small size and the lack of methods adapted for their study. Electron microscopy has made significant contributions to the EV field since their initial discovery. Here, we describe the use of two transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques for imaging and quantifying EVs. Cryo-TEM combined with receptor-specific gold labeling is applied to reveal the morphology, size, and phenotype of EVs, while their enumeration is achieved after high-speed sedimentation on EM grids.

  8. Microfabricated high-bandpass foucault aperture for electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaeser, Robert; Cambie, Rossana; Jin, Jian

    2014-08-26

    A variant of the Foucault (knife-edge) aperture is disclosed that is designed to provide single-sideband (SSB) contrast at low spatial frequencies but retain conventional double-sideband (DSB) contrast at high spatial frequencies in transmission electron microscopy. The aperture includes a plate with an inner open area, a support extending from the plate at an edge of the open area, a half-circle feature mounted on the support and located at the center of the aperture open area. The radius of the half-circle portion of reciprocal space that is blocked by the aperture can be varied to suit the needs of electron microscopy investigation. The aperture is fabricated from conductive material which is preferably non-oxidizing, such as gold, for example.

  9. Combined time-lapse cinematography and immuno-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, B M; Goscicka, T; MacKenzie, J L; Gautam, A; Tate, M; Clark, J

    1990-04-01

    A method was developed to record interactions between mobile non-adherent immunocytes by time-lapse cinematography and then to study the same cells by immuno-electron microscopy, using monoclonal antibodies against surface components. For this purpose a modified stage was designed to fit an inverted microscope. The attachment included a device to cool the culture chamber with N2 gas, a micro-injector for monoclonal antibody and immuno-gold treatment, and two pairs of washing needles to change the medium without disturbance. The technique was first employed to study the formation of aggregates around the antigen-presenting cells in cultures containing cells from hyper-immunized animals. Recently peripheral blood cells from normal subjects and patients with immune deficiency syndromes were stimulated with pokeweed mitogen, cluster formation was recorded, and the cells were processed for immuno-electron microscopy.

  10. Ultrafast electron microscopy in materials science, biology, and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Wayne E.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Frank, Alan; Reed, Bryan; Schmerge, John F.; Siwick, Bradley J.; Stuart, Brent C.; Weber, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    The use of pump-probe experiments to study complex transient events has been an area of significant interest in materials science, biology, and chemistry. While the emphasis has been on laser pump with laser probe and laser pump with x-ray probe experiments, there is a significant and growing interest in using electrons as probes. Early experiments used electrons for gas-phase diffraction of photostimulated chemical reactions. More recently, scientists are beginning to explore phenomena in the solid state such as phase transformations, twinning, solid-state chemical reactions, radiation damage, and shock propagation. This review focuses on the emerging area of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM), which comprises ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM). The topics that are treated include the following: (1) The physics of electrons as an ultrafast probe. This encompasses the propagation dynamics of the electrons (space-charge effect, Child's law, Boersch effect) and extends to relativistic effects. (2) The anatomy of UED and DTEM instruments. This includes discussions of the photoactivated electron gun (also known as photogun or photoelectron gun) at conventional energies (60-200 keV) and extends to MeV beams generated by rf guns. Another critical aspect of the systems is the electron detector. Charge-coupled device cameras and microchannel-plate-based cameras are compared and contrasted. The effect of various physical phenomena on detective quantum efficiency is discussed. (3) Practical aspects of operation. This includes determination of time zero, measurement of pulse-length, and strategies for pulse compression. (4) Current and potential applications in materials science, biology, and chemistry. UEM has the potential to make a significant impact in future science and technology. Understanding of reaction pathways of complex transient phenomena in materials science, biology, and chemistry will provide fundamental

  11. An adjustable electron achromat for cathode lens microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromp, R.M., E-mail: rtromp@us.ibm.com [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Leiden Institute of Physics, Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Niels Bohrweg 2, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-12-15

    Chromatic aberration correction in light optics began with the invention of a two-color-corrected achromatic crown/flint lens doublet by Chester Moore Hall in 1730. Such color correction is necessary because any single glass shows dispersion (i.e. its index of refraction changes with wavelength), which can be counteracted by combining different glasses with different dispersions. In cathode lens microscopes (such as Photo Electron Emission Microscopy – PEEM) we encounter a similar situation, where the chromatic aberration coefficient of the cathode lens shows strong dispersion, i.e. depends (non-linearly) on the energy with which the electrons leave the sample. Here I show how a cathode lens in combination with an electron mirror can be configured as an adjustable electron achromat. The lens/mirror combination can be corrected at two electron energies by balancing the settings of the electron mirror against the settings of the cathode lens. The achromat can be adjusted to deliver optimum performance, depending on the requirements of a specific experiment. Going beyond the achromat, an apochromat would improve resolution and transmission by a very significant margin. I discuss the requirements and outlook for such a system, which for now remains a wish waiting for fulfilment. - Highlights: • The properties of cathode objective lens plus electron mirror are discussed. • In analogy with light-optical achromats, cathode lens plus mirror can be configured as an electron achromat. • Unlike light optics, the electron achromat can be adjusted to best fulfill experimental requirements.

  12. Image formation and image analysis in electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heel, M. van.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis covers various aspects of image formation and image analysis in electron microscopy. The imaging of relatively strong objects in partially coherent illumination, the coherence properties of thermionic emission sources and the detection of objects in quantum noise limited images are considered. IMAGIC, a fast, flexible and friendly image analysis software package is described. Intelligent averaging of molecular images is discussed. (C.F.)

  13. Demonstration of Polysaccharide Capsule in Campylobacter jejuni Using Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Karlyshev, Andrey V.; McCrossan, Maria V.; Wren, Brendan W.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, we reported that Campylobacter jejuni, an important gastrointestinal pathogen, has the genetic determinants to produce a capsular polysaccharide (Karlyshev et al., Mol. Microbiol. 35:529–541, 2000). Despite these data, the presence of a capsule in these bacteria has remained controversial. In this study we stain C. jejuni cells with the cationic dye Alcian blue and demonstrate for the first time by electron microscopy that C. jejuni cells produce a polysaccharide capsule that is ret...

  14. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadana, D.K.

    1982-10-01

    A method to prepare cross-sectional (X) semiconductor specimens for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been described. The power and utility of XTEM has been demonstrated. It has been shown that accuracy and interpretation of indirect structural-defects profiling techniques, namely, MeV He + channeling and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) can be greatly enhanced by comparing their results with those obtained by XTEM from the same set of samples

  15. Application of Colloidal Palladium Nanoparticles for Labeling in Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vancová, Marie; Šlouf, Miroslav; Langhans, Jan; Pavlová, Eva; Nebesářová, Jana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 5 (2011), s. 810-816 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520704; GA AV ČR KJB600960906; GA ČR GAP205/10/0348 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : electron microscopy * colloidal palladium * nanoparticles * labeling * salivary glands * Ixodes ricinus Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.007, year: 2011

  16. Reciprocity relations in transmission electron microscopy: A rigorous derivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Florian F; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    A concise derivation of the principle of reciprocity applied to realistic transmission electron microscopy setups is presented making use of the multislice formalism. The equivalence of images acquired in conventional and scanning mode is thereby rigorously shown. The conditions for the applicability of the found reciprocity relations is discussed. Furthermore the positions of apertures in relation to the corresponding lenses are considered, a subject which scarcely has been addressed in previous publications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Electron microscopy and plastic deformation of HCP metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.-P.; Le Hazif, Roger

    1976-01-01

    The recent literature on the slip systems of the h.c.p. metals is reviewed and the contribution of transmission electron microscopy assessed. It is now clear that the stress-strain curves and the dislocation configurations in the slip plane are very similar, whether the principal slip system is basal or prismatic. The important problem of the relative ease of slip systems is linked to the ease of splitting of dislocations in the slip planes and to the electronic band structure of the metal [fr

  18. Early studies of placental ultrastructure by electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, A M; Enders, A C

    2016-01-01

    many other scientists to Washington University in St. Louis. Work on human placental ultrastructure was initiated at Cambridge and Kyoto whilst domestic animals were initially studied by Björkman in Stockholm and electron micrographs of bat placenta were published by Wimsatt of Cornell University......BACKGROUND: Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was first applied to study placental ultrastructure in the 1950's. We review those early studies and mention the scientists that employed or encouraged the use of TEM. FINDINGS: Among the pioneers Edward W. Dempsey was a key figure who attracted...

  19. Weak-beam electron microscopy of radiation-induced segregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saka, H.

    1983-01-01

    The segregation of solute atoms to dislocations during irradiation by 1 MeV electrons in a HVEM was studied by measuring the dissociation width of extended dislocations in Cu-5.1 at.%Si, Cu-5.3 at.%Ge, Ag-9.4 at.% In and Ag-9.6 at.%Al alloys. 'Weak-beam' electron microscopy was used. In Cu-Si (oversized solute), Cu-Ge (oversize) and Ag-Al (undersize), solute enrichment was observed near dislocations, while in Ag-In (oversize) solute depletion was observed. The results are discussed in terms of current mechanisms for radiation-induced segregation. (author)

  20. Experiments in electron microscopy: from metals to nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unwin, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy has advanced remarkably as a tool for biological structure research since the development of methods to examine radiation-sensitive unstained specimens and the introduction of cryo-techniques. Structures of biological molecules at near-atomic resolution can now be obtained from images of single particles as well as crystalline arrays. It has also become possible to analyze structures of molecules in their functional context, i.e. in their natural membrane or cellular setting, and in an ionic environment like that in living tissue. Electron microscopy is thus opening ways to answer definitively questions about physiological mechanisms. Here I recall a number of experiments contributing to, and benefiting from the technical advances that have taken place. I begin—in the spirit of this crystallography series—with some biographical background, and then sketch the path to an analysis by time-resolved microscopy of the opening mechanism of an ion channel (nicotinic acetylcholine receptor). This analysis illustrates how electron imaging can be combined with freeze-trapping to illuminate a transient biological event: in our case, chemical-to-electrical transduction at the nerve-muscle synapse. (invited comment)

  1. Navigating 3D electron microscopy maps with EM-SURFER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Rodríguez, Juan; Xiong, Yi; Han, Xusi; Guang, Shuomeng; Christoffer, Charles; Kihara, Daisuke

    2015-05-30

    The Electron Microscopy DataBank (EMDB) is growing rapidly, accumulating biological structural data obtained mainly by electron microscopy and tomography, which are emerging techniques for determining large biomolecular complex and subcellular structures. Together with the Protein Data Bank (PDB), EMDB is becoming a fundamental resource of the tertiary structures of biological macromolecules. To take full advantage of this indispensable resource, the ability to search the database by structural similarity is essential. However, unlike high-resolution structures stored in PDB, methods for comparing low-resolution electron microscopy (EM) density maps in EMDB are not well established. We developed a computational method for efficiently searching low-resolution EM maps. The method uses a compact fingerprint representation of EM maps based on the 3D Zernike descriptor, which is derived from a mathematical series expansion for EM maps that are considered as 3D functions. The method is implemented in a web server named EM-SURFER, which allows users to search against the entire EMDB in real-time. EM-SURFER compares the global shapes of EM maps. Examples of search results from different types of query structures are discussed. We developed EM-SURFER, which retrieves structurally relevant matches for query EM maps from EMDB within seconds. The unique capability of EM-SURFER to detect 3D shape similarity of low-resolution EM maps should prove invaluable in structural biology.

  2. System and method for compressive scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W

    2015-01-13

    A scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) system is disclosed. The system may make use of an electron beam scanning system configured to generate a plurality of electron beam scans over substantially an entire sample, with each scan varying in electron-illumination intensity over a course of the scan. A signal acquisition system may be used for obtaining at least one of an image, a diffraction pattern, or a spectrum from the scans, the image, diffraction pattern, or spectrum representing only information from at least one of a select subplurality or linear combination of all pixel locations comprising the image. A dataset may be produced from the information. A subsystem may be used for mathematically analyzing the dataset to predict actual information that would have been produced by each pixel location of the image.

  3. Electron microscopy study of Ni induced crystallization in amorphous Si thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radnóczi, G. Z.; Battistig, G.; Pécz, B.; Dodony, E.; Vouroutzis, N.; Stoemenos, J.; Frangis, N.; Kovács, A.

    2015-01-01

    The crystallization of amorphous silicon is studied by transmission electron microscopy. The effect of Ni on the crystallization is studied in a wide temperature range heating thinned samples in-situ inside the microscope. Two cases of limited Ni source and unlimited Ni source are studied and compared. NiSi 2 phase started to form at a temperature as low as 250°C in the limited Ni source case. In-situ observation gives a clear view on the crystallization of silicon through small NiSi 2 grain formation. The same phase is observed at the crystallization front in the unlimited Ni source case, where a second region is also observed with large grains of Ni 3 Si 2 . Low temperature experiments show, that long annealing of amorphous silicon at 410 °C already results in large crystallized Si regions due to the Ni induced crystallization

  4. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions and image interpretation in transmission electron mic­ roscopy. The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Munster and is a revised version of the first part of my earlier book Elek­ tronenmikroskopische Untersuchungs- und Priiparationsmethoden, omitting the part which describes specimen-preparation methods. In the introductory chapter, the different types of electron microscope are compared, the various electron-specimen interactions and their applications are summarized and the most important aspects of high-resolution, analytical and high-voltage electron microscopy are discussed. The optics of electron lenses is discussed in Chapter 2 in order to bring out electron-lens properties that are important for an understanding of the function of an electron microscope. In Chapter 3, the wave optics of elec­ trons and the phase shifts by electrostatic and magnetic fields are introduced; Fresne...

  5. Axial ion-electron emission microscopy of IC radiation hardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, B. L.; Vizkelethy, G.; Walsh, D. S.; Swenson, D.

    2002-05-01

    A new system for performing radiation effects microscopy (REM) has been developed at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque. This system combines two entirely new concepts in accelerator physics and nuclear microscopy. A radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac is used to boost the energy of ions accelerated by a conventional Tandem Van de Graaff-Pelletron to velocities of 1.9 MeV/amu. The electronic stopping power for heavy ions is near a maximum at this velocity, and their range is ˜20 μm in Si. These ions therefore represent the most ionizing form of radiation in nature, and are nearly ideal for performing single event effects testing of integrated circuits. Unfortunately, the energy definition of the RFQ-boosted ions is rather poor (˜ a few %), which makes problematic the focussing of such ions to the submicron spots required for REM. To circumvent this problem, we have invented ion electron emission microscopy (IEEM). One can perform REM with the IEEM system without focussing or scanning the ion beam. This is because the position on the sample where each ion strikes is determined by projecting ion-induced secondary electrons at high magnification onto a single electron position sensitive detector. This position signal is then correlated with each REM event. The IEEM system is now mounted along the beam line in an axial geometry so that the ions pass right through the electron detector (which is annular), and all of the electrostatic lenses used for projection. The beam then strikes the sample at normal incidence which results in maximum ion penetration and removes a parallax problem experienced in an earlier system. Details of both the RFQ-booster and the new axial IEEM system are given together with some of the initial results of performing REM on Sandia-manufactured radiation hardened integrated circuits.

  6. Electron microscopy study of antioxidant interaction with bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Oleg P.; Novikova, Olga V.; Konnov, Nikolai P.; Korsukov, Vladimir N.; Gunkin, Ivan F.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    2000-10-01

    To maintain native microorganisms genotype and phenotype features a lyophylization technique is widely used. However in this case cells are affected by influences of vacuum and low temperature that cause a part of the cells population to be destruction. Another factor reduced microorganisms vitality is formation of reactive oxygen forms that damage certain biological targets (such as DNA, membranes etc.) Recently to raise microorganism's resistance against adverse condition natural and synthetic antioxidants are used. Antioxidant- are antagonists of free radicals. Introduction of antioxidants in protective medium for lyophylization increase bacteria storage life about 2,0-4,8 fold in comparison with reference samples. In the article the main results of our investigation of antioxidants interaction with microorganism cells is described. As bacteria cells we use vaccine strain yersinia pestis EV, that were grown for 48 h at 28 degree(s)C on the Hottinger agar (pH 7,2). Antioxidants are inserted on the agar surface in specimen under test. To investigate a localization of antioxidants for electron microscopy investigation, thallium organic antioxidants were used. The thallium organic compounds have an antioxidant features if thallium is in low concentration (about 1(mu) g/ml). The localization of the thallium organic antioxidants on bacteria Y. pestis EV is visible in electron microscopy images, thallium being heavy metal with high electron density. The negatively stained bacteria and bacteria thin sections with thallium organic compounds were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy. The localization of the thallium organic compounds is clearly visible in electron micrographs as small dark spots with size about 10-80nm. Probably mechanisms of interaction of antioxidants with bacteria cells are discussed.

  7. Static and Dynamic Electron Microscopy Investigations at the Atomic and Ultrafast Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Pranav Kumar

    Advancements in the electron microscopy capabilities - aberration-corrected imaging, monochromatic spectroscopy, direct-electron detectors - have enabled routine visualization of atomic-scale processes with millisecond temporal resolutions in this decade. This, combined with progress in the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen holder technology and nanofabrication techniques, allows comprehensive experiments on a wide range of materials in various phases via in situ methods. The development of ultrafast (sub-nanosecond) time-resolved TEM with ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) has further pushed the envelope of in situ TEM to sub-nanosecond temporal resolution while maintaining sub-nanometer spatial resolution. A plethora of materials phenomena - including electron-phonon coupling, phonon transport, first-order phase transitions, bond rotation, plasmon dynamics, melting, and dopant atoms arrangement - are not yet clearly understood and could be benefitted with the current in situ TEM capabilities having atomic-level and ultrafast precision. Better understanding of these phenomena and intrinsic material dynamics (e.g. how phonons propagate in a material, what time-scales are involved in a first-order phase transition, how fast a material melts, where dopant atoms sit in a crystal) in new-generation and technologically important materials (e.g. two-dimensional layered materials, semiconductor and magnetic devices, rare-earth-element-free permanent magnets, unconventional superconductors) could bring a paradigm shift in their electronic, structural, magnetic, thermal and optical applications. Present research efforts, employing cutting-edge static and dynamic in situ electron microscopy resources at the University of Minnesota, are directed towards understanding the atomic-scale crystallographic structural transition and phonon transport in an iron-pnictide parent compound LaFeAsO, studying the mechanical stability of fast moving hard-drive heads in heat

  8. Probing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and organic compounds using scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Yongpeng [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China)], E-mail: yongpengt@yahoo.com.cn; Li Changming [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Liang Feng [Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen Jianmin [Shenzhen Municipal Hospital for Chronic Disease Control and Prevention, Guangdong 518020 (China); Zhang Hong; Liu Guoqing; Sun Huibin [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Luong, John H.T. [Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council Canada, Montreal, Quebec, H4P 2R2 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy have been used to probe the cytotoxicity effect of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), ethidium bromide (EB) and nanoparticles (ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}) on a T lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cell line. The increased calcium ion (from CaCl{sub 2}) in the culture medium stimulated the accumulation of BaP and EB inside the cell, leading to cell death. ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, however, showed a protective effect against these two organic compounds. Such inorganic nanoparticles complexed with BaP or EB which became less toxic to the cell. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles as an insoluble particle model scavenged by macrophage were investigated in rats. They were scavenged out of the lung tissue about 48 h after infection. This result suggest that some insoluble inorganic nanoparticles of PM (particulate matters) showed protective effects on organic toxins induced acute toxic effects as they can be scavenged by macrophage cells. Whereas, some inorganic ions such as calcium ion in PM may help environmental organic toxins to penetrate cell membrane and induce higher toxic effect.

  9. The potentials and challenges of electron microscopy in the study of atomic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banhart, Florian; Torre, Alessandro La; Romdhane, Ferdaous Ben; Cretu, Ovidiu

    2017-04-01

    The article is a brief review on the potential of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in the investigation of atom chains which are the paradigm of a strictly one-dimensional material. After the progress of TEM in the study of new two-dimensional materials, microscopy of free-standing one-dimensional structures is a new challenge with its inherent potentials and difficulties. In-situ experiments in the TEM allowed, for the first time, to generate isolated atomic chains consisting of metals, carbon or boron nitride. Besides having delivered a solid proof for the existence of atomic chains, in-situ TEM studies also enabled us to measure the electrical properties of these fundamental linear structures. While ballistic quantum conductivity is observed in chains of metal atoms, electrical transport in chains of sp1-hybridized carbon is limited by resonant states and reflections at the contacts. Although substantial progress has been made in recent TEM studies of atom chains, fundamental questions have to be answered, concerning the structural stability of the chains, bonding states at the contacts, and the suitability for applications in nanotechnology. Contribution to the topical issue "The 16th European Microscopy Congress (EMC 2016)", edited by Richard Brydson and Pascale Bayle-Guillemaud

  10. In situ scanning tunneling microscopy study of Ca-modified rutile TiO2(110 in bulk water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Serrano

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the rising technological interest in the use of calcium-modified TiO2 surfaces in biomedical implants, the Ca/TiO2 interface has not been studied in an aqueous environment. This investigation is the first report on the use of in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM to study calcium-modified rutile TiO2(110 surfaces immersed in high purity water. The TiO2 surface was prepared under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV with repeated sputtering/annealing cycles. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED analysis shows a pattern typical for the surface segregation of calcium, which is present as an impurity on the TiO2 bulk. In situ STM images of the surface in bulk water exhibit one-dimensional rows of segregated calcium regularly aligned with the [001] crystal direction. The in situ-characterized morphology and structure of this Ca-modified TiO2 surface are discussed and compared with UHV-STM results from the literature. Prolonged immersion (two days in the liquid leads to degradation of the overlayer, resulting in a disordered surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, performed after immersion in water, confirms the presence of calcium.

  11. A new ball-on-disk vacuum tribometer with in situ measurement of the wear track by digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylan, B.; Ciani, D.; Zhang, B.; Cuche, E.; Wasmer, K.

    2017-12-01

    This contribution presents a new ball-on-disk vacuum tribometer with in situ measurement of the wear track by digital holographic microscopy. This new tribometer allows observation of the evolution of the wear track in situ and in real-time. The method combines a high vacuum high temperature ball-on-disk tribometer with a digital holographic microscope (DHM). The machine was tested and validated by taking DHM images during wear tests at room temperature and in vacuum at 2 · 10-6 of polished 100Cr6 steel disks. We demonstrated that the DHM system is well suited to monitor the evolution of the wear track during sliding. We found that, with an acquisition time of 0.1 ms for the DHM, the maximal linear speed is 10 cm s-1 to have reliable images. We proved, via scanning electron microscope (SEM) pictures, that the lines in the sliding direction in all DHM images exist. We also validated the new tribometer by having an excellent correlation between the images and profiles of the wear track taken by the DHM with the ones from a confocal microscope. Finally, the new tribometer combined with the DHM has four advantages. It can test under vacuum and various atmospheric conditions. The evolution of the wear track is measured in situ and in real-time. Hence, the problem of replacing the sample is avoided. Thanks to the DHM technology, the vertical accuracy of the topographical measurement is 4 nm.

  12. Investigation of Nematode Diversity using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fluorescent Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seacor, Taylor; Howell, Carina

    2013-03-01

    Nematode worms account for the vast majority of the animals in the biosphere. They are colossally important to global public health as parasites, and to agriculture both as pests and as beneficial inhabitants of healthy soil. Amphid neurons are the anterior chemosensory neurons in nematodes, mediating critical behaviors including chemotaxis and mating. We are examining the cellular morphology and external anatomy of amphid neurons, using fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, of a wide range of soil nematodes isolated in the wild. We use both classical systematics (e.g. diagnostic keys) and molecular markers (e.g. ribosomal RNA) to classify these wild isolates. Our ultimate aim is to build a detailed anatomical database in order to dissect genetic pathways of neuronal development and function across phylogeny and ecology. Research supported by NSF grants 092304, 0806660, 1058829 and Lock Haven University FPDC grants

  13. Low energy electron microscopy imaging using Medipix2 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikharulidze, I.; Gastel, R. van; Schramm, S.; Abrahams, J.P.; Poelsema, B.; Tromp, R.M.; Molen, S.J. van der

    2011-01-01

    Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM) and Photo-Emission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) predominantly use a combination of microchannel plate (MCP), phosphor screen and optical camera to record images formed by 10-20 keV electrons. We have tested the performance of a LEEM/PEEM instrument with a Medipix2 hybrid pixel detector using an Ir(1 1 1) sample with graphene flakes grown on its surface. We find that Medipix2 offers a number of advantages over the MCP. The adjustable threshold settings allow Medipix2 to operate as a noiseless detector, offering an improved signal-to-noise ratio for the same amount of signal compared to the MCP. At the same magnification Medipix2 images exhibit superior resolution and can handle significantly higher electron current densities than an MCP, offering the prospect of substantially higher frame rates in LEEM imaging. These factors make Medipix2 an excellent candidate to become the detector of choice for LEEM/PEEM applications.

  14. Low energy electron microscopy imaging using Medipix2 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikharulidze, I., E-mail: irakli@chem.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Gastel, R. van [MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500AE Enschede (Netherlands); Schramm, S. [Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Abrahams, J.P. [Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Poelsema, B. [MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500AE Enschede (Netherlands); Tromp, R.M. [Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Molen, S.J. van der [Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2011-05-15

    Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM) and Photo-Emission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) predominantly use a combination of microchannel plate (MCP), phosphor screen and optical camera to record images formed by 10-20 keV electrons. We have tested the performance of a LEEM/PEEM instrument with a Medipix2 hybrid pixel detector using an Ir(1 1 1) sample with graphene flakes grown on its surface. We find that Medipix2 offers a number of advantages over the MCP. The adjustable threshold settings allow Medipix2 to operate as a noiseless detector, offering an improved signal-to-noise ratio for the same amount of signal compared to the MCP. At the same magnification Medipix2 images exhibit superior resolution and can handle significantly higher electron current densities than an MCP, offering the prospect of substantially higher frame rates in LEEM imaging. These factors make Medipix2 an excellent candidate to become the detector of choice for LEEM/PEEM applications.

  15. Stereoscopic and photometric surface reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, S.

    2000-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is one of the most important devices to examine microscopic structures as it offers images of a high contrast range with a large depth of focus. Nevertheless, three-dimensional measurements, as desired in fracture mechanics, have previously not been accomplished. This work presents a system for automatic, robust and dense surface reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy combining new approaches in shape from stereo and shape from photometric stereo. The basic theoretical assumption for a known adaptive window algorithm is shown not to hold in scanning electron microscopy. A constraint derived from this observation yields a new, simplified, hence faster calculation of the adaptive window. The correlation measure itself is obtained by a new ordinal measure coefficient. Shape from photometric stereo in the SEM is formulated by relating the image formation process with conventional photography. An iterative photometric ratio reconstruction is invented based on photometric ratios of backscatter electron images. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated using ground truth data obtained by three alternative shape recovery devices. Most experiments showed relative height accuracy within the tolerances of the alternative devices. (author)

  16. In situ Reduction and Oxidation of Nickel from Solid Oxide Fuel Cells in a Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faes, Antonin; Jeangros, Quentin; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2009-01-01

    Environmental transmission electron microscopy was used to characterize in situ the reduction and oxidation of nickel from a Ni/YSZ solid oxide fuel cell anode support between 300-500{degree sign}C. The reduction is done under low hydrogen pressure. The reduction initiates at the NiO/YSZ interface...

  17. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  18. Low energy electron point source microscopy: beyond imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Andre; Goelzhaeuser, Armin [Physics of Supramolecular Systems and Surfaces, University of Bielefeld, Postfach 100131, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2010-09-01

    Low energy electron point source (LEEPS) microscopy has the capability to record in-line holograms at very high magnifications with a fairly simple set-up. After the holograms are numerically reconstructed, structural features with the size of about 2 nm can be resolved. The achievement of an even higher resolution has been predicted. However, a number of obstacles are known to impede the realization of this goal, for example the presence of electric fields around the imaged object, electrostatic charging or radiation induced processes. This topical review gives an overview of the achievements as well as the difficulties in the efforts to shift the resolution limit of LEEPS microscopy towards the atomic level. A special emphasis is laid on the high sensitivity of low energy electrons to electrical fields, which limits the structural determination of the imaged objects. On the other hand, the investigation of the electrical field around objects of known structure is very useful for other tasks and LEEPS microscopy can be extended beyond the task of imaging. The determination of the electrical resistance of individual nanowires can be achieved by a proper analysis of the corresponding LEEPS micrographs. This conductivity imaging may be a very useful application for LEEPS microscopes. (topical review)

  19. On the Progress of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) Imaging in a Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng; Müller, Erich; Meffert, Matthias; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2018-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with low-energy electrons has been recognized as an important addition to the family of electron microscopies as it may avoid knock-on damage and increase the contrast of weakly scattering objects. Scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) are well suited for low-energy electron microscopy with maximum electron energies of 30 keV, but they are mainly used for topography imaging of bulk samples. Implementation of a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) detector and a charge-coupled-device camera for the acquisition of on-axis transmission electron diffraction (TED) patterns, in combination with recent resolution improvements, make SEMs highly interesting for structure analysis of some electron-transparent specimens which are traditionally investigated by TEM. A new aspect is correlative SEM, STEM, and TED imaging from the same specimen region in a SEM which leads to a wealth of information. Simultaneous image acquisition gives information on surface topography, inner structure including crystal defects and qualitative material contrast. Lattice-fringe resolution is obtained in bright-field STEM imaging. The benefits of correlative SEM/STEM/TED imaging in a SEM are exemplified by structure analyses from representative sample classes such as nanoparticulates and bulk materials.

  20. Prospects for hybrid pixel detectors in electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faruqi, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    The current status of CCD-based detectors for cryo-electron microscopy of membrane and other proteins is described briefly, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of the technique. Over the past few years CCD detectors have been used extensively in electron crystallography of membrane proteins, and in particular, in the study of the molecular transitions which take place during the photo-cycle of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin. Direct-detection methods, which avoid the intermediate stages of converting the electron energy into light, offer the possibility of improved spatial resolution compared to CCD detectors; in addition, photon counting and noise-free readout should improve the signal-to-noise ratio

  1. SEGMENTATION OF MITOCHONDRIA IN ELECTRON MICROSCOPY IMAGES USING ALGEBRAIC CURVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedhosseini, Mojtaba; Ellisman, Mark H; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution microscopy techniques have been used to generate large volumes of data with enough details for understanding the complex structure of the nervous system. However, automatic techniques are required to segment cells and intracellular structures in these multi-terabyte datasets and make anatomical analysis possible on a large scale. We propose a fully automated method that exploits both shape information and regional statistics to segment irregularly shaped intracellular structures such as mitochondria in electron microscopy (EM) images. The main idea is to use algebraic curves to extract shape features together with texture features from image patches. Then, these powerful features are used to learn a random forest classifier, which can predict mitochondria locations precisely. Finally, the algebraic curves together with regional information are used to segment the mitochondria at the predicted locations. We demonstrate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art algorithms in segmentation of mitochondria in EM images.

  2. Ultrahigh Voltage Electron Microscopy Links Neuroanatomy and Neuroscience/Neuroendocrinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Sakamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional (3D analysis of anatomical ultrastructures is extremely important in most fields of biological research. Although it is very difficult to perform 3D image analysis on exact serial sets of ultrathin sections, 3D reconstruction from serial ultrathin sections can generally be used to obtain 3D information. However, this technique can only be applied to small areas of a specimen because of technical and physical difficulties. We used ultrahigh voltage electron microscopy (UHVEM to overcome these difficulties and to study the chemical neuroanatomy of 3D ultrastructures. This methodology, which links UHVEM and light microscopy, is a useful and powerful tool for studying molecular and/or chemical neuroanatomy at the ultrastructural level.

  3. In-situ straining and time-resolved electron tomography data acquisition in a transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, S; Miyazaki, S; Gondo, T; Kawamoto, K; Horii, N; Sato, K; Furukawa, H; Kudo, H; Miyazaki, H; Murayama, M

    2017-04-01

    This paper reports the preliminary results of a new in-situ three-dimensional (3D) imaging system for observing plastic deformation behavior in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) as a directly relevant development of the recently reported straining-and-tomography holder [Sato K et al. (2015) Development of a novel straining holder for transmission electron microscopy compatible with single tilt-axis electron tomography. Microsc. 64: 369-375]. We designed an integrated system using the holder and newly developed straining and image-acquisition software and then developed an experimental procedure for in-situ straining and time-resolved electron tomography (ET) data acquisition. The software for image acquisition and 3D visualization was developed based on the commercially available ET software TEMographyTM. We achieved time-resolved 3D visualization of nanometer-scale plastic deformation behavior in a Pb-Sn alloy sample, thus demonstrating the capability of this system for potential applications in materials science. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. A method to provide rapid in situ determination of tip radius in dynamic atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Sergio; Guang Li; Souier, Tewfik; Gadelrab, Karim; Chiesa, Matteo; Thomson, Neil H.

    2012-01-01

    We provide a method to characterize the tip radius of an atomic force microscopy in situ by monitoring the dynamics of the cantilever in ambient conditions. The key concept is that the value of free amplitude for which transitions from the attractive to repulsive force regimes are observed, strongly depends on the curvature of the tip. In practice, the smaller the value of free amplitude required to observe a transition, the sharper the tip. This general behavior is remarkably independent of the properties of the sample and cantilever characteristics and shows the strong dependence of the transitions on the tip radius. The main advantage of this method is rapid in situ characterization. Rapid in situ characterization enables one to continuously monitor the tip size during experiments. Further, we show how to reproducibly shape the tip from a given initial size to any chosen larger size. This approach combined with the in situ tip size monitoring enables quantitative comparison of materials measurements between samples. These methods are set to allow quantitative data acquisition and make direct data comparison readily available in the community.

  5. Generation and application of bessel beams in electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillo, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.grillo@cnr.it [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); CNR-IMEM, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, I-43124 Parma (Italy); Harris, Jérémie [Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 25 Templeton St., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 6N5 (Canada); Gazzadi, Gian Carlo [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Balboni, Roberto [CNR-IMM Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Mafakheri, Erfan [Dipartimento di Fisica Informatica e Matematica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Dennis, Mark R. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Frabboni, Stefano [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Informatica e Matematica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Boyd, Robert W.; Karimi, Ebrahim [Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 25 Templeton St., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2016-07-15

    We report a systematic treatment of the holographic generation of electron Bessel beams, with a view to applications in electron microscopy. We describe in detail the theory underlying hologram patterning, as well as the actual electron-optical configuration used experimentally. We show that by optimizing our nanofabrication recipe, electron Bessel beams can be generated with relative efficiencies reaching 37±3%. We also demonstrate by tuning various hologram parameters that electron Bessel beams can be produced with many visible rings, making them ideal for interferometric applications, or in more highly localized forms with fewer rings, more suitable for imaging. We describe the settings required to tune beam localization in this way, and explore beam and hologram configurations that allow the convergences and topological charges of electron Bessel beams to be controlled. We also characterize the phase structure of the Bessel beams generated with our technique, using a simulation procedure that accounts for imperfections in the hologram manufacturing process. - Highlights: • Bessel beams with different convergence, topological charge, visible fringes are demonstrated. • The relation between the Fresnel hologram and the probe shape is explained by detailed calculations and experiments. • Among the holograms here presented the highest relative efficiency is 37%, the best result ever reached for blazed holograms.

  6. A high sensitivity imaging detector for electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faruqi, A.R.; Andrews, H.N.; Henderson, R.

    1995-01-01

    A camera for electron microscopy based on a low readout noise cooled-CCD is described in this paper. The primary purpose of this camera is to record electron diffraction from ordered arrays of proteins but also has potential applications in imaging, electron tomography and for the automatic alignment of the electron microscope. Electrons (energy similar 120 kV) which are scattered by the specimen to form the image, which is normally recorded on film, are converted to visible photons in a polycrystalline phosphor and the resulting image is stored on the CCD (EEV 05-20, 1152 by 814, 22.5 μm square pixels). The main advantages of using CCDs include a large dynamic range, very good linearity and the possibility of immediate access to the data which is in a digitised form capable of further processing on-line during the experiment. We have built specially designed CCD ''drive'' electronics in a VME crate, interfaced to a Sun Sparcstation, for controlling the CCD operations. Data reduction programs have been installed, previously used off-line, to speed up data processing, and provide analysed data within a few minutes after the exposure. (orig.)

  7. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  8. Generation and application of bessel beams in electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Harris, Jérémie; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Balboni, Roberto; Mafakheri, Erfan; Dennis, Mark R.; Frabboni, Stefano; Boyd, Robert W.; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    We report a systematic treatment of the holographic generation of electron Bessel beams, with a view to applications in electron microscopy. We describe in detail the theory underlying hologram patterning, as well as the actual electron-optical configuration used experimentally. We show that by optimizing our nanofabrication recipe, electron Bessel beams can be generated with relative efficiencies reaching 37±3%. We also demonstrate by tuning various hologram parameters that electron Bessel beams can be produced with many visible rings, making them ideal for interferometric applications, or in more highly localized forms with fewer rings, more suitable for imaging. We describe the settings required to tune beam localization in this way, and explore beam and hologram configurations that allow the convergences and topological charges of electron Bessel beams to be controlled. We also characterize the phase structure of the Bessel beams generated with our technique, using a simulation procedure that accounts for imperfections in the hologram manufacturing process. - Highlights: • Bessel beams with different convergence, topological charge, visible fringes are demonstrated. • The relation between the Fresnel hologram and the probe shape is explained by detailed calculations and experiments. • Among the holograms here presented the highest relative efficiency is 37%, the best result ever reached for blazed holograms.

  9. Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies of Electron-Selective Titanium Oxide Contacts in Silicon Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Haider; Yang, Xinbo; Weber, Klaus; Schoenfeld, Winston V.; Davis, Kristopher O.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the cross-section of electron-selective titanium oxide (TiO2) contacts for n-type crystalline silicon solar cells were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. It was revealed that the excellent cell efficiency of 21

  10. Dynamic Processes in Biology, Chemistry, and Materials Science: Opportunities for UltraFast Transmission Electron Microscopy - Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabius, Bernd C.; Browning, Nigel D.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Diehl, Barbara L.; Stach, Eric A.

    2012-07-25

    This report summarizes a 2011 workshop that addressed the potential role of rapid, time-resolved electron microscopy measurements in accelerating the solution of important scientific and technical problems. A series of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Academy of Science workshops have highlighted the critical role advanced research tools play in addressing scientific challenges relevant to biology, sustainable energy, and technologies that will fuel economic development without degrading our environment. Among the specific capability needs for advancing science and technology are tools that extract more detailed information in realistic environments (in situ or operando) at extreme conditions (pressure and temperature) and as a function of time (dynamic and time-dependent). One of the DOE workshops, Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next Generation Instrumentation and Beyond, specifically addressed the importance of electron-based characterization methods for a wide range of energy-relevant Grand Scientific Challenges. Boosted by the electron optical advancement in the last decade, a diversity of in situ capabilities already is available in many laboratories. The obvious remaining major capability gap in electron microscopy is in the ability to make these direct in situ observations over a broad spectrum of fast (µs) to ultrafast (picosecond [ps] and faster) temporal regimes. In an effort to address current capability gaps, EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, organized an Ultrafast Electron Microscopy Workshop, held June 14-15, 2011, with the primary goal to identify the scientific needs that could be met by creating a facility capable of a strongly improved time resolution with integrated in situ capabilities. The workshop brought together more than 40 leading scientists involved in applying and/or advancing electron microscopy to address important scientific problems of relevance to DOE’s research

  11. Three-Dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    KAUST Repository

    De Jonge, Niels

    2010-01-18

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2-3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. © 2010 Microscopy Society of America.

  12. Voltammetry and In Situ Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy of De Novo Designed Heme Protein Monolayers on Au(111)-Electrode Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, Tim; Li, Wu; Haehnel, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    to the tunnelling current, apparently due to slow electron transfer kinetics. As a consequence, STM images of heme-containing and heme-free MOP-C did not reveal any notable differences in apparent height or physical extension. The apparent height of heme-containing MOP-C did not show any dependence on the substrate...... potential being varied around the redox potential of the protein. The mere presence of an accessible molecular energy level is not sufficient to result in detectable tunnelling current modulation. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......In the present work, we report the electrochemical characterization and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) studies of monolayers of an artificial de novo designed heme protein MOP-C, covalently immobilized on modified Au(111) surfaces. The protein forms closely packed monolayers, which...

  13. Analysis of archaeological materials through Scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho, A.; Tenorio C, D.; Elizalde, S.; Mandujano, C.; Cassiano, G.

    2005-01-01

    With the purpose to know the uses and the chemical composition of some cultural objects in the pre hispanic epoch this work presents several types of analysis for identifying them by means of the Scanning electron microscopy and its techniques as the Functional analysis of artifacts based on the 'tracks of use' analysis, also the X-ray spectroscopy and the X-ray dispersive energy (EDS) are mentioned, all of them allowing a major approach to the pre hispanic culture in Mexico. (Author)

  14. Fracture characteristics of uranium alloys by scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koger, J.W.; Bennett, R.K. Jr.

    1976-10-01

    The fracture characteristics of uranium alloys were determined by scanning electron microscopy. The fracture mode of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of uranium-7.5 weight percent niobium-2.5 weight percent zirconium (Mulberry) alloy, uranium--niobium alloys, and uranium--molybdenum alloys in aqueous chloride solutions is intergranular. The SCC fracture surface of the Mulberry alloy is characterized by very clean and smooth grain facets. The tensile-overload fracture surfaces of these alloys are characteristically ductile dimple. Hydrogen-embrittlement failures of the uranium alloys are brittle and the fracture mode is transgranular. Fracture surfaces of the uranium-0.75 weight percent titanium alloys are quasi cleavage

  15. Droplet Epitaxy Image Contrast in Mirror Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, S. M.; Zheng, C. X.; Jesson, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Image simulation methods are applied to interpret mirror electron microscopy (MEM) images obtained from a movie of GaAs droplet epitaxy. Cylindrical symmetry of structures grown by droplet epitaxy is assumed in the simulations which reproduce the main features of the experimental MEM image contrast, demonstrating that droplet epitaxy can be studied in real-time. It is therefore confirmed that an inner ring forms at the droplet contact line and an outer ring (or skirt) occurs outside the droplet periphery. We believe that MEM combined with image simulations will be increasingly used to study the formation and growth of quantum structures.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of Bi-2223/Ag tapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L.G.; Bals, S.; Tendeloo, G. Van

    2001-01-01

    during the tape processing, (3) a study of the grain boundaries on an atomic scale, including intergrowth investigations. Tapes with different process parameters have been compared with respect to the microstructure. A fully processed tape has on the average 50% thicker Bi-2223 grains than a tape after......The microstructure of (Bi,Pb)(2)Sr2Ca2CuOx (Bi-2223) tapes has been investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM. The emphasis has been placed on: (1) an examination of the grain morphology and size, (2) grain and colony boundary angles, which are formed...

  17. The thin layer technique and its application to electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranc, G.

    1957-10-01

    This work deals with the technique of thin layers obtained by evaporation under vacuum, in the thickness range extending from a few monoatomic layers to several hundred angstroms. The great theoretical and practical interest of these layers has, it is well known, given rise to many investigations from Faraday onwards. Within the necessarily restricted limits of this study, we shall approach the problem more particularly from the point of view of: - their production; - their use in electron microscopy. A critical appraisal is made, in the light of present-day knowledge, based on our personal experience and on an extensive bibliography which we have collected on the subject. (author) [fr

  18. Correction of bubble size distributions from transmission electron microscopy observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkegaard, P.; Eldrup, M.; Horsewell, A.; Skov Pedersen, J.

    1996-01-01

    Observations by transmission electron microscopy of a high density of gas bubbles in a metal matrix yield a distorted size distribution due to bubble overlap and bubble escape from the surface. A model is described that reconstructs 3-dimensional bubble size distributions from 2-dimensional projections on taking these effects into account. Mathematically, the reconstruction is an ill-posed inverse problem, which is solved by regularization technique. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations support the validity of our model. (au) 1 tab., 32 ills., 32 refs

  19. In situ Measurements of Phytoplankton Fluorescence Using Low Cost Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana L. Wright

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger.

  20. Direct single electron detection with a CMOS detector for electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faruqi, A.R.; Henderson, R.; Pryddetch, M.; Allport, P.; Evans, A.

    2005-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation into the use of a monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) for electron microscopy. MAPS, designed originally for astronomers at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratories, was installed in a 120 kV electron microscope (Philips CM12) at the MRC Laboratory in Cambridge for tests which included recording single electrons at 40 and 120 keV, and measuring signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), spatial resolution and radiation sensitivity. Our results show that, due to the excellent SNR and resolution, it is possible to register single electrons. The radiation damage to the detector is apparent with low doses and gets progressively greater so that its lifetime is limited to 600,000-900,000 electrons/pixel (very approximately 10-15 krad). Provided this detector can be radiation hardened to reduce its radiation sensitivity several hundred fold and increased in size, it will provide excellent performance for all types of electron microscopy

  1. Etude des catalyseurs hétérogènes à base de Co en conditions réactives "réalistes" par microscopie électronique in-situ et opérando

    OpenAIRE

    Dembélé , Kassiogé

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we studied cobalt catalysts used in producing hydrocarbons through the Fischer-Trospch synthesis process, in which their activation, operation and deactivation mechanisms are recorded using in-situ and environmental transmission electron microscopy. An operando methodology was developed by combining electron microscopy-based structural studies in an environmental cell and mass spectrometry analysis of the reacting gases. Using controlled-morphology nanocatalysts we have demonstr...

  2. Visualizing aquatic bacteria by light and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thiago P; Noyma, Natália P; Duque, Thabata L A; Gamalier, Juliana P; Vidal, Luciana O; Lobão, Lúcia M; Chiarini-Garcia, Hélio; Roland, Fábio; Melo, Rossana C N

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of the functional role of aquatic bacteria in microbial food webs is largely dependent on methods applied to the direct visualization and enumeration of these organisms. While the ultrastructure of aquatic bacteria is still poorly known, routine observation of aquatic bacteria by light microscopy requires staining with fluorochromes, followed by filtration and direct counting on filter surfaces. Here, we used a new strategy to visualize and enumerate aquatic bacteria by light microscopy. By spinning water samples from varied tropical ecosystems in a cytocentrifuge, we found that bacteria firmly adhere to regular slides, can be stained by fluorochoromes with no background formation and fast enumerated. Significant correlations were found between the cytocentrifugation and filter-based methods. Moreover, preparations through cytocentrifugation were more adequate for bacterial viability evaluation than filter-based preparations. Transmission electron microscopic analyses revealed a morphological diversity of bacteria with different internal and external structures, such as large variation in the cell envelope and capsule thickness, and presence or not of thylakoid membranes. Our results demonstrate that aquatic bacteria represent an ultrastructurally diverse population and open avenues for easy handling/quantification and better visualization of bacteria by light microscopy without the need of filter membranes.

  3. Electronic structure classifications using scanning tunneling microscopy conductance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, K.M.; Swartzentruber, B.S.; Osbourn, G.C.; Bouchard, A.; Bartholomew, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    The electronic structure of atomic surfaces is imaged by applying multivariate image classification techniques to multibias conductance data measured using scanning tunneling microscopy. Image pixels are grouped into classes according to shared conductance characteristics. The image pixels, when color coded by class, produce an image that chemically distinguishes surface electronic features over the entire area of a multibias conductance image. Such open-quotes classedclose quotes images reveal surface features not always evident in a topograph. This article describes the experimental technique used to record multibias conductance images, how image pixels are grouped in a mathematical, classification space, how a computed grouping algorithm can be employed to group pixels with similar conductance characteristics in any number of dimensions, and finally how the quality of the resulting classed images can be evaluated using a computed, combinatorial analysis of the full dimensional space in which the classification is performed. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  4. Examination of living fungal spores by scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, N.D.; Lord, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    Ascospores of Sordaria macrospora germinated and produced hyphae exhibiting normal growth and differentiation after examination by scanning electron microscopy and following numerous, different preparative protocols. Seventy-nine to ninety-nine percent of the ascospores retained normal viability after being observed in the fully frozen-hydrated, partially freeze-dried, and vacuum-dried states at accelerating voltages of 5 and 40 keV. Hyphae did not survive these treatments. From these observations it is concluded that ascospores of S. macrospora can remain in a state of suspended animation while being observed in the scanning electron microscope. The ascospores also survived, but with reduced viability: 6 h in glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde, 6 h in OsO4, or 2 h in glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde followed by 2 h in OsO 4 . However, the ascospores did not germinate after dehydration in ethanol. (author)

  5. Electron microscopy studies of materials used for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei, Carmen M.

    2004-07-01

    Concerns over global warming and air pollution have stimulated the concept of the ''Hydrogen Economy'' and the potential extensive use of hydrogen as an energy carrier. Hydrogen storage in a solid matrix has become one of the promising solutions for vehicular applications. In this study, several transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques such as high resolution (HR), electron diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFT EM) as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been used to study the microstructure of materials related to hydrogen storage applications. Some of the results are compared with powder X-ray diffraction (PXD) data. A TbNiAl compound processed by the hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination (HDDR) route has been studied using a combination of SEM, TEM and PXD. Information about the variations in the composition and surface topography in both disproportionation and recombination stages is given by the SEM backscattered electrons and secondary electrons images. The crystallites that have undergone the recombination process were found smaller in size. The sodium alanate, NaAIH4 is one of the most promising candidate materials for hydrogen storage. Ti additives are effective at reducing the reaction temperatures and improving the efficiency of the kinetics. The microstructure of NaAlH4 with TiF3 additive has been examined after the initial ball milling and after 15 cycles, using TEM, SEM and EDS. The effect of the additive on particle morphology, grain size and distribution of the phases has been studied. The additive has uneven distribution in the sample after initial ball milling. After 15 cycles, EDS maps show some combination of Ti with the alanate phase. No significant change in grain size of the Na/Al rich particles between the ball milled and 15 cycled sample was observed. The LiAlD4

  6. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibil, Helen R; Grünewald, Kay; Stuart, David I

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback.

  7. Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Chris; Burnley, Tom; Patwardhan, Ardan; Scheres, Sjors; Topf, Maya; Roseman, Alan; Winn, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) is a new initiative for the structural biology community, following the success of CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography. Progress in supporting the users and developers of cryoEM software is reported. The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed

  8. Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Chris; Burnley, Tom [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Patwardhan, Ardan [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); Scheres, Sjors [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Topf, Maya [University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Roseman, Alan [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Winn, Martyn, E-mail: martyn.winn@stfc.ac.uk [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Science and Technology Facilities Council, Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) is a new initiative for the structural biology community, following the success of CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography. Progress in supporting the users and developers of cryoEM software is reported. The Collaborative Computational Project for Electron cryo-Microscopy (CCP-EM) has recently been established. The aims of the project are threefold: to build a coherent cryoEM community which will provide support for individual scientists and will act as a focal point for liaising with other communities, to support practising scientists in their use of cryoEM software and finally to support software developers in producing and disseminating robust and user-friendly programs. The project is closely modelled on CCP4 for macromolecular crystallography, and areas of common interest such as model fitting, underlying software libraries and tools for building program packages are being exploited. Nevertheless, cryoEM includes a number of techniques covering a large range of resolutions and a distinct project is required. In this article, progress so far is reported and future plans are discussed.

  9. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  10. Transmission electron microscopy a textbook for materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, David B

    1996-01-01

    Electron microscopy has revolutionized our understanding the extraordinary intellectual demands required of the mi­ of materials by completing the processing-structure-prop­ croscopist in order to do the job properly: crystallography, erties links down to atomistic levels. It now is even possible diffraction, image contrast, inelastic scattering events, and to tailor the microstructure (and meso structure ) of materials spectroscopy. Remember, these used to be fields in them­ to achieve specific sets of properties; the extraordinary abili­ selves. Today, one has to understand the fundamentals ties of modem transmission electron microscopy-TEM­ of all of these areas before one can hope to tackle signifi­ instruments to provide almost all of the structural, phase, cant problems in materials science. TEM is a technique of and crystallographic data allow us to accomplish this feat. characterizing materials down to the atomic limits. It must Therefore, it is obvious that any curriculum in modem mate­ be use...

  11. Experimental procedures to mitigate electron beam induced artifacts during in situ fluid imaging of nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Evans, James E.; Arslan, Ilke; Ristenpart, William D.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-01-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy of various fluid and hydrated nanomaterial samples has revealed multiple imaging artifacts and electron beam–fluid interactions. These phenomena include growth of crystals on the fluid stage windows, repulsion of particles from the irradiated area, bubble formation, and the loss of atomic information during prolonged imaging of individual nanoparticles. Here we provide a comprehensive review of these fluid stage artifacts, and we present new experimental evidence that sheds light on their origins in terms of experimental apparatus issues and indirect electron beam sample interactions with the fluid layer. A key finding is that many artifacts are a result of indirect electron beam interactions, such as production of reactive radicals in the water by radiolysis, and the associated crystal growth. The results presented here will provide a methodology for minimizing fluid stage imaging artifacts and acquiring quantitative in situ observations of nanomaterial behavior in a liquid environment

  12. Experimental procedures to mitigate electron beam induced artifacts during in situ fluid imaging of nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woehl, Taylor J., E-mail: tjwoehl@ucdavis.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Jungjohann, Katherine L. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Evans, James E. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Arslan, Ilke [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Ristenpart, William D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Browning, Nigel D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy of various fluid and hydrated nanomaterial samples has revealed multiple imaging artifacts and electron beam–fluid interactions. These phenomena include growth of crystals on the fluid stage windows, repulsion of particles from the irradiated area, bubble formation, and the loss of atomic information during prolonged imaging of individual nanoparticles. Here we provide a comprehensive review of these fluid stage artifacts, and we present new experimental evidence that sheds light on their origins in terms of experimental apparatus issues and indirect electron beam sample interactions with the fluid layer. A key finding is that many artifacts are a result of indirect electron beam interactions, such as production of reactive radicals in the water by radiolysis, and the associated crystal growth. The results presented here will provide a methodology for minimizing fluid stage imaging artifacts and acquiring quantitative in situ observations of nanomaterial behavior in a liquid environment.

  13. Quantitative electron microscopy and spectroscopy of MgB2 wires and tapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birajdar, B; Peranio, N; Eibl, O

    2008-01-01

    In MgB 2 the correlation of microstructure with superconducting properties, in particular the critical current density, requires powerful analytical tools. Critical current densities and electrical resistivities of different MgB 2 superconductors differ by orders of magnitudes and the current limiting mechanisms have not been fully understood. Granularity of MgB 2 is one significant reason for reduced critical current densities and is introduced intrinsically by the anisotropy of B c2 but also extrinsically by the microstructure of the material. B c2 enhancement by doping is another important challenge for chemical analysis and, at present, doping levels are not well controlled on the sub-μm scale. In this paper the quantitative electron microscopy and spectroscopy methods essential for the microstructural analysis of MgB 2 are described. By quantitative electron microscopy and spectroscopy we mean a combined SEM and TEM analysis that covers various length scales from μm to nm. Contamination-free sample preparation, chemical mapping including B, and advanced chemical quantification using x-ray microanalysis were essential elements of the applied methodology. The methodology was applied to in situ and ex situ MgB 2 wires and tapes with and without SiC additives. Quantitative B analysis by EDX spectroscopy was applied quantitatively in the SEM and TEM, which is a major achievement. Although MgB 2 is a binary system, the thermodynamics of phase formation is complex, and the complexity is dramatically increased if additives like SiC are used. The small, sub-μm grain sizes of the matrix and secondary phases require TEM methods. However, granularity on the μm scale was also identified and underlines the importance of the combined SEM and TEM studies. Significant differences in the microstructure were observed for in situ and ex situ samples. This holds particularly if SiC was added and yielded Mg 2 Si for in situ samples annealed at 600-650 deg. C and Mg-Si-O phases

  14. Hybrid fluorescence and electron cryo-microscopy for simultaneous electron and photon imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hirofumi; Fukuda, Yoshiyuki; Arai, Yoshihiro; Terakawa, Susumu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    Integration of fluorescence light and transmission electron microscopy into the same device would represent an important advance in correlative microscopy, which traditionally involves two separate microscopes for imaging. To achieve such integration, the primary technical challenge that must be solved regards how to arrange two objective lenses used for light and electron microscopy in such a manner that they can properly focus on a single specimen. To address this issue, both lateral displacement of the specimen between two lenses and specimen rotation have been proposed. Such movement of the specimen allows sequential collection of two kinds of microscopic images of a single target, but prevents simultaneous imaging. This shortcoming has been made up by using a simple optical device, a reflection mirror. Here, we present an approach toward the versatile integration of fluorescence and electron microscopy for simultaneous imaging. The potential of simultaneous hybrid microscopy was demonstrated by fluorescence and electron sequential imaging of a fluorescent protein expressed in cells and cathodoluminescence imaging of fluorescent beads. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of strained semiconductor structures using transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezdoel, Vasfi Burak

    2011-08-15

    Today's state-of-the-art semiconductor electronic devices utilize the charge transport within very small volumes of the active device regions. The structural, chemical and optical material properties in these small dimensions can critically affect the performance of these devices. The present thesis is focused on the nanometer scale characterization of the strain state in semiconductor structures using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Although high-resolution TEM has shown to provide the required accuracy at the nanometer scale, optimization of imaging conditions is necessary for accurate strain measurements. An alternative HRTEM method based on strain mapping on complex-valued exit face wave functions is developed to reduce the artifacts arising from objective lens aberrations. However, a much larger field of view is crucial for mapping strain in the active regions of complex structures like latest generation metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). To overcome this, a complementary approach based on electron holography is proposed. The technique relies on the reconstruction of the phase shifts in the diffracted electron beams from a focal series of dark-field images using recently developed exit-face wave function reconstruction algorithm. Combining high spatial resolution, better than 1 nm, with a field of view of about 1 {mu}m in each dimension, simultaneous strain measurements on the array of MOSFETs are possible. Owing to the much lower electron doses used in holography experiments when compared to conventional quantitative methods, the proposed approach allows to map compositional distribution in electron beam sensitive materials such as InGaN heterostructures without alteration of the original morphology and chemical composition. Moreover, dark-field holography experiments can be performed on thicker specimens than the ones required for high-resolution TEM, which in turn reduces the thin foil relaxation. (orig.)

  16. Active pixel sensor array as a detector for electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Leblanc, Philippe; Duttweiler, Fred; Jin, Liang; Bouwer, James C; Peltier, Steve; Ellisman, Mark; Bieser, Fred; Matis, Howard S; Wieman, Howard; Denes, Peter; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Xuong, Nguyen-Huu

    2005-09-01

    A new high-resolution recording device for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is urgently needed. Neither film nor CCD cameras are systems that allow for efficient 3-D high-resolution particle reconstruction. We tested an active pixel sensor (APS) array as a replacement device at 200, 300, and 400 keV using a JEOL JEM-2000 FX II and a JEM-4000 EX electron microscope. For this experiment, we used an APS prototype with an area of 64 x 64 pixels of 20 microm x 20 microm pixel pitch. Single-electron events were measured by using very low beam intensity. The histogram of the incident electron energy deposited in the sensor shows a Landau distribution at low energies, as well as unexpected events at higher absorbed energies. After careful study, we concluded that backscattering in the silicon substrate and re-entering the sensitive epitaxial layer a second time with much lower speed caused the unexpected events. Exhaustive simulation experiments confirmed the existence of these back-scattered electrons. For the APS to be usable, the back-scattered electron events must be eliminated, perhaps by thinning the substrate to less than 30 microm. By using experimental data taken with an APS chip with a standard silicon substrate (300 microm) and adjusting the results to take into account the effect of a thinned silicon substrate (30 microm), we found an estimate of the signal-to-noise ratio for a back-thinned detector in the energy range of 200-400 keV was about 10:1 and an estimate for the spatial resolution was about 10 microm.

  17. Preliminary Study of In Vivo Formed Dental Plaque Using Confocal Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KA. Al-Salihi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is relatively a new light microscopical imaging technique with a wide range of applications in biological sciences. The primary value of CLSM for the biologist is its ability to provide optical sections from athree-dimensional specimen. The present study was designed to assess the thickness and content of in vivo accumulated dental plaque using CLSM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Materials and Methods: Acroflat lower arch splints (acrylic appliance were worn by five participants for three days without any disturbance. The formed plaques were assessed using CLSM combined with vital fluorescence technique and SEM.Results: In this study accumulated dental plaque revealed varied plaque microflora vitality and thickness according to participant’s oral hygiene. The thickness of plaque smears ranged from 40.32 to 140.72 μm and 65.00 to 128.88 μm for live (vital and dead accumulated microorganisms, respectively. Meanwhile, the thickness of plaque on the appliance ranged from 101 μm to 653 μm. CLSM revealed both dead and vital bacteria on the surface of the dental plaque. In addition, SEM revealed layers of various bacterial aggregations in all dental plaques.Conclusion: This study offers a potent non-invasive tool to evaluate and assess the dental plaque biofilm, which is a very important factor in the development of dental caries.

  18. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Nellist, Peter D., E-mail: peter.nellist@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Cosgriff, Eireann C.; D' Alfonso, Adrian J.; Morgan, Andrew J.; Allen, Leslie J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Hashimoto, Ayako [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Takeguchi, Masaki [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Mitsuishi, Kazutaka [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Quantum Dot Research Center, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Shimojo, Masayuki [High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Laboratory, Saitama Institute of Technology, 1690 Fusaiji, Fukaya 369-0293 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. -- Research Highlights: {yields} The confocal probe image in a scanning confocal electron microscopy image reveals information about the thickness and height of the crystalline layer. {yields} The form of the contrast in a three-dimensional bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy image can be explained in terms of the confocal probe image. {yields} Despite the complicated form of the contrast in bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy, we see that depth information is transferred on a 10 nm scale.

  19. In-situ investigation of thermal instabilities and solid state dewetting in polycrystalline platinum thin films via confocal laser microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahangir, S.; Cheng, Xuan; Huang, H. H.; Nagarajan, V. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia); Ihlefeld, J. [Electronic, Optical, and Nanomaterials Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2014-10-28

    Solid state dewetting and the subsequent morphological changes for platinum thin films grown on zinc oxide (ZnO) buffered (001) silicon substrates (Pt/ZnO/SiO{sub 2}/(001)Si system) is investigated under vacuum conditions via a custom-designed confocal laser microscope coupled with a laser heating system. Live imaging of thin film dewetting under a range of heating and quenching vacuum ambients reveals events including hillock formation, hole formation, and hole growth that lead to formation of a network of Pt ligaments, break up of Pt ligaments to individual islands and subsequent Pt islands shape reformation, in chronological fashion. These findings are corroborated by ex-situ materials characterization and quantitative electron microscopy analysis. A secondary hole formation via blistering before film rupture is revealed to be the critical stage, after which a rapid dewetting catastrophe occurs. This process is instantaneous and cannot be captured by ex-situ methods. Finally, an intermetallic phase forms at 900 °C and alters the morphology of Pt islands, suggesting a practical limit to the thermal environments that may be used for these platinized silicon wafers in vacuum conditions.

  20. In-situ investigation of thermal instabilities and solid state dewetting in polycrystalline platinum thin films via confocal laser microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahangir, S.; Cheng, Xuan; Huang, H. H.; Nagarajan, V.; Ihlefeld, J.

    2014-01-01

    Solid state dewetting and the subsequent morphological changes for platinum thin films grown on zinc oxide (ZnO) buffered (001) silicon substrates (Pt/ZnO/SiO 2 /(001)Si system) is investigated under vacuum conditions via a custom-designed confocal laser microscope coupled with a laser heating system. Live imaging of thin film dewetting under a range of heating and quenching vacuum ambients reveals events including hillock formation, hole formation, and hole growth that lead to formation of a network of Pt ligaments, break up of Pt ligaments to individual islands and subsequent Pt islands shape reformation, in chronological fashion. These findings are corroborated by ex-situ materials characterization and quantitative electron microscopy analysis. A secondary hole formation via blistering before film rupture is revealed to be the critical stage, after which a rapid dewetting catastrophe occurs. This process is instantaneous and cannot be captured by ex-situ methods. Finally, an intermetallic phase forms at 900 °C and alters the morphology of Pt islands, suggesting a practical limit to the thermal environments that may be used for these platinized silicon wafers in vacuum conditions.

  1. Method to characterize inorganic particulates in lung tissue biopsies using field emission scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowers, Heather; Breit, George N.; Strand, Matthew; Pillers, Renee M.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Todorov, Todor I.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Wolf, Ruth E.; Robinson, Maura; Parr, Jane; Miller, Robert J.; Groshong, Steve; Green, Francis; Rose, Cecile

    2018-01-01

    Humans accumulate large numbers of inorganic particles in their lungs over a lifetime. Whether this causes or contributes to debilitating disease over a normal lifespan depends on the type and concentration of the particles. We developed and tested a protocol for in situ characterization of the types and distribution of inorganic particles in biopsied lung tissue from three human groups using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Many distinct particle types were recognized among the 13 000 particles analyzed. Silica, feldspars, clays, titanium dioxides, iron oxides and phosphates were the most common constituents in all samples. Particles were classified into three general groups: endogenous, which form naturally in the body; exogenic particles, natural earth materials; and anthropogenic particles, attributed to industrial sources. These in situ results were compared with those using conventional sodium hypochlorite tissue digestion and particle filtration. With the exception of clays and phosphates, the relative abundances of most common particle types were similar in both approaches. Nonetheless, the digestion/filtration method was determined to alter the texture and relative abundances of some particle types. SEM/EDS analysis of digestion filters could be automated in contrast to the more time intensive in situ analyses.

  2. Attosecond electron pulse trains and quantum state reconstruction in ultrafast transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priebe, Katharina E.; Rathje, Christopher; Yalunin, Sergey V.; Hohage, Thorsten; Feist, Armin; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2017-12-01

    Ultrafast electron and X-ray imaging and spectroscopy are the basis for an ongoing revolution in the understanding of dynamical atomic-scale processes in matter. The underlying technology relies heavily on laser science for the generation and characterization of ever shorter pulses. Recent findings suggest that ultrafast electron microscopy with attosecond-structured wavefunctions may be feasible. However, such future technologies call for means to both prepare and fully analyse the corresponding free-electron quantum states. Here, we introduce a framework for the preparation, coherent manipulation and characterization of free-electron quantum states, experimentally demonstrating attosecond electron pulse trains. Phase-locked optical fields coherently control the electron wavefunction along the beam direction. We establish a new variant of quantum state tomography—`SQUIRRELS'—for free-electron ensembles. The ability to tailor and quantitatively map electron quantum states will promote the nanoscale study of electron-matter entanglement and new forms of ultrafast electron microscopy down to the attosecond regime.

  3. Robust image alignment for cryogenic transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Robert A; Kowal, Julia; Ringler, Philippe; Stahlberg, Henning

    2017-03-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy recently experienced great improvements in structure resolution due to direct electron detectors with improved contrast and fast read-out leading to single electron counting. High frames rates enabled dose fractionation, where a long exposure is broken into a movie, permitting specimen drift to be registered and corrected. The typical approach for image registration, with high shot noise and low contrast, is multi-reference (MR) cross-correlation. Here we present the software package Zorro, which provides robust drift correction for dose fractionation by use of an intensity-normalized cross-correlation and logistic noise model to weight each cross-correlation in the MR model and filter each cross-correlation optimally. Frames are reliably registered by Zorro with low dose and defocus. Methods to evaluate performance are presented, by use of independently-evaluated even- and odd-frame stacks by trajectory comparison and Fourier ring correlation. Alignment of tiled sub-frames is also introduced, and demonstrated on an example dataset. Zorro source code is available at github.com/CINA/zorro. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Electron microscopy study of radiation effects in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoto, T.

    1987-03-01

    Boron carbide is a disordered non-stoechiometric material with a strongly microtwinned polycristallyne microstructure. This ceramic is among the candidate materials for the first wall coating in fusion reactor and is used as a neutron absorber in the control rods of fast breeder reactors. The present work deals with the nature of radiation damage in this solid. Because of helium internal production, neutron irradiated boron carbide is affected by swelling and by a strong microcracking which can break up a pellet in fine powder. These processes are rather intensitive to the irradiation parameters (temperature, flux and even neutron spectrum). Transmission electron microscopy of samples irradiated by the fast neutrons of a reactor, the electrons of a high voltage electron microscope and of samples implanted with helium ions was used to understand the respective roles of helium and point defects in the processes of swelling and microcracking. The design of an irradiation chamber for helium implantation at controlled temperature from 600 to 1700 0 C was an important technical part of this work [fr

  6. Trends in the Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Ardan

    2017-06-01

    Recent technological advances, such as the introduction of the direct electron detector, have transformed the field of cryo-EM and the landscape of molecular and cellular structural biology. This study analyses these trends from the vantage point of the Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB), the public archive for three-dimensional EM reconstructions. Over 1000 entries were released in 2016, representing almost a quarter of the total number of entries (4431). Structures at better than 6 Å resolution now represent one of the fastest-growing categories, while the share of annually released tomography-related structures is approaching 20%. The use of direct electron detectors is growing very rapidly: they were used for 70% of the structures released in 2016, in contrast to none before 2011. Microscopes from FEI have an overwhelming lead in terms of usage, and the use of the RELION software package continues to grow rapidly after having attained a leading position in the field. China is rapidly emerging as a major player in the field, supplementing the US, Germany and the UK as the big four. Similarly, Tsinghua University ranks only second to the MRC Laboratory for Molecular Biology in terms of involvement in publications associated with cryo-EM structures at better than 4 Å resolution. Overall, the numbers point to a rapid democratization of the field, with more countries and institutes becoming involved.

  7. Selection of electron acceptors and strategies for in situ bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The most critical aspect of designing in situ bioremediation systems is, typically, the selection and method of delivery of the electron acceptor. Nitrate, sulfate, and several forms of oxygen can be introduced, depending on the contaminants and the site conditions. Oxygen can be added as air, pure oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, or an oxygen release compound. Simplistic cost calculations can illustrate the advantages of some methods over others, providing technical requirements can be met

  8. Scanning electron microscopy of the neuropathology of murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Christian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms leading to death and functional impairments due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Most of the knowledge about the pathomechanisms of CM originates from studies in animal models. Though extensive histopathological studies of the murine brain during CM are existing, alterations have not been visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM so far. The present study investigates the neuropathological features of murine CM by applying SEM. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. When typical symptoms of CM developed perfused brains were processed for SEM or light microscopy, respectively. Results Ultrastructural hallmarks were disruption of vessel walls, parenchymal haemorrhage, leukocyte sequestration to the endothelium, and diapedesis of macrophages and lymphocytes into the Virchow-Robin space. Villous appearance of observed lymphocytes were indicative of activated state. Cerebral oedema was evidenced by enlargement of perivascular spaces. Conclusion The results of the present study corroborate the current understanding of CM pathophysiology, further support the prominent role of the local immune system in the neuropathology of CM and might expose new perspectives for further interventional studies.

  9. Electron microscopy study of red mud after seawater neutralisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo, S.P.; Kiyohara, P.K.; Antunes, M.L.P.; Frost, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Red Mud, residue of Bayer process for extracting alumina from bauxite, is produced in large quantity. This residue is very alkaline and can cause damage to health and the environment. One way to minimize the environmental impact of this residue is neutralization by sea water. The Brazilian Red Mud was treated with sea water. It appears that the initial pH of the samples is reduced to 8. The analysis by x-ray diffraction allows to identify the formation of hydrotalcite and aragonite. The transmission electron microscopy images show that this consists of particles with dimensions between 0.02 to 2 μm. It was possible to identify by EDS/MET particles of magnesium, confirming the formation of hydrotalcite. (author)

  10. The role of electron microscopy in the UKAEA Northern Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumerling, R.; Cawthorn, C.; Slattery, G.; Bilsby, C.F.

    1983-01-01

    The role of electron microscopy in the Northern Division of the UKAEA is to assist in the development of safe and efficient nuclear power, particularly in optimising fuel element performance, but also to solve the materials problems which arise in both nuclear and non-nuclear plant. Some of the fuel element investigations under-taken in the past 25 years are reviewed under six headings: compatibility of different materials - fuel, cladding and coolant; dimensional stability of the fuel element; heat transfer from fuel to coolant; fission gas release from the fuel; cladding integrity and causes of failure; and safety. The various types of thermal reactor and fast reactors pose different materials problems, but similarities abound and often experience with one system can be of value in another. Current investigations are discussed. (U.K.)

  11. Visualization of bacterial polysaccharides by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolanski, B S; McAleer, W J; Hilleman, M R

    1983-04-01

    Highly purified capsular polysaccharides of Neisseria meningitidis groups A, B, and C have been visualized by high resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM). Spheroidal macromolecules approximately 200 A in diameter are characteristic of the Meningococcus A and C polysaccharides whereas filaments that are 400-600 A in length are found in Meningococcus B polysaccharide preparations. Filaments are occasionally found associated with the spheroidal Meningococcus A and C polysaccharides and it is proposed that these structures are composed of a long (1-4 microns) filament or filaments that are arranged in spheroidal molecules or micelles of high molecular weight. The Meningococcus B polysaccharide, by contrast, is a short flexuous filament or strand of relatively low molecular weight. A relationship between morphology and antigenicity is proposed.

  12. High-resolution electron microscopy and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F H

    1987-12-01

    A review of research on high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) carried out at the Institute of Physics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is presented. Apart from the direct observation of crystal and quasicrystal defects for some alloys, oxides, minerals, etc., and the structure determination for some minute crystals, an approximate image-contrast theory named pseudo-weak-phase object approximation (PWPOA), which shows the image contrast change with crystal thickness, is described. Within the framework of PWPOA, the image contrast of lithium ions in the crystal of R-Li2Ti3O7 has been observed. The usefulness of diffraction analysis techniques such as the direct method and Patterson method in HREM is discussed. Image deconvolution and resolution enhancement for weak-phase objects by use of the direct method are illustrated. In addition, preliminary results of image restoration for thick crystals are given.

  13. Optimization of permanganic etching of polyethylenes for scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naylor, K.L.; Phillips, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The permanganic etching technique has been studied as a function of time, temperature, and concentration for a series of polyethylenes. Kinetic studies show that a film of reaction products builds up on the surface, impeding further etching, an effect which is greatest for the lowest-crystallinity polymers. SEM studies combined with EDS show that the film contains sulfur, potassium and some manganese. An artifact is produced by the etching process which is impossible to remove by washing procedures if certain limits of time, temperature, and concentration are exceeded. For lower-crystallinity polyethylenes multiple etching and washing steps were required for optimal resolution. Plastic deformation during specimen preparation, whether from scratches or freeze fracturing, enhances artifact formation. When appropriate procedures are used, virtually artifact-free surfaces can be produced allowing a combination of permanganic etching and scanning electron microscopy to give a rapid method for detailed morphological characterization of bulk specimens

  14. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals from cattle bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Sangeeta; Wei, Shanghai; Han, Jie; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    In this present study, hydroxyapatite which was obtained from cattle bones has been heat treated at temperature 400 °C and 600 °C. The microstructure after the treatment has been studied in detail using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction techniques. The TEM results indicate that natural bone consists of collagen and hydroxyapatite nano-crystals which are needle shaped. The heat treatment influences the crystallinity and growth of these hydroxyapatite nano-crystals known as ‘crystal maturation’ or ‘crystal ageing’. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite is obtained from cattle bones. • Material has been characterised using XRD and TEM. • Crystal growth and orientation has been studied in detail.

  15. Analytical electron microscopy of neutron-irradiated reactor alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Exposure to the high neutron fluxes and temperatures from 400 to 650 0 C in the core region of a fast breeder reactor profoundly alters the microstructure and properties of structural steels and superalloys. The development of irradiation-induced voids, dislocations and precipitates, as well as segregation of alloying elements on a microscopic scale has been related to macroscopic swelling, creep, hardening and embrittlement which occur during prolonged exposures in reactor. Microanalytical studies using TEM/STEM methods, primarily energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) microanalysis, have greatly aided understanding of alloy behavior under irradiation. The main uses of analytical electron microscopy in studying irradiated alloys have been the identification of irradiation-induced precipitates and determination of the changes in local composition due to irradiation-induced solute segregation

  16. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals from cattle bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Sangeeta, E-mail: spt658@aucklanduni.ac.nz [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand); Wei, Shanghai [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand); Han, Jie [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 205 North Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL (United States); Gao, Wei [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand)

    2015-11-15

    In this present study, hydroxyapatite which was obtained from cattle bones has been heat treated at temperature 400 °C and 600 °C. The microstructure after the treatment has been studied in detail using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction techniques. The TEM results indicate that natural bone consists of collagen and hydroxyapatite nano-crystals which are needle shaped. The heat treatment influences the crystallinity and growth of these hydroxyapatite nano-crystals known as ‘crystal maturation’ or ‘crystal ageing’. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite is obtained from cattle bones. • Material has been characterised using XRD and TEM. • Crystal growth and orientation has been studied in detail.

  17. Electron Microscopy Analysis of the Nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Hernández, Roberto; López-Villaseñor, Imelda; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Segura-Valdez, María De L.; Jiménez-García, Luis F.

    2005-08-01

    The nucleolus is the main site for synthesis and processing of ribosomal RNA in eukaryotes. In mammals, plants, and yeast the nucleolus has been extensively characterized by electron microscopy, but in the majority of the unicellular eukaryotes no such studies have been performed. Here we used ultrastructural cytochemical and immunocytochemical techniques as well as three-dimensional reconstruction to analyze the nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi, which is an early divergent eukaryote of medical importance. In T. cruzi epimastigotes the nucleolus is a spherical intranuclear ribonucleoprotein organelle localized in a relatively central position within the nucleus. Dense fibrillar and granular components but not fibrillar centers were observed. In addition, nuclear bodies resembling Cajal bodies were observed associated to the nucleolus in the surrounding nucleoplasm. Our results provide additional morphological data to better understand the synthesis and processing of the ribosomal RNA in kinetoplastids.

  18. Characterization of nanomaterials in food by electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dudkiewicz, Agnieszka; Tiede, Karen; Löschner, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    (e.g., size and shape).This review presents an overview of electron microscopy (EM)-based methods that have been, or have the potential to be, applied to imaging ENMs in foodstuffs. We provide an overview of approaches to sample preparation, including drying, chemical treatment, fixation......Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are increasingly being used in the food industry. In order to assess the efficacy and the risks of these materials, it is essential to have access to methods that not only detect the nanomaterials, but also provide information on the characteristics of the materials...... and cryogenic methods. We then describe standard and non-standard EM-based approaches that are available for imaging prepared samples. Finally, we present a strategy for selecting the most appropriate method for a particular foodstuff....

  19. Electron microscopy and plastic deformation of industrial austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Barry

    1976-01-01

    The different mechanisms of plastic deformation observed in austenitic stainless steels are described and the role of transmission electron microscopy in the elucidation of the mechanisms is presented. At temperatures below 0,5Tm, different variants of dislocation glide are competitive: slip of perfect and partial dislocations, mechanical twinning and strain-induced phase transformations. The predominance of one or other of these mechanisms can be rationalized in terms of the temperature and composition dependence of the stacking fault energy and the thermodynamic stability of the austenite. At temperatures above 0,5Tm dislocation climb and diffusion of point defects become increasingly important and at these temperatures recovery, recrystallization and precipitation can also occur during deformation [fr

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of Strongylus spp. in zebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Els, H J; Malan, F S; Scialdo-Krecek, R C

    1983-12-01

    The external ultrastructure of the anterior and posterior extremities of the nematodes, Strongylus asini , Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus equinus and Strongylus edentatus, was studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fresh specimens of S. asini were collected from the caecum, ventral colon and vena portae of Equus burchelli and Equus zebra hartmannae ; S. vulgaris from the caecum, colon and arteria ileocolica of E. burchelli ; S. equinus from the ventral colon of E. z. hartmannae and S. edentatus from the caecum and ventral colon of both zebras , during surveys of parasites in zebras in the Etosha Game Reserve, South West Africa/Namibia, and the Kruger National Park, Republic of South Africa. The worms were cleaned, fixed and mounted by standard methods and photographed in a JEOL JSM - 35C scanning electron microscope (SEM) operating at 12kV . The SEM showed the following differences: the tips of the external leaf-crowns varied and were fine and delicate in S. asini , coarse and broad in S. vulgaris and, in S. equinus and S. edentatus, closely adherent, separating into single elements for half their length. The excretory pores showed only slight variation, and the morphology of the copulatory bursae did not differ from those seen with light microscopy. The genital cones differed markedly: S. asini had a ventral triangular projection and laterally 2 finger-like projections: in S. vulgaris there were numerous bosses on the lateral and ventral aspects of the cone; in S. equinus 2 finger-like processes projected laterocaudally ; and in S. edentatus 2 pairs of papilla-like processes projected laterally on the ventral aspects, and a pair of rounded projections and a pair of hair-like structures adorned the dorsal aspects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Spatiotemporal Observation of Electron-Impact Dynamics in Photovoltaic Materials Using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Basamat; Sun, Jingya; Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2017-01-01

    information can be obtained using the one-of-a-kind methodology of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM). Here, we address the fundamental issue of how the thickness of the absorber layer may significantly affect the charge carrier dynamics

  2. Nano-structured thin films : a Lorentz transmission electron microscopy and electron holography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosson, J.Th.M. de; Raedt, H.A. De; Zhong, ZY; Saka, H; Kim, TH; Holm, EA; Han, YF; Xie, XS

    2005-01-01

    This paper aims at applying advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to functional materials, such as ultra-soft magnetic films for high-frequency inductors, to reveal the structure-property relationship. The ultimate goal is to delineate a more quantitative way to obtain information of the

  3. Towards high resolution operando electron microscopy of a working catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puspitasari, I.

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this PhD project are to address the challenges of in-situ TEM and introduce a new generation of in-situ TEM equipment. In Chapter 2 the in-situ TEM facilities are introduced, focusing on the nanoreactor that has gone through quite some development stages during this project.

  4. Degradation of thin poly(lactic acid) films: Characterization by capacitance–voltage, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and contact-angle measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schusser, S.; Menzel, S.; Bäcker, M.; Leinhos, M.; Poghossian, A.; Wagner, P.; Schöning, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    For the development of new biopolymers and implantable biomedical devices with predicted biodegradability, simple, non-destructive, fast and inexpensive techniques capable for real-time in situ testing of the degradation kinetics of polymers are highly appreciated. In this work, a capacitive field-effect electrolyte–insulator–semiconductor (EIS) sensor has been applied for real-time in situ monitoring of degradation of thin poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) films over a long-time period of one month. Generally, the polymer-modified EIS (PMEIS) sensor is capable of detecting any changes in the bulk, surface and interface properties of the polymer (e.g., thickness, coverage, dielectric constant, surface potential) induced by degradation processes. The time-dependent capacitance–voltage (C–V) characteristics of PMEIS structures were used as an indicator of the polymer degradation. To accelerate the PDLLA degradation, experiments were performed in alkaline buffer solution of pH 10.6. The results of these degradation measurements with the EIS sensor were verified by the detection of lactic acid (product of the PDLLA degradation) in the degradation medium. In addition, the micro-structural and morphological changes of the polymer surface induced by the polymer degradation have been systematically studied by means of scanning-electron microscopy, atomic-force microscopy, optical microscopy, and contact-angle measurements

  5. Localization of fluorescently labeled structures in frozen-hydrated samples using integrated light electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, F.G.A.; Bárcena, M.A.; Agronskaia, A.V.; Gerritsen, H.C.; Moscicka, K.B.; Diebolder, C.A.; Driel, L.F.; Limpens, R.W.A.L.; Bos, E.; Ravelli, R.B.G.; Koning, R.I.; Koster, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an increasingly popular technique to study complex biological systems at various levels of resolution. Fluorescence microscopy can be employed to scan large areas to localize regions of interest which are then analyzed by electron microscopy to obtain

  6. Surface polymerization of (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) probed by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy on Au(111) in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shahzada; Carstens, Timo; Berger, Rüdiger; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Endres, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The electropolymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) to poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) was investigated in the air and water-stable ionic liquids 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl) trifluorophosphate [HMIm]FAP and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) amide [EMIm]TFSA. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) results show that the electropolymerization of EDOT in the ionic liquid can be probed on the nanoscale. In contrast to present understanding, it was observed that the EDOT can be oxidised in ionic liquids well below its oxidation potential and the under potential growth of polymer was visualized by in situ STM. These results serve as the first study to confirm the under potential growth of conducting polymers in ionic liquids. Furthermore, ex situ microscopy measurements were performed. Quite a high current of 670 nA was observed on the nanoscale by conductive scanning force microscopy (CSFM).

  7.   In situ identification of streptococci and other bacteria in initial dental biofilm by confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Kilian, Mogens; Nilsson, Holger

    2007-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has been employed as a method for studying intact natural biofilm. When combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) it is possible to analyze spatial relationships and changes of specific members of microbial populations over time. The aim...

  8. Differentiating fibroadenoma and ductal carcinoma in situ from normal breast tissue by multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yuting; Wu, Yan; Lian, Yuane; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Fibroadenoma (FA) is the most common benign tumor of the female breast and several studies have reported that women with it have increased risk of breast cancer. While the ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a very early form of breast cancer. Thus, early detections of FA and DCIS are critical for improving breast tumor outcome and survival. In this paper, we use multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to obtain the high-contrast images of fresh, unfixed, unstained human breast specimens (normal breast tissue, FA and DCIS). Our results show that MPM has the ability to identify the characteristics of FA and DCIS including changes of duct architecture and collagen morphology. These results are consistent with the histological results. With the advancement of MPM, the technique has potential ability to serve as a real-time noninvasive imaging tool for early detection of breast tumor.

  9. Instrumentation for in situ flow electrochemical Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabu, Vinod; Obst, Martin; Hosseinkhannazer, Hooman; Reynolds, Matthew; Rosendahl, Scott; Wang, Jian; Hitchcock, Adam P.

    2018-06-01

    We report the design and performance of a 3-electrode device for real time in situ scanning transmission X-ray microscopy studies of electrochemical processes under both static (sealed, non-flow) conditions and with a continuous flow of electrolytes. The device was made using a combination of silicon microfabrication and 3D printing technologies. The performance is illustrated by results of a study of copper deposition and stripping at a gold working electrode. X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy at the Cu 2p edge was used to follow the evolution as a function of potential and time of the spatial distributions of Cu(0) and Cu(i) species electro-deposited from an aqueous solution of copper sulphate. The results are interpreted in terms of competing mechanisms for the reduction of Cu(ii).

  10. Avoiding drying-artifacts in transmission electron microscopy: Characterizing the size and colloidal state of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michen, Benjamin; Geers, Christoph; Vanhecke, Dimitri; Endes, Carola; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Balog, Sandor; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2015-01-01

    Standard transmission electron microscopy nanoparticle sample preparation generally requires the complete removal of the suspending liquid. Drying often introduces artifacts, which can obscure the state of the dispersion prior to drying and preclude automated image analysis typically used to obtain number-weighted particle size distribution. Here we present a straightforward protocol for prevention of the onset of drying artifacts, thereby allowing the preservation of in-situ colloidal features of nanoparticles during TEM sample preparation. This is achieved by adding a suitable macromolecular agent to the suspension. Both research- and economically-relevant particles with high polydispersity and/or shape anisotropy are easily characterized following our approach (http://bsa.bionanomaterials.ch), which allows for rapid and quantitative classification in terms of dimensionality and size: features that are major targets of European Union recommendations and legislation. PMID:25965905

  11. Multiphoton microscopy: an efficient tool for in-situ study of cultural heritage artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latour, Gaël.; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Didier, Marie; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2013-05-01

    We present multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of historical artifacts by combining Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) and Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopies. Three-dimensional (3D) non-contact laser-scanning imaging with micrometer resolution is performed without any preparation of the objects under study. 2PEF signals are emitted by a wide range of fluorophores such as pigments and binder, which can be discriminated thanks to their different emission spectral bands by using suitable spectral filters in the detection channel. SHG signals are specific for dense non-centrosymmetric organizations such as the crystalline cellulose within the wood cell walls. We also show that plaster particles exhibit SHG signals. These particles are bassanite crystals with a non-centrosymmetric crystalline structure, while the other types of calcium sulphates exhibit a centrosymmetric crystalline structure with no SHG signal. In our study, we first characterize model single-layered samples: wood, gelatin-based films containing plaster or cochineal lake and sandarac film containing cochineal lake. We then study multilayered coating systems on wood and show that multimodal nonlinear microscopy successfully reveals the 3D distribution of all components within the stratified sample. We also show that the fine structure of the wood can be assessed, even through a thick multilayered varnish coating. Finally, in situ multimodal nonlinear imaging is demonstrated in a historical violin. SHG/2PEF imaging thus appears as an efficient non-destructive and contactless 3D imaging technique for in situ investigation of historical coatings and more generally for wood characterization and coating analysis at micrometer scale.

  12. Morphological classification of bioaerosols from composting using scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamer Vestlund, A.; Al-Ashaab, R.; Tyrrel, S.F.; Longhurst, P.J.; Pollard, S.J.T.; Drew, G.H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Bioaerosols were captured using the filter method. • Bioaerosols were analysed using scanning electron microscope. • Bioaerosols were classified on the basis of morphology. • Single small cells were found more frequently than aggregates and larger cells. • Smaller cells may disperse further than heavier aggregate structures. - Abstract: This research classifies the physical morphology (form and structure) of bioaerosols emitted from open windrow composting. Aggregation state, shape and size of the particles captured are reported alongside the implications for bioaerosol dispersal after release. Bioaerosol sampling took place at a composting facility using personal air filter samplers. Samples were analysed using scanning electron microscopy. Particles were released mainly as small (<1 μm) single, spherical cells, followed by larger (>1 μm) single cells, with aggregates occurring in smaller proportions. Most aggregates consisted of clusters of 2–3 particles as opposed to chains, and were <10 μm in size. No cells were attached to soil debris or wood particles. These small single cells or small aggregates are more likely to disperse further downwind from source, and cell viability may be reduced due to increased exposure to environmental factors

  13. Thin dielectric film thickness determination by advanced transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, A.C.; Foran, B.; Kisielowski, C.; Muller, D.; Pennycook, S.; Principe, E.; Stemmer, S.

    2003-09-01

    High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) has been used as the ultimate method of thickness measurement for thin films. The appearance of phase contrast interference patterns in HR-TEM images has long been confused as the appearance of a crystal lattice by non-specialists. Relatively easy to interpret crystal lattice images are now directly observed with the introduction of annular dark field detectors for scanning TEM (STEM). With the recent development of reliable lattice image processing software that creates crystal structure images from phase contrast data, HR-TEM can also provide crystal lattice images. The resolution of both methods was steadily improved reaching now into the sub Angstrom region. Improvements in electron lens and image analysis software are increasing the spatial resolution of both methods. Optimum resolution for STEM requires that the probe beam be highly localized. In STEM, beam localization is enhanced by selection of the correct aperture. When STEM measurement is done using a highly localized probe beam, HR-TEM and STEM measurement of the thickness of silicon oxynitride films agree within experimental error. In this paper, the optimum conditions for HR-TEM and STEM measurement are discussed along with a method for repeatable film thickness determination. The impact of sample thickness is also discussed. The key result in this paper is the proposal of a reproducible method for film thickness determination.

  14. Recent applications of scanning electron microscopy; Neueste Anwendungen der Rasterelektronenmikroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Sten; Moverare, Johan; Peng, Ru [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Management and Engineering

    2013-07-01

    A few examples were shown of how to use SEM to study phenomena that are not normally visible and possible to identify by introducing a known phenomenon called Electron Channeling. The channeling is best utilized in a FEG SEM not because of the in lens detection system but due to the fact that the highly coherent high electron density probe is creating a high contrast image with a resolution that is high enough to image crystal defects on a dislocation level. The fact that diffraction phenomena are involved in channeling is also of great importance for the contrast formation. The technique allows the user to choose to either just take a picture or decide if the image should be based on careful determination of the Bragg condition. The biggest advantage with channeling in addition the good contrast produced is the possibility to literally combine it with other techniques like EBSD. In fact, it is also possible to use thin foils to combine ECCI, EBSD, EDS and STEM in a modern FEG SEM. The development of a eucentric specimen stage of the same class as a TEM stage would allow even more advanced microscopy in SEM. (orig.)

  15. Morphological classification of bioaerosols from composting using scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamer Vestlund, A. [Institute for Energy and Resource Technology, Environmental Science and Technology Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Building 40, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); FIRA International Ltd., Maxwell Road, Stevenage, Herts SG1 2EW (United Kingdom); Al-Ashaab, R.; Tyrrel, S.F.; Longhurst, P.J.; Pollard, S.J.T. [Institute for Energy and Resource Technology, Environmental Science and Technology Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Building 40, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Drew, G.H., E-mail: g.h.drew@cranfield.ac.uk [Institute for Energy and Resource Technology, Environmental Science and Technology Department, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Building 40, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Bioaerosols were captured using the filter method. • Bioaerosols were analysed using scanning electron microscope. • Bioaerosols were classified on the basis of morphology. • Single small cells were found more frequently than aggregates and larger cells. • Smaller cells may disperse further than heavier aggregate structures. - Abstract: This research classifies the physical morphology (form and structure) of bioaerosols emitted from open windrow composting. Aggregation state, shape and size of the particles captured are reported alongside the implications for bioaerosol dispersal after release. Bioaerosol sampling took place at a composting facility using personal air filter samplers. Samples were analysed using scanning electron microscopy. Particles were released mainly as small (<1 μm) single, spherical cells, followed by larger (>1 μm) single cells, with aggregates occurring in smaller proportions. Most aggregates consisted of clusters of 2–3 particles as opposed to chains, and were <10 μm in size. No cells were attached to soil debris or wood particles. These small single cells or small aggregates are more likely to disperse further downwind from source, and cell viability may be reduced due to increased exposure to environmental factors.

  16. An electronically tunable ultrafast laser source applied to fluorescence imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunsby, C; Lanigan, P M P; McGinty, J; Elson, D S; Requejo-Isidro, J; Munro, I; Galletly, N; McCann, F; Treanor, B; Oenfelt, B; Davis, D M; Neil, M A A; French, P M W

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is used widely in microscopy and macroscopic imaging applications for fields ranging from biomedicine to materials science. A critical component for any fluorescence imaging system is the excitation source. Traditionally, wide-field systems use filtered thermal or arc-generated white light sources, while point scanning confocal microscope systems require spatially coherent (point-like) laser sources. Unfortunately, the limited range of visible wavelengths available from conventional laser sources constrains the design and usefulness of fluorescent probes in confocal microscopy. A 'hands-off' laser-like source, electronically tunable across the visible spectrum, would be invaluable for fluorescence imaging and provide new opportunities, e.g. automated excitation fingerprinting and in situ measurement of excitation cross-sections. Yet more information can be obtained using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), which requires that the light source be pulsed or rapidly modulated. We show how a white light continuum, generated by injecting femtosecond optical radiation into a micro-structured optical fibre, coupled with a simple prism-based tunable filter arrangement, can fulfil all these roles as a continuously electronically tunable (435-1150 nm) visible ultrafast light source in confocal, wide-field and FLIM systems

  17. Directly Observing Micelle Fusion and Growth in Solution by Liquid-Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parent, Lucas R. [Department; amp, Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, United States; Bakalis, Evangelos [Dipartimento; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo [Materials; Institute; Kammeyer, Jacquelin K. [Department; amp, Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, United States; Park, Chiwoo [Department; de Pablo, Juan [Materials; Institute; Zerbetto, Francesco [Dipartimento; Patterson, Joseph P. [Department; amp, Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, United States; Laboratory; Gianneschi, Nathan C. [Department; amp, Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, United States

    2017-11-16

    Amphiphilic small molecules and polymers form commonplace nanoscale macromolecular compartments and bilayers, and as such are truly essential components in all cells and in many cellular processes. The nature of these architectures, including their formation, phase changes, and stimuli-response behaviors, is necessary for the most basic functions of life, and over the past half-century, these natural micellar structures have inspired a vast diversity of industrial products, from biomedicines to detergents, lubricants, and coatings. The importance of these materials and their ubiquity have made them the subject of intense investigation regarding their nanoscale dynamics with increasing interest in obtaining sufficient temporal and spatial resolution to directly observe nanoscale processes. However, the vast majority of experimental methods involve either bulk-averaging techniques including light, neutron, and X-ray scattering, or are static in nature including even the most advanced cryogenic transmission electron microscopy techniques. Here, we employ in situ liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM) to directly observe the evolution of individual amphiphilic block copolymer micellar nanoparticles in solution, in real time with nanometer spatial resolution. These observations, made on a proof-of-concept bioconjugate polymer amphiphile, revealed growth and evolution occurring by unimer addition processes and by particle-particle collision-and-fusion events. The experimental approach, combining direct LCTEM observation, quantitative analysis of LCTEM data, and correlated in silico simulations, provides a unique view of solvated soft matter nanoassemblies as they morph and evolve in time and space, enabling us to capture these phenomena in solution.

  18. Electron Microscopy Characterization of Vanadium Dioxide Thin Films and Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Felipe

    Vanadium dioxide (VO_2) is a material of particular interest due to its exhibited metal to insulator phase transition at 68°C that is accompanied by an abrupt and significant change in its electronic and optical properties. Since this material can exhibit a reversible drop in resistivity of up to five orders of magnitude and a reversible drop in infrared optical transmission of up to 80%, this material holds promise in several technological applications. Solid phase crystallization of VO_2 thin films was obtained by a post-deposition annealing process of a VO_{x,x approx 2} amorphous film sputtered on an amorphous silicon dioxide (SiO_2) layer. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD) were utilized to study the morphology of the solid phase crystallization that resulted from this post-deposition annealing process. The annealing parameters ranged in temperature from 300°C up to 1000°C and in time from 5 minutes up to 12 hours. Depending on the annealing parameters, EBSD showed that this process yielded polycrystalline vanadium dioxide thin films, semi-continuous thin films, and films of isolated single-crystal particles. In addition to these films on SiO_2, other VO_2 thin films were deposited onto a-, c-, and r-cuts of sapphire and on TiO_2(001) heated single-crystal substrates by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD). The temperature of the substrates was kept at ˜500°C during deposition. EBSD maps and orientation imaging microscopy were used to study the epitaxy and orientation of the VO_2 grains deposited on the single crystal substrates, as well as on the amorphous SiO_2 layer. The EBSD/OIM results showed that: 1) For all the sapphire substrates analyzed, there is a predominant family of crystallographic relationships wherein the rutile VO_2{001} planes tend to lie parallel to the sapphire's {10-10} and the rutile VO_2{100} planes lie parallel to the sapphire's {1-210} and {0001}. Furthermore, while this family of

  19. Molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy: intermolecular electron tunneling for single-molecule recognition and electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of molecular tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Molecular tips offer many advantages: first is their ability to perform chemically selective imaging because of chemical interactions between the sample and the molecular tip, thus improving a major drawback of conventional STM. Rational design of the molecular tip allows sophisticated chemical recognition; e.g., chiral recognition and selective visualization of atomic defects in carbon nanotubes. Another advantage is that they provide a unique method to quantify electron transfer between single molecules. Understanding such electron transfer is mandatory for the realization of molecular electronics.

  20. In situ 3D characterization of historical coatings and wood using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latour, Gaël; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Didier, Marie; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2012-10-22

    We demonstrate multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of historical artifacts by combining Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) microscopies. We first identify the nonlinear optical response of materials commonly encountered in coatings of cultural heritage artifacts by analyzing one- and multi-layered model samples. We observe 2PEF signals from cochineal lake and sandarac and show that pigments and varnish films can be discriminated by exploiting their different emission spectral ranges as in luminescence linear spectroscopy. We then demonstrate SHG imaging of a filler, plaster, composed of bassanite particles which exhibit a non centrosymmetric crystal structure. We also show that SHG/2PEF imaging enables the visualization of wood microstructure through typically 60 µm-thick coatings by revealing crystalline cellulose (SHG signal) and lignin (2PEF signal) in the wood cell walls. Finally, in situ multimodal nonlinear imaging is demonstrated in a historical violin. SHG/2PEF imaging thus appears as a promising non-destructive and contactless tool for in situ 3D investigation of historical coatings and more generally for wood characterization and coating analysis at micrometer scale.

  1. A microscopy approach for in situ inspection of micro-coordinate measurement machine styli for contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaobing; Pascal, Jonathan; Lawes, Simon

    2017-09-01

    During the process of measurement using a micro-coordinate measurement machine (µCMM) contamination gradually builds up on the surface of the stylus tip and affects the dimensional accuracy of the measurement. Regular inspection of the stylus for contamination is essential to determine the appropriate cleaning interval and prevent the dimensional error from becoming significant. However, in situ inspection of a µCMM stylus is challenging due to the size, spherical shape, material and surface properties of a typical stylus. To address this challenge, this study evaluates several non-contact measurement technologies for in situ stylus inspection and, based on those findings, proposes a cost-effective microscopy approach. The operational principle is then demonstrated by an automated prototype, coordinated directly by the CMM software MCOSMOS, with an effective threshold of detection as low as 400 nm and a large field of view and depth of field. The level of contamination on the stylus has been found to increase steadily with the number of measurement contacts made. Once excessive contamination is detected on the stylus, measurement should be stopped and a stylus cleaning procedure should be performed to avoid affecting measurement accuracy.

  2. A microscopy approach for in situ inspection of micro-coordinate measurement machine styli for contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Xiaobing; Lawes, Simon; Pascal, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    During the process of measurement using a micro-coordinate measurement machine (µCMM) contamination gradually builds up on the surface of the stylus tip and affects the dimensional accuracy of the measurement. Regular inspection of the stylus for contamination is essential to determine the appropriate cleaning interval and prevent the dimensional error from becoming significant. However, in situ inspection of a µCMM stylus is challenging due to the size, spherical shape, material and surface properties of a typical stylus. To address this challenge, this study evaluates several non-contact measurement technologies for in situ stylus inspection and, based on those findings, proposes a cost-effective microscopy approach. The operational principle is then demonstrated by an automated prototype, coordinated directly by the CMM software MCOSMOS, with an effective threshold of detection as low as 400 nm and a large field of view and depth of field. The level of contamination on the stylus has been found to increase steadily with the number of measurement contacts made. Once excessive contamination is detected on the stylus, measurement should be stopped and a stylus cleaning procedure should be performed to avoid affecting measurement accuracy. (paper)

  3. New developments in electron microscopy for serial image acquisition of neuronal profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yoshiyuki

    2015-02-01

    Recent developments in electron microscopy largely automate the continuous acquisition of serial electron micrographs (EMGs), previously achieved by laborious manual serial ultrathin sectioning using an ultramicrotome and ultrastructural image capture process with transmission electron microscopy. The new systems cut thin sections and capture serial EMGs automatically, allowing for acquisition of large data sets in a reasonably short time. The new methods are focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy, ultramicrotome/serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, automated tape-collection ultramicrotome/scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope camera array. In this review, their positive and negative aspects are discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy with high spatial precision and improved sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schorb, Martin; Briggs, John A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Performing fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy on the same sample allows fluorescent signals to be used to identify and locate features of interest for subsequent imaging by electron microscopy. To carry out such correlative microscopy on vitrified samples appropriate for structural cryo-electron microscopy it is necessary to perform fluorescence microscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Here we describe an adaptation of a cryo-light microscopy stage to permit use of high-numerical aperture objectives. This allows high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of vitrified samples. We describe and apply a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy workflow together with a fiducial bead-based image correlation procedure. This procedure allows us to locate fluorescent bacteriophages in cryo-electron microscopy images with an accuracy on the order of 50 nm, based on their fluorescent signal. It will allow the user to precisely and unambiguously identify and locate objects and events for subsequent high-resolution structural study, based on fluorescent signals. - Highlights: • Workflow for correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy. • Cryo-fluorescence microscopy setup incorporating a high numerical aperture objective. • Fluorescent signals located in cryo-electron micrographs with 50 nm spatial precision

  5. Correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy with high spatial precision and improved sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schorb, Martin [Structural and Computational Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Briggs, John A.G., E-mail: john.briggs@embl.de [Structural and Computational Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    Performing fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy on the same sample allows fluorescent signals to be used to identify and locate features of interest for subsequent imaging by electron microscopy. To carry out such correlative microscopy on vitrified samples appropriate for structural cryo-electron microscopy it is necessary to perform fluorescence microscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Here we describe an adaptation of a cryo-light microscopy stage to permit use of high-numerical aperture objectives. This allows high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of vitrified samples. We describe and apply a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy workflow together with a fiducial bead-based image correlation procedure. This procedure allows us to locate fluorescent bacteriophages in cryo-electron microscopy images with an accuracy on the order of 50 nm, based on their fluorescent signal. It will allow the user to precisely and unambiguously identify and locate objects and events for subsequent high-resolution structural study, based on fluorescent signals. - Highlights: • Workflow for correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy. • Cryo-fluorescence microscopy setup incorporating a high numerical aperture objective. • Fluorescent signals located in cryo-electron micrographs with 50 nm spatial precision.

  6. Photo electron emission microscopy of polarity-patterned materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W-C; Rodriguez, B J; Gruverman, A; Nemanich, R J

    2005-01-01

    This study presents variable photon energy photo electron emission microscopy (PEEM) of polarity-patterned epitaxial GaN films, and ferroelectric LiNbO 3 (LNO) single crystals and PbZrTiO 3 (PZT) thin films. The photo electrons were excited with spontaneous emission from the tunable UV free electron laser (FEL) at Duke University. We report PEEM observation of polarity contrast and measurement of the photothreshold of each polar region of the materials. For a cleaned GaN film with laterally patterned Ga- and N-face polarities, we found a higher photoelectric yield from the N-face regions compared with the Ga-face regions. Through the photon energy dependent contrast in the PEEM images of the surfaces, we can deduce that the threshold of the N-face region is less than ∼4.9 eV while that of the Ga-face regions is greater than 6.3 eV. In both LNO and PZT, bright emission was detected from the negatively poled domains, indicating that the emission threshold of the negative domain is lower than that of the positive domain. For LNO, the measured photothreshold was ∼4.6 eV at the negative domain and ∼6.2 eV at the positive domain, while for PZT, the threshold of the negative domain was less than 4.3 eV. Moreover, PEEM observation of the PZT surface at elevated temperatures displayed that the domain contrast disappeared near the Curie temperature of ∼300 deg. C. The PEEM polarity contrast of the polar materials is discussed in terms of internal screening from free carriers and defects and the external screening due to adsorbed ions

  7. Photo electron emission microscopy of polarity-patterned materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W.-C.; Rodriguez, B. J.; Gruverman, A.; Nemanich, R. J.

    2005-04-01

    This study presents variable photon energy photo electron emission microscopy (PEEM) of polarity-patterned epitaxial GaN films, and ferroelectric LiNbO3 (LNO) single crystals and PbZrTiO3 (PZT) thin films. The photo electrons were excited with spontaneous emission from the tunable UV free electron laser (FEL) at Duke University. We report PEEM observation of polarity contrast and measurement of the photothreshold of each polar region of the materials. For a cleaned GaN film with laterally patterned Ga- and N-face polarities, we found a higher photoelectric yield from the N-face regions compared with the Ga-face regions. Through the photon energy dependent contrast in the PEEM images of the surfaces, we can deduce that the threshold of the N-face region is less than ~4.9 eV while that of the Ga-face regions is greater than 6.3 eV. In both LNO and PZT, bright emission was detected from the negatively poled domains, indicating that the emission threshold of the negative domain is lower than that of the positive domain. For LNO, the measured photothreshold was ~4.6 eV at the negative domain and ~6.2 eV at the positive domain, while for PZT, the threshold of the negative domain was less than 4.3 eV. Moreover, PEEM observation of the PZT surface at elevated temperatures displayed that the domain contrast disappeared near the Curie temperature of ~300 °C. The PEEM polarity contrast of the polar materials is discussed in terms of internal screening from free carriers and defects and the external screening due to adsorbed ions.

  8. Microstructural differences between two Zr(C,N) coatings revealed by analytical transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dörfel, Ilona; Rooch, Heidemarie; Österle, Werner

    2012-01-01

    properties. - Highlights: ► Electron microscopy cleared tribological differences of 2 Zr(C,N) coatings. ► Sample preparation by focused ion beam technique and an in-situ lift-out method. ► Long term stability of the sample with nano-multilayers and interface free of oxygen. ► Nano-multilayers are pairs with higher and lower Zr content and different width. ► Minority Zr 3 (C,N) 4 phase concentrate in multilayer stripes of lower Zr content.

  9. In Situ Analysis of a Silver Nanoparticle-Precipitating Shewanella Biofilm by Surface Enhanced Confocal Raman Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal Schkolnik

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an electroactive bacterium, capable of reducing extracellular insoluble electron acceptors, making it important for both nutrient cycling in nature and microbial electrochemical technologies, such as microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis. When allowed to anaerobically colonize an Ag/AgCl solid interface, S. oneidensis has precipitated silver nanoparticles (AgNp, thus providing the means for a surface enhanced confocal Raman microscopy (SECRaM investigation of its biofilm. The result is the in-situ chemical mapping of the biofilm as it developed over time, where the distribution of cytochromes, reduced and oxidized flavins, polysaccharides and phosphate in the undisturbed biofilm is monitored. Utilizing AgNp bio-produced by the bacteria colonizing the Ag/AgCl interface, we could perform SECRaM while avoiding the use of a patterned or roughened support or the introduction of noble metal salts and reducing agents. This new method will allow a spatially and temporally resolved chemical investigation not only of Shewanella biofilms at an insoluble electron acceptor, but also of other noble metal nanoparticle-precipitating bacteria in laboratory cultures or in complex microbial communities in their natural habitats.

  10. Probing Individual Ice Nucleation Events with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbing; China, Swarup; Knopf, Daniel; Gilles, Mary; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is one of the processes of critical relevance to a range of topics in the fundamental and the applied science and technologies. Heterogeneous ice nucleation initiated by particles proceeds where microscopic properties of particle surfaces essentially control nucleation mechanisms. Ice nucleation in the atmosphere on particles governs the formation of ice and mixed phase clouds, which in turn influence the Earth's radiative budget and climate. Heterogeneous ice nucleation is still insufficiently understood and poses significant challenges in predictive understanding of climate change. We present a novel microscopy platform allowing observation of individual ice nucleation events at temperature range of 193-273 K and relative humidity relevant for ice formation in the atmospheric clouds. The approach utilizes a home built novel ice nucleation cell interfaced with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (IN-ESEM system). The IN-ESEM system is applied for direct observation of individual ice formation events, determining ice nucleation mechanisms, freezing temperatures, and relative humidity onsets. Reported microanalysis of the ice nucleating particles (INP) include elemental composition detected by the energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (EDX), and advanced speciation of the organic content in particles using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The performance of the IN-ESEM system is validated through a set of experiments with kaolinite particles with known ice nucleation propensity. We demonstrate an application of the IN-ESEM system to identify and characterize individual INP within a complex mixture of ambient particles.

  11. Correlating Intravital Multi-Photon Microscopy to 3D Electron Microscopy of Invading Tumor Cells Using Anatomical Reference Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karreman, Matthia A.; Mercier, Luc; Schieber, Nicole L.; Shibue, Tsukasa; Schwab, Yannick; Goetz, Jacky G.

    2014-01-01

    Correlative microscopy combines the advantages of both light and electron microscopy to enable imaging of rare and transient events at high resolution. Performing correlative microscopy in complex and bulky samples such as an entire living organism is a time-consuming and error-prone task. Here, we investigate correlative methods that rely on the use of artificial and endogenous structural features of the sample as reference points for correlating intravital fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. To investigate tumor cell behavior in vivo with ultrastructural accuracy, a reliable approach is needed to retrieve single tumor cells imaged deep within the tissue. For this purpose, fluorescently labeled tumor cells were subcutaneously injected into a mouse ear and imaged using two-photon-excitation microscopy. Using near-infrared branding, the position of the imaged area within the sample was labeled at the skin level, allowing for its precise recollection. Following sample preparation for electron microscopy, concerted usage of the artificial branding and anatomical landmarks enables targeting and approaching the cells of interest while serial sectioning through the specimen. We describe here three procedures showing how three-dimensional (3D) mapping of structural features in the tissue can be exploited to accurately correlate between the two imaging modalities, without having to rely on the use of artificially introduced markers of the region of interest. The methods employed here facilitate the link between intravital and nanoscale imaging of invasive tumor cells, enabling correlating function to structure in the study of tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:25479106

  12. In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Nicholas A.; Magel, Gregory A.; Hartfield, Cheryl D.; Moore, Thomas M.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Rack, Philip D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {mu}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

  13. A Low-Temperature Electron Microscopy and Electron Diffraction Study of La1.84Sr0.16CuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Takashi; Omori, Mamoru; Hirabayashi, Makoto; Syono, Yasuhiko

    1987-10-01

    A high-Tc superconducting compound, La1.84Sr0.16CuO4, has been investigated by electron microscopy and electron diffraction in the range from 10 K to ambient temperature. The tetragonal K2NiF4-type structure undergoes an orthorhombic distortion below about 130 K. In the low-temperature phase, extra diffraction spots and twin lamellae are observed reversibly on cooling and heating in situ. Based on the observed results, a plausible structure model with orthorhombic distortion is proposed.

  14. A low-temperature electron microscopy and electron diffraction study of La1.84Sr0.16CuO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, Takashi; Omori, Mamoru; Hirabayashi, Makoto; Syono, Yasuhiko

    1987-01-01

    A high-T c superconducting compound, La 1.84 Sr 0.16 CuO 4 , has been investigated by electron microscopy and electron diffraction in the range from 10 K to ambient temperature. The tetragonal K 2 NiF 4 -type structure undergoes an orthorhombic distortion below about 130 K. In the low-temperature phase, extra diffraction spots and twin lamellae are observed reversibly on cooling and heating in situ. Based on the observed results, a plausible structure model with orthorhombic distortion is proposed. (author)

  15. Low-temperature electron microscopy and electron diffraction study of La/sub 1. 84/Sr/sub 0. 16/CuO/sub 4/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, Takashi; Omori, Mamoru; Hirabayashi, Makoto; Syono, Yasuhiko

    1987-10-01

    A high-T/sub c/ superconducting compound, La/sub 1.84/Sr/sub 0.16/CuO/sub 4/, has been investigated by electron microscopy and electron diffraction in the range from 10 K to ambient temperature. The tetragonal K/sub 2/NiF/sub 4/-type structure undergoes an orthorhombic distortion below about 130 K. In the low-temperature phase, extra diffraction spots and twin lamellae are observed reversibly on cooling and heating in situ. Based on the observed results, a plausible structure model with orthorhombic distortion is proposed

  16. Towards 3D crystal orientation reconstruction using automated crystal orientation mapping transmission electron microscopy (ACOM-TEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobler, Aaron; Kübel, Christian

    2018-01-01

    To relate the internal structure of a volume (crystallite and phase boundaries) to properties (electrical, magnetic, mechanical, thermal), a full 3D reconstruction in combination with in situ testing is desirable. In situ testing allows the crystallographic changes in a material to be followed by tracking and comparing the individual crystals and phases. Standard transmission electron microscopy (TEM) delivers a projection image through the 3D volume of an electron-transparent TEM sample lamella. Only with the help of a dedicated TEM tomography sample holder is an accurate 3D reconstruction of the TEM lamella currently possible. 2D crystal orientation mapping has become a standard method for crystal orientation and phase determination while 3D crystal orientation mapping have been reported only a few times. The combination of in situ testing with 3D crystal orientation mapping remains a challenge in terms of stability and accuracy. Here, we outline a method to 3D reconstruct the crystal orientation from a superimposed diffraction pattern of overlapping crystals without sample tilt. Avoiding the typically required tilt series for 3D reconstruction enables not only faster in situ tests but also opens the possibility for more stable and more accurate in situ mechanical testing. The approach laid out here should serve as an inspiration for further research and does not make a claim to be complete.

  17. Electron Microscopy Observation of Biomineralization within Wood Tissues of Kurogaki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazue Tazaki

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between minerals and microorganisms play a crucial role in living wood tissues. However, living wood tissues have never been studied in the field. Fortunately, we found several kurogaki (black persimmon; Diospyros kaki trees at Tawara in Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan. Here, we report the characterization of kurogaki based on scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, associated with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS analyses, X-ray fluorescence analyses (XRF and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD analyses. This study aims to illustrate the ability of various microorganisms associated with biominerals within wood tissues of kurogaki, as shown by SEM-EDS elemental content maps and TEM images. Kurogaki grows very slowly and has extremely hard wood, known for its striking black and beige coloration, referred to as a “peacock pattern”. However, the scientific data for kurogaki are very limited. The black “peacock pattern” of the wood mainly comprises cellulose and high levels of crystal cristobalite. As per the XRD results, the black taproot contains mineralized 7 Å clays (kaolinite, cellulose, apatite and cristobalite associated with many microorganisms. The chemical compositions of the black and beige portions of the black persimmon tree were obtained by ICP-MS analyses. Particular elements such as abundant Ca, Mg, K, P, Mn, Ba, S, Cl, Fe, Na, and Al were concentrated in the black region, associated with Pb and Sr elements. SEM-EDS semi-qualitative analyses of kurogaki indicated an abundance of P and Ca in microorganisms in the black region, associated with Pb, Sr, S, Mn, and Mg elements. On the other hand, XRF and XRD mineralogical data showed that fresh andesite, weathered andesite, and the soils around the roots of kurogaki correlate with biomineralization of the black region in kurogaki roots, showing clay minerals (kaolinite and

  18. In situ electrical and thermal monitoring of printed electronics by two-photon mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorelli, Francesco; Accanto, Nicolò; Jørgensen, Mikkel; van Hulst, Niek F; Krebs, Frederik C

    2017-06-19

    Printed electronics is emerging as a new, large scale and cost effective technology that will be disruptive in fields such as energy harvesting, consumer electronics and medical sensors. The performance of printed electronic devices relies principally on the carrier mobility and molecular packing of the polymer semiconductor material. Unfortunately, the analysis of such materials is generally performed with destructive techniques, which are hard to make compatible with in situ measurements, and pose a great obstacle for the mass production of printed electronics devices. A rapid, in situ, non-destructive and low-cost testing method is needed. In this study, we demonstrate that nonlinear optical microscopy is a promising technique to achieve this goal. Using ultrashort laser pulses we stimulate two-photon absorption in a roll coated polymer semiconductor and map the resulting two-photon induced photoluminescence and second harmonic response. We show that, in our experimental conditions, it is possible to relate the total amount of photoluminescence detected to important material properties such as the charge carrier density and the molecular packing of the printed polymer material, all with a spatial resolution of 400 nm. Importantly, this technique can be extended to the real time mapping of the polymer semiconductor film, even during the printing process, in which the high printing speed poses the need for equally high acquisition rates.

  19. Automated Quantitative Rare Earth Elements Mineralogy by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindern, Sven; Meyer, F. Michael

    2016-09-01

    Increasing industrial demand of rare earth elements (REEs) stems from the central role they play for advanced technologies and the accelerating move away from carbon-based fuels. However, REE production is often hampered by the chemical, mineralogical as well as textural complexity of the ores with a need for better understanding of their salient properties. This is not only essential for in-depth genetic interpretations but also for a robust assessment of ore quality and economic viability. The design of energy and cost-efficient processing of REE ores depends heavily on information about REE element deportment that can be made available employing automated quantitative process mineralogy. Quantitative mineralogy assigns numeric values to compositional and textural properties of mineral matter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with a suitable software package for acquisition of backscatter electron and X-ray signals, phase assignment and image analysis is one of the most efficient tools for quantitative mineralogy. The four different SEM-based automated quantitative mineralogy systems, i.e. FEI QEMSCAN and MLA, Tescan TIMA and Zeiss Mineralogic Mining, which are commercially available, are briefly characterized. Using examples of quantitative REE mineralogy, this chapter illustrates capabilities and limitations of automated SEM-based systems. Chemical variability of REE minerals and analytical uncertainty can reduce performance of phase assignment. This is shown for the REE phases parisite and synchysite. In another example from a monazite REE deposit, the quantitative mineralogical parameters surface roughness and mineral association derived from image analysis are applied for automated discrimination of apatite formed in a breakdown reaction of monazite and apatite formed by metamorphism prior to monazite breakdown. SEM-based automated mineralogy fulfils all requirements for characterization of complex unconventional REE ores that will become

  20. Transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and confocal raman microscopic analysis of ultrastructural and compositional heterogeneity of Cornus alba L. wood cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianfeng; Ji, Zhe; Zhou, Xia; Zhang, Zhiheng; Xu, Feng

    2013-02-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence microscopy, and confocal Raman microscopy can be used to characterize ultrastructural and compositional heterogeneity of plant cell walls. In this study, TEM observations revealed the ultrastructural characterization of Cornus alba L. fiber, vessel, axial parenchyma, ray parenchyma, and pit membrane between cells, notably with the ray parenchyma consisting of two well-defined layers. Fluorescence microscopy evidenced that cell corner middle lamella was more lignified than adjacent compound middle lamella and secondary wall with variation in lignification level from cell to cell. In situ Raman images showed that the inhomogeneity in cell wall components (cellulose and lignin) among different cells and within morphologically distinct cell wall layers. As the significant precursors of lignin biosynthesis, the pattern of coniferyl alcohol and aldehyde (joint abbreviation Lignin-CAA for both structures) distribution in fiber cell wall was also identified by Raman images, with higher concentration occurring in the fiber secondary wall where there was the highest cellulose concentration. Moreover, noteworthy was the observation that higher concentration of lignin and very minor amounts of cellulose were visualized in the pit membrane areas. These complementary microanalytical methods provide more accurate and complete information with regard to ultrastructural and compositional characterization of plant cell walls.

  1. ''In situ'' electronic testing method of a neutron detector performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J.M.; Levai, F.

    1987-01-01

    The method allows detection of any important change in the electrical characteristics of a neutron sensor channel. It checks the response signal produced by an electronic detector circuit when a pulse generator is connected as input signal in the high voltage supply. The electronic circuit compares the detector capacitance value, previously measured, against a reference value, which is adjusted in a window type comparator electronic circuit to detect any important degrading condition of the capacitance value in a detector-cable system. The ''in-situ'' electronic testing method of neutron detector performance has been verified in a laboratory atmosphere to be a potential method to detect any significant change in the capacitance value of a nuclear sensor and its connecting cable, also checking: detector disconnections, cable disconnections, length changes of the connecting cable, electric short-opened circuits in the sensor channel, and any electrical trouble in the detector-connector-cable system. The experimental practices were carried out by simulation of several electric changes in a nuclear sensor-cable system from a linear D.C. channel which measures reactor power during nuclear reactor operation. It was made at the Training Reactor Electronic Laboratory. The results and conclusions obtained at the Laboratory were proved, satisfactorily, in the Electronic Instrumentation of Budapest Technical University Training Reactor, Hungary

  2. Fossil micro-organisms evidenced by electronic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prashnowsky, A.A.; Oberlies, F.; Burger, K.

    1983-04-01

    Fossil microorganisms in colonies and in the form of isolated cells (iron bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes etc.) were detected by electron microscopy of rocks containing remains of plant roots, carbonaceous substance, and strata of clay iron stone with ooids. These findings suggest an environment favourable to bacterial activity during sedimentation in the Upper Carboniferous and during the later processes of peat and coal formation. They also suggest that bacterial processes are an important factor in coal formation. Accurate data on coal formation can only be obtained by systematic biochemical studies. Analyses of the defined organic substances provide a better understanding of the conversion processes of the original substances. For example, the results of sterine analysis provide information on the mycoplancton, phytoplancton and zooplancton of the Upper Carboniferous. For some types of rock, the ratio of saponifiable to non-saponifiable constituents of the organic compounds yield information on stability under various geochemical conditions. The interactions between the various groups of microorganisms also play a major role in the solution of ecological problems.

  3. Scanning electron microscopy and roughness study of dental composite degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Cortez, Louise Ribeiro; Zarur, Raquel de Oliveira; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-04-01

    Our aim was to test the hypothesis that the use of mouthwashes, consumption of soft drinks, as well as the type of light curing unit (LCU), would change the surface roughness (Ra) and morphology of a nanofilled composite resin (Z350® 3M ESPE). Samples (80) were divided into eight groups: Halogen LCU, group 1, saliva (control); group 2, Pepsi Twist®; group 3, Listerine®; group 4, Colgate Plax®; LED LCU, group 5, saliva; group 6, Pepsi Twist®; group 7, Listerine®; group 8, Colgate Plax®. Ra values were measured at baseline, and after 7 and 14 days. One specimen of each group was prepared for scanning electron microscopy analysis after 14 days. The data were subjected to multifactor analysis of variance at a 95% confidence followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference post-hoc test. All the treatments resulted in morphological changes in composite resin surface, and the most significant change was in Pepsi Twist® groups. The samples of G6 had the greatest increase in Ra. The immersion of nanofilled resin in mouthwashes with alcohol and soft drink increases the surface roughness. Polymerization by halogen LCU (reduced light intensity) associated with alcohol contained mouthwash resulted in significant roughness on the composite.

  4. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunov, O.; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy

  5. An overview on bioaerosols viewed by scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittmaack, K.; Wehnes, H.; Heinzmann, U.; Agerer, R.

    2005-01-01

    Bioaerosols suspended in ambient air were collected with single-stage impactors at a semiurban site in southern Germany during late summer and early autumn. Sampling was mostly carried out at a nozzle velocity of 35 m/s, corresponding to a minimum aerodynamic diameter (cut-off diameter) of aerosol particles of 0.8 μm. The collected particles, sampled for short periods (∼15 min) to avoid pile-up, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The observed bioaerosols include brochosomes, fungal spores, hyphae, insect scales, hairs of plants and, less commonly, bacteria and epicuticular wax. Brochosomes, which serve as a highly water repellent body coating of leafhoppers, are hollow spheroids with diameters around 400 nm, resembling C 60 or footballs (soccer balls). They are usually airborne not as individuals but in the form of large clusters containing up to 10,000 individual species or even more. Various types of spores and scales were observed, but assignment turned out be difficult due to the large number of fungi and insects from which they may have originated. Pollens were observed only once. The absence these presumably elastic particles suggests that they are frequently lost, at the comparatively high velocities, due to bounce-off from the nonadhesive impaction surfaces

  6. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy nanostructural study of shed microparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Issman

    Full Text Available Microparticles (MPs are sub-micron membrane vesicles (100-1000 nm shed from normal and pathologic cells due to stimulation or apoptosis. MPs can be found in the peripheral blood circulation of healthy individuals, whereas elevated concentrations are found in pregnancy and in a variety of diseases. Also, MPs participate in physiological processes, e.g., coagulation, inflammation, and angiogenesis. Since their clinical properties are important, we have developed a new methodology based on nano-imaging that provides significant new data on MPs nanostructure, their composition and function. We are among the first to characterize by direct-imaging cryogenic transmitting electron microscopy (cryo-TEM the near-to-native nanostructure of MP systems isolated from different cell types and stimulation procedures. We found that there are no major differences between the MP systems we have studied, as most particles were spherical, with diameters from 200 to 400 nm. However, each MP population is very heterogeneous, showing diverse morphologies. We investigated by cryo-TEM the effects of standard techniques used to isolate and store MPs, and found that either high-g centrifugation of MPs for isolation purposes, or slow freezing to -80 °C for storage introduce morphological artifacts, which can influence MP nanostructure, and thus affect the efficiency of these particles as future diagnostic tools.

  7. An overview on bioaerosols viewed by scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittmaack, K. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany)]. E-mail: wittmaack@gsf.de; Wehnes, H. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Pathology, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany); Heinzmann, U. [GSF-National Research Centre for Environment and Health, Institute of Pathology, 85758 Neuherberg (Germany); Agerer, R. [Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich, Department Biology, Biodiversity Research: Mycology, Menzinger Stasse 67, 80638 Munich (Germany)

    2005-06-15

    Bioaerosols suspended in ambient air were collected with single-stage impactors at a semiurban site in southern Germany during late summer and early autumn. Sampling was mostly carried out at a nozzle velocity of 35 m/s, corresponding to a minimum aerodynamic diameter (cut-off diameter) of aerosol particles of 0.8 {mu}m. The collected particles, sampled for short periods ({approx}15 min) to avoid pile-up, were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The observed bioaerosols include brochosomes, fungal spores, hyphae, insect scales, hairs of plants and, less commonly, bacteria and epicuticular wax. Brochosomes, which serve as a highly water repellent body coating of leafhoppers, are hollow spheroids with diameters around 400 nm, resembling C{sub 60} or footballs (soccer balls). They are usually airborne not as individuals but in the form of large clusters containing up to 10,000 individual species or even more. Various types of spores and scales were observed, but assignment turned out be difficult due to the large number of fungi and insects from which they may have originated. Pollens were observed only once. The absence these presumably elastic particles suggests that they are frequently lost, at the comparatively high velocities, due to bounce-off from the nonadhesive impaction surfaces.

  8. Specific surface area evaluation method by using scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrescu, Camelia; Petrescu, Cristian; Axinte, Adrian

    2000-01-01

    Ceramics are among the most interesting materials for a large category of applications, including both industry and health. Among the characteristic of the ceramic materials, the specific surface area is often difficult to evaluate.The paper presents a method of evaluation for the specific surface area of two ceramic powders by means of scanning electron microscopy measurements and an original method of computing the specific surface area.Cumulative curves are used to calculate the specific surface area under assumption that the values of particles diameters follow a normal logarithmic distribution. For two powder types, X7R and NPO the results are the following: - for the density ρ (g/cm 2 ), 5.5 and 6.0, respectively; - for the average diameter D bar (μm), 0.51 and 0.53, respectively; - for σ, 1.465 and 1.385, respectively; - for specific surface area (m 2 /g), 1.248 and 1.330, respectively. The obtained results are in good agreement with the values measured by conventional methods. (authors)

  9. Observations of silicon carbide by high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.J.; Jepps, N.W.; Page, T.F.

    1978-01-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques, principally involving direct lattice imaging, have been used as part of a study of the crystallography and phase transformation mechanics of silicon carbide polytypes. In particular, the 3C (cubic) and 6H (hexagonal) polytypes have been examined together with partially transformed structural mixtures. Although direct observation of two-dimensional atomic structures was not possible at an operating voltage of 100 kV, considerable microstructural information has been obtained by careful choice of the experimental conditions. In particular, tilted beam observations of the 0.25 nm lattice fringes have been made in the 3C polytype for two different brace 111 brace plane arrays in order to study the dimensions and coherency of finely-twinned regions together with brace 0006 brace and brace 1 0 bar1 2 brace lattice images in the 6H polytype which allow the detailed stacking operations to be resolved. Lower resolution lattice images formed with axial illumination have also been used to study the nature of the 3C → 6H transformation and results are presented showing that the transformation interface may originate with fine twinning of the 3C structure followed by growth of the resultant 6H regions. Observations have been made of the detailed stepped structure of this interface together with the stacking fault distribution in the resultant 6H material. (author)

  10. Reference nano-dimensional metrology by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Fluegge, Jens; Bosse, Harald; Heidelmann, Markus; Kübel, Christian; Prang, Robby

    2013-01-01

    Traceable and accurate reference dimensional metrology of nano-structures by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is introduced in the paper. Two methods, one based on the crystal lattice constant and the other based on the pitch of a feature pair, were applied to calibrate the TEM magnification. The threshold value, which was defined as the half-intensity of boundary materials, is suggested to extract the boundary position of features from the TEM image. Experimental investigations have demonstrated the high potential of the proposed methods. For instance, the standard deviation from ten repeated measurements of a line structure with a nominal 100 nm critical dimension (CD) reaches 1σ = 0.023 nm, about 0.02%. By intentionally introduced defocus and larger sample alignment errors, the investigation shows that these influences may reach 0.20 and 1.3 nm, respectively, indicating the importance of high-quality TEM measurements. Finally, a strategy for disseminating the destructive TEM results is introduced. Using this strategy, the CD of a reference material has been accurately determined. Its agreement over five independent TEM measurements is below 1.2 nm. (paper)

  11. Transmission electron microscopy of weakly deformed alkali halide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strunk, H.

    1976-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is applied to the investigation of the dislocation arrangement of [001]-orientated alkali halide crystals (orientation four quadruple slip) deformed into stage I of the work-hardenig curve. The investigations pertain mainly to NaCl - (0.1-1) mole-% NaBr crystals, because these exhibit a relatively long stage I. The time available for observing the specimens is limited by the ionization radiation damage occuring in the microscope. An optimum reduction of the damage rate is achieved by a combination of several experimental techniques that are briefly outlined. The crystals deform essentially in single glide. According to the observations, stage I deformation of pure and weakly alloyed NaCl crystals is characterized by the glide of screw dislocations, which bow out between jogs and drag dislocation dipoles behind them. In crystals with >= 0.5 mole-% NaBr this process is not observed to occur. This is attributed to the increased importance of solid solution hardening. (orig.) [de

  12. Transformations of gold nanoparticles investigated using variable temperature high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, N.P. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Huis, M.A. van; Zandbergen, H.W. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technolgy, Lorentzweg 1, NL-2628CJ, Delft, The Netherlands. (Netherlands); Xu, H. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, and Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Kirkland, A.I., E-mail: angus.kirkland@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Recently designed advanced in-situ specimen holders for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in studies of gold nanoparticles. We report results of variable temperature TEM experiments in which structural transformations have been correlated with specimen temperature, allowing general trends to be identified. Transformation to a decahedral morphology for particles in the size range 5-12 nm was observed for the majority of particles regardless of their initial structure. Following in-situ annealing, decahedra were found to be stable at room temperature, confirming this as the equilibrium morphology, in agreement with recently calculated phase diagrams. Other transitions at low temperature in addition to surface roughening have also been observed and correlated with the same nanoscale phase diagram. Investigations of gold particles at high temperature have revealed evidence for co-existing solid and liquid phases. Overall, these results are important in a more precise understanding of the structure and action of catalytic gold nanoparticles and in the experimental verification of theoretical calculations.

  13. On the role of the gas environment, electron-dose-rate, and sample on the image resolution in transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Martin; Jespersen, Sebastian Pirel Fredsgaard; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad

    2016-01-01

    on the electron-dose-rate. In this article, we demonstrate that both the total and areal electron-dose-rates work as descriptors for the dose-rate-dependent resolution and are related through the illumination area. Furthermore, the resolution degradation was observed to occur gradually over time after......The introduction of gaseous atmospheres in transmission electron microscopy offers the possibility of studying materials in situ under chemically relevant environments. The presence of a gas environment can degrade the resolution. Surprisingly, this phenomenon has been shown to depend...... initializing the illumination of the sample and gas by the electron beam. The resolution was also observed to be sensitive to the electrical conductivity of the sample. These observations can be explained by a charge buildup over the electron-illuminated sample area, caused by the beam–gas–sample interaction...

  14. Use of analytical electron microscopy and auger electron spectroscopy for evaluating materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Thomas, M.T.; Baer, D.R.

    1982-11-01

    Analytical electron microscopy (AEM) can be used to characterize the microstructure and microchemistry of materials over dimensions less than 10 nm while Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) can be used to characterize the chemical composition of surfaces and interfaces to a depth of less than 1 nm. Frequently, the information gained from both instruments can be coupled to give new insight into the behavior of materials. Examples of the use of AEM and AES to characterize segregation, sensitization and radiation damage are presented. A short description of the AEM and AES techniques are given

  15. Interference electron microscopy of one-dimensional electron-optical phase objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazzini, P.F.; Ortolani, L.; Pozzi, G.; Ubaldi, F.

    2006-01-01

    The application of interference electron microscopy to the investigation of electron optical one-dimensional phase objects like reverse biased p-n junctions and ferromagnetic domain walls is considered. In particular the influence of diffraction from the biprism edges on the interference images is analyzed and the range of applicability of the geometric optical equation for the interpretation of the interference fringe shifts assessed by comparing geometric optical images with full wave-optical simulations. Finally, the inclusion of partial spatial coherence effects are discussed

  16. Atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy of electron beam–sensitive crystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daliang; Zhu, Yihan; Liu, Lingmei; Ying, Xiangrong; Hsiung, Chia-En; Sougrat, Rachid; Li, Kun; Han, Yu

    2018-02-01

    High-resolution imaging of electron beam–sensitive materials is one of the most difficult applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The challenges are manifold, including the acquisition of images with extremely low beam doses, the time-constrained search for crystal zone axes, the precise image alignment, and the accurate determination of the defocus value. We develop a suite of methods to fulfill these requirements and acquire atomic-resolution TEM images of several metal organic frameworks that are generally recognized as highly sensitive to electron beams. The high image resolution allows us to identify individual metal atomic columns, various types of surface termination, and benzene rings in the organic linkers. We also apply our methods to other electron beam–sensitive materials, including the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbBr3.

  17. Atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy of electron beam–sensitive crystalline materials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Daliang

    2018-01-18

    High-resolution imaging of electron beam-sensitive materials is one of the most difficult applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The challenges are manifold, including the acquisition of images with extremely low beam doses, the time-constrained search for crystal zone axes, the precise image alignment, and the accurate determination of the defocus value. We develop a suite of methods to fulfill these requirements and acquire atomic-resolution TEM images of several metal organic frameworks that are generally recognized as highly sensitive to electron beams. The high image resolution allows us to identify individual metal atomic columns, various types of surface termination, and benzene rings in the organic linkers. We also apply our methods to other electron beam–sensitive materials, including the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbBr3.

  18. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy of Ag nanoparticles grown on an ionic liquid substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2010-07-01

    We report a novel method of growing silver nanostructures by cathodic sputtering onto an ionic liquid (IL) and our visualization by transmission cryo-electron microscopy to avoid beam-induced motion of the nanoparticles. By freezing the IL suspension and controlling electron dose, we can assess properties of particle size, morphology, crystallinity, and aggregation in situ and at high detail. We observed round silver nanoparticles with a well-defined diameter of 7.0 ± 1.5 nm that are faceted with crystalline cubic structures and ∼80% of the particles have multiply twinned faults. We also applied cryo-electron tomography to investigate the structure of the nanoparticles and to directly visualize the IL wetting around them. In addition to particles, we observed nanorods that appear to have assembled from individual nanoparticles. Reexamination of the samples after 4-5 days from initial preparation showed significant changes in morphology, and potential mechanisms for this are discussed. © 2010 Materials Research Society.

  19. Electrochemistry and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of pure and redox-marked DNA- and UNA-based oligonucleotides on Au(111)-electrode surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Salvatore, Princia; Karlsen, K.

    2013-01-01

    the strongest and in accord with multiple site Ru-attachment. In situ STM disclosed molecular scale features in varying coverage on addition of the metal ions. The Ru-derivatives showed a bias voltage dependent broad maximum in the tunnelling current–overpotential correlation which could be correlated......We have studied adsorption and electrochemical electron transfer of several 13- and 15-base DNA and UNA (unlocked nucleic acids) oligonucleotides (ONs) linked to Au(111)-electrode surfaces via a 50-C6-SH group using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and scanning tunnelling microscopy in aqueous buffer under...

  20. EDITORIAL: Electron Microscopy and Analysis Group Conference 2011 (EMAG 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebus, Guenter; Walther, Thomas; Brydson, Rik; Ozkaya, Dogan; MacLaren, Ian; Donnelly, Steve; Nellist, Pete; Li, Ziyou; Baker, Richard; Chiu, YuLung

    2012-07-01

    The biennial EMAG conference has established a strong reputation as a key event for the national and international electron microscopy community. In 2011 the meeting was held at The University of Birmingham, and I must first take this opportunity of thanking Birmingham for hosting the conference and for the excellent support we received from the local organisers. As a committee, we are delighted to see that enthusiasm for the EMAG conference series continues to be strong. We received more than 160 submitted abstracts, and 157 delegates attended the meeting. The scientific programme organiser, Ian MacLaren, put together an exciting programme. Plenary lectures were presented by Professor Knut Urban, Dr Frances Ross and Dr Richard Henderson. There were a further 10 invited speakers, from the UK, Continental Europe, Australia, the USA and Japan. The quality of the contributed oral and poster presentations was also very high. EMAG is keen to encourage student participation, and a winner and two runners-up were presented with prizes for the best oral and poster presentations from a student. I am always struck by the scientific quality of the oral and poster contributions and the vibrant discussions that occur both in the formal sessions and in the exhibition space at EMAG. I am convinced that a crucial part of maintaining that scientific quality is the opportunity that is offered of having a paper fully reviewed by two internationally selected referees and published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. For many students, this is the first fully reviewed paper they publish. I hope that you, like me, will be struck by the scientific quality of the 87 papers that follow, and that you will find them interesting and informative. Finally I must thank the platinum sponsors for their support of the meeting. These were Gatan, Zeiss, FEI, JEOL and Hitachi. I must also thank the European Microscopy Society for their generous sponsorship and support for the travel costs of

  1. Physical methods for studying minerals and solid materials: X-ray, electron and neutron diffraction; scanning and transmission electron microscopy; X-ray, electron and ion spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhart, J.-P.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: theoretical aspects of radiation-matter interactions; production and measurement of radiations (X rays, electrons, neutrons); applications of radiation interactions to the study of crystalline materials. The following techniques are presented: X-ray and neutron diffraction, electron microscopy, electron diffraction, X-ray fluorescence analysis, electron probe microanalysis, surface analysis by electron emission spectrometry (ESCA and Auger electrons), scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion emission analysis [fr

  2. The cryo-electron microscopy structure of huntingtin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiang; Bin Huang; Cheng, Jingdong; Seefelder, Manuel; Engler, Tatjana; Pfeifer, Günter; Oeckl, Patrick; Otto, Markus; Moser, Franziska; Maurer, Melanie; Pautsch, Alexander; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Fernández-Busnadiego, Rubén; Kochanek, Stefan

    2018-03-01

    Huntingtin (HTT) is a large (348 kDa) protein that is essential for embryonic development and is involved in diverse cellular activities such as vesicular transport, endocytosis, autophagy and the regulation of transcription. Although an integrative understanding of the biological functions of HTT is lacking, the large number of identified HTT interactors suggests that it serves as a protein-protein interaction hub. Furthermore, Huntington’s disease is caused by a mutation in the HTT gene, resulting in a pathogenic expansion of a polyglutamine repeat at the amino terminus of HTT. However, only limited structural information regarding HTT is currently available. Here we use cryo-electron microscopy to determine the structure of full-length human HTT in a complex with HTT-associated protein 40 (HAP40; encoded by three F8A genes in humans) to an overall resolution of 4 Å. HTT is largely α-helical and consists of three major domains. The amino- and carboxy-terminal domains contain multiple HEAT (huntingtin, elongation factor 3, protein phosphatase 2A and lipid kinase TOR) repeats arranged in a solenoid fashion. These domains are connected by a smaller bridge domain containing different types of tandem repeats. HAP40 is also largely α-helical and has a tetratricopeptide repeat-like organization. HAP40 binds in a cleft and contacts the three HTT domains by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions, thereby stabilizing the conformation of HTT. These data rationalize previous biochemical results and pave the way for improved understanding of the diverse cellular functions of HTT.

  3. Synchrotron-based in situ soft X-ray microscopy of Ag corrosion in aqueous chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzini, B; D'Urzo, L; Gianoncelli, A; Kaulich, B; Kiskinova, M; Prasciolu, M; Tadjeddine, A

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report an in situ X-ray microscopy study of a model metal electrochemistry system, incorporating faradaic reactivity: the anodic corrosion and cathodic electrodeposition of Ag in aqueous systems. The information at sub-μm scale about morpho-chemical evolution of the electrified interface, provided by this novel electroanalytical approach fosters fundamental understanding of important issues concerning material fabrication and stability, which are crucial in developing the next generation electrochemical technologies, such as fuel cells and biosensors. The key methodology challenge faced in this pilot electrochemical experiments is combining a three-electrode configuration and wet environment, which required metal electrodes suitable for transmitting soft X-rays and a sealed cell allowing working in high vacuum. This has been solved via lithographic fabrication route fabricating 75 nm thick Ag electrodes and using Si 3 N 4 membranes as X-ray windows and electrode support. Imaging in the STXM mode with phase contrast allowed us to monitor the corrosion morphologies and metal outgrowth features. Localised thickness variation and the build-up of reaction products of electron density different from that of the starting material have been detected with high sensitivity.

  4. Miniaturized Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope for In Situ Planetary Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Abbott, Terry; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Thaisen, Kevin; Taylor , Lawrence; Ramsey, Brian; Jerman, Gregory; Sampson, Allen; Harvey, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of remote planetary surfaces calls for the advancement of low power, highly-miniaturized instrumentation. Instruments of this nature that are capable of multiple types of analyses will prove to be particularly useful as we prepare for human return to the moon, and as we continue to explore increasingly remote locations in our Solar System. To this end, our group has been developing a miniaturized Environmental-Scanning Electron Microscope (mESEM) capable of remote investigations of mineralogical samples through in-situ topographical and chemical analysis on a fine scale. The functioning of an SEM is well known: an electron beam is focused to nanometer-scale onto a given sample where resulting emissions such as backscattered and secondary electrons, X-rays, and visible light are registered. Raster scanning the primary electron beam across the sample then gives a fine-scale image of the surface topography (texture), crystalline structure and orientation, with accompanying elemental composition. The flexibility in the types of measurements the mESEM is capable of, makes it ideally suited for a variety of applications. The mESEM is appropriate for use on multiple planetary surfaces, and for a variety of mission goals (from science to non-destructive analysis to ISRU). We will identify potential applications and range of potential uses related to planetary exploration. Over the past few of years we have initiated fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept assembly, consisting of a cold-field-emission electron gun and custom high-voltage power supply, electrostatic electron-beam focusing column, and scanning-imaging electronics plus backscatter detector. Current project status will be discussed. This effort is funded through the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences - Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program.

  5. Direct observations of the MOF (UiO-66) structure by transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Liangkui; Zhang, Daliang; Xue, Ming; Li, Huan; Qiu, Shilun

    2013-01-01

    As a demonstration of ab initio structure characterizations of nano metal organic framework (MOF) crystals by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron diffraction tomography methods, a Zr-MOF (UiO-66) structure

  6. In-situ detection of drugs-of-abuse on clothing using confocal Raman microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Esam M.A. [Raman Spectroscopy Group, University Analytical Centre, Division of Chemical and Forensic Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom); Edwards, Howell G.M. [Raman Spectroscopy Group, University Analytical Centre, Division of Chemical and Forensic Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: h.g.m.edwards@bradford.ac.uk; Hargreaves, Michael D.; Scowen, Ian J. [Raman Spectroscopy Group, University Analytical Centre, Division of Chemical and Forensic Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-12

    This study describes the application of confocal Raman microscopy to the detection and identification of drugs-of-abuse in situ on undyed natural synthetic fibres, and coloured textile specimens. Raman spectra were obtained from drug particles trapped between the fibres of the specimens. Pure samples of cocaine hydrochloride and N-methyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-amphetamine HCl (MDMA-HCl) were used in this study. Raman spectra were collected from drug particles of an average size in the range 5-15 {mu}m. Despite the presence of spectral bands arising from the natural and synthetic polymer and dyed textiles, the drugs could be identified by their characteristic Raman bands. If necessary, interfering bands could be successfully removed by spectral subtraction. Furthermore, Raman spectra were recorded from drug particles trapped between the fibres of highly fluorescent specimens. Interference from the fibres, including background fluorescence, was overcome by careful focusing of the confocal beam and the resulting spectra allow ready differentiation from interference from the fibres substrate bands. Spectra of several drugs-of-abuse on dyed and undyed clothing substrates were readily obtained within 3 min with little or no sample preparation and with no alteration of the evidential material.

  7. In-situ detection of drugs-of-abuse on clothing using confocal Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Esam M.A.; Edwards, Howell G.M.; Hargreaves, Michael D.; Scowen, Ian J.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the application of confocal Raman microscopy to the detection and identification of drugs-of-abuse in situ on undyed natural synthetic fibres, and coloured textile specimens. Raman spectra were obtained from drug particles trapped between the fibres of the specimens. Pure samples of cocaine hydrochloride and N-methyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-amphetamine HCl (MDMA-HCl) were used in this study. Raman spectra were collected from drug particles of an average size in the range 5-15 μm. Despite the presence of spectral bands arising from the natural and synthetic polymer and dyed textiles, the drugs could be identified by their characteristic Raman bands. If necessary, interfering bands could be successfully removed by spectral subtraction. Furthermore, Raman spectra were recorded from drug particles trapped between the fibres of highly fluorescent specimens. Interference from the fibres, including background fluorescence, was overcome by careful focusing of the confocal beam and the resulting spectra allow ready differentiation from interference from the fibres substrate bands. Spectra of several drugs-of-abuse on dyed and undyed clothing substrates were readily obtained within 3 min with little or no sample preparation and with no alteration of the evidential material

  8. In situ alkali-silica reaction observed by x-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtis, K.E.; Monteiro, P.J.M.; Brown, J.T.; Meyer-Ilse, W.

    1997-01-01

    In concrete, alkali metal ions and hydroxyl ions contributed by the cement and reactive silicates present in aggregate can participate in a destructive alkali-silica reaction (ASR). This reaction of the alkalis with the silicates produces a gel that tends to imbibe water found in the concrete pores, leading to swelling of the gel and eventual cracking of the affected concrete member. Over 104 cases of alkali-aggregate reaction in dams and spillways have been reported around the world. At present, no method exists to arrest the expansive chemical reaction which generates significant distress in the affected structures. Most existing techniques available for the examination of concrete microstructure, including ASR products, demand that samples be dried and exposed to high pressure during the observation period. These sample preparation requirements present a major disadvantage for the study of alkali-silica reaction. Given the nature of the reaction and the affect of water on its products, it is likely that the removal of water will affect the morphology, creating artifacts in the sample. The purpose of this research is to observe and characterize the alkali-silica reaction, including each of the specific reactions identified previously, in situ without introducing sample artifacts. For observation of unconditioned samples, x-ray microscopy offers an opportunity for such an examination of the alkali-silica reaction. Currently, this investigation is focusing on the effect of calcium ions on the alkali-silica reaction

  9. In situ alkali-silica reaction observed by x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtis, K.E.; Monteiro, P.J.M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Brown, J.T.; Meyer-Ilse, W. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    In concrete, alkali metal ions and hydroxyl ions contributed by the cement and reactive silicates present in aggregate can participate in a destructive alkali-silica reaction (ASR). This reaction of the alkalis with the silicates produces a gel that tends to imbibe water found in the concrete pores, leading to swelling of the gel and eventual cracking of the affected concrete member. Over 104 cases of alkali-aggregate reaction in dams and spillways have been reported around the world. At present, no method exists to arrest the expansive chemical reaction which generates significant distress in the affected structures. Most existing techniques available for the examination of concrete microstructure, including ASR products, demand that samples be dried and exposed to high pressure during the observation period. These sample preparation requirements present a major disadvantage for the study of alkali-silica reaction. Given the nature of the reaction and the affect of water on its products, it is likely that the removal of water will affect the morphology, creating artifacts in the sample. The purpose of this research is to observe and characterize the alkali-silica reaction, including each of the specific reactions identified previously, in situ without introducing sample artifacts. For observation of unconditioned samples, x-ray microscopy offers an opportunity for such an examination of the alkali-silica reaction. Currently, this investigation is focusing on the effect of calcium ions on the alkali-silica reaction.

  10. In situ microscopy for online monitoring of cell concentration in Pichia pastoris cultivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquard, D; Enders, A; Roth, G; Rinas, U; Scheper, T; Lindner, P

    2016-09-20

    In situ Microscopy (ISM) is an optical non-invasive technique to monitor cells in bioprocesses in real-time. Pichia pastoris is one of the most promising protein expression systems. This yeast combines fast growth on simple media and important eukaryotic features such as glycosylation. In this work, the ISM technology was applied to Pichia pastoris cultivations for online monitoring of the cell concentration during cultivation. Different ISM settings were tested. The acquired images were analyzed with two image processing algorithms. In seven cultivations the cell concentration was monitored by the applied algorithms and offline samples were taken to determine optical density (OD) and dry cell mass (DCM). Cell concentrations up to 74g/L dry cell mass could be analyzed via the ISM. Depending on the algorithm and the ISM settings, an accuracy between 0.3 % and 12 % was achieved. The overall results show that for a robust measurement a combination of the two described algorithms is required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Time-Lapse, in Situ Imaging of Ice Crystal Growth Using Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellini, Moreno; Noirjean, Cecile; Dedovets, Dmytro; Maria, Juliette; Deville, Sylvain

    2016-11-30

    Ice crystals nucleate and grow when a water solution is cooled below its freezing point. The growth velocities and morphologies of the ice crystals depend on many parameters, such as the temperature of ice growth, the melting temperature, and the interactions of solutes with the growing crystals. Three types of morphologies may appear: dendritic, cellular (or fingerlike), or the faceted equilibrium form. Understanding and controlling which type of morphology is formed is essential in several domains, from biology to geophysics and materials science. Obtaining, in situ, three dimensional observations without introducing artifacts due to the experimental technique is nevertheless challenging. Here we show how we can use laser scanning confocal microscopy to follow in real-time the growth of smoothed and faceted ice crystals in zirconium acetate solutions. Both qualitative and quantitative observations can be made. In particular, we can precisely measure the lateral growth velocity of the crystals, a measure otherwise difficult to obtain. Such observations should help us understand the influence of the parameters that control the growth of ice crystals in various systems.

  12. Selective two-photon collagen crosslinking in situ measured by Brillouin microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Sheldon J. J.; Kuznetsov, Ivan A.; Kim, Moonseok; Choi, Myunghwan; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2017-02-01

    Two-photon polymerization and crosslinking are commonly used methods for microfabrication of three-dimensional structures with applications spanning from photonic microdevices, drug delivery systems, to cellular scaffolds. However, the use of two-photon processes for precise, internal modification of biological tissues has not yet been reported. One of the major challenges has been a lack of appropriate tools to monitor and characterize crosslinked regions nondestructively. Here, we demonstrate spatially selective two-photon collagen crosslinking (2P-CXL) in intact tissue for the first time. Using riboflavin photosensitizer and femtosecond laser irradiation, we crosslinked a small volume of tissue within animal corneas. Collagen fiber orientations and photobleaching were characterized by second harmonic generation and two-photon fluorescence imaging, respectively. Using confocal Brillouin microscopy, we measured local changes in longitudinal mechanical moduli and visualized the cross-linked pattern without perturbing surrounding non-irradiated regions. 2P-CXL-induced tissue stiffening was comparable to that achieved with conventional one-photon CXL. Our results demonstrate the ability to selectively stiffen biological tissue in situ at high spatial resolution, with broad implications in ophthalmology, laser surgery, and tissue engineering.

  13. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis of daily disposable limbal ring contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Kathrine Osborn; Kakkassery, Joseph; Boree, Danielle; Pinto, David

    2014-09-01

    Limbal ring (also known as 'circle') contact lenses are becoming increasingly popular, especially in Asian markets because of their eye-enhancing effects. The pigment particles that give the eye-enhancing effects of these lenses can be found on the front or back surface of the contact lens or 'enclosed' within the lens matrix. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the pigment location and surface roughness of seven types of 'circle' contact lenses. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis was performed using a variable pressure Hitachi S3400N instrument to discern the placement of lens pigments. Atomic force microscopy (Dimension Icon AFM from Bruker Nano) was used to determine the surface roughness of the pigmented regions of the contact lenses. Atomic force microscopic analysis was performed in fluid phase under contact mode using a Sharp Nitride Lever probe (SNL-10) with a spring constant of 0.06 N/m. Root mean square (RMS) roughness values were analysed using a generalised linear mixed model with a log-normal distribution. Least square means and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals were estimated for each brand, location and pigment combination. SEM cross-sectional images at 500× and 2,000× magnification showed pigment on the surface of six of the seven lens types tested. The mean depth of pigment for 1-DAY ACUVUE DEFINE (1DAD) lenses was 8.1 μm below the surface of the lens, while the remaining lens types tested had pigment particles on the front or back surface. Results of the atomic force microscopic analysis indicated that 1DAD lenses had significantly lower root mean square roughness values in the pigmented area of the lens than the other lens types tested. SEM and AFM analysis revealed pigment on the surface of the lens for all types tested with the exception of 1DAD. Further research is required to determine if the difference in pigment location influences on-eye performance. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental

  14. Correlative Analysis of Immunoreactivity in Confocal Laser-Scanning Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Focused Ion Beam Milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro eSonomura

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional reconstruction of ultrastructure of rat brain with minimal effort has recently been realized by scanning electron microscopy combined with focused ion beam milling (FIB-SEM. Because application of immunohistochemical staining to electron microscopy has a great advantage in that molecules of interest are specifically localized in ultrastructures, we here tried to apply immunocytochemistry to FIB-SEM and correlate immunoreactivity in confocal laser-scanning microcopy (CF-LSM with that in FIB-SEM. The dendrites of medium-sized spiny neurons in rat neostriatum were visualized with a recombinant viral vector, which labeled the infected neurons with membrane-targeted GFP in a Golgi stain-like fashion, and thalamostriatal afferent terminals were immunolabeled with Cy5 fluorescence for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2. After detecting the sites of terminals apposed to the dendrites in CF-LSM, GFP and VGluT2 immunoreactivities were further developed for electron microscopy by the immunogold/silver enhancement and immunoperoxidase/diaminobenzidine (DAB methods, respectively. In the contrast-inverted FIB-SEM images, silver precipitation and DAB deposits were observed as fine dark grains and diffuse dense profiles, respectively, indicating that these immunoreactivities were easily recognizable as in the images of transmission electron microscopy. In the sites of interest, some appositions were revealed to display synaptic specialization of asymmetric type. The present method is thus useful in the three-dimensional analysis of immunocytochemically differentiated synaptic connection in the central neural circuit.

  15. The New Electron Microscopy: Cells and Molecules in Three Dimensions | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI recently announced the launch of the new National Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility (NCEF) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR). The launch comes while cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is enjoying the spotlight as a newly emerging, rapidly evolving technology with the potential to revolutionize the field of structural biology. Read more...

  16. Electron microscopy study of Nb-rich nanoprecipitates in Ni–Ti–Nb and their influence on the martensitic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, H.; Pourbabak, S.; Van Humbeeck, J.; Schryvers, D.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Nb-rich nanoprecipitates in the matrix of an annealed commercial Ni–Ti–Nb alloy are investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, including slice-and-view and chemical analysis. The precipitates have a diameter of around 100 nm, are faceted and have a cube-on-cube relation with the B2 matrix. In situ TEM cooling shows that the martensitic transformation is hampered by the presence of these precipitates. The latter could explain the increase in hysteresis when compared with the binary system.

  17. Accurate virus quantitation using a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) detector in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancett, Candace D; Fetterer, David P; Koistinen, Keith A; Morazzani, Elaine M; Monninger, Mitchell K; Piper, Ashley E; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Kearney, Brian J; Norris, Sarah L; Rossi, Cynthia A; Glass, Pamela J; Sun, Mei G

    2017-10-01

    A method for accurate quantitation of virus particles has long been sought, but a perfect method still eludes the scientific community. Electron Microscopy (EM) quantitation is a valuable technique because it provides direct morphology information and counts of all viral particles, whether or not they are infectious. In the past, EM negative stain quantitation methods have been cited as inaccurate, non-reproducible, and with detection limits that were too high to be useful. To improve accuracy and reproducibility, we have developed a method termed Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy - Virus Quantitation (STEM-VQ), which simplifies sample preparation and uses a high throughput STEM detector in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) coupled with commercially available software. In this paper, we demonstrate STEM-VQ with an alphavirus stock preparation to present the method's accuracy and reproducibility, including a comparison of STEM-VQ to viral plaque assay and the ViroCyt Virus Counter. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis and Calibration of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy Images with atomic Resolution Influenced by Surface Drift Phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Møller, Per

    1994-01-01

    The influence of surface drift velocities on in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) experiments with atomic resolution is analysed experimentally and mathematically. Constant drift velocities much smaller than the speed of scanning can in many in situ STM experiments with atomic resolution ...... as well as the vectors of the non-distorted surface lattice can be determined. The calibration of distances can thus be carried out also when the image is influenced by drift. Results with gold surfaces and graphite surfaces are analysed and discussed....

  19. In situ protein expression in tumour spheres: development of an immunostaining protocol for confocal microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiswald, Louis-Bastien; Guinebretière, Jean-Marc; Richon, Sophie; Bellet, Dominique; Saubaméa, Bruno; Dangles-Marie, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    Multicellular tumour sphere models have been shown to closely mimic phenotype characteristics of in vivo solid tumours, or to allow in vitro propagation of cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are usually characterized by the expression of specific membrane markers using flow cytometry (FC) after enzymatic dissociation. Consequently, the spatial location of positive cells within spheres is not documented. Confocal microscopy is the best technique for the imaging of thick biological specimens after multi-labelling but suffers from poor antibody penetration. Thus, we describe here a new protocol for in situ confocal imaging of protein expression in intact spheroids. Protein expression in whole spheroids (150 μm in diameter) from two human colon cancer cell lines, HT29 and CT320X6, has been investigated with confocal immunostaining, then compared with profiles obtained through paraffin immunohistochemistry (pIHC) and FC. Target antigens, relevant for colon cancer and with different expression patterns, have been studied. We first demonstrate that our procedure overcomes the well-known problem of antibody penetration in compact structures by performing immunostaining of EpCAM, a membrane protein expressed by all cells within our spheroids. EpCAM expression is detected in all cells, even the deepest ones. Likewise, antibody access is confirmed with CK20 and CD44 immunostaining. Confocal imaging shows that 100% of cells express β-catenin, mainly present in the plasma membrane with also cytoplasmic and nuclear staining, in agreement with FC and pIHC data. pIHC and confocal imaging show similar CA 19-9 cytoplasmic and membranar expression profile in a cell subpopulation. CA 19-9 + cell count confirms confocal imaging as a highly sensitive method (75%, 62% and 51%, for FC, confocal imaging and pIHC, respectively). Finally, confocal imaging reveals that the weak expression of CD133, a putative colon CSC marker, is restricted to the luminal cell surface of colorectal cancer acini

  20. Fluorescence (FISH) and chromogenic (CISH) in situ hybridisation in prostate carcinoma cell lines: comparison and use of virtual microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, K; Hamilton, P W; Maxwell, P

    2008-01-01

    Chromogenic in situ hybridisation (CISH) has become an attractive alternative to fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) due to its permanent stain which is more familiar to pathologists and because it can be viewed using light microscopy. The aim of the present study is to examine reproducibility in the assessment of abnormal chromosome number by CISH in comparison to FISH. Using three prostate cell lines--PNT1A (derived from normal epithelium), LNCAP and DU145 (derived from prostatic carcinoma), chromosomes 7 and 8 were counted in 40 nuclei in FISH preparations (x100 oil immersion) and 100 nuclei in CISH preparations (x40) by two independent observers. The CISH slides were examined using standard light microscopy and virtual microscopy. Reproducibility was examined using paired Student's t-test (PCISH. No significant differences in chromosome count were seen between the techniques. Chromosomes 7 and 8 showed disomic status for each cell line except LNCAP, which proved to be heterogeneous (disomic/aneusomic), particularly for chromosome 8. Virtual microscopy proved to be easy to use and gave no significant differences from standard light microscopy. These results support the hypothesis that there is no significant difference between FISH and CISH techniques.