WorldWideScience

Sample records for situ drifts studies

  1. Combining a coupled FTIR-EGA system and in situ DRIFTS for studying soil organic matter in arable soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Demyan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An optimized spectroscopic method combining quantitative evolved gas analysis via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-EGA in combination with a qualitative in situ thermal reaction monitoring via diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (in situT DRIFTS is being proposed to rapidly characterize soil organic matter (SOM to study its dynamics and stability. A thermal reaction chamber coupled with an infrared gas cell was used to study the pattern of thermal evolution of carbon dioxide (CO2 in order to relate evolved gas (i.e., CO2 to different qualities of SOM. Soil samples were taken from three different arable sites in Germany: (i the Static Fertilization Experiment, Bad Lauchstädt (Chernozem, from treatments of farmyard manure (FYM, mineral fertilizer (NPK, their combination (FYM + NPK and control without fertilizer inputs; (ii Kraichgau; and (iii Swabian Alb (Cambisols areas, Southwest Germany. The two latter soils were further fractionated into particulate organic matter (POM, sand and stable aggregates (Sa + A, silt and clay (Si + C, and NaOCl oxidized Si + C (rSOC to gain OM of different inferred stabilities; respiration was measured from fresh soil samples incubated at 20 °C and 50% water holding capacity for 490 days. A variable long path length gas cell was used to record the mid-infrared absorbance intensity of CO2 (2400 to 2200 cm−1 being evolved during soil heating from 25 to 700 °C with a heating rate of 68 °C min−1 and holding time of 10 min at 700 °C. Separately, the heating chamber was placed in a diffuse reflectance chamber (DRIFTS for measuring the mid-infrared absorbance of the soil sample during heating. Thermal stability of the bulk soils and fractions was measured via the temperature of maximum CO2 evolution (CO2max. Results indicated that the FYM + NPK and FYM treatments of the Chernozem soils had a lower CO2max as compared to both NPK and CON treatments. On average, CO2max of the

  2. Combining a coupled FTIR-EGA system and in situ DRIFTS for studying soil organic matter in arable soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demyan, M. S.; Rasche, F.; Schütt, M.; Smirnova, N.; Schulz, E.; Cadisch, G.

    2013-05-01

    An optimized spectroscopic method combining quantitative evolved gas analysis via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-EGA) in combination with a qualitative in situ thermal reaction monitoring via diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (in situT DRIFTS) is being proposed to rapidly characterize soil organic matter (SOM) to study its dynamics and stability. A thermal reaction chamber coupled with an infrared gas cell was used to study the pattern of thermal evolution of carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to relate evolved gas (i.e., CO2) to different qualities of SOM. Soil samples were taken from three different arable sites in Germany: (i) the Static Fertilization Experiment, Bad Lauchstädt (Chernozem), from treatments of farmyard manure (FYM), mineral fertilizer (NPK), their combination (FYM + NPK) and control without fertilizer inputs; (ii) Kraichgau; and (iii) Swabian Alb (Cambisols) areas, Southwest Germany. The two latter soils were further fractionated into particulate organic matter (POM), sand and stable aggregates (Sa + A), silt and clay (Si + C), and NaOCl oxidized Si + C (rSOC) to gain OM of different inferred stabilities; respiration was measured from fresh soil samples incubated at 20 °C and 50% water holding capacity for 490 days. A variable long path length gas cell was used to record the mid-infrared absorbance intensity of CO2 (2400 to 2200 cm-1) being evolved during soil heating from 25 to 700 °C with a heating rate of 68 °C min-1 and holding time of 10 min at 700 °C. Separately, the heating chamber was placed in a diffuse reflectance chamber (DRIFTS) for measuring the mid-infrared absorbance of the soil sample during heating. Thermal stability of the bulk soils and fractions was measured via the temperature of maximum CO2 evolution (CO2max). Results indicated that the FYM + NPK and FYM treatments of the Chernozem soils had a lower CO2max as compared to both NPK and CON treatments. On average, CO2max of the Chernozem

  3. In Situ Structure-Function Studies of Oxide Supported Rhodium Catalysts by Combined Energy Dispersive XAFS and DRIFTS Spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, John; Dent, Andrew J.; Diaz-Moreno, Sofia; Fiddy, Steven G.; Jyoti, Bhrat; Tromp, Moniek; Newton, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    The techniques of energy dispersive EXAFS (EDE), diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and mass spectrometry (MS) have been combined to study the structure and function of an oxide supported metal catalyst, namely 5 wt% Rh/Al2O3. Using a FreLoN camera as the EDE detector and a rapid-scanning IR spectrometer, experiments could be performed with a repetition rate of 50 ms. The results show that the nature of the rhodium centers is a function of the partial pressures of the reacting gases (CO and NO) and also temperature. This combination of gases oxidizes metallic rhodium particles to Rh(CO)2 at room temperature. The proportion of the rhodium adopting this site increases as the temperature is raised (up to 450 K). Above that temperature the dicarbonyl decomposes and the metal reclusters. Once this condition is met, catalysis ensues. Gas switching techniques show that at 573 K with NO in excess, the clusters can be oxidized rapidly to afford a linear nitrosyl complex; re-exposure to CO also promotes reclustering and the CO adopts terminal (atop) and bridging (2-fold) sites

  4. CTF Void Drift Validation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salko, Robert K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gosdin, Chris [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Avramova, Maria N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gergar, Marcus [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    This milestone report is a summary of work performed in support of expansion of the validation and verification (V&V) matrix for the thermal-hydraulic subchannel code, CTF. The focus of this study is on validating the void drift modeling capabilities of CTF and verifying the supporting models that impact the void drift phenomenon. CTF uses a simple turbulent-diffusion approximation to model lateral cross-flow due to turbulent mixing and void drift. The void drift component of the model is based on the Lahey and Moody model. The models are a function of two-phase mass, momentum, and energy distribution in the system; therefore, it is necessary to correctly model the ow distribution in rod bundle geometry as a first step to correctly calculating the void distribution due to void drift.

  5. In situ observation of lithium hydride hydrolysis by DRIFT spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awbery, Roy P.; Broughton, Duncan A.; Tsang, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    Polycrystalline LiH was studied in situ using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy to investigate the effect water vapour has on the rate of production of the corrosion products, particularly LiOH. The reaction rate of the formation of surface LiOH was monitored by measurement of the hydroxyl (OH) band at 3676 cm -1 . The initial hydrolysis rate of LiH exposed to water vapour at 50% relative humidity was found to be almost two times faster than LiH exposed to water vapour at 2% relative humidity. The hydrolysis rate was shown to be initially very rapid followed by a much slower, almost linear rate. The change in hydrolysis rate was attributed to the formation of a coherent layer of LiOH on the LiH surface. Exposure to lower levels of water vapour appeared to result in the formation of a more coherent corrosion product, resulting in effective passivation of the surface to further attack from water

  6. Facile synthesis of surface N-doped Bi_2O_2CO_3: Origin of visible light photocatalytic activity and in situ DRIFTS studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Ying; Zhao, Ziyan; Wang, Fang; Cao, Kun; Doronkin, Dmitry E.; Dong, Fan; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Surfactant (CTAB) can induce nitrogen interstitially doping in the Bi_2O_2CO_3 surface, leading to the formation of localized states from N−O bond, which probably account for the origin of the visible light activity. Moreover, the photocatalytic NO oxidation processes over Bi_2O_2CO_3 were successfully monitored for the first time by in situ DRIFTS. - Highlights: • Interstitially doping N in the Bi_2O_2CO_3 surface was achieved at room temperature. • N-doped Bi_2O_2CO_3 exhibited significantly enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity compared to the pristine Bi_2O_2CO_3. • The formation of localized states from N−O bond could account for the visible light activity of Bi_2O_2CO_3. • The photocatalytic NO oxidation process was monitored by in situ DRIFTS. - Abstract: Bi_2O_2CO_3 nanosheets with exposed {001} facets were prepared by a facile room temperature chemical method. Due to the high oxygen atom density in {001} facets of Bi_2O_2CO_3, the addition of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) does not only influence the growth of crystalline Bi_2O_2CO_3, but also modifies the surface properties of Bi_2O_2CO_3 through the interaction between CTAB and Bi_2O_2CO_3. Nitrogen from CTAB as dopant interstitially incorporates in the Bi_2O_2CO_3 surface evidenced by both experimental and theoretical investigations. Hence, the formation of localized states from N−O bond improves the visible light absorption and charge separation efficiency, which leads to an enhancement of visible light photocatalytic activity toward to the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and oxidation of NO. In addition, the photocatalytic NO oxidation over Bi_2O_2CO_3 nanosheets was successfully monitored for the first time using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier-transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Both bidentate and monodentate nitrates were identified on the surface of catalysts during the photocatalytic reaction process. The application of this strategy to

  7. Cooling tower drift: comprehensive case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laulainen, N.S.; Ulanski, S.L.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive experiment to study drift from mechanical drift cooling towers was conducted during June 1978 at the PG and E Pittsburg Power Plant. The data from this study will be used for validation of drift deposition models. Preliminary results show the effects of tower geometry and orientation with respect to the wind and to single- or two-tower operation. The effect of decreasing relative humidity during a test run can also be seen

  8. Analysis and Calibration of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy Images with atomic Resolution Influenced by Surface Drift Phenomena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Møller, Per

    1994-01-01

    The influence of surface drift velocities on in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) experiments with atomic resolution is analysed experimentally and mathematically. Constant drift velocities much smaller than the speed of scanning can in many in situ STM experiments with atomic resolution ...... as well as the vectors of the non-distorted surface lattice can be determined. The calibration of distances can thus be carried out also when the image is influenced by drift. Results with gold surfaces and graphite surfaces are analysed and discussed....

  9. Facile synthesis of surface N-doped Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3}: Origin of visible light photocatalytic activity and in situ DRIFTS studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ying, E-mail: yzhou@swpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation, Southwest Petroleum University, Xindu Rd. 8, Chengdu 610500 (China); The Center of New Energy Materials and Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Xindu Rd. 8, Chengdu 610500 (China); Insititute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Zhao, Ziyan [State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation, Southwest Petroleum University, Xindu Rd. 8, Chengdu 610500 (China); The Center of New Energy Materials and Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Xindu Rd. 8, Chengdu 610500 (China); Wang, Fang; Cao, Kun [The Center of New Energy Materials and Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Xindu Rd. 8, Chengdu 610500 (China); Doronkin, Dmitry E. [Insititute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Dong, Fan [College of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Chonqing Technology and Business University, Chongqing 400067 (China); Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk, E-mail: grunwaldt@kit.edu [Insititute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: Surfactant (CTAB) can induce nitrogen interstitially doping in the Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} surface, leading to the formation of localized states from N−O bond, which probably account for the origin of the visible light activity. Moreover, the photocatalytic NO oxidation processes over Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were successfully monitored for the first time by in situ DRIFTS. - Highlights: • Interstitially doping N in the Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} surface was achieved at room temperature. • N-doped Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} exhibited significantly enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity compared to the pristine Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. • The formation of localized states from N−O bond could account for the visible light activity of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. • The photocatalytic NO oxidation process was monitored by in situ DRIFTS. - Abstract: Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} nanosheets with exposed {001} facets were prepared by a facile room temperature chemical method. Due to the high oxygen atom density in {001} facets of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, the addition of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) does not only influence the growth of crystalline Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, but also modifies the surface properties of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} through the interaction between CTAB and Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Nitrogen from CTAB as dopant interstitially incorporates in the Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} surface evidenced by both experimental and theoretical investigations. Hence, the formation of localized states from N−O bond improves the visible light absorption and charge separation efficiency, which leads to an enhancement of visible light photocatalytic activity toward to the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and oxidation of NO. In addition, the photocatalytic NO oxidation over Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} nanosheets was successfully monitored for the first time using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier

  10. In situ DRIFTS study of O{sub 3} adsorption on CaO, γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CuO, α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZnO at room temperature for the catalytic ozonation of cinnamaldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Su, Tongming; Jiang, Yuexiu; Xie, Xinling [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Qin, Zuzeng, E-mail: qinzuzeng@gmail.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Ji, Hongbing, E-mail: jihb@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); School of Chemistry, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • In situ DRIFTS study of O{sub 3} adsorption on metal oxides at room temperature. • Using acidic probe molecules (DRIFTS) characterization of surface basicity. • Correlation between basic strength of metal oxides and O{sub 3} adsorption. • Study on the competitive adsorption of O{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}. • DRIFTS study of cinnamaldehyde ozonation and benzaldehyde excessive oxidation. - Abstract: In situ DRIFTS were conducted to identify adsorbed ozone and/or adsorbed oxygen species on CaO, ZnO, γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CuO and α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces at room temperature. Samples were characterized by means of TG, XRD, N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption, pyridine-IR, nitrobenzene-IR, chloroform-IR, and CO{sub 2}-TPD. Pyridine-DRIFTS measurements evidence two kinds of acid sites in all the samples. Nitrobenzene, chloroform-DRIFTS, and CO{sub 2}-TPD reveal that there are large amounts of medium-strength base sites on all the metal oxides, and only CaO, ZnO, and γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} have strong base sites. And the benzaldehyde selectivity was increased in the same order of the alkalinity of the metal oxides. With weaker sites, ozone molecules form coordinative complexes bound via the terminal oxygen atom, observed by vibrational frequencies at 2095–2122 and 1026–1054 cm{sup −1}. The formation of ozonide O{sub 3}{sup −} at 790 cm{sup −1}, atomic oxygen at 1317 cm{sup −1}, and superoxide O{sub 2}{sup −} at 1124 cm{sup −1} was detected; these species are believed to be intermediates of O{sub 3} decomposition on strong acid/base sites. The adsorption of ozone on metal oxides is a weak adsorption, and other gases, such as CO{sub 2}, will compete with O{sub 3} adsorption. The mechanism of cinnamaldehyde ozonation at room temperature over CaO shows that cinnamaldehyde can not only be oxidized into cinnamic acid, but also be further oxidized into benzaldehyde, benzoic acid, maleic anhydride, and ultimately mineralized to CO{sub 2} in the

  11. The Study of Westward Drift in the Main Geomagnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bayanjargal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have obtained a solution for the velocity of westward drift from the induction equation in which an approach for main geomagnetic field was built. Distribution functions B(r, t entered into the induction equation have been built by the observatories' data in North America and the Europe from 1991 to 2006. The longitudinal −0.123 degree/year and latitudinal 0.068 degree/year drifts were defined in North America. And the longitudinal −0.257 degree/year drift was defined in Europe from 1991 to 2006. These drifts are similar to results of other studies.

  12. Barents Sea field test of herder to thicken oil for in-situ burning in drift ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buist, I.; Potter, S.; Sorstrom, S.E.

    2009-01-01

    Thick oil slicks are the key to effective in situ burning. Pack ice can enable in situ burning by keeping slicks thick. Oil spills in drift ice conditions can rapidly spread and become too thin to ignite. The application of chemical surface-active agents known as oil herders are commonly used in open waters to clean and contain oil slicks. Herders result in the formation of a monolayer of surfactants on the water surface and reduce the surface tension on the surrounding water considerably. When the surfactant monolayer reaches the edge of a thin oil slick, it changes the balance of interfacial forces acting on the slick edge and allows the interfacial tensions to contract the oil into thicker layers. This study examined the use of chemical herding agents to thicken oil spills in broken ice to allow them to be ignited and burned in situ. Two meso-scale field burn tests were conducted in May 2008 with crude oil slicks of about 0.1 and 0.7 m 3 in open drift ice off Svalbard in the Barents Sea. Prior to the field experiments, 2 series of small laboratory tests were conducted using Heidrun and Statfjord crudes to determine the ability of the U.S. Navy herding agent to contract slicks of the oil. In the first field experiment involving 102 litres of fresh Heidrun, the slick was unexpectedly carried by currents to a nearby ice edge where the oil was ignited and burned. Approximately 80 per cent of the oil was consumed in the burn. In the second field experiment involving 630 litres of fresh Heidrun, the free-drifting oil was allowed to spread for 15 minutes until it was much too thin to ignite. When the herding agent was applied, the slick contracted and thickened for about 10 minutes and was then ignited using a gelled gas igniter. A 9-minute long burn consumed about 90 per cent of the oil. 9 refs., 5 tabs., 34 figs.

  13. Thermal simulation of drift emplacement (TSS): In-situ instrumentation and numerical modeling of stress measurement methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heusermann, S.

    1988-01-01

    In the course of the planned demonstration test Thermal Simulation of Drift Emplacement (TSS) BGR is carrying out in-situ-measurements of rock stresses, rock deformability and permeability of salt rock and backfill material. The following techniques developed and proved by BGR during the last years are planned to be used in the TSS project: overcoring technique, dilatometer technique, hard inclusion technique, slot-cutting techniques, large-flatjack technique, compensation tests in laboratory, vacuum tests, injection tests, and tracer tests. The purpose of measurements is to determine: the initial stress state; stress gradients around test drifts; stress change caused by mining activities, by creep and stress relaxation and by temperature; the in-situ load-deformation behavior of rock salt; the permeability of rock salt around test drifts; the compaction behavior of backfill material; and the load-deformation behavior of rock salt and borehole grout in laboratory tests

  14. Study and analysis of drift chamber parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Laso, L.

    1988-01-01

    The present work deals mainly with drift chambers. In the first chapter a summary of drift chamber properties is presented. The information has been collected from the extensive bibliography available in this field. A very simple calculation procedure of drift chamber parameters has been developed and is presented in detail in the second chapter. Some prototypes have been made following two geometries (multidrift chamber and Z-chambers). Several installations have been used for test and calibration of these prototypes. A complete description of these installations is given in the third chapter. Cosmic rays, beta particles from a Ru106 radiactive source and a test beam in the WA (West Area) of SPS at CERN have been used for experimental purposes. The analysis and the results are described for the different setups. The experimental measurements have been used to produce a complete cell parametrization (position as function of drift time) and to obtain spatial resolution values (in the range of 200-250 um). Experimental results are in good agreement with numerical calculations. (Author)

  15. Drift-scale thermomechanical analysis for the retrievability systems study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, F.C.

    1996-01-01

    A numerical method was used to estimate the stability of potential emplacement drifts without considering a ground support system as a part of the Thermal Loading Systems Study for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The stability of the drift is evaluated with two variables: the level of thermal loading and the diameter of the emplacement drift. The analyses include the thermomechanical effects generated by the excavation of the drift, subsequently by the thermal loads from heat-emitting waste packages, and finally by the thermal reduction resulting from rapid cooling ventilation required for the waste retrieval if required. The Discontinuous Deformation Analysis (DDA) code was used to analyze the thermomechanical response of the rock mass of multiple blocks separated by joints. The result of this stability analysis is used to discuss the geomechanical considerations for the advanced conceptual design (ACD) with respect to retrievability. In particular, based on the rock mass strength of the host rock described in the current version of the Reference Information Base, the computed thermal stresses, generated by 111 MTU/acre thermal loads in the near field at 100 years after waste emplacement, is beyond the criterion for the rock mass strength used to predict the stability of the rock mass surrounding the emplacement drift

  16. Cooling tower drift studies at the Paducah, Kentucky Gaseous Diffusion Plant. [Transport of drift-derived chromium in terrestrial ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, F.G.; Hanna, S.R.; Parr, P.D.

    1979-01-01

    The transfer and fate of chromium from cooling tower drift to terrestrial ecosystems were quantified at the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment facility at Paducah, Kentucky. Chromium concentrations in plant materials (fescue grass) decreased with increasing distance from the cooing tower, ranging from 251 +- 19 ppM at 15 meters to 0.52 +- 0.07 ppM at 1500 meters. The site of drift contamination, size characteristics, and elemental content of drift particles were determined using a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray analysis capabilities. Results indicate that elemental content in drift water (mineral residue) may not be equivalent to the content in the recirculating cooling water of the tower. This hypothesis is contrary to basic assumptions in calculating drift emissions. A laboratory study simulating throughfall from 1 to 6 inches of rain suggested that there are more exchange sites associated with litter than live foliage. Leachate from each one inch throughfall simulant removed 3% of the drift mass from litter compared to 7 to 9% from live foliage. Results suggest that differences in retention are related to chemical properties of the drift rather than physical lodging of the particle residue. To determine the potential for movement of drift-derived chromium to surface streams, soil--water samplers (wells) were placed along a distance gradient to Little Bayou Creek. Samples from two depths following rainstorms revealed the absence of vertical or horizontal movement with maximum concentrations of 0.13 ppb at 50 meters from the tower. Preliminary model estimates of drift deposition are compared to depositionmeasurements. Isopleths of the predicted deposition are useful to identify areas of maximum drift transport in the environs of the gaseous diffusion plant.

  17. Drift scale thermomechanical analysis for thermal loading and retrievability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, F.C.

    1995-01-01

    The repository portion of the Mined Geologic Disposal System for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste is currently in the advanced conceptual design stage. In support of systems studies, a numerical method was used to estimate the stability of emplacement drifts. Thermomechanical analyses, using the Discontinuous Deformation Analysis code, were performed using input data from Yucca Mountain documents. The analysis found that the stresses produced in the rock at thermal loads of 27.4 kilograms uranium per m2 (KgU/m2) would exceed stability criteria and could result in tunnel instability. At thermal loads between 20.5 KgU/m2, the drift is predicted to be stable and its structural integrity remains after thermal loading. In this case, the smaller diameter drift emplacement appears to have better stability. However, local rock spalling may occur. According to the numerical prediction, more rock fall may occur during the retrieval period due to the stress relaxation caused by the rapid cooling in the immediate drift area

  18. Metocean input data for drift models applications: Loustic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michon, P.; Bossart, C.; Cabioc'h, M.

    1995-01-01

    Real-time monitoring and crisis management of oil slicks or floating structures displacement require a good knowledge of local winds, waves and currents used as input data for operational drift models. Fortunately, thanks to world-wide and all-weather coverage, satellite measurements have recently enabled the introduction of new methods for the remote sensing of the marine environment. Within a French joint industry project, a procedure has been developed using basically satellite measurements combined to metocean models in order to provide marine operators' drift models with reliable wind, wave and current analyses and short term forecasts. Particularly, a model now allows the calculation of the drift current, under the joint action of wind and sea-state, thus radically improving the classical laws. This global procedure either directly uses satellite wind and waves measurements (if available on the study area) or indirectly, as calibration of metocean models results which are brought to the oil slick or floating structure location. The operational use of this procedure is reported here with an example of floating structure drift offshore from the Brittany coasts

  19. Contribution to Diogene detector drift chambers study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drouet, M.

    1981-06-01

    Diogene detector has been brought into operation at Saclay with the collaboration of Strasbourg CRN and Clermont-Ferrand LPC. The Diogene essential characteristic is its solid angle near four pi, allowing complete exclusive measurements. Diogene characteristics allow to detect an important multiplicity of charged particles in coincidence, to measure their impulse until a transverse impulse around 1 GeV/c, and to identify them by their energy loss measurement. These general characteristics are exposed after some brief recalls on charged particle detection and migration counters. Technical aspects of the prototype are examined. It has been built to test fabrication technology, choice exactness and performance estimation validity. These detector performance estimation calculations that may be waited for in tracks reconstruction, impulse and energy loss resolution are exposed. Before, the electrostatics study for the prototype is reviewed. The temporary balance of already carried out tests is made [fr

  20. Study on a drift chamber for high energy experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puget, Maria Augusta Constante

    1993-01-01

    This work deals with the studies of a multiwire gaseous detector operating as a drift chamber, which will be part of the SELEX spectrometer of the experiment Fermilab E781. A prototype was designed to be built and tested at IFUSP. Results are shown of the analysis of data taken with another similar detector whose construction and test were done at Fermilab, with the aim of studying its characterization and performance. (author)

  1. Results from the large scale in situ drift sealing experiment in the salt mine Sondershausen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitz, P.; Koch, G. [Freiberg Univ. of Mining an Technology, Institute of Mining Engineering (Germany); Gruner, M. [Wilsnack and Partners Freiberg / Saxony (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of the research, which is supported by the Federal Ministry for Education and Research (Bundesministerium fur Bildung und Forschung) and the state of Thuringia from 1997 to 2003, are long term stable drift sealing systems for underground waste disposals. As a result of the material selection for the sealing element bricks from a mixture of bentonite and quartz-sand were produced. The static abutment was built with natural salt bricks. A real drift sealing system was built in the former potash mine Sondershausen in a depth of 700 m and then tested under a fluid pressure up to 80 bar with saturated salt-brine. The functionality of the bentonite sealing element was proved successfully. Since 1998 some 500 t of such bentonite blocks with sand have been produced and built-in in underground sealing elements in salt mines. (authors)

  2. Mechanical degradation of Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain - A Modeling Case Study. Part I: Nonlithophysal Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Lin; D. Kicker; B. Damjanac; M. Board; M. Karakouzian

    2006-01-01

    This paper outlines rock mechanics investigations associated with mechanical degradation of planned emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, which is the designated site for the proposed U.S. high-level nuclear waste repository. The factors leading to drift degradation include stresses from the overburden, stresses induced by the heat released from the emplaced waste, stresses due to seismically related ground motions, and time-dependent strength degradation. The welded tuff emplacement horizon consists of two groups of rock with distinct engineering properties: nonlithophysal units and lithophysal units, based on the relative proportion of lithophysal cavities. The term 'lithophysal' refers to hollow, bubble like cavities in volcanic rock that are surrounded by a porous rim formed by fine-grained alkali feldspar, quartz, and other minerals. Lithophysae are typically a few centimeters to a few decimeters in diameter. Part I of the paper concentrates on the generally hard, strong, and fractured nonlithophysal rock. The degradation behavior of the tunnels in the nonlithophysal rock is controlled by the occurrence of keyblocks. A statistically equivalent fracture model was generated based on extensive underground fracture mapping data from the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Three-dimensional distinct block analyses, generated with the fracture patterns randomly selected from the fracture model, were developed with the consideration of in situ, thermal, and seismic loads. In this study, field data, laboratory data, and numerical analyses are well integrated to provide a solution for the unique problem of modeling drift degradation

  3. Barber's Point, Oahu, Hawaii Drift Card Study 2002-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drift cards were be released from Barber's Point, Oahu, approximately once a month during the two year span to get an idea of the distribution of card drift under...

  4. In situ DRIFTS investigation of NH3-SCR reaction over CeO2/zirconium phosphate catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiulin; Fan, Jie; Ning, Ping; Song, Zhongxian; Liu, Xin; Wang, Lanying; Wang, Jing; Wang, Huimin; Long, Kaixian

    2018-03-01

    A series of ceria modified zirconium phosphate catalysts were synthesized for selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia (NH3-SCR). Over 98% NOx conversion and 98% N2 selectivity were obtained by the CeO2/ZrP catalyst with 20 wt.% CeO2 loading at 250-425 °C. The interaction between CeO2 and zirconium phosphate enhanced the redox abilities and surface acidities of the catalysts, resulting in the improvement of NH3-SCR activity. The in situ DRIFTS results indicated that the NH3-SCR reaction over the catalysts followed both Eley-Rideal and Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanisms. The amide (sbnd NH2) groups and the NH4+ bonded to Brønsted acid sites were the important intermediates of Eley-Rideal mechanism.

  5. Silicon drift-chamber studies for possible use at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humanic, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    It is proposed to continue the program now underway at the University of Pittsburgh to study the feasibility of using silicon drift-chambers as particle tracking devices at RHIC. We are currently testing a UA6-type detector obtained from BNL and plan to also study a new device that will become available this year: a cylindrical geometry detector designed for NA45 (CERN). In addition we propose to fabricate and study a detector to be used in vertex determination for the RHIC OASIS experiment. The two-year budget for this proposal is $246.962. 5 refs., 12 figs

  6. Silicon drift-chamber studies for possible use at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humanic, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    It is proposed to continue the program now underway at the University of Pittsburgh to study the feasibility of using silicon drift-chambers as particle tracking devices at RHIC. We are currently testing a UA6-type detector obtained from BNL, and propose to also study a new device that will become available this year: a cylindrical geometry detector design for NA45 (CERN). This new detector will be produced at BNL and the MPI-Institute in Munich and will incorporate updated techniques which should result in a reliable device with improved performance over the UA6-type detector. The one-year budget for this proposal is $50,079. 28 refs., 2 figs

  7. Studies of drift waves in a toroidal heliac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, X.H.; Blackwell, B.D.; Hamberger, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Low frequency, coherent density fluctuations have been studied for three typical magnetic configurations in the helical axis stellarator SHEILA using Langmuir probe techniques. The parametric dependence, the threshold magnetic field, the frequency spectrum and the spatial structure of the fluctuations are measured experimentally. Mode analyses are made in a magnetic coordinate system. Both the mode numbers thus obtained and the smallness of the directly measured values of the wavenumber along the magnetic field lines indicate a close correspondence between the helicity of the fluctuations and the field lines. These experimental results are consistent with a collisional drift wave model, derived from a linearized two-fluid theory, related to the heliac geometry. Density reduction associated with the fluctuations is clearly observed and is consistent with rough estimates of the cross-filed particle flux due to the fluctuations. 17 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab

  8. The Study of Westward Drift in the Main Geomagnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Bayanjargal, G.

    2013-01-01

    We have obtained a solution for the velocity of westward drift from the induction equation in which an approach for main geomagnetic field was built. Distribution functions B(r, t) entered into the induction equation have been built by the observatories' data in North America and the Europe from 1991 to 2006. The longitudinal −0.123 degree/year and latitudinal 0.068 degree/year drifts were defined in North America. And the longitudinal −0.257 degree/year drift was defined in Europe from 1991...

  9. Studies of dynamics of electron clouds in STAR silicon drift detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bellwied, R; Brandon, N; Caines, H; Chen, W; Dimassimo, D; Dyke, H; Hall, J R; Hardtke, D; Hoffmann, G W; Humanic, T J; Kotova, A I; Kotov, I V; Kraner, H W; Li, Z; Lynn, D; Middelkamp, P; Ott, G; Pandey, S U; Pruneau, C A; Rykov, V L; Schambach, J; Sedlmeir, J; Sugarbaker, E R; Takahashi, J; Wilson, W K

    2000-01-01

    The dynamics of electrons generated in silicon drift detectors was studied using an IR LED. Electrons were generated at different drift distances. In this way, the evolution of the cloud as a function of drift time was measured. Two methods were used to measure the cloud size. The method of cumulative functions was used to extract the electron cloud profiles. Another method obtains the cloud width from measurements of the charge collected on a single anode as a function of coordinate of the light spot. The evolution of the electron cloud width with drift time is compared with theoretical calculations. Experimental results agreed with theoretical expectations.

  10. Studies of electron drift velocity in nitrogen and isobutane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC/SP), SP (Brazil); Vivaldini, Tulio C.; Lima, Iara B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept. de fisica. Lab. de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas

    2009-07-01

    Full text: The electron drift velocity is one of the most important transport parameters used to describe the physical behaviour of gas discharges and the development of avalanches in gaseous detectors, mainly when temporal information is significant, as in drift chambers and in the recent Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). Although many filling gases, isobutane is frequently used in RPCs, due to its excellent timing properties, but at high electric fields conditions there are insufficient data available in literature. In the present work we report the preliminary results related to the dependence of the electron drift velocity for isobutane as function of the reduced electric field E/N, in the range of 100 Td up to 216 Td. There are different methods to determine electron drift velocity in a gas, and our measurements were based on the Pulsed Townsend technique, which consists of extracting electrons from a metallic cathode and accelerates them toward the anode by a uniform electric field. Once the drift distance and the transit time are known, the drift velocities can be determined. In our system, the incidence of a nitrogen laser beam (LTB MNL200-LD) liberates electron from the cathode made of aluminium (40mm diameter). By means of a high voltage supply (Bertan, 225-30), these electrons are accelerated toward the anode (made of a high resistivity glass - 2:10{sup 12}{omega} cm) and this movement produces a fast electric signal in the anode, which is digitalized in an oscilloscope (LeCroy WavePro 7000) with 1 GHz bandwidth and 10 GS/s. The values obtained were compared to that ones of a Bolsig+ simulation code. In order to validate the technique and to analyze non-uniformity effects, results for nitrogen are also presented. (author)

  11. Studies of electron drift velocity in nitrogen and isobutane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B.; Vivaldini, Tulio C.; Lima, Iara B.; Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R.; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The electron drift velocity is one of the most important transport parameters used to describe the physical behaviour of gas discharges and the development of avalanches in gaseous detectors, mainly when temporal information is significant, as in drift chambers and in the recent Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). Although many filling gases, isobutane is frequently used in RPCs, due to its excellent timing properties, but at high electric fields conditions there are insufficient data available in literature. In the present work we report the preliminary results related to the dependence of the electron drift velocity for isobutane as function of the reduced electric field E/N, in the range of 100 Td up to 216 Td. There are different methods to determine electron drift velocity in a gas, and our measurements were based on the Pulsed Townsend technique, which consists of extracting electrons from a metallic cathode and accelerates them toward the anode by a uniform electric field. Once the drift distance and the transit time are known, the drift velocities can be determined. In our system, the incidence of a nitrogen laser beam (LTB MNL200-LD) liberates electron from the cathode made of aluminium (40mm diameter). By means of a high voltage supply (Bertan, 225-30), these electrons are accelerated toward the anode (made of a high resistivity glass - 2:10 12 Ω cm) and this movement produces a fast electric signal in the anode, which is digitalized in an oscilloscope (LeCroy WavePro 7000) with 1 GHz bandwidth and 10 GS/s. The values obtained were compared to that ones of a Bolsig+ simulation code. In order to validate the technique and to analyze non-uniformity effects, results for nitrogen are also presented. (author)

  12. Cooling tower drift: experiment design for comprehensive case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laulainen, N.S.

    1978-01-01

    A drift experiment program to develop a data base which can be used for validation of drift deposition models has been formulated. The first field effort is designed for a suitable mechanical-draft cooling tower to be selected after site visits have been conducted. The discussion here demonstrates the importance of characterizing the droplet size spectrum emitted from the tower and to accurately account for droplet evaporation, because the downwind droplet deposition patterns and near-surface airborne concentrations are extremely sensitive to these parameters

  13. The Cascade Drift Module: a GIS-based study on regional pesticide deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holterman, H.J.; Zande, van de J.C.

    2008-01-01

    The Cascade Project describes the modelling of spray drift and pesticide fate for a network of interconnected water bodies in a rural area. The present study concerns the first part of the proj ect, the Cascade Drift Module, which models the spatial and temporal distribution of deposits of spray

  14. Dendrogeomorphology - a new tool to study drift-sand dynamics Netherlands Journal of Geosciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouden, den J.; Sass-Klaassen, U.; Copini, P.

    2007-01-01

    dendrogeomorphological approach is presented, using wood characteristics of native oak (Quercus robur L.) to infer dynamics of aeolian sediment transport in drift-sand areas. Wood samples, taken from oaks in two drift-sand areas, were analysed to study changes in tree-ring pattern and wood anatomy

  15. Stokes drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bremer, T. S.; Breivik, Ø.

    2017-12-01

    During its periodic motion, a particle floating at the free surface of a water wave experiences a net drift velocity in the direction of wave propagation, known as the Stokes drift (Stokes 1847 Trans. Camb. Philos. Soc. 8, 441-455). More generally, the Stokes drift velocity is the difference between the average Lagrangian flow velocity of a fluid parcel and the average Eulerian flow velocity of the fluid. This paper reviews progress in fundamental and applied research on the induced mean flow associated with surface gravity waves since the first description of the Stokes drift, now 170 years ago. After briefly reviewing the fundamental physical processes, most of which have been established for decades, the review addresses progress in laboratory and field observations of the Stokes drift. Despite more than a century of experimental studies, laboratory studies of the mean circulation set up by waves in a laboratory flume remain somewhat contentious. In the field, rapid advances are expected due to increasingly small and cheap sensors and transmitters, making widespread use of small surface-following drifters possible. We also discuss remote sensing of the Stokes drift from high-frequency radar. Finally, the paper discusses the three main areas of application of the Stokes drift: in the coastal zone, in Eulerian models of the upper ocean layer and in the modelling of tracer transport, such as oil and plastic pollution. Future climate models will probably involve full coupling of ocean and atmosphere systems, in which the wave model provides consistent forcing on the ocean surface boundary layer. Together with the advent of new space-borne instruments that can measure surface Stokes drift, such models hold the promise of quantifying the impact of wave effects on the global atmosphere-ocean system and hopefully contribute to improved climate projections. This article is part of the theme issue 'Nonlinear water waves'.

  16. An Experimental Study of the Accuracy of Compensation in Lithium Drifted Germanium Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauber, A; Malmsten, B

    1969-10-15

    The nature and magnitude of the space charge existing in the compensated layer of lithium drifted germanium detectors has been studied as a function of drifted depth and of the electric field applied during drift. Experimental values were obtained from the dependence of detector capacitance on applied bias. In most cases there was a linear space charge gradient in the compensated layer. When small electric fields were applied to deep compensated layers, the space charge became constant throughout a large part of the compensated layer. There is some evidence for a strong decrease of mobile carrier recombination lifetime with increasing drifted depth, possibly down to a few microseconds for drifted depths of the order of 7 mm. The experimental results of the investigation are to a large extent in good agreement with theory.

  17. Silicon drift chamber studies for the RHIC STAR experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humanic, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    The two-hit resolution of a silicon drift chamber is measured using a pulsed Nd:Yag laser and a time digitizer readout. The data is analyzed by forming the covariance matrix in time samples, and transforming to a matrix in amplitude and time variation of each of the two hits. The resolution of the two-hit separation is found to be better than 25 microns with a drift field of 530 V/cm and a separation of more than 500 microns, with the resolution increasing to 50 microns as the separation nears 500 microns. Results are also presented for multiply ionizing tracks, showing a great improvement over single minimum ionizing. 8 refs

  18. Cooling tower drift studies at the Paducah, Kentucky Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, F.G.; Hanna, S.R.; Parr, P.D.

    1979-01-01

    The transfer and fate of chromium from cooling tower drift to terrestrial ecosystems were quantified at the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment facility at Paducah, Kentucky. Chromium concentrations in plant materials (fescue grass) decreased with increasing distance from the cooing tower, ranging from 251 +- 19 ppM at 15 meters to 0.52 +- 0.07 ppM at 1500 meters. The site of drift contamination, size characteristics, and elemental content of drift particles were determined using a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray analysis capabilities. Results indicate that elemental content in drift water (mineral residue) may not be equivalent to the content in the recirculating cooling water of the tower. This hypothesis is contrary to basic assumptions in calculating drift emissions. A laboratory study simulating throughfall from 1 to 6 inches of rain suggested that there are more exchange sites associated with litter than live foliage. Leachate from each one inch throughfall simulant removed 3% of the drift mass from litter compared to 7 to 9% from live foliage. Results suggest that differences in retention are related to chemical properties of the drift rather than physical lodging of the particle residue. To determine the potential for movement of drift-derived chromium to surface streams, soil--water samplers (wells) were placed along a distance gradient to Little Bayou Creek. Samples from two depths following rainstorms revealed the absence of vertical or horizontal movement with maximum concentrations of 0.13 ppb at 50 meters from the tower. Preliminary model estimates of drift deposition are compared to depositionmeasurements. Isopleths of the predicted deposition are useful to identify areas of maximum drift transport in the environs of the gaseous diffusion plant

  19. Drift Scale Modeling: Study of Unsaturated Flow into a Drift Using a Stochastic Continuum Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkholzer, J.T.; Tsang, C.F.; Tsang, Y.W.; Wang, J.S

    1996-01-01

    Unsaturated flow in heterogeneous fractured porous rock was simulated using a stochastic continuum model (SCM). In this model, both the more conductive fractures and the less permeable matrix are generated within the framework of a single continuum stochastic approach, based on non-parametric indicator statistics. High-permeable fracture zones are distinguished from low-permeable matrix zones in that they have assigned a long range correlation structure in prescribed directions. The SCM was applied to study small-scale flow in the vicinity of an access tunnel, which is currently being drilled in the unsaturated fractured tuff formations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Extensive underground testing is underway in this tunnel to investigate the suitability of Yucca Mountain as an underground nuclear waste repository. Different flow scenarios were studied in the present paper, considering the flow conditions before and after the tunnel emplacement, and assuming steady-state net infiltration as well as episodic pulse infiltration. Although the capability of the stochastic continuum model has not yet been fully explored, it has been demonstrated that the SCM is a good alternative model feasible of describing heterogeneous flow processes in unsaturated fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain

  20. Simulation study of time-walk issues for drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Yuzo; Itoh, Setsuo; Mori, Shigeki; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Tanaka, Manobu.

    1991-01-01

    Time walk is evaluated for a drift tube of 2.9 cm in diameter filled with P10 gas, with an anode wire of 70 μm in diameter. Its magnitude, if the shaping is of Poisson type and a leading-edge discriminator is used, is found to be 2-10 ns when 50 % gain variation is allowed in the gas multiplication. On the other hand, the use of a constant fraction timing discriminator is expected to reduce this to the order of 0.1 ns. (author)

  1. Study of drift tube resolution using numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundin, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    The results off a simulation of straw tube detector response are presented. These gas ionization detectors and the electronics which must presumably go along with them are characterized in a simple but meaningful manner. The physical processes which comprise the response of the individual straw tubes are broken down and examined in detail. Different parameters of the simulation are varied and resulting predictions of drift tube spatial resolution are shown. In addition, small aspects of the predictions are compared to recent laboratory results, which can be seen as a measure of the simulation's usefulness. 10 refs., 8 figs

  2. Drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Yosuke

    1977-01-01

    Drift chamber is becoming an important detector in high energy physics as a precision and fast position detector because of its high spatial resolution and count-rate. The basic principle is that it utilizes the drift at constant speed of electrons ionized along the tracks of charged particles towards the anode wire in the nearly uniform electric field. The method of measuring drift time includes the analog and digital ones. This report describes about the construction of and the application of electric field to the drift chamber, mathematical analysis on the electric field and equipotential curve, derivation of spatial resolution and the factor for its determination, and selection of gas to be used. The performance test of the chamber was carried out using a small test chamber, the collimated β source of Sr-90, and 500 MeV/C electron beam from the 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron in the Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. Most chambers to date adopted one dimensional read-out, but it is very advantageous if the two dimensional read-out is feasible with one chamber when the resolution in that direction is low. The typical methods of delay line and charge division for two dimensional read-out are described. The development of digital read-out system is underway, which can process the signal of a large scale drift chamber at high speed. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  3. Drift study of SU8 cantilevers in liquid and gaseous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenje, Maria; Keller, Stephan; Dohn, Søren; Davis, Zachary J; Boisen, Anja

    2010-05-01

    We present a study of the drift, in terms of cantilever deflections without probe/target interactions, of polymeric SU8 cantilevers. The drift is measured in PBS buffer (pH 7.4) and under vacuum (1mbar) conditions. We see that the cantilevers display a large drift in both environments. We believe this is because the polymer matrix absorbs liquid in one situation whereas it is being degassed in the other. An inhomogeneous expansion/contraction of the cantilever is seen because one surface of the cantilever may still have remains of the release layer from the fabrication. To further study the effect, we coat the cantilevers with a hydrophobic coating, perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (FDTS). Fully encapsulating the SU8 cantilever greatly reduces the drift in liquid whereas a less significant change is seen in vacuum.

  4. Drift study of SU8 cantilevers in liquid and gaseous environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tenje, Maria; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Dohn, Søren

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of the drift, in terms of cantilever deflections without probe/target interactions, of polymeric SU8 cantilevers. The drift is measured in PBS buffer (pH 7.4) and under vacuum (1 mbar) conditions. We see that the cantilevers display a large drift in both environments. We believe...... coat the cantilevers with a hydrophobic coating, perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (FDTS). Fully encapsulating the SU8 cantilever greatly reduces the drift in liquid whereas a less significant change is seen in vacuum....... this is because the polymer matrix absorbs liquid in one situation whereas it is being degassed in the other. An inhomogeneous expansion/contraction of the cantilever is seen because one surface of the cantilever may still have remains of the release layer from the fabrication. To further study the effect, we...

  5. Geotechnical characterization for the Main Drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kicker, D.C.; Martin, E.R.; Brechtel, C.E.; Stone, C.A.; Kessel, D.S.

    1997-07-01

    Geotechnical characterization of the Main Drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility was based on borehole data collected in site characterization drilling and on scanline rock mass quality data collected during the excavation of the North Ramp. The Main Drift is the planned 3,131-m near-horizontal tunnel to be excavated at the potential repository horizon for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Main Drift borehole data consisted of three holes--USW SD-7, SD-9, and SD-12--drilled along the tunnel alignment. In addition, boreholes USW UZ-14, NRG-6, and NRG-7/7A were used to supplement the database on subsurface rock conditions. Specific data summarized and presented included lithologic and rock structure core logs, rock mechanics laboratory testing, and rock mass quality indices. Cross sections with stratigraphic and thermal-mechanical units were also presented. Topics discussed in the report include geologic setting, geologic features of engineering and construction significance, anticipated ground conditions, and the range of required ground support. Rock structural and rock mass quality data have been developed for each 3-m interval of core in the middle nonlithophysal stratigraphic zone of the Topopah Spring Tuff Formation. The distribution of the rock mass quality data in all boreholes used to characterize the Main Drift was assumed to be representative of the variability of the rock mass conditions to be encountered in the Main Drift. Observations in the North Ramp tunnel have been used to project conditions in the lower lithophysal zone and in fault zones

  6. An analytic study of the perpendicularly propagating electromagnetic drift instabilities in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yansong; Kulsrud, Russell; Ji, Hantao

    2008-01-01

    A local linear theory is proposed for a perpendicularly propagating drift instability driven by relative drifts between electrons and ions. The theory takes into account local cross-field current, pressure gradients, and modest collisions as in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment [M. Yamada et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 1936 (1997)]. The unstable waves have very small group velocities in the direction of the pressure gradient, but have a large phase velocity near the relative drift velocity between electrons and ions in the direction of the cross-field current. By taking into account the electron-ion collisions and applying the theory in the Harris sheet, we establish that this instability could be excited near the center of the Harris sheet and have enough e-foldings to grow to large amplitude before it propagates out of the unstable region. Comparing with the other magnetic reconnection related instabilities (lower-hybrid-drift instability, modified two-stream instability, etc.) studied previously, we believe the instability we found is a favorable candidate to produce anomalous resistivity because of its unique wave characteristics, such as electromagnetic component, large phase velocity, and small group velocity in the cross-current-layer direction.

  7. Experimental study on the thermal performance of a mechanical cooling tower with different drift eliminators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, M.; Martinez, P.J.; Viedma, A.

    2009-01-01

    Cooling towers are equipment devices commonly used to dissipate heat from power generation units, water-cooled refrigeration, air conditioning and industrial processes. Water drift emitted from cooling towers is objectionable for several reasons, mainly due to human health hazards. It is common practice to fit drift eliminators to cooling towers in order to minimize water loss from the system. It is foreseeable that the characteristics of the installed drift eliminators, like their pressure drop, affect the thermal performance of the cooling tower. However, no references regarding this fact have been found in the reviewed bibliography. This paper studies the thermal performance of a forced draft counter-flow wet cooling tower fitted with different drift eliminators for a wide range of air and water mass flow rates. The data registered in the experimental set-up were employed to obtain correlations of the tower characteristic, which defines the cooling tower's thermal performance. The outlet water temperature predicted by these correlations was compared with the experimentally registered values obtaining a maximum difference of ±3%

  8. Studies on the drift properties and spatial resolution using a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R&D studies on the performance as well as on the gas properties of the. microMEGAS-based time ... ies present a new challenge to develop the technology and prove the feasibility of achieving a ... micro-mesh structure with 50 µm gap.

  9. A DRIFTS study of the partial oxidation of ethanol on Rh catalysts; Estudo da oxidacao parcial do etanol em catalisadores de Rh por DRIFTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Raquel Lima; Passos, Fabio Barboza, E-mail: fbpassos@vm.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Quimica e de Petroleo

    2013-09-01

    The partial oxidation of ethanol on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2} and Ce{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} supported rhodium catalysts was investigated by Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The catalysts were characterized by temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and cyclohexane dehydrogenation. DRIFTS studies on the partial oxidation of ethanol showed that ethanol is adsorbed dissociatively, through O-H bond breaking, with the formation of ethoxy species, followed by successive dehydrogenation to acetaldehyde and acetyl species. Further oxidation to acetate and carbonate species lead to the formation of CO, CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2} by decomposition. The presence of CeO{sub 2} in the catalysts favored the oxidation steps due to its oxygen storage capacity. (author)

  10. Rectangular drift tube characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, D.S.; Musienko, Yu.V.

    1985-01-01

    Results on the study of the characteristics of a 50 x 100 mm aluminium drift tube are presented. The tube was filled with argon-methane and argon-isobutane mixtures. With 16 per cent methane concentration the largest deviation from a linear relation between the drift time and the drift path over 50 mm is less than 2 mm. The tube filled with argon-isobutane mixture is capable of operating in a limited streamer mode

  11. Studies of Helium Based Gas Mixtures Using a Small Cell Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heise, Jaret; British Columbia U.

    2006-01-01

    An international collaboration is currently working on the construction and design of an asymmetric B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center that will be ready to collect data in 1999. The main physics motivation for such a facility is to test the description and mechanism of CP violation in the Standard Model of particle physics and provide insight into the question of why more matter than antimatter is observed in the universe today. In particular, this experiment will measure CP violation in the decay of B mesons. In the early stages of this effort, the Canadian contingent proposed to build the central tracking chamber for the BABAR detector. Presently, a prototype drift chamber is in operation and studies are being performed to test some of the unique features of drift chamber design dictated by the conditions of the experiment. Using cosmic muons, it is possible to study tracking and pattern recognition in the prototype chamber, and therefore calculate the efficiency and spatial resolution of the prototype chamber cells. These performance features will be used to test whether or not the helium-based gas mixtures proposed for the BABAR drift chamber are a viable alternative to the more traditional argon-based gases

  12. Study on the snow drifting modelling criteria in boundary layer wind tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta BĂETU

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study on modelling the wind drifting of the snow deposited on the flat roofs of buildings in wind tunnel. The physical model of snow drifting in wind tunnel simulating the urban exposure to wind action is not frequently reported in literature, but is justified by the serious damages under accidental important snow falls combined with strong wind actions on the roofs of various buildings. A uniform layer of snow deposited on the flat roof was exposed to wind action in order to obtain the drifting. The parameters involved in the modelling at reduced scale, with particles of glass beads, of the phenomenon of transportation of the snow from the roof were analysed, particularly the roughness length and the friction wind speed. A numerical simulation in ANSYS CFX program was developed in parallel, by which a more accurate visualization of the particularities of the wind flow over the roof was possible, in the specific areas where the phenomenon of snow transportation was more susceptible to occur. Modified roughness length and friction wind speed were determined through methods used in the literature, an attempt being made in this work to analyse the factors that influence their values.

  13. An Analytic Study of the Perpendicularly Propagating Electromagnetic Drift Instabilities in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Kulsrud, R.; Ji, H.

    2008-01-01

    A local linear theory is proposed for a perpendicularly propagating drift instability driven by relative drifts between electrons and ions. The theory takes into account local cross-field current, pressure gradients and modest collisions as in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) (10). The unstable waves have very small group velocities in the direction of the pressure gradient, but have a large phase velocity near the relative drift velocity between electrons and ions in the direction of cross-field current. By taking into account the electron-ion collisions and applying the theory in the Harris sheet, we establish that this instability could be excited near the center of the Harris sheet and have enough efoldings to grow to large amplitude before it propagates out of the unstable region. Comparing with the other magnetic reconnection related instabilities (LHDI, MTSI et.) studied previously, we believe the instability we find is a favorable candidate to produce anomalous resistivity because of its unique wave characteristics, such as electromagnetic component, large phase velocity, and small group velocity in the cross current layer direction

  14. Water-gas shift. An examination of Pt promoted MgO and tetragonal and monoclinic ZrO2 by in situ drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenu, Emilie; Jacobs, Gary; Crawford, Adam C.; Keogh, Robert A.; Patterson, Patricia M.; Sparks, Dennis E.; Davis, Burtron H.

    2005-01-01

    In situ DRIFTS measurements on unpromoted and Pt promoted MgO and ZrO 2 (both tetragonal and monoclinic) indicate that at high H 2 O/CO ratios, where the reaction rate has been reported to be zero order in H 2 O and first order in CO, the mechanism involved in the catalysis of water-gas shift is likely a surface formate mechanism, in agreement with Shido and Iwasawa. Pt was found to catalyze the removal of surface carbonates and to facilitate the generation of active OH groups relative to the unpromoted catalyst. Comparison with Pt/ceria revealed that the OH groups involved in the catalysis of magnesia and zirconia may be those of the bridging variety which occur at defect sites. That is, water dissociated over vacancies to produce bridging OH groups, as observed by infrared spectroscopy. The existence of such an adsorbed species is implied in the zero reaction order for water, where kinetics suggests that the surface should be saturated by an adsorbed water species. The lower extent of vacancy formation for magnesia and zirconia-based materials in comparison with ceria could explain a lower surface population of active bridging OH groups. CO was used as a probe molecule of the reduced centers, as it reacts with bridging OH groups to generate surface formates, a proposed WGS intermediate, and the decomposition of which is proposed to be the rate-limiting step. The trends in formate intensity by CO adsorption and CO conversion in WGS catalytic testing both followed the order: Pt/ceria>Pt/m-zirconia>Pt/t-zirconia>Pt/magnesia. In all cases, a normal kinetic isotope effect was observed in switching from H 2 O to D 2 O, consistent with a link between the rate-limiting step and the decomposition of surface formates, as noted previously by Shido and Iwasawa for Rh/ceria, MgO, and ZnO

  15. High-speed and supersonic upward plasma drifts: multi-instrumental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafyeva, E.; Zakharenkova, I.; Hairston, M. R.; Huba, J.; Coley, W. R.

    2017-12-01

    Since the pioneering observations by Aggson et al. (1992, JGR, doi: 10.1002/92JA00644), there have been several reports of the occurrence of high-speed (Vz>800 m/s) and supersonic plasma flows in the post-sunset (e.g., Hysell et al., 1994, JGR, doi: 10.1029/94JA00476; Hanson et al., 1997, JGR, doi: 10.1029/96JA03376) and the pre-dawn sector (Astafyeva and Zakharenkova, 2015, GRL, doi:10.1002/2015GL066369). However, despite this observational evidence, these events remain rare and are not well understood. The main issue is to determine the background conditions leading to the occurrence of these high-speed plasma drifts. In this work, we perform a multi-instrumental study of high-speed and supersonic upward plasma drift events/structures. For this purpose, we analyze data from several ground-based and space-borne instruments, including data from the DMSP, Swarm and C/NOFS (IVM instrument) satellites. In addition to the space-borne instruments, we use data from ground-based GPS-receivers and ionosondes to further investigate the background ionosphere conditions, as well as the effects produced by the plasma bubbles and ionospheric irregularities. Besides the observations, we add the SAMI3/ESF modeling results on plasma bubble simulations and high-speed drifts inside plasma bubbles. TIE-GCM runs (from the CCMC, https://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov) are used to define the background atmospheric/ionospheric and electrodynamical conditions leading to the occurrence of the high-speed and supersonic plasma drift events. Our search of events with upward plasma drift exceeding 800 m/s in the data of DMSP for the years 2002-2016 shows that such high-speed events are extremely rare. During this period of time, only 6 events were found, two of them occurred during the recovery phase of a geomagnetic storm, while the other four were detected during geomagnetically quiet conditions. Concerning the generation of such events, our preliminary results show that enhanced electric fields are

  16. Geology of the ECRB Cross Drift-Exploratory Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain Project, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE

    1999-01-01

    The Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block Cross Drift (Cross Drift) excavated at Yucca Mountain is being studied to determine its suitability as a permanent high-level nuclear waste repository. This report presents a summary of data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) personnel on behalf of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the Department of Energy in the Cross Drift from Sta. 00+00 to 26+64. This report includes descriptions of lithostratigraphic units, an analysis of data from full-periphery geologic maps (FPGM) and detailed line survey (DLS) data, a detailed description of the Solitario Canyon Fault zone (SCFZ), and an analysis of geotechnical and engineering characteristics. The Cross Drift is excavated entirely within the Topopah Spring Tuff formation of the Paintbrush Group. Units exposed in the crystal-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff, include the Topopah Spring crystal-poor upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul) (Sta. 0+00 to 10+15), the Topopah Spring crystal-poor middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn) (Sta. 10+15 to 14+44), the Topopah Spring crystal-poor lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll) (Sta. 14+44 to 23+26), and the Topopah Spring crystal-poor lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln) (Sta. 23+26 to 25+85). The lower portion of the Topopah Spring crystal-rich lithophysal transition subzone (Tptrl1) is exposed on the west side of the Solitario Canyon fault from Sta. 26+57.5 to 26+64. Lithologically, the units exposed in the Cross Drift are similar in comparable stratigraphic intervals of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), particularly in terms of welding, secondary crystallization, fracturing, and type, size, color, and abundance of pumice and lithic clasts. The most notable difference is the lack of the intensely fractured zone (IFZ) in the Cross Drift. The as-built cross section and the pre-construction cross section compare favorably. Lithostratigraphic contacts and structures on the pre-construction cross section were

  17. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwayne C. Kicker

    2001-09-28

    analyzed is relatively minor. (3) The analysis of thermal and time-dependent effects on rock fall in this study is based on a reduction in the joint cohesion. Joint cohesion has been conservatively reduced from a laboratory test value of 0.86 MPa to a value of 0.01 MPa after 10,000 years. The results from this analysis indicate that time-dependent and thermal effects have a minor impact on rock fall. (4) Both the 75 percentile and the worst-case drift degradation profiles have been provided in this analysis for the current emplacement drift azimuth of approximately 75{sup o}. Most of the emplacement drift openings were not affected by rock fall. For the current emplacement drift alignment, the highest percentage of drift affected by rock fall was 8% in the Tptpmn unit. The Tptpmn unit produced the highest frequency of key blocks per kilometer compared to the other lithologic units (Tables 26 and 41). (5) This key block analysis has shown that the current drift alignment is relatively favorable in terms of reducing the potential maximum size rock block compared to most drift orientations.

  18. [Study of spectrum drifting of primary colors and its impact on color rendering properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Xiao-dong

    2012-08-01

    LEDs are currently used widely to display text, graphics and images in large screens. With red, green and blue LEDs as three primary colors, color rendition will be realized through color mixing. However, LEDs' spectrum will produce drifts with the changes in the temperature environment. With the changes in the driving current simulating changes in the temperature, the three primary color LEDs' spectral drifts were tested, and the drift characteristics of the three primary colors were obtained respectively. Based on the typical characteristics of the LEDs and the differences between LEDs with different colors in composition and molecular structure, the paper analyzed the reason for the spectrum drifts and the drift characteristics of different color LEDs, and proposed the equations of spectrum drifts. Putting the experimental data into the spectrum drift equations, the paper analyzed the impacts of primary colors on the mixed color, pointed out a way to reduce the chromatic aberration, and provided the theory for engineering application of color LEDs.

  19. Multiline digital radiographic imager study with synchronization to detector gas ion drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyret, O.

    1985-01-01

    This direct digital radiographic imager is based on X-ray detection in high pressure rare gas ionization chamber. This linear multidetector, from which scanning radiography is realized, records many lines together. Spatial resolution performance in scanning direction are made sure by scanning synchronization with ion drift in detector. After a physical study and a potential evaluation of its performances on mock-up, a 128 cell prototype has been realized. The first images give validation and limits of such a radiographic process [fr

  20. Studies on the detection characteristics of the OPERA drift tube spectrometer; Studien zu den Nachweiseigenschaften des OPERA-Driftroehrenspektrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldorf, Christian

    2009-07-15

    Within the framework of this diploma thesis the density dependent detection characteristics of the OPERA Precision Tracker are studied at a test set up with two drift tube modules. Measurements of gain, hit efficiency, spatial resolution and time-to-distance relation are presented depending on the density, anode voltage and discriminator thresholds. At a constant anode voltage the gain falls with increasing density. Therefore the hit efficiency and the spatial resolution decrease with increasing density above 1,70 kg/m{sup 3}. Within the temperature-fluctuations of 6 K inside the LNGS, an uncertainty of the spatial resolution up to 75 {mu}m is found. Within these temperature-fluctuations the upper limit for the variation of the drift distance at a drift time of 1200 ns is about 220 {mu}m. Both effects are tolerable for the spatial resolution of the OPERA Drift Tubes. (orig.)

  1. Study on collapse mechanism of junction between greatly deeper shaft and horizontal drifts (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Yukio; Yamachi, Hiroshi; Katsunuma, Yoshio; Nakata, Masao; Kuwahara, Hideki; Yamada, Fumitaka; Matsushita, Kiyoshi; Sato, Toshinori

    2008-03-01

    The Mizunami underground research laboratory is planned to consist of greatly deeper shaft and horizontal drifts. A junction space between a greatly deeper shaft and horizontal drifts forms which would take a complicated mechanical behavior during a junction excavation. However, a quantitative design method of supporting measures for a deep junction has not yet been established. This is because a conventional shaft design has been conducted based on past experience. Detail records have not been left either in what kind of collapses and deformed phenomena occurring in shaft constructions in a past. In order to examine a collapse mechanism of greatly deeper shaft junction, we have conducted literature surveys and interview studies concerned with deep shaft construction works in a past, and investigated what collapses or difficulties had been occurred in deep shaft junctions. Considering the results of investigations with reviews of intellectuals, a collapse mechanism of a super deep shaft junction depends on both a construction procedure of shaft junction and a geological condition at great depth. During a construction of a shaft junction, stress state of rock masses near junction wall would take a complicated stress path. Especially, it should be necessary to take a most careful consideration on that tangential stress acted around a shaft wall may reduce during horizontal drift excavation. On the other hand, where greatly deeper junction intersects faults and/or fractures with a large angle, a collapse called 'Take-nuke' may occur or extraordinary earth pressure acts on a concrete wall. This is the most typical difficulties during shaft construction. In order to recognize a mechanism of these phenomena and to find out a cause of collapse generation, numerical studies that can simulate a practical rock mass behavior around a shaft junction should be carry out. We demonstrate the finite difference method is most adequate for these simulations with intellectual review

  2. Evaluating the effects of herbicide drift on nontarget terrestrial plants: A case study with mesotrione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain, Richard A; Perine, Jeff; Cooke, Catriona; Ellis, Clare Butler; Harrington, Paul; Lane, Andrew; O'Sullivan, Christine; Ledson, Mark

    2017-09-01

    Nature of exposure is a fundamental driver in nontarget terrestrial plant risk assessment for pesticides; consequently a novel study was designed to generate field-based drift exposure and evaluate corresponding biological effects of the herbicide mesotrione. The approach used a combination of US guideline drift reduction technology and vegetative vigor approaches. In each of 3 independent replicate spray application trials, 10 pots each of lettuce and tomato were placed at distances of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 ft (∼3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 m) from the downwind edge of the spray boom. Each application was conducted using a commercial 60-ft (18-m) boom sprayer fitted with TeeJet ® Technologies TTI110025 nozzles, with a nominal application rate of 0.2 lb a.i./A (224 g a.i./ha). The environmental conditions required by the protocol (air temperature 10-30 °C and wind perpendicular to the swath (±30°) blowing toward the plants at a mean wind speed of ≥10 mph [≥4.5 m/s] measured at 2.0 m above the ground) were met for each application. Following exposure, plants were transferred to a greenhouse for the 21-d vegetative vigor phase of the study. Symptoms of phytotoxicity and plant height were assessed at 7, 14, and 21 d after treatment. On completion of the 21-d after treatment assessment, all plants were harvested and dried in an oven to determine shoot dry weight. The biological data indicated that no statistically significant effects were observed at a distance of 30 ft (∼9 m) from mesotrione drift at wind speeds of ≥10 mph (10.9-12.4 mph); this endpoint (30 ft) is defined as the no observed effects distance (NOED). Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2465-2475. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  3. In-situ burning: NIST studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    In-situ burning of spilled oil has distinct advantages over other countermeasures. It offers the potential to convert rapidly large quantities of oil into its primary combustion products, carbon dioxide and water, with a small percentage of other unburned and residue byproducts. Because the oil is converted to gaseous products of combustion by burning, the need for physical collection, storage, and transport of recovered fluids is reduced to the few percent of the original spill volume that remains as residue after burning. Burning oil spills produces a visible smoke plume containing smoke particulate and other products of combustion which may persist for many kilometers from the burn. This fact gives rise to public health concerns, related to the chemical content of the smoke plume and the downwind deposition of particulate, which need to be answered. In 1985, a joint Minerals Management Service (MMS) and Environment Canada (EC) in-situ burning research program was begun at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). This research program was designed to study the burning of large crude oil spills on water and how this burning would affect air quality by quantifying the products of combustion and developing methods to predict the downwind smoke particulate deposition. To understand the important features of in-situ burning, it is necessary to perform both laboratory and mesoscale experiments. Finally, actual burns of spilled oil at sea will be necessary to evaluate the method at the anticipated scale of actual response operations. In this research program there is a continuing interaction between findings from measurements on small fire experiments performed in the controlled laboratory environments of NIST and the Fire Research Institute (FRI) in Japan, and large fire experiments at facilities like the USCG Fire Safety and Test Detachment in Mobile, Alabama where outdoor liquid fuel burns in large pans are possible

  4. In-silico studies of neutral drift for functional protein interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Md Zulfikar; Wingreen, Ned S.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    We have developed a minimal physically-motivated model of protein-protein interaction networks. Our system consists of two classes of enzymes, activators (e.g. kinases) and deactivators (e.g. phosphatases), and the enzyme-mediated activation/deactivation rates are determined by sequence-dependent binding strengths between enzymes and their targets. The network is evolved by introducing random point mutations in the binding sequences where we assume that each new mutation is either fixed or entirely lost. We apply this model to studies of neutral drift in networks that yield oscillatory dynamics, where we start, for example, with a relatively simple network and allow it to evolve by adding nodes and connections while requiring that dynamics be conserved. Our studies demonstrate both the importance of employing a sequence-based evolutionary scheme and the relative rapidity (in evolutionary time) for the redistribution of function over new nodes via neutral drift. Surprisingly, in addition to this redistribution time we discovered another much slower timescale for network evolution, reflecting hidden order in sequence space that we interpret in terms of sparsely connected domains.

  5. Cooling tower drift studies at the Paducah, Kentucky Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, F. G.; Hanna, S. R.; Parr, P. D.

    1978-12-01

    The transfer and fate of chromium from cooling tower drift to terrestrial ecosystems were quantified with concentrations in plant materials (fescue grass) decreasing with increasing distance from the cooling tower. Results indicate that elemental content in drift water (mineral residue) may not be equivalent to the content in the recirculating cooling water of the tower. This hypothesis is contrary to basic assumptions in calculating drift emissions. Results suggest that differences in retention in litter and foliage are related to chemical properties of the drift rather than physical lodging of the particle residue. To determine the potential for movement of drift-derived chromium to surface streams, soil-water samplers (wells) were placed along a distance gradient to Little Bayou Creek. Preliminary model estimates of drift deposition are compared to deposition measurements.

  6. Reducing Pesticide Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides information about pesticide spray drift, including problems associated with drift, managing risks from drift and the voluntary Drift Reduction Technology program that seeks to reduce spray drift through improved spray equipment design.

  7. Studies of Read-Out Electronics and Trigger for Muon Drift Tube Detectors at High Luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, Sebastian

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Centre for Particle Physics, CERN, collides protons with an unprecedentedly high centre-of-mass energy and luminosity. The collision products are recorded and analysed by four big experiments, one of which is the ATLAS detector. For precise measurements of the properties of the Higgs-Boson and searches for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model, the LHC luminosity of $L=10^{34}cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ is planned to be increased by a factor of ten leading to the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). In order to cope with the higher background and data rates, the LHC experiments need to be upgraded. In this thesis, studies for the upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer are presented with respect to the read-out electronics of the Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) and the small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers and the Level-1 muon trigger. Due to the reduced tube diameter of sMDT chambers, background occupancy and space charge effects are suppressed by an order of magnitude compar...

  8. Reactions of SO 2 on hydrated cement particle system for atmospheric pollution reduction: A DRIFTS and XANES study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Girish; Wu, Qiyuan; Moon, Juhyuk; Orlov, Alexander

    2017-07-01

    An investigation of the adsorptive property of hydrated cement particle system for sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal was conducted. In situ and ex situ experiments using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) characterization techniques were employed to identify surface species formed during the exposure to SO2. Oxidation of SO2 to sulfate and sulfite species observed during these experiments indicated dominant reaction pathways for SO2 reaction with concrete constituents, such as calcium hydroxide, which were also moderated by adsorption on porous surfaces of crushed aggregates. The impact of variable composition of concrete on its adsorption capacity and reaction mechanisms was also proposed in this work.

  9. Efficiency profile method to study the hit efficiency of drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abyzov, A.; Bel'kov, A.; Lanev, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Walter, M.; Hulsbergen, W.

    2002-01-01

    A method based on the usage of efficiency profile is proposed to estimate the hit efficiency of drift chambers with a large number of channels. The performance of the method under real conditions of the detector operation has been tested analysing the experimental data from the HERA-B drift chambers

  10. Study of the performance of ATLAS muon drift-tube chambers in magntic fields and at high irradiation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valderanis, Chrysostomos

    2012-07-26

    The performance of ATLAS muon drift-tube (MDT) chambers has been studied in detail using high-energy muon beams. The measurements of the drift tube properties in magnetic fields showed that inelastic collisions of the drifting electrons with the CO{sub 2} molecules in the Ar:CO{sub 2} (93:7) gas mixture of the MDT chambers have to be taken into account in the simulation of the drift properties. Such inelastic collisions are now correctly treated by the Garfield simulation programme from version 9 providing an accurate description of the behaviour of the ATLAS muon drift tubes, in particular in the magnetic field. Measurements at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN were performed to study the performance of the MDT chambers in the presence of high {gamma} ray background fluences. The chambers have a spatial resolution better than 40 {mu}m at the nominal background rates expected at the Large Hadron Collider design luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and a resolution better than 50 {mu}m for up to five times higher background rates. Efficient muon detection up to background counting rates of 500 kHz per tube corresponding to 35% occupancy was demonstrated.

  11. Drift velocity studies at a time projection chamber for various water contents in the gas mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoever, F.W.

    2007-03-01

    For the answer of different open questions in high energy physics the construction of a linear e + e - collider with a c. m. energy of up to one TeV is prepared. With this is connected a comprehensive development on detectors, which must satisfy the requirements of the planned experiments. For the track chamber a TPC is considered. Hereby it deals with a gas-based concept, which has already been proved in past experiments and which is at time further developed by means of test chambers. The composition of the gas mixtureplays hereby an important role. Impurities of the gas mixture, especially by oxygen and water from the ambient air are a fact, which occurs every time in the development phase and can scarcely be avoided. From this arose the motivation to study directly the effects of this impurities. The object of the present thesis are correlations between drift velocity and water content in the chamber gas of a TPC

  12. Impact of groyne fields on the littoral drift: A hybrid morphological modelling study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, S. E.; Drønen, N.; Deigaard, R.

    2016-01-01

    of this mechanism is presented including effects of scales, e.g. the effect of the relative length of the groynes (compared to the width of the surf zone).The model results indicate a strong dependency of the reduction in littoral drift on the initial geometric bypass ratio (Qgeo*), which is defined from the groyne......This paper concerns numerical modelling of the impact on the littoral drift and the shoreline from groynes forming a field of equidistant and identical groynes. The most important effect of a groyne on the shoreline morphology is that the littoral drift is blocked completely or partially. A local...... reduction in the littoral drift around the groyne introduces alongshore gradients in the alongshore sediment transport and sedimentation and erosion around the groyne which will cause re-orientation of the bed contours towards the prevailing wave direction until an equilibrium is reached. A discussion...

  13. Theoretical Studies of Drift-Alfven and Energetic Particle Physics in Fusion Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Chen

    2005-07-06

    Nonlinear equations for the slow space-time evolution of the radial drift-wave envelope and zonal flow amplitude have been self-consistently derived for a model nonuniform tokamak equilibrium within the coherent four-wave drift wave-zonal flow modulation interaction model of Chen, Lin, and White [Phys. Plasmas 7, 3129 (2000)]. Solutions clearly demonstrate turbulence spreading due to nonlinearly dispersiveness and, consequently, the device-size dependence of the saturated wave intensities and transport coefficients.

  14. Modeling Exoplanetary Atmospheres using BART, TEA, and Drift-RHD; Theoretical studies and Observational Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs-Dixon, Ian

    numerous published papers, further work is needed to couple them self-consistently. Our theoretical studies focus on a number of objectives. We will start by incorporating our kinetic, non-equilibrium cloud model within BART, allowing us to obtain a consistent solution for cloud characteristics. We will further test simple parameterizations against the full solution to explore the reliability of simpler models. Utilizing Drift-RHD, we will explore the role of horizontal advection on cloud distribution, investigate the validity of 1D retrievals by comparing them to selfconsistently generated 3D models, and develop a retrieval framework for wavelengthdependent phase-curves. TEA will be enhanced with additional databases and the inclusion of condensates, providing realistic initial cloudy-model for retrievals. To explore the importance of equilibrium chemistry and exclude non-plausible chemical compositions (often the outcome of many retrieval approaches) we will relax the assumption of non-equilibrium chemistry by utilizing an analytical chemical equilibrium approach in BART. To address observations, our OBS suit for generating synthetic observations will be adapted to interface with our models, allowing us to both compare to existing observations and make predictions for future observations. With these tools, we are particularly well suited to understand discriminants between classes of models and identifying which particular set of observations could most readily distinguish cloud constituents and temperature features. The proposed research is directly relevant to the Planetary Science and Astrophysics goals through furthering our understanding of compositions, dynamics, energetics, and chemical behaviors of exoplanetary atmospheres. In addition, to maximize NASA's investment and encourage open access, we have and will continue to make all of our codes public and available to the community throughout the course of the research.

  15. Ageing studies for the ATLAS MDT muonchambers and development of a gas filter to prevent drift tube ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, S.

    2008-01-01

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector, which is currently assembled at the LHC accelerator at CERN, uses drift tubes as basic detection elements over most of the solid angle. The performance of these monitored drift tubes (MDTs), in particular their spatial resolution of 80 μm, determines the precision of the spectrometer. If ageing effects occur, the precision of the drift tubes will be degraded. Hence ageing effects have to be minimized or avoided altogether if possible. Even with a gas mixture of Ar:CO 2 =93:7, which was selected for its good ageing properties, ageing effects were observed in test systems. They were caused by small amounts of impurities, in particular volatile silicon compounds. Systematic studies revealed the required impurity levels deteriorating the drift tubes to be well below 1 ppm. Many components of the ATLAS MDT gas system are supplied by industry. In a newly designed ageing experiment in Freiburg these components were validated for their use in ATLAS. With a fully assembled ATLAS gas distribution rack as test component ageing effects were observed. It was therefore decided to install gas filters in the gas distribution lines to remove volatile silicon compounds efficiently from the gas mixture. Finally a filter was designed that can adsorb up to 5.5 g of volatile silicon compounds, hereby reducing the impurities in the outlet gas mixture to less than 30 ppb. (orig.)

  16. A numerical study of the influence of the void drift model on the predictions of the assert subchannel code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tye, P.; Teyssedou, A.; Troche, N.; Kiteley, J.

    1996-01-01

    One of the factors which is important in order to ensure the continued safe operation of nuclear reactors is the ability to accurately predict the 'Critical Heat Flux' (CHF) throughout the rod bundles in the fuel channel. One method currently used by the Canadian nuclear industry to predict the CHF in the fuel bundles of CANDU reactors is to use the ASSERT subchannel code to predict the local thermal-hydraulic conditions prevailing at each axial location in each subchannel in conjunction with appropriate correlations or the CHF look-up table. The successful application of the above methods depends greatly on the ability of ASSERT to accurately predict the local flow conditions throughout the fuel channel. In this paper, full range qualitative verification tests, using the ASSERT subchannel code are presented which show the influence of the void drift model on the predictions of the local subchannel quality. For typical cases using a 7 rod subset of a full 37 element rod bundle taken from the ASSERT validation database, it will be shown that the void drift term can significantly influence the calculated distribution of the quality in the rod bundle. In order to isolate, as much as possible, the influence of the void drift term this first numerical study is carried out with the rod bundle oriented both vertically and horizontally. Subsequently, additional numerical experiments will be presented which show the influence that the void drift model has on the predicted CHF locations. (author)

  17. Theoretical study of the effect of pump wavelength drift on mode instability in a high-power fiber amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yakun; Tao, Rumao; Su, Rongtao; Wang, Xiaolin; Ma, Pengfei; Zhang, Hanwei; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the effect of pump wavelength drift on the threshold of mode instability (MI) in high-power ytterbium-doped fiber lasers. By using a semi-analytical model, we study the effects of pump wavelength drift with a central pump wavelength around 976 nm and 915 nm, respectively. The influences of the pump absorption coefficient and total pump absorption are considered simultaneously. The results indicate that the effect of pump wavelength drift around 976 nm is stronger than that around 915 nm. For more efficient suppression of MI by shifting the pump wavelength, efficient absorption of pump power is required. The MI thresholds for fibers with different total pump absorptions and cladding diameters are compared. When the total pump absorption is increased, the gain saturation is enhanced, which results in the MI being mitigated more effectively and being more sensitive to pump wavelength drift. The MI threshold in gain fibers with larger inner cladding diameter is higher but more dependent upon pump wavelength. The results of this work can help in optimizing the pump wavelength and fiber parameters and suppressing MI in high-power fiber lasers.

  18. Ageing studies for the ATLAS MDT muonchambers and development of a gas filter to prevent drift tube ageing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, S.

    2008-01-15

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector, which is currently assembled at the LHC accelerator at CERN, uses drift tubes as basic detection elements over most of the solid angle. The performance of these monitored drift tubes (MDTs), in particular their spatial resolution of 80 {mu}m, determines the precision of the spectrometer. If ageing effects occur, the precision of the drift tubes will be degraded. Hence ageing effects have to be minimized or avoided altogether if possible. Even with a gas mixture of Ar:CO{sub 2}=93:7, which was selected for its good ageing properties, ageing effects were observed in test systems. They were caused by small amounts of impurities, in particular volatile silicon compounds. Systematic studies revealed the required impurity levels deteriorating the drift tubes to be well below 1 ppm. Many components of the ATLAS MDT gas system are supplied by industry. In a newly designed ageing experiment in Freiburg these components were validated for their use in ATLAS. With a fully assembled ATLAS gas distribution rack as test component ageing effects were observed. It was therefore decided to install gas filters in the gas distribution lines to remove volatile silicon compounds efficiently from the gas mixture. Finally a filter was designed that can adsorb up to 5.5 g of volatile silicon compounds, hereby reducing the impurities in the outlet gas mixture to less than 30 ppb. (orig.)

  19. Ageing studies for the ATLAS MDT Muonchambers and development of a gas filter to prevent drift tube ageing

    CERN Document Server

    König, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at CERN uses drift tubes as basic detection elements over most of the solid angle. The performance of these monitored drift tubes (MDTs), in particular their spatial resolution of 80 µm, determines the precision of the spectrometer. If ageing effects occur, the precision of the drift tubes will be degraded. Hence ageing effects have to be minimized or avoided altogether if possible. Even with a gas mixture of Ar:CO2 (93:7), which was selected for its good ageing properties, ageing effects were observed in test systems. They were caused by small amounts of impurities, in particular volatile silicon compounds. Systematic studies revealed the required impurity levels deteriorating the drift tubes to be well below 1 ppm. Many components of the ATLAS MDT gas system are supplied by industry. In a newly designed ageing experiment in Freiburg these components were validated for their use in ATLAS. With a fully assembled ATLAS gas distribution rack as test component ageing ...

  20. Double beta decays studied by β-γ spectroscopy with a drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, K.; Ejiri, H.; Shibata, T.

    1986-01-01

    A large scale ultra low background β-γ spectrometer ELEGANTS-V for studying double beta decays(ββ) of /sup 100/Mo and/or /sup 150/Nd is designed and is now under construction. It consists of drift chambers for identification of tracks and vertex of two β-rays, thin NaI(T1) or plastic scintillators for β-rays energy and NaI(T1) counters for γ- and cosmic-rays. Specifications of the spectrometer; energy resolution, detection efficiency, possible background counting rate and available ββ sources, have been evaluated. The spectrometer has extremely high sensitivities of the neutrinoless ββ decays (0νββ), two neutrino ββ decays (2νββ) and neutrinoless ββ decays followed one boson (Majoron). It may detect 0νββ decays with half lives up to T/sub 1/2/ = 1.2- 1.7 . 10/sup 23/ year. This limit corresponds to one part of million for the Majoran neutrino mass in units of the electron mass and for the right-handed weak current in units of the left handed one

  1. Numerical studies and measurements on the side-coupled drift tube linac (SCDTL) accelerating structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Spataro, B.

    2000-01-01

    The 3 GHz linac section designed for the low energy (7-65 MeV) part of TOP (therapy oncological protons) linac (Picardi et al., 1997, 1996), operating at 3 GHz frequency and in π/2 mode, consists of eight modules of the structure SCDTL (side-coupled drift tube linac). The first module is designed to accelerate 7 MeV protons up to 13.4 MeV, and a prototype is presently under construction. Electromagnetic field calculations of the non-axisymmetric cavities carried out by using MAFIA 3D code (Weiland, 1986) gave the RF wall losses and the full mode spectrum. Two prototypes, an aluminium model of the first quintuplet and a copper model of the last triplet of the module, were built in order to check the complex 3D properties of the structure, and to refine the tuning procedure. This paper reports the results of the 3D numerical simulations about the RF properties of the first module and of some RF measurements on the prototypes. The beam dynamics study results in the SCDTL section are discussed as well

  2. The new insight into the structure-activity relation of Pd/CeO2-ZrO2-Nd2O3 catalysts by Raman, in situ DRIFTS and XRD Rietveld analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Yang, L; Lin, J; Zhou, R

    2016-01-28

    Pd/CeO2-ZrO2-Nd2O3 (CZN) catalysts with different CeO2/ZrO2 molar ratios were synthesized and have been characterized by multiple techniques, e.g. XRD in combination with Rietveld refinement, UV-Raman, XPS and in situ DRIFTS. The XRD pattern of CZN with CeO2/ZrO2 molar ratios ≥1/2 can be indexed satisfactorily to the fluorite structure with a space group Fm3̄m, while the XRD patterns of CZ12 only display diffraction peaks of the tetragonal phase (S.G. P42/nmc). Nd addition can effectively stabilize the cubic structure of the CZN support and increase the enrichment of defect sites on the surface, which may be related to the better catalytic activity of Pd/CZN12 catalysts compared with Pd/CZ12. The presence of moderate ZrO2 can increase the concentration of O* active species, leading to accelerate the formation of nitrate species and thus enhance the catalytic activity of NOx and HC elimination. The Pd-dispersion decreases with the increasing Zr content, leading to the decreased CO catalytic activity, especially for the aged catalysts. The change regularity of the OSC value is almost the same with the in situ dynamic operational window, demonstrating that the in situ dynamic operational window is basically affected by the OSC value.

  3. Drift-tube studies of ion-molecule reactions at low collision energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, B.K.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis presents experimental studies of ion-molecule reactions at low collision energies using two drift tube mass spectrometer apparatus. The reactions studied are (i) proton transfer from HeH + to ArH + , (ii) charge and ion transfer reactions of O 2 2+ with NO, CO 2 , Ne and O 2 + ( 4 π u ) with CO 2 , (iii) oxidation reactions of Zr + and ZrO + with NO, CO 2 and O 2 , (iv) vibrational quenching reactions of H 3 + with He, (v) termolecular clustering reactions of H 2 CN + and H 2 CN + (HCN) (with He as the third body), (vi) three body association reactions of H + and D + with He (with He as the third body) and (vii) termolecular association reaction of NO + with NO (with Ne as third body). All the reactions were studied at thermal energies (at room temperature), reactions of O 2 2+ with NO and CO 2 , Zr + with NO/CO 2 /O 2 were also studied at center-of-mass energies higher than thermal and the association reactions of H 2 CN + /H 2 CN + (HCN) with HCN and H + /D + with He were studied at low temperatures. In addition, the thesis presents model calculations for the sweep-out effect which is an instrumental effect. A super Langevin rate constant is introduced which is a higher-order correction to the Langevin model. A theoretical model for the three-body ion-atom association rate constant is presented in the appendix of the thesis

  4. Current components, physical, ocean circulation, wind circulation, and other data from moored buoys, CTD casts, drifting buoys, and in situ wind recorders from AIRCRAFT and other platforms from the North Atlantic Ocean and other locations as part of the Seasonal Response of the Equatorial Atlantic Experiment/Français Océan et Climat dans l'Atlantique Equatorial (SEQUAL/FOCAL) project from 1980-01-25 to 1985-12-18 (NODC Accession 8700111)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current components, physical, ocean circulation, wind circulation, and other data were collected from moored buoys, CTD casts, drifting buoys, and in situ wind...

  5. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Kicker

    2004-01-01

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal stress. (3) The DRKBA

  6. Drift Degradation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal

  7. Radial plasma drifts deduced from VLF whistler mode signals - A modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulter, E. M.; Andrews, M. K.; Bailey, G. J.; Moffett, R. J.

    1984-05-01

    VLF whistler mode signals have previously been used to infer radial plasma drifts in the equatorial plane of the plasmasphere and the field-aligned ionosphere-protonosphere coupling fluxes. Physical models of the plasmasphere consisting of O(+) adn H(+) ions along dipole magnetic field lines, and including radial E x B drifts, are applied to a mid-latitude flux tube appropriate to whistler mode signals received at Wellington, New Zealand, from the fixed frequency VLF transmitter NLK (18.6 kHz) in Seattle, U.S.A. These models are first shown to provide a good representation of the recorded Doppler shift and group delay data. They are then used to simulate the process of deducing the drifts and fluxes from the recorded data. Provided the initial whistler mode duct latitude and the ionospheric contributions are known, the drifts at the equatorial plane can be estimated to about + or - 20 m/s (approximately 10-15 percent), and the two hemisphere ionosphere-protonosphere coupling fluxes to about + or - 10 to the 12th/sq m-sec (approximately 40 percent).

  8. Three-dimensional simulation studies of 10 MeV, 352.2 MHz drift ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    drift tube Linac was done by varying the gap to cell length (g/L) ratio using SUPERFISH ... diameter and stem diameter were taken to be the same to ease fabrication ... The effect on resonant frequency of the DTL, due to tuners, vacuum ports and post- ... the electric field and frequency, and is highly dependent on mesh size.

  9. SEEPAGE INTO DRIFTS IN UNSATRUATED FRACTURED ROCK AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENS BIRHOLZER; GUOMIN LI; CHIN-FU TSANG; YVONNE TSANG

    1998-01-01

    An important issue for the long-term performance of underground nuclear waste repositories is the rate of seepage into the waste emplacement drifts. A prediction of the future seepage rate is particularly complicated for the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as it is located in thick, partially saturated, fractured tuff formations. The long-term situation in the drifts several thousand years after waste emplacement will be characterized by a relative humidity level close to or equal to 100%. as the drifts will be sealed and unventilated, and the waste packages will have cooled. The underground tunnels will then act as capillary barriers for the unsaturated flow, ideally diverting water around them, if the capillary forces are stronger than gravity and viscous forces. Seepage into the drifts will only be possible if the hydraulic pressure in the rock close to the drift walls increases to positive values; i.e., the flow field becomes locally saturated. In the present work, we have developed and applied a methodology to study the potential rate of seepage into underground cavities embedded in a variably saturated, heterogeneous fractured rock formation. The fractured rock mass is represented as a stochastic continuum where the fracture permeabilities vary by several orders of magnitude. Three different realizations of random fracture permeability fields are generated, with the random permeability structure based on extensive fracture mapping, borehole video analysis, and in-situ air permeability testing. A 3-D numerical model is used to simulate the heterogeneous steady-state flow field around the drift, with the drift geometry explicitly represented within the numerical discretization grid. A variety of flow scenarios are considered assuming present-day and future climate conditions at Yucca Mountain. The numerical study is complemented by theoretical evaluations of the drift seepage problem, using stochastic perturbation theory to develop a better

  10. A study of various types of electronics for drift chambers: development of a test bench and results for 1500 channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostarakis, Panayotis.

    1976-01-01

    An electronic chain to be connected with drift chambers is studied for use in High Energy Physics. Studies have been made to define the best components to be put into the elements (amplifiers, cables, TDC...). Measurements have been done to determine the characteristics of the chosen elements. A test apparatus has been built to control each channel (about 1550). Finally all chain elements have been tested [fr

  11. Nonlinear drift tearing mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenyj, L.M.; Kuznetsova, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear study of magnetic perturbation development under single-mode conditions in collision-free plasma in configurations with the magnetic field shear is investigated. Results are obtained with regard of transverse component of electrical field and its effect on ion dynamics within wide range of ion Larmor radius value and values of magnetic field shear. Increments of nonlinear drift tearing mode are obtained and it is shown that excitation drastic conditions of even linearly stable modes are possible. Mechanism of instability nonlinear stabilization is considered and the value of magnetic island at the saturation threshold is estimeted. Energy of nonlinear drift tearing mode is discussed

  12. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houseworth, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of the

  13. Drift wave turbulence studies on closed and open flux surfaces: effect limiter/divertor plates location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, T.; Scott, B.

    2007-01-01

    The field line connection of a tokamak sheared magnetic field has an important impact on turbulence, by ensuring a finite parallel dynamical response for every degree of freedom available in the system. This constitutes the main property which distinguishes closed from open flux surfaces in such a device. In the latter case, the poloidal periodicity of the magnetic field is replaced by a Debye sheath arising where the field lines strike the limiter/divertor plates. This is enough to break the field line connection constraint and allow the existence of convective cell modes, leading to a change in the character of the turbulence from drift wave- (closed flux surfaces) to interchange-type (open flux surfaces), and hence increasing the turbulent transport observed. Here we study the effect of changing the poloidal position of the limiter/divertor plates, using the three-dimensional electromagnetic gyrofluid turbulence code GEM, which has time dependently self consistent field aligned flux tube coordinates. For the closed flux surfaces, the globally consistent periodic boundary conditions are invoked, and for open flux surfaces a standard Debye sheath is used at the striking points. In particular, the use of two limiter positions simultaneously, top and bottom, is in order, such to allow a separation between the inboard and outboard sides of the tokamak. This highlights the differences between those two regions of the tokamak, where the curvature is either favourable (former) or unfavourable (latter), and further makes room for future experimental qualitative comparisons, for instance, on double null configurations of the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. (author)

  14. Validation study of a drift-wave turbulence model for CSDX linear plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi, P.; Holland, C.; Thakur, S. C.; Tynan, G. R.

    2017-09-01

    A validation study of self-regulating drift-wave turbulence/zonal flow dynamics in the Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment linear plasma device using Langmuir probe synthetic diagnostics is presented in this paper. We use a set of nonlocal 3D equations, which evolve density, vorticity, and electron temperature fluctuations, and include proper sheath boundary conditions. Nonlinear simulations of these equations are carried out using BOUndary Turbulence (BOUT++) framework. To identify the dominant parametric dependencies of the model, a linear growth rate sensitivity analysis is performed using input parameter uncertainties, which are taken from the experimental measurements. For the direct comparison of nonlinear simulation results to experiment, we use synthetic Langmuir probe diagnostics to generate a set of synthetic ion saturation current and floating potential fluctuations. In addition, comparisons of azimuthal velocities determined via time-delay estimation, and nonlinear energy transfer are shown. We observe a significant improvement of model-experiment agreement relative to the previous 2D simulations. An essential component of this improved agreement is found to be the effect of electron temperature fluctuations on floating potential measurements, which introduces clear amplitude and phase shifts relative to the plasma potential fluctuations in synthetically measured quantities, where the simulations capture the experimental measurements in the core of plasma. However, the simulations overpredict the fluctuation levels at larger radii. Moreover, systematic simulation scans show that the self-generated E × B zonal flows profile is very sensitive to the steepening of density equilibrium profile. This suggests that evolving both fluctuations and equilibrium profiles, along with the inclusion of modest axial variation of radial profiles in the model are needed for further improvement of simulation results against the experimental measurements.

  15. The KLOE drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, A.

    2002-01-01

    The design and construction of the large drift chamber of the KLOE experiment is presented. The track reconstruction is described, together with the calibration method and the monitoring systems. The stability of operation and the performance are studied with samples of e + e - , K S K L and K + K - events

  16. Loss Aversion Reflects Information Accumulation, Not Bias: A Drift-Diffusion Model Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Summer N; Clithero, John A; Harris, Alison M; Reed, Catherine L

    2017-01-01

    Defined as increased sensitivity to losses, loss aversion is often conceptualized as a cognitive bias. However, findings that loss aversion has an attentional or emotional regulation component suggest that it may instead reflect differences in information processing. To distinguish these alternatives, we applied the drift-diffusion model (DDM) to choice and response time (RT) data in a card gambling task with unknown risk distributions. Loss aversion was measured separately for each participant. Dividing the participants into terciles based on loss aversion estimates, we found that the most loss-averse group showed a significantly lower drift rate than the other two groups, indicating overall slower uptake of information. In contrast, neither the starting bias nor the threshold separation (barrier) varied by group, suggesting that decision thresholds are not affected by loss aversion. These results shed new light on the cognitive mechanisms underlying loss aversion, consistent with an account based on information accumulation.

  17. Coupled In-Rock and In-Drift Hydrothermal Model Study For Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. Danko; J. Birkholzer; D. Bahrami

    2006-01-01

    A thermal-hydrologic-natural-ventilation model is configured for simulating temperature, humidity, and condensate distributions in the coupled domains of the in-drift airspace and the near-field rockmass in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. The multi-physics problem is solved with MULTIFLUX in which a lumped-parameter computational fluid dynamics model is iterated with TOUGH2. The solution includes natural convection, conduction, and radiation for heat as well as moisture convection and diffusion for moisture transport with half waste package scale details in the drift, and mountain-scale heat and moisture transport in the porous and fractured rock-mass. The method provides fast convergence on a personal computer computational platform. Numerical examples and comparison with a TOUGH2 based, integrated model are presented

  18. Radiation aging studies of CO2 hydrocarbon mixtures for the SLD drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venuti, J.P.; Chadwick, G.B.

    1988-10-01

    The SLD drift chamber requires a 'slow' drifting gas and low diffusion to allow wave form digitization. CO 2 provides this but requires an admixture of a quencher to provide more gain. A test chamber with an 8 sense wire cell, such as will appear in the final chamber, was exposed to an x-ray tube while containing a variety of binary admixtures of Co 2 : 8% isobutane, 8% ethane, and 2% isopropanol. It was determined that adding small fractions of water (≤0.66%) or isopropanol (1--2%) to the Co 2 : 8% ethane, or 8% isobutane extended the useful life of the chamber so that integrated charge collections of /approximately/1 C/cm are permissible. Results and discussions are presented. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  19. Loss Aversion Reflects Information Accumulation, Not Bias: A Drift-Diffusion Model Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summer N. Clay

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Defined as increased sensitivity to losses, loss aversion is often conceptualized as a cognitive bias. However, findings that loss aversion has an attentional or emotional regulation component suggest that it may instead reflect differences in information processing. To distinguish these alternatives, we applied the drift-diffusion model (DDM to choice and response time (RT data in a card gambling task with unknown risk distributions. Loss aversion was measured separately for each participant. Dividing the participants into terciles based on loss aversion estimates, we found that the most loss-averse group showed a significantly lower drift rate than the other two groups, indicating overall slower uptake of information. In contrast, neither the starting bias nor the threshold separation (barrier varied by group, suggesting that decision thresholds are not affected by loss aversion. These results shed new light on the cognitive mechanisms underlying loss aversion, consistent with an account based on information accumulation.

  20. Three-dimensional simulation studies of 10 MeV, 352.2 MHz drift ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is proposed to build a drift tube Linac (DTL) at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, India, that will form a part of the future Spallation Neutron Source. This DTL will accelerate 30 mA H-ion beam from 3 MeV to 10 MeV. The DTL is designed to operate at 352.2 MHz with a maximum duty cycle of 3%.

  1. A straw drift chamber spectrometer for studies of rare kaon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, K.; Ambrose, D.; Arroyo, C.; Bachman, M.; Connor, D.; Eckhause, M.; Ecklund, K.M.; Graessle, S.; Hamela, M.; Hamilton, S.; Hancock, A.D.; Hartman, K.; Hebert, M.; Hoff, C.H.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Irwin, G.M.; Kane, J.R.; Kanematsu, N.; Kuang, Y.; Lee, R.; Marcin, M.; Martin, R.D.; McDonough, J.; Milder, A.; Molzon, W.R.; Ouimette, D.; Pommot-Maia, M.; Proga, M.; Riley, P.J.; Ritchie, J.L.; Rubin, P.D.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Ware, B.; Welsh, R.E.; Wojcicki, S.G.; Worm, S.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the design, construction, readout, tests, and performance of planar drift chambers, based on 5-mm-diameter copperized Mylar and Kapton straws, used in an experimental search for rare kaon decays. The experiment took place in the high-intensity neutral beam at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory, using a neutral beam stop, two analyzing dipoles, and redundant particle identification to remove backgrounds

  2. Study on a cellmap for the reconstruction of cosmic ray tracks in drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Yu; Ma Yuqian

    2005-01-01

    Taking 13 Cosmic experiment (L3+C) as an example, the authors discussed a new Cellmap to reconstruct the hit in drift chamber of magnetic spectrometer for the very inclined comic-ray tracks, and compared the reconstruction results with the standard Cellmap of L3+C. It shows that, for the very inclined cosmic-ray tracks, the new Cellmap can reconstruct more hits than the standard Cellmap, and the distribution of χ 2 of track reconstruction is also improved. (authors)

  3. A statistical study of gyro-averaging effects in a reduced model of drift-wave transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, J. D.; del-Castillo-Negrete, D.; Sokolov, I. M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2016-08-01

    A statistical study of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on transport driven by electrostatic drift-waves is presented. The study is based on a reduced discrete Hamiltonian dynamical system known as the gyro-averaged standard map (GSM). In this system, FLR effects are incorporated through the gyro-averaging of a simplified weak-turbulence model of electrostatic fluctuations. Formally, the GSM is a modified version of the standard map in which the perturbation amplitude, K0, becomes K0J0(ρ ̂ ) , where J0 is the zeroth-order Bessel function and ρ ̂ is the Larmor radius. Assuming a Maxwellian probability density function (pdf) for ρ ̂ , we compute analytically and numerically the pdf and the cumulative distribution function of the effective drift-wave perturbation amplitude K0J0(ρ ̂ ) . Using these results, we compute the probability of loss of confinement (i.e., global chaos), Pc, and the probability of trapping in the main drift-wave resonance, Pt. It is shown that Pc provides an upper bound for the escape rate, and that Pt provides a good estimate of the particle trapping rate. The analytical results are compared with direct numerical Monte-Carlo simulations of particle transport.

  4. STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF THERMAL DRIFT ON RELIABILITY OF PRESSURE SENSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDELAZIZ BEDDIAF

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Piezoresistive pressure sensors, using a Wheatstone bridge with the piezoresistors, are typically supplied with a voltage ranging from 3 to 10 V involve thermal drift caused by Joule heating. In this paper, an accurate numerical model for optimization and predicting the thermal drift in piezoresistive pressure sensors due to the electric heater in its piezoresistors is adopted. In this case, by using the solution of 2D heat transfer equation considering Joule heating in Cartesian coordinates for the transient regime, we determine how the temperature affects the sensor when the supply voltage is applied. For this, the elevation of temperature due to the Joule heating has been calculated for various values of supply voltage and for several operating times of the sensor; by varying different geometrical parameters. Otherwise, the variation of the coefficient 44 in p-Si and pressure sensitivity as a function of the applied potential, as well as, for various times, for different dimensions of the device, have been also established. It is observed that the electrical heating leads to an important temperature rise in the piezoresistor. Consequently, it causes drift in the pressure sensitivity of the sensor upon application of a voltage. Finally, this work allows us to evaluate the reliability of sensors. Also, it permits to predict their behaviour against temperature due to the application of a voltage of a bridge and to minimize this effect by optimizing the geometrical parameters of the sensor and by reducing the supply voltage.

  5. In situ stress measurements at the Spent Fuel Test-Climax facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creveling, J.B.; Shuri, F.S.; Foster, K.M.; Mills, S.V.

    1984-05-01

    The status of the following studies is given: in situ state of stress; stress gradient into rib from south heater drift; pillar stresses; and rock deformational properties. 11 references, 38 figures, 12 tables

  6. Seepage into drifts in unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkholzer, Jens; Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Tsang, Yvonne

    1998-01-01

    An important issue for the long-term performance of underground nuclear waste repository is the rate of seepage into the waste emplacement drifts. A prediction of the future seepage rate is particularly complicated for the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as it is located in thick, partially saturated, fractured tuff formations. The long-term situation in the drifts several thousand years after waste emplacement will be characterized by a relative humidity level close to or equal to 100%, as the drifts will be sealed and unventilated, and the waste packages will have cooled. The underground tunnels will then act as capillary barriers for the unsaturated flow, ideally diverting water around them, if the capillary forces are stronger than gravity and viscous forces. Seepage into the drifts will only be possible if the hydraulic pressure in the rock close to the drift walls increases to positive values; i.e., the flow field becomes locally saturated. In the present work, they have developed and applied a methodology to study the potential rate of seepage into underground cavities embedded in a variably saturated, heterogeneous fractured rock formation. The fractured rock mass is represented as a stochastic continuum where the fracture permeabilities vary by several orders of magnitude. Three different realizations of random fracture permeability fields are generated, with the random permeability structure based on extensive fracture mapping, borehole video analysis, and in-situ air permeability testing. A 3-D numerical model is used to simulate the heterogeneous steady-state flow field around the drift, with the drift geometry explicitly represented within the numerical discretization grid. A variety of flow scenarios are considered assuming present-day and future climate conditions at Yucca Mountain. The numerical study is complemented by theoretical evaluations of the drift seepage problem, using stochastic perturbation theory to develop a better

  7. Lithium-drifted silicon for harsh radiation environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J.; Buttar, C.; Brozel, M.; Keffous, A.; Cheriet, A.; Bourenane, K.; Bourenane, A.; Kezzoula, F.; Menari, H.

    2008-06-01

    A model describing the passivation by Li atoms of acceptors arising from radiation damage in Si detectors has been developed. Our studies indicate that it is possible to produce a protocol that will allow the in-situ recovery of lithium-drifted Si particle detectors under irradiation by high-energy particles. Our model for particle damage recovery is supported by preliminary results on the recovery of old, degraded detectors.

  8. Lithium-drifted silicon for harsh radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: j.grant@physics.gla.ac.uk; Buttar, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Brozel, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS81TS (United Kingdom); Keffous, A.; Cheriet, A.; Bourenane, K.; Bourenane, A.; Kezzoula, F.; Menari, H. [Unite de Developpment de la Technologie du Silicium, 02 Bd Frantz Fanon, B.P. 399 Alger-Gare (Algeria)

    2008-06-11

    A model describing the passivation by Li atoms of acceptors arising from radiation damage in Si detectors has been developed. Our studies indicate that it is possible to produce a protocol that will allow the in-situ recovery of lithium-drifted Si particle detectors under irradiation by high-energy particles. Our model for particle damage recovery is supported by preliminary results on the recovery of old, degraded detectors.

  9. Spectroscopic identification of the active site for CO oxidation on Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by concentration modulation in situ DRIFTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavers, M.; Davidson, J.M.; Harkness, I.R.; Rees, L.V.C.; McDougall, G.S.

    1999-12-10

    Diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy experiments are described in which the concentrations of the reactant gases passing over a solid catalyst are modulated. This simple modification to the normal in situ experiment enables direct correlation of specific surface species with the production of gaseous products. Spectra of solely the active surface intermediates with no contribution from so called spectator species are generated. For CO oxidation over a Rh/alumina catalyst at 576 K, the active CO species is identified as linearly adsorbed CO on oxidized Rh sites ({nu}{sub CO} = 2,100 cm{sup {minus}1}) on a catalyst surface apparently otherwise dominated by CO adsorbed as unreactive geminal dicarbonyl.

  10. In situ DRIFTs investigation of the reaction mechanism over MnO{sub x}-MO{sub y}/Ce{sub 0.75}Zr{sub 0.25}O{sub 2} (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hang; Zha, Kaiwen; Li, Hongrui; Shi, Liyi; Zhang, Dengsong, E-mail: dszhang@shu.edu.cn

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • MnO{sub x}-FeO{sub y}/Ce{sub 0.75}Zr{sub 0.25}O{sub 2} catalyst has a strong NO oxidation ability. • A high dispersion of active components is achieved on catalyst surface. • At high temperatures, bidentate nitrate is the common active species. • The addition of Fe can improve the reactivity of gaseous NO{sub 2} and bridged nitrates. - Abstract: A series of MnO{sub x}-MO{sub y}/Ce{sub 0.75}Zr{sub 0.25}O{sub 2} (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) catalysts were synthesized by an impregnation method and used for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3}. The catalytic performances of various MnO{sub x}-MO{sub y}/Ce{sub 0.75}Zr{sub 0.25}O{sub 2} catalysts were studied. It was found that MnO{sub x}-FeO{sub y}/Ce{sub 0.75}Zr{sub 0.25}O{sub 2} catalyst showed excellent low-temperature activity and a broad temperature window. The catalysts were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Characterization of the catalyst confirmed the addition of iron oxide can enhance the NO oxidation ability of the catalyst which results in the outstanding low-temperature SCR activity. Meanwhile, iron oxides were well dispersed on catalyst surface which could avoid the agglomeration of active species, contributing to the strong interaction between active species and the support. More importantly, in situ DRIFTS results confirmed that bidentate nitrates are general active species on these catalysts, whereas the reactivity of gaseous NO{sub 2} and bridged nitrates got improved because of the addition of Fe.

  11. 2D BiOCl/Bi12O17Cl2 nanojunction: Enhanced visible light photocatalytic NO removal and in situ DRIFTS investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wendong; Dong, Xin'an; Jia, Bin; Zhong, Junbo; Sun, Yanjuan; Dong, Fan

    2018-02-01

    Novel two-dimensional (2D) BiOCl/Bi12O17Cl2 nanojunctions were fabricated by a facile one-pot in situ method at room temperature. The as-prepared samples were analyzed by XRD, SEM, TEM, HRTEM, UV-vis DRS, PL, ESR and BET-BJH measurement in detail. The photocatalytic performance of the samples was evaluated by removal of NO at ppb level under visible-light illumination. The result reveals that the BiOCl/Bi12O17Cl2 nanojunctions manifests conspicuously enhanced photocatalytic efficiency for NO removal. The facilitated performance can be ascribed to the well-matched band structure and relatively high specific surface area. In addition, the in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy was applied to investigate the adsorption and photocatalytic NO oxidation processes. The reaction mechanism of photocatalytic NO oxidation was proposed based on the observed intermediates. The present work could pave a way to synthesize novel visible light photocatalysts at room temperature for environmental application.

  12. Advanced numerical studies of the neutralized drift compression of intense ion beam pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B. Sefkow

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal bunch compression of intense ion beams for warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion applications occurs by imposing an axial velocity tilt onto an ion beam across the acceleration gap of a linear induction accelerator, and subsequently allowing the beam to drift through plasma in order to neutralize its space-charge and current as the pulse compresses. The detailed physics and implications of acceleration gap effects and focusing aberration on optimum longitudinal compression are quantitatively reviewed using particle-in-cell simulations, showing their dependence on many system parameters. Finite-size gap effects are shown to result in compression reduction, due to an increase in the effective longitudinal temperature imparted to the beam, and a decrease in intended fractional tilt. Sensitivity of the focal plane quality to initial longitudinal beam temperature is explored, where slower particles are shown to experience increased levels of focusing aberration compared to faster particles. A plateau effect in axial compression is shown to occur for larger initial pulse lengths, where the increases in focusing aberration over the longer drift lengths involved dominate the increases in relative compression, indicating a trade-off between current compression and pulse duration. The dependence on intended fractional tilt is also discussed and agrees well with theory. A balance between longer initial pulse lengths and larger tilts is suggested, since both increase the current compression, but have opposite effects on the final pulse length, drift length, and amount of longitudinal focusing aberration. Quantitative examples are outlined that explore the sensitive dependence of compression on the initial kinetic energy and thermal distribution of the beam particles. Simultaneous transverse and longitudinal current density compression can be achieved in the laboratory using a strong final-focus solenoid, and simulations addressing the effects

  13. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for SR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Sun

    2000-01-01

    This analysis demonstrates that a satisfactory ground control system can be designed for the Yucca Mountain site, and provides the technical basis for the design of ground support systems to be used in repository emplacement and non-emplacement drifts. The repository ground support design was based on analytical methods using acquired computer codes, and focused on the final support systems. A literature review of case histories, including the lessons learned from the design and construction of the ESF, the studies on the seismic damages of underground openings, and the use of rock mass classification systems in the ground support design, was conducted (Sections 6.3.4 and 6.4). This review provided some basis for determining the inputs and methodologies used in this analysis. Stability of the supported and unsupported emplacement and non-emplacement drifts was evaluated in this analysis. The excavation effects (i.e., state of the stress change due to excavation), thermal effects (i.e., due to heat output from waste packages), and seismic effects (i.e., from potential earthquake events) were evaluated, and stress controlled modes of failure were examined for two in situ stress conditions (k 0 =0.3 and 1.0) using rock properties representing rock mass categories of 1 and 5. Variation of rock mass units such as the non-lithophysal (Tptpmn) and lithophysal (Tptpll) was considered in the analysis. The focus was on the non-lithophysal unit because this unit appears to be relatively weaker and has much smaller joint spacing. Therefore, the drift stability and ground support needs were considered to be controlled by the design for this rock unit. The ground support systems for both emplacement and non-emplacement drifts were incorporated into the models to assess their performance under in situ, thermal, and seismic loading conditions. Both continuum and discontinuum modeling approaches were employed in the analyses of the rock mass behavior and in the evaluation of the

  14. Study of redshifted H I from the epoch of reionization with drift scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Sourabh; Sethi, Shiv K.; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Shankar, N. Udaya; Dwarakanath, K. S.; Deshpande, Avinash A. [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore (India); Bernardi, Gianni [Square Kilometre Array South Africa (SKA SA), 3rd Floor, The Park, Park Road, Pinelands 7405 (South Africa); Bowman, Judd D. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ85281 (United States); Briggs, Frank; Gaensler, Bryan M. [ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), 44 Rosehill Street, Redfern, NSW 2016 (Australia); Cappallo, Roger J.; Corey, Brian E.; Goeke, Robert F. [MIT Haystack Observatory, Westford, MA 01886 (United States); Emrich, David [Curtin University, Perth (Australia); Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Kasper, Justin C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hazelton, Bryna J. [University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hewitt, Jacqueline N. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, 37-241, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie [Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand); Kaplan, David L., E-mail: sourabh@rri.res.in, E-mail: sethi@rri.res.in [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); and others

    2014-09-20

    Detection of the epoch of reionization (EoR) in the redshifted 21 cm line is a challenging task. Here, we formulate the detection of the EoR signal using the drift scan strategy. This method potentially has better instrumental stability compared to the case where a single patch of sky is tracked. We demonstrate that the correlation time between measured visibilities could extend up to 1-2 hr for an interferometer array such as the Murchison Widefield Array, which has a wide primary beam. We estimate the EoR power based on a cross-correlation of visibilities over time and show that the drift scan strategy is capable of detecting the EoR signal with a signal to noise that is comparable/better compared to the tracking case. We also estimate the visibility correlation for a set of bright point sources and argue that the statistical inhomogeneity of bright point sources might allow their separation from the EoR signal.

  15. Effects of binge drinking and hangover on response selection sub-processes-a study using EEG and drift diffusion modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Hoffmann, Sven; Beste, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Effects of binge drinking on cognitive control and response selection are increasingly recognized in research on alcohol (ethanol) effects. Yet, little is known about how those processes are modulated by hangover effects. Given that acute intoxication and hangover seem to be characterized by partly divergent effects and mechanisms, further research on this topic is needed. In the current study, we hence investigated this with a special focus on potentially differential effects of alcohol intoxication and subsequent hangover on sub-processes involved in the decision to select a response. We do so combining drift diffusion modeling of behavioral data with neurophysiological (EEG) data. Opposed to common sense, the results do not show an impairment of all assessed measures. Instead, they show specific effects of high dose alcohol intoxication and hangover on selective drift diffusion model and EEG parameters (as compared to a sober state). While the acute intoxication induced by binge-drinking decreased the drift rate, it was increased by the subsequent hangover, indicating more efficient information accumulation during hangover. Further, the non-decisional processes of information encoding decreased with intoxication, but not during hangover. These effects were reflected in modulations of the N2, P1 and N1 event-related potentials, which reflect conflict monitoring, perceptual gating and attentional selection processes, respectively. As regards the functional neuroanatomical architecture, the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) as well as occipital networks seem to be modulated. Even though alcohol is known to have broad neurobiological effects, its effects on cognitive processes are rather specific. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  16. The adsorption of methanol and water on SAPO-34: in situ and ex situ X-ray diffraction studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wragg, David S.; Johnsen, Rune; Norby, Poul

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of methanol on SAPO-34 has been studied using a combination of in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction to follow the process and ex situ high resolution powder diffraction to determine the structure. The unit cell volume of SAPO-34 is found to expand by 0.5% during methanol ad...

  17. Study for drifts of the oxidation in nitrous oxide of an activated coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Velasquez; Jose de Jesus; Carballo Suarez, Luis M; Freitas, Madalena; Farias, Joaquim Luis Faria; Figueiredo, Jose Luis

    2001-01-01

    In order to obtain materials with different surface properties, an activated carbon was modified by thermal treatment with 20% of nitrous oxide in nitrogen at 500 centigrade degrees, for different periods of time, and also with 5 % of oxygen in nitrogen at 425 centigrade degrees for 600 minutes and 100% of hydrogen at 950 centigrade degrees for 360 minutes. Drifts were used to characterize the surface chemistry of the material treated. The qualitative result s show that the treatments with N2O have larger effects on the intensity of the surface groups. These changes could be associated to the incorporation of nitrogen into the carbon matrix. In agreement with literature reports, it could be said that the gas phase oxidation of the activated carbon shows mainly superficial groups such as carboxylic anhydrides, phenols and carboxylates, lactones and quinones

  18. Numerical study of drift-kinetic evolution of collisional plasmas in tori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beasley, C.O. Jr.; Meier, H.K.; van Rij, W.I.; McCune, J.E.

    1976-03-01

    Preliminary numerical results for the dynamics of toroidally confined plasmas in the drift-kinetic, Fokker--Planck description are discussed. These solutions were obtained by using the techniques inherent to the collisional plasma model (CPM) described in detail elsewhere. An initial value problem is solved in the local approximation in which collisions and particle dynamics compete in a given magnetic field to set up a quasi-equilibrium. Both the plasma (guiding center) distribution function and many macroscopic quantities of interest are monitored. Good agreement with corresponding but more approximate theories is obtained over a wide range of collisionality, particularly with regard to the neoclassical particle flux. Encouraging confirmation of earlier results for the distribution function is achieved when due account is taken of the differing collisionality of particles with differing energies. These initial results indicate the potential importance of certain non-local effects as well as inclusion of self-consistency between fields and plasma currents and densities

  19. Vibrational Spectrum of HMX at CO2 Laser Wavelengths: A Combined DRIFT and LPAS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Puiu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The vibrational spectrum of solid standard HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine was investigated. Two spectroscopic techniques were adopted for their different sensitivity and resolution. A preliminary survey of the absorption bands of the compound was performed in the 8000–400 cm−1 spectral range by employing the diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT technique at room temperature. The high-resolution line spectrum of HMX was obtained in the 9.2–10.8 μm spectral range by laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS method, using a line tuneable 10 W stabilised cw CO2 laser light source. By comparing the data collected with the two techniques in the common frequency range, a very good agreement was observed.

  20. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flauger, Raphael [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); McAllister, Liam [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Silverstein, Eva [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Westphal, Alexander, E-mail: flauger@physics.ucsd.edu, E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu, E-mail: evas@stanford.edu, E-mail: alexander.westphal@desy.de [Theory Group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-10-01

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  1. Drifting oscillations in axion monodromy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flauger, Raphael; Westphal, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    We study the pattern of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum in axion monodromy inflation, accounting for drifts in the oscillation period that can be important for comparing to cosmological data. In these models the potential energy has a monomial form over a super-Planckian field range, with superimposed modulations whose size is model-dependent. The amplitude and frequency of the modulations are set by the expectation values of moduli fields. We show that during the course of inflation, the diminishing energy density can induce slow adjustments of the moduli, changing the modulations. We provide templates capturing the effects of drifting moduli, as well as drifts arising in effective field theory models based on softly broken discrete shift symmetries, and we estimate the precision required to detect a drifting period. A non-drifting template suffices over a wide range of parameters, but for the highest frequencies of interest, or for sufficiently strong drift, it is necessary to include parameters characterizing the change in frequency over the e-folds visible in the CMB. We use these templates to perform a preliminary search for drifting oscillations in a part of the parameter space in the Planck nominal mission data.

  2. In situ study on the formation of FeTe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Wulff, Anders Christian; Yue, Zhao

    2011-01-01

    The formation of the FeTe compound from a mixture of Fe and Te powders was studied in situ by means of high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. FeTe does not form directly from the starting elements; instead, FeTe2 forms as an intermediate product. During a 2 °C/min heating ramp, Te first reacts...

  3. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive)

  4. In situ stress determination research study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, W.G.; Thompson, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate and implement rock stress determination instruments and techniques developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) at its Underground Research Laboratory (URL) for use in jointed rock and to continue the development of analytical and interpretation methods for stress determination results including effects of scale, structure and anisotropy. Testing and evaluation of the instruments and methods developed at URL need to be done in a similar rock type prior to underground access at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

  5. The OPAL vertex drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.R.; Elcombe, P.A.; Hill, J.C.; Roach, C.M.; Armitage, J.C.; Carnegie, R.K.; Estabrooks, P.; Hemingway, R.; Karlen, D.; McPherson, A.; Pinfold, J.; Roney, J.M.; Routenburg, P.; Waterhouse, J.; Hargrove, C.K.; Klem, D.; Oakham, F.G.; Carter, A.A.; Jones, R.W.L.; Lasota, M.M.B.; Lloyd, S.L.; Pritchard, T.W.; Wyatt, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    A high precision vertex drift chamber has been installed in the OPAL experiment at LEP. The design of the chamber and the associated readout electronics is described. The performance of the system has been studied using cosmic ray muons and the results of these studies are presented. A space resolution of 50 μm in the drift direction is obtained using the OPAL central detector gas mixture at 4 bar. (orig.)

  6. Study on pulsed-operation of the drift tube quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutou, M.

    1982-01-01

    The heavy ion linac for NUMATRON project is designed not only as a injector for a synchrotron but also as a supplier of heavy ion beams for experiments with linac beam. In one repetition cycle of the synchrotron (1sec), the linac injects nearly 25 beam pulses with pulse width of 300 μsec and pulse interval of 30 msec. And the ion species can be varied every repetition. On the other hand, when it is off duty of injection to the synchrotron, the linac accelerates the beams that are directly used for the experiments. Also in this case, the ion species should be varied according to the requests of the experiments, for instance every 1 sec. Therefore, the quadrupole magnets installed in the drift tubes of the linac must be excited with pulse mode. The power supply of the quadrupole magnets will consists of two parts, namely pulse-excitation and dc-excitation power sources. The report describes the posibilities on the pulse-operation of the quadrupole magnets with the field gradient of asymptotically equals 10 KG/cm, and the analysis of the power supply of the quadrupole magnets. (author)

  7. SOFC anode reduction studied by in situ TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    The Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) is a promising part of future energy approaches due to a relatively high energy conversion efficiency and low environmental pollution. SOFCs are typically composed of ceramic materials which are highly complex at the nanoscale. TEM is routinely applied ex situ...... for studying these nanoscale structures, but only few SOFC studies have applied in situ TEM to observe the ceramic nanostructures in a reactive gas environment at elevated temperatures. The present contribution focuses on the reduction of an SOFC anode which is a necessary process to form the catalytically...... active Ni surface before operating the fuel cells. The reduction process was followed in the TEM while exposing a NiO/YSZ (YSZ = Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2) model anode to H2 at T = 250-1000⁰C. Pure NiO was used in reference experiments. Previous studies have shown that the reduction of pure Ni...

  8. Study of the variation of maximum beam size with quadrupole gradient in the FMIT drift tube linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boicourt, G.P.; Jameson, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The sensitivity of maximum beam size to input mismatch is studied as a function of quadrupole gradient in a short, high-current, drift-tube linac (DTL), for two presriptions: constant phase advance with constant filling factor; and constant strength with constant-length quads. Numerical study using PARMILA shows that the choice of quadrupole strength that minimizes the maximum transverse size of the matched beam through subsequent cells of the linac tends to be most sensitive to input mismatch. However, gradients exist nearby that result in almost-as-small beams over a suitably broad range of mismatch. The study was used to choose the initial gradient for the DTL portion of the Fusion Material Irradiation Test (FMIT) linac. The matching required across quad groups is also discussed

  9. Triage Drift:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Rødje, Kjetil

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a workplace study of triage work practices within an emergency department (ED). We examine the practices, procedures, and organization in which ED staff uses tools and technologies when coordinating the essential activity of assessing and sorting patients arriving at the ED...

  10. Drift chamber detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez Laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    A review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers is presented. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysied, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author)

  11. Drift Chambers detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs

  12. FIELD INVESTIGATION OF THE DRIFT SHADOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.W. Su; T.J. Kneafsey

    2006-01-01

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an underground void that, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rock mass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturated rock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirming the existence of the drift shadow have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of drift shadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristics could provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in the subsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the field program that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadow--and the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sand mine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch, California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it an excellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. The mine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine formation, an approximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales, coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the mine required the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other, driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. This configuration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rock mass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around the underlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performed are described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radial pattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situ water content using a gravimetric technique, as well as analyzed for chemistry. With the active hydrologic test, water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel drifts and the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottom drift

  13. A new in situ model to study erosive enamel wear, a clinical pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruben, J.L.; Truin, G.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop an in situ model for erosive wear research which allows for more clinically relevant exposure parameters than other in situ models and to show tooth site-specific erosive wear effect of an acid challenge of orange juice on enamel. METHODS: This pilot study included 6

  14. IFMIF - Design Study for in Situ Creep Fatigue Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, S.; Heinzel, V.; Simakov, St.; Stratmanns, E.; Vladimirov, P.; Moeslang, A.

    2006-01-01

    While the high flux volume (20-50 dpa/fpy) of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is dedicated to the irradiation of ∼ 1100 qualified specimens that will be post irradiation examined after disassembling in dedicated Hot Cells, various in situ experiments are foreseen in the medium flux volume (1-20 dpa/fpy). Of specific importance for structural lifetime assessments of fusion power reactors are instrumented in situ creep-fatigue experiments, as they can simulate realistically a superposition of thermal fatigue or creep fatigue and irradiation with fusion relevant neutrons. Based on former experience with in situ fatigue tests under high energy light ion irradiation, a design study has been performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ creep fatigue tests in the IFMIF medium flux position. The vertically arranged test module for such experiments consists basically of a frame similar to a universal testing machine, but equipped with three pulling rods, driven by independent step motors, instrumentation systems and specimen cooling systems. Therefore, three creep fatigue specimens may be tested at one time in this apparatus. Each specimen is a hollow tube with coolant flow in the specimen interior to maintain individual specimen temperatures. The recently established IFMIF global 3D geometry model was used together the latest McDeLicious code for the neutral and charged particle transport calculations. These comprehensive neutronics calculations have been performed with a fine special resolution of 0.25 cm 3 , showing among others that the specimens will be irradiated with a homogeneous damage rate of up to 13(∼ 9%) dpa/fpy and a fusion relevant damage to helium ratio of 10-12 appm He/dpa. In addition, damage and gas production rates as well as the heat deposition in structural parts of the test module have been calculated. Despite of the vertical gradients in the nuclear heating, CFD code calculations with STAR-CD revealed very

  15. Aging Studies for the Large Honeycomb Drift Tube System of the Outer Tracker of HERA-B

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, H; Beck, M; Belkov, A; Berkhan, K; Bohm, G; Bruinsma, M; Buran, T; Capeans, M; Chamanina, J; Chen, BX; Deckers, H; Dehmelt, K; Dong, X; Eckmann, R; Emelianov, D; Fourletov, S; Golutvin, I; Hohlmann, M; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Hulsbergen, W; Jia, Y; Jiang, C; Kapitza, H; Karabekyan, S; Ke, Z; Kiryushin, Y; Kolanoski, H; Korpar, S; Krizan, P; Krucker, D; Lanyov, A; Liu, Y Q; Lohse, T; Loke, R; Mankel, R; Medin, G; Michel, E; Moshkin, A; Ni, J; Nowak, S; Ouchrif, M; Padilla, C; Pose, D; Ressing, D; Saveliev, V; Schmidt, B; Schmidt-Parzefall, W; Schreiner, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarz, Andreas S; Siccama, I; Solunin, S; Somov, S; Souvorov, V; Spiridonov, A; Staric, M; Stegmann, C; Steinkamp, O; Tesch, N; Tsakov, I; Uwer, U; Vassiliev, S; Vukotic, I; Walter, M; Wang, J J; Wang, Y M; Wurth, R; Yang, J; Zheng, Z; Zhu, Z; Zimmerman, R

    2003-01-01

    The HERA-B Outer Tracker consists of drift tubes folded from polycarbonate foil and is operated with Ar/CF4/CO2 as drift gas. The detector has to stand radiation levels which are similar to LHC conditions. The first prototypes exposed to radiation in HERA-B suffered severe radiation damage due to the development of self-sustaining currents (Malter effect). In a subsequent extended R&D program major changes to the original concept for the drift tubes (surface conductivity, drift gas, production materials) have been developed and validated for use in harsh radiation environments. In the test program various aging effects (like Malter currents, gain loss due to anode aging and etching of the anode gold surface) have been observed and cures by tuning of operation parameters have been developed.

  16. Validation of the AGDISP model for predicting airborne atrazine spray drift: a South African ground application case study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nsibande, SA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Air dispersion software models for evaluating pesticide spray drift during application have been developed that can potentially serve as a cheaper convenient alternative to field monitoring campaigns. Such models require validation against field...

  17. Field investigation of the drift shadow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Grace W.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Cook, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an underground void that, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rockmass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturated rock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirming its existence have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of drift shadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristics could provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in the subsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the field program that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadow and the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sandmine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch, California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it an excellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. The mine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine Formation, an approximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales, coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the mine required the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other, driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. This configuration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rockmass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around the underlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performed are described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radial pattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situ water content and chemical constituents. With the active hydrologic test, water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel drifts and the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottom drift. Tensiometers, electrical resistance probes, neutron probes, and ground

  18. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed

  19. Dike/Drift Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Gaffiney

    2004-11-23

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

  20. Dike/Drift Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffiney, E.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1)

  1. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Drift Burst Hypothesis postulates the existence of short-lived locally explosive trends in the price paths of financial assets. The recent US equity and Treasury flash crashes can be viewed as two high profile manifestations of such dynamics, but we argue that drift bursts of varying magnitude are an expected and regular occurrence in financial markets that can arise through established mechanisms such as feedback trading. At a theoretical level, we show how to build drift bursts into the...

  2. Occipitocervical fusion – An epidemiological drift experienced in an Irish tertiary spinal referral center: Twenty-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadim Tarazi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: We noticed a clear epidemiological drift in the cervical spine pathologies requiring OCF during the first and second decade of study period with an increase in prevalence of pathological fractures secondary to metastatic disease. In addition, a drop in rheumatoid cervical disease requiring OCF has been noted.

  3. Dike/Drift Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.S. Gaffney

    2003-10-08

    This report documents the model of events associated with a potential intrusion of magma from a volcanic dike into a drift or drifts in the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. The following topics are included in this report: (1) A discussion of dike propagation, which provides the basis for describing the path that a representative dike, or swarm of dikes, would follow during an event. (2) A discussion of magma flow, which evaluates the interaction at the junction of the propagating dike with the drift and the movement of magmatic products into and down drifts and, potentially, through a drift to the surface by way of access drift or a secondary dike opened up along the drift. (3) A discussion of gas flow and conductive cooling of a magma-filled drift, describing how an adjacent drift that has not been intersected by a dike could be affected by post-intrusion phenomena. Note that a gas flow analysis is also addressed in ''Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Form and Waste Packages'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161810]), and those results are consistent with the results presented in this report.

  4. Dike/Drift Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E.S. Gaffney

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the model of events associated with a potential intrusion of magma from a volcanic dike into a drift or drifts in the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. The following topics are included in this report: (1) A discussion of dike propagation, which provides the basis for describing the path that a representative dike, or swarm of dikes, would follow during an event. (2) A discussion of magma flow, which evaluates the interaction at the junction of the propagating dike with the drift and the movement of magmatic products into and down drifts and, potentially, through a drift to the surface by way of access drift or a secondary dike opened up along the drift. (3) A discussion of gas flow and conductive cooling of a magma-filled drift, describing how an adjacent drift that has not been intersected by a dike could be affected by post-intrusion phenomena. Note that a gas flow analysis is also addressed in ''Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Form and Waste Packages'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 161810]), and those results are consistent with the results presented in this report

  5. Electrochemical studies, in-situ and ex-situ characterizations of different manganese compounds electrodeposited in aerated solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peulon, S.; Lacroix, A.; Chausse, A.; Larabi-Gruet, N.

    2007-01-01

    This work deals with the electrodeposition of manganese compounds. A systematic study of the synthesis experimental conditions has been carried out, and the obtained depositions have been characterized by different ex-situ analyses methods (XRD, FTIR, SEM). The in-situ measurements of mass increase with a quartz microbalance during the syntheses have allowed to estimate the growth mechanisms which are in agreement with the ex-situ characterizations. The cation has an important role in the nature of the electrodeposited compounds. In presence of sodium, a mixed lamellar compound Mn(III)/Mn(IV), the birnessite, is deposited, whereas in presence of potassium, bixbyite is formed (Mn 2 O 3 ), these two compounds having a main role in the environment. The substrate can also influence the nature of the formed intermediary compounds. Little studied compounds such as feitkneichtite (β-MnOOH) and groutite (α-MnOOH) have been revealed. (O.M.)

  6. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    With the advent of the 800 MeV PS Booster in 1972, the original injector of the PS, a 50 MeV Alvarez-type proton linac, had reached its limits, in terms of intensity and stability. In 1973 one therefore decided to build a new linac (Linac 2), also with a drift-tube Alvarez structure and an energy of 50 MeV. It had a new Cockcroft-Walton preinjector with 750 keV, instead of the previous one with 500 keV. Linac 2 was put into service in 1980. The old Linac 1 was then used for the study of, and later operation with, various types of ions. This picture shows Linac 2 drift-tubes, suspended on stems coming from the top, in contrast to Linac 1, where the drift-tubes stood on stems coming from the bottom.

  7. Case study of the gradient features of in situ concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengkun Hou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recognition of gradient features of the properties of in situ concrete is important for the interpretation/prediction of service life. In this work, the gradient features: water absorption, porosity, mineralogy, morphology and micromechanical properties were studied on two in situ road concretes (15 and 5 years old, respectively by weighing, MIP, XRD, IR, SEM/EDS and micro-indentation techniques. Results showed that a coarsening trend of the pores of the concrete leads to a gradual increase of liquid transport property from inside to outside. Although the carbonation of the exposed surface results in a compact microstructure of the paste, its combined action with calcium-leaching leads to a comparable porosity of different concrete layers. Moreover, the combining factors result in three morphological features, i.e. a porous and granular exposed-layer, a fibrous and porous subexposed-layer and a compact inner-layer. Micro-indentation test results showed that a hard layer that moves inward with aging exists due to the alterations of the mineralogy, the pore and the gel structure.

  8. A Novel Penetration System for in situ Astrobiological Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Gao

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to ultraviolet flux in the surface layers of most solar bodies, future astrobiological research is increasingly seeking to conduct subsurface penetration and drilling to detect chemical signature for extant or extinct life. To address this issue, we present a micro-penetrator concept (mass < 10 kg that is suited for extraterrestrial planetary deployment and in situ investigation of chemical and physical properties. The instrumentation in this concept is a bio-inspired drill to access material beneath sterile surface layer for biomarker detection. The proposed drill represents a novel concept of two-valve-reciprocating motion, inspired by the working mechanism of wood wasp ovipositors. It is lightweight (0.5 kg, driven at low power (3 W, and able to drill deep (1-2 m. Tests have shown that the reciprocating drill is feasible and has potential of improving drill efficiency without using any external force. The overall penetration system provides a small, light and energy efficient solution to in situ astrobiological studies, which is crucial for space engineering. Such a micro-penetrator can be used for exploration of terrestrial-type planets or other small bodies of the solar system with the minimum of modifications.

  9. A Novel Penetration System for in situ Astrobiological Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Gao

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to ultraviolet flux in the surface layers of most solar bodies, future astrobiological research is increasingly seeking to conduct subsurface penetration and drilling to detect chemical signature for extant or extinct life. To address this issue, we present a micro-penetrator concept (mass < 10 kg that is suited for extraterrestrial planetary deployment and in situ investigation of chemical and physical properties. The instrumentation in this concept is a bio-inspired drill to access material beneath sterile surface layer for biomarker detection. The proposed drill represents a novel concept of two-valve-reciprocating motion, inspired by the working mechanism of wood wasp ovipositors. It is lightweight (0.5 kg, driven at low power (3 W, and able to drill deep (1-2 m. Tests have shown that the reciprocating drill is feasible and has potential of improving drill efficiency without using any external force. The overall penetration system provides a small, light and energy efficient solution to in situ astrobiological studies, which is crucial for space engineering. Such a micro-penetrator can be used for exploration of terrestrial-type planets or other small bodies of the solar system with the minimum of modifications.

  10. Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, D.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository non-emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for non-emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). This calculation will provide input for the development of LA documents. The scope of this calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts including access mains, ramps, exhaust mains, turnouts, intersections between access mains and turnouts, and intersections between exhaust mains and emplacement drifts, portals, TBM launch chambers, observation drift and test alcove in the performance confirmation (PC) facilities, etc. The calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts subjected to a combined loading of in-situ stress, seismic stress, and/or thermal stress. Other effects such as hydrological and chemical effects are not considered in this analysis

  11. An electrodeless drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.; Barlow, R.J.; Bowdery, C.K.; Duerdoth, I.; Rowe, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    We describe a chamber in which the drift field is controlled by the deposition of electrostatic charge on an insulating surface. The chamber operates with good efficiency and precision for observed drift distances of up to 45 cm, promises to be extremely robust and adaptable and offers a very cheap way of making particle detectors. (orig.)

  12. Modeling concept drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borchani, Hanen; Martinez, Ana Maria; Masegosa, Andrés R.

    2015-01-01

    An often used approach for detecting and adapting to concept drift when doing classification is to treat the data as i.i.d. and use changes in classification accuracy as an indication of concept drift. In this paper, we take a different perspective and propose a framework, based on probabilistic ...... data set from a Spanish bank....

  13. Systematic studies on the reconstruction efficiency and accuracy of a track drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelshaeuser, H.

    1993-02-01

    The author has studied the reconstruction efficiency of the NA35-TPC by means of a simulation of the tracks by means of laser radiation. He has obtained results on the diffusion constant and the track resolution. (HSI) [de

  14. Time dependent drift Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1982-04-01

    The motion of individual charged particles in a given magnetic and an electric fields is discussed. An idea of a guiding center distribution function f is introduced. The guiding center distribution function is connected to the asymptotic Hamiltonian through the drift kinetic equation. The general non-stochastic magnetic field can be written in a contravariant and a covariant forms. The drift Hamiltonian is proposed, and the canonical gyroradius is presented. The proposed drift Hamiltonian agrees with Alfven's drift velocity to lowest non-vanishing order in the gyroradius. The relation between the exact, time dependent equations of motion and the guiding center equation is clarified by a Lagrangian analysis. The deduced Lagrangian represents the drift motion. (Kato, T.)

  15. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-01-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package corrosion or radionuclide transport

  16. Job satisfaction and preference drift.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maassen van den Brink, H.; Groot, W.J.N.

    1999-01-01

    Most empirical studies do not find that higher wages lead to more job satisfaction. In this paper we argue that the insignificant effect of wages on job satisfaction is due to preference drift. We adapt the standard ordered response model to allow for preference shifts. The empirical results support

  17. The Semantic Drift of Quotations in Blogspace: A Case Study in Short-Term Cultural Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerique, Sébastien; Roth, Camille

    2018-01-01

    We present an empirical case study that connects psycholinguistics with the field of cultural evolution, in order to test for the existence of cultural attractors in the evolution of quotations. Such attractors have been proposed as a useful concept for understanding cultural evolution in relation with individual cognition, but their existence has been hard to test. We focus on the transformation of quotations when they are copied from blog to blog or media website: by coding words with a number of well-studied lexical features, we show that the way words are substituted in quotations is consistent (a) with the hypothesis of cultural attractors and (b) with known effects of the word features. In particular, words known to be harder to recall in lists have a higher tendency to be substituted, and words easier to recall are produced instead. Our results support the hypothesis that cultural attractors can result from the combination of individual cognitive biases in the interpretation and reproduction of representations. Copyright © 2017 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  18. In situ ellipsometric study of surface immobilization of flagellar filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurunczi, S., E-mail: kurunczi@mfa.kfki.hu [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Nemeth, A.; Huelber, T. [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Kozma, P. [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Department of Nanotechnology, Research Institute of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, Egyetem u. 10, Veszprem, H-8200 (Hungary); Petrik, P. [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Jankovics, H. [Department of Nanotechnology, Research Institute of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, Egyetem u. 10, Veszprem, H-8200 (Hungary); Sebestyen, A. [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Department of Nanotechnology, Research Institute of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, Egyetem u. 10, Veszprem, H-8200 (Hungary); Vonderviszt, F. [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Department of Nanotechnology, Research Institute of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, Egyetem u. 10, Veszprem, H-8200 (Hungary); Institute of Enzymology, Karolina ut 29-33, Budapest, H-1113 (Hungary); and others

    2010-10-15

    Protein filaments composed of thousands of subunits are promising candidates as sensing elements in biosensors. In this work in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry is applied to monitor the surface immobilization of flagellar filaments. This study is the first step towards the development of layers of filamentous receptors for sensor applications. Surface activation is performed using silanization and a subsequent glutaraldehyde crosslinking. Structure of the flagellar filament layers immobilized on activated and non-activated Si wafer substrates is determined using a two-layer effective medium model that accounted for the vertical density distribution of flagellar filaments with lengths of 300-1500 nm bound to the surface. The formation of the first interface layer can be explained by the multipoint covalent attachment of the filaments, while the second layer is mainly composed of tail pinned filaments floating upwards with the free parts. As confirmed by atomic force microscopy, covalent immobilization resulted in an increased surface density compared to absorption.

  19. In situ Raman spectroscopy studies of bulk and surface metal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.; Jehng, J.M.; Deo, G.; Guliants, V.V.; Benziger, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    Bulk V-P-O and model supported vanadia catalysts were investigated with in situ Raman spectroscopy during n-butane oxidation to maleic anhydride in order to determine the fundamental molecular structure-reactivity/selectivity insights that can be obtained from such experiments. The in situ Raman

  20. Design of an electrochemical cell for in situ XAS studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, N. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Box 6154, CEP 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Morais, J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Avenida Bento Goncalves, 9500, Bairro Agronomia, CP 15051, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Alves, M.C.M. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Avenida Bento Goncalves, 9500, Bairro Agronomia, CP 15003, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)], E-mail: maria@iq.ufrgs.br

    2007-05-15

    In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies have been carried out on the electrochemical insertion of Co metal particles in polypyrrole. This has become possible due to the development of an electrochemical cell to allow XAS studies in fluorescence geometry under steady-state conditions. The experimental set-up allows the in situ monitoring of the structural and electronic changes of the selected atom in a matrix. The project of the electrochemical cell is presented with the results obtained at different stages of the electrochemical process. XANES and EXAFS results showed that the initial stage of the cobalt insertion in polypyrrole took place in an ionic form, like [-[(C{sub 4}H{sub 2}N){sub 3}CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}OSO{sub 3}{sup -}]{sub 6}Co{sup 2+}] with posterior reduction to a metallic form. The quantitative analysis of the first shell shows that, at -0.60 V, the cobalt atoms are surrounded by 6 ({+-}0.5) atoms located at 2.12 ({+-}0.05) A with a large Debye-Waller factor ({sigma}{sup 2}) value of 0.0368 ({+-}0.0074). At -0.80 V, two distances of R = 1.99 ({+-}0.01) and R = 2.50 ({+-}0.01) A show the coexistence of cobalt in the oxidized and reduced (Co{sup 0}) forms. The Co-Co distance corresponds to that of bulk cobalt. At -1.20 V, the obtained values of N = 12 ({+-}0.5) and R = 2.56 ({+-}0.01) A and a Debye-Waller factor of 0.0176 ({+-}0.0004) suggest the formation of metallic cobalt in a quite disordered form.

  1. Drift Degradation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G.H. Nieder-Westermann

    2005-01-01

    The outputs from the drift degradation analysis support scientific analyses, models, and design calculations, including the following: (1) Abstraction of Drift Seepage; (2) Seismic Consequence Abstraction; (3) Structural Stability of a Drip Shield Under Quasi-Static Pressure; and (4) Drip Shield Structural Response to Rock Fall. This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The drift degradation analysis includes the development and validation of rockfall models that approximate phenomenon associated with various components of rock mass behavior anticipated within the repository horizon. Two drift degradation rockfall models have been developed: the rockfall model for nonlithophysal rock and the rockfall model for lithophysal rock. These models reflect the two distinct types of tuffaceous rock at Yucca Mountain. The output of this modeling and analysis activity documents the expected drift deterioration for drifts constructed in accordance with the repository layout configuration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172801])

  2. Design study of a low-power, low-noise front-end for multianode silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caponetto, L.; Presti, D. Lo; Randazzo, N.; Russo, G.V.; Leonora, E.; Lo Nigro, L.; Petta, C.; Reito, S.; Sipala, V.

    2005-01-01

    The read-out for Silicon Drift Detectors in the form of a VLSI chip is presented, with a view to applications in High Energy Physics and space experiments. It is characterised by extremely low power dissipation, small noise and size

  3. Competitive Association and Charge Transfer in the Reactions of NO + with some Ketones: a Select Ion Flow Drift Tube Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fairley, D. A.; Milligan, D. B.; Freeman, C. G.; McEwan, M. J.; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 193, č. 1 (1999), s. 35-43 ISSN 1387-3806 Grant - others:Marsden Fund(NZ) - Institutional research plan: CEZ:A54/98:Z4-040-9-ii Keywords : ion-molecule reaction kinetics * selected ion flow drift tube * ternary association Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.086, year: 1999

  4. Comparative study of in-situ filter test methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, M.; Stevens, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    Available methods of testing high efficiency particulate aerosol (HEPA) filters in-situ have been reviewed. In order to understand the relationship between the results produced by different methods a selection has been compared. Various pieces of equipment for generating and detecting aerosols have been tested and their suitability assessed. Condensation-nuclei, DOP (di-octyl phthalate) and sodium-flame in-situ filter test methods have been studied, using the 500 cfm (9000 m 3 /h) filter test rig at Harwell and in the field. Both the sodium-flame and DOP methods measure the penetration through leaks and filter material. However the measured penetration through filtered leaks depends on the aerosol size distribution and the detection method. Condensation-nuclei test methods can only be used to measure unfiltered leaks since condensation nuclei have a very low penetration through filtered leaks. A combination of methods would enable filtered and unfiltered leaks to be measured. A condensation-nucleus counter using n-butyl alcohol as the working fluid has the advantage of being able to detect any particle up to 1 μm in diameter, including DOP, and so could be used for this purpose. A single-particle counter has not been satisfactory because of interference from particles leaking into systems under extract, particularly downstream of filters, and because the concentration of the input aerosol has to be severely limited. The sodium-flame method requires a skilled operator and may cause safety and corrosion problems. The DOP method using a total light scattering detector has so far been the most satisfactory. It is fairly easy to use, measures reasonably low values of penetration and gives rapid results. DOP has had no adverse effect on HEPA filters over a long series of tests

  5. Solar Drift-Pair Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavsky, A.; Volvach, Ya.; Konovalenko, A.; Koval, A.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper a new sight on the study of solar bursts historically called drift pairs (DPs) is presented. Having a simple morphology on dynamic spectra of radio records (two short components separated in time, and often they are very similar) and discovered at the dawn of radio astronomy, their features remain unexplained totally up to now. Generally, the DPs are observed during the solar storms of type III bursts, but not every storm of type III bursts is linked with DPs. Detected by ground-based instruments at decameter and meter wavelengths, the DP bursts are limited in frequency bandwidth. They can drift from high frequencies to low ones and vice versa. Their frequency drift rate may be both lower and higher than typical rates of type III bursts at the same frequency range. The development of low-frequency radio telescopes and data processing provide additional possibilities in the research. In this context the fresh analysis of DPs, made from recent observations in the summer campaign of 2015, are just considered. Their study was implemented by updated tools of the UTR-2 radio telescope at 9-33 MHz. During 10-12 July of 2015, DPs forming the longest patterns on dynamic spectra are about 7% of the total number of recorded DPs. Their marvelous resemblance in frequency drift rates with the solar S-bursts is discussed.

  6. Study on a drift chamber for high energy experiments; Estudos sobre uma camara de arrasto para um experimento de altas energias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puget, Maria Augusta Constante

    1993-12-31

    This work deals with the studies of a multiwire gaseous detector operating as a drift chamber, which will be part of the SELEX spectrometer of the experiment Fermilab E781. A prototype was designed to be built and tested at IFUSP. Results are shown of the analysis of data taken with another similar detector whose construction and test were done at Fermilab, with the aim of studying its characterization and performance. (author) 35 refs., 54 figs., 17 tabs.

  7. Study on a drift chamber for high energy experiments; Estudos sobre uma camara de arrasto para um experimento de altas energias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puget, Maria Augusta Constante

    1994-12-31

    This work deals with the studies of a multiwire gaseous detector operating as a drift chamber, which will be part of the SELEX spectrometer of the experiment Fermilab E781. A prototype was designed to be built and tested at IFUSP. Results are shown of the analysis of data taken with another similar detector whose construction and test were done at Fermilab, with the aim of studying its characterization and performance. (author) 35 refs., 54 figs., 17 tabs.

  8. In-Situ Optical Studies of Oxidation/Reduction Kinetics on SOFC Cermet Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    DATES COVERED (From - To) 1/29/10-9/30/10 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE In situ optical studies of oxidation/reduction kinetics on SOFC cermet anodes 5a...0572 In-situ Optical Studies of Oxidation/Reduction Kinetics on SOFC Cermet Anodes Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Montana State University...of Research In-situ Optical Studies of Oxidation/Reduction Kinetics on SOFC Cermet Anodes Principal Investigator Robert Walker Organization

  9. An in situ FTIR spectroscopic and thermogravimetric analysis study of the dehydration and dihydroxylation of SnO2: the contribution of the (100), (110) and (111) facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, P A; Attidekou, P S; Egdell, R G; Maneelok, S; Manning, D A C

    2016-08-17

    Nanoparticulate SnO2 produced by a hydrothermal method was characterised by BET, XRD, TGA-MS and in situ variable temperature diffuse reflectance infra red spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to determine the surface behaviour of water. For the (100) facets, hydrogen bonding does not occur, and water adsorption is less strong than for the (111) and (110) facets where hydrogen bonding does occur. Reversible uptake of oxygen was observed. These findings have implications for other surface-gas reactions in which Ni and Sb co-doped SnO2 (NATO) anodes are used for ozone generation. BET showed the relatively high surface area and nanometer scale of the SnO2 particles, whilst XRD confirmed the nano dimension of the crystallites and showed only the cassiterite phase. TGA analysis indicated four temperature regions over which mass loss was observed. These and the in situ DRIFTS studies revealed the existence of various forms of water associated with specific crystal facets of the SnO2, as well as the existence of isolated O-H groups and adsorbed oxygen species. Electronic absorptions were also observed and the data rationalised in terms of the existence of both free electron absorptions, and absorptions from oxygen vacancy states. The role of adsorbed molecular oxygen in electrochemical ozone generation at Ni and Sb co-doped SnO2 (NATO) anodes was strongly suggested by this work.

  10. Collisional drift fluids and drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, D.; Correa-Restrepo, D.

    1995-05-01

    The usual theoretical description of drift-wave turbulence (considered to be one possible cause of anomalous transport in a plasma), e.g. the Hasegawa-Wakatani theory, makes use of various approximations, the effect of which is extremely difficult to assess. This concerns in particular the conservation laws for energy and momentum. The latter is important as concerns charge separation and resulting electric fields which are possibly related to the L-H transition. Energy conservation is crucial for the stability behaviour; it will be discussed via an example. New collisional multispecies drift-fluid equations were derived by a new method which yields in a transparent way conservation of energy and total angular momentum, and the law for energy dissipation. Both electrostatic and electromagnetic field variations are considered. The method is based primarily on a Lagrangian for dissipationless fluids in drift approximation with isotropic pressures. The dissipative terms are introduced by adding corresponding terms to the ideal equations of motion and of the pressures. The equations of motion, of course, no longer result from a Lagrangian via Hamilton's principle. Their relation to the ideal equations imply, however, also a relation to the ideal Lagrangian of which one can take advantage. Instead of introducing heat conduction one can also assume isothermal behaviour, e.g. T ν (x)=const. Assumptions of this kind are often made in the literature. The new method of introducing dissipation is not restricted to the present kind of theories; it can equally well be applied to theories such as multi-fluid theories without using the drift approximation of the present paper. Linear instability is investigated via energy considerations and the implications of taking ohmic resistivity into account are discussed. (orig./WL)

  11. Summary of feasibility studies on in situ disposal as a decommissioning option for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbrecht, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    A scoping study was conducted over the period 1998-2000 to consider the feasibility of in situ disposal as a decommissioning option for AECL's Nuclear Power Demonstration Reactor located at Rolphton, Ontario. The results of a detailed assessment are summarized and the study concludes that in situ disposal appears feasible. Additional work required to confirm the results is also identified. A second in situ component, contaminated Winnipeg River sediments at AECL's Whiteshell Laboratory located in Manitoba, was also evaluated. That study concluded that in situ abandonment would have no adverse impact on aquatic life, humans and the environment. A summary of the study is presented as an appendix to the report. (author)

  12. Drift in salinity data from Argo profiling floats in the Sea of Japan

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Bajish, C.C.; Behera, S.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.

    In drift analysis of salinity sensors, one major problem is the difficulty in delineating sensor drift from water mass changes. In the present study, a new method is proposed for finding sensor drift that is free from water mass changes...

  13. Drift reversal capability in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, M.; Itoh, K.; Okamura, S.

    2002-10-01

    The maximum-J (J is the second adiabatic invariant) capability, i.e., the drift reversal capability, is examined in quasi-axisymmetric (QAS) stellarators and quasi-poloidally symmetric (QPS) stellarators as a possible mechanism for turbulent transport suppression. Due to the existence of non-axisymmetry of the magnetic field strength in QAS configurations, a local maximum of J is created to cause the drift reversal. The increase of magnetic shear in finite beta equilibria also has favorable effect in realizing the drift reversal. The radial variation of the uniform magnetic field component plays a crucial role for the drift reversal in a QPS configuration. Thus, the drift reversal capability and its external controllability are demonstrated for QAS and QPS stellarators, by which the impact of magnetic configuration on turbulent transport can be studied in experiments. (author)

  14. Drift reversal capability in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, M.; Itoh, K.; Okamura, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Nakajima, N.; Itoh, S.-I.; Neilson, G.H.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Rewoldt, G.

    2003-01-01

    The maximum-J (J is the second adiabatic invariant) capability, i.e., the drift reversal capability, is examined in quasi-axisymmetric (QAS) stellarators and quasi-poloidally symmetric (QPS) stellarators as a possible mechanism for turbulent transport suppression. Due to the existence of non-axisymmetry of the magnetic field strength in QAS configurations, a local maximum of J is created to cause the drift reversal. The increase of magnetic shear in finite beta equilibria also has favorable effect in realizing the drift reversal. The radial variation of the uniform magnetic field component plays a crucial role for the drift reversal in a QPS configuration. Thus, the drift reversal capability and its external controllability are demonstrated for QAS and QPS stellarators, by which the impact of magnetic configuration on turbulent transport can be studied in experiments. (author)

  15. Dissipative drift instability in dusty plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilakshi Das

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An investigation has been done on the very low-frequency electrostatic drift waves in a collisional dusty plasma. The dust density gradient is taken perpendicular to the magnetic field B0⃗, which causes the drift wave. In this case, low-frequency drift instabilities can be driven by E1⃗×B0⃗ and diamagnetic drifts, where E1⃗ is the perturbed electric field. Dust charge fluctuation is also taken into consideration for our study. The dust- neutral and ion-neutral collision terms have been included in equations of motion. It is seen that the low-frequency drift instability gets damped in such a system. Both dust charging and collision of plasma particles with the neutrals may be responsible for the damping of the wave. Both analytical and numerical techniques have been used while developing the theory.

  16. Changing the size of a mirror-reflected hand moderates the experience of embodiment but not proprioceptive drift: a repeated measures study on healthy human participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkopf, Priscilla G; Lloyd, Donna M; Johnson, Mark I

    2017-06-01

    Mirror visual feedback is used for reducing pain and visually distorting the size of the reflection may improve efficacy. The findings of studies investigating size distortion are inconsistent. The influence of the size of the reflected hand on embodiment of the mirror reflection is not known. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of magnifying and minifying mirror reflections of the hand on embodiment measured using an eight-item questionnaire and on proprioceptive drift. During the experiment, participants (n = 45) placed their right hand behind a mirror and their left hand in front of a mirror. Participants watched a normal-sized, a magnified and a minified reflection of the left hand while performing synchronised finger movements for 3 min (adaptive phase). Measurements of embodiment were taken before (pre) and after (post) synchronous movements of the fingers of both hands (embodiment adaptive phase). Results revealed larger proprioceptive drift post-adaptive phase (p = 0.001). Participants agreed more strongly with questionnaire items associated with location, ownership and agency of the reflection of the hand post-adaptive phase (p embodiment of the reflection of the hand. Magnifying and minifying the reflection of the hand has little effect on proprioceptive drift, but it weakens the subjective embodiment experience. Such factors need to be taken into account in future studies using this technique, particularly when assessing mirror visual feedback for pain management.

  17. Electrochemical studies, in-situ and ex-situ characterizations of different manganese compounds electrodeposited in aerated solutions; Etudes electrochimiques, suivis in-situ et caracterisations ex-situ de divers composes de manganese electrodeposes dans des solutions aerees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peulon, S.; Lacroix, A.; Chausse, A. [Univ. d' Evry-val-d' Essonne, Laboratoire Analyse et Modelisation pour la Biologie et l' Environnement (LAMBE CNRS UMR 8587), 91 - Evry (France); Larabi-Gruet, N. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN/DPC/SECR/L3MR), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2007-07-01

    This work deals with the electrodeposition of manganese compounds. A systematic study of the synthesis experimental conditions has been carried out, and the obtained depositions have been characterized by different ex-situ analyses methods (XRD, FTIR, SEM). The in-situ measurements of mass increase with a quartz microbalance during the syntheses have allowed to estimate the growth mechanisms which are in agreement with the ex-situ characterizations. The cation has an important role in the nature of the electrodeposited compounds. In presence of sodium, a mixed lamellar compound Mn(III)/Mn(IV), the birnessite, is deposited, whereas in presence of potassium, bixbyite is formed (Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}), these two compounds having a main role in the environment. The substrate can also influence the nature of the formed intermediary compounds. Little studied compounds such as feitkneichtite ({beta}-MnOOH) and groutite ({alpha}-MnOOH) have been revealed. (O.M.)

  18. The central drift chamber of the SAPHIR detector - implementation into the experiment and study of its properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    At the Bonn accelerator facility ELSA the large solid angle detector SAPHIR was built for the investigation of photon induced reactions. A main component of SAPHIR is the central drift chamber (CDC) matching the magneto gap of 1m 3 . The diameter of the in total 1828 hexagonal drift cells is about 18 mm. The subject of this paper is the implementation of the CDC in the experiment. After the description of the hardware follows the presentation of the software tools for filtering and monitoring the data, which have been developed and tested. An algorithm for extracting the space time relationship is presented. The properties of the chamber with an improved gas mixture (Helium/Neon/Isobutane8 21.25:63.75:15) have been investigated. A spatial resolution of about 200 μm was achieved. The efficiency of the chamber is 97% at a tagged photon of 5x10 4 per second crossing the chamber. (orig.) [de

  19. Drift Scale THM Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutqvist, J.

    2004-01-01

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because a sufficient amount of water must be available within a

  20. Steam reforming of methanol over oxide decorated nanoporous gold catalysts: a combined in situ FTIR and flow reactor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J; Mahr, C; Murshed, M M; Gesing, T M; Rosenauer, A; Bäumer, M; Wittstock, A

    2017-03-29

    Methanol as a green and renewable resource can be used to generate hydrogen by reforming, i.e., its catalytic oxidation with water. In combination with a fuel cell this hydrogen can be converted into electrical energy, a favorable concept, in particular for mobile applications. Its realization requires the development of novel types of structured catalysts, applicable in small scale reactor designs. Here, three different types of such catalysts were investigated for the steam reforming of methanol (SRM). Oxides such as TiO 2 and CeO 2 and mixtures thereof (Ce 1 Ti 2 O x ) were deposited inside a bulk nanoporous gold (npAu) material using wet chemical impregnation procedures. Transmission electron and scanning electron microscopy reveal oxide nanoparticles (1-2 nm in size) abundantly covering the strongly curved surface of the nanoporous gold host (ligaments and pores on the order of 40 nm in size). These catalysts were investigated in a laboratory scaled flow reactor. First conversion of methanol was detected at 200 °C. The measured turn over frequency at 300 °C of the CeO x /npAu catalyst was 0.06 s -1 . Parallel investigation by in situ infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) reveals that the activation of water and the formation of OH ads are the key to the activity/selectivity of the catalysts. While all catalysts generate sufficient OH ads to prevent complete dehydrogenation of methanol to CO, only the most active catalysts (e.g., CeO x /npAu) show direct reaction with formic acid and its decomposition to CO 2 and H 2 . The combination of flow reactor studies and in operando DRIFTS, thus, opens the door to further development of this type of catalyst.

  1. Exhaust catalysis studies using in-situ positron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vonkeman, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    In this thesis the kinetics of noble metal catalysts with a formulation related to that of commercial automotive exhaust catalysts, have been examined. The application of a new radioisotope tracer technique in studies of catalyst kinetics is described. Reactant and product molecules were pulsed over a catalyst under conditions such, that the reaction rates were kinetically controlled. Labelling of the reacting molecules enables the in-situ measurement of transient phenomena in a reactor as a function of time and position, if a tomograph is used as detection system. Integral reactor profiles are measured, by which concentration gradients occurring in the reactor can be studied. The large amount of data obtained during each experiment were used to quantify the kinetics. To this end, a refined mathematical model of the kinetics based on the elementary steps of adsorption, desorption and surface reaction was used to simulate the experiments. The experimental conditions in this study were representative for the cold start of a car, when the catalyst is heating up. By applying small catalyst particles and high linear velocities the influence of transport phenomena was excluded so that the experiments were carried out in the kinetically controlled regime. Reaction kinetics of carbon monoxide oxidation by oxygen and nitrogen oxide were studied. Experimental data obtained with surface science techniques were very useful in constructing the kinetic model. By simulating the experiments, the relevant kinetic parameters could be quantified and information on the elementary reaction steps was obtained. Since carbon dioxide adsorbs strongly to the catalyst carrier; 10% carbon dioxide was added to the gas phase (in actual automotive exhaust gas the concentration of carbon dioxide is 10 - 15%). This enabled the determination of the transients due to the interaction of gas components with the catalytically active compounds of the catalyst. (author). 446 refs.; 57 figs.; 21 tabs

  2. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs

  3. Seepage into drifts with mechanical degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2002-01-01

    Seepage into drifts in unsaturated tuff is an important issue for the long-term performance of the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Drifts in which waste packages will potentially be emplaced are subject to degradation in the form of rockfall from the drift ceiling induced by stress relief, seismic, or thermal effects. The objective of this study is to calculate seepage rates for various drift-degradation scenarios and for different values of percolation flux for the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and the Topopah Spring lower lithophysal (Tptpll) units. Seepage calculations are conducted by (1) defining a heterogeneous permeability model on the drift scale that is consistent with field data, (2) selecting calibrated parameters associated with the Tptpmn and Tptpll units, and (3) simulating seepage on detailed degraded-drift profiles, which were obtained from a separate rock mechanics engineering analysis. The simulation results indicate (1) that the seepage threshold (i.e., the percolation flux at which seepage first occurs) is not significantly changed by drift degradation, and (2) the degradation-induced increase in seepage above the threshold is influenced more by the shape of the cavity created by rockfall than the rockfall volume

  4. Radial semiconductor drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlings, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    The conditions under which the energy resolution of a radial semiconductor drift chamber based detector system becomes dominated by the step noise from the detector dark current have been investigated. To minimise the drift chamber dark current attention should be paid to carrier generation at Si/SiO 2 interfaces. This consideration conflicts with the desire to reduce the signal risetime: a higher drift field for shorter signal pulses requires a larger area of SiO 2 . Calculations for the single shaping and pseudo Gaussian passive filters indicate that for the same degree of signal risetime sensitivity in a system dominated by the step noise from the detector dark current, the pseudo Gaussian filter gives only a 3% improvement in signal/noise and 12% improvement in rate capability compared with the single shaper performance. (orig.)

  5. Travelling fronts in stochastic Stokes’ drifts

    KAUST Repository

    Blanchet, Adrien; Dolbeault, Jean; Kowalczyk, Michał

    2008-01-01

    By analytical methods we study the large time properties of the solution of a simple one-dimensional model of stochastic Stokes' drift. Semi-explicit formulae allow us to characterize the behaviour of the solutions and compute global quantities

  6. In situ studies of NO reduction by H

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roobol, S. B.; Onderwaater, W. G.; van Spronsen, M. A.; Carla, F; Balmes, O; Navarro-Paredes, V; Vendelbo, S.B.; Kooyman, P.J.; Elkjær, C. F.; Helveg, S; Felici, R; Frenken, J. W.M.; Groot, I.M.N.

    2017-01-01

    In situ surface X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy at 1 bar show massive material transport of platinum during high-temperature NO reduction with H2. A Pt(110) single-crystal surface shows a wide variety of surface reconstructions and extensive faceting of the

  7. In Situ Study of Noncatalytic Metal Oxide Nanowire Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rackauskas, Simas; Jiang, Hua; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2014-01-01

    a catalyst is still widely disputed and unclear. Here, we show that the nanowire growth during metal oxidation is limited by a nucleation of a new layer. On the basis of in situ transmission electron microscope investigations we found that the growth occurs layer by layer at the lowest specific surface...

  8. In situ coral reef oxygen metabolism: an eddy correlation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew H Long

    Full Text Available Quantitative studies of coral reefs are challenged by the three-dimensional hard structure of reefs and the high spatial variability and temporal dynamics of their metabolism. We used the non-invasive eddy correlation technique to examine respiration and photosynthesis rates, through O2 fluxes, from reef crests and reef slopes in the Florida Keys, USA. We assessed how the photosynthesis and respiration of different reef habitats is controlled by light and hydrodynamics. Numerous fluxes (over a 0.25 h period were as high as 4500 mmol O2 m(-2 d(-1, which can only be explained by efficient light utilization by the phototrophic community and the complex canopy structure of the reef, having a many-fold larger surface area than its horizontal projection. Over diel cycles, the reef crest was net autotrophic, whereas on the reef slope oxygen production and respiration were balanced. The autotrophic nature of the shallow reef crests implies that the export of organics is an important source of primary production for the larger area. Net oxygen production on the reef crest was proportional to the light intensity, up to 1750 µmol photons m(-2 s(-1 and decreased thereafter as respiration was stimulated by high current velocities coincident with peak light levels. Nighttime respiration rates were also stimulated by the current velocity, through enhanced ventilation of the porous framework of the reef. Respiration rates were the highest directly after sunset, and then decreased during the night suggesting that highly labile photosynthates produced during the day fueled early-night respiration. The reef framework was also important to the acquisition of nutrients as the ambient nitrogen stock in the water had sufficient capacity to support these high production rates across the entire reef width. These direct measurements of complex reefs systems yielded high metabolic rates and dynamics that can only be determined through in situ, high temporal resolution

  9. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy probe for in situ mechanism study of graphene-oxide-based resistive random access memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nho, Hyun Woo; Kim, Jong Yun; Wang, Jian; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Choi, Sung-Yool; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Here, an in situ probe for scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) has been developed and applied to the study of the bipolar resistive switching (BRS) mechanism in an Al/graphene oxide (GO)/Al resistive random access memory (RRAM) device. To perform in situ STXM studies at the C K- and O K-edges, both the RRAM junctions and the I0 junction were fabricated on a single Si3N4 membrane to obtain local XANES spectra at these absorption edges with more delicate I0 normalization. Using this probe combined with the synchrotron-based STXM technique, it was possible to observe unique chemical changes involved in the BRS process of the Al/GO/Al RRAM device. Reversible oxidation and reduction of GO induced by the externally applied bias voltages were observed at the O K-edge XANES feature located at 538.2 eV, which strongly supported the oxygen ion drift model that was recently proposed from ex situ transmission electron microscope studies.

  10. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    are an expected and regular occurrence in financial markets that can arise through established mechanisms such as feedback trading. At a theoretical level, we show how to build drift bursts into the continuous-time Itô semi-martingale model in such a way that the fundamental arbitrage-free property is preserved......, currencies and commodities. We find that the majority of identified drift bursts are accompanied by strong price reversals and these can therefore be regarded as “flash crashes” that span brief periods of severe market disruption without any material longer term price impacts....

  11. Gas and water flow in an excavation-induced fracture network around an underground drift: A case study for a radioactive waste repository in clay rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Vaissière, Rémi; Armand, Gilles; Talandier, Jean

    2015-02-01

    The Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) surrounding a drift, and in particular its evolution, is being studied for the performance assessment of a radioactive waste underground repository. A specific experiment (called CDZ) was designed and implemented in the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in France to investigate the EDZ. This experiment is dedicated to study the evolution of the EDZ hydrogeological properties (conductivity and specific storage) of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone under mechanical compression and artificial hydration. Firstly, a loading cycle applied on a drift wall was performed to simulate the compression effect from bentonite swelling in a repository drift (bentonite is a clay material to be used to seal drifts and shafts for repository closure purpose). Gas tests (permeability tests with nitrogen and tracer tests with helium) were conducted during the first phase of the experiment. The results showed that the fracture network within the EDZ was initially interconnected and opened for gas flow (particularly along the drift) and then progressively closed with the increasing mechanical stress applied on the drift wall. Moreover, the evolution of the EDZ after unloading indicated a self-sealing process. Secondly, the remaining fracture network was resaturated to demonstrate the ability to self-seal of the COx claystone without mechanical loading by conducting from 11 to 15 repetitive hydraulic tests with monitoring of the hydraulic parameters. During this hydration process, the EDZ effective transmissivity dropped due to the swelling of the clay materials near the fracture network. The hydraulic conductivity evolution was relatively fast during the first few days. Low conductivities ranging at 10-10 m/s were observed after four months. Conversely, the specific storage showed an erratic evolution during the first phase of hydration (up to 60 days). Some uncertainty remains on this parameter due to volumetric strain during the

  12. Oral microemulsions of paclitaxel: in situ and pharmacokinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nornoo, Adwoa O; Zheng, Haian; Lopes, Luciana B; Johnson-Restrepo, Boris; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Reed, Rachel

    2009-02-01

    The overall goal of this study was to develop cremophor-free oral microemulsions of paclitaxel (PAC) to enhance its permeability and oral absorption. The mechanism of this enhancement, as well as characteristics of the microemulsions relevant to the increase in permeability and absorption of the low solubility, low permeability PAC was investigated. Phase diagrams were used to determine the macroscopic phase behavior of the microemulsions and to compare the efficiency of different surfactant-oil mixtures to incorporate water. The microemulsion region on the phase diagrams utilizing surfactant-myvacet oil combinations was in decreasing order: lecithin: butanol: myvacet oil (LBM, 48.5%)>centromix CPS: 1-butanol: myvacet oil (CPS, 45.15%)>capmul MCM: polysorbate 80: myvacet oil (CPM, 27.6%)>capryol 90: polysorbate 80: myvacet oil (CP-P80, 23.9%)>capmul: myvacet oil (CM, 20%). Oil-in-water (o/w) microemulsions had larger droplet sizes (687-1010 nm) than the water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsions (272-363 nm) when measured using a Zetasizer nano series particle size analyzer. Utilizing nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), the self-diffusion coefficient (D) of PAC in CM, LBM and CPM containing 10% of deuterium oxide (D(2)O) was 2.24x10(-11), 1.97x10(-11) and 0.51x10(-11) m(2)/s, respectively. These values indicate the faster molecular mobility of PAC in the two w/o microemulsions (CM and LBM) than the o/w microemulsion--CPM. The in situ permeability of PAC through male CD-IGS rat intestine was 3- and 11-fold higher from LBM and CM, respectively, than that from the control clinical formulation, Taxol (CE, cremophor: ethanol) in a single pass perfusion study. PAC permeability was significantly increased in the presence of the pgp/CYP3A4 inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA). This enhancement may be attributed to the pgp inhibitory effect of the surfactants, oil and/or the membrane perturbation effect of the surfactants. The oral disposition of PAC in CM, LBM and CPM compared

  13. SOLPS-ITER Study of neutral leakage and drift effects on the alcator C-Mod divertor plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Dekeyser

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As part of an effort to validate the edge plasma model in the SOLPS-ITER code suite under ITER-relevant divertor plasma and neutral conditions, we report on progress in the modeling of the Alcator C-Mod divertor plasma with the new code. We perform simulations with a complete drifts model and kinetic neutrals, including effects of neutral viscosity, ion-molecule collisions and Lyα-opaque conditions, but assuming a pure deuterium plasma. Through a series of simulations with varying divertor geometries, we show the importance of including neutal leakage paths through the divertor substructure on the divertor plasma solution. Moreover, the impact of drifts on inner-outer target asymmetries is assessed. Including both effects, we achieve excellent agreement between simulations and upstream and outer target Langmuir Probe data. In absence of strong volumetric losses due to e.g. impurity radiation in our simulations, the strong inner target detachment observed experimentally remains elusive in our modeling at present.

  14. Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectroscopy diagnostic system for the study of non-thermal electrons at Aditya tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, S; Joisa, Y S; Raval, J V; Ghosh, J; Tanna, R; Shukla, B K; Bhatt, S B

    2014-11-01

    Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectrometer diagnostic was developed to study the non-thermal electron for Aditya tokamak plasma. The diagnostic was mounted on a radial mid plane port at the Aditya. The objective of diagnostic includes the estimation of the non-thermal electron temperature for the ohmically heated plasma. Bi-Maxwellian plasma model was adopted for the temperature estimation. Along with that the study of high Z impurity line radiation from the ECR pre-ionization experiments was also aimed. The performance and first experimental results from the new X-ray spectrometer system are presented.

  15. Tapping with intentional drift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vardy, A.N.; Daffertshofer, A.; Beek, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    When tapping a desired frequency, subjects tend to drift away from this target frequency. This compromises the estimate of the correlation between inter-tap intervals (ITIs) as predicted by the two-level model of Wing and Kristofferson which consists of an internal timer ('clock') and motor delays.

  16. High resolution drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 μm resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs

  17. Argus drift chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilov, M; Nagovizin, V; Hasemann, H; Michel, E; Schmidt-Parzefall, W; Wurth, R; Kim, P

    1983-11-15

    The ARGUS detector came into operation at the DORIS-II e/sup +/s/sup -/ storage ring at the end of 1982. Its two meter long drift chamber contains 5940 sense and 24588 field wires organized in uniform 18x18.8 mm/sup 2/ drift cells filling the whole volume. These cells form 36 layers, 18 of which provide stereo views. Each sense wire is equipped with a single hit TDC and ADC for coordinate and dE/dx measurements. The chamber is operated with propane to improve momentum and dE/dx resolution. The drift chamber design and initial performance are presented. With a very crude space-time relation approximation and without all the necessary corrections applied a spatial resolution of about 200 ..mu..m was obtained for half of the drift cell volume. Further corrections should improve this result. An intrinsic dE/dx resolution of 4.2% and an actual resolution of 5% were obtained for cosmic muons and also for Bhabha scattered electrons. An actual dE/dx resolution of 5.6% was obtained for pions from e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation data with almost no track selection. A relativistic rise of 30% was observed in good agreement with theory. The long-term stability is still to be investigated.

  18. Inland drift sand landscapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanta, J.; Siepel, H.

    2010-01-01

    Man has had a complex relationship with inland drift sands through the ages. For some centuries these landscapes were seen as a threat to society, especially agriculture and housing. At present we conserve these landscapes as important Natura 2000 priority habitats. In this book you may find these

  19. Guiding center drift equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1979-03-01

    The quations for particle guiding center drift orbits are given in a new magnetic coordinate system. This form of the equations not only separates the fast motion along the lines from the slow motion across, but also requires less information about the magnetic field than many other formulations of the problem

  20. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  1. In situ NMR studies of reactions on catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haw, James F [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-12-31

    Zeolites are useful in the synthesis of fine chemicals. The systematic understanding of organic chemistry of zeolite catalysis may contribute to: the elucidation of reaction mechanisms of existing catalytic processes; the discovery of new catalytic reactions; the application of zeolite catalysis to the synthesis of fine chemicals. This work presents species of zeolites identified by in situ NMR; reactions of organic chemicals on zeolites and proposes mechanisms as well as reactivity trends 3 refs., 7 tabs.

  2. Drift chamber performance in the field of a superconducting magnet: measurement of the drift angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, G.H.; Sherman, S.; McDonald, K.T.; Smith, A.J.S.; Thaler, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented of the first measurements in a study of drift chamber performance in magnetic fields up to 6 tesla. The angle of the electron drift was measured as a function of electric and magnetic field intensity. It appears that even at the high fields of superconducting magnets (3 to 6 tesla) the drift angle induced by the Lorentz force can be corrected for with tilted electric drift fields and/or the use of Xenon gas. At 3 tesla a drift field tilted at 45 0 with a magnitude of 3.5 kV/cm should restore normal operating conditions. At 4 tesla, a 45 0 tilt field would have a magnitude 5 kV/cm

  3. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M and O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M and O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report

  4. Intrafractional baseline drift during free breathing breast cancer radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Christer Andre; Acosta Roa, Ana María; Lund, Jo-Åsmund; Frengen, Jomar

    2017-06-01

    Intrafraction motion in breast cancer radiation therapy (BCRT) has not yet been thoroughly described in the literature. It has been observed that baseline drift occurs as part of the intrafraction motion. This study aims to measure baseline drift and its incidence in free-breathing BCRT patients using an in-house developed laser system for tracking the position of the sternum. Baseline drift was monitored in 20 right-sided breast cancer patients receiving free breathing 3D-conformal RT by using an in-house developed laser system which measures one-dimensional distance in the AP direction. A total of 357 patient respiratory traces from treatment sessions were logged and analysed. Baseline drift was compared to patient positioning error measured from in-field portal imaging. The mean overall baseline drift at end of treatment sessions was -1.3 mm for the patient population. Relatively small baseline drift was observed during the first fraction; however it was clearly detected already at the second fraction. Over 90% of the baseline drift occurs during the first 3 min of each treatment session. The baseline drift rate for the population was -0.5 ± 0.2 mm/min in the posterior direction the first minute after localization. Only 4% of the treatment sessions had a 5 mm or larger baseline drift at 5 min, all towards the posterior direction. Mean baseline drift in the posterior direction in free breathing BCRT was observed in 18 of 20 patients over all treatment sessions. This study shows that there is a substantial baseline drift in free breathing BCRT patients. No clear baseline drift was observed during the first treatment session; however, baseline drift was markedly present at the rest of the sessions. Intrafraction motion due to baseline drift should be accounted for in margin calculations.

  5. Study on the fabrication of Al matrix composites strengthened by combined in-situ alumina particle and in-situ alloying elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zanjun; Yang Bin; Cui Hua; Zhang Jishan

    2003-01-01

    A new idea to fabricate aluminum matrix composites strengthened by combined in-situ particle strengthening and in-situ alloying has been proposed. Following the concept of in-situ alloying and in-situ particle strengthening, aluminum matrix composites reinforced by Cu and α-Al 2 O 3 particulate (material I) and the same matrix reinforced by Cu, Si alloying elements and α-Al 2 O 3 particulate (material II) have been obtained. SEM observation, EDS and XRD analysis show that the alloy elements Cu and Si exist in the two materials, respectively. In-situ Al 2 O 3 particulates are generally spherical and their mean size is less than 0.5 μm. TEM observation shows that the in-situ α-Al 2 O 3 particulates have a good cohesion with the matrix. The reaction mechanism of the Al 2 O 3 particulate obtained by this method was studied. Thermodynamic considerations are given to the in-situ reactions and the distribution characteristic of in-situ the α-Al 2 O 3 particulate in the process of solidification is also discussed

  6. Style drift in private equity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cumming, D.; Fleming, G.; Schwienbacher, A.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the concept of style drift to private equity investment. We present theory and evidence pertaining to style drifts in terms of a fund manager's stated focus on particular stages of entrepreneurial development. We develop a model that derives conditions under which style drifts are less

  7. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Tsang

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  8. Effects of thermal annealing on C/FePt granular multilayers: in situ and ex situ studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babonneau, D; Abadias, G; Toudert, J; Girardeau, T; Fonda, E; Micha, J S; Petroff, F

    2008-01-01

    The comprehensive study of C/FePt granular multilayers prepared by ion-beam sputtering at room temperature and subsequent annealing is reported. The as-deposited multilayers consist of carbon-encapsulated FePt nanoparticles (average size ∼3 nm) with a disordered face-centered-cubic structure. The effects of thermal annealing on the structural and magnetic properties are investigated by using dedicated ex situ and in situ techniques, including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, magnetometry, and coupled grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering and x-ray diffraction. Our structural data show that the particle size and interparticle distance increase slightly with annealing at temperatures below 790 K by thermally activated migration of Fe and Pt atoms. We find that thermal annealing at temperatures above 870 K results in the dramatic growth of the FePt nanoparticles by coalescence and their gradual L1 0 ordering. In addition, we observe a preferential graphitization of the carbon matrix, which provides protection against oxidation for the FePt nanoparticles. Magnetization measurements indicate that progressive magnetic hardening occurs after annealing. The dependences of the blocking temperature, saturation magnetization, coercivity, and magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy on the annealing temperature are discussed on the basis of the structural data

  9. Treatability Study Report for In SITU Lead Immobilization Using Phosphate-Based Binders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bricka, R. M; Marwaha, Anirudha; Fabian, Gene L

    2008-01-01

    .... The treatability study described in this report was designed to develop the information necessary to support the immobilization of lead contaminants in soil by in situ treatment with phosphate-based binders...

  10. Study of the frequency of translocations and dicentrics in human spermatozoid using fluorescent in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, R.; Ponsa, I.; Tusell, L.; Genesca, A.; Miro, R.; Egozcue, J.

    1998-01-01

    Present study has intended to analyze the induction translocations and dicentrics in human sperms irradiated in vitro to the dose 4Gy by means of the use technical in situ hybridization with probes marked fluorescently

  11. In Situ Raman Study of Liquid Water at High Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Alexandr V; Rashchenko, Sergey V; Goryainov, Sergey V; Likhacheva, Anna Yu; Korsakov, Andrey V

    2018-06-01

    A pressure shift of Raman band of liquid water (H 2 O) may be an important tool for measuring residual pressures in mineral inclusions, in situ barometry in high-pressure cells, and as an indicator of pressure-induced structural transitions in H 2 O. However, there was no consensus as to how the broad and asymmetric water Raman band should be quantitatively described, which has led to fundamental inconsistencies between reported data. In order to overcome this issue, we measured Raman spectra of H 2 O in situ up to 1.2 GPa using a diamond anvil cell, and use them to test different approaches proposed for the description of the water Raman band. We found that the most physically meaningful description of water Raman band is the decomposition into a linear background and three Gaussian components, associated with differently H-bonded H 2 O molecules. Two of these components demonstrate a pronounced anomaly in pressure shift near 0.4 GPa, supporting ideas of structural transition in H 2 O at this pressure. The most convenient approach for pressure calibration is the use of "a linear background + one Gaussian" decomposition (the pressure can be measured using the formula P (GPa) = -0.0317(3)·Δν G (cm -1 ), where Δν G represents the difference between the position of water Raman band, fitted as a single Gaussian, in measured spectrum and spectrum at ambient pressure).

  12. Drift-Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Banoo

    1998-01-01

    equation in the discrete momentum space. This is shown to be similar to the conventional drift-diffusion equation except that it is a more rigorous solution to the Boltzmann equation because the current and carrier densities are resolved into M×1 vectors, where M is the number of modes in the discrete momentum space. The mobility and diffusion coefficient become M×M matrices which connect the M momentum space modes. This approach is demonstrated by simulating electron transport in bulk silicon.

  13. Negative Drift in Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, Per Kristian

    2011-01-01

    An important step in gaining a better understanding of the stochastic dynamics of evolving populations, is the development of appropriate analytical tools. We present a new drift theorem for populations that allows properties of their long-term behaviour, e.g. the runtime of evolutionary algorithms......, to be derived from simple conditions on the one-step behaviour of their variation operators and selection mechanisms....

  14. Optimization of drift gases for accuracy in pressurized drift tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Kirchner, J J; Dinner, A R; Fidkowski, K J; Wyatt, J H

    2001-01-01

    Modern detectors such as ATLAS use pressurized drift tubes to minimize diffusion and achieve high coordinate accuracy. However, the coordinate accuracy depends on the exact knowledge of converting measured times into coordinates. Linear space-time relationships are best for reconstruction, but difficult to achieve in the $E \\propto \\frac{1}{r}$ field. Previous mixtures, which contained methane or other organic quenchers, are disfavored because of ageing problems. From our studies of nitrogen and carbon dioxide, two mixtures with only small deviations from linearity were determined and measured. Scaling laws for different pressures and magnetic fields are also given.

  15. Optimization of drift gases for accuracy in pressurized drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, J.J.; Becker, U.J.; Dinner, R.B.; Fidkowski, K.J.; Wyatt, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    Modern detectors such as ATLAS use pressurized drift tubes to minimize diffusion and achieve high coordinate accuracy. However, the coordinate accuracy depends on the exact knowledge of converting measured times into coordinates. Linear space-time relationships are best for reconstruction, but difficult to achieve in the E∝1/r field. Previous mixtures, which contained methane or other organic quenchers, are disfavored because of ageing problems. From our studies of nitrogen and carbon dioxide, two mixtures with only small deviations from linearity were determined and measured. Scaling laws for different pressures and magnetic fields are also given

  16. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram, F.; Evertsson, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Lundgren, E.; Zhang, F.; Pan, J.; Carlà, F.; Nilsson, J.-O.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  17. Study on tertiary in-situ leachable uranium mineralization conditions in South Songliao basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhenqiang; Li Guokuan; Zhao Zonghua; Zhang Jingxun

    2001-01-01

    Tertiary in-situ leachable mineralization in Songliao Basin was analyzed in theory in the past. Since 1998, regional investigation at 1:200000 scale has been done with about 120 holes drilled. Based on drill holes recording, section compiling and sample analysis, the authors investigate into the Tertiary in-situ leachable conditions including rock character, sedimentary facies, rock chemistry, organic substances, uranium content, sandstone porosity, sandstone bodies, interlayer oxidation, and hydro-dynamic value. The study would play important role in prospecting for in-situ leachable uranium in South Songliao basin

  18. Experimental work on drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, J.; Duran, I.; Gonzalez, E.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Olmos, P.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental work made on drift chambers is described in two chapters. In the firt chapter we present the description of the experimental installation used, as well as some details on the data adquisition systems and the characteristics on three ways used for calibration proposes (cosmic muons, β radiation and test beam using SPS at CERN facilities). The second chapter describes the defferent prototypes studied. The experimental set up and the analysis are given. Some results are discussed. The magnetic field effect is also studied. (Author)

  19. Characterization Of Cobalt-Exchanged Zeolite A By DRIFT Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappers, M. J.; van der Maas, John H.; Chalmers, J. M.; Howard, J.

    1989-12-01

    In-situ DRIFT spectroscopy has been succesfully used for the characterization of Co4Na4-A. Dehydration of the zeolite A appears to involve formation and breakdown of hydration complexes and hydrolysis. The position of cations and hydroxyl groups within the zeolite structure was derived from the adsorption of carbon monoxide and acetonitrile.

  20. Consistent guiding center drift theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmel, H.K.

    1982-04-01

    Various guiding-center drift theories are presented that are optimized in respect of consistency. They satisfy exact energy conservation theorems (in time-independent fields), Liouville's theorems, and appropriate power balance equations. A theoretical framework is given that allows direct and exact derivation of associated drift-kinetic equations from the respective guiding-center drift-orbit theories. These drift-kinetic equations are listed. Northrop's non-optimized theory is discussed for reference, and internal consistency relations of G.C. drift theories are presented. (orig.)

  1. Laboratory Course on Drift Chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Ferreira, Ix-B.; Garcia-Herrera, J.; Villasenor, L.

    2006-01-01

    Drift chambers play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. We started this laboratory course with a brief review of the theoretical background and then moved on to the the experimental setup which consisted of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber. We also used a plastic scintillator paddle, standard P-10 gas mixture (90% Ar, 10% CH4) and a collimated 90Sr source. During the laboratory session the students performend measurements of the following quantities: a) drift velocities and their variations as function of the drift field; b) gas gains and c) diffusion of electrons as they drifted in the gas

  2. A long-term aging study of honeycomb drift tubes for the HERA-B Outer Tracker using a circulated and purified CF$_{4}$ gas mixture

    CERN Document Server

    Capéans-Garrido, M; Hohlmann, M; Schmidt, B

    2003-01-01

    The Outer Tracker of HERA-B uses a gas mixture containing CF/sub 4/ to obtain high electron drift velocities. The high cost of this gas makes it necessary to circulate the gas mixture which must then be purified to avoid accumulation of air and pollutants. However, the usage of gas purifiers poses the danger of outgassing pollutants from the purifiers themselves into the gas stream. Purifiers could also be attacked chemically by the aggressive products from the cracking of CF/sub 4/ molecules in the plasma avalanches of the detector. This could potentially release further harmful pollutants into the gas stream. To test for such effects, a long-term irradiation study of about 3000 h was carried out with the honeycomb drift tubes that are used in the Outer Tracker. This provided a check of the long-term stability of the gas purifiers before putting them into operation for the full-size detector. We report on the experimental setup, procedures and the results obtained. (8 refs).

  3. In situ study of hydrothermal MnO2 formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birgisson, Steinar; Shen, Yanbin; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    Our group has designed and successfully implemented an experimental setup capable of in situ measurements of solvothermal reactions. The setup uses synchrotron radiation and a time resolution in the range 1-10 seconds can be acquired [1]. The experiments can be optimized either to measure powder X......-ray diffraction (PXRD) data or total scattering (TS) data. From PXRD data properties such as what crystalline phases are present and their weight fractions, structural parameters (e.g. unit cell parameters, site occupancies, bond lengths), crystallite sizes and morphologies are extracted as a function of reaction...... time using Rietveld refinements [2]. TS data gives information about all the material in the solution; from complexes to amorphous particles to crystalline particles. Properties such as bond lengths, scale factors and particle sizes as a function of reaction time can be extracted via real space...

  4. In situ electrochemical atomic force microscope study on graphite electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirasawa, K.A.; Sato, Tomohiro; Asahina, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Shoji; Mori, Shoichiro [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Inashiki, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Research Center

    1997-04-01

    Interest in the formation of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) film on graphite electrodes has increased recently in the quest to improve the performance of lithium-ion batteries. Topographic and frictional changes on the surface of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite electrode in 1 M LiCiO{sub 4} ethylene carbonate/ethylmethyl carbonate (1:1) electrolyte were examined during charge and discharge by in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy and friction force microscopy simultaneously in real-time. Solid electrolyte interphase film formation commenced at approximately 2 V vs. Li/Li{sup +} and stable film formation with an island-like morphology was observed below approximately 0.9 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}. Further experiments on a KS-44 graphite/polyvinylidene difluoride binder composite electrode showed similar phenomena.

  5. Kinetic theory of drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, G.

    1988-01-01

    The linear stability of the electrostatic drift waves in slab geometry has been studied analytically and numerically. The effects of magnetic field with shear, of the finite Larmor radius, of an electron streaming, of a temperature gradient and of collisions have been retained. The analytical solution has been obtained using the matched asymptotic expansion technique, and an expression for the critical streaming parameter has been derived. Finally, assuming that the transport in the Reversed Field Pinches is dominated by this instability, a scaling law for the temperature in such machine is derived

  6. Drift vortices in continuous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernousenko, V.M.; Chernenko, I.V.; Chernyshenko, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    The work is devoted to investigation into the problems of large-scale cortex drift and generation in continuous media based on the solution of notably non-linear differential equations. Using the capability of the modern computer technique it is possible to consider a series of cases with regard to medium viscosity and its inhomogeneity and with regard to three-dimensional vortex nature. Based on the solutions obtained the large-scale steady-state vortex generation processes are considered. The results can be used when studying non-linear phenomena in plasma and processes of substance and energy transfer in non-equilibrium media. 16 refs.; 5 figs

  7. The Drifting Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    By studying in great detail the 'ringing' of a planet-harbouring star, a team of astronomers using ESO's 3.6-m telescope have shown that it must have drifted away from the metal-rich Hyades cluster. This discovery has implications for theories of star and planet formation, and for the dynamics of our Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 09a/08 ESO PR Photo 09a/08 Iota Horologii The yellow-orange star Iota Horologii, located 56 light-years away towards the southern Horologium ("The Clock") constellation, belongs to the so-called "Hyades stream", a large number of stars that move in the same direction. Previously, astronomers using an ESO telescope had shown that the star harbours a planet, more than 2 times as large as Jupiter and orbiting in 320 days (ESO 12/99). But until now, all studies were unable to pinpoint the exact characteristics of the star, and hence to understand its origin. A team of astronomers, led by Sylvie Vauclair from the University of Toulouse, France, therefore decided to use the technique of 'asteroseismology' to unlock the star's secrets. "In the same way as geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth and learn about the inner structure of our planet, it is possible to study sound waves running through a star, which forms a sort of large, spherical bell," says Vauclair. The 'ringing' from this giant musical instrument provides astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the star's interior. And to 'listen to the music', the astronomers used one of the best instruments available. The observations were conducted in November 2006 during 8 consecutive nights with the state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla. Up to 25 'notes' could be identified in the unique dataset, most of them corresponding to waves having a period of about 6.5 minutes. These observations allowed the astronomers to obtain a very precise portrait of Iota Horologii: its

  8. In Situ Study of Thermal Stability of Copper Oxide Nanowires at Anaerobic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many metal oxides with promising electrochemical properties were developed recently. Before those metal oxides realize the use as an anode in lithium ion batteries, their thermal stability at anaerobic environment inside batteries should be clearly understood for safety. In this study, copper oxide nanowires were investigated as an example. Several kinds of in situ experiment methods including in situ optical microscopy, in situ Raman spectrum, and in situ transmission electron microscopy were adopted to fully investigate their thermal stability at anaerobic environment. Copper oxide nanowires begin to transform as copper(I oxide at about 250°C and finish at about 400°C. The phase transformation proceeds with a homogeneous nucleation.

  9. Study of lixiviant damage of a sandstone deposit during in-situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Wensheng; Wang Limin; Jiang Yan; Jiang Guoping; Tan Yahui

    2014-01-01

    The permeability of sandstone deposit is a key factor for economical uranium recovery during in-situ leaching uranium. Low permeability sandstone uranium deposits behave low push-pull capacity, and show formation damage in leaching operations. It is important to study formation damage of permeability, therefore, and to stabilize even improve the push-pull power of drillholes during in-situ leaching. In this paper, formation damage caused by lixiviants was investigated based on a low permeability sandstone uranium deposit. The resulted showed that, under the conditions of in-situ leaching, the salinity of leaching fluid has no harm to formation permeability, on the contrary, the increment of salinity of lixiviant during in-situ leaching improve the permeability of the deposit. The alkalinity, hydrogen peroxide and productivity of the lixiviant cause no significant formation damage. But the fine particles in the lixiviant shows formation damage significantly, and the quantity of the particles should be controlled during production. (authors)

  10. Setup for in situ x-ray diffraction study of swift heavy ion irradiated materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulriya, P K; Singh, F; Tripathi, A; Ahuja, R; Kothari, A; Dutt, R N; Mishra, Y K; Kumar, Amit; Avasthi, D K

    2007-11-01

    An in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) setup is designed and installed in the materials science beam line of the Pelletron accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre for in situ studies of phase change in swift heavy ion irradiated materials. A high vacuum chamber with suitable windows for incident and diffracted X-rays is integrated with the goniometer and the beamline. Indigenously made liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature sample cooling unit is installed. The snapshots of growth of particles with fluence of 90 MeV Ni ions were recorded using in situ XRD experiment, illustrating the potential of this in situ facility. A thin film of C60 was used to test the sample cooling unit. It shows that the phase of the C60 film transforms from a cubic lattice (at room temperature) to a fcc lattice at around T=255 K.

  11. Setup for in situ x-ray diffraction study of swift heavy ion irradiated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulriya, P. K.; Singh, F.; Tripathi, A.; Ahuja, R.; Kothari, A.; Dutt, R. N.; Mishra, Y. K.; Kumar, Amit; Avasthi, D. K.

    2007-11-01

    An in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) setup is designed and installed in the materials science beam line of the Pelletron accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre for in situ studies of phase change in swift heavy ion irradiated materials. A high vacuum chamber with suitable windows for incident and diffracted X-rays is integrated with the goniometer and the beamline. Indigenously made liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature sample cooling unit is installed. The snapshots of growth of particles with fluence of 90MeV Ni ions were recorded using in situ XRD experiment, illustrating the potential of this in situ facility. A thin film of C60 was used to test the sample cooling unit. It shows that the phase of the C60 film transforms from a cubic lattice (at room temperature) to a fcc lattice at around T =255K.

  12. Study of a particle detector with very high spatial precision (drift chambers), and analysis of the physical phenomena governing the operation of this detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, Guy.

    1976-01-01

    The physical principles of drift chambers are studied and various measurements which can be performed with these chambers are described. The laws governing the passage of particles through matter are first reviewed and different transport coefficients, (velocity, scattering coefficient, characteristic energy ...) of the electrons under the influence of an electric field for different gases (argon, CO 2 , isobutane, methane, methylal) are studied. The theoretical predictions are then compared with the experimental results. The different amplification processes in the gas and the space charge effect of the positive ions on electron multiplication for large particle fluxes are also studied as well as the mobility of positive ions in different gases. After these results, the operating characteristics (efficiency, linearity of the space-time ratio, spatial resolution), with and without an external magnetic field are determined [fr

  13. Drifting black aurorae?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoute-Vanneck, H.; Scourfield, M.W.J.; Nielsen, E.

    1990-01-01

    Characteristics of eastward drifting forms, previously described in the literature as black aurorae, have been identified in low-light level TV camera data. The TV field of view was within the field of view of STARE and that of an all-sky camera. On the basis of these observations the authors propose that these auroral forms are a manifestation of folds or waves on the borders of auroral bands propagating along the dark regions between neighboring auroral bands. Conditions under which the folds or waves occur are compatible with their formation by the Kelvin-Helmholtz electrostatic instability

  14. ABSTRACTION OF DRIFT SEEPAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Michael L.

    2001-01-01

    Drift seepage refers to flow of liquid water into repository emplacement drifts, where it can potentially contribute to degradation of the engineered systems and release and transport of radionuclides within the drifts. Because of these important effects, seepage into emplacement drifts is listed as a ''principal factor for the postclosure safety case'' in the screening criteria for grading of data in Attachment 1 of AP-3.15Q, Rev. 2, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''. Abstraction refers to distillation of the essential components of a process model into a form suitable for use in total-system performance assessment (TSPA). Thus, the purpose of this analysis/model is to put the information generated by the seepage process modeling in a form appropriate for use in the TSPA for the Site Recommendation. This report also supports the Unsaturated-Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report. The scope of the work is discussed below. This analysis/model is governed by the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS MandO 2000a). Details of this activity are in Addendum A of the technical work plan. The original Work Direction and Planning Document is included as Attachment 7 of Addendum A. Note that the Work Direction and Planning Document contains tasks identified for both Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and Natural Environment Program Operations (NEPO). Only the PAO tasks are documented here. The planning for the NEPO activities is now in Addendum D of the same technical work plan and the work is documented in a separate report (CRWMS MandO 2000b). The Project has been reorganized since the document was written. The responsible organizations in the new structure are the Performance Assessment Department and the Unsaturated Zone Department, respectively. The work plan for the seepage abstraction calls for determining an appropriate abstraction methodology, determining uncertainties in seepage, and providing

  15. A PEM fuel cell for in situ XAS studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltshire, Richard J.K.; King, Colin R.; Rose, Abigail; Wells, Peter P.; Hogarth, Martin P.; Thompsett, David; Russell, Andrea E.

    2005-01-01

    A miniature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has been designed to enable in situ XAS investigations of the anode catalyst using fluorescence detection. The development of the cell is described, in particular the modifications required for elevated temperature operation and humidification of the feed gasses. The impact of the operating conditions is observed as an increase in the catalyst utilisation, which is evident in the EXAFS collected at the Pt L III and Ru K edges for a PtRu/C catalyst. The Pt component of the catalyst was found to be readily reduced by hydrogen in the fuel, while the Ru was only fully reduced under conditions of good gas flow and electrochemical contact. Under such conditions no evidence of O neighbours were found at the Ru edge. The results are interpreted in relation to the lack of surface sensitivity of the EXAFS method and indicate that the equilibrium coverage of O species on the Ru surface sites is too low to be observed using EXAFS

  16. Pulse shape simulation for drift chambers with long drift paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed Monte Carlo program for the simulation of drift chamber pulse shapes is described. It has been applied to the case of a jet chamber with drift paths up to 24 cm. Results on pulse shapes and corresponding spatial and double hit resolution are discussed and compared to recent measurements of the OPAL central detector jet chamber full size prototype and to measurements of a small 20-wire prototype, which was designed to study the pulse shapes generated by tracks in a magnetic field. Simulated pulse shapes and spatial resolutions agree well with the experimental data. Clustering, saturation and wire crosstalk are shown to be necessary ingredients in the simulation. A deterioration in resolution due to the influence of crosstalk signals is correctly reproduced, as well as the cancellation of this effect by a hardwired first and second neighbour crosstalk compensation. The simulation correctly describes the asymmetry in spatial resolution observed for tracks with positive or negative inclination against the wire plane when a magnetic field is present. The effect of saturation on double hit resolution is found to be small. The magnetic field is predicted to improve the double hit resolution. (orig.)

  17. Pulse shape simulation for drift chambers with long drift paths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, H J

    1987-09-15

    A detailed Monte Carlo program for the simulation of drift chamber pulse shapes is described. It has been applied to the case of a jet chamber with drift paths up to 24 cm. Results on pulse shapes and corresponding spatial and double hit resolution are discussed and compared to recent measurements of the OPAL central detector jet chamber full size prototype and to measurements of a small 20-wire prototype, which was designed to study the pulse shapes generated by tracks in a magnetic field. Simulated pulse shapes and spatial resolutions agree well with the experimental data. Clustering, saturation and wire crosstalk are shown to be necessary ingredients in the simulation. A deterioration in resolution due to the influence of crosstalk signals is correctly reproduced, as well as the cancellation of this effect by a hardwired first and second neighbour crosstalk compensation. The simulation correctly describes the asymmetry in spatial resolution observed for tracks with positive or negative inclination against the wire plane when a magnetic field is present. The effect of saturation on double hit resolution is found to be small. The magnetic field is predicted to improve the double hit resolution.

  18. Drift velocity monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented.

  19. The CLEO III drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, D; Briere, R A; Chen, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Csorna, S; Dickson, M; Dombrowski, S V; Ecklund, K M; Lyon, A; Marka, S; Meyer, T O; Patterson, J R; Sadoff, A; Thies, P; Thorndike, E H; Urner, D

    2002-01-01

    The CLEO group at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring has constructed and commissioned a new central drift chamber. With 9796 cells arranged in 47 layers ranging in radius from 13.2 to 79 cm, the new drift chamber has a smaller outer radius and fewer wires than the drift chamber it replaces, but allows the CLEO tracking system to have improved momentum resolution. Reduced scattering material in the chamber gas and in the inner skin separating the drift chamber from the silicon vertex detector provides a reduction of the multiple scattering component of the momentum resolution and an extension of the usable measurement length into the silicon. Momentum resolution is further improved through quality control in wire positioning and symmetry of the electric fields in the drift cells which have provided a reduction in the spatial resolution to 88 mu m (averaged over the full drift range).

  20. Electromagnetic drift waves dispersion for arbitrarily collisional plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonjae, E-mail: wol023@ucsd.edu; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I., E-mail: skrash@mae.ucsd.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Angus, J. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on resistive and collisionless drift waves are studied. A local linear analysis on an electromagnetic drift-kinetic equation with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-like collision operator demonstrates that the model is valid for describing linear growth rates of drift wave instabilities in a wide range of plasma parameters showing convergence to reference models for limiting cases. The wave-particle interactions drive collisionless drift-Alfvén wave instability in low collisionality and high beta plasma regime. The Landau resonance effects not only excite collisionless drift wave modes but also suppress high frequency electron inertia modes observed from an electromagnetic fluid model in collisionless and low beta regime. Considering ion temperature effects, it is found that the impact of finite Larmor radius effects significantly reduces the growth rate of the drift-Alfvén wave instability with synergistic effects of high beta stabilization and Landau resonance.

  1. Miniaturized Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope for In Situ Planetary Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Abbott, Terry; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Thaisen, Kevin; Taylor , Lawrence; Ramsey, Brian; Jerman, Gregory; Sampson, Allen; Harvey, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of remote planetary surfaces calls for the advancement of low power, highly-miniaturized instrumentation. Instruments of this nature that are capable of multiple types of analyses will prove to be particularly useful as we prepare for human return to the moon, and as we continue to explore increasingly remote locations in our Solar System. To this end, our group has been developing a miniaturized Environmental-Scanning Electron Microscope (mESEM) capable of remote investigations of mineralogical samples through in-situ topographical and chemical analysis on a fine scale. The functioning of an SEM is well known: an electron beam is focused to nanometer-scale onto a given sample where resulting emissions such as backscattered and secondary electrons, X-rays, and visible light are registered. Raster scanning the primary electron beam across the sample then gives a fine-scale image of the surface topography (texture), crystalline structure and orientation, with accompanying elemental composition. The flexibility in the types of measurements the mESEM is capable of, makes it ideally suited for a variety of applications. The mESEM is appropriate for use on multiple planetary surfaces, and for a variety of mission goals (from science to non-destructive analysis to ISRU). We will identify potential applications and range of potential uses related to planetary exploration. Over the past few of years we have initiated fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept assembly, consisting of a cold-field-emission electron gun and custom high-voltage power supply, electrostatic electron-beam focusing column, and scanning-imaging electronics plus backscatter detector. Current project status will be discussed. This effort is funded through the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences - Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program.

  2. Experimental study on neptunium migration under in situ geochemical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumata, M.; Vandergraaf, T. T.

    1998-12-01

    Results are reported for migration experiments performed with Np under in situ geochemical conditions over a range of groundwater flow rates in columns of crushed rock in a specially designed facility at the 240-level of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) near Pinawa, Manitoba, Canada. This laboratory is situated in an intrusive granitic rock formation, the Lac du Bonnet batholith. Highly altered granitic rock and groundwater were obtained from a major subhorizontal fracture zone at a depth of 250 m in the URL. The granite was wet-crushed and wet-sieved with groundwater from this fracture zone. The 180-850-μm size fraction was selected and packed in 20-cm long, 2.54-cm in diameter Teflon™-lined stainless steel columns. Approximately 30-ml vols of groundwater containing 3HHO and 237Np were injected into the columns at flow rates of 0.3, 1, and 3 ml/h, followed by elution with groundwater, obtained from the subhorizontal fracture, at the same flow rates, for a period of 95 days. Elution profiles for 3HHO were obtained, but no 237Np was detected in the eluted groundwater. After terminating the migration experiments, the columns were frozen, the column material was removed and cut into twenty 1-cm thick sections and each section was analyzed by gamma spectrometry. Profiles of 237Np were obtained for the three columns. A one-dimensional transport model was fitted to the 3HHO breakthrough curves to obtain flow parameters for this experiment. These flow parameters were in turn applied to the 237Np concentration profiles in the columns to produce sorption and dispersion coefficients for Np. The results show a strong dependence of retardation factors ( Rf) on flow rate. The decrease in the retarded velocity of the neptunium ( Vn) varied over one order of magnitude under the geochemical conditions for these experiments.

  3. In-situ synchrotron PXRD study of spinel LiMn2O4 formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birgisson, Steinar; Jensen, Kirsten Marie Ørnsbjerg; Christiansen, Troels Lindahl

    structural properties for the reaction being studied. Normally the reactions are started by heating and a constant temperature is kept throughout the experiment. In this study the hydrothermal reaction previously shown to produce spinel LiMn2O4 nanoparticles is studied in-situ to learn more about the phase......O4, depending on the initial concentration if Li-ions. An impurity phase, identified as Mn3O4, is also detected in different concentrations depending on reaction time and temperature. We have developed an experimental technique for in-situ measurements of solvothermal reactions under sub...... in the in-situ measurements it gives a unique opportunity to study reaction kinetics and thermodynamic quantities of the reactions. A temperature study of the reaction has been conducted to see how the formation rate and particle growth is affected by temperature while the precursor concentration is kept...

  4. Desorption of hydrogen from magnesium hydride: in-situ electron diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, B.; Jones, I.P.; Walton, A.; Mann, V.; Book, D.; Harris, I.R.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of a phase change has been studied where electron beam in Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) has been used to transform MgH 2 into magnesium. A combination of in-situ Electron Diffraction (ED) and an in-situ Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) study under ED mode describes the phase transformation in terms of, respectively, change in the crystal structure and Plasmon energy shift. The orientation relation [001] MgH2 //[-2110] Mg and (-110) MgH2 //(0001) Mg , obtained from the ED study, has been used to propose a model for the movements of magnesium atoms in the structural change to describe the dynamics of the process. The in-situ EELS study has been compared with the existing H-desorption model. The study aims to describe the sorption dynamics of hydrogen in MgH 2 which is a base material for a number of promising hydrogen storage systems. (author)

  5. Electronics for proportional drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fremont, G.; Friend, B.; Mess, K.H.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Tarle, J.C.; Verweij, H.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration); Geske, K.; Riege, H.; Schuett, J.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration); Semenov, Y.; CERN-Hamburg-Amsterdam-Rome-Moscow Collaboration)

    1980-01-01

    An electronic system for the read-out of a large number of proportional drift tubes (16,000) has been designed. This system measures deposited charge and drift-time of the charge of a particle traversing a proportional drift tube. A second event can be accepted during the read-out of the system. Up to 40 typical events can be collected and buffered before a data transfer to a computer is necessary. (orig.)

  6. Studies on thermal decomposition of phenol binder using TG/DTG/DTA and FTIR-DRIFTS techniques in temperature range 20-500 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *Artur Bobrowski

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of thermoanalytical and structural research on phenolic binder used in foundry for the preparation of moulding sand. The binder has been prepared based on resole type phenolic resin with the addition of ester hardener. The aim of the study was to determine the structural changes taking place in the phenolic binder under the influence of temperature. Results show that in the investigated range of temperatures,phenolic binder exhibits three exothermic thermal effects accompanying the decomposition process. The test results using the Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS technique show that the addition of a hardener stabilizes the binder structure within methylene bridges. The reduction in the reaction rate observed in the DTA curve at about 330 癈 can be associated with the formation of gaseous products by decomposition of the binder or, as suggested by the literature data, the formation of triple bonds and CN-HCN groups.

  7. On the nature of gallium species in gallium-modified mordenite and MFI zeolites. A comparative DRIFT study of carbon monoxide adsorption and hydrogen dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serykh, Alexander I; Kolesnikov, Stanislav P

    2011-04-21

    The results of a DRIFT study of carbon monoxide molecular adsorption and hydrogen dissociative adsorption on gallium-modified mordenite and MFI (ZSM-5) zeolites are presented. It was found that in the reduced gallium-modified mordenite (Ga-MOR) both Ga(3+) and Ga(+) exchanged cations are present and can be detected by CO adsorption. Ga(3+) cations in Ga-MOR dissociatively adsorb molecular hydrogen at elevated temperatures, resulting in the formation of gallium hydride species and acidic hydroxyl groups. In the reduced Ga-MFI evacuated at 823 K under medium vacuum conditions only Ga(+) exchanged intrazeolite cations were detected. It was found, however, that Ga(3+) intrazeolite exchanged cations which form upon high-temperature disproportionation of Ga(+) cations in the reduced Ga-MFI and Ga-MOR can be stabilized by high-temperature oxidation of these zeolites.

  8. Beach sediments drift study by means of radioactive tracers; L'etude du transport littoral par la methode des traceurs radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hours, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Jaffry, P [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Lab. National d' Hydraulique

    1959-07-01

    The present state of the sediments drift studies by means of radioactive tracers is exposed. Various processes of labelling, immersion and detection, used in France and other countries, are reviewed. A more extended analysis of some aspects of the problem by the same authors can be found in 'La Houille Blanche', number 3, may-june 1959 (Rapport C.E.A. number 1269). (author) [French] L'etude du transport littoral des sediments et galets par la methode des traceurs radioactifs est en plein developpement. Le present rapport precise l'etat actuel de la question. Les techniques de marquage, d'immersion et de detection utilisees en France et a l'etranger sont decrites; une analyse plus detaillee de certains aspects de la question est presentee par les memes auteurs dans 'La Houille Blanche', numero 3, mai-juin 1959 (Rapport C.E.A. numero 1269). (auteur)

  9. Optical drift effects in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzyński, Mikołaj; Kopiński, Jarosław

    2018-03-01

    We consider the question of determining the optical drift effects in general relativity, i.e. the rate of change of the apparent position, redshift, Jacobi matrix, angular distance and luminosity distance of a distant object as registered by an observer in an arbitrary spacetime. We present a fully relativistic and covariant approach, in which the problem is reduced to a hierarchy of ODE's solved along the line of sight. The 4-velocities and 4-accelerations of the observer and the emitter and the geometry of the spacetime along the line of sight constitute the input data. We build on the standard relativistic geometric optics formalism and extend it to include the time derivatives of the observables. In the process we obtain two general, non-perturbative relations: the first one between the gravitational lensing, represented by the Jacobi matrix, and the apparent position drift, also called the cosmic parallax, and the second one between the apparent position drift and the redshift drift. The applications of the results include the theoretical study of the drift effects of cosmological origin (so-called real-time cosmology) in numerical or exact Universe models.

  10. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.S.Y. YANG

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what

  11. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YANG, J.S.Y.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes2. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in2 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and analyses

  12. DRIFT-INDUCED PERPENDICULAR TRANSPORT OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, M. S.; Dalla, S.; Kelly, J.; Laitinen, T.

    2013-01-01

    Drifts are known to play a role in galactic cosmic ray transport within the heliosphere and are a standard component of cosmic ray propagation models. However, the current paradigm of solar energetic particle (SEP) propagation holds the effects of drifts to be negligible, and they are not accounted for in most current SEP modeling efforts. We present full-orbit test particle simulations of SEP propagation in a Parker spiral interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), which demonstrate that high-energy particle drifts cause significant asymmetric propagation perpendicular to the IMF. Thus in many cases the assumption of field-aligned propagation of SEPs may not be valid. We show that SEP drifts have dependencies on energy, heliographic latitude, and charge-to-mass ratio that are capable of transporting energetic particles perpendicular to the field over significant distances within interplanetary space, e.g., protons of initial energy 100 MeV propagate distances across the field on the order of 1 AU, over timescales typical of a gradual SEP event. Our results demonstrate the need for current models of SEP events to include the effects of particle drift. We show that the drift is considerably stronger for heavy ion SEPs due to their larger mass-to-charge ratio. This paradigm shift has important consequences for the modeling of SEP events and is crucial to the understanding and interpretation of in situ observations

  13. A study on in-situ measuring method and modeling technique of an unsaturated zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, Hisashi [Hazama Corp., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Technical Research Inst.; Amemiya, Kiyoshi; Nishida, Kaoru; Lin, Weiren; Lei, Xinglin

    1997-03-01

    It is generally considered that an unsaturated zone is generated in the vicinity of a drift after excavation. In such a zone, invasion of air containing oxygen possibly changes geochemical environment (redox condition) of the rock mass. However, no measurement technique for quantitative understanding of this unsaturated zone is currently available. This study has been started to develop the measuring method in the several years. This year, fundamental information has been obtained through analysis, laboratory experiments using homogeneous rock samples and field measurement described below. (1) experiments on the mechanism of undersaturation in rock. (2) experiments on the measuring method of the extend of unsaturated zone. (author)

  14. A Structural Study of Escherichia coli Cells Using an In Situ Liquid Chamber TEM Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studying cell microstructures and their behaviors under living conditions has been a challenging subject in microbiology. In this work, in situ liquid chamber TEM was used to study structures of Escherichia coli cells in aqueous solutions at a nanometer-scale resolution. Most of the cells remained intact under electron beam irradiation, and nanoscale structures were observed during the TEM imaging. The analysis revealed structures of pili surrounding the E. coli cells; the movements of the pili in the liquid were also observed during the in situ tests. This technology also allowed the observation of features of the nucleoid in the E. coli cells. Overall, in situ TEM can be applied as a valuable tool to study real-time microscopic structures and processes in microbial cells residing in native aqueous solutions.

  15. Accurate computer simulation of a drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killian, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    A general purpose program for drift chamber studies is described. First the capacitance matrix is calculated using a Green's function technique. The matrix is used in a linear-least-squares fit to choose optimal operating voltages. Next the electric field is computed, and given knowledge of gas parameters and magnetic field environment, a family of electron trajectories is determined. These are finally used to make drift distance vs time curves which may be used directly by a track reconstruction program. Results are compared with data obtained from the cylindrical chamber in the Axial Field Magnet experiment at the CERN ISR

  16. Properties of low-pressure drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breskin, A.; Trautner, N.

    1976-01-01

    Drift chambers operated with methylal vapour or ethylene at pressures in the range of 10-110 torr are described. A systematic study of position resolution, pulse height and rise time shows that especially for ethylene they are strongly influenced by electron diffusion. Intrinsic position resolution was found to be at least as good as found at atmospheric pressure. A relative pulse height resolution of 10% was obtained with 5.5 MeV alpha-particles. A simple mathematical model which can describe the processes in the drift chamber is presented. (Auth.)

  17. Accurate computer simulation of a drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Killian, T J

    1980-01-01

    The author describes a general purpose program for drift chamber studies. First the capacitance matrix is calculated using a Green's function technique. The matrix is used in a linear-least-squares fit to choose optimal operating voltages. Next the electric field is computed, and given knowledge of gas parameters and magnetic field environment, a family of electron trajectories is determined. These are finally used to make drift distance vs time curves which may be used directly by a track reconstruction program. The results are compared with data obtained from the cylindrical chamber in the Axial Field Magnet experiment at the CERN ISR. (1 refs).

  18. Thermal annealing dynamics of carbon-coated LiFePO{sub 4} nanoparticles studied by in-situ analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumeich, Frank, E-mail: krumeich@inorg.chem.ethz.ch [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 1, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Waser, Oliver; Pratsinis, Sotiris E. [Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    The thermal behavior of core-shell carbon-coated lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO{sub 4}-C) nanoparticles made by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) during annealing was investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in-situ X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) as well as ex-situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Crystallization of the initially glassy LiFePO{sub 4}-C nanoparticles starts at quite low temperatures (T=400 °C), forming single crystals inside the confinement of the carbon shell. Upon increasing the temperature to T≥700 °C, LiFePO{sub 4} starts to diffuse through the carbon shell resulting in cavities inside the mostly intact carbon shell. By increasing the temperature further to T≥800 °C, the initial core-shell morphology converts into open carbon shells (flakes and cenospheres) and bulky LiFePO{sub 4} particles (diameter in the range 300–400 nm), in agreement with ex-situ experiments. - Graphical abstract: TEM images of a typical sample area recorded at room temperature and after heating in-situ heating reveal the growth of particles and the formation of empty carbon cages. - Highlights: • LiFePO{sub 4} coated by a carbon shell is produced by flame spray pyrolysis. • The amorphous LiFePO{sub 4} starts to crystallize at 400 °C as revealed by in-situ XRD. • Crystal growth was visualized by TEM heating experiments. • The formation of empty carbon cages starts at 700 °C.

  19. In Situ PDF Study of the Nucleation and Growth of Intermetallic PtPb Nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saha, Dipankar; Bojesen, Espen D.; Mamakhel, Mohammad Aref Hasen

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of Pt and PtPb nanocrystal formation under supercritical ethanol conditions has been investigated by means of in situ X-ray total scattering and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. The metal complex structures of two different platinum precursor solutions, chloroplatinic acid...... supercritical ethanol process for obtaining phase-pure hexagonal PtPb nanocrystals. The study thus highlights the importance of in situ studies in revealing atomic-scale information about nucleation mechanisms, which can be used in design of specific synthesis pathways, and the new continuous-flow process...

  20. Progress in semiconductor drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Walton, J.; Gatti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in testing semiconductor drift detectors is reported. Generally better position and energy resolutions were obtained than resolutions published previously. The improvement is mostly due to new electronics better matched to different detectors. It is shown that semiconductor drift detectors are becoming versatile and reliable detectors for position and energy measurements

  1. Nanoscale size effect in in situ titanium based composites with cell viability and cytocompatibility studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklaszewski, Andrzej, E-mail: andrzej.miklaszewski@put.poznan.pl [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Poznan University of Technology, Jana Pawla II 24, 61-138 Poznan (Poland); Jurczyk, Mieczysława U. [Division Mother' s and Child' s Health, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Polna 33, 60-535 Poznan (Poland); Kaczmarek, Mariusz [Department of Immunology, Chair of Clinical Immunology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Rokietnicka 5D, 60-806 Poznan (Poland); Paszel-Jaworska, Anna; Romaniuk, Aleksandra; Lipińska, Natalia [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Przybyszewskiego 49, 60-355 Poznan (Poland); Żurawski, Jakub [Department of Immunobiochemistry, Chair of Biology and Environmental Sciences, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Rokietnicka 8, 60-806 Poznan (Poland); Urbaniak, Paulina [Department of Cell Biology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Rokietnicka 5D, 60-806 Poznan (Poland); Jurczyk, Mieczyslaw [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Poznan University of Technology, Jana Pawla II 24, 61-138 Poznan (Poland)

    2017-04-01

    Novel in situ Metal Matrix Nanocomposite (MMNC) materials based on titanium and boron, revealed their new properties in the nanoscale range. In situ nanocomposites, obtained through mechanical alloying and traditional powder metallurgy compaction and sintering, show obvious differences to their microstructural analogue. A unique microstructure connected with good mechanical properties reliant on the processing conditions favour the nanoscale range of results of the Ti-TiB in situ MMNC example. The data summarised in this work, support and extend the knowledge boundaries of the nanoscale size effect that influence not only the mechanical properties but also the studies on the cell viability and cytocompatibility. Prepared in the same bulk, in situ MMNC, based on titanium and boron, could be considered as a possible candidate for dental implants and other medical applications. The observed relations and research conclusions are transferable to the in situ MMNC material group. Aside from all the discussed relations, the increasing share of these composites in the ever-growing material markets, heavily depends on the attractiveness and a possible wider application of these composites as well as their operational simplicity presented in this work. - Highlights: • Nano and microscale size precursor influence the final composite microstructure and properties. • Obtained from the nanoscale precursor sinters, characterise with a uniform and highly dispersed microstructure • Mechanical properties favoured Nano scale size precursor • Boron addition could be significantly reduced for moderate properties range. • A possible candidate for dental implants and other medical applications.

  2. Mean Lagrangian drift in continental shelf waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivdal, M.; Weber, J. E. H.

    2012-04-01

    The time- and depth-averaged mean drift induced by barotropic continental shelf waves (CSW's) is studied theoretically for idealized shelf topography by calculating the mean volume fluxes to second order in wave amplitude. The waves suffer weak spatial damping due to bottom friction, which leads to radiation stress forcing of the mean fluxes. In terms of the total wave energy density E¯ over the shelf region, the radiation stress tensor component S¯11 for CSW's is found to be different from that of shallow water surface waves in a non-rotating ocean. For CSW's, the ratio ¯S11/¯E depends strongly on the wave number. The mean Lagrangian flow forced by the radiation stress can be subdivided into a Stokes drift and a mean Eulerian drift current. The magnitude of the latter depends on the ratio between the radiation stress and the bottom stress acting on the mean flow. When the effect of bottom friction acts equally strong on the waves and the mean current, calculations for short CSW's show that the Stokes drift and the friction-dependent wave-induced mean Eulerian current varies approximately in anti-phase over the shelf, and that the latter is numerically the largest. For long CSW's they are approximately in phase. In both cases the mean Lagrangian current, which is responsible for the net particle drift, has its largest numerical value at the coast on the shallow part of the shelf. Enhancing the effect of bottom friction on the Eulerian mean flow, results in a general current speed reduction, as well as a change in spatial structure for long waves. Applying realistic physical parameters for the continental shelf west of Norway, calculations yield along-shelf mean drift velocities for short CSW's that may be important for the transport of biological material, neutral tracers, and underwater plumes of dissolved oil from deep water drilling accidents.

  3. Study of properties of helium-based gas mixtures for use of low momentum and high precision measurement in drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chang; Zhang Qinjian; Ma Jimao; Huang Xiuping; Yi Kai; Zheng Shuchen

    1998-01-01

    Measured drift velocities using an uniform field drift chamber and multiplication factors obtained with proportional tubes in He-based gas mixtures He + CH 4 (80/20, 70/30) and He + iC 4 H 10 (85/15, 80/20, 70/30) are reported. The results are good agreement with calculations by Garfield Code. The Saturated drift velocity is V d ≅ 2.7 cm/μs and multiplication factor of M ≅ 10 4 -10 5 at certain working voltage is manageable in He/CH 4 (80/20) gas mixture, and it is good candidate of working gas for use of low momentum and high precision measurement in the drift chambers

  4. Prediction of littoral drift with artificial neural networks

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, A.K.; Deo, M.C.; SanilKumar, V.

    of the rate of sand drift has still remained as a problem. The current study addresses this issue through the use of artificial neural networks (ANN). Feed forward networks were developed to predict the sand drift from a variety of causative variables...

  5. Non-linear coupling of drift modes in a quadrupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.A.; Sandeman, J.C.; Tessema, G.Y.

    1990-01-01

    We report continuing experimental studies of non-linear interactions of drift waves, with direct evidence of a growth saturation mechanism by transfer of energy to lower frequency modes. Wave launching experiments show that the decay rate of drift waves can be strongly amplitude dependent. (author) 9 refs., 5 figs

  6. Effect of magnetic shear on dissipative drift instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzdar, P.N.; Chen, L.; Kaw, P.K.; Oberman, C.

    1978-03-01

    In this letter we report the results of a linear radial eigenmode analysis of dissipative drift waves in a plasma with magnetic shear and spatially varying density gradient. The results of the analysis are shown to be consistent with a recent experiment on the study of dissipative drift instabilities in a toroidal stellarator

  7. Autoresonant control of drift waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shagalov, A.G.; Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Naulin, Volker

    2017-01-01

    The control of nonlinear drift waves in a magnetized plasmas column has been investigated. The studies are based on the Hasegawa–Mima model, which is solved on a disk domain with radial inhomogeneity of the plasma density. The system is forced by a rotating potential with varying frequency defined...... on the boundary. To excite and control the waves we apply the autoresonant effect, taking place when the amplitude of the forcing exceeds a threshold value and the waves are phase-locked with the forcing. We demonstrate that the autoresonant approach is applicable for excitation of a range of steady nonlinear...... waves of the lowest azimuthal mode numbers and for controlling their amplitudes and phases. We also demonstrate the excitation of zonal flows (m = 0 modes), which are controlled via the forced modes....

  8. Psychometric Consequences of Subpopulation Item Parameter Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins-Manley, Anne Corinne

    2017-01-01

    This study defines subpopulation item parameter drift (SIPD) as a change in item parameters over time that is dependent on subpopulations of examinees, and hypothesizes that the presence of SIPD in anchor items is associated with bias and/or lack of invariance in three psychometric outcomes. Results show that SIPD in anchor items is associated…

  9. Resistive drift wave turbulence and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatani, M.

    1986-01-01

    Our efforts for studying the properties of resistive drift wave turbulence by using model mode-coupling equations are shown. It may be related to the edge turbulence and the associated anomalous transport in tokamaks or in stellarator/heliotron. (author)

  10. Learning drifting concepts with neural networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biehl, Michael; Schwarze, Holm

    1993-01-01

    The learning of time-dependent concepts with a neural network is studied analytically and numerically. The linearly separable target rule is represented by an N-vector, whose time dependence is modelled by a random or deterministic drift process. A single-layer network is trained online using

  11. Spontaneous dispersion of PdO onto acid sites of zeolites studied by in situ DXAFS

    CERN Document Server

    Okumura, K; Niwa, M; Yokota, S; Kato, K; Tanida, H; Uruga, T

    2003-01-01

    The generation of highly dispersed PdO over zeolite supports was studied using in situ energy-dispersive XAFS (DXAFS) technique. From the comparison with the Na-ZSM-5, it was found that the oxidation as well as the spontaneous dispersion of Pd was promoted through the interaction between PdO and acid sites of H-form zeolites. (author)

  12. Coalescence and compression in centrifuged emulsions studied with in situ optical microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krebs, T.; Ershov, D.S.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    We report an experimental method to investigate droplet dynamics in centrifuged emulsions and its application to study droplet compression and coalescence. The experimental setup permits in situ monitoring of an ensemble of droplets in a centrifuged monolayer of monodisperse emulsion droplets using

  13. Dynamical In Situ Study of Morphological Changes of Bentonite in ESEM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátilová, Eva; Neděla, Vilém; Sun, H.; Mašín, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, S1 (2017), s. 2196-2197 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : ESEM * morphological changes * in situ study Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  14. Surface phenomena revealed by in situ imaging: studies from adhesion, wear and cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Mahato, Anirban; Yeung, Ho; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2017-03-01

    Surface deformation and flow phenomena are ubiquitous in mechanical processes. In this work we present an in situ imaging framework for studying a range of surface mechanical phenomena at high spatial resolution and across a range of time scales. The in situ framework is capable of resolving deformation and flow fields quantitatively in terms of surface displacements, velocities, strains and strain rates. Three case studies are presented demonstrating the power of this framework for studying surface deformation. In the first, the origin of stick-slip motion in adhesive polymer interfaces is investigated, revealing a intimate link between stick-slip and surface wave propagation. Second, the role of flow in mediating formation of surface defects and wear particles in metals is analyzed using a prototypical sliding process. It is shown that conventional post-mortem observation and inference can lead to erroneous conclusions with regard to formation of surface cracks and wear particles. The in situ framework is shown to unambiguously capture delamination wear in sliding. Third, material flow and surface deformation in a typical cutting process is analyzed. It is shown that a long-standing problem in the cutting of annealed metals is resolved by the imaging, with other benefits such as estimation of energy dissipation and power from the flow fields. In closure, guidelines are provided for profitably exploiting in situ observations to study large-strain deformation, flow and friction phenomena at surfaces that display a variety of time-scales.

  15. Direct Observations of Oxygen-induced Platinum Nanoparticle Ripening Studied by In Situ TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Chorkendorff, Ib; Dahl, Søren

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses the sintering mechanism of Pt nanoparticles dispersed on a planar, amorphous Al2O3 support as a model system for a catalyst for automotive exhaust abatement. By means of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the model catalyst was monitored during the exposure to 10...

  16. In situ, Cr K-edge XAS study on the Phillips catalyst : activation and ethylene polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groppo, E.; Prestipino, C.; Cesano, F.; Bonino, F.; Bordiga, S.; Lamberti, C.; Thuene, P.C.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.; Zecchina, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this in situ EXAFS and XANES study on the Phillips ethylene-polymerization Cr/SiO2 catalyst, two polymerization routes are investigated and compared. The first mimics that adopted in industrial plants, where ethylene is dosed directly on the oxidized catalyst, while in the second the oxidized

  17. Development of equipment for in situ studies of biofilm in hot water systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagh, Lene Karen; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Arvin, Erik

    1999-01-01

    New equipment was developed for in situ studies of biofilms in hot water tanks and hot water pipes under normal operation and pressure. Sampling ports were installed in the wall of a hot water tank and through these operating shafts were inserted with a test plug in the end. The surface of the test...

  18. Nonlinear radial propagation of drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, M.

    1985-01-01

    We study the linear and the nonlinear radial propagation of drift wave energy in an inhomogeneous plasma. The drift mode excited in such a plasma is dispersive in nature. The drift wave energy spreads out symmetrically along the direction of inhomogeneity with a finite group velocity. To study the effect of the nonlinear coupling on the propagation of energy in a collision free plasma, we solve the Hasegawa-Mima equation as a mixed initial boundary-value problem. The solutions of the linearized equation are used to check the reliability of our numerical calculations. Additional checks are also performed on the invariants of the system. Our results reveal that a pulse gets distorted as it propagates through the medium. The peak of the pulse propagates with a finite velocity that depends on the amplitude of the initial pulse. The polarity of propagation depends on the initial parameters of the pulse. We have also studied drift wave propagation in a resistive plasma. The Hasegawa-Wakatani equations are used to investigate this problem

  19. Evaluation of intensity drift correction strategies using MetaboDrift, a normalization tool for multi-batch metabolomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonusin, Chanisa; IglayReger, Heidi B; Soni, Tanu; Rothberg, Amy E; Burant, Charles F; Evans, Charles R

    2017-11-10

    In recent years, mass spectrometry-based metabolomics has increasingly been applied to large-scale epidemiological studies of human subjects. However, the successful use of metabolomics in this context is subject to the challenge of detecting biologically significant effects despite substantial intensity drift that often occurs when data are acquired over a long period or in multiple batches. Numerous computational strategies and software tools have been developed to aid in correcting for intensity drift in metabolomics data, but most of these techniques are implemented using command-line driven software and custom scripts which are not accessible to all end users of metabolomics data. Further, it has not yet become routine practice to assess the quantitative accuracy of drift correction against techniques which enable true absolute quantitation such as isotope dilution mass spectrometry. We developed an Excel-based tool, MetaboDrift, to visually evaluate and correct for intensity drift in a multi-batch liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (LC-MS) metabolomics dataset. The tool enables drift correction based on either quality control (QC) samples analyzed throughout the batches or using QC-sample independent methods. We applied MetaboDrift to an original set of clinical metabolomics data from a mixed-meal tolerance test (MMTT). The performance of the method was evaluated for multiple classes of metabolites by comparison with normalization using isotope-labeled internal standards. QC sample-based intensity drift correction significantly improved correlation with IS-normalized data, and resulted in detection of additional metabolites with significant physiological response to the MMTT. The relative merits of different QC-sample curve fitting strategies are discussed in the context of batch size and drift pattern complexity. Our drift correction tool offers a practical, simplified approach to drift correction and batch combination in large metabolomics studies

  20. In-situ TEM Studies : Heat-treatment and Corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malladi, S.R.K.

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been well known as a powerful characterisation tool to understand the structure and composition of various materials down to the atomic level. Over the years, several TEM studies have been carried out to understand the compositional, structural and

  1. In-situ TEM studies of microstructure evolution under ion irradiation for nuclear engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaoumi, D.

    2011-01-01

    One of the difficulties of studying processes occurring under irradiation (in a reactor environment) is the lack of kinetics information since usually samples are examined ex situ (i.e. after irradiation) so that only snapshots of the process are available. Given the dynamic nature of the phenomena, direct in situ observation is invaluable for better understanding the mechanisms, kinetics and driving forces of the processes involved. This can be done using in situ ion irradiation in a TEM at the IVEM facility at Argonne National Laboratory which, in the USA, is a unique facility. To predict the in reactor behavior of alloys, it is essential to understand the basic mechanisms of radiation damage formation (loop density, defect interactions) and accumulation (loop evolution, precipitation or dissolution of second phases etc.). In-situ Ion-irradiation in a TEM has proven a very good tool for that purpose as it allows for the direct determination of the formation and evolution of irradiation-induced damage and the spatial correlation of the defect structures with the pre-existing microstructure (including lath boundaries, network dislocations and carbides) as a function of dose, dose rate, temperature and ion type. Using this technique, different aspects of microstructure evolution under irradiation were studied, such as defect cluster formation and evolution as a function of dose in advanced Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels, the irradiation stability of precipitates in Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels, and irradiation-induced grain-growth. Such studies will be reported in this presentation

  2. A new cryostat for 'in situ' radiation damage studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hariharan, Y.; Radhakrishnan, T.S.

    1977-01-01

    Conventional cryostats to study properties of materials between 4deg K and 300deg K base their designs either on continuous flow or bath type. A new cryostat which incorporates the advantages of both these has been designed and fabricated. This essentially has three chambers isolated from each other by poor thermal links. These are enclosed in a vacuum chamber and the whole assembly is immersed in a 4 He bath. The lowermost chamber is kept in good thermal contact with the bath. The second chamber can be maintained between 4deg K and 77deg K by circulation of cold 4 He vapour. The uppermost chamber can be maintained between 77deg K and 300deg K by circulating cold nitrogen vapours. There is a through axial hole in the centre, through which the sample can be moved up and down by means of a thin walled stainless steel tube. This comes out from the top of the cryostat through a Wilson seal. Thus the specimen can be anchored in any of the three chambers. This cryostat can be used to study the radiation damages caused by α-particles the sample being kept at 4.2deg K. There is provision for isolating the sample from the radiation zone. Isothermal and isochronal annealing of the damage caused can also be studied. Provision for taking out electrical leads from both inside and outside the sample chamber are also there. (auth.)

  3. Plant reproduction is altered by simulated herbicide drift to constructed plant communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbicide drift may have unintended impacts on native vegetation, adversely affecting structure and function of plant communities. However, these potential effects have been rarely studied or quantified. To determine potential ecological effects of herbicide drift, we construct...

  4. Cost studies of thermally enhanced in situ soil remediation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremser, J.; Booth, S.R.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes five thermally enhanced technologies that may be used to remediate contaminated soil and water resources. The standard methods of treating these contaminated areas are Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE), Excavate ampersand Treat (E ampersand T), and Pump ampersand Treat (P ampersand T). Depending on the conditions at a given site, one or more of these conventional alternatives may be employed; however, several new thermally enhanced technologies for soil decontamination are emerging. These technologies are still in demonstration programs which generally are showing great success at achieving the expected remediation results. The cost savings reported in this work assume that the technologies will ultimately perform as anticipated by their developers in a normal environmental restoration work environment. The five technologies analyzed in this report are Low Frequency Heating (LF or Ohmic, both 3 and 6 phase AC), Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS), Radio Frequency Heating (RF), Radio Frequency Heating using Dipole Antennae (RFD), and Thermally Enhanced Vapor Extraction System (TEVES). In all of these technologies the introduction of heat to the formation raises vapor pressures accelerating contaminant evaporation rates and increases soil permeability raising diffusion rates of contaminants. The physical process enhancements resulting from temperature elevations permit a greater percentage of volatile organic compound (VOC) or semi- volatile organic compound (SVOC) contaminants to be driven out of the soils for treatment or capture in a much shorter time period. This report presents the results of cost-comparative studies between these new thermally enhanced technologies and the conventional technologies, as applied to five specific scenarios

  5. Drift of suspended ferromagnetic particles due to the Magnus effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, S. I.; Pedchenko, B. O.

    2017-01-01

    A minimal system of equations is introduced and applied to study the drift motion of ferromagnetic particles suspended in a viscous fluid and subjected to a time-periodic driving force and a nonuniformly rotating magnetic field. It is demonstrated that the synchronized translational and rotational oscillations of these particles are accompanied by their drift in a preferred direction, which occurs under the action of the Magnus force. We calculate both analytically and numerically the drift velocity of particles characterized by single-domain cores and nonmagnetic shells and show that there are two types of drift, unidirectional and bidirectional, which can be realized in suspensions composed of particles with different core-shell ratios. The possibility of using the phenomenon of bidirectional drift for the separation of core-shell particles in suspensions is also discussed.

  6. Electron drift in a large scale solid xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, J.; Jaskierny, W.F.

    2015-01-01

    A study of charge drift in a large scale optically transparent solid xenon is reported. A pulsed high power xenon light source is used to liberate electrons from a photocathode. The drift speeds of the electrons are measured using a 8.7 cm long electrode in both the liquid and solid phase of xenon. In the liquid phase (163 K), the drift speed is 0.193 ± 0.003 cm/μs while the drift speed in the solid phase (157 K) is 0.397 ± 0.006 cm/μs at 900 V/cm over 8.0 cm of uniform electric fields. Therefore, it is demonstrated that a factor two faster electron drift speed in solid phase xenon compared to that in liquid in a large scale solid xenon

  7. Experimental oil release on Haltenbanken 1982. Drifting and spreading of oil. [Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerstroem, S.E.; Johansen, Oe; Celius, K.K.; Audunson, T.; Steinbakke, P.

    1984-03-29

    In the experiment, 100 m/sup 3/ of Statfjord crude oil was released at Haltenbanken. The oil was followed for 7 days and projects concerning drifting and spreading of oil, microbiological decay and ecological effects, ecological studies of the impact on fish, zooplancton, fish eggs and larvae, training with equipment and control functions and experiment leading and coordination were carried out. In this project ''drifting and spreading of oil'' information on physical environment, decay of oil, mixing of oil in water, oil spill surveillance, warning and simulation and numerical modelling are collected. The results of these areas were compared to the mathematical simulation and warning models Oilsim and Sliktrak. New methods for in situ measurements for relative values of oil in water were used. It was found that most of the physical and chemical changes of oil spills occur during the first 24 hours. The drifting and alterations of the oil was recorded and a new simulation model for three-dimentional spreading of oil in water was made. 49 tables, 130 drawings, 32 references.

  8. Drift chamber data readout system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiladze, S.G.; Lokhonyai, L.

    1980-01-01

    An electronic system for processing drift chamber signals is described. The system consists of 4-channel fast amplifier-discriminators of low threshold, 16-channel time-expanders transforming 0.5 μs time intervals to 10 μs and a 9-bit time-to-digital converter (TDC) recording up to 16 expanded time intervals. If the average track multiplicity is small, TDC is capable to process signals from 4 time-expanders (i.e., 64 drift gaps). In order to record multiple tracks per drift gap discriminator outputs can be connected to a number of time-expander channels. The fast clear input enables the system to be cleared within 0.5 μs. Efficient readout from TDC is facilated by reading only those channels which contain non-zero data (9 bits - drift time; 6 bits - wire number)

  9. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1977-01-01

    Being redied for installation, those at the right are for tank 1, those on the left for tank 2. Contrary to Linac 1, which had drift-tubes supported on stems, here the tubes are suspended, for better mechanical stability.

  10. Nanoindentation studies of ex situ AlN/Al metal matrix nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fale, Sandeep; Likhite, Ajay; Bhatt, Jatin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Formation of in-situ phases nucleated on AlN particles strengthens the matrix. • Formation of in-situ phases increases with AlN content in nanocomposites. • Stronger in-situ phases results in increased hardness and modulus of elasticity. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline Aluminium nitride (AlN) powder is dispersed in different weight ratio in Aluminum matrix to fabricate metal matrix nanocomposite (MMNC) using ex situ melt metallurgy process. The synthesized Al–AlN nanocomposites are studied for phase analysis using high resolution scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) and for hardness behavior using microindentation and nanoindentation tests. Quantitative analysis of the oxide phases is calculated from thermodynamic data and mass balance equation using elemental data obtained from energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) results. Role of oxide phases in association with AlN particles is investigated to understand the mechanical behavior of composites using nanoindentation tester. Load–displacement profile obtained from nanoindentation test reveals distribution of oxide phases along with AlN particle and their effect on indent penetration

  11. On nonlinear periodic drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauschke, U.; Schlueter, H.

    1990-09-01

    Nonlinear periodic drift waves are investigated on the basis of a simple perturbation scheme for both the amplitude and inverse frequency. The coefficients for the generation of the forced harmonics are derived, a nonlinear dispersion relation is suggested and a criterion for the onset of the modulational instability is obtained. The results are compared with the ones obtained with the help of a standard KBM-treatment. Moreover cnoidal drift waves are suggested and compared to an experimental observation. (orig.)

  12. A MAS NMR and DRIFT study of the Ga species in Ga/H-ZSM5 catalysts and their effect on propane ammoxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, P. [Indian Inst. of Petroleum, Dehradun (India). Catalysis Division; Quartararo, J. [Liverpool Univ., Liverpool (United Kingdom). Leverhulme Centre for Innovative Catalysis, Dept. of Chemistry; Abd Hamid, S.B. [Malaya Univ., Postgraduate School, Bangunan (Malaysia); Derouane, E.G. [Algarve Univ., Faro (Portugal). Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Vedrine, J.C. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Surface, Paris (France). Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Magusin, P.C.M.M.; Anderson, B.G. [Eindhoven Univ. of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands). Schuit Institute of Catalysis

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a study that sought information about the nature and environment of the gallium (Ga) species in Ga/H-ZSM5 zeolites following H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} redox treatments applied during their activation by use of magic-angle spinning (MAS) {sup 71}Ga, {sup 27}Al, and {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy (Ga coordination) complemented by diffuse reflectance FT IR (DRIFT) spectroscopy (Bronsted acidity). This information was then correlated with their catalytic behavior for the ammoxidation of propane. Ga species were observed in several environments: octahedrally coordinated gallium in small Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles at the external surface of the zeolite crystals; octahedrally coordinated gallium in GaO(OH) or related species; and tetrahedrally coordinated gallium in cationic-exchange positions inside the zeolite. Redox (H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}) cycles promote the migration of gallium from the GaO(OH) or Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} species at the external surface of the zeolite crystals to cationic-exchange sites within the zeolite channels. It was concluded that the redox treatment had a beneficial effect on its catalytic performance for the ammoxidation of propane, which occurs via a bifunctional mechanism. The main product was acetonitrile at high gallium and aluminium contents. It was suggested that higher yields in acrylonitrile could be obtained through Ga-modified zeolites with a higher gallium and lower aluminium content. 22 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  13. Generalized drift-flux correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, K.; Young, M.Y.; Hochreiter, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    A one-dimensional drift-flux model with five conservation equations is frequently employed in major computer codes, such as TRAC-PD2, and in simulator codes. In this method, the relative velocity between liquid and vapor phases, or slip ratio, is given by correlations, rather than by direct solution of the phasic momentum equations, as in the case of the two-fluid model used in TRAC-PF1. The correlations for churn-turbulent bubbly flow and slug flow regimes were given in terms of drift velocities by Zuber and Findlay. For the annular flow regime, the drift velocity correlations were developed by Ishii et al., using interphasic force balances. Another approach is to define the drift velocity so that flooding and liquid hold-up conditions are properly simulated, as reported here. The generalized correlation is used to reanalyze the MB-2 test data for two-phase flow in a large-diameter pipe. The results are applied to the generalized drift flux velocity, whose relationship to the other correlations is discussed. Finally, the generalized drift flux correlation is implemented in TRAC-PD2. Flow reversal from countercurrent to cocurrent flow is computed in small-diameter U-shaped tubes and is compared with the flooding curve

  14. An Exercise on Calibration: DRIFTS Study of Binary Mixtures of Calcite and Dolomite with Partially Overlapping Spectral Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzi Pezzolo, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Unlike most spectroscopic calibrations that are based on the study of well-separated features ascribable to the different components, this laboratory experience is especially designed to exploit spectral features that are nearly overlapping. The investigated system consists of a binary mixture of two commonly occurring minerals, calcite and…

  15. Materials testing for in situ stabilization treatability study of INEEL mixed wastes soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, J.; Fuhrmann, M.

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the contaminant-specific materials testing phase of the In Situ Stabilization Comprehensive Environment Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Treatability Study (TS). The purpose of materials testing is to measure the effectiveness of grouting agents to stabilize Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Acid Pit soils and select a grout material for use in the Cold Test Demonstration and Acid Pit Stabilization Treatability Study within the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Test results will assist the selecting a grout material for the follow-on demonstrations described in Test Plan for the Cold Test Demonstration and Acid Pit Stabilization Phases of the In Situ Stabilization Treatability Study at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex

  16. Experimental study of the recombination of a drifting low temperature plasma in the divertor simulator Mistral-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brault, C.; Escarguel, A.; Koubiti, M.; Stamm, R.; Pierre, Th.; Quotb, K.; Guyomarc'h, D.

    2004-01-01

    In a new divertor simulator, an ultra-cold (T e 18 m -3 . The collector is segmented into two plates and a transverse electric field is applied through a potential difference between the plates. The Lorentz force induces the ejection of a very-low temperature plasma jet in the limiter shadow. The characteristic convection time and decay lengths have been obtained with an ultra-fast camera. The study of the atomic physics of the recombining plasma allows to understand the measured decay time and to explain the emission spectra. (authors)

  17. Survival probability of Baltic larval cod in relation to spatial overlap patterns with their prey obtained from drift model studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichsen, H.H.; Schmidt, J.O.; Petereit, C.

    2005-01-01

    Temporal mismatch between the occurrence of larvae and their prey potentially affects the spatial overlap and thus the contact rates between predator and prey. This might have important consequences for growth and survival. We performed a case study investigating the influence of circulation......-prey overlap, dependent on the hatching time of cod larvae. By performing model runs for the years 1979-1998 investigated the intra- and interannual variability of potential spatial overlap between predator and prey. Assuming uniform prey distributions, we generally found the overlap to have decreased since...

  18. Ex-Situ and In-Situ Ellipsometric Studies of the Thermal Oxide on InP

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-06

    ion---- Distribution/ Availabilit ? Codes£v l llt Codes Avail and/or Dist| Special Abstract The thermally grown InP oxide as etched by an aqueous...aqueous NH4OH/NH4F, and Law(17) has reported observations of orientational ordering of water and organic solvents on pyrex surfaces by in-situ...minutes, followed by a sequence of acetone, deionized water (d. i. water ) rinse. After being dipped in a concentrated aqueous HF solution for 15 seconds

  19. In situ NMR and modeling studies of nitroxide mediated copolymerization of styrene and n-butyl acrylate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hlalele, L.; Klumperman, L.

    2011-01-01

    The combination of in situ1H NMR and in situ31P NMR was used to study the nitroxide mediated copolymerization of styrene and n-butyl acrylate. The alkoxyamine MAMA-DEPN was employed to initiate and mediate the copolymerization. The nature of the ultimate/terminal monomer units of dormant polymer

  20. In Situ X-ray Diffraction Studies of Cathode Materials in Lithium Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X. Q.; Sun, X.; McBreen, J.; Mukerjee, S.; Gao, Yuan; Yakovleva, M. V.; Xing, X. K.; Daroux, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in lithiated transition metal oxides because of their use as cathodes in lithium batteries. LiCoO 2 , LiNiO 2 and LiMn 2 O 4 are the three most widely used and studied materials, At present, although it is relative expensive and toxic, LiCoO 2 is the material of choice in commercial lithium ion batteries because of its ease of manufacture, better thermal stability and cycle life. However, the potential use of lithium ion batteries with larger capacity for power tools and electric vehicles in the future will demand new cathode materials with higher energy density, lower cost and better thermal stability. LiNiO 2 is isostructural with LiCoO 2 . It offers lower cost and high energy density than LiCoO 2 . However, it has much poorer thermal stability than LiCoO 2 , in the charged (delithiated) state. Co, Al, and other elements have been used to partially replace Ni in LiNiO 2 system in order to increase the thermal stability. LiMn 2 O 4 has the highest thermal stability and lowest cost and toxicity. However, the low energy density and poor cycle life at elevated temperature are the major obstacles for this material. In order to develop safer, cheaper, and better performance cathode materials, the in-depth understanding of the relationships between the thermal stability and structure, performance and structure are very important. The performance here includes energy density and cycle life of the cathode materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is one of the most powerful tools to study these relationships. The pioneer ex situ XRD work on cathode materials for lithium batteries was done by Ohzuku. His XRD studies on LiMn 2 O 4 , LiCoO 2 , LiNiO 2 , LiNi 0.5 Co 0.5 O 2 , and LiAl x Ni 1-x O 2 cathodes at different states of charge have provided important guidelines for the development of these new materials. However, the kinetic nature of the battery system definitely requires an in situ XRD technique to study the detail structural changes of the

  1. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Treatability study work plan (Revision 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sresty, G.C.

    1994-01-01

    A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 degrees to 95 degrees C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern. This document is a Treatability Study Work Plan for the demonstration program. The document contains a description of the proposed treatability study, background of the EM heating process, description of the field equipment, and demonstration test design

  2. Irradiation-related amorphization and crystallization: In situ transmission electron microscope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.W.

    1994-01-01

    Interfacing an ion accelerator to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) allows the analytical functions of TEM imaging and diffraction to be employed during ion-irradiation effects studies. At present there are twelve such installations in Japan, one in France and one in the US. This paper treats several aspects of in situ studies involving electron and ion beam induced and enhanced phase transformations and presents results of several in situ experiments to illustrate the dynamics of this approach in the materials science of irradiation effects. The paper describes the ion- and electron-induced amorphization of CuTi; the ion-irradiation-enhanced transformation of TiCr 2 ; and the ion- and electron-irradiation-enhanced crystallization of CoSi 2

  3. A flow-through hydrothermal cell for in situ neutron diffraction studies of phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, Brian; Tenailleau, Christophe; Nogthai, Yung; Studer, Andrew; Brugger, Joel; Pring, Allan

    2006-01-01

    A flow-through hydrothermal cell for the in situ neutron diffraction study of crystallisation and phase transitions has been developed. It can be used for kinetic studies on materials that exhibit structural transformations under hydrothermal conditions. It is specifically designed for use on the medium-resolution powder diffractometer (MRPD) at ANSTO, Lucas Heights, Sydney. But it is planned to adapt the design for the Polaris beamline at ISIS and the new high-intensity powder diffractometer (Wombat) at the new Australian reactor Opal. The cell will operate in a flow-through mode over the temperature range from 25-300 deg. C and up to pressures of 100 bar. The first results of a successful transformation of pentlandite (Fe,Ni) 9 S 8 to violarite (Fe,Ni) 3 S 4 under mild conditions (pH∼4) at 120 deg. C and 3 bar using in situ neutron diffraction measurements are presented

  4. Rotating cell for in situ Raman spectroelectrochemical studies of photosensitive redox systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavan, Ladislav; Janda, Pavel; Krause, Matthias; Ziegs, Frank; Dunsch, Lothar

    2009-03-01

    A recently developed rotating spectroelectrochemical cell for in situ Raman spectroscopic studies of photoreactive compounds without marked decomposition of the sample is presented. Photochemically and thermally sensitive redox systems are difficult to be studied under stationary conditions by in situ spectroelectrochemistry using laser excitation as in Raman spectroscopy. A rotating spectroelectrochemical cell can circumvent these difficulties. It can be used for any type of a planar electrode and for all electrode materials in contact with aqueous or nonaqueous solutions as well as with ionic liquids. The innovative technical solution consists of the precession movement of the spectroelectrochemical cell using an eccentric drive. This precession movement allows a fixed electrical connection to be applied for interfacing the electrochemical cell to a potentiostat. Hence, any electrical imperfections and noise, which would be produced by sliding contacts, are removed. A further advantage of the rotating cell is a dramatic decrease of the thermal load of the electrochemical system. The size of the spectroelectrochemical cell is variable and dependent on the thickness of the cuvettes used ranging up to approximately 10 mm. The larger measuring area causes a higher sensitivity in the spectroscopic studies. The as constructed spectroelectrochemical cell is easy to handle. The performance of the cell is demonstrated for ordered fullerene C(60) layers and the spectroelectrochemical behavior of nanostructured fullerenes. Here the charge transfer at highly ordered fullerene C(60) films was studied by in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry under appropriate laser power and accumulation time without marked photodecomposition of the sample.

  5. Study of turbulence of Lower Hybrid Drift Instability origin with the Multi Level Multi Domain semi-implicit adaptive PIC method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Maria Elena; Beck, Arnaud; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We study turbulence generated by the Lower Hybrid Drift Instability (LHDI [1]) in the terrestrial magnetosphere. The problem is not only of interest per se, but also for the implications it can have for the so-called turbulent reconnection. The LHDI evolution is simulated with the PIC Multi Level Multi Domain code Parsek2D-MLMD [2,3], which simulates different parts of the domain with different spatial and temporal resolutions. This allows to satisfy, at a low computing cost, the two necessary requirements for LHDI turbulence simulations: 1) a large domain, to capture the high wavelength branch of the LHDI and of the secondary kink instability and 2) high resolution, to cover the high wavenumber part of the power spectrum and to capture the wavenumber at which the turbulent cascade ends. The turbulent cascade proceeds seamlessly from the coarse (low resolution) to the refined (high resolution) grid, the only one resolved enough to capture its end, which is studied here and related to wave-particle interaction processes. We also comment upon the role of smoothing (a common technique used in PIC simulations to reduce particle noise, [4]) in simulations of turbulence and on how its effects on power spectra may be easily mistaken, in absence of accurate convergence studies, for the end of the inertial range. [1] P. Gary, Theory of space plasma microinstabilities, Cambridge Atmospheric and Space Science Series, 2005. [2] M. E. Innocenti, G. Lapenta, S. Markidis, A. Beck, A. Vapirev, Journal of Computational Physics 238 (2013) 115 - 140. [3] M. E. Innocenti, A. Beck, T. Ponweiser, S. Markidis, G. Lapenta, Computer Physics Communications (accepted) (2014). [4] C. K. Birdsall, A. B. Langdon, Plasma physics via computer simulation, Taylor and Francis, 2004.

  6. Nearshore drift dynamics of natural versus artificial seagrass wrack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baring, Ryan J.; Fairweather, Peter G.; Lester, Rebecca E.

    2018-03-01

    Drifting macrophytes such as seagrass and macroalgae are commonly found washed ashore on sandy beaches but few studies have investigated the drift trajectories of macrophytes whilst near to the coast. This is the first study to investigate the surface drifting of small clumps of seagrass released at various distances from shore, across multiple days with contrasting wind and tidal conditions, in a large gulf in southern Australia. Natural and artificial radio-tagged seagrass units generally travelled in the same directions as tides but trajectories were variable across sampling days and when tagged units were released at different distances from shore. Natural and artificial units diverged from each other particularly on days when wind speeds increased but generally drifted in the same direction and ended up within close proximity to each other at the 6-h endpoint. During calm conditions, tagged seagrass units drifted with tides for 0.25-5 km and, during one sampling day when wind speeds increased, drifted for >5 km over the 6-h time period. Only tagged units that were released closest to shore stranded on sandy beaches within the six hours of observation, so it would be difficult to predict the eventual stranding location on shorelines for macrophytes released further offshore. This study provides evidence of the variability of macrophyte drift dynamics near to coastlines. Acknowledging this variability is essential for further understanding of the ecological significance of allochthonous material arriving at shorelines, which should be integrated into future research and management of sandy-beach ecosystems.

  7. Coarsening of Pd nanoparticles in an oxidizing atmosphere studied by in situ TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Chorkendorff, Ib; Dahl, Søren

    2016-01-01

    The coarsening of supported palladium nanoparticles in an oxidizing atmosphere was studied in situ by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Specifically, the Pd nanoparticles were dispersed on a planar and amorphous Al2O3 support and were observed during the exposure to 10 mbar technical...... for the Ostwald ripening process indicates that the observed change in the particle size distribution can be accounted for by wetting of the Al2O3 support by the larger Pd nanoparticles....

  8. Studying the Kinetics of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation with In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    McDowell, Matthew T.

    2012-09-04

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to study the electrochemical lithiation of high-capacity crystalline Si nanoparticles for use in Li-ion battery anodes. The lithiation reaction slows down as it progresses into the particle interior, and analysis suggests that this behavior is due not to diffusion limitation but instead to the influence of mechanical stress on the driving force for reaction. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. In Situ Raman Spectroscopy of Supported Chromium Oxide Catalysts: Reactivity Studies with Methanol and Butane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    1996-01-01

    The interactions of methanol and butane with supported chromium oxide catalysts under oxidizing and reducing conditions were studied by in situ Raman spectroscopy as a function of the specific oxide support (Al2O3, ZrO2, TiO2, SiO2, Nb2O5, 3% SiO2/TiO2, 3% TiO2/SiO2, and a physical mixture of SiO2

  10. Autoradiographic study of transcription during early germination of Zea mays embryos maintained in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deltour, Roger

    1979-01-01

    Recovery of RNA synthesis was studied by autoradiography in primary root of Zea mays embryos germinating at 16 0 C. [H 3 ] uridine was provided to embryos maintained in situ. During the first 4hrs of germination the cell radioactivity is located almost exclusively in the extranucleolar chromatin. These observations agree well with previous results obtained when [H 3 ] uridine was provided to isolated embryos [fr

  11. Studying the Kinetics of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation with In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    McDowell, Matthew T.; Ryu, Ill; Lee, Seok Woo; Wang, Chongmin; Nix, William D.; Cui, Yi

    2012-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to study the electrochemical lithiation of high-capacity crystalline Si nanoparticles for use in Li-ion battery anodes. The lithiation reaction slows down as it progresses into the particle interior, and analysis suggests that this behavior is due not to diffusion limitation but instead to the influence of mechanical stress on the driving force for reaction. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. In situ atomic force microscopy in the study of electrogeneration of polybithiophene on Pt electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innocenti, M.; Loglio, F.; Pigani, L.; Seeber, R.; Terzi, F.; Udisti, R.

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemical AFM technique has been used for the in situ study of the electrogeneration-deposition process of polybithiophene at varying the polymerisation conditions, such as supporting electrolyte, i.e., LiClO 4 or tetrabutylammonium hexafluorophosphate, and polymerisation procedure, i.e., either potentiostatic or potentiodynamic method. In order to better follow the evolution of the morphology of the deposit, particularly during the early stages of the polymer film growth, a suitable home-made electrochemical cell has been used

  13. Cathode readout with stripped resistive drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Novikov, E.A.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Shafranov, M.D.; Zhiltsov, V.E.

    1995-01-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with a carbon layer with a resistivity of 0.5, 30 and 70 kΩ/□. Both the anode wire and the cathode strip signals were detected to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented. (orig.)

  14. Cathode readout with stripped resistive drift tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, V. N.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Novikov, E. A.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Shafranov, M. D.; Zhiltsov, V. E.

    1995-12-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with a carbon layer with a resistivity of 0.5, 30 and 70 kΩ/□. Both the anode wire and the cathode strip signals were detected to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented.

  15. A MAS NMR and DRIFT study of the Ga species in Ga/H-ZSM5 catalysts and their effect on propane ammoxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, P.; Quartararo, J.; Hamid, abd S.B.; Derouane, E.G.; Védrine, J.C.; Magusin, P.C.M.M.; Anderson, B.G.

    2005-01-01

    71Ga, 27Al and 29Si MAS-NMR and DRIFT spectroscopies were used to characterize the state of gallium in Ga/H-ZSM5 catalysts tested for their ability to catalyse the ammoxidation of propane. Ga-species were observed in two different possible environments: octahedrally-coordinated gallium in small

  16. Flexible metal-organic framework compounds: In situ studies for selective CO{sub 2} capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, A.J., E-mail: andrew.allen@nist.gov [Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8520 (United States); Espinal, L.; Wong-Ng, W. [Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8520 (United States); Queen, W.L. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6102 (United States); The Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brown, C.M. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6102 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Kline, S.R. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6102 (United States); Kauffman, K.L. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Culp, J.T. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); URS Corporation, South Park, PA 15219 (United States); Matranga, C. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States)

    2015-10-25

    Results are presented that explore the dynamic structural changes occurring in two highly flexible nanocrystalline metal-organic framework (MOF) compounds during the adsorption and desorption of pure gases and binary mixtures. The Ni(1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene)[Ni(CN){sub 4}] and catena-bis(dibenzoylmethanato)-(4,4′-bipyridyl)nickel(II) chosen for this study are 3-D and 1-D porous coordination polymers (PCP) with a similar gate opening pressure response for CO{sub 2} isotherms at 303 K, but with differing degrees of flexibility for structural change to accommodate guest molecules. As such, they serve as a potential model system for evaluating the complex kinetics associated with dynamic structure changes occurring in response to gas adsorption in flexible MOF systems. Insights into the crystallographic changes occurring as the MOF pore structure expands and contracts in response to interactions with CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures have been obtained from in situ small-angle neutron scattering and neutron diffraction, combined with ex situ X-ray diffraction structure measurements. The role of structure in carbon capture functionality is discussed with reference to the ongoing characterization challenges and a possible materials-by-design approach. - Graphical abstract: We present in situ small-angle neutron scattering results for two flexible metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The figure shows that for one (NiBpene, high CO{sub 2} adsorption) the intensity of the Bragg peak for the expandable d-spacing most associated with CO{sub 2} adsorption varies approximately with the isotherm, while for the other (NiDBM-Bpy, high CO{sub 2} selectivity) the d-spacing, itself, varies with the isotherm. The cartoons show the proposed modes of structural change. - Highlights: • Dynamic structures of two flexible MOF CO{sub 2} sorbent compounds are compared in situ. • These porous solid sorbents serve as models for pure & dual gas adsorption. • Different

  17. The application of in situ analytical transmission electron microscopy to the study of preferential intergranular oxidation in Alloy 600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, M.G., E-mail: m.g.burke@manchester.ac.uk; Bertali, G.; Prestat, E.; Scenini, F.; Haigh, S.J.

    2017-05-15

    In situ analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can provide a unique perspective on dynamic reactions in a variety of environments, including liquids and gases. In this study, in situ analytical TEM techniques have been applied to examine the localised oxidation reactions that occur in a Ni-Cr-Fe alloy, Alloy 600, using a gas environmental cell at elevated temperatures. The initial stages of preferential intergranular oxidation, shown to be an important precursor phenomenon for intergranular stress corrosion cracking in pressurized water reactors (PWRs), have been successfully identified using the in situ approach. Furthermore, the detailed observations correspond to the ex situ results obtained from bulk specimens tested in hydrogenated steam and in high temperature PWR primary water. The excellent agreement between the in situ and ex situ oxidation studies demonstrates that this approach can be used to investigate the initial stages of preferential intergranular oxidation relevant to nuclear power systems. - Highlights: • In situ analytical TEM has been performed in 1 bar H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O vapor at 360–480 °C. • Nanoscale GB migration and solute partitioning correlate with ex situ data for Alloy 600 in H{sub 2}-steam. • This technique can provide new insights into localised reactions associated with localised oxidation.

  18. Characteristic parameters of drift chambers calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Martinez-Laso, L.

    1989-01-01

    We present here the methods we used to analyse the characteristic parameters of drift chambers. The algorithms to calculate the electric potential in any point for any drift chamber geometry are presented. We include the description of the programs used to calculate the electric field, the drift paths, the drift velocity and the drift time. The results and the errors are discussed. (Author) 7 refs

  19. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Treatability study work plan, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sresty, G.C.

    1994-07-07

    A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. The EM heating process for soil decontamination is based on volumetric heating technologies developed during the `70s for the recovery of fuels from shale and tar sands by IIT Research Institute (IITRI) under a co-operative program with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Additional modifications of the technology developed during the mid `80s are currently used for the production of heavy oil and waste treatment. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 to 95 C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern.

  20. Drift curves from spray applications on commom bean crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Rodrigues Bueno

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In order to avoid the occurrence of drift in pesticide applications, it is fundamental to know the behavior of sprayed droplets. This study aimed to determine drift curves in pesticide applications on common bean crop under brazilian weather conditions, using different nozzle types and compared them with the "German" and "Dutch" drift prediction models. The experiment was conducted in Uberlândia, Minas Gerais/Brazil, in completely randomized design with ten replications and 4 x 20 split-plot arrangement in space. Drift deposited on collectors located over ground level was resulted by 150 L ha-1 carrier volume applications through four nozzle types (XR 11002 (fine droplets; AIXR 11002 (coarse droplets; TT 11002 (medium droplets; TTI 11002 (extremely coarse droplets, collected in 20 downwind distances, parallel to the crop line outside the target area, spaced by 2.5 m. The tracer rhodamine B was added to the spray to be quantified by fluorimetry. Drift prediction models adjusted by exponential functions were obtained considering the 90th percentile for XR, TT, AIXR and TTI nozzles. It is suggested to use the estimated drift models from this study for each nozzle type in drift prediction evaluations on bean crops under brazilian weather conditions.

  1. Performance of silicon drift detectors in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castoldi, A.; Gatti, E.; Manzari, V.; Rehak, P.

    1997-01-01

    A study of the properties of silicon drift detectors in a magnetic field was carried out. A silicon drift detector with 41 anodes, providing unambiguous x and y position information, was used for measurements. Studies were done in three principal orientations of the detector relative to the direction of the magnetic field. The magnetic field was varied between 0 and 0.7 T and the drift field between 300 and 600 V/cm. Basic agreement with the theory of electron transport in semiconductors in a magnetic field was found. The transport properties of electrons in a magnetic field can be described by a mobility matrix. The components of the matrix depend on the electron mobility, Hall mobility and on the vector of the magnetic field. The precision of measurement was better than 0.2% for most of the parameters. For the electric field of a silicon drift detector, there is a first-order effect of the magnetic field only in one out of three principal directions. In this direction, the plane of the detector is perpendicular to the magnetic field and electrons drift at an angle α relative to the direction of the drift field. In two other principal directions, which are more important for tracking of the particles with drift detectors, there are no first-order magnetic effects. (orig.)

  2. Estimating Outer Zone Radial Diffusion Coefficients from Drift Scale Fluctuations in Van Allen Particle Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, T. P., III; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    During geomagnetic storms, the Earth's outer radiation belt experiences enhanced radial transport. This transport occurs via phase-dependent radial displacements of particles, either by impulsive events or drift resonant waves. Because transport is phase dependent, it produces drift phase bunching, which can be observed with in situ particle detectors. We provide bounds on the radial diffusion coefficients derived from this drift phase structure as seen by NASA's Van Allen Probes. We compare these bounds to published radial diffusion coefficient models, particularly those derived independently from electromagnetic field observations.

  3. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Jolley

    2000-11-09

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses.

  4. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, D.

    2000-01-01

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses

  5. Field experiment on spray drift: deposition and airborne drift during application to a winter wheat crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, André; Linnemann, Volker; van de Zande, Jan C; Vereecken, Harry

    2008-11-01

    A field experiment was performed to evaluate various techniques for measuring spray deposition and airborne drift during spray application to a winter wheat crop. The application of a spraying agent containing the fluorescent dye Brilliant Sulfo Flavine by a conventional boom sprayer was done according to good agricultural practice. Deposition was measured by horizontal collectors in various arrangements in and outside the treated area. Airborne spray drift was measured both with a passive and an active air collecting system. Spray deposits on top of the treated canopy ranged between 68 and 71% of the applied dose and showed only small differences for various arrangements of the collectors. Furthermore, only small variations were measured within the various groups of collectors used for these arrangements. Generally, the highest spray deposition outside the treated area was measured close to the sprayed plot and was accompanied by a high variability of values, while a rapid decline of deposits was detected in more remote areas. Estimations of spray deposits with the IMAG Drift Calculator were in accordance with experimental findings only for areas located at a distance of 0.5-4.5 m from the last nozzle, while there was an overestimation of a factor of 4 at a distance of 2.0-3.0 m, thus revealing a high level of uncertainty of the estimation of deposition for short distances. Airborne spray drift measured by passive and active air collecting systems was approximately at the same level, when taking into consideration the collector efficiency of the woven nylon wire used as sampling material for the passive collecting system. The maximum value of total airborne spray drift for both spray applications (0.79% of the applied dose) was determined by the active collecting system. However, the comparatively high variability of measurements at various heights above the soil by active and passive collecting systems revealed need for further studies to elucidate the spatial

  6. In-situ oxidation study of Pd(100) by surface x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilic, Volkan; Franz, Dirk; Stierle, Andreas [AG Grenzflaechen, Universitaet Siegen (Germany); Martin, Natalia; Lundgren, Edvin [Department of Synchrotron Radiation Research, Lund University (Sweden); Mantilla, Miguel [MPI fuer Metallforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The oxidation of the Pd(100) surface at oxygen pressures in the 10{sup -6} mbar to 10{sup 3} mbar range and temperatures up to 1000 K has been studied in-situ by surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD). The SXRD experiments were performed at the MPI beamline at the Angstrom Quelle Karlsruhe (ANKA). We present the surface and crystal truncation rod (CTR) data from the ({radical}(5) x {radical}(5)) surface layer. We show that the transformation from the surface oxide to PdO bulk oxide can be observed in-situ under specific pressure and temperature conditions. We compare our results with previously proposed structure models based on low energy electron diffraction (LEED) I(V) curves and density functional theory calculations. Finally, we elucidate the question of commensurability of the surface oxide layer with respect to the Pd(100) substrate.

  7. A case study of in situ oil contamination in a mangrove swamp (Rio De Janeiro, Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Elcia M S; Duran, Robert; Guyoneaud, Rémy; Goñi-Urriza, Marisol; García de Oteyza, T; Crapez, Miriam A C; Aleluia, Irene; Wasserman, Julio C A

    2009-08-01

    Mangroves are sensitive ecosystems of prominent ecological value that lamentably have lost much of their areas across the world. The vulnerability of mangroves grown in proximity to cities requires the development of new technologies for the remediation of acute oil spills and chronic contaminations. Studies on oil remediation are usually performed with in vitro microcosms whereas in situ experiments are rare. The aim of this work was to evaluate oil degradation on mangrove ecosystems using in situ microcosms seeded with an indigenous hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial consortium (HBC). Although the potential degradation of oil through HBC has been reported, their seeding directly on the sediment did not stimulate oil degradation during the experimental period. This is probably due to the availability of carbon sources that are easier to degrade than petroleum hydrocarbons. Our results emphasize the fragility of mangrove ecosystems during accidental oil spills and also the need for more efficient technologies for their remediation.

  8. Study on underground-water restoration of acid in-situ leaching process with electrodialytic desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Chongyuan; Meng Jin; Li Weicai

    2003-01-01

    The study focus undergrounder water restoration of acid in-situ leaching process with electrodialysis desalination in Yining Uranium Mine. It is shown in field test that electrodialysis desalination is an effective method for underground water restoration of acid in-situ leaching process. When TDS of underground-water at the decommissioning scope is 10-12 g/L, and TDS will be less than 1 g/L after the desalination process, the desalination rate is more than 90%, freshwater recovery 60%-70%, power consumption for freshwater recovery 5 kW·h/m 3 , the distance of the desalination flow 12-13 m, current efficiency 80%, and the throughput of the twin membrane 0.22-0.24 m 3 /(m 2 ·d)

  9. Compositional Simulation of In-Situ Combustion EOR: A Study of Process Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Priyanka; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; von Solms, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    In order to facilitate the study of the influence of reservoir process characteristics in In-Situ combustion modeling and advance the work of Kristensen et al. in this domain; a fully compositional In-situ combustion (ISC) model of Virtual Kinetic Cell (VKC; single-cell model) for laboratory scale....... This incorporates fourteen pseudo components and fourteen reactions (distributed amongst thermal cracking, low temperature oxidation and high temperature oxidation). The paper presents a set of derivative plots indicating that reservoir process characterization in terms of thermal behavior of oil can be well...... construed in terms of thermo-oxidative sensitivity of SARA fractions. It can be interpreted from the results that operating parameters like air injection rate, oxygen feed concentration and activation energy have significant influence on oil recovery; an increase in air injection rate can lead to cooling...

  10. Numerical study on core damage and interpretation of in situ state of stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakala, M. [Gridpoint Finland Oy (Finland)

    1999-06-01

    Core disking is a phenomenon where a diamond cored core sample will be sliced when released from a stressed host rock. Ring disking is a similar phenomenon which takes place during overcoring with a pilot hole. Because of the uniform shape and spacing of disk fracturing, it has the potential to be used for estimating the in situ state of stress. If this is feasible, it could be used in high stress states where the traditional stress measuring techniques are not valid or even possible. In this work the both the core disking and ring disking phenomena were studied based on the elastic bottom hole stress application developed and a series of fracture growth stability simulations. The results-showed that both phenomena are very complicated and site specific, but the spacing, shape, extent and initiation point are clearly stress state dependent. Throughout the work, guidelines for the in situ stress field interpretation method were developed and implemented for the borehole aligned orthogonal stress field and Poisson`s ratio of 0.25. Based on this study, the in situ state of stress can be estimated with acceptable accuracy if information on both core disking and ring disking is available. On the other hand, as an indirect method, there are no reasons to use it if direct measurements can be used. (orig.) 35 refs.

  11. Development of new ultrafiltration techniques maintaining in-situ hydrochemical conditions for colloidal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aosai, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Mizuno, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Chemical state of elements in groundwater is one of the most important information for understanding behavior of elements in underground environment. Chemical state of elements controlled mainly by groundwater physico-chemical parameters. Because the change of physico-chemical parameters of groundwater, due to pressure release and oxidation during sampling, causes changes in chemical state of elements, systematic methodologies for understanding in situ chemical state is required. In this study, in order to understand chemical state of elements in groundwater, an ultrafiltration instrument for maintaining in-situ pressure and anaerobic conditions was developed. The instrument developed in this study for ultrafiltration made of passivated Stainless Used Steel (SUS) materials, was designed to keep groundwater samples maintaining in-situ pressure/anaerobic conditions. Ultrafiltration of groundwater was conducted at a borehole drilled from the 200 mbGL (meters below ground level) Sub-stage at a depth of 200 m at the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory. Chemical analyses of groundwater were also conducted using samples filtered under both pressurized/anaerobic and atmospheric conditions and passivated SUS materials with different elapsed times after passivation. The results indicate that our ultrafiltration method is suitable for collection of filtered groundwater and passivation is an essential treatment before ultrafiltration. (author)

  12. Numerical study on core damage and interpretation of in situ state of stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakala, M.

    1999-06-01

    Core disking is a phenomenon where a diamond cored core sample will be sliced when released from a stressed host rock. Ring disking is a similar phenomenon which takes place during overcoring with a pilot hole. Because of the uniform shape and spacing of disk fracturing, it has the potential to be used for estimating the in situ state of stress. If this is feasible, it could be used in high stress states where the traditional stress measuring techniques are not valid or even possible. In this work the both the core disking and ring disking phenomena were studied based on the elastic bottom hole stress application developed and a series of fracture growth stability simulations. The results-showed that both phenomena are very complicated and site specific, but the spacing, shape, extent and initiation point are clearly stress state dependent. Throughout the work, guidelines for the in situ stress field interpretation method were developed and implemented for the borehole aligned orthogonal stress field and Poisson's ratio of 0.25. Based on this study, the in situ state of stress can be estimated with acceptable accuracy if information on both core disking and ring disking is available. On the other hand, as an indirect method, there are no reasons to use it if direct measurements can be used. (orig.)

  13. Characterizing the nature of subpulse drifting in pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Rahul; Mitra, Dipanjan

    2018-04-01

    We report a detailed study of subpulse drifting in four long-period pulsars. These pulsars were observed in the Meterwavelength Single-pulse Polarimetric Emission Survey and the presence of phase-modulated subpulse drifting was reported in each case. We carried out longer duration and more sensitive observations lasting 7000-12 000 periods in the frequency range 306-339 MHz. The drifting features were characterized in great detail, including the phase variations across the pulse window. For two pulsars, J0820-1350 and J1720-2933, the phases changed steadily across the pulse window. The pulsar J1034-3224 has five components. The leading component was very weak and was barely detectable in our single-pulse observations. The four trailing components showed subpulse drifting. The phase variations changed in alternate components with a reversal in the sign of the gradient. This phenomenon is known as bi-drifting. The pulsar J1555-3134 showed two distinct peak frequencies of comparable strengths in the fluctuation spectrum. The two peaks did not appear to be harmonically related and were most likely a result of different physical processes. Additionally, the long observations enabled us to explore the temporal variations of the drifting features. The subpulse drifting was largely constant with time but small fluctuations around a mean value were seen.

  14. New developments on silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashevsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    In the frame of the project to develop large-area linear drift detectors few prototypes have been designed and produced. the function of these prototypes is to allow the evaluation of the solutions chosen for the geometry of the on-board electrodes and the production process. On these prototypes it is studied the static characteristics and measured time of-flight and charge collection injecting charges with an IR laser source. It is report the results from one of the prototypes

  15. Ocean modelling aspects for drift applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephane, L.; Pierre, D.

    2010-12-01

    Nowadays, many authorities in charge of rescue-at-sea operations lean on operational oceanography products to outline research perimeters. Moreover, current fields estimated with sophisticated ocean forecasting systems can be used as input data for oil spill/ adrift object fate models. This emphasises the necessity of an accurate sea state forecast, with a mastered level of reliability. This work focuses on several problems inherent to drift modeling, dealing in the first place with the efficiency of the oceanic current field representation. As we want to discriminate the relevance of a particular physical process or modeling option, the idea is to generate series of current fields of different characteristics and then qualify them in term of drift prediction efficiency. Benchmarked drift scenarios were set up from real surface drifters data, collected in the Mediterranean sea and off the coasts of Angola. The time and space scales that we are interested in are about 72 hr forecasts (typical timescale communicated in case of crisis), for distance errors that we hope about a few dozen of km around the forecast (acceptable for reconnaissance by aircrafts) For the ocean prediction, we used some regional oceanic configurations based on the NEMO 2.3 code, nested into Mercator 1/12° operational system. Drift forecasts were computed offline with Mothy (Météo France oil spill modeling system) and Ariane (B. Blanke, 1997), a Lagrangian diagnostic tool. We were particularly interested in the importance of the horizontal resolution, vertical mixing schemes, and any processes that may impact the surface layer. The aim of the study is to ultimately point at the most suitable set of parameters for drift forecast use inside operational oceanic systems. We are also motivated in assessing the relevancy of ensemble forecasts regarding determinist predictions. Several tests showed that mis-described observed trajectories can finally be modelled statistically by using uncertainties

  16. Mechanical properties enhancement and microstructure study of Al-Si-TiB2 in situ composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Majhi, J.; Pattnaik, A. B.; Sahoo, J. K.; Das, Swagat

    2018-03-01

    Al–Si alloy-based composite is one of the most promising MMC materials owing to its outstanding mechanical properties, wear and corrosion resistance, low cost and ability to be synthesized via conventional casting routes. Challenges in achieving clean interface between reinforced particles and matrix alloy have been overcome by means of in-situ techniques of fabrication. Present investigation is concerned with synthesizing Al-Si-TiB2 in-situ composites through stir casting route using K2TiF6 and KBF4 halide salts for exothermic salt metal reaction. X-Ray diffraction analysis revealed the existence of TiB2 in the prepared samples. Effect of TiB2in-situ particles in the Al-Si base alloy has been investigated from the results obtained from optical microscopy as well as SEM study and wear analysis with a pin on disc wear testing apparatus. Improved hardness and wear properties were observed with addition of TiB2.

  17. An in situ study of zirconium-based conversion treatment on zinc surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, P. [Materials innovation institute (M2i), Elektronicaweg 25, 2628 XG Delft (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Laha, P. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Electrochemical and Surface Engineering, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Terryn, H. [Delft University of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Electrochemical and Surface Engineering, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Mol, J.M.C., E-mail: J.M.C.Mol@tudelft.nl [Delft University of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • We investigated the deposition mechanism of zirconium conversion layer on zinc. • In situ FTIR and electrochemical measurements are conducted. • The initial hydroxyl fraction plays an important role in the deposition process. • Deposition starts with hydroxyl removal by fluoride ions. • An increase of alkalinity adjacent to the surface promotes deposition of Zr. - Abstract: This study is focused on the deposition process of zirconium-based conversion layers on Zn surfaces. The analysis approach is based on a Kretschmann configuration in which in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy is combined with open circuit potential (OCP) and near surface pH measurements. Differently pretreated Zn surfaces were subjected to conversion treatments, while the Zr-based deposition mechanism was probed in situ. It was found that the initial hydroxyl fraction promotes the overall Zr conversion process as the near surface pH values are influenced by the initial hydroxyl fraction. Kinetics of the early surface activation and the subsequent Zr-based conversion process are discussed and correlated to the initial hydroxyl fractions.

  18. Matrix diffusion studies by electrical conductivity methods. Comparison between laboratory and in-situ measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlsson, Y.; Neretnieks, I.

    1998-01-01

    Traditional laboratory diffusion experiments in rock material are time consuming, and quite small samples are generally used. Electrical conductivity measurements, on the other hand, provide a fast means for examining transport properties in rock and allow measurements on larger samples as well. Laboratory measurements using electrical conductivity give results that compare well to those from traditional diffusion experiments. The measurement of the electrical resistivity in the rock surrounding a borehole is a standard method for the detection of water conducting fractures. If these data could be correlated to matrix diffusion properties, in-situ diffusion data from large areas could be obtained. This would be valuable because it would make it possible to obtain data very early in future investigations of potentially suitable sites for a repository. This study compares laboratory electrical conductivity measurements with in-situ resistivity measurements from a borehole at Aespoe. The laboratory samples consist mainly of Aespoe diorite and fine-grained granite and the rock surrounding the borehole of Aespoe diorite, Smaaland granite and fine-grained granite. The comparison shows good agreement between laboratory measurements and in-situ data

  19. Predicting public sector accountability : From agency drift to forum drift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillemans, Thomas|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/229913881; Busuioc, Madalina

    2015-01-01

    Principal-agent theory has been the dominant theory at the heart of public sector accountability research. The notion of the potentially drifting agent-such as independent public agencies, opaque transnational institutions, or recalcitrant street-level bureaucrats-has been the guiding paradigm in

  20. Hole drift mobility in poly(hexylphenylsilane)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunimi, Y.; Seki, S.; Tagawa, S.

    2000-01-01

    Poly(n-alkylphenylsilane)s in which n-alkyl were changed from methyl to octyl were polymerized. Hole transport properties of poly(alkyllphenylsilane)s were systematically studied by the DC time-of-flight (TOF) technique. While the hole drift mobility of poly(methylphenylsilane) increased monotonously in entire field, those of poly(hexylphenylsilane) and poly(octylphenylsilane) decreased with increase in the field strength. Temperature dependence of hole drift mobility in those polymers was small. On the basis of Baessler's disorder formalism the mobility was analyzed quantitatively to disserve complex contributions of charge transport. The analyzed results indicated that with increase in the length of n-alkyl side-groups, the energetic disorder of hopping sites became smaller and the disorder of distance between hopping sites became larger. These results were supported by the results obtained by UV absorption measurement and positron annihilation life-time spectroscopy measurement. (author)

  1. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-09-23

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling.

  2. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-01-01

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling

  3. Collisional drift fluid equations and implications for drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfirsch, Dieter; Correa-Restrepo, Dario

    1996-01-01

    The usual theoretical description of drift-wave turbulence (considered to be one possible cause of anomalous transport in a plasma), e.g. the Hasegawa-Wakatani theory, makes use of various approximations, the effects of which are extremely difficult to assess. This concerns in particular the conservation laws for energy and momentum. The latter law is important in relation to charge separation and the resulting electric fields, which are possibly related to the L-H transition. Energy conservation is crucial to the stability behaviour, it will be discussed by means of an example. New collisional multi-species drift-fluid equations were derived by a new method which yields, in a transparent way, conservation of energy and total angular momentum and the law for energy dissipation. Both electrostatic and electromagnetic field variations are considered. The only restriction involved is the validity of the drift approximation; in particular, there are no assumptions restricting the geometry of the system. The method is based primarily on a Lagrangian for dissipationless fluids in the drift approximation with isotropic pressures. The dissipative terms are introduced by adding corresponding terms to the ideal equations of motion and of the pressures. The equations of motion, of course, no longer result from a Lagrangian via Hamilton's principle. However, their relation to the ideal equations also implies a relation to the ideal Lagrangian, which can be used to advantage. Instead of introducing heat conduction one can also assume isothermal behaviour, e.g. T v (x) = constant. Assumptions of this kind are often made in the literature. The new method of introducing dissipation is not restricted to the present kind of theory; it can equally well be applied to theories such as multi-fluid theories without using the drift approximation of the present paper. (author)

  4. Internal Clock Drift Estimation in Computer Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Marouani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most computers have several high-resolution timing sources, from the programmable interrupt timer to the cycle counter. Yet, even at a precision of one cycle in ten millions, clocks may drift significantly in a single second at a clock frequency of several GHz. When tracing the low-level system events in computer clusters, such as packet sending or reception, each computer system records its own events using an internal clock. In order to properly understand the global system behavior and performance, as reported by the events recorded on each computer, it is important to estimate precisely the clock differences and drift between the different computers in the system. This article studies the clock precision and stability of several computer systems, with different architectures. It also studies the typical network delay characteristics, since time synchronization algorithms rely on the exchange of network packets and are dependent on the symmetry of the delays. A very precise clock, based on the atomic time provided by the GPS satellite network, was used as a reference to measure clock drifts and network delays. The results obtained are of immediate use to all applications which depend on computer clocks or network time synchronization accuracy.

  5. Comparative simulation study of coupled THM processes near back-filled and open-drift nuclear waste repositories in Task D of the International DECOVALEX Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Chijimatsu, M.; Kolditz, O.; Liu, Quan-Sheng; Oda, Y.; Wang, Wenqing; Zhang, Cheng-Yuan

    2006-01-01

    As part of the ongoing international DECOVALEX project, four research teams used five different models to simulate coupled thermal, hydrological, and mechanical (THM) processes near underground waste emplacement drifts. The simulations were conducted for two generic repository types, one with open and the other with back-filled repository drifts, under higher and lower post-closure temperature, respectively. In the completed first model inception phase of the project, a good agreement was achieved between the research teams in calculating THM responses for both repository types, although some disagreement in hydrological responses are currently being resolved. Good agreement in the basic thermal-mechanical responses was also achieved for both repository types, even though some teams used relatively simplified thermal-elastic heat-conduction models that neglect complex near-field thermal-hydrological processes. The good agreement between the complex and simplified process models indicates that the basic thermal-mechanical responses can be predicted with a relatively high confidence level

  6. In-situ x-ray absorption study of copper films in ground water solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvashnina, K.O.; Butorin, S.M.; Modin, A.; Soroka, I.; Marcellini, M.; Nordgren, J.; Guo, J.-H.; Werme, L.

    2007-01-01

    This study illustrates how the damage from copper corrosion can be reduced by modifying the chemistry of the copper surface environment. The surface modification of oxidized copper films induced by chemical reaction with Cl - and HCO 3 - in aqueous solutions was monitored by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that corrosion of copper can be significantly reduced by adding even a small amount of sodium bicarbonate. The studied copper films corroded quickly in chloride solutions, whereas the same solution containing 1.1 mM HCO 3 - prevented or slowed down the corrosion processes

  7. An in situ study of the adsorption behavior of functionalized particles on selfassembled monolayers via different chemical interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ling, X.Y.; Malaquin, Laurent; Reinhoudt, David; Wolf, Heiko; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2007-01-01

    The formation of particle monolayers by convective assembly was studied in situ with three different kinds of particle-surface interactions: adsorption onto native surfaces, with additional electrostatic interactions, and with supramolecular host-guest interactions. In the first case

  8. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xianjun, E-mail: xjxie@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Wang, Yanxin, E-mail: yx.wang@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Pi, Kunfu [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Liu, Chongxuan [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China)

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO{sub 4} and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na{sub 2}HAsO{sub 4}) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles

  9. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-01-01

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO 4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na 2 HAsO 4 ) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles. - Highlights:

  10. Construction of a test cell for the laser calibration of the planar ZEUS drift chambers and studies of algorithms for the analysis of FADC signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabbous, H.

    1988-07-01

    The planar drift chambers (FTD 1, 2, 3) of the ZEUS forward detector (FDET) will be operated in an inhomogeneous part of the magnetic field produced by the ZEUS solenoid. The calibration of the drift chambers will therefore be performed by measuring the space-drift-time-relation in a small test cell for a variety of combinations of anti E and anti B. This will be done by means of an UV-laser. The test cell is designed to be rotated around 2 axes in the homogeneous anti B-field of a large magnet available at DESY. The laser beam enters the test cell through a quartz window and is appropriately deflected by a system of 3 mirrors. In the second part of this paper several algorithms for the analysis of FADC signals are investigated, in view of optimal spatial and double track resolution. The best results have been obtained with a newly developed method based on digital filtering. (orig.) [de

  11. Spin-drift transport in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M Idrish [Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh)

    2008-02-07

    We present a study on spin transport in semiconductors under applied electric fields. Our experiments detect photoinjected electron spins and their relaxation during drift transport in intrinsic and moderately n-doped GaAs, based on the extraordinary Hall (eH) effect. For relatively low electric field (E), the optically spin-induced eH effect in n-doped GaAs is found to be enhanced with increasing doping density and not to depend much on E, indicating that a substantial amount of optical spin polarization is preserved during the drift transport in these extrinsic semiconductors. However, when the spin-oriented electrons are injected with a high E, a very significant decrease is observed in the eH voltage (V{sub eH}) due to an increase in the spin precession frequency of the hot electrons. Spin relaxation by the D'yakonov-Perel' mechanism is calculated, and is suggested to be the reason for such a rapid spin relaxation for hot electrons under a high E. However, in an intrinsic GaAs (i-GaAs), a much weaker V{sub eH} is observed and, as the electron spins scattered by holes due to the Coulomb interaction in i-GaAs, the spin relaxation by the Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanism is considered. Skew scattering and side jump as possible mechanisms of the optically spin-induced transverse Hall currents are discussed. Based on a spin drift-diffusion model, drift and diffusion contributions to the V{sub eH} are examined. The results are also discussed in comparison with theoretical investigations.

  12. Report on in-situ studies of flash sintering of uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raftery, Alicia Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Flash sintering is a novel type of field assisted sintering that uses an electric field and current to provide densification of materials on very short time scales. The potential for field assisted sintering techniques to be used in producing nuclear fuel is gaining recognition due to the potential economic benefits and improvements in material properties. The flash sintering behavior has so far been linked to applied and material parameters, but the underlying mechanisms active during flash sintering have yet to be identified. This report summarizes the efforts to investigate flash sintering of uranium dioxide using dilatometer studies at Los Alamos National Laboratory and two separate sets of in-situ studies at Brookhaven National Laboratory’s NSLS-II XPD-1 beamline. The purpose of the dilatometer studies was to understand individual parameter (applied and material) effects on the flash behavior and the purpose of the in-situ studies was to better understand the mechanisms active during flash sintering. As far as applied parameters, it was found that stoichiometry, or oxygen-to-metal ratio, has a significant effect on the flash behavior (time to flash and speed of flash). Composite systems were found to have degraded sintering behavior relative to pure UO2. The critical field studies are complete for UO2.00 and will be analyzed against an existing model for comparison. The in-situ studies showed that the strength of the field and current are directly related to the sample temperature, with temperature-driven phase changes occurring at high values. The existence of an ‘incubation time’ has been questioned, due to a continuous change in lattice parameter values from the moment that the field is applied. Some results from the in-situ experiments, which should provide evidence regarding ion migration, are still being analyzed. Some preliminary conclusions can be made from these results with regard to using field assisted sintering to

  13. Discovery of remarkable subpulse drifting pattern in PSR B0818-41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, B.; Gupta, Y.; Gil, J.; Sendyk, M.

    The study of pulsars showing systematic subpulse drift patterns provides important clues for understanding of pulsar emission mechanism. Pulsars with wide profiles provide extra insights because of the presence of multiple drift bands (e.g PSR B0826-34). We report the discovery of a remarkable subpulse drift pattern in a relatively less studied wide profile pulsar, PSR B0818-41, using the GMRT. We find simultaneous occurrence of three drift regions with two drift rates, an inner region with steeper apparent drift rate flanked on each side by a region of slower apparent drift rate. Furthermore, the two closely spaced drift regions always maintain a constant phase relationship. These unique drift properties seen for this pulsar is very rare. We interpret that the observed drift pattern is created by intersection of our line of sight (LOS) with two conal rings in a inner LOS (negative beta) geometry. We argue that the carousel rotation periodicity (P_4) and the number of sparks (N_sp) are the same for the rings and claim that P_4 is close to the measured P_3. Based on our analysis results and interpretations, we simulate the radiation from B0818-41. The simulations support our interpretations and reproduce the average profile and the observed drift pattern. The results of our study show that PSR B0818-41 is a powerful system to explore the pulsar radio emission mechanism, the implications of which are also discussed in our work.

  14. Transient chaotic transport in dissipative drift motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyarzabal, R.S. [Pós-Graduação em Ciências/Física, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Szezech, J.D. [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Batista, A.M., E-mail: antoniomarcosbatista@gmail.com [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Souza, S.L.T. de [Departamento de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de São João del Rei, 36420-000, Ouro Branco, MG (Brazil); Caldas, I.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 05315-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Viana, R.L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Sanjuán, M.A.F. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipán s/n, 28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-04-22

    Highlights: • We consider a situation for which a chaotic transient is present in the dynamics of the two-wave model with damping. • The damping in plasma models can be a way for study a realistic behavior of confinement due the collisional effect. • The escape time as a function of the damping obey a power-law scaling. • We have made a qualitative transport analysis with a simple model that can be useful for more complete models. • We have shown that the pattern of the basin of attraction depends on the damping parameter. - Abstract: We investigate chaotic particle transport in magnetised plasmas with two electrostatic drift waves. Considering dissipation in the drift motion, we verify that the removed KAM surfaces originate periodic attractors with their corresponding basins of attraction. We show that the properties of the basins depend on the dissipation and the space-averaged escape time decays exponentially when the dissipation increases. We find positive finite time Lyapunov exponents in dissipative drift motion, consequently the trajectories exhibit transient chaotic transport. These features indicate how the transient plasma transport depends on the dissipation.

  15. The erosive effects of some mouthrinses on enamel. A study in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontefract, H; Hughes, J; Kemp, K; Yates, R; Newcombe, R G; Addy, M

    2001-04-01

    There are both anecdotal clinical and laboratory experimental data suggesting that low pH mouthrinses cause dental erosion. This evidence is particularly relevant to acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) formulations since they have plaque inhibitory properties comparable to chlorhexidine but without the well known local side effects. Studies in situ and in vitro were planned to measure enamel erosion by low pH mouthrinses. The study in situ measured enamel erosion by ASC, essential oil and hexetidine mouthrinses over 15-day study periods. The study was a 5 treatment, single blind cross over design involving 15 healthy subjects using orange juice, as a drink, and water, as a rinse, as positive and negative controls respectively. 2 enamel specimens from unerupted human third molar teeth were placed in the palatal area of upper removable acrylic appliances which were worn from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Friday for 3 weeks. Rinses were used 2x daily and 250 ml volumes of orange juice were imbibed 4x daily. Enamel loss was determined by profilometry on days 5, 10 and 15. The study in vitro involved immersing specimens in the 4 test solutions together with a reduced acid ASC formulation for a period of 4 h under constant stirring; Enamel loss was measured by profilometry every hour. Enamel loss was in situ progressive over time with the 3 rinses and orange juice but negligible with water. ASC produced similar erosion to orange juice and significantly more than the two proprietary rinses and water. The essential oil and hexetidine rinses produced similar erosion and significantly more than water. Enamel loss in vitro was progressive over time, and the order from low to high erosion was reduced acid ASC, ASC, Essential oil, and hexetidine mouthrinses and orange juice. Based on the study in situ, it is recommended that low pH mouthrinses should not be considered for long term or continuous use and never as pre-brushing rinses. In view of the plaque inhibitory efficacy of ASC

  16. Mitigating Backgrounds with a Novel Thin-Film Cathode in the DRIFT-IId Dark Matter Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eric H.

    The nature of dark matter, which comprises 85% of the matter density in the universe, is a major outstanding question in physics today. The standard hypothesis is that the dark matter is a new weakly interacting massive particle, which is present throughout the galaxy. These particles could interact within detectors on Earth, producing low-energy nuclear recoils. Two distinctive signatures arise from the solar motion through the galaxy. The DRIFT experiment aims to measure one of these, the directional signature that is based on the sidereal modulation of the nuclear recoil directions. Although DRIFT has demonstrated its capability for detecting this signature, it has been plagued by a large number of backgrounds that have limited its reach. The focus of this thesis is on characterizing these backgrounds and describing techniques that have essentially eliminated them. The background events in the DRIFT-IId detector are predominantly caused by alpha decays on the central cathode in which the alpha particles completely or partially absorbed by the cathode material. This thesis describes the installation a 0.9 mum thick aluminized-mylar cathode as a way to reduce the probability of producing these backgrounds. We study three generations of cathode (wire, thin-film, and radiologically clean thin-film) with a focus on identifying and quantifying the sources of alpha decay backgrounds, as well as their contributions to the background rate in the detector. This in-situ study is based on alpha range spectroscopy and the determination of the absolute alpha detection efficiency. The results for the final radiologically clean version of the cathode give a contamination of 3.3 +/- 0.1 ppt 234U and 73 +/- 2 ppb 238U, and an efficiency for rejecting an RPR from an alpha decay that is a factor 70 +/- 20 higher than for the original wire cathode. Along with other background reduction measures, the thin-film cathode has reduced the observed background rate from 130/day to 1.7/day

  17. Novel in situ radiotracer methods for the direct and indirect study of chromate adsorption on alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gancs, L.; Nemeth, Z.; Horanyi, G.

    2002-01-01

    Radiotracer methods, particularly the radiotracer thin foil method, provide unique possibility of in situ monitoring of chromate adsorption on powdered adsorbents. Two different versions of the thin foil method can be distinguished. In the direct method, the species to be studied is labelled and the radiation measured gives direct information on the adsorption of this species. In the indirect method, a different labelled indicator species is added to the system and the adsorption of this species is followed and the adsorption of the species to be studied is determined based on analysis of the competitive adsorption processes. Both methods were used in the present study. In the in situ methods, the radiation measured consists of two main parts, one coming from the solution background, the other originating from the adsorption layer. In the case of the thin foil method using isotopes emitting soft β - radiation or low energy X-ray the solution background is governed and minimised by self-absorption of the radiation. In the direct study we applied an experimental methodology based on the energy selective measurement of the characteristic K α,β X-radiation emitted by the 51 Cr-labelled chromate species, whereas 35 S-labelled sulphate ions were used as the indicator species in the indirect study. (P.A.)

  18. Towards functionalization of graphene: in situ study of the nucleation of copper-phtalocyanine on graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarz, Daniel; Henneke, Caroline; Kumpf, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Molecular films present an elegant way for the uniform functionalization or doping of graphene. Here, we present an in situ study on the initial growth of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) on epitaxial graphene on Ir(111). We followed the growth up to a closed monolayer with low energy electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction (μLEED). The molecules coexist on graphene in a disordered phase without long-range order and an ordered crystalline phase. The local topography of the grap...

  19. A STUDY ON MICROSTRUCTURE CHARACTERISTICS OF IN SITU FORMED TiC REINFORCED COMPOSITE COATINGS

    OpenAIRE

    PENG LIU; WEI GUO; HUI LUO

    2012-01-01

    In situ synthesized TiC reinforced composite coating was fabricated by laser cladding of Al-Ni-Cr-C powders on titanium alloys, which can greatly improve the surface performance of the substrate. In this study, the Al-Ni-Cr-C laser-cladded composite coatings have been researched by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). There was a metallurgical combination between the Al-Ni-Cr-C laser-cladded coating and the Ti-6Al-4V substrat...

  20. Development of conductivity probe and temperature probe for in-situ measurements in hydrological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, U.; Galindo, B.J.; Castagnet, A.C.G.

    1981-05-01

    A conductivity probe and a temperature probe have been developed for in-situ measurements in various hydrological field studies. The conductivity probe has platinum electrodes and is powered with two 12 volt batteries. The sensing element of the temperature probe consists of a resistor of high coefficient of temperature. Response of the conductivity probe is measured in a milliampere mater while the resistance of the thermistor is read by a digital meter. The values of conductivity and temperature are derived from respective calibration. The probes are prototype and their range of measurement can be improved depending upon the requirement of the field problem. (Author) [pt

  1. Case studies illustrating in-situ remediation methods for soil and groundwater contaminated with petrochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Robert A.; Lance, P.E.; Downs, A.; Kier, Brian P. [EMCON Northwest Inc., Portland, OR (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Four case studies of successful in-situ remediation are summarized illustrating cost-effective methods to remediate soil and groundwater contaminated with volatile and non-volatile petrochemicals. Each site is in a different geologic environment with varying soil types and with and without groundwater impact. The methods described include vadose zone vapor extraction, high-vacuum vapor extraction combined with groundwater tab.le depression, air sparging with groundwater recovery and vapor extraction, and bio remediation of saturated zone soils using inorganic nutrient and oxygen addition

  2. Sintering of oxide-supported Pt and Pd nanoparticles in air studied by in situ TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Søren Bredmose

    This thesis presents a fundamental study of the sintering of supported nanoparticles in relation to diesel oxidation catalysts. The sintering of supported nanoparticles is an important challenge in relation to this catalyst, as well as many other catalyst systems, and a fundamental understanding...... of Pt, Pd and bimetallic Pt-Pd nanoparticles supported on a flat and homogeneous Al2O3 or SiO2 surface. By using in situ TEM on the planar model catalysts it was possible to directly monitor the detailed dynamical changes of the individual nanoparticles during exposure to oxidizing conditions...

  3. Chlorophyll bleaching by UV-irradiation in vitro and in situ: Absorption and fluorescence studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvezdanovic, Jelena; Cvetic, Tijana; Veljovic-Jovanovic, Sonja; Markovic, Dejan

    2009-01-01

    Chlorophyll bleaching by UV-irradiation has been studied by absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy in extracts containing mixtures of photosynthetic pigments, in acetone and n-hexane solutions, and in aqueous thylakoid suspensions. Chlorophyll undergoes destruction (bleaching) accompanied by fluorescent transient formation obeying first-order kinetics. The bleaching is governed by UV-photon energy input, as well as by different chlorophyll molecular organizations in solvents of different polarities (in vitro), and in thylakoids (in situ). UV-C-induced bleaching of chlorophylls in thylakoids is probably caused by different mechanisms compared to UV-A- and UV-B-induced bleaching

  4. Case studies illustrating in-situ remediation methods for soil and groundwater contaminated with petrochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Robert A; Lance, P E; Downs, A; Kier, Brian P [EMCON Northwest Inc., Portland, OR (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Four case studies of successful in-situ remediation are summarized illustrating cost-effective methods to remediate soil and groundwater contaminated with volatile and non-volatile petrochemicals. Each site is in a different geologic environment with varying soil types and with and without groundwater impact. The methods described include vadose zone vapor extraction, high-vacuum vapor extraction combined with groundwater tab.le depression, air sparging with groundwater recovery and vapor extraction, and bio remediation of saturated zone soils using inorganic nutrient and oxygen addition

  5. Design, installation and in-situ performance study of ultrasonic continuous level meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surya Prakash, G.; Somayaji, K.M.

    1995-01-01

    The report discusses the design and the development of a continuous liquid level meter based on ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. A review of various methods for level measurement along with the details of pulse-echo technique are presented. Also discussed is the development of discrete level detectors based on ultrasonic techniques. Lastly, the procedures adopted for in-situ installation of these level meters in FBTR and RML are given along with the field performance study. Some of the typical merits and limitations of the method and the surface preparation procedure are also highlighted. (author) (author)

  6. The Geodiversity in Drift Sand Landscapes of The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ancker, Hanneke; Jungerius, Pieter Dirk; Riksen, Michel

    2015-04-01

    The authors carried out detailed field studies of more than twelve drift sand landscapes in The Netherlands. The objective of these studies was to restore Natura-2000 values by restoring the wind activity. Active drift sands occur almost exclusively in The Netherlands, Natura 2000 habitat 2330 'Inland dunes with open Corynephorus and Agrostis grasslands', for which reason our country is largely responsible for this European landscape. Active drift sands had almost disappeared for two reasons: first, the stabilization of the drift sands by air pollution, mainly nitrogen, which stimulates the growth of algae and grasses that initiate soil formation, and second, by the growth of forests surrounding the sands, which decreases the wind force. The restoration studies revealed differences in the geodiversity between and within the drift sand areas. Whereas the drift sands on geological and soil maps show as almost homogenous areas, they have in fact highly variable geo-conditions of which examples will be given. These geodiversity aspects concern differences in geomorphological structure, origin, sediments and age of the drift sands. Differences in wind and water erosion, trampling and soil formation add to the geodiversity within the drift sand areas. Especially in the primary stages of succession the differences in geodiversity are relevant for the Natura-2000 values. We discerned three main types of active sands. Firstly, the impressive drift sands with large parabolic dune structures, often consisting of series of interlocking parabolic dunes. They developed from the northeast towards the southwest, against the direction of the dominant wind, and must have taken centuries to develop. Small parts of these systems are still active, other parts show different degrees of soil formation. Their origin is still unclear but probably dates from medieval times (Heidinga, 1985, Jungerius & Riksen, 2008). Second are the drift sand areas with irregular hills from 0.5 to about 2

  7. Identity confirmation of drugs and explosives in ion mobility spectrometry using a secondary drift gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanu, Abu B; Hill, Herbert H

    2007-10-15

    This work demonstrated the potential of using a secondary drift gas of differing polarizability from the primary drift gas for confirmation of a positive response for drugs or explosives by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The gas phase mobilities of response ions for selected drugs and explosives were measured in four drift gases. The drift gases chosen for this study were air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide providing a range of polarizability and molecular weights. Four other drift gases (helium, neon, argon and sulfur hexafluoride) were also investigated but design limitations of the commercial instrument prevented their use for this application. When ion mobility was plotted against drift gas polarizability, the resulting slopes were often unique for individual ions, indicating that selectivity factors between any two analytes varied with the choice of drift gas. In some cases, drugs like THC and heroin, which are unresolved in air or nitrogen, were well resolved in carbon dioxide or nitrous oxide.

  8. Application of in-situ bioassays with macrophytes in aquatic mesocosm studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coors, Anja; Kuckelkorn, Jochen; Hammers-Wirtz, Monika; Strauss, Tido

    2006-10-01

    Aquatic mesocosm studies assess ecotoxicological effects of chemicals by using small artificial ponds as models of lentic ecosystems. In this study, methods of controlled insertion of macrophytes within an outdoor mesocosm study were explored. Although analytically confirmed concentrations of the model herbicide terbuthylazine were high enough to expect direct effects on phytoplankton, functional parameters and dominant taxa abundance indicated only minor and transient effects. In-situ assays with Lemna minor, Myriophyllum spicatum, Potamogeton lucens and Chara globularis revealed adverse effects at concentrations in accordance with literature data. Complex interactions such as nutrient limitation and competition were possible reasons for the observed growth promotion at the lower concentration of about 5 microg/l terbuthylazine. The approach of macrophyte in-situ bioassays within a mesocosm study proved to be applicable. Presumed advantages are simultaneous acquisition of toxicity data for several species of aquatic plants under more realistic conditions compared to laboratory tests and inclusion of macrophytes as important structural and functional components in mesocosms while limiting their domination of the model ecosystem.

  9. In-situ Non-destructive Studies on Biofouling Processes in Reverse Osmosis Membrane Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Nadia

    2016-12-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems are high-pressure membrane filtration processes that can produce high quality drinking water. Biofouling, biofilm formation that exceeds a certain threshold, is a major problem in spiral wound RO and NF membrane systems resulting in a decline in membrane performance, produced water quality, and quantity. In practice, detection of biofouling is typically done indirectly through measurements of performance decline. Existing direct biofouling detection methods are mainly destructive, such as membrane autopsies, where biofilm samples can be contaminated, damaged and resulting in biofilm structural changes. The objective of this study was to test whether transparent luminescent planar oxygen sensing optodes, in combination with a simple imaging system, can be used for in-situ, non-destructive biofouling characterization. Aspects of the study were early detection of biofouling, biofilm spatial patterning in spacer filled channels, and the effect of feed cross-flow velocity, and feed flow temperature. Oxygen sensing optode imaging was found suitable for studying biofilm processes and gave detailed spatial and quantitative biofilm development information enabling better understanding of the biofouling development process. The outcome of this study attests the importance of in-situ, non-destructive imaging in acquiring detailed knowledge on biofilm development in membrane systems contributing to the development of effective biofouling control strategies.

  10. Methodology for studying strain inhomogeneities in polycrystalline thin films during in situ thermal loading using coherent x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaxelaire, N; Labat, S; Thomas, O [Aix-Marseille University, IM2NP, FST avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen, F-13397 Marseille Cedex (France); Proudhon, H; Forest, S [MINES ParisTech, Centre des materiaux, CNRS UMR 7633, BP 87, 91003 Evry Cedex (France); Kirchlechner, C; Keckes, J [Erich Schmid Institute for Material Science, Austrian Academy of Science and Institute of Metal Physics, University of Leoben, Jahnstrasse 12, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Jacques, V; Ravy, S [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)], E-mail: nicolas.vaxelaire@univ-cezanne.fr

    2010-03-15

    Coherent x-ray diffraction is used to investigate the mechanical properties of a single grain within a polycrystalline thin film in situ during a thermal cycle. Both the experimental approach and finite element simulation are described. Coherent diffraction from a single grain has been monitored in situ at different temperatures. This experiment offers unique perspectives for the study of the mechanical properties of nano-objects.

  11. Methodology for studying strain inhomogeneities in polycrystalline thin films during in situ thermal loading using coherent x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaxelaire, N; Labat, S; Thomas, O; Proudhon, H; Forest, S; Kirchlechner, C; Keckes, J; Jacques, V; Ravy, S

    2010-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction is used to investigate the mechanical properties of a single grain within a polycrystalline thin film in situ during a thermal cycle. Both the experimental approach and finite element simulation are described. Coherent diffraction from a single grain has been monitored in situ at different temperatures. This experiment offers unique perspectives for the study of the mechanical properties of nano-objects.

  12. Chromogenic in situ hybridisation for the assessment of HER2 status in breast cancer: an international validation ring study

    OpenAIRE

    van de Vijver, Marc; Bilous, Michael; Hanna, Wedad; Hofmann, Manfred; Kristel, Petra; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Rüschoff, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Before any new methodology can be introduced into the routine diagnostic setting it must be technically validated against the established standards. To this end, a ring study involving five international pathology laboratories was initiated to validate chromogenic in situ hybridisation (CISH) against fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) as a test for assessing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status in breast cancer. Methods Each...

  13. An Equation-of-State Compositional In-Situ Combustion Model: A Study of Phase Behavior Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Rode; Gerritsen, M. G.; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2009-01-01

    phase behavior sensitivity for in situ combustion, a thermal oil recovery process. For the one-dimensional model we first study the sensitivity to numerical discretization errors and provide grid density guidelines for proper resolution of in situ combustion behavior. A critical condition for success...... to ignition. For a particular oil we show that the simplified approach overestimates the required air injection rate for sustained front propagation by 17% compared to the equation of state-based approach....

  14. Noise-induced drift in two-dimensional anisotropic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farago, Oded

    2017-10-01

    We study the isothermal Brownian dynamics of a particle in a system with spatially varying diffusivity. Due to the heterogeneity of the system, the particle's mean displacement does not vanish even if it does not experience any physical force. This phenomenon has been termed "noise-induced drift," and has been extensively studied for one-dimensional systems. Here, we examine the noise-induced drift in a two-dimensional anisotropic system, characterized by a symmetric diffusion tensor with unequal diagonal elements. A general expression for the mean displacement vector is derived and presented as a sum of two vectors, depicting two distinct drifting effects. The first vector describes the tendency of the particle to drift toward the high diffusivity side in each orthogonal principal diffusion direction. This is a generalization of the well-known expression for the noise-induced drift in one-dimensional systems. The second vector represents a novel drifting effect, not found in one-dimensional systems, originating from the spatial rotation in the directions of the principal axes. The validity of the derived expressions is verified by using Langevin dynamics simulations. As a specific example, we consider the relative diffusion of two transmembrane proteins, and demonstrate that the average distance between them increases at a surprisingly fast rate of several tens of micrometers per second.

  15. A flexible gas flow reaction cell for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroner, Anna B., E-mail: anna.kroner@diamond.ac.uk; Gilbert, Martin; Duller, Graham; Cahill, Leo; Leicester, Peter; Woolliscroft, Richard; Shotton, Elizabeth J. [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Chilton, Oxfordshire, OX110DE (United Kingdom); Mohammed, Khaled M. H. [UK Catalysis Hub, Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire, OX110FA (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    A capillary-based sample environment with hot air blower and integrated gas system was developed at Diamond to conduct X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of materials under time-resolved, in situ conditions. The use of a hot air blower, operating in the temperature range of 298-1173 K, allows introduction of other techniques e.g. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy for combined techniques studies. The flexibility to use either quartz or Kapton capillaries allows users to perform XAS measurement at energies as low as 5600 eV. To demonstrate performance, time-resolved, in situ XAS results of Rh catalysts during the process of activation (Rh K-edge, Ce L{sub 3}-edge and Cr K-edge) and the study of mixed oxide membrane (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3−δ}) under various partial oxygen pressure conditions are described.

  16. In Situ Synchrotron X-ray Study of Ultrasound Cavitation and Its Effect on Solidification Microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Jiawei; Tan, Dongyue; Lee, Tung Lik (Hull)

    2014-12-11

    Considerable progress has been made in studying the mechanism and effectiveness of using ultrasound waves to manipulate the solidification microstructures of metallic alloys. However, uncertainties remain in both the underlying physics of how microstructures evolve under ultrasonic waves, and the best technological approach to control the final microstructures and properties. We used the ultrafast synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging facility housed at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, US to study in situ the highly transient and dynamic interactions between the liquid metal and ultrasonic waves/bubbles. The dynamics of ultrasonic bubbles in liquid metal and their interactions with the solidifying phases in a transparent alloy were captured in situ. The experiments were complemented by the simulations of the acoustic pressure field, the pulsing of the bubbles, and the associated forces acting onto the solidifying dendrites. The study provides more quantitative understanding on how ultrasonic waves/bubbles influence the growth of dendritic grains and promote the grain multiplication effect for grain refinement.

  17. Cutaneous melanoma in situ: translational evidence from a large population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Nitti, Donato

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma in situ (CMIS) is a nosologic entity surrounded by health concerns and unsolved debates. We aimed to shed some light on CMIS by means of a large population-based study. Patients with histologic diagnosis of CMIS were identified from the Surveillance Epidemiology End Results (SEER) database. The records of 93,863 cases of CMIS were available for analysis. CMIS incidence has been steadily increasing over the past 3 decades at a rate higher than any other in situ or invasive tumor, including invasive skin melanoma (annual percentage change [APC]: 9.5% versus 3.6%, respectively). Despite its noninvasive nature, CMIS is treated with excision margins wider than 1 cm in more than one third of cases. CMIS is associated with an increased risk of invasive melanoma (standardized incidence ratio [SIR]: 8.08; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.66-8.57), with an estimated 3:5 invasive/in situ ratio; surprisingly, it is also associated with a reduced risk of gastrointestinal (SIR: 0.78, CI: 0.72-0.84) and lung (SIR: 0.65, CI: 0.59-0.71) cancers. Relative survival analysis shows that persons with CMIS have a life expectancy equal to that of the general population. CMIS is increasingly diagnosed and is often overtreated, although it does not affect the life expectancy of its carriers. Patients with CMIS have an increased risk of developing invasive melanoma (which warrants their enrollment in screening programs) but also a reduced risk of some epithelial cancers, which raises the intriguing hypothesis that genetic/environmental risk factors for some tumors may oppose the pathogenesis of others.

  18. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I; Martinez laso, L

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  19. Low Drift Type N Thermocouples for Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scervini, M.; Rae, C.

    2013-06-01

    Thermocouples are the most commonly used sensors for temperature measurement in nuclear reactors. They are crucial for the control of current nuclear reactors and for the development of GEN IV reactors. In nuclear applications thermocouples are strongly affected by intense neutron fluxes. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. Thermocouple drift can be very significant for in-pile temperature measurements and may render the temperature sensors unreliable after exposure to nuclear radiation for relatively short times compared to the life required for temperature sensors in nuclear applications. Previous experiences with type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluxes. Currently the use of Nickel based thermocouples is limited to temperatures lower than 1000 deg. C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. In this work, undertaken as part of the European project METROFISSION, the drift of type N thermocouples has been investigated in the temperature range 600-1300 deg. C. The approach of this study is based on the attempt to separate the contributions of each thermo-element to drift. In order to identify the dominant thermo-element for drift, the contributions of both positive (NP) and negative (NN) thermo-elements to the total drift of 3.2 mm diameter MIMS thermocouples have been measured in each drift test using a pure Pt thermo-element as a reference. Conventional Inconel-600 sheathed type N thermocouples have been compared with type N thermocouples sheathed in a new alloy. At temperatures higher than 1000 deg. C conventional Inconel600 sheathed type N thermocouples can experience a

  20. Equatorial F-region plasma depletion drifts: latitudinal and seasonal variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Pimenta

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The equatorial ionospheric irregularities have been observed in the past few years by different techniques (e.g. ground-based radar, digisonde, GPS, optical instruments, in situ satellite and rocket instrumentation, and its time evolution and propagation characteristics can be used to study important aspects of ionospheric dynamics and thermosphere-ionosphere coupling. At present, one of the most powerful optical techniques to study the large-scale ionospheric irregularities is the all-sky imaging photometer system, which normally measures the strong F-region nightglow 630 nm emission from atomic oxygen. The monochromatic OI 630 nm emission images usually show quasi-north-south magnetic field-aligned intensity depletion bands, which are the bottomside optical signatures of large-scale F-region plasma irregularities (also called plasma bubbles. The zonal drift velocities of the plasma bubbles can be inferred from the space-time displacement of the dark structures (low intensity regions seen on the images. In this study, images obtained with an all-sky imaging photometer, using the OI 630 nm nightglow emission, from Cachoeira Paulista (22.7° S, 45° W, 15.8° S dip latitude, Brazil, have been used to determine the nocturnal monthly and latitudinal variation characteristics of the zonal plasma bubble drift velocities in the low latitude (16.7° S to 28.7° S region. The east and west walls of the plasma bubble show a different evolution with time. The method used here is based on the western wall of the bubble, which presents a more stable behavior. Also, the observed zonal plasma bubble drift velocities are compared with the thermospheric zonal neutral wind velocities obtained from the HWM-90 model (Hedin et al., 1991 to investigate the thermosphere-ionosphere coupling. Salient features from this study are presented and discussed.Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; ionospheric irregularities; instruments and techniques

  1. Site characterization and validation - Inflow to the validation drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, W.G.C.; Black, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogeological experiments have had an essential role in the characterization of the drift site on the Stripa project. This report focuses on the methods employed and the results obtained from inflow experiments performed on the excavated drift in stage 5 of the SCV programme. Inflows were collected in sumps on the floor, in plastic sheeting on the upper walls and ceiling, and measured by means of differential humidity of ventilated air at the bulkhead. Detailed evaporation experiments were also undertaken on uncovered areas of the excavated drift. The inflow distribution was determined on the basis of a system of roughly equal sized grid rectangles. The results have highlighted the overriding importance of fractures in the supply of water to the drift site. The validation drift experiment has revealed that in excess of 99% of inflow comes from a 5 m section corresponding to the 'H' zone, and that as much as 57% was observed coming from a single grid square (267). There was considerable heterogeneity even within the 'H' zone, with 38% of such samples areas yielding no flow at all. Model predictions in stage 4 underestimated the very substantial declines in inflow observed in the validation drift when compared to the SDE; this was especially so in the 'good' rock areas. Increased drawdowns in the drift have generated less flow and reduced head responses in nearby boreholes by a similar proportion. This behaviour has been the focus for considerable study in the latter part of the SCV project, and a number of potential processes have been proposed. These include 'transience', stress redistribution resulting from the creation of the drift, chemical precipitation, blast-induced dynamic unloading and related gas intrusion, and degassing. (au)

  2. Glycolate adsorption at gold and platinum electrodes: A theoretical and in situ spectroelectrochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, Jose Manuel; Blanco, Raquel; Orts, Jose Manuel; Perez, Juan Manuel; Rodes, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of glycolate anions at sputtered gold thin-film electrodes was studied in perchloric acid solutions by cyclic voltammetry experiments combined with in situ Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) and Surface Enhanced Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy under attenuated total reflection conditions (ATR-SEIRAS). Theoretical harmonic vibrational frequencies and band intensities obtained from B3LYP/LANL2DZ,6-31+G(d) calculations for glycolate species adsorbed on Au clusters with (1 1 1) orientation were used to interpret the experimental spectra. Vibrational data confirm the bidentate bonding of glycolate anions through the oxygen atoms of the carboxylate group, in a bridge configuration with the OCO plane perpendicular to the metal surface. The DFT calculations show no significant effect of the total charge of the metal cluster-adsorbate adduct on the vibrational frequencies of adsorbed glycolate species. The infrared experimental study is extended to platinum films electrochemically deposited onto sputtered gold thin-film electrodes showing the potential-dependent formation of adsorbed CO upon dissociative adsorption of glycolate anions. As in the case of gold, the reversible adsorption of glycolate anions takes place in a bidentate configuration as predicted by DFT calculations for glycolate adsorbed on Pt(1 1 1) clusters. At low glycolic acid concentration, the in situ ATR-SEIRA spectra evidence the formation of adsorbed oxalate as reaction intermediate.

  3. Two US EPA bioremediation field initiative studies: Evaluation of in-situ bioventing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayles, G.D.; Brenner, R.C.; Hinchee, R.E.; Vogel, C.M.; Miller, R.N.

    1992-01-01

    Bioventing is the process of supplying oxygen in-situ to oxygen-deprived soil microbes by forcing air through contaminated soil at low air flow rates. Unlike soil venting or soil vacuum extraction technologies, bioventing attempts to stimulate biodegradative activity while minimizing stripping of volatile organics. The process destroys the toxic compounds in the ground. Bioventing technology is especially valuable for treating contaminated soils in areas where structures and utilities cannot be disturbed because the equipment needed (air injection/withdrawal wells, air blower, and soil gas monitoring wells) is relatively non-invasive. The US EPA Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory, with resources from the US EPA Bioremediation Field Initiative, began two parallel 2-year field studies of in-situ of 1991 in collaboration with the US Air Force. The field sites are located at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) near Fairbanks, Alaska, and Hill AFB near Salt Lake City, Utah. Each site has jet fuel JP-4 contaminated unsaturated soil where a spill has occurred in association with a fuel distribution network. With the pilot-scale experience gained in these studies and others, bioventing should be available in the very near future as an inexpensive, unobtrusive means of treating large quantities of organically contaminated soils. 5 figs

  4. In situ X-ray diffraction studies on the piezoelectric response of PZT thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydok, A., E-mail: davydok@mpie.de [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Université de Toulon, IM2NP UMR 7334, 13397 Marseille (France); Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung, Department Structure and Nano-/Micromechanics of Materials, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Cornelius, T.W. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Université de Toulon, IM2NP UMR 7334, 13397 Marseille (France); Mocuta, C. [SOLEIL Synchrotron, DiffAbs beamline, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin - BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Lima, E.C. [Universidade Federal do Tocantins, 77500-000 Porto Nacional, TO (Brazil); Araujo, E.B. [Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Av. Brasil, 56 Centro, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil); Thomas, O. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Université de Toulon, IM2NP UMR 7334, 13397 Marseille (France)

    2016-03-31

    Piezoelectric properties of randomly oriented self-polarized PbZr{sub 0.50}Ti{sub 0.50}O{sub 3} (PZT) thin films were investigated using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Possibilities for investigating the piezoelectric effect using micro-sized hard X-ray beams are demonstrated and perspectives for future dynamical measurements on PZT samples with variety of compositions and thicknesses are given. Studies performed on the crystalline [100, 110] directions evidenced piezoelectric anisotropy. The piezoelectric coefficient d{sub 33} was calculated in terms of the lab reference frame (d{sub perp}) and found to be two times larger along the [100] direction than along the [110] direction. The absolute values for the d{sub perp} amount to 120 and 230 pm/V being in good agreement with experimental and theoretical values found in literature for bulk PZT ceramics. - Highlights: • We performed in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies on (PZT) thin films. • We discuss anisotropy of piezo effect in different crystallographic directions. • Perpendicular component Piezo coefficient of thin PZT layer is defined.

  5. In situ synchrotron X-ray studies during metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Carol [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (United States); Highland, Matthew J.; Perret, Edith; Fuoss, Paul H.; Streiffer, Stephen K.; Stephenson, G. Brian [Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (United States); Richard, Marie-Ingrid [Universite Paul Cezanne Aix-Marseille, Marseille (France)

    2012-07-01

    In-situ, time-resolved techniques provide valuable insight into the complex interplay of surface structural and chemical evolution occurring during materials synthesis and processing of semiconductors. Our approach is to observe the evolution of surface structure and morphology at the atomic scale in real-time during metal organic vapor phase deposition (MOCVD) by using grazing incidence x-ray scattering and X-ray fluorescence, coupled with visible light scattering. Our vertical-flow MOCVD chamber is mounted on a 'z-axis' surface diffractometer designed specifically for these studies of the film growth, surface evolution and the interactions within a controlled growth environment. These techniques combine the ability of X-rays to penetrate a complex environment for measurements during growth and processing, with the sensitivity of surface scattering techniques to atomic and nanoscale structure. In this talk, we outline our program and discuss examples from our in-situ and real-time X-ray diffraction and fluorescence studies of InN, GaN, and InGaN growth on GaN(0001).

  6. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles. Copyright © 2015

  7. Characterising large area silicon drift detectors with MOS injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonvicini, V.; Rashevsky, A.; Vacchi, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of the INFN DSI project, the first prototypes of a large-area Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) have been designed and produced on 5'' diameter wafers of Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) silicon with a resistivity of 3000 Ω·cm. The detector is a 'butterfly' bi-directional structure with a drift length of 32 mm and the drifting charge is collected by two arrays of anodes having a pitch of 200 μm. The high-voltage divider is integrated on-board and is realised with p + implantations. For test and calibration purposes, the detector has a new type of MOS injector. The paper presents results obtained to injecting charge at the maximum drift distance (32mm) from the anodes by means of the MOS injecting structure, As front-end electronics, the authors have used a 32-channels low-noise bipolar VLSI circuit (OLA, Omni-purpose Low-noise Amplifer) specifically designed for silicon drift detectors. The uniformity of the drift time in different regions of the sensitive area and its dependence on the ambient temperature are studied

  8. ATLAS Muon Drift Tube Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Y [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organisation, Tsukuba (Japan); Ball, B; Chapman, J W; Dai, T; Ferretti, C; Gregory, J [University of Michigan, Department of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Beretta, M [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Boterenbrood, H; Jansweijer, P P M [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Brandenburg, G W; Fries, T; Costa, J Guimaraes da; Harder, S; Huth, J [Harvard University, Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ceradini, F [INFN Roma Tre and Universita Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma (Italy); Hazen, E [Boston University, Physics Department, Boston, MA (United States); Kirsch, L E [Brandeis University, Department of Physics, Waltham, MA (United States); Koenig, A C [Radboud University Nijmegen/Nikhef, Dept. of Exp. High Energy Physics, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lanza, A [INFN Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Mikenberg, G [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics, Rehovot (Israel)], E-mail: brandenburg@physics.harvard.edu (and others)

    2008-09-15

    This paper describes the electronics used for the ATLAS monitored drift tube (MDT) chambers. These chambers are the main component of the precision tracking system in the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The MDT detector system consists of 1,150 chambers containing a total of 354,000 drift tubes. It is capable of measuring the sagitta of muon tracks to an accuracy of 60 {mu}m, which corresponds to a momentum accuracy of about 10% at p{sub T}= 1 TeV. The design and performance of the MDT readout electronics as well as the electronics for controlling, monitoring and powering the detector will be discussed. These electronics have been extensively tested under simulated running conditions and have undergone radiation testing certifying them for more than 10 years of LHC operation. They are now installed on the ATLAS detector and are operating during cosmic ray commissioning runs.

  9. ATLAS Muon Drift Tube Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Arai, Y; Beretta, M; Boterenbrood, H; Brandenburg, G W; Ceradini, F; Chapman, J W; Dai, T; Ferretti, C; Fries, T; Gregory, J; Guimarães da Costa, J; Harder, S; Hazen, E; Huth, J; Jansweijer, P P M; Kirsch, L E; König, A C; Lanza, A; Mikenberg, G; Oliver, J; Posch, C; Richter, R; Riegler, W; Spiriti, E; Taylor, F E; Vermeulen, J; Wadsworth, B; Wijnen, T A M

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the electronics used for the ATLAS monitored drift tube (MDT) chambers. These chambers are the main component of the precision tracking system in the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The MDT detector system consists of 1,150 chambers containing a total of 354,000 drift tubes. It is capable of measuring the sagitta of muon tracks to an accuracy of 60 microns, which corresponds to a momentum accuracy of about 10% at pT = 1 TeV. The design and performance of the MDT readout electronics as well as the electronics for controlling, monitoring and powering the detector will be discussed. These electronics have been extensively tested under simulated running conditions and have undergone radiation testing certifying them for more than 10 years of LHC operation. They are now installed on the ATLAS detector and are operating during cosmic ray commissioning runs.

  10. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, H.

    2016-01-01

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  11. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, H., E-mail: hendrik.jansen@desy.de

    2016-09-21

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  12. MPS II drift chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed

  13. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated

  14. Autocalibration of high precision drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacci, C.; Bini, C.; Ciapetti, G.; De Zorzi, G.; Gauzzi, P.; Lacava, F.; Nisati, A.; Pontecorvo, L.; Rosati, S.; Veneziano, S.; Cambiaghi, M.; Casellotti, G.; Conta, C.; Fraternali, M.; Lanza, A.; Livan, M.; Polesello, G.; Rimoldi, A.; Vercesi, V.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results on MDT (monitored drift tubes) autocalibration studies obtained from the analysis of the data collected in Summer 1995 on the H8B Muon Test Beam. In particular we studied the possibility of autocalibration of the MDT using four or three layers of tubes, and we compared the calibration obtained using a precise external tracker with the output of the autocalibration procedure. Results show the feasibility of autocalibration with four and three tubes and the good accuracy of the autocalibration procedure. (orig.)

  15. Cathode Readout with Stripped Resistive Drift Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Novikov, E.A.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Shafranov, M.D.; Zhil'tsov, V.E.

    1994-01-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with carbon layer of resistivity 0.5, 30 and 70 k Ohm/sq. The gas mixture used was Ar/CH 4 . Both the anode wire and cathode signals were detected in order to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  16. Fatty acid profile of the initial oral biofilm (pellicle): an in-situ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Marco; Kümmerer, Klaus; Al-Ahmad, Ali; Hannig, Christian

    2013-09-01

    The first step of bioadhesion on dental surfaces is the formation of the acquired pellicle. This mainly acellular layer is formed instantaneously on all solid surfaces exposed to oral fluids. It is composed of proteins, glycoproteins and lipids. However, information on the lipid composition is sparse. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the fatty acid (FA) profile of the in-situ pellicle for the first time. Furthermore, the impact of rinses with safflower oil on the pellicle's FA composition was investigated. Pellicles were formed in situ on bovine enamel slabs mounted on individual upper jaw splints. The splints were carried by ten subjects over durations of 3-240 min. After comprehensive sample preparation, gas chromatography coupled with electron impact ionization mass spectrometry (GC-EI/MS) was used in order to characterize qualitatively and quantitatively a wide range of FA (C12-C24). The relative FA profiles of the pellicle samples gained from different subjects were remarkably similar, whereas the amount of FA showed significant interindividual variability. An increase in FA in the pellicle was observed over time. The application of rinses with safflower oil resulted in an accumulation of its specific FA in the pellicle. Pellicle formation is a highly selective process that does not correlate directly with salivary composition, as shown for FA.

  17. Laboratory studies on natural restoration of ground water after in-situ leach uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, N.E.; Deutsch, W.J.; Serne, R.J.

    1983-05-01

    When uranium is mined using in-situ leach techniques, the chemical quality of the ground water in the ore-zone aquifer is affected. This could lead to long-term degradation of the ground water if restoration techniques are not applied after the leaching is completed. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is conducting an NRC-sponsored research project on natural restoration and induced-restoration techniques. Laboratory studies were designed to evaluate the ability of the natural system (ore-zone sediments and groundwater) to mitigate the effects of mining on aquifer chemistry. Using batch and flow-through column experiments [performed with lixiviant (leaching solution) and sediments from the reduced zone of an ore-zone aquifer], we found that the natural system can lower uranium and bicarbonate concentrations in solutions and reduce the lixiviant redox potential (Eh). The change in redox potential could cause some of the contaminants that were dissolved during the uranium leaching operation to precipitate, thereby lowering their solution concentration. The concentrations of other species such as calcium, potassium, and sulfate increased, possibly as a result of mineral dissolution and ion exchange. In this paper, we describe the experimentally determined mobility of contaminants after in-situ leach mining, and discuss the possible chemical process affecting mobility

  18. Prioritising in situ conservation of crop resources: a case study of African cowpea (Vigna unguiculata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moray, C; Game, E T; Maxted, N

    2014-06-17

    Conserving crop wild relatives (CWR) is critical for maintaining food security. However, CWR-focused conservation plans are lacking, and are often based on the entire genus, even though only a few taxa are useful for crop improvement. We used taxonomic and geographic prioritisation to identify the best locations for in situ conservation of the most important (priority) CWR, using African cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) as a case study. Cowpea is an important crop for subsistence farmers in sub-Saharan Africa, yet its CWR are under-collected, under-conserved and under-utilised in breeding. We identified the most efficient sites to focus in situ cowpea CWR conservation and assessed whether priority CWR would be adequately represented in a genus-based conservation plan. We also investigated whether priority cowpea CWR are likely to be found in existing conservation areas and in areas important for mammal conservation. The genus-based method captured most priority CWR, and the distributions of many priority CWR overlapped with established conservation reserves and targets. These results suggest that priority cowpea CWR can be conserved by building on conservation initiatives established for other species.

  19. In-situ study of hydriding kinetics in Pd-based thin film systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmelle, Renaud; Proost, Joris [Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Div. of Materials and Process Engineering

    2010-07-01

    The hydriding kinetics of Pd thin films has been investigated in detail. The key experimental technique used in this work consists of a high resolution curvature measurement setup, which continuously monitors the reflections of multiple laser beams coming off a cantilevered sample. After mounting the sample inside a vacuum chamber, a H-containing gas mixture is introduced to instantaneously generate a given hydrogen partial pressure (p{sub H2}) inside the chamber. The resulting interaction of H with the Pd layer then leads to a volume expansion of the thin film system. This induces in turn changes in the sample curvature as a result of internal stresses developing in the Pd film during a hydriding cycle. Based on such curvature date obtained in-situ at different p{sub H2}, a two-step model for the kinetics of Pd-hydride formation has been proposed and expressions for the hydrogen adsorption and absorption velocities have been derived. The rate-limiting steps have been identified by studying the p{sub H2}-dependence of these velocities. Furthermore, from our in-situ experimental data, relevant kinetic parameters have been calculated. The effect of dry air exposure of the Pd films on the hydriding kinetics has been considered as well. (orig.)

  20. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and molecular studies in infertile men with dysplasia of the fibrous sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Baccio; Collodel, Giulia; Gambera, Laura; Moretti, Elena; Serafini, Francesca; Piomboni, Paola

    2005-07-01

    To perform fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and molecular analysis in patients with the genetic sperm defect "dysplasia of the fibrous sheath" (DFS). Retrospective study. Regional Referral Center for Male Infertility, Siena, Italy. Twelve infertile patients with DFS sperm defects. Family history, lymphocytic karyotype, physical and hormonal assays, semen analysis. The DFS sperm phenotype was defined by light, fluorescent, and electron microscopy. Sperm chromosomal constitution was examined by FISH. Gene deletions were tested by polymerase chain reaction. The genetic sperm defect DFS was determined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Immunofluorescence staining of A-kinase anchoring protein 4 (AKAP4) showed a moderate and diffuse signal, revealing a disorganized and incompletely assembled fibrous sheath. In 11 of 12 DFS patients, polymerase chain reaction for detecting the presence of partial sequence of AKAP4/AKAP3 binding regions gave positive results. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed in decondensed sperm nuclei with probes for chromosomes 18, X, and Y. The mean disomy frequency of chromosome 18 was in the normal range, whereas the mean disomy frequencies of sex chromosomes and diploidies were twice those of controls. These results should be considered when DFS sperm are used in assisted reproductive technology, owing to the high risk of transmission of chromosomal unbalance and of DFS sperm defects to male offspring.

  1. Laboratory studies on natural restoration of ground water after in-situ leach uranium mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, N.E.; Deutsch, W.J.; Serne, R.J.

    1983-05-01

    When uranium is mined using in-situ leach techniques, the chemical quality of the ground water in the ore-zone aquifer is affected. This could lead to long-term degradation of the ground water if restoration techniques are not applied after the leaching is completed. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is conducting an NRC-sponsored research project on natural restoration and induced-restoration techniques. Laboratory studies were designed to evaluate the ability of the natural system (ore-zone sediments and groundwater) to mitigate the effects of mining on aquifer chemistry. Using batch and flow-through column experiments (performed with lixiviant (leaching solution) and sediments from the reduced zone of an ore-zone aquifer), we found that the natural system can lower uranium and bicarbonate concentrations in solutions and reduce the lixiviant redox potential (Eh). The change in redox potential could cause some of the contaminants that were dissolved during the uranium leaching operation to precipitate, thereby lowering their solution concentration. The concentrations of other species such as calcium, potassium, and sulfate increased, possibly as a result of mineral dissolution and ion exchange. In this paper, we describe the experimentally determined mobility of contaminants after in-situ leach mining, and discuss the possible chemical process affecting mobility.

  2. Growth studies of CVD-MBE by in-situ diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maracas, George N.; Steimle, Timothy C.

    1992-10-01

    This is the final technical report for the three year DARPA-URI program 'Growth Studies of CVD-MBE by in-situ Diagnostics'. The goals of the program were to develop non-invasive, real time epitaxial growth monitoring techniques and combine them to gain an understanding of processes that occur during MBE growth from gas sources. We have adapted these techniques to a commercially designed gas source MBE system (Vacuum Generators Inc.) to facilitate technology transfer out of the laboratory into industrial environments. The in-situ measurement techniques of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) have been successfully implemented to monitor the optical and chemical properties of the growing epitaxial film and the gas phase reactants. The ellipsometer was jointly developed with the J. Woolam Co. and has become a commercial product. The temperature dependence of group 3 and 5 desorption from GaAs and InP has been measured as well as the incident effusion cell fluxes. The temporal evolution of the growth has also been measured both by SE and LIF to show the smoothing of heterojunction surfaces during growth interruption. Complicated microcavity optical device structures have been monitored by ellipsometry in real time to improve device quality. This data has been coupled with the structural information obtained from reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) to understand the growth processes in binary and ternary bulk 3-5 semiconductors and heterojunctions.

  3. Prevention of dental erosion of a sports drink by nano-sized hydroxyapatite in situ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Ji Hyun; Kwon, Ho Keun; Kim, Baek Il

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the inhibitory effects of the sports drink containing nano-sized hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) on dental erosion in situ. The study had a single-blind, two-treatment crossover design. The two treatment groups were a control group (CG; Powerade only) and an experimental group (EG; 0.25% wt/vol nano-HA was added to Powerade). Ten subjects wore removable palatal appliances containing bovine enamel specimens. The appliances were immersed in each drink for 10 mins, 4 times a day for 10 days. The tooth surface microhardness (SMH) was tested, and the erosion depth and the morphology of the tooth surface were observed. The data were analysed by repeated measures anova and t-test. Between the baseline and the 10th day, SMH was decreased by 80% in the specimens of the CG (P erosion depth of 12.70 ± 4.66 μm and an irregular tooth surface were observed on the 10th day in the specimens of the CG. No dental erosions, however, was observed in the specimens of the EG. The sports drink containing 0.25% nano-HA was effective in preventing dental erosion in situ. © 2014 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Micro-CT in situ study of carbonate rock microstructural evolution for geologic CO2 storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yi; Yang, Yan; Rogowska, M.

    2017-01-01

    to achieve this is to find a suitable condition to create a stable 3D space in carbonate rock by injecting liquid to prepare space for the later CO2 injection. Micro-CT imaging is a non-destructive 3D method that can be used to study the property changes of carbonate rocks during and after CO2 injection....... The advance in lab source based micro-CT has made it capable of in situ experiments. We used a commercial bench top micro-CT (Zeiss Versa XRM410) to study the microstructure changes of chalk during liquid injection. Flexible temporal CT resolution is essential in this study because that the time scales...... of coupled physical and chemical processes can be very different. The results validated the feasibility of using a bench top CT system with a pressure cell to monitor the mesoscale multiphase interactions in chalk....

  5. Analysis of long-term closure in drifts excavated in Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone: roles of anisotropy and hydro-mechanical couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guayacan Carrillo, Lina Maria

    2016-01-01

    The French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra) began in 2000 the construction of an Underground Research Laboratory (URL) with the main goal of demonstrating the feasibility of a geological repository in Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone. Several research programs have taken place to improve the knowledge of the rock properties and its response to the excavation progress. A network of experimental drifts has been constructed with variations on: excavation method, structure geometry, supports system and orientations with respect to principal stresses' directions. In each drift different sections have been instrumented to monitor the hydro-mechanical behavior of the rock mass formation. Continuous monitoring of the excavated zone around the drifts in the main level (-490 m) revealed the development of a fractured zone (extensional and shear fractures) induced by the excavation. The extent of this fractured zone depends on the drift orientation regarding the in-situ stress field. Accordingly, the convergence measurements showed an anisotropic closure which depends also on the drifts' orientations. Moreover, marked overpressures and an anisotropic pore pressure field around the drifts have been also observed. The approach proposed in this work is mainly based on a direct analysis of the convergence measurements, for studying the anisotropic response of the rock formation during and after excavation. The convergence evolution is analyzed on the basis of the semi-empirical law proposed by Sulem et al. (1987) [Int J Rock Mech Min Sci Geomech Abstr 24: 145-154]. The monitoring and analysis of convergence data can provide a reliable approach of the interaction between rock mass and support. Therefore, the anisotropy and the variability of the closure are analyzed taking into account different field cases: drifts excavated in two different orientations (i.e. influence of the initial stress state), different methods, sizes and rates of excavation and

  6. HER-2 gene amplification by chromogenic in situ hybridisation (CISH) compared with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) in breast cancer-A study of two hundred cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, A; Andreu, F J; Seguí, M A; Baré, M L; Fernández, S; Dinarés, C; Rey, M

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare two methods used to analyse HER-2 gene amplification (fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and chromogenic in situ hybridisation (CISH)), and determine the accuracy of the antibodies CB11 and HercepTest for immunohistochemical detection of HER-2 overexpression from archival breast cancer tissue. Additionally, interobserver variability in the interpretation of CISH and immunohistochemical tests was measured. Two hundred cases of invasive breast carcinoma diagnosed between 2000 and 2003 were selected. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed with HercepTest and CB11, and gene amplification was determined by FISH (PathVision, Vysis) and CISH (Zymed) using tissue macroarrays. An excellent concordance (94.8%) was found between CISH and FISH. Considering FISH as gold standard, sensitivity of CISH was 97.5% and specificity 94%. Overall interobserver agreement of CISH was 97.5% and of IHC 84%. Both antibodies showed a sensitivity of 95.2% and a specificity of 70.7% (CB11) and 81.2% (HercepTest). Our results show that CISH is a highly accurate, reproducible and practical technique to determine HER-2 gene amplification. CB11 and HercepTest are good screening methods with a high sensitivity. The performance of tissue macroarrays to test HER-2 status by IHC, FISH and CISH has demonstrated to be an available and effective method to study large series of tumours.

  7. Suspended sediment drift and dispersion at Hibernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedford, T.; Drozdowski, A.; Hannah, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    Surface water waves and near-bottom currents around the Hibernia oil production platform on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland were examined to determine how the different seasons affect changes in wave magnitude and directions of water currents. Wave observations revealed a strong correlation with seasons, with the larger waves occurring in fall and early winter. There was no obvious seasonality in the size or direction of currents. The benthic boundary layer transport (BBLT) model was used to predict the drift and dispersion pathways of suspended drilling muds discharged from the Hibernia platform. The 2-year study from March 1998 to May 2000 involved 5-day BBLT model simulations covering the complete period of current meter deployment. The study focused on the sensitivity of the drift and dispersion to variability in the physical environment and uncertainty in the bottom stress calculation and particle settling velocity. The BBLT model incorporates a stress dependent particle settling velocity that includes the main features of the flocculations of drill mud fines under marine conditions. The study provides a better understanding of how drill mud concentration levels can change with variations in waves, currents, and bottom stress. It was determined that drift is generally oriented along the northwest/southeast axis, with a typical magnitude of 0.8 cm/sec for the fast settling velocity and 3.1 cm/sec for the slow settling velocity. It was concluded that near-surface or mid-depth discharges of drilling mud in the summer may not reach the sea floor. 17 refs., 13 tabs., 36 figs

  8. In situ experimental study for the optimization of chlorine dosage in seawater cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebot, E.; Casanueva, T.; Fernandez-Baston, M.M.; Sales, D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Food Technology and Environmental Technologies, University of Cadiz (Spain); Casanueva, J.F. [Department of Thermal Engines, University of Cadiz (Spain)

    2006-11-15

    The paper details an in situ study for the evaluation of the evolution of fouling heat transfer resistance and to optimize the antifouling chlorine dosage at a 550MW power station. A portable pilot plant has been designed to simulate the steam surface condenser and used as an accurate fouling monitor that takes the seawater from the same intake point as the power station. This study includes fouling extraction and its characterization for different dosage patterns. The residual chlorine concentration at the cooling-water discharge from the power station is 0.2mg/l and has been considered appropriate for the prevention of the formation of fouling, because with this concentration approximately 90% reduction in the amount of fouling is obtained. Residual chlorine dosages lower than 0.2ppm could be effective in controlling fouling development if mechanical techniques of fouling control are also available. (author)

  9. The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.P.; Baggs, R.; Fujino, D.

    1989-03-01

    We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 μm spatial resolution and 2 gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO 2 mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  10. In situ experimental study of subduction zone fluids using diamond anvil cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, H.; Foy, E.; Somogyi, A.; Munsch, P.; Simon, G.; Kubsky, S.

    2008-12-01

    Experiments carried out in diamond anvil cells combined with in situ synchrotron light source measurements represent the only one issue to observe and study fluid equilibria in real time, at the pressure and temperature conditions of the subduction zones. We will present new results recently obtained at the DIFFABS beam line (SOLEIL Synchrotron) aiming at studying equilibria between silica-rich hydrous melts and aqueous fluids in the presence of U, Th, Pb, Ba and Br. We used synchrotron X-Ray fluorescence analysis performed in situ in Bassett-modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cells in order to monitor the chemical transfers of the studied elements between the phases in equilibrium at different pressures (up to 1.6 GPa) and temperatures (up to 900°C). We have calculated the partition coefficients for each studied element (i): Difluid/melt = Cifluid/Cimelt. Results show that U and Th exhibit more affinities for the silica-rich hydrous fluids in the presence or absence of Br, considered here such as an analogue for Cl, (i.e. 0.4 > 10 after decompression) this coefficient decreases with pressure suggesting that Br would not be immediately washed out from the subducted plate during dehydration but may be recycled deeper in the mantle. These new data combined with previous ones obtained for Pb, Ba (Bureau et al., 2007, HPR vol 27, p. 235) and Rb, Sr, Zr (Bureau et al., 2004, Eos Trans. AGU, 85(47), V11C-05), allow us to propose a general outline of the fluid phase transfers through the subduction factory: (1) at shallow level: their nature and composition, the impact of the presence of halogens and the fertilizing role of such fluids in the mantle wedge, where the generation of arc magmas takes place (2) deeper in the mantle: where hydrous silica-rich supercritical fluids may also favour a deep recycling of a fraction of volatiles and trace elements present in the subducted oceanic crust.

  11. Relative drift between black aurora and the ionospheric plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Blixt

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Black auroras are recognized as spatially well-defined regions within uniform diffuse aurora where the optical emission is significantly reduced. Although a well studied phenomenon, there is no generally accepted theory for black auroras. One theory suggests that black regions are formed when energetic magnetospheric electrons no longer have access to the loss cone. If this blocking mechanism drifts with the source electron population in the magnetosphere, black auroras in the ionosphere should drift eastward with a velocity that increases with the energy of the precipitating electrons in the surrounding aurora, since the gradient-B curvature drift is energy dependent. It is the purpose of this paper to test this hypothesis. To do so we have used simultaneous measurements by the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT radar and an auroral TV camera at Tromsø, Norway. We have analyzed 8 periods in which a black aurora occurred frequently to determine their relative drift with respect to the ionospheric plasma. The black aurora was found to drift eastward with a velocity of 1.5–4km/s, which is in accordance with earlier observations. However, one case was found where a black patch was moving westward, this being the first report of such behaviour in the literature. In general, the drift was parallel to the ionospheric flow but at a much higher velocity. This suggests that the generating mechanism is not of ionospheric origin. The characteristic energy of the precipitating electron population was estimated through inversion of E-region plasma density profiles. We show that the drift speed of the black patches increased with the energy of the precipitating electrons in a way consistent with the gradient-B curvature drift, suggesting a magnetospheric mechanism for the black aurora. As expected, a comparison of the drift speeds with a rudimentary dipole field model of the gradient-B curvature drift speed only yields order-of-magnitude agreement, which

  12. Multiphoton microscopy: an efficient tool for in-situ study of cultural heritage artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latour, Gaël.; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Didier, Marie; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2013-05-01

    We present multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of historical artifacts by combining Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) and Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopies. Three-dimensional (3D) non-contact laser-scanning imaging with micrometer resolution is performed without any preparation of the objects under study. 2PEF signals are emitted by a wide range of fluorophores such as pigments and binder, which can be discriminated thanks to their different emission spectral bands by using suitable spectral filters in the detection channel. SHG signals are specific for dense non-centrosymmetric organizations such as the crystalline cellulose within the wood cell walls. We also show that plaster particles exhibit SHG signals. These particles are bassanite crystals with a non-centrosymmetric crystalline structure, while the other types of calcium sulphates exhibit a centrosymmetric crystalline structure with no SHG signal. In our study, we first characterize model single-layered samples: wood, gelatin-based films containing plaster or cochineal lake and sandarac film containing cochineal lake. We then study multilayered coating systems on wood and show that multimodal nonlinear microscopy successfully reveals the 3D distribution of all components within the stratified sample. We also show that the fine structure of the wood can be assessed, even through a thick multilayered varnish coating. Finally, in situ multimodal nonlinear imaging is demonstrated in a historical violin. SHG/2PEF imaging thus appears as an efficient non-destructive and contactless 3D imaging technique for in situ investigation of historical coatings and more generally for wood characterization and coating analysis at micrometer scale.

  13. Diel drift of Chironomidae larvae in a pristine Idaho mountain stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    Simultaneous hourly net collections in a meadow and canyon reach of a mountain stream determined diel and spatial abundances of drifting Chironomidae larvae. Sixty-one taxa were identified to the lowest practical level, 52 in the meadow and 41 in the canyon. Orthocladiinae was the most abundant subfamily with 32 taxa and a 24 h mean density of 294 individuals 100 m-3 (meadow) and 26 taxa and a mean of 648 individuals 100 m-3 (canyon). Chironominae was the second most abundant subfamily. Nonchironomid invertebrates at both sites and total Chironomidae larvae (meadow) were predominantly night-drifting. Parakiefferiella and Psectrocladius were day-drifting (meadow) whereas 8 other chironomid taxa (meadow) and 2 taxa (canyon) were night-drifting. All others were aperiodic or too rare to test periodicity, Stempellinella cf brevis Edwards exhibited catastrophic drift in the canyon only. The different drift patterns between sites is attributed to greater loss of streambed habitat in the canyon compared to the meadow as streamflow decreased. Consequent crowding of chironomid larvae in the canyon caused catastrophic drift or interfered with drift periodicty. This study adds to knowledge of Chironomidae drift and shows influences on drift of hydrologic and geomorphic conditions. ?? 1989 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  14. The Effects of Radial and Poloidal ExB Drifts in the Tokamak SOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Jing; Zhu Sizheng

    2006-01-01

    The effects of radial and poloidal ExB drifts in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of a limiter tokamak are studied with a one-dimensional fluid code. The transport equations are solved in the poloidal direction with the radial influxes as the source terms. The simulation results show that in the high recycling regime, the effect of the radial ExB drift on plasma density tends to be stronger than that of the poloidal ExB drift. In the sheath-limited regime, the effects of the radial ExB drift and poloidal ExB drift on plasma density are almost equally important. Considering the influence on the electron temperature, the poloidal ExB drift tends to be more important than the radial ExB drift in both the high recycling regime and sheath-limited regime. For the normal B φ , the poloidal ExB drift tends to raise the pressure at the low field side while the radial ExB drift favours the high field side. The simulation results also show that the ExB drift influences the asymmetries on the parameter distributions at the high field side and low field side, and the distributions are much more symmetric with the field reversal

  15. The Effect of Unheated Sections on Moisture Transport in the Emplacement Drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. Danko; J. Birkholzer; D. Bahrami

    2006-01-01

    The goals of this study are: (1) to configure a thermal-hydrological, natural-ventilation model for simulating temperature, humidity, and condensate distributions in the coupled domains of in-drift airspace and near-field rockmass. Rokmass model: TOUGH2, in-drift model: MULTIFLUX (MF); (2) obtain meaningful results from the model for a practical application in which the beneficial effects of unheated drift sections are analyzed; and (3) study the sensitivity to the axial dispersion coefficient with the model

  16. In situ and Ex situ Annealing Studies of Hydrothermally Synthesized SrFe12O19 Nano Platelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, Frederik; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Ahlburg, Jakob

    Strontium hexaferrite is a chemically stable and cheap magnetic compound, free of rare-earth metals. Previous studies have shown that nanostructuring can improve the magnetic performance of strontium hexaferrite, both as a powder and after pellet compaction, which allows for better bulk magnets f...

  17. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnenthale, E.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) 2000 [1534471]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M and O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: Performance Assessment (PA); Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR; Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); and UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: Continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data, sensitivity and validation studies described in this AMR are

  18. Applications of in situ optical measurements in ecological and biogeochemical studies - a framework for a user-driven national network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, B. A.; Pellerin, B. A.; Downing, B. D.; Saraceno, J.; Aiken, G.; Stumpner, P.

    2010-12-01

    A critical challenge for understanding the dynamics between water quality, and ecological processes is obtaining data at time scales in which changes occur. Traditional, discrete sampling, approaches for data collection are often limited by analytical and field costs, site access, and logistical challenges, for long-term sampling at a large number of sites. The timescales of change, however, are often minutes, hours, or years. In situ optical (absorbance and fluorescence) instruments offer opportunities to help overcome these difficulties by directly or indirectly measuring constituents of interest. In situ optical instrumentation have been in use in oceanographic studies for well over 50 years, and as advances in the science, engineering and technology of these sensors have improved, optical sensors have become more commercially viable and available for research. We present several examples that highlight applications of in situ optical measurements for understanding dynamics in stream, river, and estuary systems. Examples illustrate the utility of in situ optical sensors for studies over short-duration events of days to weeks (diurnal cycles, tidal cycles, storm events and snowmelt periods) as well as longer-term continuous monitoring for months to years. We also highlight applied in situ optical measurements as proxies for constituents that are difficult and expensive to measure at high spatiotemporal resolution, for example, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved organic nitrogen, mercury and methylmercury, trihalomethane precursors, harmful algal blooms, and others. We propose that relatively simple absorbance and fluorescence measurements made in situ could be incorporated into short and long-term ecological research and monitoring programs, resulting in advanced understanding of sources that contribute to water quality improvements or degradation, contaminant and carbon cycling, and the occurrence and persistence of harmful algal blooms. Linking these efforts

  19. In-situ TEM study of domain switching in GaN thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baoming; Wang, Tun; Haque, Aman; Snure, Michael; Heller, Eric; Glavin, Nicholas

    2017-09-01

    Microstructural response of gallium nitride (GaN) films, grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, was studied as a function of applied electrical field. In-situ transmission electron microscopy showed sudden change in the electron diffraction pattern reflecting domain switching at around 20 V bias, applied perpendicular to the polarization direction. No such switching was observed for thicker films or for the field applied along the polarization direction. This anomalous behavior is explained by the nanoscale size effects on the piezoelectric coefficients of GaN, which can be 2-3 times larger than the bulk value. As a result, a large amount of internal energy can be imparted in 100 nm thick films to induce domain switching at relatively lower voltages to induce such events at the bulk scale.

  20. Towards functionalization of graphene: in situ study of the nucleation of copper-phtalocyanine on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Daniel; Henneke, Caroline; Kumpf, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Molecular films present an elegant way for the uniform functionalization or doping of graphene. Here, we present an in situ study on the initial growth of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) on epitaxial graphene on Ir(111). We followed the growth up to a closed monolayer with low energy electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction (μLEED). The molecules coexist on graphene in a disordered phase without long-range order and an ordered crystalline phase. The local topography of the graphene substrate plays an important role in the nucleation process of the crystalline phase. Graphene flakes on Ir(111) feature regions that are under more tensile stress than others. We observe that the CuPc molecules form ordered domains initially on those graphene regions that are closest to the fully relaxed lattice. We attribute this effect to a stronger influence of the underlying Ir(111) substrate for molecules adsorbed on those relaxed regions.

  1. Towards functionalization of graphene: in situ study of the nucleation of copper-phtalocyanine on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Daniel; Henneke, Caroline; Kumpf, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Molecular films present an elegant way for the uniform functionalization or doping of graphene. Here, we present an in situ study on the initial growth of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) on epitaxial graphene on Ir(111). We followed the growth up to a closed monolayer with low energy electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction (μLEED). The molecules coexist on graphene in a disordered phase without long-range order and an ordered crystalline phase. The local topography of the graphene substrate plays an important role in the nucleation process of the crystalline phase. Graphene flakes on Ir(111) feature regions that are under more tensile stress than others. We observe that the CuPc molecules form ordered domains initially on those graphene regions that are closest to the fully relaxed lattice. We attribute this effect to a stronger influence of the underlying Ir(111) substrate for molecules adsorbed on those relaxed regions. (paper)

  2. In situ surface and interface study of crystalline (3×1)-O on InAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Xiaoye, E-mail: xxq102020@utdallas.edu; Wallace, Robert M., E-mail: rmwallace@utdallas.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Wang, Wei-E.; Rodder, Mark S. [Advanced Logic Lab, Samsung Semiconductor, Inc., Austin, Texas 78754 (United States)

    2016-07-25

    The oxidation behavior of de-capped InAs (100) exposed to O{sub 2} gas at different temperatures is investigated in situ with high resolution of monochromatic x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. The oxide chemical states and structure change dramatically with the substrate temperature. A (3 × 1) crystalline oxide layer on InAs is generated in a temperature range of 290–330 °C with a coexistence of In{sub 2}O and As{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The stability of the crystalline oxide upon the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO{sub 2} is studied as well. It is found that the generated (3 × 1) crystalline oxide is stable upon ALD HfO{sub 2} growth at 100 °C.

  3. In-Situ TEM Study of Interface Sliding and Migration in an Ultrafine Lamellar Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiung, L M

    2005-12-06

    The instability of interfaces in an ultrafine TiAl-({gamma})/Ti{sub 3}Al-({alpha}{sub 2}) lamellar structure by straining at room temperature has been investigated using in-situ straining techniques performed in a transmission electron microscope. The purpose of this study is to obtain experimental evidence to support the creep mechanisms based upon the interface sliding in association with a cooperative movement of interfacial dislocations previously proposed to interpret the nearly linear creep behavior observed from ultrafine lamellar TiAl alloys. The results have revealed that both the sliding and migration of lamellar interfaces can take place simultaneously as a result of the cooperative movement of interfacial dislocations.

  4. In-Situ X-ray Tomography Study of Cement Exposed to CO2 Saturated Brine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chavez Panduro, E. A.; Torsæter, M.; Gawel, K.

    2017-01-01

    For successful CO2 storage in underground reservoirs, the potential problem of CO2 leakage needs to be addressed. A profoundly improved understanding of the behavior of fractured cement under realistic subsurface conditions including elevated temperature, high pressure and the presence of CO2...... saturated brine is required. Here, we report in situ X-ray micro computed tomography (μ-CT) studies visualizing the microstructural changes upon exposure of cured Portland cement with an artificially engineered leakage path (cavity) to CO2 saturated brine at high pressure. Carbonation of the bulk cement......, self-healing of the leakage path in the cement specimen, and leaching of CaCO3 were thus directly observed. The precipitation of CaCO3, which is of key importance as a possible healing mechanism of fractured cement, was found to be enhanced in confined regions having limited access to CO2...

  5. In situ stresses in rock masses: methodology for its study in tunnel projects in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madirolas Perez, G.; Perucho Martinez, A.

    2014-01-01

    In situ stress is one of the main factors to be taken into account in the design of tunnels, as it can cause inadmissible stresses and strains leading to high deviations in the budgets. For that reason, the stress state is directly introduced into the numerical models used for the design of tunnels. In Spain, although several tunnels have been carried out with an important overburden in tectonically relevant zones, a quantitative determination of the stresses has not been usually included in civil work projects. Therefore, it is considered necessary to implement a routine procedure of study of civil work projects involving tunnels excavated in rock, and a new detailed methodology is proposed. The challenge is that project managers, who face works in which stresses may play a determinant role, may have a practical reference enabling them to optimize available resources and to include the real stress information in the design of underground works. (Author)

  6. Spectroelectrochemical study of polyphenylene by in situ external reflection FT-IR spectroscopy. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvarnstroem, C.; Ivaska, A.

    1994-01-01

    In situ external reflection FT-IR measurements are performed during cyclic voltammetric scans on electrochemically polymerized polyphenylene films. The films are polymerized either in 0.1 or 0.8 M biphenyl in 0.1 M TBABF 4 in acetonitrile. Changes in the IR spectrum of films of different thicknesses are studied when the films are potentially cycled from the neutral to the oxidized states of the polymer. No differences between films made in high or low dimer concentration can be observed in the spectra. The potential-dependent insertion and expulsion of solvent, residual water, anions and cations in and out of the film have different behaviour in films of different thicknesses. Changes in the structure of the segments in the film, from the benzenoid form into the quinoid form, can be followed. Differences between the first and subsequent cyclic potential scans are observed. (orig.)

  7. In situ Raman study of C60 polymerization during isothermal pressurizing at 800 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talyzin, A V; Dubrovinsky, L S

    2004-01-01

    The first in situ Raman study of C 60 isothermal compression at 800 K and up to 32 GPa was performed using rhombohedral and tetragonal phases as starting materials. The rhombohedral phase shows a phase transition to 3D polymer above 10 GPa, similar to that in experiments where isobaric heating was used at pressures of 9-13 GPa. It is shown that the T-P diagram of C 60 polymeric phases (temperature increase followed by pressurizing) is significantly different from the known P-T diagram (pressurizing followed by heating). Tetragonal polymer exhibited significantly stronger stability and can be followed at least up to ∼15 GPa. Heating up to 800 K of tetragonal polymer at pressures of 6-8 GPa confirms that, due to geometrical frustrations, the tetragonal phase remains stable even at pressure and temperature conditions at which rhombohedral polymer is usually formed

  8. In situ neutron scattering study of nanostructured PbTe-PbS bulk thermoelectric material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Fei [Temple University; Schmidt, Robert D [ORNL; Case, Eldon D [Michigan State University, East Lansing; An, Ke [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructures play an important role in thermoelectric materials. Their thermal stability, such as phase change and evolution at elevated temperatures, is thus of great interest to the thermoelectric community. In this study, in situ neutron diffraction was used to examine the phase evolution of nanostructured bulk PbTe-PbS materials fabricated using hot pressing and pulsed electrical current sintering (PECS). The PbS second phase was observed in all samples in the as-pressed condition. The temperature dependent lattice parameter and phase composition data show an initial formation of PbS precipitates followed by a redissolution during heating. The redissolution process started around 570 600 K, and completed at approximately 780 K. During cooling, the PECS sample followed a reversible curve while the heating/cooling behavior of the hot pressed sample was irreversible.

  9. In-situ studies of bulk deformation structures: Static properties under load and dynamics during deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Bo

    2006-01-01

    The main goal of the study presented in this thesis was to perform in-situ investigations on deformation structures in plastically deformed polycrystalline copper at low degrees of tensile deformation (model system for cell forming pure fcc metals. Anovel synchrotron...... grains in polycrystalline samples during tensile deformation. We have shown that the resulting 3D reciprocal space maps from tensile deformed copper comprise a pronounced structure, consisting of bright sharp peaks superimposed on a cloud of enhanced intensity. Based on the integrated intensity......, the width of the peaks, and spatial scanning experiments it is concluded that the individual peaks arise from individual dislocation-free regions (the subgrains) in the dislocation structure. The cloud is attributed to the dislocation rich walls. Samples deformed to 2% tensile strain were investigated under...

  10. In situ X-ray and neutron diffraction study of Ba2In2O5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speakman, S.A.; Misture, S.T.

    2001-01-01

    Order-disorder transitions in barium indate, Ba 2 In 2 O 5 , have been studied using in-situ X-ray and neutron diffraction. At room temperature, the crystal structure is an orthorhombic brownmillerite structure. At 706 C, the crystal structure is orthorhombic, possibly of the Imma or Ibm2 space groups. At 900 C, oxygen vacancies begin to disorder. The order-disorder transition occurs slowly in two steps over a temperature range of 900 - 925 C. Above this temperature range, the crystal structure is tetragonal, most likely belonging to the space group I 4/mcm. A second order-disorder transition begins at 1040 C, and proceeds over the temperature range 1040 - 1065 C. Above this temperature range, the crystal structure is a cubic, oxygen-deficient perovskite structure, with space group Pm3m. At an undetermined temperature above 1200 C, Ba 2 In 2 O 5 begins to decompose. (orig.)

  11. Reactive molecular beam epitaxial growth and in situ photoemission spectroscopy study of iridate superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Fan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available High-quality (001-oriented perovskite [(SrIrO3m/(SrTiO3] superlattices (m=1/2, 1, 2, 3 and ∞ films have been grown on SrTiO3(001 epitaxially using reactive molecular beam epitaxy. Compared to previously reported superlattices synthesized by pulsed laser deposition, our superlattices exhibit superior crystalline, interface and surface structure, which have been confirmed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction, scanning transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The transport measurements confirm a novel insulator-metal transition with the change of dimensionality in these superlattices, and our first systematic in situ photoemission spectroscopy study indicates that the increasing strength of effective correlations induced by reducing dimensionality would be the dominating origin of this transition.

  12. Study of Barley Grain Molecular Structure for Ruminants Using DRIFT, FTIR-ATR and Synchrotron Radiation Infrared Microspectroscopy (SR-IMS): A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Peiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Barley inherent structures are highly associated with nutrient utilization and availability in both humans and animals. Barley has different degradation kinetics compared with other cereal grains. It has a relatively higher degradation rate and extent, which often cause digestive disorder in the rumen. Therefore understanding barley inherent structure at cellular and molecular levels and processing-induced structure changes is important, because we can manipulate barley inherent structures and digestive behaviors. Several molecular spectroscopy techniques can be used to detect barley inherent structures at cellular and molecular levels. This article reviews several applications of the IR molecular spectral bioanalytical techniques - DRIFT, FT/IR-ATR and SR-IMS for barley chemistry, molecular structure and molecular nutrition research

  13. Measurement of the positron-drift time relation of a high-pressure drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruefert, W.

    1989-04-01

    As a test of its performance, the measurement of the drift time versus drift distance relation of a high pressure drift chamber using cosmic rays is described. Two multiwire proportional chambers, mounted above and below the detector, are used to define the track of the cosmic particle in the drift chamber. The drift chamber is read out by FADCs (Flash Analog to Digital Converter), and the drift time is determined from the FADC signals by the DOS- (Difference Of Samples) method. The measured drift time versus drift distance relation showed good agreement with the relation, which is expected from the spatial dependence of the electric field and the dependence of the drift velocity on this field. (orig.) [de

  14. The effect of tissue decalcification on mRNA retention within bone for in-situ hybridization studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, L; Freemont, A J; Hoyland, J A

    1993-06-01

    Tissue decalcification is a routine part of the preparation of bone tissue for histological studies. Although in-situ hybridization has been employed to localize mRNA of collagenous and non-collagenous bone related proteins in skeletal tissue, little is known regarding the effects of decalcifying agents on mRNA retention within tissue. In this study in-situ hybridization using an oligonucleotide probe (i.e. a poly d(T) probe) to detect total messenger RNA has been employed to investigate the effects of the decalcifying agents nitric acid, formic acid and EDTA on mRNA retention compared to undeacalcified tissue. The results show that formalin fixation and EDTA decalcification preserve substantial amounts of mRNA within the tissue. In particular, this study illustrates that it is possible to perform in-situ hybridization on formalin fixed decalcified paraffin embedded tissue.

  15. Drift waves in a stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Sedlak, J.E.; Similon, P.L.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Ross, D.W.

    1982-11-01

    We investigate the eigenmode structure of drift waves in a straight stellarator using the ballooning mode formalism. The electrons are assumed to be adiabatic and the ions constitute a cold, magnetized fluid. The effective potential has an overall parabolic envelope but is modulated strongly by helical ripples along B. We have found two classes of solutions: those that are strongly localized in local helical wells, and those that are weakly localized and have broad spatial extent. The weakly localized modes decay spatially due to the existence of Mathieu resonances between the periods of the eigenfunction and the effective potential

  16. [HER-2 oncogene amplification assessment in invasive breast cancer by dual-color in situ hybridization (dc-CISH): a comparative study with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhdar, Abbas; Bronsard, Marc; Lemieux, Renald; Geha, Sameh

    2011-12-01

    The amplification of the gene encoding for the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2 oncogene), located on chromosome 17 (17q21-q22), or the overexpression of this receptor have prognostic and therapeutic implications in invasive breast cancer. An evaluation of the HER-2 status by immunohistochemistry (IHC) is performed on all invasive breast cancer cases. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is considered as the gold standard for the detection of HER-2 gene amplification for IHC equivocal cases (score 2+). A more recent in situ hybridization technique, the dual-color chromogenic in situ hybridization (dc-CISH), has been proposed as an alternative to FISH. The aim of this study was to measure the correlation between dc-CISH and FISH for HER-2 oncogene amplification assessment in invasive breast cancer. We built four tissue micro-array (TMA) blocs with 100 breast invasive cancer cases that had been previously tested by IHC for HER-2 detection: 10 score 0 cases, 10 score 3+cases, 39 score 1+and 41 score 2+cases. Both FISH and dc-CISH techniques were applied on all TMA cases as well as on two additional slides serving as controls. Interpretation of dc-CISH was carried out by a pathologist using an optical microscope. For FISH, the interpretation was done by a professional from the medical genetics department using a fluorescent microscope linked to a computer system for image capturing and analysis. The interpretation of the HER-2/CEN-17 ratio for both tests was in accordance with the values of the updated recommendations from the Canadian National Consensus Meeting on HER-2/neu testing in breast cancer and from the ASCO/CAP. Among the 100 cases initially included in the study, eight were excluded from the analysis due to sampling or technical flaws. From the 92 remaining cases, we obtained a concordance of 97.8% (90/92 cases) between the two techniques (Kappa coefficient 0.97, 95% confidence interval). The correlation coefficient (rho) between ratios

  17. [Study of the phase transformation of TiO2 with in-situ XRD in different gas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Jing; Guo, Lie-Jin

    2011-04-01

    TiO2 sample was prepared by sol-gel method from chloride titanium. The phase transformation of the prepared TiO2 sample was studied by in-situ XRD and normal XRD in different gas. The experimental results showed that the phase transformation temperatures of TiO2 were different under in-situ or normal XRD in different kinds of gas. The transformation of amorphous TiO2 to anatase was controlled by kinetics before 500 degrees C. In-situ XRD showed that the growth of anatase was inhibited, but the transformation of anatase to rutile was accelerated under inactive nitrogen in contrast to air. Also better crystal was obtained under hydrogen than in argon. These all showed that external oxygen might accelerate the growth of TiO2, but reduced gas might partly counteract the negative influence of lack of external oxygen. The mechanism of phase transformation of TiO2 was studied by in-situ XRD in order to control the structure in situ.

  18. Rheological Studies of Komatiite Liquids by In-Situ Falling Sphere Viscometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    O Dwyer, L.; Lesher, C. E.; Baxter, G.; Clark, A.; Fuss, T.; Tangeman, J.; Wang, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The rheological properties of komatiite liquids at high pressures and temperatures are being investigated by the in situ falling sphere technique, using the T-25 multianvil apparatus at the GSECARS 13 ID-D-D beamline at the Advanced Photon Source, ANL. The refractory and fluid nature of komatiite and other ultramafic liquids relevant to the Earth's deep interior, presents unique challenges for this approach. To reduce the density contrast between the melt and the marker sphere, and thus increase the Stoke's travel time, we have begun testing various composite spheres composed of refractory silicates and metals. Two successful custom designs are zirconia silicate mantled by Pt and Pt mantled by forsterite. These custom spheres contain sufficient Pt to absorb x-rays, while containing sufficient low-density refractory silicate so that marker sphere densities are in the range of 4-6 g/cc. These relatively more buoyant spheres increase travel time. These custom spheres, together with Re or Pt marker spheres, have been used to determine the viscosity of Gorgona anhydrous komatiite around 1600 ° C between 3.5 and 6 GPa. Initial experiments yield viscosities of 2.8 Pa s at 3.5 GPa, 5.3 Pa s at 4.6 GPa and 7.6 Pa s at 6 GPa. The observed positive pressure dependence of viscosity is consistent with recent results on pyrolite composition liquids and suggests that the activation volume for highly depolymerized melts will be positive for at least upper mantle conditions. The development of low-density, x-ray detectable marker spheres has applications in studies of melt density, whereby in situ detection of sink-float behavior during heating and compression cycles may be possible.

  19. In situ study of heavy ion induced radiation damage in NF616 (P92) alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topbasi, Cem; Motta, Arthur T.; Kirk, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The ferritic–martensitic alloy NF616 was irradiated in situ with 1 MeV Kr ions at 50 K and 473 K. ► The defect cluster density increases with dose and saturates at ∼6 dpa at 50 K and 473 K. ► The defect size distributions do not change with dose at this temperature range. ► Results indicate that defect cluster formation and destruction is governed by cascade impact. - Abstract: NF616 is a nominal 9Cr ferritic–martensitic steel that is amongst the primary candidates for cladding and duct applications in the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor, one of the Generation IV nuclear energy systems. In this study, an in situ investigation of the microstructure evolution in NF616 under heavy ion irradiation has been conducted. NF616 was irradiated to 8.4 dpa at 50 K and to 7.6 dpa at 473 K with 1 MeV Kr ions. Nano-sized defects first appeared as white dots in dark-field TEM images and their areal density increased until saturation (∼6 dpa). Dynamic observations at 50 K and 473 K showed appearance and disappearance of TEM-visible defect clusters under irradiation that continued above saturation dose. Quantitative analysis showed no significant change in the average size (∼3–4 nm) and distribution of defect clusters with increasing dose at 50 K and 473 K. These results indicate a cascade-driven process of microstructure evolution under irradiation in these alloys that involves both the formation of TEM-visible defect clusters by various degrees of cascade overlap and cascade induced defect cluster elimination. According to this mechanism, saturation of defect cluster density is reached when the rate of defect cluster formation by overlap is equal to the rate of cluster elimination during irradiation.

  20. Corneal ectasia after myopic laser in situ keratomileusis: a long-term study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spadea L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Leopoldo Spadea,1 Emilia Cantera,2 Magdalena Cortes,2 Nicole Evangelista Conocchia,1 Charles WM Stewart11University of L’Aquila, Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Eye Clinic, L’Aquila, 2Villa Stuart Clinic, Department of Ophthalmic Sciences, Rome, ItalyBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term postoperative incidence of and key factors in the genesis of corneal ectasia after myopic laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK in a large number of cases.Methods: A retrospective review of one surgeon's myopic LASIK database was performed. Patients were stratified into two groups based on date of surgery, ie, group 1 (1313 eyes from 1999 to 2001 and group 2 (2714 eyes from 2001 to 2003. Visual acuity, refraction, pachymetry, and corneal topography data were available for each patient from examinations performed both before and after the refractive procedures.Results: Of the 4027 surgically treated eyes, 23 (0.57% developed keratectasia during the follow-up period, which was a minimum seven years; nine eyes (0.69% were from group 1 and 14 eyes (0.51% were from group 2. The onset of corneal ectasia was at 2.57 ± 1.04 (range 1–4 years and 2.64 ± 1.29 (range 0.5–5 years, respectively, for groups 1 and 2. The most important preoperative risk factors using the Randleman Ectasia Risk Score System were manifest refractive spherical error in group 1 and a thin residual stromal bed in group 2. Each of the cases that developed corneal ectasia had risk factors that were identified.Conclusion: Ectasia was an uncommon outcome after an otherwise uncomplicated laser in situ keratomileusis procedure. The variables present in eyes developing postoperative LASIK ectasia can be better understood using the Randleman Ectasia Risk Score System.Keywords: corneal topography, Ectasia Risk Score System, keratectasia, myopia, LASIK

  1. Corrosion in Haas expanders with and without use of an antimicrobial agent: an in situ study

    Science.gov (United States)

    BAGATIN, Cristhiane Ristum; ITO, Izabel Yoko; ANDRUCIOLI, Marcela Cristina Damião; NELSON-FILHO, Paulo; FERREIRA, José Tarcísio Lima

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate in situ the occurrence of corrosion in the soldering point areas between the wire, silver brazing and band in Haas expanders. Material and Methods Thirty-four 7-12-year-old patients who needed maxillary expansion with a Haas expander were randomly assigned to two groups of 17 individuals each, according to the oral hygiene protocol adopted during the orthodontic treatment: Group I (control), toothbrushing with a fluoride dentifrice and Group II (experimental), toothbrushing with the same dentifrice plus 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate (Periogard®) mouthrinses twice a week. The appliances were removed after approximately 4 months. Fragments of the appliances containing a metallic band with a soldered wire were sectioned at random for examination by stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Data were analyzed statistically by Fisher's test at 5% significance level. Results The analysis by optical microscopy revealed areas with color change suggestive of corrosion in the soldering point areas joining the band and the wire in all specimens of both groups, with no statistically significant difference between the groups (p=1). The peaks of chemical elements (Ni, Fe, Cr, O, C and P) revealed by EDS were also similar in both groups. Conclusion: Color changes and peaks of chemical elements suggestive of corrosion were observed in the soldering point areas between the wire, silver brazing and band in both control and experimental groups, which indicate that the 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthrinses did not influence the occurrence of corrosion in situ. PMID:22231004

  2. In situ disinfection of sewage contaminated shallow groundwater: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Morgan M; Cooper, William J; Grant, Stanley B

    2011-11-01

    Sewage-contaminated shallow groundwater is a potential cause of beach closures and water quality impairment in marine coastal communities. In this study we set out to evaluate the feasibility of several strategies for disinfecting sewage-contaminated shallow groundwater before it reaches the coastline. The disinfection rates of Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci bacteria (ENT) were measured in mixtures of raw sewage and brackish shallow groundwater collected from a coastal community in southern California. Different disinfection strategies were explored, ranging from benign (aeration alone, and aeration with addition of brine) to aggressive (chemical disinfectants peracetic acid (PAA) or peroxymonosulfate (Oxone)). Aeration alone and aeration with brine did not significantly reduce the concentration of EC and ENT after 6 h of exposure, while 4-5 mg L(-1) of PAA or Oxone achieved >3 log reduction after 15 min of exposure. Oxone disinfection was more rapid at higher salinities, most likely due to the formation of secondary oxidants (e.g., bromine and chlorine) that make this disinfectant inappropriate for marine applications. Using a Lagrangian modeling framework, we identify several factors that could influence the performance of in-situ disinfection with PAA, including the potential for bacterial regrowth, and the non-linear dependence of disinfection rate upon the residence time of water in the shallow groundwater. The data and analysis presented in this paper provide a framework for evaluating the feasibility of in-situ disinfection of shallow groundwater, and elucidate several topics that warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Oxford-Diamond In Situ Cell for studying chemical reactions using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhouse, Saul J.; Vranješ, Nenad; Jupe, Andrew; Drakopoulos, Michael; O'Hare, Dermot

    2012-08-01

    A versatile, infrared-heated, chemical reaction cell has been assembled and commissioned for the in situ study of a range of chemical syntheses using time-resolved energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) on Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source. Specialized reactor configurations have been constructed to enable in situ EDXRD investigation of samples under non-ambient conditions. Chemical reactions can be studied using a range of sample vessels such as alumina crucibles, steel hydrothermal autoclaves, and glassy carbon tubes, at temperatures up to 1200 °C.

  4. In situ optical emission study on the role of C2 in the synthesis of singlewalled carbon nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motaung, DE

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available applications. In this study, the authors have applied in situ optical emission spectroscopy (OES) to study the plasma in the laser-furnace method to synthesize SWCNTs. In particular, the authors have investigated the temporal and spatial behavior of C2 as well...

  5. Drift-time measurement electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernicka, M.

    1978-01-01

    The aim of the construction was to improve the time resolution without using the facility of time stretching, to have a fast read-out possibility, and to be still cheaper in price in comparison to other systems. A possibility was thus foreseen for using the firm Fairchild. These integrated circuits (IC) have, for example, a propagation delay of 0.75 ns for a gate. One can expect therefore less time jitter and less time difference between the different inputs. Furthermore this IC offers a greater flexibility and therefore the number of ICs decreases and distances become smaller. Working with clock frequencies up to 166.6 MHz is easily possible without running into timing problems. On the other hand, to make full use of the advantages of this IC, it was necessary to build the print as a multilayer. The only risk could be in the use of a completely new product. A further aim was to build for this system a second type of drift-time module with a short time range for measuring drift time and pulse length in rotated multiwire proportional chambers. A brief outline of the specifications of the different modules is given in table 1. (Auth.)

  6. Role of an encapsulating layer for reducing resistance drift in phase change random access memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Jin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Phase change random access memory (PCRAM devices exhibit a steady increase in resistance in the amorphous phase upon aging and this resistance drift phenomenon directly affects the device reliability. A stress relaxation model is used here to study the effect of a device encapsulating layer material in addressing the resistance drift phenomenon in PCRAM. The resistance drift can be increased or decreased depending on the biaxial moduli of the phase change material (YPCM and the encapsulating layer material (YELM according to the stress relationship between them in the drift regime. The proposed model suggests that the resistance drift can be effectively reduced by selecting a proper material as an encapsulating layer. Moreover, our model explains that reducing the size of the phase change material (PCM while fully reset and reducing the amorphous/crystalline ratio in PCM help to improve the resistance drift, and thus opens an avenue for highly reliable multilevel PCRAM applications.

  7. The large cylindrical drift chamber of TASSO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, H.; Fischer, H.M.; Hartmann, H.; Loehr, B.; Wollstadt, M.; Fohrmann, R.; Schmueser, P.; Cassel, D.G.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.

    1980-03-01

    We have built and operated a large cylindrical drift chamber for the TASSO experiment at the DESY storage ring, PETRA. The chamber has a length of 3.5 m, a diameter of 2.5 m, and a total of 2340 drift cells. The cells are arranged in 15 concentric layers such that tracks can be reconstructed in three dimensions. A spatial resolution of 220 μm has been achieved for tracks of normal incidence on the drift cells. (orig.)

  8. Electron injection in semiconductor drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Castoldi, A.; Vacchi, A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reports the first successful results of a simple MOS structure to inject electrons at a given position in Silicon Drift Detectors. The structure allows on-line calibration of the drift velocity of electrons within the detector. The calibration is a practical method to trace the temperature dependence of the electron mobility. Several of these injection structures can be implemented in silicon drift detectors without additional steps in the fabrication process. 5 refs., 11 figs

  9. Drift-free MPEG-4 AVC semi-fragile watermarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnaoui, M.; Mitrea, M.

    2014-02-01

    While intra frame drifting is a concern for all types of MPEG-4 AVC compressed-domain video processing applications, it has a particular negative impact in watermarking. In order to avoid the drift drawbacks, two classes of solutions are currently considered in the literature. They try either to compensate the drift distortions at the expense of complex decoding/estimation algorithms or to restrict the insertion to the blocks which are not involved in the prediction, thus reducing the data payload. The present study follows a different approach. First, it algebraically models the drift distortion spread problem by considering the analytic expressions of the MPEG-4 AVC encoding operations. Secondly, it solves the underlying algebraic system under drift-free constraints. Finally, the advanced solution is adapted to take into account the watermarking peculiarities. The experiments consider an m-QIM semi-fragile watermarking method and a video surveillance corpus of 80 minutes. For prescribed data payload (100 bit/s), robustness (BER < 0.1 against transcoding at 50% in stream size), fragility (frame modification detection with accuracies of 1/81 from the frame size and 3s) and complexity constraints, the modified insertion results in gains in transparency of 2 dB in PSNR, of 0.4 in AAD, of 0.002 in IF, of 0.03 in SC, of 0.017 NCC and 22 in DVQ.

  10. Learning From Short Text Streams With Topic Drifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peipei; He, Lu; Wang, Haiyan; Hu, Xuegang; Zhang, Yuhong; Li, Lei; Wu, Xindong

    2017-09-18

    Short text streams such as search snippets and micro blogs have been popular on the Web with the emergence of social media. Unlike traditional normal text streams, these data present the characteristics of short length, weak signal, high volume, high velocity, topic drift, etc. Short text stream classification is hence a very challenging and significant task. However, this challenge has received little attention from the research community. Therefore, a new feature extension approach is proposed for short text stream classification with the help of a large-scale semantic network obtained from a Web corpus. It is built on an incremental ensemble classification model for efficiency. First, more semantic contexts based on the senses of terms in short texts are introduced to make up of the data sparsity using the open semantic network, in which all terms are disambiguated by their semantics to reduce the noise impact. Second, a concept cluster-based topic drifting detection method is proposed to effectively track hidden topic drifts. Finally, extensive studies demonstrate that as compared to several well-known concept drifting detection methods in data stream, our approach can detect topic drifts effectively, and it enables handling short text streams effectively while maintaining the efficiency as compared to several state-of-the-art short text classification approaches.

  11. The Silicon Environment in Silica Polymorphs, Aluminosilicate Crystals and Melts: An In Situ High Temperature XAS Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormier, L.; Neuville, D. R.; Roux, J.; Ligny, D. de; Henderson, G. S.; Flank, A.-M.; Lagarde, P.

    2007-01-01

    High temperature X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Si K-edge has been used to obtain in situ information on SiO2 phase transitions upon heating. Important modifications are observed for the XANES spectra of the high temperature polymorphs, in relation to disordering of the SiO4 tetrahedra beyond the short-range correlations. This paper also presents the XANES spectra of anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8) from room temperature up to the melt (1900 K). This study shows the possibilities for determining the Si environment in crystals and glasses up to the liquid state using in situ XANES measurements

  12. Ultrahigh-vacuum in situ electrochemistry with solid polymer electrolyte and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of polypyrrole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skotheim, T.A.; Florit, M.I.; Melo, A.; O'Grady, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    A new in situ combined electrochemistry and x-ray-photoelectron-spectroscopy (XPS) technique using solid polymer electrolytes has been used to characterize electrically conducting films of polypyrrole perchlorate. The technique allows in situ electrochemical oxidation and reduction (doping and undoping) in ultrahigh vacuum and the simultaneous study of the polymer with XPS as a function of its electrochemical potential. We demonstrate that some anion species interact strongly electrostatically with the nitrogen heteroatoms. We also show conclusively that the electrochemistry of polypyrrole is highly irreversible

  13. Back to the Origin: In Situ Studies Are Needed to Understand Selection during Crop Diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda H. Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Crop domestication has been embraced as a model system to study the genetics of plant evolution. Yet, the role of the environment, including biotic forces such as microbial and insect communities, in contributing to crop phenotypes under domestication and diversification has been poorly explored. In particular, there has been limited progress in understanding how human selection, agricultural cultivation (soil disturbance, fertilization, and irrigation, and biotic forces act as selective pressures on crop phenotypes. For example, geographically-structured pathogenic, pestiferous, and mutualistic interactions with crop plants have likely given rise to landraces that interact differently with local microbial and insect communities. In order to understand the adaptive role of crop traits, we argue that more studies should be conducted in the geographic centers of origin to test hypotheses on how abiotic, biotic, and human selective forces have shaped the phenotypes of domesticated plants during crop domestication and subsequent diversification into landraces. In these centers of origin, locally endemic species associated with wild ancestors have likely contributed to the selection on plant phenotypes. We address a range of questions that can only be studied in the geographic center of crop origin, placing emphasis on Mesoamerican polyculture systems, and highlight the significance of in situ studies for increasing the sustainability of modern agricultural systems.

  14. Multislice simulations for in-situ HRTEM studies of nanostructured magnesium hydride at ambient hydrogen pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surrey, Alexander, E-mail: a.surrey@ifw-dresden.de [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Schultz, Ludwig [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Rellinghaus, Bernd, E-mail: b.rellinghaus@ifw-dresden.de [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Multislice HRTEM contrast simulations of a windowed environmental cell. • Study of Mg and MgH2 nanocrystals as model system in hydrogen at ambient pressure. • Investigation of spatial resolution and contrast depending on specimen thickness, defocus, and hydrogen pressure. • Atomic resolution is expected for specimens as thin as 5  nm. - Abstract: The use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the structural characterization of many nanostructured hydrides, which are relevant for solid state hydrogen storage, is hindered due to a rapid decomposition of the specimen upon irradiation with the electron beam. Environmental TEM allows to stabilize the hydrides by applying a hydrogen back pressure of up to 4.5 bar in a windowed environmental cell. The feasibility of high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) investigations of light weight metals and metal hydrides in such a “nanoreactor” is studied theoretically by means of multislice HRTEM contrast simulations using Mg and its hydride phase, MgH{sub 2}, as model system. Such a setup provides the general opportunity to study dehydrogenation and hydrogenation reactions at the nanoscale under technological application conditions. We analyze the dependence of both the spatial resolution and the HRTEM image contrast on parameters such as the defocus, the metal/hydride thickness, and the hydrogen pressure in order to explore the possibilities and limitations of in-situ experiments with windowed environmental cells. Such simulations may be highly valuable to pre-evaluate future experimental studies.

  15. Multislice simulations for in-situ HRTEM studies of nanostructured magnesium hydride at ambient hydrogen pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surrey, Alexander; Schultz, Ludwig; Rellinghaus, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Multislice HRTEM contrast simulations of a windowed environmental cell. • Study of Mg and MgH2 nanocrystals as model system in hydrogen at ambient pressure. • Investigation of spatial resolution and contrast depending on specimen thickness, defocus, and hydrogen pressure. • Atomic resolution is expected for specimens as thin as 5  nm. - Abstract: The use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the structural characterization of many nanostructured hydrides, which are relevant for solid state hydrogen storage, is hindered due to a rapid decomposition of the specimen upon irradiation with the electron beam. Environmental TEM allows to stabilize the hydrides by applying a hydrogen back pressure of up to 4.5 bar in a windowed environmental cell. The feasibility of high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) investigations of light weight metals and metal hydrides in such a “nanoreactor” is studied theoretically by means of multislice HRTEM contrast simulations using Mg and its hydride phase, MgH_2, as model system. Such a setup provides the general opportunity to study dehydrogenation and hydrogenation reactions at the nanoscale under technological application conditions. We analyze the dependence of both the spatial resolution and the HRTEM image contrast on parameters such as the defocus, the metal/hydride thickness, and the hydrogen pressure in order to explore the possibilities and limitations of in-situ experiments with windowed environmental cells. Such simulations may be highly valuable to pre-evaluate future experimental studies.

  16. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR

  17. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  18. On stationary states of electron beams in drift space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalev, N.F.

    2002-01-01

    The article is devoted to studying the conditions of formation and existence of virtual cathodes. The problem on stationary states of the strongly magnetized electron beams in the homogeneous drift channels is discussed. The problem on the planar and coaxial moduli of the drift spaces is considered. The possibility of existing the virtual cathodes in the coaxial tubular beams by the injection currents, smaller than the threshold ones is highly proved. The inaccuracy of results of a number of works, studying the properties of the virtual cathodes in the strongly magnetized electron beams, is shown [ru

  19. In-situ, time-lapse study of extracellular polymeric substance discharge in Streptococcus mutans biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bernard Haochih; Yu, Li-Chieh

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus mutans is one of the main pathogens that cause tooth decay. By metabolizing carbohydrates, S. mutans emits extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) that adheres to the tooth surface and forms layers of biofilm. Periodontal disease occurs due to the low pH environment created by S. mutans biofilm, and such an acidic environment gradually erodes tooth enamel. Since the existence of EPS is essential in the formation of biofilm, the in-situ investigation of its generation and distribution in real time is the key to the control and suppression of S. mutans biofilm. Prior studies of the biofilm formation process by fluorescence microscope, scanning electron microscope, or spectroscope have roughly divided the mechanism into three stages: (1) initial attachment; (2) microcolonies; and (3) maturation. However, these analytical methods are incapable to observe real-time changes in different locations of the extracellular matrix, and to analyze mechanical properties for single bacteria in micro and nanoscale. Since atomic force microscopy (AFM) operates by precise control of tip-sample interaction forces in liquid and in air, living microorganisms can be analyzed under near-physiological conditions. Thus, analytical techniques based on AFM constitute powerful tools for the study of biological samples, both qualitatively and quantitatively. In this study, we used AFM to quantitatively track the changes of multiple nanomechanical properties of S. mutans, including dissipation energy, adhesion force, deformation, and elastic modulus at different metabolic stages. The data revealed that the bacterial extracellular matrix has a gradient distribution in stickiness, in which different stickiness indicates the variation of EPS compositions, freshness, and metabolic stages. In-situ, time-lapse AFM images showed the local generation and distribution of EPS at different times, in which the highest adhesion distributed along sides of the S. mutans cells. Through time

  20. In situ degradation studies of two-dimensional WSe₂-graphene heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B; Eichfield, S M; Wang, D; Robinson, J A; Haque, M A

    2015-09-14

    Heterostructures of two-dimensional materials can be vulnerable to thermal degradation due to structural and interfacial defects as well as thermal expansion mismatch, yet a systematic study does not exist in the literature. In this study, we investigate the degradation of freestanding WSe2-graphene heterostructures due to heat and charge flow by performing in situ experiments inside a transmission electron microscope. Experimental results show that purely thermal loading requires higher temperatures (>850 °C), about 150 °C higher than that under combined electrical and thermal loading. In both cases, selenium is the first element to decompose and migration of silicon atoms from the test structure to the freestanding specimen initiates rapid degradation through the formation of tungsten disilicide and silicon carbide. The role of the current flow is to enhance the migration of silicon from the sample holder and to knock-out the selenium atoms. The findings of this study provide fundamental insights into the degradation of WSe2-graphene heterostructures and inspire their application in electronics for use in harsh environments.

  1. Dual patch voltage clamp study of low membrane resistance astrocytes in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baofeng; Xu, Guangjin; Wang, Wei; Enyeart, John J; Zhou, Min

    2014-03-17

    Whole-cell patch clamp recording has been successfully used in identifying the voltage-dependent gating and conductance properties of ion channels in a variety of cells. However, this powerful technique is of limited value in studying low membrane resistance cells, such as astrocytes in situ, because of the inability to control or accurately measure the real amplitude of command voltages. To facilitate the study of ionic conductances of astrocytes, we have developed a dual patch recording method which permits membrane current and membrane potential to be simultaneously recorded from astrocytes in spite of their extraordinarily low membrane resistance. The utility of this technique is demonstrated by measuring the voltage-dependent activation of the inwardly rectifying K+ current abundantly expressed in astrocytes and multiple ionic events associated with astrocytic GABAA receptor activation. This protocol can be performed routinely in the study of astrocytes. This method will be valuable for identifying and characterizing the individual ion channels that orchestrate the electrical activity of low membrane resistance cells.

  2. Operable Unit 7-13/14 in situ thermal desorption treatability study work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, P.; Nickelson, D.; Hyde, R.

    1999-01-01

    This Work Plan provides technical details for conducting a treatability study that will evaluate the application of in situ thermal desorption (ISTD) to landfill waste at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). ISTD is a form of thermally enhanced vapor vacuum extraction that heats contaminated soil and waste underground to raise its temperature and thereby vaporize and destroy most organics. An aboveground vapor vacuum collection and treatment system then destroys or absorbs the remaining organics and vents carbon dioxide and water to the atmosphere. The technology is a byproduct of an advanced oil-well thermal extraction program. The purpose of the ISTD treatability study is to fill performance-based data gaps relative to off-gas system performance, administrative feasibility, effects of the treatment on radioactive contaminants, worker safety during mobilization and demobilization, and effects of landfill type waste on the process (time to remediate, subsidence potential, underground fires, etc.). By performing this treatability study, uncertainties associated with ISTD as a selected remedy will be reduced, providing a better foundation of remedial recommendations and ultimate selection of remedial actions for the SDA

  3. Construction update and drift velocity calibration for the CLAS drift chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestayer, M.D.; Barbosa, F.J.; Bonneau, P.; Burtin, E.; Christo, S.; Doolittle, G.; Dytman, S.A.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Hyde-Wright, C.E.; Klein, A.; Kossov, M.V.; Kuhn, S.E.; Magahiz, R.; Miskimen, R.A.; Murphy, L.Y.; O'Meara, J.E.; Pyron, T.D.; Qin, L.; Raue, B.A.; Schumacher, R.A.; Tuzel, W.; Weinstein, L.B.; Yegneswaran, A.

    1995-01-01

    We briefly describe the drift chamber system for the CLAS detector at CEBAF, concentrating on the method which will be used to calibrate the drift velocity function. We identify key features of the function which should apply to any small-cell drift chamber geometry in which the cathode and anode surfaces are wires. Using these ideas, we describe a simple method to compensate for variations in the drift velocity function due to environmental changes. (orig.)

  4. Construction update and drift velocity calibration for the CLAS drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestayer, M.D. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Barbosa, F.J. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Bonneau, P. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Burtin, E. [University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Christo, S. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Doolittle, G. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dytman, S.A. [University of Pittsburg, Pittsburg, PA (United States); Gilfoyle, G.P. [University of Richmond, Richmond, VA (United States); Hyde-Wright, C.E. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Klein, A. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Kossov, M.V. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States); Kuhn, S.E. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Magahiz, R. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Miskimen, R.A. [University of Massachussetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Murphy, L.Y. [CE Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); O`Meara, J.E. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Pyron, T.D. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Qin, L. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Raue, B.A. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Schumacher, R.A. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tuzel, W. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Weinstein, L.B. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Yegneswaran, A. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    1995-12-11

    We briefly describe the drift chamber system for the CLAS detector at CEBAF, concentrating on the method which will be used to calibrate the drift velocity function. We identify key features of the function which should apply to any small-cell drift chamber geometry in which the cathode and anode surfaces are wires. Using these ideas, we describe a simple method to compensate for variations in the drift velocity function due to environmental changes. (orig.).

  5. Electron drift time in silicon drift detectors: A technique for high precision measurement of electron drift mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castoldi, A.; Rehak, P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a precise absolute measurement of the drift velocity and mobility of electrons in high resistivity silicon at room temperature. The electron velocity is obtained from the differential measurement of the drift time of an electron cloud in a silicon drift detector. The main features of the transport scheme of this class of detectors are: the high uniformity of the electron motion, the transport of the signal electrons entirely contained in the high-purity bulk, the low noise timing due to the very small anode capacitance (typical value 100 fF), and the possibility to measure different drift distances, up to the wafer diameter, in the same semiconductor sample. These features make the silicon drift detector an optimal device for high precision measurements of carrier drift properties. The electron drift velocity and mobility in a 10 kΩ cm NTD n-type silicon wafer have been measured as a function of the electric field in the range of possible operation of a typical drift detector (167--633 V/cm). The electron ohmic mobility is found to be 1394 cm 2 /V s. The measurement precision is better than 1%. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  6. An in-situ IR study on the adsorption of CO2 and H2O on hydrotalcites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, K.T.; Gallucci, F.; Mezari, B.; Hensen, E.J.M.; van Sint Annaland, M.

    2018-01-01

    In-situ IR technique was used to study the reversible adsorption of CO2 and H2O at elevated temperatures on a potassium-promoted hydrotalcite for its use in sorption-enhanced water-gas shift (SEWGS). It was found that mainly bidentate carbonate species are responsible for the reversible (cyclic)

  7. ATR-IR spectroscopic cell for in situ studies at solid-liquid interface at elevated temperatures and pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koichumanova, Kamila; Visan, Aura; Geerdink, Bert; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Mojet, Barbara; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2017-01-01

    An in situ ATR-IR spectroscopic cell suitable for studies at solid-liquid interface is described including the design and experimental details in continuous flow mode at elevated temperatures (230 °C) and pressures (30 bar). The design parameters considered include the cell geometry, the procedure

  8. Weldon Spring, Missouri, Raffinate Pits 1, 2, 3, and 4: Preliminary grout development screening studies for in situ waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, E.W.; Gilliam, T.M.; Dole, L.R.; West, G.A.

    1987-04-01

    Results of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's initial support program to develop a preliminary grout formula to solidify in situ the Weldon Spring waste are presented. The screening study developed preliminary formulas based on a simulated composite waste and then tested the formulas on actual waste samples. Future data needs are also discussed. 1 ref., 6 figs., 9 tabs

  9. Expression and localization of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits in the goldfish retina--an in situ hybridization and immunocytochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenbranden, C. A.; Kamphuis, W.; Nunes Cardozo, B.; Kamermans, M.

    2000-01-01

    The expression and distribution of AMPA, kainate and NMDA glutamate receptor subunits was studied in the goldfish retina. For the immunocytochemical localization of the AMPA receptor antisera against GluR2, GluR2/3 and GluR4 were used, and for in situ hybridization rat specific probes for GluR1 and

  10. Spatiotemporal synchronization of drift waves in a magnetron sputtering plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martines, E.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Antoni, V.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N. [Consorzio RFX, Padova (Italy); Adámek, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-10-15

    A feedforward scheme is applied for drift waves control in a magnetized magnetron sputtering plasma. A system of driven electrodes collecting electron current in a limited region of the explored plasma is used to interact with unstable drift waves. Drift waves actually appear as electrostatic modes characterized by discrete wavelengths of the order of few centimeters and frequencies of about 100 kHz. The effect of external quasi-periodic, both in time and space, travelling perturbations is studied. Particular emphasis is given to the role played by the phase relation between the natural and the imposed fluctuations. It is observed that it is possible by means of localized electrodes, collecting currents which are negligible with respect to those flowing in the plasma, to transfer energy to one single mode and to reduce that associated to the others. Due to the weakness of the external action, only partial control has been achieved.

  11. Spatiotemporal synchronization of drift waves in a magnetron sputtering plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martines, E.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Antoni, V.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Adámek, J.

    2014-01-01

    A feedforward scheme is applied for drift waves control in a magnetized magnetron sputtering plasma. A system of driven electrodes collecting electron current in a limited region of the explored plasma is used to interact with unstable drift waves. Drift waves actually appear as electrostatic modes characterized by discrete wavelengths of the order of few centimeters and frequencies of about 100 kHz. The effect of external quasi-periodic, both in time and space, travelling perturbations is studied. Particular emphasis is given to the role played by the phase relation between the natural and the imposed fluctuations. It is observed that it is possible by means of localized electrodes, collecting currents which are negligible with respect to those flowing in the plasma, to transfer energy to one single mode and to reduce that associated to the others. Due to the weakness of the external action, only partial control has been achieved

  12. Low Power Measurements on a Finger Drift Tube Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Schempp, A

    2004-01-01

    The efficiency of RFQs decreases at higher particle energies. The DTL structures used in this energy regions have a defocusing influence on the beam. To achieve a focusing effect, fingers with quadrupole symmetry were added to the drift tubes. Driven by the same power supply as the drift tubes, the fingers do not need an additional power source or feedthrough. Beam dynamics have been studied with PARMTEQ . Detailed analysis of the field distribution was done and the geometry of the finger array has been optimized with respect to beam dynamics. A spiral loaded cavity with finger drift tubes was built up and low power measurements were done. In this contribution, the results of the rf simulating with Microwave Studio are shown in comparison with bead pertubation measurement on a prototype cavity.

  13. Indium hydroxide to oxide decomposition observed in one nanocrystal during in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miehe, Gerhard; Lauterbach, Stefan; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Gurlo, Aleksander

    2013-02-01

    The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) is used to study, in situ, spatially resolved decomposition in individual nanocrystals of metal hydroxides and oxyhydroxides. This case study reports on the decomposition of indium hydroxide (c-In(OH)3) to bixbyite-type indium oxide (c-In2O3). The electron beam is focused onto a single cube-shaped In(OH)3 crystal of {100} morphology with ca. 35 nm edge length and a sequence of HR-TEM images was recorded during electron beam irradiation. The frame-by-frame analysis of video sequences allows for the in situ, time-resolved observation of the shape and orientation of the transformed crystals, which in turn enables the evaluation of the kinetics of c-In2O3 crystallization. Supplementary material (video of the transformation) related to this article can be found online at 10.1016/j.jssc.2012.09.022. After irradiation the shape of the parent cube-shaped crystal is preserved, however, its linear dimension (edge) is reduced by the factor 1.20. The corresponding spotted selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern representing zone [001] of c-In(OH)3 is transformed to a diffuse strongly textured ring-like pattern of c-In2O3 that indicates the transformed cube is no longer a single crystal but is disintegrated into individual c-In2O3 domains with the size of about 5-10 nm. The induction time of approximately 15 s is estimated from the time-resolved Fourier transforms. The volume fraction of the transformed phase (c-In2O3), calculated from the shrinkage of the parent c-In(OH)3 crystal in the recorded HR-TEM images, is used as a measure of the kinetics of c-In2O3 crystallization within the framework of Avrami-Erofeev formalism. The Avrami exponent of ˜3 is characteristic for a reaction mechanism with fast nucleation at the beginning of the reaction and subsequent three-dimensional growth of nuclei with a constant growth rate. The structural transformation path in reconstructive decomposition of c-In(OH)3 to c

  14. Hybrid aerogels and bioactive aerogels under uniaxial compression: an in situ SAXS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esquivias, L.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The complex structure of hybrid organic/inorganic aerogels is composed by an inorganic phase covalently bonded to an organic chain forming a copolymer. Conventional hybrid aerogels were studied as well as bioactive hybrid aerogels, that is, aerogels with a calcium active phase added. In this work, the relationship between mechanical response and nanostructure was studied, using a specifically designed sample-holder for in situ uniaxial compression obtaining at the same time the small-angle X-ray pattern from synchrotron radiation (SAXS. Structural elements can be described as a particulated silica core surrounded by the organic chains. These chains are compressed on the direction parallel to the load, and a relationship between macroscopic uniaxial compression and particle and pore deformations can be established.

    La compleja estructura de los aerogeles híbridos orgánico/inorgánicos está compuesta por una fase inorgánica de sílice, unida mediante enlaces covalentes a una red de cadenas orgánicas. Se han estudiado composites híbridos convencionales y bioactivos, esto es, con una fase activa de calcio añadida. En este trabajo se ha investigado la relación entre la respuesta mecánica y la nanoestructura, con ayuda de un portamuestras específicamente diseñado para el estudio in situ de muestras bajo compresión uniaxial, a la vez que se obtiene el espectro de rayos-X a bajo-ángulo de radiación sincrotrón (SAXS. Los elementos estructurales se pueden describir como núcleos particulados de sílice rodeados de las cadenas orgánicas. Estas, se comprimen en la dirección paralela a la carga pudiéndose establecer una relación entre la compresión uniaxial macroscópica y la deformación de las partículas y poros que forman la estructura.

  15. Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G.; Tsang, C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M andO 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M andO 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in niches and in the cross drift to

  16. Indium hydroxide to oxide decomposition observed in one nanocrystal during in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miehe, Gerhard; Lauterbach, Stefan; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Gurlo, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) is used to study, in situ, spatially resolved decomposition in individual nanocrystals of metal hydroxides and oxyhydroxides. This case study reports on the decomposition of indium hydroxide (c-In(OH) 3 ) to bixbyite-type indium oxide (c-In 2 O 3 ). The electron beam is focused onto a single cube-shaped In(OH) 3 crystal of {100} morphology with ca. 35 nm edge length and a sequence of HR-TEM images was recorded during electron beam irradiation. The frame-by-frame analysis of video sequences allows for the in situ, time-resolved observation of the shape and orientation of the transformed crystals, which in turn enables the evaluation of the kinetics of c-In 2 O 3 crystallization. Supplementary material (video of the transformation) related to this article can be found online at (10.1016/j.jssc.2012.09.022). After irradiation the shape of the parent cube-shaped crystal is preserved, however, its linear dimension (edge) is reduced by the factor 1.20. The corresponding spotted selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern representing zone [001] of c-In(OH) 3 is transformed to a diffuse strongly textured ring-like pattern of c-In 2 O 3 that indicates the transformed cube is no longer a single crystal but is disintegrated into individual c-In 2 O 3 domains with the size of about 5–10 nm. The induction time of approximately 15 s is estimated from the time-resolved Fourier transforms. The volume fraction of the transformed phase (c-In 2 O 3 ), calculated from the shrinkage of the parent c-In(OH) 3 crystal in the recorded HR-TEM images, is used as a measure of the kinetics of c-In 2 O 3 crystallization within the framework of Avrami–Erofeev formalism. The Avrami exponent of ∼3 is characteristic for a reaction mechanism with fast nucleation at the beginning of the reaction and subsequent three-dimensional growth of nuclei with a constant growth rate. The structural transformation path in reconstructive

  17. Diffusion of Radionuclides in Bentonite Clay - Laboratory and in situ Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansson, Mats

    2002-12-01

    This thesis deals with the diffusion of ions in compacted bentonite clay. Laboratory experiments were performed to examine in detail different processes that affect the diffusion. To demonstrate that the results obtained from the laboratory investigations are valid under in situ conditions, two different kinds of in situ experiments were performed. Laboratory experiments were performed to better understand the impact of ionic strength on the diffusion of S 2+ and Cs + ions, which sorb to mineral surfaces primarily by ion exchange. Furthermore, surface related diffusion was examined and demonstrated to take place for Sr 2+ and Cs + but not for Co 2+ , which sorbs on mineral surfaces by complexation. The diffusion of anions in bentonite clay compacted to different dry densities was also investigated. The results indicate that anion diffusion in bentonite clay consists of two processes, one fast and another slower. We ascribe the fast diffusive process to intralayer diffusion and the slow process to diffusion in interparticle water, where anions are to some extent sorbed to edge sites of the montmorillonite. Two different types of in situ experiments were performed, CHEMLAB and LOT. CHEMLAB is a borehole laboratory, where cation (Cs + , Sr 2+ and Co 2+ ) and anion (I- and TcO 4 - ) diffusion experiments were performed using groundwater from a fracture in the borehole. In the LOT experiments cylindrical bentonite blocks surrounding a central copper rod were placed in a 4 m deep vertical borehole. The borehole was then sealed and the blocks are left for 1, 5 or >> 5 years. When the bentonite was water saturated the central copper rod is heated to simulate the temperature increase due to radioactive decay of the spent fuel. Bentonite doped with radioactive Cs and Co was placed in one of the lower blocks. Interestingly, the redox-sensitive pertechnetate ion (TcO 4 - ) which thermodynamically should be reduced and precipitate as TcO 2 n H 2 O, travelled unreduced through

  18. Single wire drift chamber design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krider, J.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the design and prototype tests of single wire drift chambers to be used in Fermilab test beam lines. The goal is to build simple, reliable detectors which require a minimum of electronics. Spatial resolution should match the 300 μm rms resolution of the 1 mm proportional chambers that they will replace. The detectors will be used in beams with particle rates up to 20 KHz. Single track efficiency should be at least 99%. The first application will be in the MT beamline, which has been designed for calibration of CDF detectors. A set of four x-y modules will be used to track and measure the momentum of beam particles

  19. Drift effects in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koclas, J.; Roy, R.; Marleau, G.

    1993-01-01

    The diffusion equation is an approximation to the transport equation which relies on the validity of Fick's law. Since this law is not explicitly integrated in the transport equation it can only be derived approximately using homogenization theories. However, such homogenization theories state that when the cell is not symmetric Fick's law breaks down due to the presence of an additional term to the neutron current, called the drift term. In fact, this term can be interpreted as a transport correction to Fick's law which tends to increase the neutron current in a direction opposite to that specified by the flux gradient. In this paper, we investigate how the presence of asymmetric liquid zone controllers will modify the flux distribution inside a CANDU core. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  20. Cricothyroidotomy In Situ Simulation Curriculum (CRIC Study): Training Residents for Rare Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosoniak, Andrew; Ryzynski, Agnes; Lebovic, Gerald; Woolfrey, Karen

    2017-04-01

    Technical skill acquisition for rare procedures can be challenging given the few real-life training opportunities. In situ simulation (ISS), a training technique that takes place in the actual workplace, is a promising method to promote environmental fidelity for rare procedures. This study evaluated a simulation-based technical skill curriculum for cricothyroidotomy using deliberate practice, followed by an ISS evaluation session. Twenty emergency medicine residents participated in a two-part curriculum to improve cricothryoidotomy performance. A pretest established participant baseline technical skill. The training session consisted of two parts, didactic teaching followed by deliberate practice using a task-training manikin. A posttest consisted of an unannounced, high-fidelity ISS, during an emergency department shift. The primary outcome was the mean performance time between the pretest and posttest sessions. Skill performance was also evaluated using a checklist scale and global rating scale. Cricothyroidotomy performance time improved significantly from pretest to posttest sessions (mean difference, 59 seconds; P training session consisting of didactic learning and deliberate practice, improved cricothyroidotomy skill performance was observed during an unannounced ISS in the emergency department. The integration of ISS in cricothyroidotomy training represents a promising approach; however, further study is needed to establish its role.

  1. In situ X-ray studies of film cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuoss, Paul; Chang, Kee-Chul; You, Hoydoo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Synchrotron X-rays are used to study in operando the structural and chemical changes of LSM and LSCF film cathodes during half-cell operations. •A-site and B-site cations actively segregate or desegregate on the changes of temperature, pO 2 , and electrochemical potential. •Chemical lattice expansions show that oxygen-cathode interface is the primary source of rate-limiting processes. •The surface and subsurface of the LSM and LSCF films have different oxidation-states due to vacancy concentration changes. •Liquid-phase infiltration and coarsening processes of cathode materials into porous YSZ electrolyte backbone were monitored by USAXS. -- Abstract: Synchrotron-based X-ray techniques have been used to study in situ the structural and chemical changes of film cathodes during half-cell operations. The X-ray techniques used include X-ray reflectivity (XR), total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF), high-resolution diffraction (HRD), ultra-small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS). The epitaxial thin film model cathodes for XR, TXRF, and HRD measurements are made by pulse laser deposition and porous film cathodes for USAX measurements are made by screen printing technique. The experimental results reviewed here include A-site and B-site segregations, lattice expansion, oxidation-state changes during cell operations and liquid-phase infiltration and coarsening of cathode to electrolyte backbone

  2. In-situ EXAFS study on the thermal decomposition of TiH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yingli; Wu Min; An Pengfei; Zheng Lirong; Chu Shengqi; Zhang Jing; Hu Tiandou

    2014-01-01

    Thermal decomposition behaviors of TiH 2 powder under a flowing helium atmosphere and in a low vacuum condition have been studied using an in situ EXAFS technique. By an EXAFS analysis containing the multiple scattering paths including H atoms, the changes of the hydrogen stoichiometric ratio and the phase transformation sequence are obtained. The results demonstrate that the initial decomposition temperature is dependent on experimental conditions, which occurs, respectively, at about 300 and 400 °C in a low vacuum condition and under a flowing helium atmosphere. During the decomposition process of TiH 2 in a low vacuum condition, the sample experiences a phase change process: δ(TiH 2 ) → δ (TiH x ) → δ(TiH x )+ β(TiH x ) → δ(TiH x )+ β(TiH x ) + α(Ti) → β(TiH x ) + α(Ti) → α(Ti) + β(Ti). This study offers a way to detect the structural information of hydrogen. A detailed discussion about the decomposition process of TiH 2 is given in this paper. (authors)

  3. Bioreactor tests preliminary to landfill in situ aeration: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raga, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.raga@unipd.it [ICEA Department, University of Padova. Via Marzolo, 9, 35131 Padova (Italy); Cossu, Raffaello [ICEA Department, University of Padova. Via Marzolo, 9, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Carbon and nitrogen mass balances in aerated landfill simulation reactors. ► Waste stabilization in aerated landfill simulation reactors. ► Effect of temperature on biodegradation processes in aerated landfills. - Abstract: Lab scale tests in bioreactor were carried out in the framework of the characterization studies of a landfill where in situ aeration (possibly followed by landfill mining) had been proposed as part of the novel waste management strategy in a region in northern Italy. The tests were run to monitor the effects produced by aerobic conditions at different temperatures on waste sampled at different depths in the landfill, with focus on the carbon and nitrogen conversion during aeration. Temperatures ranging from 35 to 45 °C were chosen, in order to evaluate possible inhibition of biodegradation processes (namely nitrification) at 45 °C in the landfill. The results obtained showed positive effects of the aeration on leachate quality and a significant reduction of waste biodegradability. Although a delay of biodegradation processes was observed in the reactor run at 45 °C, biodegradation rates increased after 2 months of aeration, providing very low values of the relevant parameters (as in the other aerated reactors) by the end of the study. Mass balances were carried out for TOC and N-NH{sub 4}{sup +}; the findings obtained were encouraging and provided evidence of the effectiveness of carbon and nitrogen conversion processes in the aerated landfill simulation reactors.

  4. Contribution of in situ acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetry to study zirconium alloy oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Haj, O.; Peres, V.; Serris, E.; Cournil, M.; Grosjean, F.; Kittel, J.; Ropital, F.

    2015-01-01

    Zirconium alloy (zircaloy-4) corrosion behavior under oxidizing atmosphere at high temperature was studied using thermogravimetric experiment associated with acoustic emission analysis. Under a mixture of oxygen and air in helium, an acceleration of the corrosion is observed due to the detrimental effect of nitrogen which produces zirconium nitride. The kinetic rate increases significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration is accompanied by an acoustic emission (AE) activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts were recorded after the kinetic transition or during the cooling of the sample. Acoustic emission signals analysis allows us to distinguish different populations of cracks in the ZrO 2 layer. These cracks have also been observed by SEM on post mortem cross section of oxidized samples and by in-situ microscopy observations on the top surface of the sample during oxidation. The numerous small convoluted thin cracks observed deeper in the zirconia scale are not detected by the AE technique. From these studies we can conclude that mechanisms as irreversible mechanisms, as cracks initiation and propagation, generate AE signals

  5. Deformation of nanotubes in peeling contact with flat substrate: An in situ electron microscopy nanomechanical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zheng, Meng; Wei, Qing; Ke, Changhong, E-mail: cke@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902-6000 (United States); Signetti, Stefano [Laboratory of Bio-Inspired and Graphene Nanomechanics, Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Pugno, Nicola M. [Laboratory of Bio-Inspired and Graphene Nanomechanics, Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Centre for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Povo (Trento) (Italy); School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-21

    Peeling of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures from flat substrates is an essential technique in studying their adhesion properties. The mechanical deformation of the nanostructure in the peeling experiment is critical to the understanding of the peeling process and the interpretation of the peeling measurements, but it is challenging to measure directly and quantitatively at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate the peeling deformation of a bundled carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber by using an in situ scanning electron microscopy nanomechanical peeling technique. A pre-calibrated atomic force microscopy cantilever is utilized as the peeling force sensor, and its back surface acts as the peeling contact substrate. The nanomechanical peeling scheme enables a quantitative characterization of the deformational behaviors of the CNT fiber in both positive and negative peeling configurations with sub-10 nm spatial and sub-nN force resolutions. Nonlinear continuum mechanics models and finite element simulations are employed to interpret the peeling measurements. The measurements and analysis reveal that the structural imperfections in the CNT fiber may have a substantial influence on its peeling deformations and the corresponding peeling forces. The research findings reported in this work are useful to the study of mechanical and adhesion properties of 1D nanostructures by using nanomechanical peeling techniques.

  6. Bioreactor tests preliminary to landfill in situ aeration: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raga, Roberto; Cossu, Raffaello

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Carbon and nitrogen mass balances in aerated landfill simulation reactors. ► Waste stabilization in aerated landfill simulation reactors. ► Effect of temperature on biodegradation processes in aerated landfills. - Abstract: Lab scale tests in bioreactor were carried out in the framework of the characterization studies of a landfill where in situ aeration (possibly followed by landfill mining) had been proposed as part of the novel waste management strategy in a region in northern Italy. The tests were run to monitor the effects produced by aerobic conditions at different temperatures on waste sampled at different depths in the landfill, with focus on the carbon and nitrogen conversion during aeration. Temperatures ranging from 35 to 45 °C were chosen, in order to evaluate possible inhibition of biodegradation processes (namely nitrification) at 45 °C in the landfill. The results obtained showed positive effects of the aeration on leachate quality and a significant reduction of waste biodegradability. Although a delay of biodegradation processes was observed in the reactor run at 45 °C, biodegradation rates increased after 2 months of aeration, providing very low values of the relevant parameters (as in the other aerated reactors) by the end of the study. Mass balances were carried out for TOC and N-NH 4 + ; the findings obtained were encouraging and provided evidence of the effectiveness of carbon and nitrogen conversion processes in the aerated landfill simulation reactors

  7. Chloride influence on the formation of lanthanum hexaboride: An in-situ diffraction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, Tracy M.; Groome, Chloe; Doran, Andrew; Beavers, Christine M.; Urban, Jeffrey J.

    2018-03-01

    LaB6 has been a material of interest for decades due to its thermionic emission, plasmonic properties, and low work function, and researchers continue to discover new properties even now. In order to meet growing interest in customizing these properties, it is important to gain better control over the system and a better understanding of the fundamental mechanism of LaB6 crystal growth and formation. Traditional synthetic methods require very high temperatures, at which point crystallization happens too quickly to be readily studied. Our discovery that LaB6 may be made using lower temperatures has made it possible to slow down crystal formation enough for lattice growth to be observed. We report here an in situ diffraction study of the reaction between LaCl3 and NaBH4. In observing the evolution of the (1 1 1), (1 1 0), and (2 0 0) lattice planes of LaB6, we have discovered that the Cl of LaCl3 has a strong influence on crystal formation, and that excess Cl, temperature and heating rate may all be used as tools to control the LaB6 final product.

  8. An in situ Raman study of the intercalation of supercapacitor-type electrolyte into microcrystalline graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardwick, Laurence J.; Hahn, Matthias; Ruch, Patrick; Holzapfel, Michael; Scheifele, Werner; Buqa, Hilmi; Krumeich, Frank; Novak, Petr; Koetz, Ruediger

    2006-01-01

    An initial Raman study on the effects of intercalation for aprotic electrolyte-based electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) is reported. In situ Raman microscopy is employed in the study of the electrochemical intercalation of tetraethylammonium (Et 4 N + ) and tetrafluoroborate (BF 4 - ) into and out of microcrystalline graphite. During cyclic voltammetry experiments, the insertion of Et 4 N + into graphite for the negative electrode occurs at an onset potential of +1.0 V versus Li/Li + . For the positive electrode, BF 4 - was shown to intercalate above +4.3 V versus Li/Li + . The characteristic G-band doublet peak (E 2g2 (i) (1578 cm -1 ) and E 2g2 (b) (1600 cm -1 )) showed that various staged compounds were formed in both cases and the return of the single G-band (1578 cm -1 ) demonstrates that intercalation was fully reversible. The disappearance of the D-band (1329 cm -1 ) in intercalated graphite is also noted and when the intercalant is removed a more intense D-band reappears, indicating possible lattice damage. For cation intercalation, such irreversible changes of the graphite structure are confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  9. Effect of different frequencies of fluoride dentifrice and mouthrinse administration: an in situ study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Correia Cavalcante Souza

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a combination of topical fluoridation methods for inhibition of enamel demineralization in the face of a cariogenic challenge has not been clearly established. This in situ crossover study aimed to assess whether the addition of daily use of fluoride mouthrinse (FR to that of fluoride dentifrice (FD is equivalent to increasing the frequency of FD application in terms of the effect on enamel demineralization and fluoride content. Over 3 phases of 14 days each, 12 volunteers wore appliances containing enamel blocks exposed to a 20 % sucrose solution 8 times/day. During each phase the blocks underwent one of the following treatments: 2x/day FD, 2x/day FD + 1x/day FR, and 3x/day FD. The blocks were assessed for hardness and fluoride content. Three x/day FD did not differ from 2x/day + 1x/day FR, however it enhanced demineralization protection when compared to 2x/day FD. All treatments produced an increase in enamel fluoride content compared to no treatment (sound blocks (p < 0.05, but the differences between them were not significant. The results of this study suggest that the daily use of fluoride mouthrinse combined with that of fluoride dentifrice has similar effects on enamel demineralization and fluoride content when compared to increasing the frequency of fluoride dentifrice use.

  10. Quantification of Stokes Drift as a Mechanism for Surface Oil Advection in the DWH Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M.

    2013-12-01

    Stokes drift has previously been qualitatively shown to be a factor in ocean surface particle transport, but has never been comprehensively quantified. In addition, most operational ocean particle advection models used during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill do not explicitly account for Stokes drift, instead using a simple parameterization based on wind drift (or ignoring it completely). This research works to quantify Stokes drift via direct calculation, with a focus on shallow water, where Stokes drift is more likely to have a relatively large impact compared to other transport processes such as ocean currents. For this study, WaveWatch III modeled waves in the Gulf of Mexico are used, from which Stokes drift is calculated using the peak wave period and significant wave height outputs. Trajectories are also calculated to examine the role Stokes drift plays in bringing surface particles (and specifically surface oil slicks) onshore. The impact of Stokes drift is compared to transport by currents and traditional estimates of wind drift.

  11. Discovery of a remarkable subpulse drift pattern in PSR B0818-41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, B.; Gupta, Y.; Gil, J.; Sendyk, M.

    2007-05-01

    We report the discovery of a remarkable subpulse drift pattern in the relatively less-studied wide profile pulsar B0818-41 using high-sensitivity Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations. We find simultaneous occurrences of three drift regions with two different drift rates: an inner region with steeper apparent drift rate flanked on each side by a region of slower apparent drift rate. Furthermore, these closely spaced drift bands always maintain a constant phase relationship. Though these drift regions have significantly different values for the measured P2, the measured P3 value is the same and equal to 18.3P1. We interpret the unique drift pattern of this pulsar as being created by the intersection of our line of sight (LOS) with two conal rings on the polar cap of a fairly aligned rotator (inclination angle α ~ 11°), with an `inner' LOS geometry (impact angle ). We argue that both rings have the same values for the carousel rotation periodicity P4 and the number of sparks Nsp. We find that Nsp is 19-21 and show that it is very likely that P4 is the same as the measured P3, making it a truly unique pulsar. We present results from simulations of the radiation pattern using the inferred parameters, which support our interpretations and reproduce the average profile as well as the observed features in the drift pattern quite well.

  12. In-Situ Synchrotron X-ray Study of the Phase and Texture Evolution of Ceria and Superconductor Films Deposited by Chemical Solution Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Zhao; Grivel, Jean-Claude; He, Dong

    2012-01-01

    In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction is used to study the phase and texture formation of ceria based films and superconductor films deposited by the chemical solution method on technical substrates. Combined analysis using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry/differential ther......In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction is used to study the phase and texture formation of ceria based films and superconductor films deposited by the chemical solution method on technical substrates. Combined analysis using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry...

  13. Drift Chambers Simulations in BM@N Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorišin Ján

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drift chambers constitute an important part of the tracking system of the BM@N experiment designed to study the production of baryonic matter at the Nuclotron energies. GEANT programming package is employed to investigate the drift chamber response to particles produced in relativistic nuclear collisions of C+C nuclei, which are simulated by the UrQMD and LAQGSM Monte Carlo generators. These simulations are combined with the first BM@N experimental data to estimate particle track coordinates and their errors.

  14. Point vortex description of drift wave vortices: Dynamics and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, M.; Horton, W.

    1991-05-01

    Point-vortex description for drift wave vortices is formulated based on the Hasegawa-Mima equation to study elementary processes for the interactions of vortices as well as statistical properties like vortex diffusion. Dynamical properties of drift wave vortices known by numerical experiments are recovered. Furthermore a vortex diffusion model discussed by Horton based on numerical simulations is shown to be analytically obtained. A variety of phenomena arising from the short-range nature of the interaction force of point vortices are suggested. 12 refs., 10 figs

  15. A Simple Stochastic Differential Equation with Discontinuous Drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Maria; Leth, John-Josef; Schiøler, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study solutions to stochastic differential equations (SDEs) with discontinuous drift. We apply two approaches: The Euler-Maruyama method and the Fokker-Planck equation and show that a candidate density function based on the Euler-Maruyama method approximates a candidate density...... function based on the stationary Fokker-Planck equation. Furthermore, we introduce a smooth function which approximates the discontinuous drift and apply the Euler-Maruyama method and the Fokker-Planck equation with this input. The point of departure for this work is a particular SDE with discontinuous...

  16. Ionospheric drift measurements on an array of six aerials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, V; Rai, R K

    1976-03-01

    Fading records were obtained using an array of six receiving aerials. A full correlation method of analysis was applied to estimate the drift and anisotropy parameters of the diffraction pattern. A study of simultaneous observations by triangles of different sizes and orientations leads to the conclusion that on an average, the larger triangle gives slightly higher values for the true drift speed and pattern size and slightly lower value for the random velocity. Also the major axis of the correlation ellipse exhibits a tendency for alignment along the largest side of the triangle.

  17. Amplifying the helicopter drift in a conformal HMD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerwitz, Sven; Knabl, Patrizia M.; Lueken, Thomas; Doehler, Hans-Ullrich

    2016-05-01

    Helicopter operations require a well-controlled and minimal lateral drift shortly before ground contact. Any lateral speed exceeding this small threshold can cause a dangerous momentum around the roll axis, which may cause a total roll over of the helicopter. As long as pilots can observe visual cues from the ground, they are able to easily control the helicopter drift. But whenever natural vision is reduced or even obscured, e.g. due to night, fog, or dust, this controllability diminishes. Therefore helicopter operators could benefit from some type of "drift indication" that mitigates the influence of a degraded visual environment. Generally humans derive ego motion by the perceived environmental object flow. The visual cues perceived are located close to the helicopter, therefore even small movements can be recognized. This fact was used to investigate a modified drift indication. To enhance the perception of ego motion in a conformal HMD symbol set the measured movement was used to generate a pattern motion in the forward field of view close or on the landing pad. The paper will discuss the method of amplified ego motion drift indication. Aspects concerning impact factors like visualization type, location, gain and more will be addressed. Further conclusions from previous studies, a high fidelity experiment and a part task experiment, will be provided. A part task study will be presented that compared different amplified drift indications against a predictor. 24 participants, 15 holding a fixed wing license and 4 helicopter pilots, had to perform a dual task on a virtual reality headset. A simplified control model was used to steer a "helicopter" down to a landing pad while acknowledging randomly placed characters.

  18. Field study of nitrous oxide production with in situ aeration in a closed landfill site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Mitali; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Komiya, Teppei; Xiaoli, Chai

    2016-03-01

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) has gained considerable attention as a contributor to global warming and depilation of stratospheric ozone layer. Landfill is one of the high emitters of greenhouse gas such as methane and N(2)O during the biodegradation of solid waste. Landfill aeration has been attracted increasing attention worldwide for fast, controlled and sustainable conversion of landfills into a biological stabilized condition, however landfill aeration impel N(2)O emission with ammonia removal. N(2)O originates from the biodegradation, or the combustion of nitrogen-containing solid waste during the microbial process of nitrification and denitrification. During these two processes, formation of N(2)O as a by-product from nitrification, or as an intermediate product of denitrification. In this study, air was injected into a closed landfill site and investigated the major N(2)O production factors and correlations established between them. The in-situ aeration experiment was carried out by three sets of gas collection pipes along with temperature probes were installed at three different distances of one, two and three meter away from the aeration point; named points A-C, respectively. Each set of pipes consisted of three different pipes at three different depths of 0.0, 0.75 and 1.5 m from the bottom of the cover soil. Landfill gases composition was monitored weekly and gas samples were collected for analysis of nitrous oxide concentrations. It was evaluated that temperatures within the range of 30-40°C with high oxygen content led to higher generation of nitrous oxide with high aeration rate. Lower O(2) content can infuse N(2)O production during nitrification and high O(2) inhibit denitrification which would affect N(2)O production. The findings provide insights concerning the production potentials of N(2)O in an aerated landfill that may help to minimize with appropriate control of the operational parameters and biological reactions of N turnover. Investigation of

  19. Photosynthetic activity, photoprotection and photoinhibition in intertidal microphytobenthos as studied in situ using variable chlorophyll fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serôdio, João; Vieira, Sónia; Cruz, Sónia

    2008-06-01

    The photosynthetic activity of microphytobenthos biofilms was studied in situ on an intertidal mudflat of the Ria de Aveiro, Portugal. Time series of physical variables characterizing the microenvironment at the sediment photic zone (incident solar irradiance, temperature, salinity), photophysiological parameters and productive biomass of undisturbed microalgal assemblages were measured during daytime low-tide periods along one spring-neap tidal cycle, with the objective of (1) characterizing the short-term variability in photosynthetic activity in situ, (2) relating it with the changing environmental conditions and (3) with the operation of physiologically (xanthophyll cycle) and behaviorally (vertical migration) based photoprotective processes, and (4) assessing the occurrence of photoinhibition. Pulse Amplitude Modulated (PAM) fluorometry was applied to measure photosynthetic activity (the effective and maximum quantum yield of photosystem II, Δ F/ Fm' and Fv/ Fm; the photosynthesis index EFY; rapid light-response curves (RLC)), the photoprotective operation of the xanthophyll cycle and photoinhibition (non-photochemical quenching, NPQ; quantum efficiency of open RCs, Fv'/ Fm'), and vertical migration (productive biomass, Fo). The photosynthetic activity was found to be strongly affected by the cumulative light dose received during the morning low-tide periods. The fluorescence indices Δ F/ Fm', EFY, Fv'/ Fm' and RLC parameters were more depressed under high irradiances when clear sky was present during the morning low tide than when foggy conditions reduced the light dose received during a comparable period. Productive biomass exhibited maximum values in the first hours of the morning, followed by a steep decrease when irradiance reached moderate levels, due to the downward migration of the microalgae. This photophobic migratory response appeared to display a photoprotective role, allowing Δ F/ Fm' to remain near optimum values until irradiance reached

  20. Nuclear Waste Package Mockups: A Study of In-situ Redox State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helean, K.; Anderson, B.; Brady, P. V.

    2006-05-01

    The Yucca Mountain Repository (YMR), located in southern Nevada, is to be the first facility in the U.S. for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuels. Total system performance assessment(TSPA) has indicated that among the major radionuclides contributing to dose are Np, Tc, and I. These three radionuclides are mobile in most geochemical settings, and therefore sequestering them within the repository horizon is a priority for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Corroding steel may offset radionuclide transport processes within the proposed waste packages at YMR by retaining radionuclides, creating locally reducing conditions, and reducing porosity. Ferrous iron has been shown to reduce UO22+ to UO2s, and some ferrous iron-bearing ion-exchange materials have been shown to adsorb radionuclides and heavy metals. Locally reducing conditions may lead to the reduction and subsequent immobilization of problematic dissolved species such as TcO4-, NpO2+, and UO22+ and can also inhibit corrosion of spent nuclear fuel. Water occluded during corrosion produces bulky corrosion products, and consequently less porosity is available for water and radionuclide transport. The focus of this study is on the nature of Yucca Mountain waste package corrosion products and their effects on local redox conditions, radionuclide transport, and porosity. In order to measure in-situ redox, six small-scale (1:40) waste package mockups were constructed using A516 and 316 stainless steel, the same materials as the proposed Yucca Mountain waste packages. The mockups are periodically injected with a simulated groundwater and the accumulated effluent and corrosion products are evaluated for their Fe(II)/Fe(III) content and mineralogy. Oxygen fugacities are then calculated and, thus, in-situ redox conditions are determined. Early results indicate that corrosion products are largely amorphous Fe-oxyhydroxides, goethite and magnetite. That information together with the