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Sample records for situ biostimulation reducing

  1. Biostimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-03-01

    Biostimulation is one of the most mature methods of bioremediation of hydrocarbons, yet recent advances in geophysics, stable isotope analyses, and molecular microbiology promise dramatic increases in the depth, breadth, and throughput of biostimulation strategies. Using a systems biology approach we can now understand not only what microbes are present, but their in situ activities to trace nutrients, electron donors, electron acceptors, contaminants, and environmental stressors. Using this knowledge in combination with critical biogeochemistry, hydrology, geology, and toxicology will be enabling to develop conceptual and numerical models for the best biostimulation strategy and better long-term stewardship of the environment.

  2. Biostimulation proved to be the most efficient method in the comparison of in situ soil remediation treatments after a simulated oil spill accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpanen, Suvi; Dahl, Mari; Gerlach, Magdalena; Mikkonen, Anu; Malk, Vuokko; Mikola, Juha; Romantschuk, Martin

    2016-12-01

    The use of in situ techniques in soil remediation is still rare in Finland and most other European countries due to the uncertainty of the effectiveness of the techniques especially in cold regions and also due to their potential side effects on the environment. In this study, we compared the biostimulation, chemical oxidation, and natural attenuation treatments in natural conditions and pilot scale during a 16-month experiment. A real fuel spill accident was used as a model for experiment setup and soil contamination. We found that biostimulation significantly decreased the contaminant leachate into the water, including also the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL). The total NAPL leachate was 19 % lower in the biostimulation treatment that in the untreated soil and 34 % lower in the biostimulation than oxidation treatment. Soil bacterial growth and community changes were first observed due to the increased carbon content via oil amendment and later due to the enhanced nutrient content via biostimulation. Overall, the most effective treatment for fresh contaminated soil was biostimulation, which enhanced the biodegradation of easily available oil in the mobile phase and consequently reduced contaminant leakage through the soil. The chemical oxidation did not enhance soil cleanup and resulted in the mobilization of contaminants. Our results suggest that biostimulation can decrease or even prevent oil migration in recently contaminated areas and can thus be considered as a potentially safe in situ treatment also in groundwater areas.

  3. Natural biostimulants reduce the incidence of BER in sweet yellow pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Parađiković

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern greenhouse pepper production should evolve towards more sustainable systems. The growing technique which combines soilless culture and biostimulants may reduce nutrient and water use with beneficial impact on the environment. Therefore, this work aimed to investigate effects of biostimulants application on hydroponically produced pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L. in conditions of reduced fertilization. Positive influence of biostimulant treatment on yield parameters was observed along with significant decrease in incidence of blossom-end rot (BER in two pepper cultivars. Biostimulants application resulted in overall increase in macro- and microelement content in fruits of treated pepper cultivars. Generally, biostimulants improved the yield of pepper plants grown hydroponically by increasing the nutrient uptake and decreasing the occurrence of BER. Thus, the application of biostimulants could be considered as a good production strategy for obtaining high yields of nutritionally valuable vegetables with lower impact on the environment.

  4. Microbially Mediated Immobilization of Contaminants Through In Situ Biostimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott Fendorf

    2003-01-01

    In most natural environments, a multitude of metabolic substrates are resent simultaneously. Organisms that can utilize uranium as a metabolic substrate for respiration also may have the ability to use a variety of other oxidized substrates as electron acceptors. Thus, these substrates are, in effect, competing for electrons that are being passed through the electron transport chain during respiration. To assess the feasibility of in situ immobilization of uranium in subsurface environments and to understand the cycling of uranium, it is necessary to discern the chemical and/or biological conditions dictating which terminal electron acceptor(s) will be utilized

  5. Microbially Mediated Immobilization of Contaminants Through In Situ Biostimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Fendorf

    2003-07-31

    In most natural environments, a multitude of metabolic substrates are resent simultaneously. Organisms that can utilize uranium as a metabolic substrate for respiration also may have the ability to use a variety of other oxidized substrates as electron acceptors. Thus, these substrates are, in effect, competing for electrons that are being passed through the electron transport chain during respiration. To assess the feasibility of in situ immobilization of uranium in subsurface environments and to understand the cycling of uranium, it is necessary to discern the chemical and/or biological conditions dictating which terminal electron acceptor(s) will be utilized.

  6. Effect of bioaugmentation and biostimulation on sulfate-reducing column startup captured by functional gene profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Luciana P; Hiibel, Sage R; Perrault, Elizabeth M; Reardon, Kenneth F; Pruden, Amy

    2012-10-01

    Sulfate-reducing permeable reactive zones (SR-PRZs) depend upon a complex microbial community to utilize a lignocellulosic substrate and produce sulfides, which remediate mine drainage by binding heavy metals. To gain insight into the impact of the microbial community composition on the startup time and pseudo-steady-state performance, functional genes corresponding to cellulose-degrading (CD), fermentative, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic microorganisms were characterized in columns simulating SR-PRZs using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Duplicate columns were bioaugmented with sulfate-reducing or CD bacteria or biostimulated with ethanol or carboxymethyl cellulose and compared with baseline dairy manure inoculum and uninoculated controls. Sulfate removal began after ~ 15 days for all columns and pseudo-steady state was achieved by Day 30. Despite similar performance, DGGE profiles of 16S rRNA gene and functional genes at pseudo-steady state were distinct among the column treatments, suggesting the potential to control ultimate microbial community composition via bioaugmentation and biostimulation. qPCR revealed enrichment of functional genes in all columns between the initial and pseudo-steady-state time points. This is the first functional gene-based study of CD, fermentative and sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea in a lignocellulose-based environment and provides new qualitative and quantitative insight into startup of a complex microbial system. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatability Test Plan for an In Situ Biostimulation Reducing Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Long, Philip E.; Brockman, Fred J.; Oostrom, Mart; Hubbard, Susan; Borden, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2007-07-21

    This treatability test plan supports a new, integrated strategy to accelerate cleanup of chromium in the Hanford 100 Areas. This plan includes performing a field-scale treatability test for bioreduction of chromate, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen. In addition to remediating a portion of the plume and demonstrating reduction of electron acceptors in the plume, the data from this test will be valuable for designing a full-scale bioremediation system to apply at this and other chromium plumes at Hanford.

  8. Treatability Test Plan for an In Situ Biostimulation Reducing Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Long, Philip E.; Brockman, Fred J.; Oostrom, Mart; Hubbard, Susan; Borden, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2007-10-26

    This treatability test plan supports a new, integrated strategy to accelerate cleanup of chromium in the 100 Areas at the Hanford Site. This plan includes performing a field-scale treatability test for bioreduction of chromate, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen. In addition to remediating a portion of the plume and demonstrating reduction of electron acceptors in the plume, the data from this test will be valuable for designing a full-scale bioremediation system to apply at this and other chromium plumes at the Hanford Site.

  9. STRAWBERRY (FRAGARIA X ANANASSA DUCH LEAF ANTIOXIDATIVE RESPONSE TO BIOSTIMULATORS AND REDUCED FERTILIZATION WITH N AND K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Špoljarević

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Strawberry cultivar Elsanta was grown in peat based substrate in a green house. Full dose and 50% reduced nitrogen and potassium fertilization were applied during fruit bearing period in spring, along with biostimulators Viva®, Megafol® and their combination. The specific activities of guaiacol peroxidase (GPXs; EC 1.11.1.7, catalase (CATs; EC 1.11.1.6, ascorbate peroxidase (APXs; EC 1.11.1.11 and glutathione reductase (GRs; EC 1.6.4.2 in strawberry leaf were stimulated by biostimulators and reduced fertilization. The strongest link seen here was between the enzymes of ascorbate-glutathione cycle (APXs and GRs, which were positively related to trifoliate leaf fresh mass (TLFM. The highest TLFM was observed in Megafol® treated plants.

  10. Functional genes reveal the intrinsic PAH biodegradation potential in creosote-contaminated groundwater following in situ biostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyyssönen, Mari; Kapanen, Anu; Piskonen, Reetta; Lukkari, Tuomas; Itävaara, Merja

    2009-08-01

    A small-scale functional gene array containing 15 functional gene probes targeting aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation pathways was used to investigate the effect of a pilot-scale air sparging and nutrient infiltration treatment on hydrocarbon biodegradation in creosote-contaminated groundwater. Genes involved in the different phases of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) biodegradation were detected with the functional gene array in the contaminant plume, thus indicating the presence of intrinsic biodegradation potential. However, the low aerobic fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 16S rRNA genes closely similar to sulphate-reducing and denitrifying bacteria and the negligible decrease in contaminant concentrations showed that aerobic PAH biodegradation was limited in the anoxic groundwater. Increased abundance of PAH biodegradation genes was detected by functional gene array in the monitoring well located at the rear end of the biostimulated area, which indicated that air sparging and nutrient infiltration enhanced the intrinsic, aerobic PAH biodegradation. Furthermore, ten times higher naphthalene dioxygenase gene copy numbers were detected by real-time PCR in the biostimulated area, which was in good agreement with the functional gene array data. As a result, functional gene array analysis was demonstrated to provide a potential tool for evaluating the efficiency of the bioremediation treatment for enhancing hydrocarbon biodegradation in field-scale applications.

  11. In situ biosurfactant production and hydrocarbon removal by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 in bioaugmented and biostimulated oil-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángeles, Martínez-Toledo; Refugio, Rodríguez-Vázquez

    2013-01-01

    In situ biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) production by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 was achieved during a bioaugmented and biostimulated treatment to remove hydrocarbons from aged contaminated soil from oil well drilling operations. Rhamnolipid production and contaminant removal were determined for several treatments of irradiated and non-irradiated soils: nutrient addition (nitrogen and phosphorus), P. putida addition, and addition of both (P. putida and nutrients). The results were compared against a control treatment that consisted of adding only sterilized water to the soils. In treatment with native microorganisms (non-irradiated soils) supplemented with P. putida, the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was 40.6%, the rhamnolipid production was 1.54 mg/kg, and a surface tension of 64 mN/m was observed as well as a negative correlation (R = -0.54; p soil treated with P. putida, TPH removal was 24.5% with rhamnolipid generation of 1.79 mg/kg and 65.6 mN/m of surface tension, and a correlation between bacterial growth and biosurfactant production (R = -0.64; p soils, in situ rhamnolipid production by P. putida enhanced TPH decontamination of the soil.

  12. In situ biosurfactant production and hydrocarbon removal by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 in bioaugmented and biostimulated oil-contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Toledo Ángeles

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ biosurfactant (rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 was achieved during a bioaugmented and biostimulated treatment to remove hydrocarbons from aged contaminated soil from oil well drilling operations. Rhamnolipid production and contaminant removal were determined for several treatments of irradiated and non-irradiated soils: nutrient addition (nitrogen and phosphorus, P. putida addition, and addition of both (P. putida and nutrients. The results were compared against a control treatment that consisted of adding only sterilized water to the soils. In treatment with native microorganisms (non-irradiated soils supplemented with P. putida, the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH was 40.6%, the rhamnolipid production was 1.54 mg/kg, and a surface tension of 64 mN/m was observed as well as a negative correlation (R = -0.54; p < 0.019 between TPH concentration (mg/kg and surface tension (mN/m, When both bacteria and nutrients were involved, TPH levels were lowered to 33.7%, and biosurfactant production and surface tension were 2.03 mg/kg and 67.3 mN/m, respectively. In irradiated soil treated with P. putida, TPH removal was 24.5% with rhamnolipid generation of 1.79 mg/kg and 65.6 mN/m of surface tension, and a correlation between bacterial growth and biosurfactant production (R = -0.64; p < 0.009 was observed. When the nutrients and P. putida were added, TPH removal was 61.1%, 1.85 mg/kg of biosurfactants were produced, and the surface tension was 55.6 mN/m. In summary, in irradiated and non-irradiated soils, in situ rhamnolipid production by P. putida enhanced TPH decontamination of the soil.

  13. Project Work Plan: Hanford 100-D Area Treatability Demonstration - In Situ Biostimulation for Reducing Barrier

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    Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Long, Philip E.

    2006-05-31

    This work plan supports a new, integrated approach to accelerate cleanup of chromium in the Hanford 100 Areas. This new approach will provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the ISRM barrier by directly treating chromium and other oxidizing species in groundwater (i.e., nitrate and dissolved oxygen), thereby increasing the longevity of the ISRM barrier and protecting the ecological receptors and human health at the river boundary.

  14. Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization: Microbial and Mineralogical Controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joel E. Kostka; Lainie Petrie; Nadia North; David L. Balkwill; Joseph W. Stucki; Lee Kerkhof

    2004-01-01

    The overall objective of our project is to understand the microbial and geochemical mechanisms controlling the reduction and immobilization of U(VI) during biostimulation in subsurface sediments of the Field Research Center (FRC) which are cocontaminated with uranium and nitrate. The focus will be on activity of microbial populations (metal- and nitrate-reducing bacteria) and iron minerals which are likely to make strong contributions to the fate of uranium during in situ bioremediation. The project will: (1) quantify the relationships between active members of the microbial communities, iron mineralogy, and nitrogen transformations in the field and in laboratory incubations under a variety of biostimulation conditions, (2) purify and physiologically characterize new model metal-reducing bacteria isolated from moderately acidophilic FRC subsurface sediments, and (3) elucidate the biotic and abiotic mechanisms by which FRC aluminosilicate clay minerals are reduced and dissolved under environmental conditions resembling those during biostimulation. Active microbial communities will be assessed using quantitative molecular techniques along with geochemical measurements to determine the different terminal-electron-accepting pathways. Iron minerals will be characterized using a suite of physical, spectroscopic, and wet chemical methods. Monitoring the activity and composition of the denitrifier community in parallel with denitrification intermediates during nitrate removal will provide a better understanding of the indirect effects of nitrate reduction on uranium speciation. Through quantification of the activity of specific microbial populations and an in-depth characterization of Fe minerals likely to catalyze U sorption/precipitation, we will provide important inputs for reaction-based biogeochemical models which will provide the basis for development of in situ U bioremediation strategies. In collaboration with Jack Istok and Lee Krumholz, we have begun to study the

  15. Hanford 100-D Area Biostimulation Treatability Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Elmore, Rebecca P.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Sklarew, Deborah S.; Johnson, Christian D.; Oostrom, Martinus; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Peterson, John E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Gasperikova, E.; Ajo-Franklin, J.

    2009-09-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a treatability test designed to demonstrate that in situ biostimulation can be applied to help meet cleanup goals in the Hanford Site 100-D Area. In situ biostimulation has been extensively researched and applied for aquifer remediation over the last 20 years for various contaminants. In situ biostimulation, in the context of this project, is the process of amending an aquifer with a substrate that induces growth and/or activity of indigenous bacteria for the purpose of inducing a desired reaction. For application at the 100-D Area, the purpose of biostimulation is to induce reduction of chromate, nitrate, and oxygen to remove these compounds from the groundwater. The in situ biostimulation technology is intended to provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier previously installed in the Hanford 100-D Area and thereby increase the longevity of the ISRM barrier. Substrates for the treatability test were selected to provide information about two general approaches for establishing and maintaining an in situ permeable reactive barrier based on biological reactions, i.e., a biobarrier. These approaches included 1) use of a soluble (miscible) substrate that is relatively easy to distribute over a large areal extent, is inexpensive, and is expected to have moderate longevity; and 2) use of an immiscible substrate that can be distributed over a reasonable areal extent at a moderate cost and is expected to have increased longevity.

  16. Laser biostimulation in pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utz, Irina A.; Lagutina, L. E.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    1995-01-01

    In the present paper the method and apparatus for percutaneous laser irradiation of blood (PLIB) in vessels (veins) are described. Results of clinical investigations of biostimulating effects under PLIB by red laser light (633 nm) in Cubiti and Saphena Magna veins are presented.

  17. In Situ Microbial Community Control of the Stability of Bio-reduced Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, Brett R.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Resch, Charles T.; Arntzen, Evan; Smithgall, Amanda N.; Pfiffner, Susan; Gan, M.; McKinley, James P.; Long, Philip E.; White, David C.

    2008-01-01

    In aerobic aquifers typical of many Department of Energy (DOE) legacy waste sites, uranium is present in the oxidized U(VI) form which is more soluble and thus more mobile. Field experiments at the Old Rifle UMTRA site have demonstrated that biostimulation by electron donor addition (acetate) promotes biological U(VI) reduction (2). However, U(VI) reduction is reversible and oxidative dissolution of precipitated U(IV) after the cessation of electron donor addition remains a critical issue for the application of biostimulation as a treatment technology. Despite the potential for oxidative dissolution, field experiments at the Old Rifle site have shown that rapid reoxidation of bio-reduced uranium does not occur and U(VI) concentrations can remain at approximately 20% of background levels for more than one year. The extent of post-amendment U(VI) removal and the maintenance of bioreduced uranium may result from many factors including U(VI) sorption to iron-containing mineral phases, generation of H2S or FeS0.9, or the preferential sorption of U(VI) by microbial cells or biopolymers, but the processes controlling the reduction and in situ reoxidation rates are not known. To investigate the role of microbial community composition in the maintenance of bioreduced uranium, in-well sediment incubators (ISIs) were developed allowing field deployment of amended and native sediments during on-going experiments at the site. Field deployment of the ISIs allows expedient interrogation of microbial community response to field environmental perturbations and varying geochemical conditions.

  18. In Situ Microbial Community Control of the Stability of Bio-reduced Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, Brett, R.; Peacock, Aaron, D.; Resch, Charles, T.; Arntzen, Evan; Smithgall, Amanda, N.; Pfiffner, Susan; Gan, M.; McKinley, James, P.; Long, Philip, E.; White, David, C.

    2008-03-28

    In aerobic aquifers typical of many Department of Energy (DOE) legacy waste sites, uranium is present in the oxidized U(VI) form which is more soluble and thus more mobile. Field experiments at the Old Rifle UMTRA site have demonstrated that biostimulation by electron donor addition (acetate) promotes biological U(VI) reduction (2). However, U(VI) reduction is reversible and oxidative dissolution of precipitated U(IV) after the cessation of electron donor addition remains a critical issue for the application of biostimulation as a treatment technology. Despite the potential for oxidative dissolution, field experiments at the Old Rifle site have shown that rapid reoxidation of bio-reduced uranium does not occur and U(VI) concentrations can remain at approximately 20% of background levels for more than one year. The extent of post-amendment U(VI) removal and the maintenance of bioreduced uranium may result from many factors including U(VI) sorption to iron-containing mineral phases, generation of H2S or FeS0.9, or the preferential sorption of U(VI) by microbial cells or biopolymers, but the processes controlling the reduction and in situ reoxidation rates are not known. To investigate the role of microbial community composition in the maintenance of bioreduced uranium, in-well sediment incubators (ISIs) were developed allowing field deployment of amended and native sediments during on-going experiments at the site. Field deployment of the ISIs allows expedient interrogation of microbial community response to field environmental perturbations and varying geochemical conditions.

  19. Biostimulation and rainfall infiltration: influence on retention of biodiesel in residual clayey soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomé, Antônio; Cecchin, Iziquiel; Reginatto, Cleomar; Colla, Luciane M; Reddy, Krishna R

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates the retention of biodiesel in residual clayey soil during biostimulation by nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium) under conditions of rainfall infiltration. Several column tests were conducted in a laboratory under different void ratios (1.14, 1.24, and 1.34), varying moisture contents (15, 25, and 35%), and in both the presence and absence of biostimulation. The volume of biodiesel (which was equivalent to the volume of voids in the soil) was placed atop the soil and allowed to percolate for a period of 15 days. The soil was subjected to different rainfall infiltration conditions (0.30 or 60 mm). The greatest reductions in residual contaminants occurred after 60 mm of rain simulation, at values of up to 74% less than in samples with the same conditions but no precipitation. However, the residual contamination decay rate was greater with 0-30 mm (0.29 g/mm) of precipitation than with 30-60 mm (0.075 g/mm). Statistical assessment revealed that increased moisture and the presence of nutrients were the factors with the most powerful effect on contaminant retention in the soil. The residual contaminant level was 21 g/kg at a moisture content of 15% and no precipitation, decreasing to 12 g/kg at 35% moisture and no precipitation. Accordingly, it is possible to conclude that biostimulation and rainfall infiltration conditions can decrease the retention of contaminants in soil and allow a greater leaching or spreading of the contamination. All of these phenomena are worthy of careful examination for the in situ bioremediation of organic contamination. • The higher moisture in the soil, due to a high initial moisture content and/or infiltration of rainfall, can reduce contaminant retention, • The use of biostimulation through the addition of nutrients to accelerate the biodegradation of toxic organic contaminants may induce inadvertent undesirable interactions between the soil and the contaminant. • When adopting

  20. Laser biostimulation of Bombyx mori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achilov, M.F.; Trunilina, O.V.

    2001-01-01

    Influence of low-intensity visible laser radiation on technological parameters of Bombyx mori cocoons and silk thread has been established. Increasing the average cocoons mass, part of cocoons silk cover, technological length and tensile strength of silk thread on 5-35% was achieved by laser biostimulation of Bombyx mori eggs of ninth postdiapause day. With tensile strength growth simultaneously the diameter of silk thread decreases and silk thread structure becomes more longitudinal, what is tested by X-ray crystal analysis. Laser biostimulation technology and device for lighting the silkworm eggs were patented in Uzbekistan. Results were interpreted by using the bioenergetic, bioinformation and water basis mechanisms. (author)

  1. Biostimulants and Its Potential Utilization in Functional Water-soluble Fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Qiang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Biostimulants are becoming widely applied and extended in the fertilizer industry, because of their effects on soil improvement, anti-stress ability enhancement and root growth promotion, which can increase efficient uptake and utilization of soil nutrients, crop yield and quality.This review introduced the concepts of biostimulants, and summarized the functions and related mechanisms of commonly-applied biostimulants in the market, i.e.humic acid, amino acid, seaweed extracts and plant-growth-promoting bacteria(PGPR. The properties and applied characteristics of different organic wastes containing some biostimulating compounds as the main material of functional water soluble fertilizers (WSFin the industry were presented. The technical keys to compound these organic wastes with some bio-active substances to produce the functional WSF were explored, with the aims to support the value -added utilization of organic wastes, reduce the use of fertilizers, and promote crops忆 quality and quantity.

  2. Effect of biostimulant sprays on Phaeomoniella chlamydospora and esca proper infected vines under greenhouse and fi eld conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Di Marco

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Biostimulants are compounds that infl uence physiological processes in plants, producing better growth and enhancing stress tolerance. The effect of some biostimulants on vines was investigated over a number of years to assess their effect both on the incidence of esca leaf symptoms in the vineyard and on the growth of Phaeomoniella chlamydospora artifi cially inoculated into potted vines. Field trials were carried out for 4–7 years in fi ve 15-20-yearold vineyards infected with esca proper. Potted plants were sprayed with biostimulants, after which the vine trunks were inoculated with P. chlamydospora, and then the vines were sprayed again with biostimulants in the following 2 or 3 growing seasons. On the whole, biostimulants in the fi eld did not reduce foliar symptoms. The percentage of symptomatic vines that had shown symptoms in previous years was higher in the biostimulant-sprayed plots. In the greenhouse, a certain reduction of internal necrosis caused by P. chlamydospora was seen with three of the four biostimulants tested. Prospects for biostimulants as a means control esca are discussed.

  3. Proposal of biostimulation for hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-decontamination and characterization of culturable bacterial community from high-dose point HCH-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadhwal, M; Singh, A; Prakash, O; Gupta, S K; Kumari, K; Sharma, P; Jit, S; Verma, M; Holliger, C; Lal, R

    2009-02-01

    To locate a high-dose point hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-contaminated site, to identify HCH-degrading bacteria in it and assay HCH-decontamination by biostimulation. Bacteria were isolated by serial dilution method from HCH-contaminated soil samples collected from areas near an HCH-manufacturing unit and its dumpsite in North India. After confirming the presence of indigenous HCH-degraders (seven of 24 strains), an ex situ biostimulation experiment was conducted. For this, residue levels in soil were diluted by mixing with pristine garden soil and aeration, moisture and nutrients were provided intermittently. This soil was monitored for reduction in Sigma-HCH (sum of alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-HCH) levels and stimulation of HCH-degraders. Experiments were conducted twice, in March-April (c. 75 microg Sigma-HCH g(-1) soil) and October-November 2006 (c. 280 microg Sigma-HCH g(-1) soil) at 26-30 degrees C. Sigma-HCH levels were reduced to decontamination via aeration, addition of nutrients and moisture, of the indigenous population. The study demonstrates that biostimulation of indigenous HCH-degrading microbial population can be used for decontamination of chronically HCH-contaminated sites.

  4. THE IMPACT OF BIOSTIMULATION ON THE FATE OF SULFATE AND ASSOCIATED SULFUR DYNAMICS IN GROUNDWATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Ziheng; Carreón-Diazconti, Concepcion; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of electron-donor addition on sulfur dynamics for a groundwater system with low levels of metal contaminants was evaluated with a pilot-scale biostimulation test conducted at a former uranium mining site. Geochemical and stable-isotope data collected before, during, and after the test were analyzed to evaluate the sustainability of sulfate reducing conditions induced by the test, the fate of hydrogen sulfide, and the impact on aqueous geochemical conditions. The results of site characterization activities conducted prior to the test indicated the absence of measurable bacterial sulfate reduction. The injection of an electron donor (ethanol) induced bacterial sulfate reduction, as confirmed by an exponential decrease of sulfate concentration in concert with changes in oxidation-reduction potential, redox species, alkalinity, production of hydrogen sulfide, and fractionation of δ34S-sulfate. High, stoichiometrically-equivalent hydrogen sulfide concentrations were not observed until several months after the start of the test. It is hypothesized that hydrogen sulfide produced from sulfate reduction was initially sequestered in the form of iron sulfides until the exhaustion of readily reducible iron oxides associated with the sediment. The fractionation of δ34S for sulfate was atypical, wherein the enrichment declined in the latter half of the experiment. It was conjectured that mixing effects associated with the release of sulfate from sulfate minerals associated with the sediments, along with possible sulfide re-oxidation contributed to this behavior. The results of this study illustrate the biogeochemical complexity that is associated with in-situ biostimulation processes involving bacterial sulfate reduction. PMID:25016586

  5. The impact of biostimulation on the fate of sulfate and associated sulfur dynamics in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Ziheng; Carreón-Diazconti, Concepcion; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2014-08-01

    The impact of electron-donor addition on sulfur dynamics for a groundwater system with low levels of metal contaminants was evaluated with a pilot-scale biostimulation test conducted at a former uranium mining site. Geochemical and stable-isotope data collected before, during, and after the test were analyzed to evaluate the sustainability of sulfate reducing conditions induced by the test, the fate of hydrogen sulfide, and the impact on aqueous geochemical conditions. The results of site characterization activities conducted prior to the test indicated the absence of measurable bacterial sulfate reduction. The injection of an electron donor (ethanol) induced bacterial sulfate reduction, as confirmed by an exponential decrease of sulfate concentration in concert with changes in oxidation-reduction potential, redox species, alkalinity, production of hydrogen sulfide, and fractionation of δ34S-sulfate. High, stoichiometrically-equivalent hydrogen sulfide concentrations were not observed until several months after the start of the test. It is hypothesized that hydrogen sulfide produced from sulfate reduction was initially sequestered in the form of iron sulfides until the exhaustion of readily reducible iron oxides within the sediment. The fractionation of δ34S for sulfate was atypical, wherein the enrichment declined in the latter half of the experiment. It was conjectured that mixing effects associated with the release of sulfate from sulfate minerals associated with the sediments, along with possible sulfide re-oxidation contributed to this behavior. The results of this study illustrate the biogeochemical complexity that is associated with in-situ biostimulation processes involving bacterial sulfate reduction.

  6. In situ Microbial Community Control of the Stability of Bio-Reduced Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Phillip E.; McKinley, James P.; White, David C.

    2006-01-01

    In aerobic aquifers typical of many Department of Energy (DOE) legacy waste sites, uranium is present in the oxidized U(VI) form which is soluble and thus mobile compared to U(IV). Previous work at the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site demonstrated that biostimulation by acetate injection promoted growth of Geobacteraceae and stimulated the microbial reduction of U(VI) to less soluble U(IV) (1, 4). Despite the potential for oxidative dissolution of bio-reduced U(IV), field experiments at the Old Rifle site show that although the rate of U(VI) reduction decreases following the on-set of sulfate reduction, U(VI) reduction continues even following the cessation of acetate injection (1, 4). However, U(VI) reduction is reversible and the basis for the observed maintenance of U(VI) reduction post-stimulation is a critical but as yet unresolved issue for the application of biostimulation as a treatment technology. The continued U(VI) reduction and the maintenance of reduced U(IV) may result from many factors including U(VI) reduction by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), generation of H2S or FeS0.9 which serves as an oxygen sink, or the preferential sorption of U(VI) by microbial cells or biopolymers. The overall goal of the project is to develop an understanding of the mechanisms for the maintenance of bio-reduced uranium in an aerobic aquifer under field conditions following the cessation of electron donor addition

  7. Impacts of biostimulant products on the growth of wheat and the microbial communities of its rhizosphere under contrasted production systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Minh; Bodson, Bernard; Colinet, Gilles; Jijakli, Haissam; Ongena, Marc; Vandenbol, Micheline; du Jardin, Patrick; Spaepen, Stijn; Delaplace, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are one of the major biostimulant classes due to their ability to stimulate root growth, enhance mineral availability, and nutrient use efficiency in crops. PGPR-containing biostimulant products could therefore make agriculture more sustainable by reducing demand for chemical fertilizer and lessen their negative environmental impacts. The aim of this project is to screen PGPR strains to (1) enhance wheat fitness level (growth, photosynthesis efficie...

  8. Effect of organic root plus (biostimulant) on the growth, nutrient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effectiveness of organic root plus (biostimulant) was compared with conventional fertilizer on the growth and yield of amaranthus in a glass house study. The treatments consisted of control, full rate each of biostimulant and fertilizer, and combination of fertilizer with biostimulant at full and half rates. The urea, single ...

  9. Laboratory and field scale bioremediation of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) contaminated soils by means of bioaugmentation and biostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Nidhi; Lata, Pushp; Jit, Simran; Sangwan, Naseer; Singh, Amit Kumar; Dwivedi, Vatsala; Niharika, Neha; Kaur, Jasvinder; Saxena, Anjali; Dua, Ankita; Nayyar, Namita; Kohli, Puneet; Geueke, Birgit; Kunz, Petra; Rentsch, Daniel; Holliger, Christof; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Lal, Rup

    2016-06-01

    Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) contaminated soils were treated for a period of up to 64 days in situ (HCH dumpsite, Lucknow) and ex situ (University of Delhi) in line with three bioremediation approaches. The first approach, biostimulation, involved addition of ammonium phosphate and molasses, while the second approach, bioaugmentation, involved addition of a microbial consortium consisting of a group of HCH-degrading sphingomonads that were isolated from HCH contaminated sites. The third approach involved a combination of biostimulation and bioaugmentation. The efficiency of the consortium was investigated in laboratory scale experiments, in a pot scale study, and in a full-scale field trial. It turned out that the approach of combining biostimulation and bioaugmentation was most effective in achieving reduction in the levels of α- and β-HCH and that the application of a bacterial consortium as compared to the action of a single HCH-degrading bacterial strain was more successful. Although further degradation of β- and δ-tetrachlorocyclohexane-1,4-diol, the terminal metabolites of β- and δ-HCH, respectively, did not occur by the strains comprising the consortium, these metabolites turned out to be less toxic than the parental HCH isomers.

  10. Biostimulation of indigenous microbial community for bioremediation of petroleum refinery sludge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayeeta Sarkar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient deficiency severely impairs the catabolic activity of indigenous microorganisms in hydrocarbon rich environments (HREs and limits the rate of intrinsic bioremediation. The present study aimed to characterize the microbial community in refinery waste and evaluate the scope for biostimulation based in situ bioremediation. Samples recovered from the wastewater lagoon of Guwahati refinery revealed a hydrocarbon enriched high total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH, oxygen-, moisture-limited, reducing environment. Intrinsic biodegradation ability of the indigenous microorganisms was enhanced significantly (>80% reduction in TPH by 90 days with nitrate amendment. Preferred utilization of both higher- (>C30 and middle- chain (C20-30 length hydrocarbons were evident from GC-MS analysis. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and community level physiological profiling (CLPP analyses indicated distinct shift in community’s composition and metabolic abilities following nitrogen (N amendment. High throughput deep sequencing of 16S rRNA gene showed that the native community was mainly composed of hydrocarbon degrading, syntrophic, methanogenic, nitrate/iron/sulfur reducing facultative anaerobic bacteria and archaebacteria, affiliated to γ- and δ-Proteobacteria and Euryarchaeota respectively. Genes for aerobic and anaerobic alkane metabolism (alkB and bssA, methanogenesis (mcrA, denitrification (nirS and narG and N2 fixation (nifH were detected. Concomitant to hydrocarbon degradation, lowering of dissolve O2 and increase in oxidation-reduction potential (ORP marked with an enrichment of N2 fixing, nitrate reducing aerobic/facultative anaerobic members e.g., Azovibrio, Pseudoxanthomonas and Commamonadaceae members was evident in N amended microcosm. This study highlighted that indigenous community of refinery sludge was intrinsically diverse, yet appreciable rate of in situ bioremediation could be achieved by supplying adequate N sources.

  11. Biostimulation of Indigenous Microbial Community for Bioremediation of Petroleum Refinery Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Jayeeta; Kazy, Sufia K.; Gupta, Abhishek; Dutta, Avishek; Mohapatra, Balaram; Roy, Ajoy; Bera, Paramita; Mitra, Adinpunya; Sar, Pinaki

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient deficiency severely impairs the catabolic activity of indigenous microorganisms in hydrocarbon rich environments (HREs) and limits the rate of intrinsic bioremediation. The present study aimed to characterize the microbial community in refinery waste and evaluate the scope for biostimulation based in situ bioremediation. Samples recovered from the wastewater lagoon of Guwahati refinery revealed a hydrocarbon enriched [high total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH)], oxygen-, moisture-limited, reducing environment. Intrinsic biodegradation ability of the indigenous microorganisms was enhanced significantly (>80% reduction in TPH by 90 days) with nitrate amendment. Preferred utilization of both higher- (>C30) and middle- chain (C20-30) length hydrocarbons were evident from GC-MS analysis. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and community level physiological profiling analyses indicated distinct shift in community’s composition and metabolic abilities following nitrogen (N) amendment. High throughput deep sequencing of 16S rRNA gene showed that the native community was mainly composed of hydrocarbon degrading, syntrophic, methanogenic, nitrate/iron/sulfur reducing facultative anaerobic bacteria and archaebacteria, affiliated to γ- and δ-Proteobacteria and Euryarchaeota respectively. Genes for aerobic and anaerobic alkane metabolism (alkB and bssA), methanogenesis (mcrA), denitrification (nirS and narG) and N2 fixation (nifH) were detected. Concomitant to hydrocarbon degradation, lowering of dissolve O2 and increase in oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) marked with an enrichment of N2 fixing, nitrate reducing aerobic/facultative anaerobic members [e.g., Azovibrio, Pseudoxanthomonas and Comamonadaceae members] was evident in N amended microcosm. This study highlighted that indigenous community of refinery sludge was intrinsically diverse, yet appreciable rate of in situ bioremediation could be achieved by supplying adequate N sources. PMID:27708623

  12. "Green technology": Bio-stimulation by an electric field for textile reactive dye contaminated agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Sivasankar; Santhanam, Manikandan; Selvaraj, Subbulakshmi; Sundaram, Maruthamuthu; Pandian, Kannan; Pazos, Marta

    2018-05-15

    The aim of the study is to degrade pollutants as well as to increase the fertility of agricultural soil by starch enhancing electrokinetic (EKA) and electro-bio-stimulation (EBS) processes. Starch solution was used as an anolyte and voltage gradient was about 0.5V/cm. The influence of bacterial mediated process was evaluated in real contaminated farming soil followed by pilot scale experiment. The in-situ formation of β-cyclodextrin from starch in the treatments had also influence on the significant removal of the pollutants from the farming soil. The conductivity of the soil was effectively reduced from 15.5dS/m to 1.5dS/m which corroborates well with the agricultural norms. The bio-stimulation was confirmed by the increase of the phosphorus content in the treated soil. Finally, phytotoxicity assays demonstrated the viability of the developed technique for soil remediation because plant germination percentage was higher in the treated soil in comparison to untreated soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of Biostimulation for Remediation of Sulfate-Contaminated Groundwater at a Mining Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Z.; Carroll, K. C.; Carreon, C.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    There is growing concern regarding sulfate contamination of groundwater. One innovative in-situ remediation option under investigation is biostimulation through addition of electron-donor amendments to enhance sulfate reduction. Two pilot-scale ethanol-injection tests were conducted at a former uranium mining site that is contaminated with sulfate and nitrate (with a lack of heavy metals), and for which there appears to be minimal natural attenuation of sulfate. The first test was a push-pull test that had a limited zone of influence, while the second test was a single-well injection test in which additional downgradient wells were monitored. For both tests, sulfate concentrations began to decline within a few weeks of injection, after nitrate concentrations were significantly reduced. Concomitantly, aqueous concentrations of manganese, iron, and hydrogen sulfide increased from background. Monitoring over many months revealed that the declines in sulfate concentration conformed to exponential decay, with first-order decay rates of approximately 0.01 /d. Analysis of sulfur stable isotope data indicated that the decrease in sulfate concentrations was microbially mediated. The results also indicated that sulfides formed during sulfate reduction may have undergone partial re-oxidation. This study illustrates the feasibility of using ethanol injection for remediation of sulfate-contaminated groundwater. However, re-oxidation of sulfides (both metal sulfide precipitates and hydrogen sulfide gas) is a potential issue of significance that would need to be addressed.

  14. [Laser biostimulation in the treatment of pleurisy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojević, Momir; Kuruc, Vesna

    2003-01-01

    Low-intensity lasers have been utilized in medicine in two ways: for local stimulation and for stimulation of acupuncture points. Literature data reveal that this method has been indiscriminately applied in psychiatry, rheumatology, gynecology, dermatology, otorhinolaryngology, in diverse acute and chronic pains, inflammations, vascular disorders, angina pectoris, bronchial asthma. Most commonly reported clinical effects are analgesia, spasmolytic and anti-inflammatory effects, as well as faster wound and bone healing. This prospective study analyses effects of laser biostimulation on patients with pleurisy. The analysis included 25 patients treated at the Institute of Lung Diseases in Sremska Kamenica during 2000, 2001 and 2002. Apart from conservative treatment, these patients were treated with laser biostimulation of acupuncture points and local region for ten days. During treatment, changes of present clinical signs, general symptoms, radiological findings, as well as changes of some relevant biochemical parameters were recorded. Results were compared with the control group which included the same number of patients, who differed from the examined group only by not being exposed to laser biostimulation. The examined group of patients with pleuritis presented with quicker resorption of pleural effusion, less pleural adhesions, more significant decrease of clinical symptoms, especially pain, as well as more significant increase of cortisol and immunoglobulin A and decrease of circulating immune complexes (CIC), leukocytes and sedimentation rate than the control group. Mechanisms of laser biostimulation in treatment of pleurisy were described in detail and the obtained results were correlated to those reported by other authors. 1. Patients with pleurisy undergoing laser stimulation presented with faster resorption of effusion and remission of the subjective symptoms, as well as significant decrease of biochemical acute inflammation parameters in the peripheral

  15. Effect of natural biostimulants on yield and nutritional quality: an example of sweet yellow pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parađiković, Nada; Vinković, Tomislav; Vinković Vrček, Ivana; Žuntar, Irena; Bojić, Mirza; Medić-Šarić, Marica

    2011-09-01

    Modifications in growing techniques can affect the yield and nutritional quality of various cultivated plant species. Owing to its high nutritional value, pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) was used in this study as a model plant to investigate the effect of natural biostimulants on yield and fruit quality parameters under conditions of reduced fertilisation. A positive influence of biostimulant treatment on yield parameters was observed. The overall increase in the pigment content of leaves after biostimulant application agreed well with the higher total and commercial yields of treated pepper cultivars compared with their controls. The results showed that natural biostimulants had a positive effect on the vitamin C and total phenolic contents in pepper fruits during the hot summer season. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) antioxidant activities were also significantly higher (P hydroponically. Thus the application of biostimulants could be considered as a good production strategy for obtaining high yields of nutritionally valuable vegetables with lower impact on the environment. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Enhanced ex-situ bioremediation of soil contaminated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    contaminated soil. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of using electrical biostimulation processes to enhance ex-situ bioremediation of soils contaminated with organic pollutants. The effect of ...

  17. Uranium Sequestration During Biostimulated Reduction and In Response to the Return of Oxic Conditions In Shallow Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Christopher C.; Johnson, Kelly J.; Akstin, Katherine; Singer, David M.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Fuhrmann, M.

    2015-01-01

    A proposed approach for groundwater remediation of uranium contamination is to generate reducing conditions by stimulating the growth of microbial populations through injection of electron donor compounds into the subsurface. Sufficiently reducing conditions will result in reduction of soluble hexavalent uranium, U(VI), and precipitation of the less soluble +4 oxidation state uranium, U(IV). This process is termed biostimulated reduction. A key issue in the remediation of uranium (U) contamination in aquifers by biostimulated reduction is the long term stability of the sequestered uranium. Three flow-through column experiments using aquifer sediment were used to evaluate the remobilization of bioreduced U sequestered under conditions in which biostimulation extended well into sulfate reduction to enhance precipitation of reduced sulfur phases such as iron sulfides. One column received added ferrous iron, Fe(II), increasing production of iron sulfides, to test their effect on remobilization of the sequestered uranium, either by serving as a redox buffer by competing for dissolved oxygen, or by armoring the reduced uranium. During biostimulation of the ambient microbial population with acetate, dissolved uranium was lowered by a factor of 2.5 or more with continued removal for over 110 days of biostimulation, well after the onset of sulfate reduction at ~30 days. Sequestered uranium was essentially all U(IV) resulting from the formation of nano-particulate uraninite that coated sediment grains to a thickness of a few 10’s of microns, sometimes in association with S and Fe. A multicomponent biogeochemical reactive transport model simulation of column effluents during biostimulation was generally able to describe the acetate oxidation, iron, sulfate, and uranium reduction for all three columns using parameters derived from simulations of field scale biostimulation experiments. Columns were eluted with artificial groundwater at equilibrium with atmospheric oxygen to

  18. SERDP ER-1421 Abiotic and Biotic Mechanisms Controlling In Situ Remediation of NDMA: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; McKinley, James P.; Crocker, Fiona H.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Devary, Brooks J.; Fredrickson, Herbert L.; Thompson, Karen T.

    2009-09-30

    This laboratory-scale project was initiated to investigate in situ abiotic/biotic mineralization of NDMA. Under iron-reducing conditions, aquifer sediments showed rapid abiotic NDMA degradation to dimethylamine (DMA), nitrate, formate, and finally, CO2. These are the first reported experiments of abiotic NDMA mineralization. The NDMA reactivity of these different iron phases showed that adsorbed ferrous iron was the dominant reactive phase that promoted NDMA reduction, and other ferrous phases present (siderite, iron sulfide, magnetite, structural ferrous iron in 2:1 clays) did not promote NDMA degradation. In contrast, oxic sediments that were biostimulated with propane promoted biomineralization of NDMA by a cometabolic monooxygenase enzyme process. Other monooxygenase enzyme processes were not stimulated with methane or toluene additions, and acetylene addition did not block mineralization. Although NDMA mineralization extent was the highest in oxic, biostimulated sediments (30 to 82%, compared to 10 to 26% for abiotic mineralization in reduced sediments), large 1-D column studies (high sediment/water ratio of aquifers) showed 5.6 times higher NDMA mineralization rates in reduced sediment (half-life 410 ± 147 h) than oxic biomineralization (half life 2293 ± 1866 h). Sequential reduced/oxic biostimulated sediment mineralization (half-life 3180 ± 1094 h) was also inefficient compared to reduced sediment. These promising laboratory-scale results for NDMA mineralization should be investigated at field scale. Future studies of NDMA remediation should focus on the comparison of this in situ abiotic NDMA mineralization (iron-reducing environments) to ex situ biomineralization, which has been shown successful in other studies.

  19. Responses of selected biota after biostimulation of a vegetable oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Responses of selected biota after biostimulation of a vegetable oil spill in the Con Joubert Bird Sanctuary wetland: A pilot study. Mapurunyane C Selala, Paul J Oberholster, Karen AK Surridge, Arno R de Klerk, Anna-Maria Botha ...

  20. Health and taste related compounds in strawberries under various irrigation regimes and bio-stimulant application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Burcak; Sarıdaş, Mehmet Ali; Çeliktopuz, Eser; Kafkas, Ebru; Paydaş Kargı, Sevgi

    2018-10-15

    Strawberry has a unique status within the fruit species in terms of health and taste related compounds. This experimental study concerned the application of a bio-stimulant at various drip irrigation levels (IR125, IR100, IR75 and IR50). The effects of the bio-stimulant (seaweed extract) on the eating quality, i.e., the taste-related (TSS, fructose, glucose, sucrose and citric, malic, l-ascorbic acid), and health-related (antioxidant activity, total phenol, myricetin and quercetin) compounds were studied in two strawberry cultivars. The 'Rubygem' with its higher sugar and lower acid content has been more preferable than the 'Kabarla' cultivar. The bio-stimulant contributes to taste by improving the TSS, fructose, sucrose and also to health by increasing the quercetin content of the fruit which is associated to the cardiovascular properties and cancer reducing agents. The experiment conducted revealed significant increases only in the TSS contents and antioxidant activity under the IR50 and IR75 deficit irrigation treatments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Liquid crystalline polymer nanocomposites reinforced with in-situ reduced graphene oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pedrazzoli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work liquid-crystalline polymer (LCP nanocomposites reinforced with in-situ reduced graphene oxide are investigated. Graphene oxide (GO was first synthesized by the Hummers method, and the kinetics of its thermal reduction was assessed. GO layers were then homogeneously dispersed in a thermotropic liquid crystalline polymer matrix (Vectran®, and an in-situ thermal reduction of GO into reduced graphene oxide (rGO was performed. Even at low rGO amount, the resulting nanocomposites exhibited an enhancement of both the mechanical properties and the thermal stability. Improvements of the creep stability and of the thermo-mechanical behavior were also observed upon nanofiller incorporation. Furthermore, in-situ thermal reduction of the insulating GO into the more electrically conductive rGO led to an important surface resistivity decrease in the nanofilled samples.

  2. Biostimulation of anaerobic BTEX biodegradation under fermentative methanogenic conditions at source-zone groundwater contaminated with a biodiesel blend (B20).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Débora Toledo; da Silva, Márcio Luis Busi; Chiaranda, Helen Simone; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Corseuil, Henry Xavier

    2013-06-01

    Field experiments were conducted to assess the potential for anaerobic biostimulation to enhance BTEX biodegradation under fermentative methanogenic conditions in groundwater impacted by a biodiesel blend (B20, consisting of 20 % v/v biodiesel and 80 % v/v diesel). B20 (100 L) was released at each of two plots through an area of 1 m(2) that was excavated down to the water table, 1.6 m below ground surface. One release was biostimulated with ammonium acetate, which was added weekly through injection wells near the source zone over 15 months. The other release was not biostimulated and served as a baseline control simulating natural attenuation. Ammonium acetate addition stimulated the development of strongly anaerobic conditions, as indicated by near-saturation methane concentrations. BTEX removal began within 8 months in the biostimulated source zone, but not in the natural attenuation control, where BTEX concentrations were still increasing (due to source dissolution) 2 years after the release. Phylogenetic analysis using quantitative PCR indicated an increase in concentration and relative abundance of Archaea (Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota), Geobacteraceae (Geobacter and Pelobacter spp.) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio, Desulfomicrobium, Desulfuromusa, and Desulfuromonas) in the biostimulated plot relative to the control. Apparently, biostimulation fortuitously enhanced the growth of putative anaerobic BTEX degraders and associated commensal microorganisms that consume acetate and H2, and enhance the thermodynamic feasibility of BTEX fermentation. This is the first field study to suggest that anaerobic-methanogenic biostimulation could enhance source zone bioremediation of groundwater aquifers impacted by biodiesel blends.

  3. Mine Waste Technology Program. In Situ Source Control Of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the results of the Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 3, In Situ Source Control of Acid Generation Using Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S....

  4. Treatability testing of intrinsic bioremediation, biostimulation, and bioaugmentation of diesel-oil contaminated soil at 5 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J. J.

    1997-01-01

    The likely success of in-situ bioremediation on diesel-contaminated soil was studied at 5 degrees C under four conditions of soil amendments. The four conditions were: (1) intrinsic bioremediation where the soil received only water, (2) biostimulation with one application of slow-release fertilizer, (3) bioaugmentation with one application of fertilizer and a cold-adapted hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial culture, and (4) surfactant enhanced bioavailability, where the soil received one application of fertilizer and treatment with a biodegradable surfactant solution. All tests showed significant reduction in diesel range under aerobic conditions after a 40-day incubation. The intrinsic control (No.1) was least effective, with 66 per cent of extractable hydrocarbons (TEH) at 5 degrees C. The biostimulated soil (No.2) was most effective, allowing a reduction in TEH of 86 per cent. The bioaugmented soil and surfactant treated soil allowed TEH reduction of about 75 per cent. Based on these results, biostimulation with slow-release fertilizer will be implemented as the most cost-effective means of bioremediation, combined with appropriate monitoring of results. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  5. Natural attenuation, biostimulation and bioaugmentation of landfill leachate management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, X. Y.; Seow, T. W.; Lim, C. K.; Ibrahim, Z.

    2018-04-01

    Landfills used for solid waste management will lead to leachate production. Proper leachate management is highly essential to be paid attention to protect the environment and living organisms’ health and safety. In this study, the remedial strategies used for leachate management were natural attenuation, biostimulation and bioaugmentation. All treatment samples were treated via 42-days combined anaerobic-aerobic treatment and the treatment efficiency was studied by measuring the removal rate of COD and ammonia nitrogen. In this study, all remedial strategies showed different degrees of contaminants removal. Lowest contaminants removal rate was achieved via bioaugmentation of B. panacihumi strain ZB1, which were 39.4% of COD and 37.6% of ammonia nitrogen removed from the leachate sample. Higher contaminants removal rate was achieved via natural attenuation and biostimulation. Native microbial population was able to remove 41% of COD and 59% of ammonia nitrogen from the leachate sample. The removal efficiency could be further improved via biostimulation to trigger microbial growth and decontamination rate. Through biostimulation, 58% of COD and 51.8% of ammonia nitrogen were removed from the leachate sample. In conclusion, natural attenuation and biostimulation should be the main choice for leachate management to avoid any unexpected impacts due to introduction of exogenous species.

  6. In-situ reduced silver nanoparticles on populus fiber and the catalytic application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Miaomiao; Gong, Yumei, E-mail: ymgong@dlpu.edu.cn; Wang, Wenheng; Xu, Guangpeng; Liu, Yuanfa; Guo, Jing, E-mail: guojing8161@163.com

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • A composite involved in in-situ chelating AgNPs on natural cellulose was prepared. • Polyamidoxime grafted from the cellulose adsorbed Ag+ which was reduced to AgNPs. • The composite exhibits excellent catalytic activity in reducing 4-nitrophenol. - Abstract: One kind of composites involved in silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) loading in-situ on natural populus fiber (PF) matrix was prepared by polyamidoxime (PAO) functionalized the cellulose fiber. In which PAO worked as trapping and stabilizing agents chelating silver ions and made it reduced in-situ to obtain AgNPs by borohydride at room temperature. The synthesized composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Moreover, the composites showed significant catalytic activity 1.87 s{sup −1} g{sup −1} and repeated usability more than 7 cycles in reducing 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) into 4-aminophenol (4-AP) detected by UV–vis spectrophotometer in aqueous solution due to the surface-enhanced immobility and large amount of AgNPs. The natural cellulose fiber provides a green platform to react and support other noble metals for wide catalytic reactions.

  7. In-situ reduced graphene oxide-polyvinyl alcohol composite coatings as protective layers on magnesium substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingkai Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple and feasible method was developed to fabricate in-situ reduced graphene oxide-polyvinyl alcohol composite (GO-PVA coatings as protective layers on magnesium substrates. Polyvinyl alcohol was used as an in-situ reductant to transform GO into reduced GO. Contiguous and uniform GO-PVA coatings were prepared on magnesium substrates by dip-coating method, and were further thermally treated at 120 °C under ambient condition to obtain in-situ reduced GO-PVA coatings. Owing to the reducing effect of PVA, thermal treatment at low temperature led to effective in-situ reduction of GO as confirmed by XRD, Raman, FTIR and XPS tests. The corrosion current density of magnesium substrates in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution could be lowered to its 1/25 when using in-situ reduced GO-PVA coatings as protective layers.

  8. Evaluation of three biostimulants in lettuce under parcel conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Caridad Jiménez Arteaga

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The work was developed in the parcel Ñico López. The valued cultivation was the lettuce variety Black simpson, with the objective of evaluating the goods of three (3 bioestimulantes (Biobras 16, Biobras plus and Quitosana, about the yield and quality of the crop. The biostimulants was applied, to three stonemasons (one for biostimulant to the six days after transplant (DDT and three parcel to the seven DDT, leaving one stonemasons that as control, for an total seven (7 treatments. The main components of yield were measured and some components of the quality of the plant were determined in the Soils Province Laboratory The data were processed by the statistical package of the Statitic version 8 on Windows. One could observe that the three biostimulants has an effect positive on the mass and quality of the studied crop.

  9. In situ polymerization of highly dispersed polypyrrole on reduced graphite oxide for dopamine detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Tao; Yu, Chenfei; Wu, Shishan; Shen, Jian

    2013-12-15

    A composite consisting of reduced graphite oxide and highly dispersed polypyrrole nanospheres was synthesized by a straightforward technique, by in situ chemical oxidative polymerization. The novel polypyrrole nanospheres can prevent the aggregation of reduced graphite oxide sheets by electrostatic repulsive interaction, and enhance their electrochemical properties in the nano-molar measurement of dopamine in biological systems with a linear range of 1-8000 nM and a detection limit as low as 0.3 nM. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  11. Diagnostic Tools for Performance Evaluation of Innovative In-Situ Remediation Technologies at Chlorinated Solvent-Contaminated Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Electronic down-hole sensors with data loggers, or fiber optic sensors, can also provide information on the pore pressure, temperature, conductivity...of a dechlorinating community resulting from in-situ biostimulation in a trichloroethene-contaminated deep, fractured basalt aquifer and comparison to...dechlorinating community resulting from in-situ biostimulation in a trichloroethene-contaminated deep, fractured basalt aquifer and comparison to a

  12. Efficacy of a mouthrinse based on hydroxyapatite to reduce initial bacterial colonisation in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensche, A; Holder, C; Basche, S; Tahan, N; Hannig, C; Hannig, M

    2017-08-01

    The present in situ - investigation aimed to specify the impact of pure hydroxyapatite microclusters on initial bioadhesion and bacterial colonization at the tooth surface. Pellicle formation was carried out in situ on bovine enamel slabs (9 subjects). After 1min of pellicle formation rinses with 8ml of hydroxyapatite (HA) microclusters (5%) in bidestilled water or chlorhexidine 0.2% were performed. As negative control no rinse was adopted. In situ biofilm formation was promoted by the intraoral slab exposure for 8h overnight. Afterwards initial bacterial adhesion was quantified by DAPI staining and bacterial viability was determined in vivo/in vitro by live/dead-staining (BacLight). SEM analysis evaluated the efficacy of the mouthrinse to accumulate hydroxyapatite microclusters at the specimens' surface and spit-out samples of the testsolution were investigated by TEM. Compared to the control (2.36×10 6 ±2.01×10 6 bacteria/cm 2 ), significantly reduced amounts of adherent bacteria were detected on specimens rinsed with chlorhexidine 0.2% (8.73×10 4 ±1.37×10 5 bacteria/cm 2 ) and likewise after rinses with the hydroxyapatite testsolution (2.08×10 5 ±2.85×10 5 bacteria/cm 2 , phydroxyapatite microclusters at the tooth surface. Adhesive interactions of HA-particles with oral bacteria were shown by TEM. Hydroxyapatite microclusters reduced initial bacterial adhesion to enamel in situ considerably and could therefore sensibly supplement current approaches in dental prophylaxis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Trichoderma-Based Biostimulants Modulate Rhizosphere Microbial Populations and Improve N Uptake Efficiency, Yield, and Nutritional Quality of Leafy Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunzio Fiorentino

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial inoculants such as Trichoderma-based products are receiving great interest among researchers and agricultural producers for their potential to improve crop productivity, nutritional quality as well as resistance to plant pathogens/pests and numerous environmental stresses. Two greenhouse experiments were conducted to assess the effects of Trichoderma-based biostimulants under suboptimal, optimal and supraoptimal levels of nitrogen (N fertilization in two leafy vegetables: Iceberg lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. and rocket (Eruca sativa Mill.. The yield, nutritional characteristics, N uptake and mineral composition were analyzed for each vegetable crop after inoculation with Trichoderma strains T. virens (GV41 or T. harzianum (T22, and results were compared to non-inoculated plants. In addition, the effect of the Trichoderma-based biostimulants on microbes associated with the rhizosphere in terms of prokaryotic and eukaryotic composition and concentration using DGGE was also evaluated. Trichoderma-based biostimulants, in particular GV41, positively increased lettuce and rocket yield in the unfertilized plots. The highest marketable lettuce fresh yield was recorded with either of the biostimulant inoculations when plants were supplied with optimal levels of N. The inoculation of rocket with GV41, and to a lesser degree with T22, elicited an increase in total ascorbic acid under both optimal and high N conditions. T. virens GV41 increased N-use efficiency of lettuce, and favored the uptake of native N present in the soil of both lettuce and rocket. The positive effect of biostimulants on nutrient uptake and crop growth was species-dependent, being more marked with lettuce. The best biostimulation effects from the Trichoderma treatments were observed in both crops when grown under low N availability. The Trichoderma inoculation strongly influenced the composition of eukaryotic populations in the rhizosphere, in particularly exerting different

  14. Plant Hormesis Management with Biostimulants of Biotic Origin in Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Hernandez, Marcela; Macias-Bobadilla, Israel; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon G; Romero-Gomez, Sergio de J; Rico-Garcia, Enrique; Ocampo-Velazquez, Rosalia V; Alvarez-Arquieta, Luz de L; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo

    2017-01-01

    Over time plants developed complex mechanisms in order to adapt themselves to the environment. Plant innate immunity is one of the most important mechanisms for the environmental adaptation. A myriad of secondary metabolites with nutraceutical features are produced by the plant immune system in order to get adaptation to new environments that provoke stress (stressors). Hormesis is a phenomenon by which a stressor (i.e., toxins, herbicides, etc.) stimulates the cellular stress response, including secondary metabolites production, in order to help organisms to establish adaptive responses. Hormetins of biotic origin (i.e., biostimulants or biological control compounds), in certain doses might enhance plant performance, however, in excessive doses they are commonly deleterious. Biostimulants or biological control compounds of biotic origin are called "elicitors" that have widely been studied as inducers of plant tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. The plant response toward elicitors is reminiscent of hormetic responses toward toxins in several organisms. Thus, controlled management of hormetic responses in plants using these types of compounds is expected to be an important tool to increase nutraceutical quality of plant food and trying to minimize negative effects on yields. The aim of this review is to analyze the potential for agriculture that the use of biostimulants and biological control compounds of biotic origin could have in the management of the plant hormesis. The use of homolog DNA as biostimulant or biological control compound in crop production is also discussed.

  15. Effect of plant-biostimulant on cassava initial growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Emílio de Souza Magalhães

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Biostimulants are complex substances that promote hormonal balance in plants, favor the genetic potential expression, and enhance growth of shoots and root system. The use of these plant growth promoters in crops can increase quantitatively and qualitatively crop production. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a commercial biostimulant on the initial growth of cassava. The experiment was arranged in a 2 x 5 factorial design, corresponding to two cassava cultivars (Cacau-UFV and Coimbra and five biostimulant concentrations (0, 4, 8, 12 and 16 mL L-1. At 90 days after planting, the characteristics leaf area, plant height, stem diameter, leaf number, total dry matter and dry matter of roots, stems and leaves were evaluated. The biostimulant promoted linear increases in plant height, leaf number, leaf area, total dry matter, dry matter of stems, leaves and roots. The cultivar Cacau-UFV had a higher growth rate than the cultivar Coimbra. The growth promoter stimulated the early growth of the cassava crop.

  16. Biostimulation of soil polluted by 40000 ppm of waste motor oil and phytoremediation with Cicer arietinum and Burkholderia cepacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meza-Ramírez Janitzi Yunuén

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil polluted by 40000 ppm of waste residual oil (WRO, is a relative high hydrocarbons mix concentration according to Mexican regulation related with as the well know NOM-138-SEMARNAT/SSA1-2003 (NOM-138. Due to cause lost soil´s fertility, inhibiting microbial life and reducing vegetal production. To NOM-138 the highest limit of hydrocarbons mix allowed in soil is equal to 4400 ppm/kg. Aims of this research were: i Biostimulation of soil polluted by 40000 ppm of WRO by vermicompost and/or bovine compost, ii Phytoremediation by Cicer arietinum and Burkholderia cepacia to reduce WRO at below value compared to highest according to NOM-138. Results showed that biostimulation of soil with bovine compost eliminated WRO at 24000 ppm in 49 days. Then phytoremediation by C. arietinum and B. cepacia decreased WRO at 2760 ppm value below to compare to highest concentration allowed to NOM-138. It´s concluded that biore-mediation of soil impacted by relatively high concentration of WRO, the best strategy was to apply both biostimulation/phytoremediation that separate.

  17. Biorremediation of soil polluted by 75000 ppm of waste motor oil applying biostimulation and phytoremediation with Sorghum vulgare and Bacillus cereus or Burkholderia cepacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balderas-León Iván

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Waste motor oil (WMO pollutes soil and causing lost soil fertility. An alternative to solve this problem its bioremediation (BR by double and following biostimulation (BS with mineral solution (MS and a legume as green manure (GM then using phytoremediation (PR with growth promoting vegetal bacteria (GPVB like Bacillus cereus and Burkholderia cepacia to minimize remaining WMO. The aims of this research were: a bioremediation of polluted soil by 75000 ppm of WMO by biostimulation and then b Its phytoremediation for remaining WMO by Sorghum vulgare inoculated with B. cereus and B. cepacia. Soil polluted by high concentration WMO was biostimulated with MS, and then Phaseolus vulgaris treated by GPVB was incorporated as GM, finally to apply PR to eliminate WMO with S. vulgare with GPVB. Results indicate that soil bioremediated by biostimulation with MS, WMO decreased at 32500 ppm/30 days, and then with GM, WMO was reduced at 10100 ppm after/90 days. Finally, to apply phytoremediation using S. vulgare and GPVB at flowering, WMO was reduced from 2500 ppm to 800 ppm. For recovering soil impacted by high concentration WMO to apply both techniques double and following BS and PR are the best option than each technique separately.

  18. Reduced satellite cell number in situ in muscular contractures from children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayanidhi, Sudarshan; Dykstra, Peter B; Lyubasyuk, Vera; McKay, Bryon R; Chambers, Henry G; Lieber, Richard L

    2015-07-01

    Satellite cells (SC) are quiescent adult muscle stem cells critical for postnatal development. Children with cerebral palsy have impaired muscular growth and develop contractures. While flow cytometry previously demonstrated a reduced SC population, extracellular matrix abnormalities may influence the cell isolation methods used, systematically isolating fewer cells from CP muscle and creating a biased result. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to use immunohistochemistry on serial muscle sections to quantify SC in situ. Serial cross-sections from human gracilis muscle biopsies (n = 11) were labeled with fluorescent antibodies for Pax7 (SC transcriptional marker), laminin (basal lamina), and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (nuclei). Fluorescence microscopy under high magnification was used to identify SC based on labeling and location. Mean SC/100 myofibers was reduced by ∼70% (p muscle growth and apparent decreased responsiveness of CP muscle to exercise. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. In situ chemical synthesis of ruthenium oxide/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for electrochemical capacitor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Kwang-Heon; Yoon, Seung-Beom; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Park, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2013-08-07

    An in situ chemical synthesis approach has been developed to prepare ruthenium oxide/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanocomposites. It is found that as the C/O ratio increases, the number density of RuO2 nanoparticles decreases, because the chemical interaction between the Ru ions and the oxygen-containing functional groups provides anchoring sites where the nucleation of particles takes place. For electrochemical capacitor applications, the microwave-hydrothermal process was carried out to improve the conductivity of RGO in RuO2/RGO nanocomposites. The significant improvement in capacitance and high rate capability might result from the RuO2 nanoparticles used as spacers that make the interior layers of the reduced graphene oxide electrode available for electrolyte access.

  20. Bioaugmentation and biostimulation as strategies for the bioremediation of a burned woodland soil contaminated by toxic hydrocarbons: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreolli, Marco; Lampis, Silvia; Brignoli, Pierlorenzo; Vallini, Giovanni

    2015-04-15

    In this work, the natural attenuation strategy (no soil amendments done) was compared with two different bioremediation approaches, namely bioaugmentation through soil inoculation with a suspension of Trichoderma sp. mycelium and biostimulation by soil addition with a microbial growth promoting formulation, in order to verify the effectiveness of these methods in terms of degradation efficiency towards toxic hydrocarbons, with particular attention to the high molecular weight (HMW) fraction, in a forest area impacted by recent wildfire in Northern Italy. The area under investigation, divided into three parcels, was monitored to figure out the dynamics of decay in soil concentration of C₁₂₋₄₀ hydrocarbons (including isoalkanes, cycloalkanes, alkyl-benzenes and alkyl-naphthalenes besides PAHs) and low molecular weight (LMW) PAHs, following the adoption of the foregoing different remediation strategies. Soil hydrocarbonoclastic potential was even checked by characterizing the autochthonous microbial cenoses. Field experiments proved that the best performance in the abatement of HMW hydrocarbons was reached 60 days after soil treatment through the biostimulation protocol, when about 70% of the initial concentration of HMW hydrocarbons was depleted. Within the same time, about 55% degradation was obtained with the bioaugmentation protocol, whilst natural attenuation allowed only a 45% removal of the starting C12-40 hydrocarbon fraction. Therefore, biostimulation seems to significantly reduce the time required for the remediation, most likely because of the enhancement of microbial degradation through the improvement of nutrient balance in the burned soil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reducing the cytotoxicity of inhalable engineered nanoparticles via in situ passivation with biocompatible materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M.; Roberts, Jeffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The cytotoxicity of model welding particles was modulated through in situ passivation. • Model welding particles were incorporated with chitosan nanoparticles for passivation. • In vitro assay revealed that the passivated particles had a lower cytotoxicity. • Passivation with chitosan adhesive or graphite paste could also reduce cytotoxicity. • This method would be suitable for efficient reduction of inhalable toxic components. - Abstract: The cytotoxicity of model welding nanoparticles was modulated through in situ passivation with soluble biocompatible materials. A passivation process consisting of a spark discharge particle generator coupled to a collison atomizer as a co-flow or counter-flow configuration was used to incorporate the model nanoparticles with chitosan. The tested model welding nanoparticles are inhaled and that A549 cells are a human lung epithelial cell line. Measurements of in vitro cytotoxicity in A549 cells revealed that the passivated nanoparticles had a lower cytotoxicity (>65% in average cell viability, counter-flow) than the untreated model nanoparticles. Moreover, the co-flow incorporation between the nanoparticles and chitosan induced passivation of the nanoparticles, and the average cell viability increased by >80% compared to the model welding nanoparticles. As a more convenient way (additional chitosan generation and incorporation devices may not be required), other passivation strategies through a modification of the welding rod with chitosan adhesive and graphite paste did also enhance average cell viability (>58%). The approach outlined in this work is potentially generalizable as a new platform, using only biocompatible materials in situ, to treat nanoparticles before they are inhaled

  2. Reducing the cytotoxicity of inhalable engineered nanoparticles via in situ passivation with biocompatible materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon, E-mail: postjb@yu.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M. [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, University of Iowa, IA 52242 (United States); Roberts, Jeffrey T., E-mail: jtrob@purdue.edu [Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The cytotoxicity of model welding particles was modulated through in situ passivation. • Model welding particles were incorporated with chitosan nanoparticles for passivation. • In vitro assay revealed that the passivated particles had a lower cytotoxicity. • Passivation with chitosan adhesive or graphite paste could also reduce cytotoxicity. • This method would be suitable for efficient reduction of inhalable toxic components. - Abstract: The cytotoxicity of model welding nanoparticles was modulated through in situ passivation with soluble biocompatible materials. A passivation process consisting of a spark discharge particle generator coupled to a collison atomizer as a co-flow or counter-flow configuration was used to incorporate the model nanoparticles with chitosan. The tested model welding nanoparticles are inhaled and that A549 cells are a human lung epithelial cell line. Measurements of in vitro cytotoxicity in A549 cells revealed that the passivated nanoparticles had a lower cytotoxicity (>65% in average cell viability, counter-flow) than the untreated model nanoparticles. Moreover, the co-flow incorporation between the nanoparticles and chitosan induced passivation of the nanoparticles, and the average cell viability increased by >80% compared to the model welding nanoparticles. As a more convenient way (additional chitosan generation and incorporation devices may not be required), other passivation strategies through a modification of the welding rod with chitosan adhesive and graphite paste did also enhance average cell viability (>58%). The approach outlined in this work is potentially generalizable as a new platform, using only biocompatible materials in situ, to treat nanoparticles before they are inhaled.

  3. In Situ Synthesis of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Gold Nanocomposites for Nanoelectronics and Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Peng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, an in situ chemical synthesis approach has been developed to prepare graphene–Au nanocomposites from chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO in aqueous media. UV–Vis absorption, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were used to demonstrate the successful attachment of Au nanoparticles to graphene sheets. Configured as field-effect transistors (FETs, the as-synthesized single-layered rGO-Au nanocomposites exhibit higher hole mobility and conductance when compared to the rGO sheets, promising its applications in nanoelectronics. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the rGO-Au FETs are able to label-freely detect DNA hybridization with high sensitivity, indicating its potentials in nanoelectronic biosensing.

  4. Technical and technological solution for vegetal bio-stimulants obtaining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghelache, D. G.; Diaconescu, I.; Pătraşcu, R.

    2017-08-01

    The paper presents a modern technology for bio fertilizers resulted from waste plant mass after harvesting crops Experimental products were obtained rich in nutrients, but unstable in terms of existing microorganisms. Therefore, they conducted further studies to obtaining bio fungicide herb, so in all investigations undertaken so far in the laboratory, were able to conclude that the introduction of medicinal plant extracts with fungicidal effect into the bio fertilizers obtained by degradation of plant material post-harvest can get various bio-stimulants with nourishing effect upon the plants. Following this technology the paper’s objective is to identify a flux scheme for experimental equipment which can produce as final outcome this type of bio-stimulant. Also, in this work, this equipment will be chosen and will be designed following and obeying to the request of every step of the above technology.

  5. Biostimulation of grapevine : mode of action and possible agronomic uses

    OpenAIRE

    Krzyzaniak, Yuko; Trouvelot, Sophie; Heloir, Marie-Claire; Fourquez, P.; Magnin-Robert, Jean-Bernard; Randoux, B.; Siah, A.; Halama, Patrice; Moreau, Emmanuelle; Adrian, Marielle

    2016-01-01

    Although there is a growing interest for the use of biostimulants in agriculture, only few methods allowing a precise description of their effects on plants have been reported. In the IRIS+ FUI project, two major and highly different worldwide crops, wheat (annual, monocotyledon) and grapevine (perennial, broadleaf), were chosen to deepen our knowledge of such compounds and explore their potential additional interest. The first objective is to develop in greenhouse conditions, a panel of tool...

  6. Effects of some biostimulators on yield and seed viability of linseed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevđović Radosav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the application of some biostimulators on the yield and quality of linseed oil on humogley and chernozem. Tested fl ax cultivar Mira was produced in the Institute for Medicinal Plant Research ‘Dr Josif Pančić’ from Belgrade. EPIN EKSTRA and CIRKON were applied as biostimulators. The seed yield, germination energy (GE and total germination (TG were investigated. The higher average yield was achieved on the chernozem type of soil. A variant with the application of EPIN EKSTRA biostimulator gave the highest yield on both soil types. A variant with the application of CIRKON biostimulator gave slightly higher yield than the control, on both soil types. The highest germination energy and total germination were achieved in the variant with the application biostimulator EPIN EKSTRA.

  7. In-Situ Survival Mechanisms of U and Tc Reducing Bacteria in Contaminated Sediments. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Krumholz Jimmy Ballard

    2005-01-01

    The proposed effort will identify genes and ultimately physiological mechanisms and pathways that are expressed under in situ conditions and are critical to functioning of aquifer dwelling anaerobic bacteria living in contaminated systems. The main objectives are: (1) Determine which Metal-reducer specific genes are important for activities in normal and contaminated subsurface sediment. To achieve these goals, we have generated a library of chromosomal mutants. These are introduced into contaminated sediments, incubated, allowed to grow, and then reisolated. A negative selection process allows us to determine which mutants have been selected against in sediments and thereby identify genes required for survival in subsurface sediments. (2) Delineate the function of these genes through GeneBank and Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) comparisons and analyze other sediment microorganisms to determine if similar genes are present in these populations. After determining the sequence of the genes identified through the previous objectives, we delineate the role of those specific genes in the physiology of G20, MR-1 and perhaps other microorganisms. (3) Determine the loss in function of a select group of mutants. Cells with mutations in known genes with testable functions are assayed for the loss of that function if specific assays are available. Mutants with unknown loss of function and other mutants are run through a series of tests including motility, attachment, and rate of sulfate or iron reduction. These tests allow us to categorize mutants for subsequent more detailed study

  8. In situ treatment with activated carbon reduces bioaccumulation in aquatic food chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupryianchyk, D; Rakowska, M I; Roessink, I; Reichman, E P; Grotenhuis, J T C; Koelmans, A A

    2013-05-07

    In situ activated carbon (AC) amendment is a new direction in contaminated sediment management, yet its effectiveness and safety have never been tested on the level of entire food chains including fish. Here we tested the effects of three different AC treatments on hydrophobic organic chemical (HOC) concentrations in pore water, benthic invertebrates, zooplankton, and fish (Leuciscus idus melanotus). AC treatments were mixing with powdered AC (PAC), mixing with granular AC (GAC), and addition-removal of GAC (sediment stripping). The AC treatments resulted in a significant decrease in HOC concentrations in pore water, benthic invertebrates, zooplankton, macrophytes, and fish. In 6 months, PAC treatment caused a reduction of accumulation of polychlorobiphenyls (PCB) in fish by a factor of 20, bringing pollutant levels below toxic thresholds. All AC treatments supported growth of fish, but growth was inhibited in the PAC treatment, which was likely explained by reduced nutrient concentrations, resulting in lower zooplankton (i.e., food) densities for the fish. PAC treatment may be advised for sites where immediate ecosystem protection is required. GAC treatment may be equally effective in the longer term and may be adequate for vulnerable ecosystems where longer-term protection suffices.

  9. Iron supplementation reduces the erosive potential of a cola drink on enamel and dentin in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Melissa Thiemi; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2012-01-01

    Iron has been suggested to reduce the erosive potential of cola drinks in vitro. The aim of this study was to evaluate in situ the effect of ferrous sulfate supplementation on the inhibition of the erosion caused by a cola drink. Ten adult volunteers participated in a crossover protocol conducted in two phases of 5 days, separated by a washout period of 7 days. In each phase, they wore palatal devices containing two human enamel and two human dentin blocks. The volunteers immersed the devices for 5 min in 150 mL of cola drink (Coca-ColaTM, pH 2.6), containing ferrous sulfate (10 mmol/L) or not (control), 4 times per day. The effect of ferrous sulfate on the inhibition of erosion was evaluated by profilometry (wear). Data were analyzed by paired t tests (pcola drinks with ferrous sulfate can be a good alternative for the reduction of their erosive potential. Additional studies should be done to test if lower ferrous sulfate concentrations can also have a protective effect as well as the combination of ferrous sulfate with other ions.

  10. Biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani disease and biostimulant effect by microbial products on bean plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Roberti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial products containing a mixture of fungi and bacteria (EM Bokashi® 2-fi and EM-5 Sutociu® characterised by plant biostimulant activity, Trichoderma harzianum T22 (biofungicide and the antagonist fungus Trichoderma sp. TJ40 were tested for efficacy against R. solani disease and for their biostimulant effects on bean plants, in growth chamber experiments, and for their direct effect on the pathogen growth, through in vitro experiments. In growth chamber experiments, EM-5 Sutociu was applied to seed (Sut/Se, substrate (Sut/S and leaf (Sut/L many times, EM Bokashi 2-fi to substrare (Bok/S once and combined with Sut, T22 and TJ40 were applied once to substrate. The pathogen was inoculated to substrate at seeding time (first experiment or at seedling phase (second experiment. Under our experimental conditions, Bok/S+Sut/S+Sut/L, Sut/S+Sut/L, Sut/Se+Sut/S+Sut/L and T22, in the first experiment, and all treatments, with the exception of Bok/S applied alone in the second experiment, gave significantly disease severity reduction and increase of dry weight and leaf area with respect to the infected control. The TJ40 treatment reduced both disease incidence and disease severity only in the second experiment. In the experiment on the biostimulant effect, T22, Bok/S+Sut/S+Sut/L, Sut/S+Sut/L and Sut/Se+Sut/S+Sut/L showed significantly increases of both dry weight and leaf area. The direct effect of the treatment with T22, TJ40, Bok and Sut on R. solani growth in vitro was studied with two methods, submerged colony (SC and well diffusion (WD assays. The pathogen growth was completely inhibited by Trichoderma T22 in both assays, by Trichoderma TJ40 in a range of 80-50 % in SD assay, and 50-30 % in WD assay and slightly inhibited or not inhibited by Bok and Sut.

  11. Biostimulation of soil polluted 10000 ppm of waste motor oil and phytoremediation with Cicer arietinum improved by Bacillus cereus/Rhizobium etli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juárez-Cisneros Gladys

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil pollution by waste motor oil (WMO is reducing its productivity. An alternative for removing WMO from soil is by biostimulation (BIS applying animal manure and then phytoremediation (PR by legume improving with plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB to reduce WMO concentration at level below 4400 ppm limit permit for the NOM-138-SEMARNAT/SSA1-2012 (NOM-138. The aims of this re-search were: i to analyze soil biostimulation polluted by 10000 ppm of WMO applying vermicompost, then subsequent soil phytoremediation with Cicer arietinum inoculated by Bacillus cereus and/or Rhizo-bium etli. In soil after applying BS by VC was measured WMO soil concentration and ii for PR was regarded phenology and biomass of C. arietinum and WMO concentration remaining at the end of this step. The results showed that soil biostimulated by VC, WMO was reduced at 1370 ppm, subsequent PR sowing C. arietinum with R. etli, WMR was reduced at 30 ppm concentration both values below to maxi-mum value accepted by NOM-138. Those data indicate that in soil polluted by WMO the best way to biorecovery soil was to integrate strategy BS/PR the last one improved by genus of PGPB.

  12. Evaluation of biostimulation and Tween 80 addition for the bioremediation of long-term DDT-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancur-Corredor, Bibiana; Pino, Nancy J; Cardona, Santiago; Peñuela, Gustavo A

    2015-02-01

    The bioremediation of a long-term contaminated soil through biostimulation and surfactant addition was evaluated. The concentrations of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT) and its metabolites 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDD) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl) ethylene (DDE) were monitored during an 8-week remediation process. Physicochemical characterization of the treated soil was performed before and after the bioremediation process. The isolation and identification of predominant microorganisms during the remediation process were also carried out. The efficiency of detoxification was evaluated after each bioremediation protocol. Humidity and pH and the heterotrophic microorganism count were monitored weekly. The DDT concentration was reduced by 79% after 8 weeks via biostimulation with surfactant addition (B+S) and 94.3% via biostimulation alone (B). Likewise, the concentrations of the metabolites DDE and DDD were reduced to levels below the quantification limits. The microorganisms isolated during bioremediation were identified as Bacillus thuringiensis, Flavobacterium sp., Cuprivadius sp., Variovorax soli, Phenylobacterium sp. and Lysobacter sp., among others. Analysis with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) allowed visualization of the colonization patterns of soil particles. The toxicity of the soil before and after bioremediation was evaluated using Vibrio fischeri as a bioluminescent sensor. A decrease in the toxic potential of the soil was verified by the increase of the concentration/effect relationship EC50 to 26.9% and 27.2% for B+S and B, respectively, compared to 0.4% obtained for the soil before treatment and 2.5% by natural attenuation after 8 weeks of treatment. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Biostimulation strategies to enhance manganese removal in drinking water biofilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breda, Inês Lousinha Ribeiro; Ramsay, Loren; Søborg, Ditte

    to national drinking water criteria. The period during which virgin filter media matures into a fully functional biofilter is designated as the start-up period. The duration of a start-up for efficient manganese removal varies from weeks to more than a year. The aim of this study was to investigate...... growth and activity of specific bacteria. Biostimulation of virgin media to enhance initial manganese removal using different amendments strategies is possible especially in the early stages of filter development whereas autocatalytic processes appear to become dominant with time. The complex...

  14. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Two Ascophyllum nodosum Extract Biostimulants: Same Seaweed but Different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi, Oscar; Fort, Antoine; Quille, Patrick; McKeown, Peter C; Spillane, Charles; O'Connell, Shane

    2016-04-13

    Biostimulants for crop management are gaining increased attention with continued demand for increased crop yields. Seaweed extracts represent one category of biostimulant, with Ascophyllum nodosum extracts (ANE) widely used for yield and quality enhancement. This study investigated how the composition of two ANE biostimulants (ANE A and ANE B) affects plant mRNA transcriptomes, using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Using Affymetrix Ath1 microarrays, significant heterogeneity was detected between the ANE biostimulants in terms of their impacts on the mRNA transcriptome of A. thaliana plants, which accumulated significantly more biomass than untreated controls. Genes dysregulated by the ANE biostimulants are associated with a wide array of predicted biological processes, molecular functions, and subcellular distributions. ANE A dysregulated 4.47% of the transcriptome, whereas ANE B dysregulated 0.87%. The compositions of both ANEs were significantly different, with a 4-fold difference in polyphenol levels, the largest observed. The standardization of the composition of ANE biostimulants represents a challenge for providing consistent effects on plant gene expression and biostimulation.

  15. Biostimulation effect of low-level laser on healing process after third molar surgery, based on biochemical markers in saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroulikova, Veronika; Dostálová, Tatjana; Podzimek, Stepan

    2015-02-01

    Third molar extractions in general anesthesia have become a standard procedure in dentistry. There is an effort to shorten healing time and decrease the number of complications as well as increase comfort after the treatment. Low-level lasers are known for their analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and stimulatory effect. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of low-level laser after surgery in general anesthesia reducing the patient's discomfort, i.e. mainly pain, and also, to monitor the biostimulation process. Our study included 79 patients treated at the Department of Maxilofacial Surgery, diagnosed with third molar retention. Diode low-level laser radiation (wavelength 830 nm, output power 270 mW, probe aperture of 6.4 mm2) with dose ~ 3 mJ was applied. The control group was treated by using placebo - red light. The exposure time was 11 seconds immediately after the suture; the treatment was repeated every day for the following 3 days. To evaluate the effect of laser biostimulation, the objective markers for immunological determination of healing - sIgA and lysozyme in non-stimulated saliva of patients - were used. The sIgA decreases after laser application from 546.91 mg/l to 304. 91mg/l and in the control group from 602.25mg/l to 425.62 mg/l. The results were statistically significant. The level of lysozyme decreases from 54.27 mg/l to 2.45mg/l after laser biostimulation, from 304.371mg/l to 11.08mg/l after placebo effect. The study has confirmed a low-level laser healing effect not directly related to pain.

  16. Biostimulant on faveiro (Dimorphandra mollis Benth. seeds and seedling vigor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tathiana Elisa Masetto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to verify the effects of biostimulant doses, applied through seeds, on faveiro (Dimorphandra mollis Benth. seeds and seedlings vigor. Seeds were previously sulfuric acid scarified in two consecutive years experiments. On 2006 August (first experiment seeds were submitted on Stimulate®: 0; 3.5; 7.0; 10.5 and 14 mL.0.5 Kg-1 doses (first experiment; and seeds picked in August, 2007, were Stimulate:0; 15; 20 and 25 mL.0.5Kg-1 of seeds treated (second experiment. After the biostimulant treatment seeds were sowed in cells trays containing 1:1 (v:v distroferric red latosol + plantmax®. The effect of different Stimulate® doses on Dimorphandra mollis seeds collected in different years were evaluated on the emergency percentage, speed emergency index, root length, aerial part height and dry seedling weight. It was conducted on entirely casualized with four repetitions of 25 seeds each treatment. The 14 mL (2006 lot and 15 mL (2007 lot 0.5Kg-1 of seeds doses provided larger percentage (50% and 66%, respectively and speed emergency indexes (0.67 and 0.9 respectively. The 20 mL.0.5Kg-1 of seeds dose treatment favored the aerial part length, but it didn't influenced the other Dimorphandra mollis seedlings vigor indexes.

  17. Impact of biostimulated redox processes on metal dynamics in an iron-rich creek soil of a former uranium mining area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Eva-Maria; Akob, Denise M; Bischoff, Sebastian; Sitte, Jana; Kostka, Joel E; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Scheinost, Andreas C; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of metals and radionuclides in soil environments is necessary for evaluating risks to pristine sites. An iron-rich creek soil of a former uranium-mining district (Ronneburg, Germany) showed high porewater concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides. Thus, this study aims to (i) evaluate metal dynamics during terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) and (ii) characterize active microbial populations in biostimulated soil microcosms using a stable isotope probing (SIP) approach. In biostimulated soil slurries, concentrations of soluble Co, Ni, Zn, As, and unexpectedly U increased during Fe(III)-reduction. This suggests that there was a release of sorbed metals and As during reductive dissolution of Fe(III)-oxides. Subsequent sulfate-reduction was concurrent with a decrease of U, Co, Ni, and Zn concentrations. The relative contribution of U(IV) in the solid phase changed from 18.5 to 88.7% after incubation. The active Fe(III)-reducing population was dominated by delta-Proteobacteria (Geobacter) in (13)C-ethanol amended microcosms. A more diverse community was present in (13)C-lactate amended microcosms including taxa related to Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, delta-Proteobacteria, and beta-Proteobacteria. Our results suggested that biostimulated Fe(III)-reducing communities facilitated the release of metals including U to groundwater which is in contrast to other studies.

  18. Modeling Biometric Traits, Yield and Nutritional and Antioxidant Properties of Seeds of Three Soybean Cultivars Through the Application of Biostimulant Containing Seaweed and Amino Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Kocira

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, attempts have been made to use preparations that allow obtaining high and good quality yields, while reducing the application of pesticides and mineral fertilizers. These include biostimulants that are safe for the natural environment and contribute to the improvement of yield size and quality, especially after the occurrence of stressors. Their use is advisable in the case of crops sensitive to such biotic stress factors like low temperatures or drought. One of these is soybean which is a very important plant from the economic viewpoint. Field experiments were established in the years 2014-2016 in a random block design in four replicates on experimental plots of 10 m2. Three soybean cultivars: Annushka, Mavka, and Atlanta were planted in the third decade of April. Fylloton biostimulant was used at 0.7% or 1% concentrations as single spraying (BBCH 13-15 or double spraying (BBCH 13-15, BBCH 61 in the vegetation period. The number of seeds per 1 m2, seed yield, thousand seed weight, number of pods per plant, number of nodes in the main shoot, height of plants, and protein and fat contents in seeds were determined. The content of phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity and antioxidant effect of soybean seeds were assayed as well. Foliar treatment of soybean with Fylloton stimulated the growth and yield of plants without compromising their nutritional and nutraceutical properties. The double application of the higher concentration of Fylloton was favorable for the plant height, seed number and soybean yield. Moreover, the highest number of pods was obtained after single treatment of plants with the lower biostimulant concentration. There was also a positive effect of using this biostimulant on the content and activity of some bioactive compounds, such as phenolics and flavonoids, and on the reducing power.

  19. Acetate biostimulation as an effective treatment for cleaning up alkaline soil highly contaminated with Cr(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Paloma; Morett, Enrique; Juárez, Katy

    2017-11-01

    Stimulation of microbial reduction of Cr(VI) to the less toxic and less soluble Cr(III) through electron donor addition has been regarded as a promising approach for the remediation of chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater sites. However, each site presents different challenges; local physicochemical characteristics and indigenous microbial communities influence the effectiveness of the biostimulation processes. Here, we show microcosm assays stimulation of microbial reduction of Cr(VI) in highly alkaline and saline soil samples from a long-term contaminated site in Guanajuato, Mexico. Acetate was effective promoting anaerobic microbial reduction of 15 mM of Cr(VI) in 25 days accompanied by an increase in pH from 9 to 10. Our analyses showed the presence of Halomonas, Herbaspirillum, Nesterenkonia/Arthrobacter, and Bacillus species in the soil sample collected. Moreover, from biostimulated soil samples, it was possible to isolate Halomonas spp. strains able to grow at 32 mM of Cr(VI). Additionally, we found that polluted groundwater has bacterial species different to those found in soil samples with the ability to resist and reduce chromate using acetate and yeast extract as electron donors.

  20. Biostimulators: A New Trend towards Solving an Old Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posmyk, Małgorzata M; Szafrańska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Stresses provoked by adverse living conditions are inherent to a changing environment (climate change and anthropogenic influence) and they are basic factors that limit plant development and yields. Agriculture always struggled with this problem. The survey of non-toxic, natural, active substances useful in protection, and stimulation of plants growing under suboptimal and even harmful conditions, as well as searching for the most effective methods for their application, will direct our activities toward sustainable development and harmony with nature. It seems highly probable that boosting natural plant defense strategies by applying biostimulators will help to solve an old problem of poor yield in plant cultivation, by provoking their better growth and development even under suboptimal environmental conditions. This work is a concise review of such substances and methods of their application to plants.

  1. Biostimulators – a new trend to solve an old problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Maria Posmyk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stresses provoked by adverse living conditions are inherent to a changing environment (climate change, anthropogenic influence and they are basic factors that limit plant development and yields. Agriculture always struggled with this problem. The survey of nontoxic, natural, active substances useful in protection and stimulation of plants growing under suboptimal and even harmful conditions, as well as searching for the most effective methods for their application, will direct our activities towards sustainable development and harmony with nature. It seems highly probable that boosting natural plant defence strategies by applying biostimulators will help to solve an old problem of poor yield in plant cultivation, by provoking their better growth and development even under suboptimal environmental conditions. This work is a concise review of such substances and methods of their application to plants.

  2. Horizontal gene transfer versus biostimulation: A strategy for bioremediation in Goa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasumarthi, Rajesh; Mutnuri, Srikanth

    2016-12-15

    Bioaugmentation, Biostimulation and Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of catabolic genes have been proven for their role in bioremediation of hydrocarbons. It also has been proved that selection of either biostimulation or bioremediation varies for every contaminated site. The reliability of HGT compared to biostimulation and bioremediation was not tested. The present study focuses on reliability of biostimulatiion, bioaugmentation and HGT during biodegradation of Diesel oil and Non aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). Pseudomonas aeruginosa (AEBBITS1) having alkB and NDO genes was used for bioaugmentation and the experiment was conducted using seawater as medium. Based on Gas chromatography results diesel was found to be degraded to 100% in both presence and absence of AEBBITS1. Denturing gradient gel electrophoresis result showed same pattern in presence and absence of AEBBITS1 indicating no HGT. NAPL degradation was found to be more by Biostimulated Bioaugmentation compared to biostimulation and bioaugmentation alone. This proves that biostimulated bioaugmentation is better strategy for oil contamination (tarabll) in Velsao beach, Goa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Design and testing of low intensity laser biostimulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallikarakis Nicolas E

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The non-invasive nature of laser biostimulation has made lasers an attractive alternative in Medical Acupuncture at the last 25 years. However, there is still an uncertainty as to whether they work or their effect is just placebo. Although a plethora of scientific papers published about the topic showing positive clinical results, there is still a lack of objective scientific proofs about the biostimulation effect of lasers in Medical Acupuncture. The objective of this work was to design and build a low cost portable laser device for stimulation of acupuncture points, considered here as small localized biosources (SLB, without stimulating any sensory nerves via shock or heat and to find out a suitable method for objectively evaluating its stimulating effect. The design is aimed for studying SLB potentials provoked by laser stimulus, in search for objective proofs of the biostimulation effect of lasers used in Medical Acupuncture. Methods The proposed biostimulator features two operational modes: program mode and stimulation mode and two output polarization modes: linearly and circularly polarized laser emission. In program mode, different user-defined stimulation protocols can be created and memorized. The laser output can be either continuous or pulse modulated. Each stimulation session consists of a pre-defined number of successive continuous or square pulse modulated sequences of laser emission. The variable parameters of the laser output are: average output power, pulse width, pulse period, and continuous or pulsed sequence duration and repetition period. In stimulation mode the stimulus is automatically applied according to the pre-programmed protocol. The laser source is 30 mW AlGaInP laser diode with an emission wavelength of 685 nm, driven by a highly integrated driver. The optical system designed for beam collimation and polarization change uses single collimating lens with large numerical aperture, linear polarizer

  4. Reducing the cytotoxicity of inhalable engineered nanoparticles via in situ passivation with biocompatible materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M; Roberts, Jeffrey T

    2015-07-15

    The cytotoxicity of model welding nanoparticles was modulated through in situ passivation with soluble biocompatible materials. A passivation process consisting of a spark discharge particle generator coupled to a collison atomizer as a co-flow or counter-flow configuration was used to incorporate the model nanoparticles with chitosan. The tested model welding nanoparticles are inhaled and that A549 cells are a human lung epithelial cell line. Measurements of in vitro cytotoxicity in A549 cells revealed that the passivated nanoparticles had a lower cytotoxicity (>65% in average cell viability, counter-flow) than the untreated model nanoparticles. Moreover, the co-flow incorporation between the nanoparticles and chitosan induced passivation of the nanoparticles, and the average cell viability increased by >80% compared to the model welding nanoparticles. As a more convenient way (additional chitosan generation and incorporation devices may not be required), other passivation strategies through a modification of the welding rod with chitosan adhesive and graphite paste did also enhance average cell viability (>58%). The approach outlined in this work is potentially generalizable as a new platform, using only biocompatible materials in situ, to treat nanoparticles before they are inhaled. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Reducing Water Sensitivity of Chitosan Biocomposite Films Using Gliadin Particles Made by In Situ Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dajian Huang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to sustain rapid expansion in the field of biocomposites, it is necessary to develop novel fillers that are biodegradable, and easy to disperse and obtain. In this work, gliadin particles (GPs fabricated through an in situ method have been reported as fillers for creating chitosan (CS-based biocomposite films. In general, the particles tend to agglomerate in the polymer matrix at high loading (approximately >10% in the biopolymer/particles composites prepared by the traditional solution-blending method. However, the micrographs of biocomposites confirmed that the GPs are well dispersed in the CS matrix in all CS/GPs composites even at a high loading of 30% in this study. It was found that the GPs could improve the mechanical properties of the biocomposites. In addition, the results of moisture uptake and solubility in water of biocomposites showed that water resistance of biocomposites was enhanced by the introduction of GPs. These results suggested that GPs fabricated through an in situ method could be a good candidate for use in biopolymer-based composites.

  6. A novel In-situ Enzymatic Cleaning Method for Reducing Membrane Fouling in Membrane Bioreactors (MBRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Bilad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel in-situ enzymatic cleaning method was developed for fouling control in membrane bioreactors (MBRs. It is achieved by bringing the required enzymes near the membrane surface by pulling the enzymes to a magnetic membrane (MM surface by means of magnetic forces, exactly where the cleaning is required. To achieve this, the enzyme was coupled to a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP and the membrane it self was loaded with MNP. The magnetic activity was turned by means of an external permanent magnet. The effectiveness of concept was tested in a submerged membrane filtration using the model enzyme-substrate of Bacillus subitilis xylanase-arabinoxylan. The MM had almost similar properties compared to the unloaded ones, except for its well distributed MNPs. The enzyme was stable during coupling conditions and the presence of coupling could be detected using a high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The system facilitated an in-situ enzymatic cleaning and could be effectively applied for control fouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs.

  7. Responses of microbial community functional structures to pilot-scale uranium in situ bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, M.; Wu, W.-M.; Wu, L.; He, Z.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Deng, Y.; Luo, J.; Carley, J.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Gentry, T.J.; Gu, B.; Watson, D.; Jardine, P.M.; Marsh, T.L.; Tiedje, J.M.; Hazen, T.C.; Criddle, C.S.; Zhou, J.

    2010-02-15

    A pilot-scale field test system with an inner loop nested within an outer loop was constructed for in situ U(VI) bioremediation at a US Department of Energy site, Oak Ridge, TN. The outer loop was used for hydrological protection of the inner loop where ethanol was injected for biostimulation of microorganisms for U(VI) reduction/immobilization. After 2 years of biostimulation with ethanol, U(VI) levels were reduced to below drinking water standard (<30 {micro}gl{sup -1}) in the inner loop monitoring wells. To elucidate the microbial community structure and functions under in situ uranium bioremediation conditions, we used a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip) to examine the microbial functional gene composition of the sediment samples collected from both inner and outer loop wells. Our study results showed that distinct microbial communities were established in the inner loop wells. Also, higher microbial functional gene number, diversity and abundance were observed in the inner loop wells than the outer loop wells. In addition, metal-reducing bacteria, such as Desulfovibrio, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter and Shewanella, and other bacteria, for example, Rhodopseudomonas and Pseudomonas, are highly abundant in the inner loop wells. Finally, the richness and abundance of microbial functional genes were highly correlated with the mean travel time of groundwater from the inner loop injection well, pH and sulfate concentration in groundwater. These results suggest that the indigenous microbial communities can be successfully stimulated for U bioremediation in the groundwater ecosystem, and their structure and performance can be manipulated or optimized by adjusting geochemical and hydrological conditions.

  8. DEMONSTRATION OF BIODEGRADATION OF DENSE, NONAQUEOUS-PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL)THROUGH BIOSTIMULATION AND BIOAUGMENTATION AT LAUNCH COMPLEX 34 IN CAPE CANAVERAL AIR FORCE STATION, FLORIDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biostimulation involves stimulating indigenous microbial cultures by adding nutrients whereas bioaugmentation involves introducing microbial cultures that are particularly adept at degrading these contaminants into the target aquifer. This demonstration involved biostimulation fo...

  9. Medroxyprogesterone acetate or long-acting progesterone in the biostimulation of lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis C.O. Magalhães

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of prepubertal ewe lambs to exogenous administration of either medroxyprogesterone acetate (MAP or long-acting progesterone (LAP together with biostimulation. Two Pool Dorset adult males and 75 mixed-breed prepubertal ewe lambs (average of 179 days-old and 30.0kg were used. The females were randomly assigned to three different groups. In the first group the females were submitted to the insertion of intravaginal sponges containing MAP (60 mg for 12 days and were then biostimulated for eight weeks. In the second group the females were submitted to a single injection of LAP (225 mg and then to biostimulation for eight weeks. In the last group, the females were only submitted to biostimulation for eight weeks. Animals were considered cyclic when plasma progesterone (P4 concentration exceeded 1.0 ng/mL in at least one of two consecutive blood samples taken within a 7-day interval in three distinct experimental moments. After treatments 93.3% of the females disregarding their group started their cyclicity and most of them (92.0%, continued to be cyclic after 63 days of either MAP or LAP together with biostimulation under both male and female effect. We conclude that prepubertal ewe lambs when submitted to protocols of either MAP or LAP followed by biostimulation result in puberty at the 7 month of age. It can be deducted that some ewe lambs submitted to the administration of either MAP or LAP together with biostimulation promoted a multiplier effect upon the other young females that were then stimulated to start cyclicity.

  10. One-step synthesis of in situ reduced metal Bi decorated bismuth molybdate hollow microspheres with enhancing photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Meng [College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Lu, Shiyu [Institute for Clean Energy & Advanced Materials, Faculty of Materials and Energy, Southwest University, Chongqing, 400715 (China); Ma, Li, E-mail: mlsys607@126.com [College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Gan, Mengyu [College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Metal Bi decorated Bi{sub 2-x}MoOy was synthesised by a simple and one-step. • Bi{sup 3+} could be in situ reduced to Bi{sup 0} gradually and dispersed uniform in Bi{sub 2-x}MoOy. • It shows excellent photocatalytic activity due to special structure and composition. - Abstract: In this feature work, in situ metal Bi are successfully modified bismuth molybdate hollow spheres using an effective one-pot solvthermal reduction without any temple. In order to deeply understand the influence of reduction conditions on the texture, surface state, and photocatalytic performance of the resulting samples, a series of products were synthesized by tuning the temperatures. The similar morphology, surface area of photocatalysis (BMO-160 and BMO-170) were synthesized, only with the different composition. The detailed characterization and analysis distinctly suggested that increasing solvothermal reduction temperature led to Bi{sup 3+} was in situ reduced to elementary substance Bi{sup 0} by ethylene glycol gradually and dispersed very uniform in bismuth molybdate. Benefiting from the enhanced charge separation, transfer, and donor density resulting from the formation of Bi decorated bismuth molybdate where Bi as cocatalyst, the photocatalytic performance of the reductive Bi/Bi{sub 2-x}MoO{sub y} hollow spheres (BMO-170) is higher than that of the untreated Bi{sub 2-x}MoO{sub y} hollow spheres (BMO-160) for Rh6G degradation under visible light irradiation. Additionally, the reductive BMO-170 has a superior stability after five cycles.

  11. In situ one-pot preparation of reduced graphene oxide/polyaniline composite for high-performance electrochemical capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Nali; Ren, Yapeng; Kong, Peipei; Tan, Lin; Feng, Huixia; Luo, Yongchun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new method to prepare reduced graphene oxide/polyaniline composite is developed. • Aniline serves as a reduction for graphene oxide under weak alkali condition. • Different characterizations confirm that GO can be effectively reduced by aniline. • A high specific capacitance of 524.4 F·g"−"1 is obtained at 0.5 A·g"−"1. - Abstract: Reduced graphene oxide/polyaniline (rGO/PANI) composites are prepared through an effective in situ one-pot synthesis route that includes the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) by aniline under weak alkali condition via hydrothermal method and then followed by in situ polymerization of aniline. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope are employed to reveal that GO is successfully reduced by aniline under weak alkali condition and PANI can be deposited on the surfaces of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. The effect of rGO is optimized by tuning the mass ratios of aniline to GO to improve the electrochemical performance of rGO/PANI composites. The maximum specific capacitance of rGO/PANI composites achieves 524.4 F/g with a mass ratio of aniline to GO 10:1 at a current density of 0.5 A/g, in comparison to the specific capacitance of 397 F/g at the same current density of pure PANI. Particularly, the specific capacity retention rate is 81.1% after 2000 cycles at 100 mv/s scan rate, which is an improvement over that of pure PANI (55.5%).

  12. In situ one-pot preparation of reduced graphene oxide/polyaniline composite for high-performance electrochemical capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Nali [College of Petrochemical Technology, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050, Gansu (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Nonferrous Metals, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050, Gansu (China); Ren, Yapeng; Kong, Peipei; Tan, Lin [College of Petrochemical Technology, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050, Gansu (China); Feng, Huixia, E-mail: fenghx@lut.cn [College of Petrochemical Technology, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050, Gansu (China); Luo, Yongchun, E-mail: luoyc@lut.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Nonferrous Metals, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050, Gansu (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A new method to prepare reduced graphene oxide/polyaniline composite is developed. • Aniline serves as a reduction for graphene oxide under weak alkali condition. • Different characterizations confirm that GO can be effectively reduced by aniline. • A high specific capacitance of 524.4 F·g{sup −1} is obtained at 0.5 A·g{sup −1}. - Abstract: Reduced graphene oxide/polyaniline (rGO/PANI) composites are prepared through an effective in situ one-pot synthesis route that includes the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) by aniline under weak alkali condition via hydrothermal method and then followed by in situ polymerization of aniline. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope are employed to reveal that GO is successfully reduced by aniline under weak alkali condition and PANI can be deposited on the surfaces of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. The effect of rGO is optimized by tuning the mass ratios of aniline to GO to improve the electrochemical performance of rGO/PANI composites. The maximum specific capacitance of rGO/PANI composites achieves 524.4 F/g with a mass ratio of aniline to GO 10:1 at a current density of 0.5 A/g, in comparison to the specific capacitance of 397 F/g at the same current density of pure PANI. Particularly, the specific capacity retention rate is 81.1% after 2000 cycles at 100 mv/s scan rate, which is an improvement over that of pure PANI (55.5%).

  13. Comment on mRNA-Sequencing Analysis Reveals Transcriptional Changes in Root of Maize Seedlings Treated with Two Increasing Concentrations of a New Biostimulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ronivaldo Rodrigues

    2018-02-28

    Overpopulation is already a reality, and the need for alternative technologies to meet a continuously increasing food demand has been much discussed around the world. In addition, soil decreasing fertility and desertification are obstacles that we will need to be overcome to increase crop productivity with a much-reduced dependence upon inorganic fertilizers. In this context, protein hydrolysates has emerged as an important strategy to reduce the use of inorganic fertilizers, whose applications as biostimulants for plant growth have shown very promising results.

  14. In Situ Analysis of the Li-O2 Battery with Thermally Reduced Graphene Oxide Cathode: Influence of Water Addition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Mie Møller; Christensen, Mathias Kjærgård; Younesi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The Li-O2 battery technology holds the promise to deliver a battery with significantly increased specific energy compared to today's Li-ion batteries. As a cathode support material, reduced graphene oxide has received increasing attention in the Li-O2 battery community due to the possibility...... of increased discharge capacity, increased battery cyclability, and decreased, charging, overpotential. In this. article we investigate the effect of water on a thermally, redircedigraphene, oxide cathode in a Li-O2 battery. Differential electrochemical mass spectrciscnieveals a, decreased electron count......-of-the cathode and not only on addition of water to the electrolyte as demonstrated by the solution-based mechanism In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiment using a new design of a capillary-based Li-O2 cell with a thermally reduced graphene oxide cathode shows formation of LiOH along with Li2O2....

  15. Current trials to reduce surgical intervention in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: Critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toss, M; Miligy, I; Thompson, A M; Khout, H; Green, A R; Ellis, I O; Rakha, E A

    2017-10-01

    The high proportion of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) presented in mammographic screening and the relatively low risk of progression to invasive disease have raised questions related to overtreatment. Following a review of current DCIS management protocols a more conservative approach has been suggested. Clinical trials have been introduced to evaluate the option of avoiding surgical intervention in a proportion of patients with DCIS defined as "low-risk" using certain clinicopathological criteria. These trials can potentially provide evidence-based models of active surveillance (with or without endocrine therapy) as a future management approach. Despite the undisputable fact of our need to address the obvious overtreatment of screen-detected DCIS, some important questions need to be considered regarding these trials including the eligibility criteria and definition of risk, the proportion of patient eligible for inclusion, and the length of time required for proper analysis of the trials' outcome in view of the long-term natural history of DCIS progression particularly the low-risk group. These factors can potentially affect the practicality and future impact of such trials. This review provides critical analysis of current DCIS management trials and highlights critical issues related to their practicality and the expected outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Paradigm Shift toward Reducing Overtreatment of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki Sagara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS of the breast has increased substantially after the introduction of breast cancer screening programs, although the clinical effects of early DCIS detection and treatment remain unclear. The standard treatment for DCIS has involved local breast-conserving surgery (BCS followed by radiotherapy (RT or total mastectomy with/without endocrine therapy, and the choice of local treatment is not usually based on clinicopathologic or biological factors. However, we have investigated the effectiveness of local treatment using breast surgery and RT using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data, and found that the effectiveness of breast surgery was modified by the nuclear grade. Furthermore, breast cancer-specific survival was identical between patients with low-grade DCIS who did and did not undergo surgery. Moreover, we found that RT after BCS for DCIS was only associated with a survival benefit among patients with risk factors for local recurrence, such as nuclear grade, age, and tumor size. Ongoing clinical trials and translational research have attempted to develop a treatment strategy that prevents the overdiagnosis and overtreatment of low-risk DCIS, as well as a biology-based treatment strategy for using targeted therapy. Therefore, to develop a tailored treatment strategy for DCIS, we need to identify molecular and biological classifications based on the results from translational research, national databases, and clinical trials.

  17. In situ mobility of uranium in the presence of nitrate following sulfate-reducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Charles J; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Watson, David B; McKay, Larry D; Hazen, Terry C; Park, Melora; Istok, Jonathan D

    2016-04-01

    Reoxidation and mobilization of previously reduced and immobilized uranium by dissolved-phase oxidants poses a significant challenge for remediating uranium-contaminated groundwater. Preferential oxidation of reduced sulfur-bearing species, as opposed to reduced uranium-bearing species, has been demonstrated to limit the mobility of uranium at the laboratory scale yet field-scale investigations are lacking. In this study, the mobility of uranium in the presence of nitrate oxidant was investigated in a shallow groundwater system after establishing conditions conducive to uranium reduction and the formation of reduced sulfur-bearing species. A series of three injections of groundwater (200 L) containing U(VI) (5 μM) and amended with ethanol (40 mM) and sulfate (20 mM) were conducted in ten test wells in order to stimulate microbial-mediated reduction of uranium and the formation of reduced sulfur-bearing species. Simultaneous push-pull tests were then conducted in triplicate well clusters to investigate the mobility of U(VI) under three conditions: 1) high nitrate (120 mM), 2) high nitrate (120 mM) with ethanol (30 mM), and 3) low nitrate (2 mM) with ethanol (30 mM). Dilution-adjusted breakthrough curves of ethanol, nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, and U(VI) suggested that nitrate reduction was predominantly coupled to the oxidation of reduced-sulfur bearing species, as opposed to the reoxidation of U(IV), under all three conditions for the duration of the 36-day tests. The amount of sulfate, but not U(VI), recovered during the push-pull tests was substantially more than injected, relative to bromide tracer, under all three conditions and further suggested that reduced sulfur-bearing species were preferentially oxidized under nitrate-reducing conditions. However, some reoxidation of U(IV) was observed under nitrate-reducing conditions and in the absence of detectable nitrate and/or nitrite. This suggested that reduced sulfur-bearing species may not be fully effective at

  18. Biostimulation and reproductive performance of artificially inseminated rabbit does (Oryctolagus cuniculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. E. EL-Azzazi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Biostimulation is a non-hormonal and practical technique that has not yet been widely utilised when applied immediately before insemination to improve reproductive efficiency in livestock species. This study was conducted to determine the influence of short-term male biostimulation on behavioural and reproductive performance of inseminated rabbit does. A total of 142 female New Zealand White rabbits were randomly assigned to 3 groups. Females were either exposed to male odour (Odour group or an adult aproned male (Male group, while the remaining does that were neither exposed to the male odour nor the adult male are considered the control group. All females were inseminated after the 2 h exposure session. Conception rates were determined by abdominal palpation 12 d after insemination. The results showed that conception rate of the male odour group (79.59% was greater than that of male presence group (76.09% and that of the control group (68.09%. Moreover, biostimulated does showed significant behavioural activities during the 2 h exposure session compared to the control group. Although no significant differences were recognised, litter size at birth and at weaning was slightly increased in biostimulated compared to control females. Nor were there any significant difference in serum oestradiol concentrations between treated groups. Conclusively, short-term 2 h biostimulation of rabbit does resulted in the appearance of various behavioural responses followed by differences in conception rates between groups after routine artificial insemination.

  19. Laser biostimulation of articular cartilage: in vitro evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yali; Guo, Zhouyi; Yang, Xiaohong; Zeng, Chang-Chun

    2004-07-01

    In the orthopaedic field, the repair of ariticular cartilage is still a difficult problem, because of the physiological characters of cartilaginous tissues and chondrocytes. To find an effective method of stimulating their regeneration, this in vitro study focuses on the biostimulation of rabbit articular chondrocytes by low-power He-Ne laser. The articular chondrocytes isolated from the cartilage of the medial condyle of the femur of the rabbit were incubated in HamF12 medium. The second passage culture were spread on 24 petri dishes and were irradiated with laser at power density of 2 - 12 mW/cm2 for 6.5 minutes, corresponding to the energy density of 1-6 J/cm2. Laser treatment was performed three times at a 24-hour interval. After lasering, incubation was continued for 24 hours. Non-irradiated cells were kept under the same conditions as the irradiated ones. The cell proliferation activity was evaluated with a XTT colorimetric method. Irradiation of 4 - 6 J/cm2 revealed a considerably higher cell proliferation activity comparing to control cultures. Thereinto, the energy density of 4 and 5 J/cm2 remarkably increased cell growth (P<0.01). The present study showed that a particular laser irradiation stimulates articular chondrocytes proliferation. These findings might be clinically relevant, indicating that low-power laser irradiation treatment is likely to achieve the repair of articular cartilage in clinic.

  20. Cultured Human Fibroblast Biostimulation Using a 940 nm Diode Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illescas-Montes, Rebeca; Melguizo-Rodríguez, Lucía; Manzano-Moreno, Francisco Javier; García-Martínez, Olga; Ruiz, Concepción

    2017-01-01

    Background: Fibroblasts are the main cells involved in regeneration during wound healing. The objective was to determine the effect of 940 nm diode laser on cultured human fibroblasts using different irradiation regimens. Methods: The CCD-1064Sk human epithelial fibroblast cell line was treated with a 940 nm diode laser at different energy doses (power: 0.2–1 W and energy density: 1–7 J/cm2) using different transmission modes (continuous or pulsed). The effect on cell growth at 24 and 72 h post-treatment was examined by measuring the proliferative capacity, the impact on the cell cycle, and the effect on cell differentiation. Results: fibroblast proliferative capacity was increased at 24 and 72 h post-treatment as a function of the energy dose. The greatest increase was observed with a power of 0.2 or 0.5 W and energy density between 1 and 4 J/cm2; no difference was observed between continuous and pulsed modes. There were no significant differences in cell cycle between treated groups and controls. α-actin expression was increased by treatment, indicating enhanced cell differentiation. Conclusion: The 940 nm diode laser has biostimulating effects on fibroblasts, stimulating proliferative capacity and cell differentiation without altering the cell cycle. Further researches are necessary to explore its potential clinical usefulness in wound healing. PMID:28773152

  1. Evaluation of Biostimulation (Nutrients) in hydrocarbons contaminated soils by respirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Erika; Roldan, Fabio; Garzon, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The biostimulation process was evaluated in a hydrocarbon contaminated soil by respirometry after amendment with inorganic compound fertilizer (ICF) (N: P: K 28:12:7) and simple inorganic salts (SIS) (NH 4 NO 3 and K 2 HPO 4 ). The soil was contaminated with oily sludge (40.000 MgTPH/Kgdw). The oxygen uptake was measured using two respirometers (HACH 2173b and OXITOP PF 600) during thirteen days (n=3). Two treatments (ICF and SIS) and three controls (abiotic, reference substance and without nutrients) were evaluated during the study. Physicochemical (pH, nutrients, and TPH) and microbiological analysis (heterotrophic and hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms) were obtained at the beginning and at the end of each assay. Higher respiration rates were recorded in sis and without nutrient control. Results were 802.28 and 850.72- 1 d-1, MgO 2 kgps - 1d i n HACH, while in OXITOP were 936.65 and 502.05 MgO 2 Kgps respectively. These data indicate that amendment of nutrients stimulated microbial metabolism. ICF had lower respiration rates (188.18 and 139.87 MgO 2 kgps - 1d - 1 i n HACH and OXITOP, respectively) as well as counts; this could be attributed to ammonia toxicity.

  2. Cultured Human Fibroblast Biostimulation Using a 940 nm Diode Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Illescas-Montes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fibroblasts are the main cells involved in regeneration during wound healing. The objective was to determine the effect of 940 nm diode laser on cultured human fibroblasts using different irradiation regimens. Methods: The CCD-1064Sk human epithelial fibroblast cell line was treated with a 940 nm diode laser at different energy doses (power: 0.2–1 W and energy density: 1–7 J/cm2 using different transmission modes (continuous or pulsed. The effect on cell growth at 24 and 72 h post-treatment was examined by measuring the proliferative capacity, the impact on the cell cycle, and the effect on cell differentiation. Results: fibroblast proliferative capacity was increased at 24 and 72 h post-treatment as a function of the energy dose. The greatest increase was observed with a power of 0.2 or 0.5 W and energy density between 1 and 4 J/cm2; no difference was observed between continuous and pulsed modes. There were no significant differences in cell cycle between treated groups and controls. α-actin expression was increased by treatment, indicating enhanced cell differentiation. Conclusion: The 940 nm diode laser has biostimulating effects on fibroblasts, stimulating proliferative capacity and cell differentiation without altering the cell cycle. Further researches are necessary to explore its potential clinical usefulness in wound healing.

  3. In situ X-ray powder diffraction studies of the synthesis of graphene oxide and formation of reduced graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, Mie Møller; Johnsen, Rune E.; Norby, Poul

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) are important materials in a wide range of fields. The modified Hummers methods, for synthesizing GO, and subsequent thermal reduction to rGO, are often employed for production of rGO. However, the mechanism behinds these syntheses methods are still unclear. We present an in situ X-ray diffraction study of the synthesis of GO and thermal reduction of GO. The X-ray diffraction revealed that the Hummers method includes an intercalation state and finally formation of additional crystalline material. The formation of GO is observed during both the intercalation and the crystallization stage. During thermal reduction of GO three stages were observed: GO, a disordered stage, and the rGO stage. The appearance of these stages depends on the heating ramp. The aim of this study is to provide deeper insight into the chemical and physical processes during the syntheses. - Graphical abstract: In situ X-ray diffraction results for of the modified Hummers synthesis and the thermal reduction of graphene oxide, revealing three stages for both syntheses as well as new GO diffraction peaks and unidentified crystalline material for the Hummers synthesis and a disordered stage for the thermal reduction of graphene oxide. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Hummers synthesis consists of three stages: dissolution, intercalation and crystal. • GO is produced early on during the synthesis and display new diffraction peaks. • An unidentified triclinic phase is observed for the Hummers synthesis. • Thermal reduction of GO display three stages: GO, a disordered stage and rGO. • In situ XRD indicate reformation of rGO even for fast heated thermal reduction.

  4. In situ X-ray powder diffraction studies of the synthesis of graphene oxide and formation of reduced graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm, Mie Møller, E-mail: mmst@dtu.dk; Johnsen, Rune E.; Norby, Poul

    2016-08-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) are important materials in a wide range of fields. The modified Hummers methods, for synthesizing GO, and subsequent thermal reduction to rGO, are often employed for production of rGO. However, the mechanism behinds these syntheses methods are still unclear. We present an in situ X-ray diffraction study of the synthesis of GO and thermal reduction of GO. The X-ray diffraction revealed that the Hummers method includes an intercalation state and finally formation of additional crystalline material. The formation of GO is observed during both the intercalation and the crystallization stage. During thermal reduction of GO three stages were observed: GO, a disordered stage, and the rGO stage. The appearance of these stages depends on the heating ramp. The aim of this study is to provide deeper insight into the chemical and physical processes during the syntheses. - Graphical abstract: In situ X-ray diffraction results for of the modified Hummers synthesis and the thermal reduction of graphene oxide, revealing three stages for both syntheses as well as new GO diffraction peaks and unidentified crystalline material for the Hummers synthesis and a disordered stage for the thermal reduction of graphene oxide. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Hummers synthesis consists of three stages: dissolution, intercalation and crystal. • GO is produced early on during the synthesis and display new diffraction peaks. • An unidentified triclinic phase is observed for the Hummers synthesis. • Thermal reduction of GO display three stages: GO, a disordered stage and rGO. • In situ XRD indicate reformation of rGO even for fast heated thermal reduction.

  5. Techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides in contaminated subsurface environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, P.M.; Watson, D.B.; Blake, D.A.; Beard, L.P.; Brooks, S.C.; Carley, J.M.; Criddle, C.S.; Doll, W.E.; Fields, M.W.; Fendorf, S.E.; Geesey, G.G.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Hubbard, S.S.; Istok, J.D.; Kelly, S.; Kemner, K.M.; Peacock, A.D.; Spalding, B.P.; White, D.C.; Wolf, A.; Wu, W.; Zhou, J.

    2004-11-14

    Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex face a daunting challenge of remediating huge below inventories of legacy radioactive and toxic metal waste. More often than not, the scope of the problem is massive, particularly in the high recharge, humid regions east of the Mississippi river, where the off-site migration of contaminants continues to plague soil water, groundwater, and surface water sources. As of 2002, contaminated sites are closing rapidly and many remediation strategies have chosen to leave contaminants in-place. In situ barriers, surface caps, and bioremediation are often the remedial strategies of chose. By choosing to leave contaminants in-place, we must accept the fact that the contaminants will continue to interact with subsurface and surface media. Contaminant interactions with the geosphere are complex and investigating long term changes and interactive processes is imperative to verifying risks. We must be able to understand the consequences of our action or inaction. The focus of this manuscript is to describe recent technical developments for assessing the performance of in situ bioremediation and immobilization of subsurface metals and radionuclides. Research within DOE's NABIR and EMSP programs has been investigating the possibility of using subsurface microorganisms to convert redox sensitive toxic metals and radionuclides (e.g. Cr, U, Tc, Co) into a less soluble, less mobile forms. Much of the research is motivated by the likelihood that subsurface metal-reducing bacteria can be stimulated to effectively alter the redox state of metals and radionuclides so that they are immobilized in situ for long time periods. The approach is difficult, however, since subsurface media and waste constituents are complex with competing electron acceptors and hydrogeological conditions making biostimulation a challenge. Performance assessment of in situ biostimulation strategies is also difficult and typically requires detailed

  6. Effect of biostimulator on the incorporation of DL(1-14C)leucine into skeletal muscle proteins of buffalo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, N.C.; Singh, L.N.

    1982-01-01

    Incorporation of 14 C-leucine into muscle proteins of buffalo calves was studied in vitro using muscle fibre preparations from biceps femoris. Biostimulator (a spleen tissue extract) stimulated the incorporation of 14 C-leucine into total proteins to some extent, but inhibited the synthesis of sarcoplasmic proteins. There was no significant difference in the relative proportion of the individual sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins in the presence or absence of biostimulator. In one major sarcoplasmic protein there was higher specific activity in the presence of biostimulator. In all the remaining 4 proteins the incorporation was inhibited. Among the myofibrillar proteins, the incorporation into troponins, myosin light chains and tropomyosin was stimulated in the presence of biostimulator. Myosin heavy chain and acting did not show any change in incorporation of 14 C-leucine after addition of the biostimulator. (author)

  7. In-Situ Survival Mechanisms of U and Tc Reducing Bacteria in Contaminated Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are model subsurface organisms for studying genes involving in situ radionuclide transformation and sediment survival. Our research objective for this project has been to develop a signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) procedure and use it to identify mutants in genes of these subsurface bacteria involved in sediment survival and radionuclide reduction. The mutant genes identified in these studies allow us for the first time to describe at the genetic level microbial processes that are actually being used by environmental bacteria while growing in their natural ecosystems. Identification of these genes revealed facets of microbial physiology and ecology that are not accessible through laboratory studies. Ultimately, this information may be used to optimize bioremediation or other engineered microbial processes. Furthermore, the identification of a mutant in a gene conferring multidrug resistance in strain MR-1 shows that this widespread mechanism of antibiotic resistance, likely has its origins as a mechanism of bacterial defense against naturally occurring toxins. Studies with D. desulfuricans G20: The STM procedure first involved generating a library of 5760 G20 mutants and screening for potential non-survivors in subsurface sediment microcosms. After two rounds of screening, a total of 117 mutants were confirmed to be true non-survivors. 97 transposon insertion regions have been sequenced to date. Upon further analysis of these mutants, we classified the sediment survival genes into COG functional categories. STM mutant insertions were located in genes encoding proteins related to metabolism (33%), cellular processes (42%), and information storage and processing (17%). We also noted 8% of STM mutants identified had insertions in genes for hypothetical proteins or unknown functions. Interestingly, at least 64 of these genes encode cytoplasmic proteins, 46 encode inner membrane proteins, and only 7 encode

  8. Experimental additions of aluminum sulfate and ammonium nitrate to in situ mesocosms to reduce cyanobacterial biovolume and microcystin concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ted D.; Wilhelm, Frank M.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Loftin, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that nitrogen additions to increase the total nitrogen:total phosphorus (TN:TP) ratio may reduce cyanobacterial biovolume and microcystin concentration in reservoirs. In systems where TP is >100 μg/L, however, nitrogen additions to increase the TN:TP ratio could cause ammonia, nitrate, or nitrite toxicity to terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Reducing phosphorus via aluminum sulfate (alum) may be needed prior to nitrogen additions aimed at increasing the TN:TP ratio. We experimentally tested this sequential management approach in large in situ mesocosms (70.7 m3) to examine effects on cyanobacteria and microcystin concentration. Because alum removes nutrients and most seston from the water column, alum treatment reduced both TN and TP, leaving post-treatment TN:TP ratios similar to pre-treatment ratios. Cyanobacterial biovolume was reduced after alum addition, but the percent composition (i.e., relative) cyanobacterial abundance remained unchanged. A single ammonium nitrate (nitrogen) addition increased the TN:TP ratio 7-fold. After the TN:TP ratio was >50 (by weight), cyanobacterial biovolume and abundance were reduced, and chrysophyte and cryptophyte biovolume and abundance increased compared to the alum treatment. Microcystin was not detectable until the TN:TP ratio was <50. Although both treatments reduced cyanobacteria, only the nitrogen treatment seemed to stimulate energy flow from primary producers to zooplankton, which suggests that combining alum and nitrogen treatments may be a viable in-lake management strategy to reduce cyanobacteria and possibly microcystin concentrations in high-phosphorus systems. Additional studies are needed to define best management practices before combined alum and nitrogen additions are implemented as a reservoir management strategy.

  9. In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Characterization of the Synthesis of Graphene Oxide and Reduced Graphene Oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Mie Møller; Johnsen, Rune E.; Norby, Poul

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) synthesised from GO, has a promising future in fields ranging from electronics to energy technologies[1]. GO may be synthesized by the modified Hummer’s method[2], where a mixture of potassium permanganate and concentrated sulfuric acid forms...... by placing a mixture of permanganate and sulphuric acid in a capillary next to graphite. The synthesis was then initiated by gently pushing the fluid mixture into the powder with N2 gas. The in situ XRD of the GO synthesis showed how the oxidation reaction proceeds in three separate stages, as seen in Figure...... 1. The first stage was the dissolution of potassium permanganate, followed by an intercalation stage and subsequent formation of crystalline material. The GO 001 diffraction peak was observed early during the synthesis, in the second stage, and the intensity of the 001 diffraction increased during...

  10. Calcium-Phosphate-Osteopontin Particles Reduce Biofilm Formation and pH Drops in in situ-Grown Dental Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Ibsen, Casper Jon Steenberg; Birkedal, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    This 2-period crossover study investigated the effect of calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles on biofilm formation and pH in 48-h biofilms grown in situ. Bovine milk osteopontin is a highly phosphorylated glycoprotein that has been shown to interfere with bacterial adhesion to salivary......-coated surfaces. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles have been shown to reduce biofilm formation and pH drops in a 5-species laboratory model of dental biofilm without affecting bacterial viability. Here, smooth surface biofilms from 10 individuals were treated ex vivo 6 times/day for 30 min with either...... calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles or sterile saline. After growth, the amount of biofilm formed was determined by confocal microscopy, and pH drops upon exposure to glucose were monitored using confocal-microscopy-based pH ratiometry. A total of 160 biofilms were analysed. No adverse effects...

  11. Cellulose nanocomposite films with in situ generated silver nanoparticles using Cassia alata leaf extract as a reducing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaranjana, P; Nagarajan, E R; Rajini, N; Jawaid, M; Rajulu, A Varada

    2017-06-01

    Cotton linters were dissolved in aq. (8% LiOH+15% urea) that was pre-cooled to -12.5°C. Using this solution cellulose gel films were prepared by regeneration method with ethyl alcohol as a coagulant. These wet films were diffused with 10wt% Cassia alata leaf extract that acted as a reducing agent. The leaf extract diffused cellulose wet films were used as the matrix. The wet matrix films were dipped individually in lower concentrated 1-5mM aq.AgNO 3 source solutions in the presence of sunlight and allowed the solutions to react with the diffused leaf extract reducing agent which in situ generated the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) inside the films as well as in the source solution. The AgNPs formed in the source solution were observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) while those formed in situ the films were observed by SEM and the particle size distribution was determined. The cellulose/AgNP composite films showed good antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli bacteria. These nanocomposite films were also characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile tests. At temperatures below 300°C, the thermal stability of the nanocomposite films was lower than that of the matrix due to the catalytic effect of AgNPs. The nanocomposite films also possessed good tensile properties. The ecofriendly cellulose/AgNP composite films with good antibacterial activity and tensile properties can be considered for medical applications like dressing materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. In situ reduced graphene oxide interlayer for improving electrode performance in ZnO nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, A.; Ramesha, C. K.; Kannan, E. S.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) thin film on the transport characteristics of vertically aligned zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs) grown on ITO substrate was studied. GO was uniformly drop casted on ZnO NRs as a passivation layer and then converted into RGO by heating it at 60 °C prior to metal electrode deposition. This low temperature reduction is facilitated by the thermally excited electrons from ZnI interstitial sites (~30 meV). Successful reduction of GO was ascertained from the increased disorder band (D) intensity in the Raman spectra. Temperature (298 K-10 K) dependent transport measurements of RGO-ZnO NRs indicate that the RGO layer not only acts as a short circuiting inhibitor but also reduces the height of the potential barrier for electron tunneling. This is confirmed from the temperature dependent electrical characteristics which revealed a transition of carrier transport from thermionic emission at high temperature (T  >  100 K) to tunneling at low temperature (T  <  100 K) across the interface. Our technique is the most promising approach for making reliable electrical contacts on vertically aligned ZnO NRs and improving the reproducibility of device characteristics.

  13. A bioenergetics-kinetics coupled modeling study on subsurface microbial metabolism in a field biostimulation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Q.; Zheng, Z.; Zhu, C.

    2006-12-01

    Microorganisms in nature conserve energy by catalyzing various geochemical reactions. To build a quantitative relationship between geochemical conditions and metabolic rates, we propose a bioenergetics-kinetics coupled modeling approach. This approach describes microbial community as a metabolic network, i.e., fermenting microbes degrade organic substrates while aerobic respirer, nitrate reducer, metal reducer, sulfate reducer, and methanogen consume the fermentation products. It quantifies the control of substrate availability and biological energy conservation on the metabolic rates using thermodynamically consistent rate laws. We applied this simulation approach to study the progress of microbial metabolism during a field biostimulation experiment conducted in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the experiment, ethanol was injected into a monitoring well and groundwater was sampled to monitor changes in the chemistry. With time, concentrations of ethanol and SO42- decreased while those of NH4+, Fe2+, and Mn2+ increased. The simulation results fitted well to the observation, indicating simultaneous ethanol degradation and terminal electron accepting processes. The rates of aerobic respiration and denitrification were mainly controlled by substrate concentrations while those of ethanol degradation, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis were controlled dominantly by the energy availability. The simulation results suggested two different microbial growth statuses in the subsurface. For the functional groups with significant growth, variations with time in substrate concentrations demonstrated a typical S curve. For the groups without significant growth, initial decreases in substrate concentrations were linear with time. Injecting substrates followed by monitoring environmental chemistry therefore provides a convenient approach to characterize microbial growth in the subsurface where methods for direct observation are currently unavailable. This research was funded by the

  14. Linking AS, SE, V, and MN Behavior to Natural Biostimulated Uranium Cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keimowitz, Alison [Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY (United States); Ranville, James [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Mailloux, Brian [Barnard College, New York, NY (United States); Figueroa, Linda [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-16

    The project “Linking As, Se, V, and Mn behavior to Natural and Biostimulated Uranium Cycling” successfully investigated Arsenic cycling the Rifle Colorado IFRC. This project trained undergraduate and graduate students at the Colorado School of Mines, Vassar College, and Barnard College. This resulted in both undergraduate theses and a PhD thesis and multiple publications. The science was highly successful and we were able to test the main hypotheses. We have shown that (H1) under reducing conditions that promote uranium immobilization arsenic is readily mobilized, that (H2) thioarsenic species are abundant during this mobilization, and (H3) we have examined arsenic mobilization for site sediment. At the Rifle IFRC Acetate was added during experiments to immobilize Uranium. These experiments successfully immobilized uranium but unfortunately would mobilize arsenic. We developed robust sampling and analysis methods for thioarsenic species. We showed that the mobilization occurred under sulfate reducing conditions and the majority of the arsenic was in the form of thioarsenic species. Previous studies had predicted the presence of thioarsenic species but this study used robust field and laboratory methods to quantitatively determine the presence of thioarsenic species. During stimulation in wells with high arsenic the primary species were trithioarsenate and dithioarsenate. In wells with low levels of arsenic release thioarsenates were absent or minor components. Fortunately after the injection of acetate ended the aquifer would become less reducing and the arsenic concentrations would decrease to pre-injection levels. In aquifers where organic carbon is being added as a remedial method or as a contaminant the transient mobility of arsenic during sulfidogenesis should be considered especially in sulfate rich aquifers as this could impact downgradient water quality.

  15. Simulation at the point of care: reduced-cost, in situ training via a mobile cart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Peter H; Kappus, Liana J; Garden, Alexander; Burns, Jeffrey P

    2009-03-01

    The rapid growth of simulation in health care has challenged traditional paradigms of hospital-based education and training. Simulation addresses patient safety through deliberative practice of high-risk low-frequency events within a safe, structured environment. Despite its inherent appeal, widespread adoption of simulation is prohibited by high cost, limited space, interruptions to clinical duties, and the inability to replicate important nuances of clinical environments. We therefore sought to develop a reduced-cost low-space mobile cart to provide realistic simulation experiences to a range of providers within the clinical environment and to serve as a model for transportable, cost-effective, widespread simulation-based training of bona-fide workplace teams. Descriptive study. A tertiary care pediatric teaching hospital. A self-contained mobile simulation cart was constructed at a cost of $8054 (mannequin not included). The cart is compatible with any mannequin and contains all equipment needed to produce a high quality simulation experience equivalent to that of our on-site center--including didactics and debriefing with videotaped recordings complete with vital sign overlay. Over a 3-year period the cart delivered 57 courses to 425 participants from five pediatric departments. All individuals were trained among their native teams and within their own clinical environment. By bringing all pedagogical elements to the actual clinical environment, a mobile cart can provide simulation to hospital teams that might not otherwise benefit from the educational tool. By reducing the setup cost and the need for dedicated space, the mobile approach provides a mechanism to increase the number of institutions capable of harnessing the power of simulation-based education internationally.

  16. Biofertilizer and biostimulant properties of the microalga Acutodesmus dimorphus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Jesus; Sommerfeld, Milton

    Microalgae represent a potential sustainable alternative for the enhancement and protection of agricultural crops. Cellular extracts and dry biomass of the green alga Acutodesmus dimorphus were applied as a seed primer, foliar spray, and biofertilizer, to evaluate seed germination, plant growth, and fruit production in Roma tomato plants. A. dimorphus culture, culture growth medium, and different concentrations (0, 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, 75, and 100 %) of aqueous cell extracts in distilled water were used as seed primers to determine effects on germination. Seeds treated with A. dimorphus culture and with extract concentrations higher than 50 % (0.75 g mL -1 ) triggered faster seed germination-2 days earlier than the control group. The aqueous extracts were also applied as foliar fertilizers at various concentrations (0, 10, 25, 50, 75, and 100 %) on tomato plants. Extract foliar application at 50 % (3.75 g mL -1 ) concentration resulted in increased plant height and greater numbers of flowers and branches per plant. Two dry biomass treatments (50 and 100 g) were applied 22 days prior to seedling transplant and at the time of transplant to assess whether the timing of the biofertilizer application influenced the effectiveness of the biofertilizer. Biofertilizer treatments applied 22 days prior to seedling transplant enhanced plant growth, including greater numbers of branches and flowers, compared to the control group and the biofertilizer treatments applied at the time of transplant. The A. dimorphus culture, cellular extract, and dry biomass applied as a biostimulant, foliar spray, and biofertilizer, respectively, were able to trigger faster germination and enhance plant growth and floral production in Roma tomato plants.

  17. Bioremediation (Natural Attenuation and Biostimulation) of Diesel-Oil-Contaminated Soil in an Alpine Glacier Skiing Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margesin, R.; Schinner, F.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of bioremediation as a treatment option for a chronically diesel-oil-polluted soil in an alpine glacier area at an altitude of 2,875 m above sea level. To examine the efficiencies of natural attenuation and biostimulation, we used field-incubated lysimeters (mesocosms) with unfertilized and fertilized (N-P-K) soil. For three summer seasons (July 1997 to September 1999), we monitored changes in hydrocarbon concentrations in soil and soil leachate and the accompanying changes in soil microbial counts and activity. A significant reduction in the diesel oil level could be achieved. At the end of the third summer season (after 780 days), the initial level of contamination (2,612 ± 70 μg of hydrocarbons g [dry weight] of soil−1) was reduced by (50 ± 4)% and (70 ± 2)% in the unfertilized and fertilized soil, respectively. Nonetheless, the residual levels of contamination (1,296 ± 110 and 774 ± 52 μg of hydrocarbons g [dry weight] of soil−1 in the unfertilized and fertilized soil, respectively) were still high. Most of the hydrocarbon loss occurred during the first summer season ([42 ± 6]% loss) in the fertilized soil and during the second summer season ([41 ± 4]% loss) in the unfertilized soil. In the fertilized soil, all biological parameters (microbial numbers, soil respiration, catalase and lipase activities) were significantly enhanced and correlated significantly with each other, as well as with the residual hydrocarbon concentration, pointing to the importance of biodegradation. The effect of biostimulation of the indigenous soil microorganisms declined with time. The microbial activities in the unfertilized soil fluctuated around background levels during the whole study. PMID:11425732

  18. In situ fabrication of green reduced graphene-based biocompatible anode for efficient energy recycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying; Mallavarapu, Megharaj; Naidu, Ravi; Chen, Zuliang

    2018-02-01

    Improving the anode configuration to enhance biocompatibility and accelerate electron shuttling is critical for efficient energy recovery in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this paper, green reduced graphene nanocomposite was successfully coated using layer-by-layer assembly technique onto carbon brush anode. The modified anode achieved a 3.2-fold higher power density of 33.7 W m -3 at a current density of 69.4 A m -3 with a 75% shorter start period. As revealed in the characterization, the green synthesized nanocomposite film affords larger surface roughness for microbial colonization. Besides, gold nanoparticles, which anchored on graphene sheets, promise the relatively high electroactive sites and facilitate electron transfer from electricigens to the anode. The reduction-oxidation peaks in cyclic voltammograms indicated the mechanism of surface cytochromes facilitated current generation while the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirmed the enhanced electron transfer from surface cytochrome to electrode. The green synthesis process has the potential to generate a high performing anode in further applications of MFCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In situ synthesis and catalytic application of reduced graphene oxide supported cobalt nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiqiang; Long, Qin; Deng, Yi; Liao, Li

    2018-05-01

    Controlled synthesis of magnetic nanocomposite with outstanding catalytic performances is a promising strategy in catalyst industry. We proposed a novel concept for fabrication of reduced graphene oxide-supported cobalt nanowires (RGO/Co-NWs) nanocomposite as high-efficient magnetic catalyst. Unlike the majority of experiments necessitating harsh synthesis conditions such as high-pressure, high-temperature and expensive template, here the RGO/Co-NWs were successfully prepared in aqueous solution under mild conditions with the assistance of external magnetic field. The synthetic process was facile and external magnetic force was adopted to induce the unidirectional self-assembly of cobalt crystals on graphene oxide to form RGO/Co-NWs. The possible formation mechanism laid on the fact that the dipole magnetic moments of the nanoparticles were aligned along the magnetic induction lines with the external magnetic field direction resulting in the formation of nanowires elongating in the direction of the magnetization axis. Simultaneously, a series of controlled reactions were conducted to illuminate the effect of graphene oxide, external magnetic field and PVP on the morphology and size of RGO/Co-NWs in the present approach. More importantly, the nanocomposite exhibited a high catalytic performance towards ammonia borane. Hence the novel nanocomposite holds a great potential for technological applications such as catalyst industry.

  20. In situ glow discharge plasma electrolytic synthesis of reduced TiO2 for enhanced visible light photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guang; Wu, Botao; Qayyum Khan, Abdul; Zeng, Heping

    2018-05-01

    Reduced titanium dioxide (TiO2‑x) due to its extraordinary visible light absorption has been widely investigated in photodegradation and water splitting nowadays. However, conventional routes to synthesize reduced TiO2 usually demand multiple preparation steps, harsh controlled conditions or expensive facilities. Here we developed a single-step in situ approach to prepare the gray TiO2‑x nanoparticles (sub-10 nm) effectively by the glow discharge plasma electrolysis (GDPE) under atmospheric pressure. The co-existence of self-doped oxygen vacancies and Ti3+ in the generated TiO2‑x nanoparticles is demonstrated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The tunable ratio of bulk/surface defect can be realized by controlling the glow discharge power directly. It should be noticed that Ti3+ in the synthesized TiO2‑x are quite stable in ambient air. The UV–vis spectra of gray TiO2‑x show an enhanced visible light absorption, which leads to high visible-light photocatalytic activity. Moreover, the as-prepared TiO2‑x after 6 months storage still shows excellent stability during photocatalytic reactions. Owing to its simplicity and effectivity, this preparation method with GDPE should provide a large-scale production for TiO2‑x with high photoactivity.

  1. Geochemical and microbial community determinants of reductive dechlorination at a site biostimulated with glycerol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atashgahi, Siavash; Lu, Yue; Zheng, Ying; Saccenti, Edoardo; Suarez-Diez, Maria; Ramiro-Garcia, Javier; Eisenmann, Heinrich; Elsner, Martin; J.M. Stams, Alfons; Springael, Dirk; Dejonghe, Winnie; Smidt, Hauke

    2017-01-01

    Biostimulation is widely used to enhance reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes in contaminated aquifers. However, the knowledge on corresponding biogeochemical responses is limited. In this study, glycerol was injected in an aquifer contaminated with cis-dichloroethene (cDCE), and

  2. Technique and effects of pre-sowing laser biostimulation of cucumber seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gładyszewska, B.; Koper, R.; Kornarzyński, K.

    1998-01-01

    Laser treatment of seeds before sowing at selected irradiation doses was described. Particular attention was paid to determining energy doses for biostimulation. Results obtained at experimental irradiation of short green-house cucumber seeds, Pasandra and Picobello cultivars, were presented. Considerable increase in yields was observed as a result of applied method

  3. Effect of biostimulant application on production and flavonoid content of marigold (Calendula officinalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Pupo de Oliveira Machado

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of medicinal plants as raw material for industry must associate quality with biomass formation and, with this purpose, the application of plant growth regulators has been studied in these crops. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a biostimulant on growth, inflorescence production and flavonoid content in marigold. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse and the treatments consisted of increasing doses of the biostimulant (0, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 mL L-1 applied by foliar spraying in ten consecutive applications. The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design, with six treatments and ten repetitions. The number of leaves and flowerheads and dry matter of roots increased linearly with increasing doses of the growth promoter, with 20%, 36.97% and 97.28% increases, respectively, compared with the control. The total dry mass and shoot dry mass showed maximum values at the highest dose tested of 15 mL L-1 (with increases of 40.09% and 46.30%, respectively. Plant height and flavonoid content reached the highest values at a dose of 6 mL L-1. The biostimulant promoted the development of marigold and positively influenced the synthesis of the secondary compound of medicinal interest. Among the tested doses, the application of rates between 6 and 9 mL L-1 of the biostimulant is recommended for more efficient large-scale production of marigold.

  4. BIOSTIMULANT EFFECT ON THE GROWTH AND PRODUCTION OF SHALLOT IN PEATLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azri

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Biostimulant from seaweed extract contains nutrients, amino acids, cytokines, auksin, laminaran, fukoidan, alginat and betain which stimulate plant metabolism so as to increase growth and yield of plants. Some research results indicate that spraying biostimulant from seaweed in corn plant can increase shoots weight of 37 until 42 percent and root weight of 34 up to 45 percent. In this study biostimulan used enriched with elements S, Zn, Cu and Mn to meet the needs of onion plants. Research using Randomized Block Design consists of two factors that is seaweed and red onion varieties with five replication. Research treatment are: without giving of seaweed and giving of seaweed whereas shallot varieties used are Bima, Moujung, and Sumenep. Results showed that giving seaweed improved peatland fertility and increased shallot production. Biostimulant and real varieties increase the growth and production of shallots. Value of profit and value B/C ratio 2.37; 1.99 dan 1.11, then the utilization of biostimulant to increase the productivity of onion in peat land, onion cultivation of Bima and Moujung varieties is economically feasible to be applied by peatland farmers in West Kalimantan.

  5. Impact of oil contamination and biostimulation on the diversity of indigenous bacterial communities in soil microcosms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, FF; Rosado, AS; Sebastian, GV; Casella, R; Machado, PLOA; Holmstrom, C; Kjelleberg, S; van Elsas, JD; Seldin, L

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of oil contamination and biostimulation (soil pH raise, and nitrogen, phosphate and sulphur addition) on the diversity of a bacterial community of an acidic Cambisol under Atlantic Forest. The experiment was based on the enumeration of bacterial

  6. Reduced Cerebral Oxygen Content in the DG and SVZ In Situ Promotes Neurogenesis in the Adult Rat Brain In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Zhang

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis in the adult brain occurs mainly within two neurogenic structures, the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ of the forebrain. It has been reported that mild hypoxia promoted the proliferation of Neural Stem Cells (NSCsin vitro. Our previous study further demonstrated that an external hypoxic environment stimulated neurogenesis in the adult rat brain in vivo. However, it remains unknown how external hypoxic environments affect the oxygen content in the brain and result in neurogenesis. Here we use an optical fiber luminescent oxygen sensor to detect the oxygen content in the adult rat brain in situ under normoxia and hypoxia. We found that the distribution of oxygen in cerebral regions is spatiotemporally heterogeneous. The Po2 values in the ventricles (45∼50 Torr and DG (approximately 10 Torr were much higher than those of other parts of the brain, such as the cortex and thalamus (approximately 2 Torr. Interestingly, our in vivo studies showed that an external hypoxic environment could change the intrinsic oxygen content in brain tissues, notably reducing oxygen levels in both the DG and SVZ, the major sites of adult neurogenesis. Furthermore, the hypoxic environment also increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF, two factors that have been reported to regulate neurogenesis, within the DG and SVZ. Thus, we have demonstrated that reducing the oxygen content of the external environment decreased Po2 levels in the DG and SVZ. This reduced oxygen level in the DG and SVZ might be the main mechanism triggering neurogenesis in the adult brain. More importantly, we speculate that varying oxygen levels may be the physiological basis of the regionally restricted neurogenesis in the adult brain.

  7. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of microcellular polyimide/in situ thermally reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotubes nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongli; Yu, Zhi; Wu, Peng; Zou, Huawei; Liu, Pengbo

    2018-03-01

    A simple and effective method was adopted to fabricate microcellular polyimide (PI)/reduced graphene oxide (GO)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) nanocomposites. Firstly, microcellular poly (amic acid) (PAA)/GO/MWCNTs nanocomposites were prepared through solvent evaporation induced phase separation. In this process, PAA and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) co-dissolved in N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) underwent phase separation with DMAc evaporating, and DBP microdomains were formed in continuous PAA phase. Subsequently, PAA was thermally imidized and simultaneously GO was in situ reduced. After DBP was removed, the microcellular PI/reduced GO (RGO)/MWCNTs nanocomposites were finally obtained. When the initial filler loading was 8 wt%, the electrical conductivity of microcellular PI/RGO, PI/MWCNTs and PI/RGO/MWCNTs nanocomposites were 0.05, 0.02 and 1.87 S·m-1, respectively, and the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding efficiency (SE) of microcellular PI/RGO, PI/MWCNTs and PI/RGO/MWCNTs nanocomposites were 13.7-15.1, 13.0-14.3 and 16.6-18.2 dB, respectively. The synergistic effect between RGO and MWCNTs enhanced both the electrical conductivity and EMI shielding performance of the microcellular PI/RGO/MWCNTs nanocomposites. The dominating EMI shielding mechanism for these materials was microwave absorption. While the initial loading of GO and MWCNT was 8 wt%, the microcellular PI/RGO/MWCNTs nanocomposite (500 μm thickness) had extremely high specific EMI SE value of 755-823 dB·cm2·g-1. Its thermal stability was also obviously improved, the 5% weight loss temperature in nitrogen was 548 °C. In addition, it also possessed a high Young's modulus of 789 MPa.

  8. Time-Lapse Electrical Geophysical Monitoring of Amendment-Based Biostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy C; Versteeg, Roelof J; Day-Lewis, Frederick D; Major, William; Lane, John W

    2015-01-01

    Biostimulation is increasingly used to accelerate microbial remediation of recalcitrant groundwater contaminants. Effective application of biostimulation requires successful emplacement of amendment in the contaminant target zone. Verification of remediation performance requires postemplacement assessment and contaminant monitoring. Sampling-based approaches are expensive and provide low-density spatial and temporal information. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is an effective geophysical method for determining temporal changes in subsurface electrical conductivity. Because remedial amendments and biostimulation-related biogeochemical processes often change subsurface electrical conductivity, ERT can complement and enhance sampling-based approaches for assessing emplacement and monitoring biostimulation-based remediation. Field studies demonstrating the ability of time-lapse ERT to monitor amendment emplacement and behavior were performed during a biostimulation remediation effort conducted at the Department of Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) Yard, in Brandywine, Maryland, United States. Geochemical fluid sampling was used to calibrate a petrophysical relation in order to predict groundwater indicators of amendment distribution. The petrophysical relations were field validated by comparing predictions to sequestered fluid sample results, thus demonstrating the potential of electrical geophysics for quantitative assessment of amendment-related geochemical properties. Crosshole radar zero-offset profile and borehole geophysical logging were also performed to augment the data set and validate interpretation. In addition to delineating amendment transport in the first 10 months after emplacement, the time-lapse ERT results show later changes in bulk electrical properties interpreted as mineral precipitation. Results support the use of more cost-effective surface-based ERT in conjunction with limited field sampling to improve spatial

  9. Time-lapse electrical geophysical monitoring of amendment-based biostimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Major, William; Lane, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Biostimulation is increasingly used to accelerate microbial remediation of recalcitrant groundwater contaminants. Effective application of biostimulation requires successful emplacement of amendment in the contaminant target zone. Verification of remediation performance requires postemplacement assessment and contaminant monitoring. Sampling-based approaches are expensive and provide low-density spatial and temporal information. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is an effective geophysical method for determining temporal changes in subsurface electrical conductivity. Because remedial amendments and biostimulation-related biogeochemical processes often change subsurface electrical conductivity, ERT can complement and enhance sampling-based approaches for assessing emplacement and monitoring biostimulation-based remediation.Field studies demonstrating the ability of time-lapse ERT to monitor amendment emplacement and behavior were performed during a biostimulation remediation effort conducted at the Department of Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) Yard, in Brandywine, Maryland, United States. Geochemical fluid sampling was used to calibrate a petrophysical relation in order to predict groundwater indicators of amendment distribution. The petrophysical relations were field validated by comparing predictions to sequestered fluid sample results, thus demonstrating the potential of electrical geophysics for quantitative assessment of amendment-related geochemical properties. Crosshole radar zero-offset profile and borehole geophysical logging were also performed to augment the data set and validate interpretation.In addition to delineating amendment transport in the first 10 months after emplacement, the time-lapse ERT results show later changes in bulk electrical properties interpreted as mineral precipitation. Results support the use of more cost-effective surface-based ERT in conjunction with limited field sampling to improve spatial

  10. Treatment of petroleum drill cuttings using bioaugmentation and biostimulation supplemented with phytoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogbara, Reginald B; Ogar, Innocent; Okparanma, Reuben N; Ayotamuno, Josiah M

    2016-07-28

    This study sought to compare the effectiveness of bioaugmentation and biostimulation, as well as the combination of both techniques, supplemented with phytoremediation, in the decontamination of petroleum drill cuttings. Drill cuttings with relatively low concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and metals were mixed with soil in the ratio 5:1 and treated with three different combinations of the bioremediation options. Option A entailed bioaugmentation supplemented with phytoremediation. Option B had the combination of biostimulation and bioaugmentation supplemented with phytoremediation. While biostimulation supplemented with phytoremediation was deployed in option C. Option O containing the drill cuttings-soil mixture without treatment served as untreated control. Fertilizer application, tillage and watering were used for biostimulation treatment, while spent mushroom substrate (Pleurotus ostreatus) and elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum) were employed for bioaugmentation and phytoremediation treatment, respectively. The drill cuttings-soil mixtures were monitored for TPH, organic carbon, total nitrogen, pH, metal concentrations, and fungal counts, over time. After 56 days of treatment, there was a decline in the initial TPH concentration of 4,114 mg kg(-1) by 5.5%, 68.3%, 75.6% and 48% in options O, A, B and C, respectively. Generally, higher TPH loss resulted from the phytoremediation treatment stage. The treated options also showed slight reductions in metal concentrations ranging from 0% to 16% of the initial low concentrations. The results highlight the effectiveness of bioaugmentation supplemented with phytoremediation. The combination of bioaugmentation and biostimulation supplemented with phytoremediation, however, may prove better in decontaminating petroleum drill cuttings to environmentally benign levels.

  11. Integral biostimulation of soil polluted by 60000 ppm of motor waste oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saucedo-Martínez Blanca Celeste

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Waste motor oil (WMO is a mixture of hydrocarbons (HICO soil pollutants. An alternative solution for its elimination is the biostimulation (BIS, secuancial, complementary and accumulative or integral which requires at first BIS by detergents to emulsify WMO, the second one following by enrichment by mineral solution, H2O2 as a O2 source for oxidation of WMO and controlling moisture soil content at 80% field capacity for exchange gases in soil to stimulate WMO mineralization The aim of the work was: i analyze in the integral BIS of contaminated soil by 60000 ppm of WMO. The first BIS was applying detergents to emulsify the WMO, the second BIS by mineral solution, then by H2O2, under humidity control at 80% of field capacity, for the best oxidation of WMO. Additionally bacterial population oxidant WMO was meas-ured, to select those which synthetized detergent related to WMO degradation, finally the type of bacteria were molecular identify. Results showed than integral BIS by an anionic / nonionic detergent, then en-richment with mineral solution, and 0.5% H2O2, reduced WMO from 60000 ppm to 27200 ppm in 23 days. Density of bacterial WMO oxidant population was 268 X 106 CFU/g dry soil, from which the domi-nant ones were selected and identified 47 bacterial genera divided into: Actinomycetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. These results showed that soil pollution by high concentration level of WMO demanded at integrated BIS, also was found some bacterial genus which synthetized detergent with potential used in soil polluted by WMO.

  12. Study of the thermal transformations of Co- and Fe-exchanged zeolites A and X by 'in situ' XRD under reducing atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronchetti, Silvia, E-mail: silvia.ronchetti@polito.it [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Turcato, Elisa Aurelia; Delmastro, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Esposito, Serena; Ferone, Claudio; Pansini, Michele [Laboratorio Materiali del Dipartimento di Meccanica, Strutture, Ambiente e Territorio, Facolta di Ingegneria dell' Universita di Cassino, Via G. Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino (Italy); Onida, Barbara; Mazza, Daniele [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    'In situ' high temperature X-ray diffraction under reducing atmosphere is used for the first time to study the thermal stability and transformations of Co- and Fe-exchanged A and X zeolites. TG-DTA and 'ex situ' XRD characterization were also carried out. The temperature of incipient crystallization of metallic phase was found to be 700 {sup o}C in Fe-zeolites and 800 {sup o}C in Co-zeolites. Moreover, ex situ X-ray experiments, after thermal treatment both under inert and reducing atmosphere, revealed the formation of ceramic phases upon the thermal collapse of the zeolitic framework. Metal nanoparticles were obtained by reduction and the size of metal clusters was found to range between 24 and 40 nm.

  13. In situ electrochemical enrichment and isolation of a magnetite-reducing bacterium from a high pH serpentinizing spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Annette R; Yoshimura, Miho; LaRowe, Doug E; Bird, Lina J; Amend, Jan P; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nealson, Kenneth H; Okamoto, Akihiro

    2017-06-01

    Serpentinization is a geologic process that produces highly reduced, hydrogen-rich fluids that support microbial communities under high pH conditions. We investigated the activity of microbes capable of extracellular electron transfer in a terrestrial serpentinizing system known as 'The Cedars'. Measuring current generation with an on-site two-electrode system, we observed daily oscillations in current with the current maxima and minima occurring during daylight hours. Distinct members of the microbial community were enriched. Current generation in lab-scale electrochemical reactors did not oscillate, but was correlated with carbohydrate amendment in Cedars-specific minimal media. Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes were consistently enriched from lab electrochemical systems on δ-MnO 2 and amorphous Fe(OH) 3 at pH 11. However, isolation of an electrogenic strain proved difficult as transfer cultures failed to grow after multiple rounds of media transfer. Lowering the bulk pH in the media allowed us to isolate a Firmicutes strain (Paenibacillus sp.). This strain was capable of electrode and mineral reduction (including magnetite) at pH 9. This report provides evidence of the in situ activity of microbes using extracellular substrates as sinks for electrons at The Cedars, but also highlights the potential importance of community dynamics for supporting microbial life through either carbon fixation, and/or moderating pH stress. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. In situ synthesized SnO2 nanorod/reduced graphene oxide low-dimensional structure for enhanced lithium storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Xuezhang; Zhang, Yiwen; Li, Junpeng; Zhong, Jiayi; Li, Meng; Fan, Xiulin; Wang, Chuntao; Chen, Lixin

    2018-03-09

    A unique SnO 2 nanorod (NR)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composite morphology has been synthesized using the in situ hydrothermal method, for use as an anode material in lithium-ion batteries. The SnO 2 NR adhering to the RGO exhibits a length of 250-400 nm and a diameter of 60-80 nm without any obvious aggregation. The initial discharge/charge capacities of the SnO 2 NR/RGO composite are 1761.3 mAh g -1 and 1233.1 mAh g -1 , with a coulombic efficiency (CE) of 70% under a current density of 200 mA g -1 , and a final capacity of 1101 mAh g -1 after 50 cycles. The rate capability of the SnO 2 NR/RGO is also improved compared to that of bare SnO 2 NR. The superior electrochemical performance is ascribed to the special morphology of the SnO 2 NRs-which plays a role in shorting the transmission path-and the sheet-like 2D graphene, which prevents the agglomeration of SnO 2 and enhances conductivity during the electrochemical reaction of SnO 2 NR/RGO.

  15. In situ synthesized SnO2 nanorod/reduced graphene oxide low-dimensional structure for enhanced lithium storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Xuezhang; Zhang, Yiwen; Li, Junpeng; Zhong, Jiayi; Li, Meng; Fan, Xiulin; Wang, Chuntao; Chen, Lixin

    2018-03-01

    A unique SnO2 nanorod (NR)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composite morphology has been synthesized using the in situ hydrothermal method, for use as an anode material in lithium-ion batteries. The SnO2 NR adhering to the RGO exhibits a length of 250-400 nm and a diameter of 60-80 nm without any obvious aggregation. The initial discharge/charge capacities of the SnO2 NR/RGO composite are 1761.3 mAh g-1 and 1233.1 mAh g-1, with a coulombic efficiency (CE) of 70% under a current density of 200 mA g-1, and a final capacity of 1101 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles. The rate capability of the SnO2 NR/RGO is also improved compared to that of bare SnO2 NR. The superior electrochemical performance is ascribed to the special morphology of the SnO2 NRs—which plays a role in shorting the transmission path—and the sheet-like 2D graphene, which prevents the agglomeration of SnO2 and enhances conductivity during the electrochemical reaction of SnO2 NR/RGO.

  16. Calcium-Phosphate-Osteopontin Particles Reduce Biofilm Formation and pH Drops in in situ Grown Dental Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Ibsen, Casper J S; Birkedal, Henrik; Nyvad, Bente

    2017-01-01

    This 2-period crossover study investigated the effect of calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles on biofilm formation and pH in 48-h biofilms grown in situ. Bovine milk osteopontin is a highly phosphorylated glycoprotein that has been shown to interfere with bacterial adhesion to salivary-coated surfaces. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles have been shown to reduce biofilm formation and pH drops in a 5-species laboratory model of dental biofilm without affecting bacterial viability. Here, smooth surface biofilms from 10 individuals were treated ex vivo 6 times/day for 30 min with either calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles or sterile saline. After growth, the amount of biofilm formed was determined by confocal microscopy, and pH drops upon exposure to glucose were monitored using confocal-microscopy-based pH ratiometry. A total of 160 biofilms were analysed. No adverse effects of repeated ex vivo treatment with calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles were observed. Particle treatment resulted in a 32% lower amount of biofilm formed (p Biofilm pH was significantly higher upon particle treatment, both shortly after the addition of glucose and after 30 min of incubation with glucose (p biofilms as well as the remineralizing potential of the particles. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Enhanced electrochemical performance of in situ reduced graphene oxide-polyaniline nanotubes hybrid nanocomposites using redox-additive aqueous electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Madhabi; Kumar, A.

    2018-02-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO)-polyaniline nanotubes (PAniNTs) nanocomposites have been synthesized by in situ reduction of GO. The morphology and structure of the nanocomposites are characterized by HRTEM, XRD and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The electrical and electrochemical performances of the nanocomposites are investigated for different RGO concentrations by conductivity measurements, cyclic voltammetry, charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Highest gravimetric specific capacitance of 448.71 F g-1 is obtained for 40 wt.% of RGO-PAniNTs nanocomposite as compared to 194.92 F g-1 for pure PAniNTs in 1 M KCl electrolyte. To further improve the electrochemical performance of the nanocomposite electrode, KI is used as redox-additive with 1 M KCl electrolyte. Highest gravimetric specific capacitance of 876.43 F g-1 and an improved cyclic stability of 91% as compared to 79% without KI after 5000 cycles is achieved for an optimized 0.1 M KI concentration. This is attributed to the presence of different ionic species of I- ions that give rise to a number of possible redox reactions improving the pseudocapacitance of the electrode. This improved capacitive performance is compared with that of catechol redox-additive in 1 M KCl electrolyte, and that of KI and catechol redox-additives added to 1 M H2SO4 electrolyte.

  18. Anaerobic Biostimulation for the In Situ Precipitation and Long-Term Sequestration of Metal Sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    attention. Serious Skin Contact: Wash with a disinfectant soap and cover the contaminated skin with an anti-bacterial cream . Seek immediate medical...tract distrubances and irritation with nausea, vomiting, colic , constipation, diarrhea, black stool. May also affect behavior/Central Nervous System

  19. In situ TCE degradation mediated by complex dehalorespiring communities during biostimulation processes

    OpenAIRE

    DUGAT-BONY, ERIC; Biderre-Petit, Corinne; Jaziri, Faouzi; David, Maude M; Denonfoux, Jérémie; Lyon, Delina Y; Richard, Jean-Yves; Curvers, Cyrille; Boucher, Delphine; Vogel, Timothy M; Peyretaillade, Eric; Peyret, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Summary The bioremediation of chloroethene contaminants in groundwater polluted systems is still a serious environmental challenge. Many previous studies have shown that cooperation of several dechlorinators is crucial for complete dechlorination of trichloroethene to ethene. In the present study, we used an explorative functional DNA microarray (DechloArray) to examine the composition of specific functional genes in groundwater samples in which chloroethene bioremediation was enhanced by del...

  20. Influence of sulfate-reducing bacteria on the corrosion of steel in seawater: laboratory and in situ study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benbouzid-Rollet, N.

    1993-01-01

    A fouling reactor was designed to study, the influence of a mixed bio-film on AISI 316 L stainless steel. The bio-film was formed on the steel surface by the fermentative bacterium Vibrio natriegens. The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris was then introduced in the reactor and colonized the surface, constituting approximately 5 % of the total population. The settlement of an anaerobic bacterium in the bio-film shows in it the existence of anaerobic micro-niches. Stainless steel electrochemical behavior was analyzed using open circuit potential and potentiodynamic polarization curves. Growth of the bio-film does not induce corrosion, but seems to change the cathodic oxygen reduction kinetics, diminishing the corrosion hazard. This effect increases when D. vulgaris grows in the bio-film. An ennobling of the open circuit potential was observed, similar to field cases already described. A case of drilling corrosion of carbon steel in a harbour area showed the characteristics of anaerobic corrosion related to sulfate-reducing bacteria. The total cultivatable SRB population was quantified and metabolic types were enumerated using specific electron donors. A maximum cell density of 1,1 x 10 8 cells/ cm 2 was estimated, revealing a very important growth of SRB on surfaces. Population structure was different in corroded and non-corroded areas. In corroded area, SRB utilizing benzoate and propionate were more abundant. A strain belonging to the sporulating genus Desulfotomaculum was isolated using these substrates, suggesting a partial aeration in the area of hole appearance. However, in vitro corrosion assays showed that the bacterial population sampled in this area induced a consequent weight loss of steel coupons, in the absence of oxygen. This was observed only with a diversified population, similar to that present in situ. It could not be reproduced with a mixed culture of two purified strains. (author)

  1. Assessment of the biostimulation against bioaugmentation and natural attenuation on contaminated soil with diesel-gasoline mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Wilmar; Gaviria, Jair; Cardona, Santiago

    2009-01-01

    In this study carried out the bioremediation of a contaminated soil with a gasoline-diesel fuel mixture in a laboratory scale, to evaluate biostimulation against natural attenuation and bioaugmentation. The reduction of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) concentration during three months was 52.79 % for natural attenuation, 60.45 % for biostimulation and 64.92 % for bioaugmentation. For the inoculation in the bioaugmentation treatment, was isolated a bacterium with the capacity of degrade hydrocarbons which was identified as Bacillus sp.

  2. A Vegetal Biopolymer-Based Biostimulant Promoted Root Growth in Melon While Triggering Brassinosteroids and Stress-Related Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Lucini

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant biostimulants are receiving great interest for boosting root growth during the first phenological stages of vegetable crops. The present study aimed at elucidating the morphological, physiological, and metabolomic changes occurring in greenhouse melon treated with the biopolymer-based biostimulant Quik-link, containing lateral root promoting peptides, and lignosulphonates. The vegetal-based biopolymer was applied at five rates (0, 0.06, 0.12, 0.24, or 0.48 mL plant-1 as substrate drench. The application of biopolymer-based biostimulant at 0.12 and 0.24 mL plant-1 enhanced dry weight of melon leaves and total biomass by 30.5 and 27.7%, respectively, compared to biopolymer applications at 0.06 mL plant-1 and untreated plants. The root dry biomass, total root length, and surface in biostimulant-treated plants were significantly higher at 0.24 mL plant-1 and to a lesser extent at 0.12 and 0.48 mL plant-1, in comparison to 0.06 mL plant-1 and untreated melon plants. A convoluted biochemical response to the biostimulant treatment was highlighted through UHPLC/QTOF-MS metabolomics, in which brassinosteroids and their interaction with other hormones appeared to play a pivotal role. Root metabolic profile was more markedly altered than leaves, following application of the biopolymer-based biostimulant. Brassinosteroids triggered in roots could have been involved in changes of root development observed after biostimulant application. These hormones, once transported to shoots, could have caused an hormonal imbalance. Indeed, the involvement of abscisic acid, cytokinins, and gibberellin related compounds was observed in leaves following root application of the biopolymer-based biostimulant. Nonetheless, the treatment triggered an accumulation of several metabolites involved in defense mechanisms against biotic and abiotic stresses, such as flavonoids, carotenoids, and glucosinolates, thus potentially improving resistance toward plant stresses.

  3. Effect of biostimulation on the microbial community in PCB-contaminated sediments through periodic amendment of sediment with iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa Varadhan, A; Khodadoust, Amid P; Brenner, Richard C

    2011-10-01

    Reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by indigenous dehalorespiring microorganisms in contaminated sediments may be enhanced via biostimulation by supplying hydrogen generated through the anaerobic corrosion of elemental iron added to the sediment. In this study, the effect of periodic amendment of sediment with various dosages of iron on the microbial community present in sediment was investigated using phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA) over a period of 18 months. Three PCB-contaminated sediments (two freshwater lake sediments and one marine sediment) were used. Signature biomarker analysis of the microbial community present in all three sediments revealed the enrichment of Dehalococcoides species, the population of which was sustained for a longer period of time when the sediment microcosms were amended with the lower dosage of iron (0.01 g iron per g dry sediment) every 6 months as compared to the blank system (without iron). Lower microbial stress levels were reported for the system periodically amended with 0.01 g of iron per g dry sediment every 6 months, thus reducing the competition from other hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms like methanogens, iron reducers, and sulfate reducers. The concentration of hydrogen in the system was found to be an important factor influencing the shift in microbial communities in all sediments with time. Periodic amendment of sediment with larger dosages of iron every 3 months resulted in the early prevalence of Geobacteraceae and sulfate-reducing bacteria followed by methanogens. An average pH of 8.4 (range of 8.2-8.6) and an average hydrogen concentration of 0.75% (range of 0.3-1.2%) observed between 6 and 15 months of the study were found to be conducive to sustaining the population of Dehalococcoides species in the three sediments amended with 0.01 g iron per g dry sediment. Biostimulation of indigenous PCB dechlorinators by the periodic amendment of contaminated sediments with low dosages of

  4. Biorestauration of soil polluted by waste motor oil by biostimulation with vermicompost and phytoremediation with Sorghum vulgare inoculated by Bacillus cereus and Rhizobium etli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juárez-Cisneros Gladys

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil pollution by waste motor oil (WMO caused soil´s lost fertility. The aims of this research where a bioremediation of soil polluted by 10000 ppm of WMO for biostimulation with vermicompost (VC at 3 and 6 % (w/w follow by b phytoremediation (PR of the same soil to eliminate remaining WMO with Sorghum vulgare inoculated with Bacillus cereus and/or Rhizobium etli or Promoting Growth Plant Bacteria (PGPB. At the first step of assay WMO concentration was measured before and after bioremediation. At the second step the same soil phytoremediation was applied for remaining WHO sowing S. vulgare inoculated with PGPB, then at flowering stage its biomass and WHO final concentration was determined. Results showed that soil impacted by WMO biostimulated with VC at 3% was eliminated 8630 ppm of WMO. At the second phase in the same soil PR applied for remaining WMO which was reduced until 210 ppm. Soil polluted by remaining WMO applied PR using S. vulgare plus R. etli WMO was decreased at 260 ppm. While S. vulgare´s biomass inoculated with PGPB was higher compared to S. vulgare grown in soil not polluted by WMO according by ANOVA - Tukey (p > 0.05. These results suggested that soil polluted by WMO could be recovering by applying integrated BR and PR better than just using one type.

  5. Understanding the effect of amino acids based biostimulant by an enantiomeric analysis of their active principles and a proteomic profiling approach

    OpenAIRE

    Sierras, Núria; Botta-Català, Anna; Staasing, L.; Martínez Esteso, María José; Bru-Martinez, Roque

    2016-01-01

    Plant biostimulants are products that contain multiple compounds and claim to activate a wide range of plant responses. Amino acid based products are one example of biostimulants with a complex composition and different product characteristics depending on their sources and production processes. Amino acid biostimulants are obtained mainly by chemical or enzymatic protein hydrolysis and the type of hydrolysis determine the content of free amino acids and their enantiomeric purity. While L-ami...

  6. Ex situ bioremediation of a soil contaminated by mazut (heavy residual fuel oil)--a field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beškoski, Vladimir P; Gojgić-Cvijović, Gordana; Milić, Jelena; Ilić, Mila; Miletić, Srdjan; Solević, Tatjana; Vrvić, Miroslav M

    2011-03-01

    Mazut (heavy residual fuel oil)-polluted soil was exposed to bioremediation in an ex situ field-scale (600 m(3)) study. Re-inoculation was performed periodically with biomasses of microbial consortia isolated from the mazut-contaminated soil. Biostimulation was conducted by adding nutritional elements (N, P and K). The biopile (depth 0.4m) was comprised of mechanically mixed polluted soil with softwood sawdust and crude river sand. Aeration was improved by systematic mixing. The biopile was protected from direct external influences by a polyethylene cover. Part (10 m(3)) of the material prepared for bioremediation was set aside uninoculated, and maintained as an untreated control pile (CP). Biostimulation and re-inoculation with zymogenous microorganisms increased the number of hydrocarbon degraders after 50 d by more than 20 times in the treated soil. During the 5 months, the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content of the contaminated soil was reduced to 6% of the initial value, from 5.2 to 0.3 g kg(-1) dry matter, while TPH reduced to only 90% of the initial value in the CP. After 150 d there were 96%, 97% and 83% reductions for the aliphatic, aromatic, and nitrogen-sulphur-oxygen and asphaltene fractions, respectively. The isoprenoids, pristane and phytane, were more than 55% biodegraded, which indicated that they are not suitable biomarkers for following bioremediation. According to the available data, this is the first field-scale study of the bioremediation of mazut and mazut sediment-polluted soil, and the efficiency achieved was far above that described in the literature to date for heavy fuel oil. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Enzymatic vegetable organic extracts as soil biochemical biostimulants and atrazine extenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, Ana María; Tejada, Manuel; Díaz, Ana Isabel; Rodríguez-Morgado, Bruno; Bautista, Juan; Parrado, Juan

    2010-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to gather information on the potential effects of organic biostimulants on soil activity and atrazine biodegradation. Carob germ enzymatic extract (CGEE) and wheat condensed distiller solubles enzymatic extract (WCDS-EE) have been obtained using an enzymatic process; their main organic components are soluble carbohydrates and proteins in the form of peptides and free amino acids. Their application to soil results in high biostimulation, rapidly increased dehydrogenase, phosphatase and glucosidase activities, and an observed atrazine extender capacity due to inhibition of its mineralization. The extender capacity of both extracts is proportional to the protein/carbohydrate ratio content. As a result, these enzymatic extracts are highly microbially available, leading to two independent phenomena, fertility and an atrazine persistence that is linked to increased soil activity.

  8. Physicochemical analyses of plant biostimulant formulations and characterisation of commercial products by instrumental techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, H. S. S.; Selby, C.; Carmichael, E.; McRoberts, C.; Rao, J. R.; Ambrosino, P.; Chiurazzi, M.; Pucci, M.; Martin, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to develop instrumental protocols for evaluating physicochemical characteristics of plant biostimulant/biofertiliser formulations. Six formulations (Rygex, Algavyt, Ryzoset, Manek, Ecoryg and Algavyt Zn/Mn) containing algal/plant extracts, humic and amino acids, lipids and inorganic components were assessed for particle size distribution and zeta potential (ZP) by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and gross compositional differences by thermogravimetri...

  9. Evaluation of Supercritical Extracts of Algae as Biostimulants of Plant Growth in Field Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Michalak, Izabela; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Dmytryk, Agnieszka; Wilk, Rados?aw; Gramza, Mateusz; R?j, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the field trials was to determine the influence of supercritical algal extracts on the growth and development of winter wheat (variety Akteur). As a raw material for the supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), the biomass of microalga Spirulina plantensis, brown seaweed – Ascophyllum nodosum and Baltic green macroalgae was used. Forthial and Asahi SL constituted the reference products. It was found that the tested biostimulants did not influence statistically significantly the plant...

  10. The effect of the biostimulator Goteo on the rooting of ninebark stem cuttings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacholczak Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available As a consequence of restrictions on the use of preparations containing synthetic auxins in nursery production, there is a necessity to replace them with more environmentally friendly biopreparations efficiently stimulating plant growth. The aim of the presented experiment was to compare the effects of the synthetic auxin indole-3-butyric acid (IBA and the biostimulator Goteo on the rooting of ninebark stem cuttings (Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Dart’s Gold’ and ‘Red Baron’ and to get some insight into the latter’s mechanisms of action in plants. Applications of the biostimulator Goteo produced comparable or slightly weaker effects compared to the treatments with IBA. Goteo stimulated elongation in new growth of cuttings when applied in watering or two-fold spraying methods. Application of the biostimulator resulted in increased levels of chlorophyll, soluble sugars and indole derivatives, while the contents of free amino acids and polyphenolic acids decreased. The above results indicate that, if necessary, Goteo may replace the synthetic auxin IBA in the propagation of ninebark in the future.

  11. Use of bioactivator, biostimulant and complex of nutrients in soybean seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Adolfo Binsfeld

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available New discoveries have stimulated the use of different substances with physiologic effects, in order to develop agricultural crops. Thus, this study aimed at evaluating seeds treated with biostimulant, bioactivator and nutrients, in the initial development of soybean seeds. Two lots of seeds (high and low vigor, BMX Potência RR cultivar were used. The products tested were an insecticide with bioactivator effect, a plant growth regulator with biostimulant effect, a complex of nutrients and a control. Under laboratory conditions, the parameters water content, germination, first germination counting, accelerated aging, cold test, length and dry matter weight of seedlings were evaluated. Under greenhouse conditions, evaluations included emergence, emergence speed index, length and dry matter weight of seedlings. The efficiency of the products tested was affected by the seed physiologic quality, with a more pronounced effect for the products in high vigor lots. In general, the treatment with best results for initial performance was the complex of nutrients, followed by the plant growth regulator with biostimulant effect. The bioactivator had negative effect on seeds germination and seedling development.

  12. Theoretical and practical aspects of pre-sowing laser biostimulation of the seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gładyszewska, B.; Kornas-Czuczwar, B.; Koper, R.; Lipski, S.

    1998-01-01

    Against the background of recent literature review basic aspects of the mechanism responsible for pre-sowing laser bio-stimulation of the seeds were discussed. Developed by professor W. Sedlak theory of bioplasma was the main point of reference. Presented results of own research works proved the positive influence of pre-sowing laser treatment of seeds on their yielding and nutritive value. The yield rises caused by pre-sowing laser seed bio-stimulation for some examined plant crops were as follows: maize (from 10 to 15%), spring wheat (from 20 to 30%), spring barley (from 20 to 25%), sugar beets (from 10 to 30%), rape seeds (from 10 to 15%). The quality of crops frawn from the laser treated seeds was also better than the control ones. For example, the protein content in grain of spring wheat grown from the seeds bio-stimulated with a the He-Ne laser increased from about 12 up to 14%. Similarly, in roots of the sugar beets grown from laser treated seeds, the sugar content rose from about 15 up to about 17% [pl

  13. In situ enhancement of the blue photoluminescence of colloidal Ga2O3 nanocrystals by promotion of defect formation in reducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Radovanovic, Pavle V

    2011-07-07

    We demonstrate redox control of defect-based photoluminescence efficiency of colloidal γ-Ga(2)O(3) nanocrystals. Reducing environment leads to an increase in photoluminescence intensity by enhancing the concentration of oxygen vacancies, while the blue emission is suppressed in oxidative conditions. These results enable optimization of nanocrystal properties by in situ defect manipulation. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  14. In situ capping for size control of monochalcogenide (ZnS, CdS and SnS) nanocrystals produced by anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Gyoung Gug; Datskos, Panos G; Jacobs, Christopher B; Ivanov, Ilia N; Joshi, Pooran C; Meyer, Harry M III; Armstrong, Beth L; Kidder, Michelle; Graham, David E; Moon, Ji-Won

    2015-01-01

    Metal monochalcogenide quantum dot nanocrystals of ZnS, CdS and SnS were prepared by anaerobic, metal-reducing bacteria using in situ capping by oleic acid or oleylamine. The capping agent preferentially adsorbs on the surface of the nanocrystal, suppressing the growth process in the early stages, thus leading to production of nanocrystals with a diameter of less than 5 nm. (paper)

  15. Multi-Scale Monitoring and Prediction of System Responses to Biostimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susan Hubbard; Jill Banfield; Jinsong Chen; Mark Conrad; Jenny Druhan; Andreas Englert; Andreas Kemna; LiLi; Phil Long; Michael O'Brien; Dimtrios Ntarlagiannis; Yves Personna; Steve Pride; Lee Slater; Carl Steefel; Ken William

    2007-01-01

    To advance solutions needed for remediation of DOE contaminated sites, approaches are needed that can elucidate and predict reactions associated with coupled biological, geochemical, and hydrological processes over a variety of spatial scales and in heterogeneous environments. Our previous laboratory experimental experiments, which were conducted under controlled and homogeneous conditions, suggest that geophysical methods have the potential for elucidating system transformations that often occur during remediation. Examples include tracking the onset and aggregation of precipitates associated with sulfate reduction using seismic and complex resistivity methods (Williams et al., 2005; Ntarlagiannis et al., 2005) as well as estimating the volume of evolved gas associated with denitrification using radar velocity. These exciting studies illustrated that geophysical responses correlated with biogeochemical changes, but also that multiple factors could impact the geophysical signature and thus a better understanding as well as integration tools were needed to advance the techniques to the point where they can be used to provide quantitative estimates of system transformations. Our current research includes theoretical, numerical, and experimental investigations, performed at the laboratory and the field scales, to determine if geophysical methods can be used to uniquely monitor system transformations. Our work is geared toward the Uranium Mill Tailings site at Rifle, CO, site (Figure 1), where ERSP-sponsored investigations are exploring the efficacy of electron-donor amendments for facilitating sustainable microbial reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) through a series of local-scale field experiments conducted in 2002-2005 (Anderson et al., 2003; Vrionis et al, 2005) Early experiments at the site showed that U(VI) loss from groundwater occurred synchronously with growth of Geobacter after acetate amendment, and illustrated the importance of maintaining iron-reducing conditions

  16. Environmental proteomics reveals early microbial community responses to biostimulation at a uranium- and nitrate-contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Nissen, Silke [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Pffifner, Susan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Loeffler, Frank E [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    High performance mass spectrometry instrumentation coupled with improved protein extraction techniques enable metaproteomics to identify active members of soil and groundwater microbial communities. Metaproteomics workflows were applied to study the initial responses (i.e., 4 days post treatment) of the indigenous aquifer microbiota to biostimulation with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) at a uranium-contaminated site. Members of the Betaproteobacteria (i.e., Dechloromonas, Ralstonia, Rhodoferax, Polaromonas, Delftia, Chromobacterium) and Firmicutes dominated the biostimulated aquifer community. Proteome characterization revealed distinct differences in protein expression between the microbial biomass collected from groundwater influenced by biostimulation and groundwater collected up-gradient of the EVO injection points. In particular, proteins involved in ammonium assimilation, EVO degradation, and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granule formation were prominent following biostimulation. Interestingly, the atypical NosZ of a Dechloromonas sp. was highly expressed suggesting active nitrous oxide (N2O) respiration. c-type cytochromes were barely detected, as was citrate synthase, a biomarker for hexavalent uranium reduction activity, suggesting that metal reduction has not commenced 4 days post EVO delivery. Environmental metaproteomics identified microbial community responses to biostimulation and elucidated active pathways demonstrating the value of this technique for complementing nucleic acid-based approaches.

  17. Analysis of biostimulated microbial communities from two field experiments reveals temporal and spatial differences in proteome profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callister, S.J.; Wilkins, M.J.; Nicora, C.D.; Williams, K.H.; Banfield, J.F.; VerBerkmoes, N.C.; Hettich, R.L.; NGuessan, A.L.; Mouser, P.J.; Elifantz, H.; Smith, R.D.; Lovley, D.R.; Lipton, M.S.; Long, P.E.

    2010-07-15

    Stimulated by an acetate-amendment field experiment conducted in 2007, anaerobic microbial populations in the aquifer at the Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Colorado reduced mobile U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). During this experiment, planktonic biomass was sampled at various time points to quantitatively evaluate proteomes. In 2008, an acetate-amended field experiment was again conducted in a similar manner to the 2007 experiment. As there was no comprehensive metagenome sequence available for use in proteomics analysis, we systematically evaluated 12 different organism genome sequences to generate sets of aggregate genomes, or “pseudo-metagenomes”, for supplying relative quantitative peptide and protein identifications. Proteomics results support previous observations of the dominance of Geobacteraceae during biostimulation using acetate as sole electron donor, and revealed a shift from an early stage of iron reduction to a late stage of iron reduction. Additionally, a shift from iron reduction to sulfate reduction was indicated by changes in the contribution of proteome information contributed by different organism genome sequences within the aggregate set. In addition, the comparison of proteome measurements made between the 2007 field experiment and 2008 field experiment revealed differences in proteome profiles. These differences may be the result of alterations in abundance and population structure within the planktonic biomass samples collected for analysis.

  18. Bioremediation of Crude Oil Contaminated Desert Soil: Effect of Biostimulation, Bioaugmentation and Bioavailability in Biopile Treatment Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyahia, Farid; Embaby, Ahmed Shams

    2016-02-15

    This work was aimed at evaluating the relative merits of bioaugmentation, biostimulation and surfactant-enhanced bioavailability of a desert soil contaminated by crude oil through biopile treatment. The results show that the desert soil required bioaugmentation and biostimulation for bioremediation of crude oil. The bioaugmented biopile system led to a total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) reduction of 77% over 156 days while the system with polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80) gave a 56% decrease in TPH. The biostimulated system with indigenous micro-organisms gave 23% reduction in TPH. The control system gave 4% TPH reduction. The addition of Tween 80 led to a respiration rate that peaked in 48 days compared to 88 days for the bioaugmented system and respiration declined rapidly due to nitrogen depletion. The residual hydrocarbon in the biopile systems studied contained polyaromatics (PAH) in quantities that may be considered as hazardous. Nitrogen was found to be a limiting nutrient in desert soil bioremediation.

  19. In-situ XPS analysis of oxidized and reduced plasma deposited ruthenium-based thin catalytic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerzak, Jacek; Redzynia, Wiktor; Tyczkowski, Jacek

    2017-12-01

    A novel in-situ study of the surface molecular structure of catalytically active ruthenium-based films subjected to the oxidation (in oxygen) and reduction (in hydrogen) was performed in a Cat-Cell reactor combined with a XPS spectrometer. The films were produced by the plasma deposition method (PEMOCVD). It was found that the films contained ruthenium at different oxidation states: metallic (Ru0), RuO2 (Ru+4), and other RuOx (Ru+x), of which content could be changed by the oxidation or reduction, depending on the process temperature. These results allow to predict the behavior of the Ru-based catalysts in different redox environments.

  20. Evaluation of autochthonous bioaugmentation and biostimulation during microcosm-simulated oil spills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, M; Pasadakis, N; Kalogerakis, N

    2013-07-15

    Oil spills are treated as a widespread problem that poses a great threat to any ecosystem. Following first response actions, bioremediation has emerged as the best strategy for combating oil spills and can be enhanced by the following two complementary approaches: bioaugmentation and biostimulation. Bioaugmentation is one of the most controversial issues of bioremediation. Studies that compare the relative performance of bioaugmentation and biostimulation suggest that nutrient addition alone has a greater effect on oil biodegradation than the addition of microbial products because the survival and degradation ability of microbes introduced to a contaminated site are highly dependent on environmental conditions. Microbial populations grown in rich media under laboratory conditions become stressed when exposed to field conditions in which nutrient concentrations are substantially lower. There is increasing evidence that the best approach to overcoming these barriers is the use of microorganisms from the polluted area, an approach proposed as autochthonous bioaugmentation (ABA) and defined as a bioaugmentation technology that exclusively uses microorganisms indigenous to the sites (soil, sand, and water) slated for decontamination. In this work, we examined the effectiveness of strategies combining autochthonous bioaugmentation with biostimulation for successful remediation of polluted marine environments. Seawater was collected from a pristine area (Agios Onoufrios Beach, Chania) and was placed in a bioreactor with 1% v/v crude oil to facilitate the adaptation of the indigenous microorganism population. The pre-adapted consortium and the indigenous population were tested in combination with inorganic or lipophilic nutrients in the presence (or absence) of biosurfactants (rhamnolipids) during 90-day long experiments. Chemical analysis (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) of petroleum hydrocarbons confirmed the results of previous work demonstrating that the

  1. Comparative bioremediation of soils contaminated with diesel oil by natural attenuation, biostimulation and bioaugmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Fatima M; Camargo, Flávio A O; Okeke, Benedict C; Frankenberger, William T

    2005-06-01

    Bioremediation of diesel oil in soil can occur by natural attenuation, or treated by biostimulation or bioaugmentation. In this study we evaluated all three technologies on the degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in soil. In addition, the number of diesel-degrading microorganisms present and microbial activity as indexed by the dehydrogenase assay were monitored. Soils contaminated with diesel oil in the field were collected from Long Beach, California, USA and Hong Kong, China. After 12 weeks of incubation, all three treatments showed differing effects on the degradation of light (C12-C23) and heavy (C23-C40) fractions of TPH in the soil samples. Bioaugmentation of the Long Beach soil showed the greatest degradation in the light (72.7%) and heavy (75.2%) fractions of TPH. Natural attenuation was more effective than biostimulation (addition of nutrients), most notably in the Hong Kong soil. The greatest microbial activity (dehydrogenase activity) was observed with bioaugmentation of the Long Beach soil (3.3-fold) and upon natural attenuation of the Hong Kong sample (4.0-fold). The number of diesel-degrading microorganisms and heterotrophic population was not influenced by the bioremediation treatments. Soil properties and the indigenous soil microbial population affect the degree of biodegradation; hence detailed site specific characterization studies are needed prior to deciding on the proper bioremediation method.

  2. Succession of microbial communities during a biostimulation process as evaluated by DGGE and clone library analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, A.; Nakahara, T.

    2001-01-01

    Aims: The objective of this study was to investigate the changes in the indigenous bacterial community structure for assessing the impact of biostimulation on spilled oil. Methods and Results: Changes in the bacterial community structure were monitored by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and clone library methods based on 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) sequences. The results of DGGE, coupled with the use of the Shannon index and principal component analysis (PCA) and clone library analyses, were consistent. In the treated (fertilized) area, one operational taxonomic unit (OTU) became dominant during the fertilization period, and it was most closely related to Pseudomonas putida. Conclusions: The bacterial community structure in the treated area was markedly different from that in the control (non-fertilized) area during the fertilization period, but in the two areas it became similar at 14 weeks after the end of fertilization. Significance and Impact of the Study: The results suggest that the bacterial community structure was disrupted by the biostimulation treatment, but that it recovered immediately after the end of fertilization. (Author)

  3. An in Situ method for establishing the presence and predicting the activity of heavy metal-reducing microbes in the subsurface. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatfield, K.

    2003-01-01

    Tracer method to establish presence and distribution of chromium reducing microbes. The primary objective of this research was to establish an in situ tracer method for detecting the presence. distribution. and activity of subsurface heavy metal-reducing microorganisms. Research focused on microbial systems responsible for the reduction of chromium and a suite of biotracers coupled to the reduction process. The tracer method developed may be used to characterize sites contaminated with chromium or expedite bioremediation: and although research focused on chromium. the method can be easily extended to other metals, organics, and radionuclides. This brief final report contains three major sections. The first identifies specific products of the research effort such as students supported and publications. The second section briefly presents major research findings, while the last section summarizes the overall research effort

  4. In Situ Tracer method for establishing the presence and predicting the activity of heavy metal-reducing microbes in the subsurface. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatfield, K.

    2003-07-01

    Tracer method to establish presence and distribution of chromium reducing microbes. The primary objective of this research was to establish an in situ tracer method for detecting the presence. distribution. and activity of subsurface heavy metal-reducing microorganisms. Research focused on microbial systems responsible for the reduction of chromium and a suite of biotracers coupled to the reduction process. The tracer method developed may be used to characterize sites contaminated with chromium or expedite bioremediation: and although research focused on chromium. the method can be easily extended to other metals, organics, and radionuclides. This brief final report contains three major sections. The first identifies specific products of the research effort such as students supported and publications. The second section briefly presents major research findings, while the last section summarizes the overall research effort.

  5. Effect of pre-sowing laser biostimulation of seeds on physico-chemical properties of glasshouse tomato fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koper, R.; Rybak, P.

    2000-01-01

    Paper presented results of study on the effect of pre-sowing laser biostimulation of glasshouse tomato seeds, Recento cultivar, on physico-chemical properties of yielded fruits. Tomato fruit resistance to elastic strains was tested in laboratory as well as the extract content and total acidity of fruits were analysed. Positive influence of laser treatment on tested tomato fruit properties was noted

  6. Combining in situ chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to reduce contaminant mass and leachability in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Daniel P; Srivastava, Vipul J; Dombrowski, Frank J; Lingle, James W

    2015-10-30

    Laboratory batch reactors were maintained for 32 weeks to test the potential for an in situ remedy that combines chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to treat soil from a manufactured gas plant, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Portland cement and slaked lime were used to activate the persulfate and to stabilize/encapsulate the contaminants that were not chemically oxidized. Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded residual contaminants using the sulfate left after persulfate activation. The ability of the combined remedy to reduce contaminant mass and leachability was compared with NaOH-activated persulfate, stabilization, and sulfate-reducing bioremediation as stand-alone technologies. The stabilization amendments increased pH and temperature sufficiently to activate the persulfate within 1 week. Activation with both stabilization amendments and NaOH removed between 55% and 70% of PAH and BTEX. However, combined persulfate and stabilization significantly reduced the leachability of residual BTEX and PAH compared with NaOH activation. Sulfide, 2-naphthoic acid, and the abundance of subunit A of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) were used to monitor native sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were negatively impacted by activated persulfate, but recovered completely within weeks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Microwave-assisted in situ synthesis of reduced graphene oxide-BiVO{sub 4} composite photocatalysts and their enhanced photocatalytic performance for the degradation of ciprofloxacin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China); Sun, Shaofang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Chang’an University, Yanta Road 126, Xi’an, 710054 (China); Song, Yang; Yan, Xu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China); Guan, Weisheng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Chang’an University, Yanta Road 126, Xi’an, 710054 (China); Liu, Xinlin [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China); Shi, Weidong, E-mail: swd1978@ujs.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Microwave-assisted in situ growth of RGO-BiVO{sub 4} composite was proposed. ► A relatively small particle size with organic-additives free. ► Graphene was formed during the microwave-heating by oxygen capture. ► GB-2 sample exhibits the highest CIP degradation ratio (3 times over pure BiVO{sub 4}). ► The enhancements of activities result from the effective charge separation. -- Abstract: To improve the photodegradation efficiency for ciprofloxacin (CIP), a new-type microwave-assisted in situ growth method is developed for the preparation of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) -BiVO{sub 4} composite photocatalysts. The as-produced RGO-BiVO{sub 4} composite photocatalysts show extremely high enhancement of CIP degradation ratio over the pure BiVO{sub 4} photocatalyst under visible light. Specially, the 2 wt% RGO-BiVO{sub 4} composite photocatalyst exhibits the highest CIP degradation ratio (68.2%) in 60 min, which is over 3 times than that (22.7%) of the pure BiVO{sub 4} particles. The enhancement of photocatalytic activities of RGO-BiVO{sub 4} photocatalysts can be attributed to the effective separation of electron–hole pairs rather than the improvement of light absorption.

  8. Enhanced crude oil biodegradation in soil via biostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Esmaeil; Hassan, Ali

    2016-08-02

    Research on feasible methods for the enhancement of bioremediation in soil contaminated by crude oil is vital in oil-exporting countries such as Kuwait, where crude oil is a major pollutant and the environment is hostile to biodegradation. This study investigated the possibility of enhancing crude oil bioremediation by supplementing soil with cost-effective organic materials derived from two widespread locally grown trees, Conocarpus and Tamarix. Amendments in soils increased the counts of soil microbiota by up to 98% and enhanced their activity by up to 95.5%. The increase in the biodegradation of crude oil (75%) and high levels of alkB expression substantiated the efficiency of the proposed amendment technology for the bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. The identification of crude-oil-degrading bacteria revealed the dominance of the genus Microbacterium (39.6%), Sphingopyxis soli (19.3%), and Bordetella petrii (19.6%) in unamended, Conocarpus-amended, and Tamarix-amended contaminated soils, respectively. Although soil amendments favored the growth of Gram-negative bacteria and reduced bacterial diversity, the structures of bacterial communities were not significantly altered.

  9. Mesocosm trials of bioremediation of contaminated soil of a petroleum refinery: comparison of natural attenuation, biostimulation and bioaugmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, M Nazaré P F S; Monteiro, Emanuela; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D

    2010-08-01

    Contamination with petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) is a global problem with environmental implications. Physico-chemical treatments can be used for soil cleanup, but they are expensive, and can have implications for soil structure and environment. Otherwise, biological remediation treatments are cost-effective and restore soil structure. Several remediation experiments have been carried out in the lab and in the field; however, there is the challenge to achieve as good or better results in the field as in the laboratory. In the ambit of a project aiming at investigating suitable biological remediation approaches for recovering a refinery contaminated soil, we present here results obtained in bioremediation trials. The approaches biostimulation and bioaugmentation were tested, in parallel, and compared with natural attenuation. For this purpose, mesocosm experiments were carried out inside the refinery area, which constitutes a real asset of this work. Soil contaminated with crude oil was excavated, re-contaminated with turbine oil, homogenised and used to fill several 0.5 m(3) high-density polyethylene containers. The efficiency of procedures as follows: (1) natural attenuation; (2) manual aeration; (3) biostimulation by adding (3.1) only nutrients; and (3.2) nutrients and a non-ionic surfactant; and (4) bioaugmentation in the presence of added (4.1) nutrients or (4.2) nutrients and a non-ionic surfactant were evaluated after a 9-month period of experiment. For bioaugmentation, a commercial bacterial product was used. In addition to physico-chemical characterization, initial and final soil contents in total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) (by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry) and the total number of bacteria (by total cell counts) were carried out. For TPH degradation evaluation the soil was divided in four fractions corresponding to different depths: 0-5; 5-10; 10-15; and 15-20 cm. Mean values of percentages of PHC degradation varied between 20 and 50% at

  10. Gene expression correlates with process rates quantified for sulfate- and Fe(III-reducing bacteria in U(VI-contaminated sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise M Akob

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Though iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria are well known for mediating uranium(VI reduction in contaminated subsurface environments, quantifying the in situ activity of the microbial groups responsible remains a challenge. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the use of quantitative molecular tools that target mRNA transcripts of key genes related to Fe(III and sulfate reduction pathways in order to monitor these processes during in situ U(VI remediation in the subsurface. Expression of the Geobacteraceae-specific citrate synthase gene (gltA and the dissimilatory (bisulfite reductase gene (dsrA, were correlated with the activity of iron- or sulfate-reducing microorganisms, respectively, under stimulated bioremediation conditions in microcosms of sediments sampled from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (OR-IFRC site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In addition, Geobacteraceae-specific gltA and dsrA transcript levels were determined in parallel with the predominant electron acceptors present in moderately and highly contaminated subsurface sediments from the OR-IFRC. Phylogenetic analysis of the cDNA generated from dsrA mRNA, sulfate-reducing bacteria-specific 16S rRNA, and gltA mRNA identified activity of specific microbial groups. Active sulfate reducers were members of the Desulfovibrio, Desulfobacterium, and Desulfotomaculum genera. Members of the subsurface Geobacter clade, closely related to uranium-reducing Geobacter uraniireducens and Geobacter daltonii, were the metabolically-active iron-reducers in biostimulated microcosms and in situ core samples. Direct correlation of transcripts and process rates demonstrated evidence of competition between the functional guilds in subsurface sediments. We further showed that active populations of Fe(III-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria are present in OR-IFRC sediments and are good potential targets for in situ bioremediation.

  11. Combining in situ chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to reduce contaminant mass and leachability in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassidy, Daniel P., E-mail: daniel.cassidy@wmich.edu [Department of Geosciences, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Srivastava, Vipul J., E-mail: vipul.srivastava@ch2m.com [CH2M HILL, 125S Wacker, Ste 3000, Chicago, IL 60606 (United States); Dombrowski, Frank J., E-mail: frank.dombrowski@we-energies.com [We Energies, 333W Everett St., A231, Milwaukee, WI 53203 (United States); Lingle, James W., E-mail: jlingle@epri.com [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), 4927W Willow Road, Brown Deer, WI 53223 (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Portland cement and lime activated persulfate by increasing pH and temperature. • Chemical oxidation achieved BTEX and PAH removal ranging from 55% to 75%. • Activating persulfate with ISS amendments reduced leachability more than NaOH. • Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded PAHs within weeks after ISCO finished. • ISCO, ISS, and anaerobic bioremediation were combined in a single application. - Abstract: Laboratory batch reactors were maintained for 32 weeks to test the potential for an in situ remedy that combines chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to treat soil from a manufactured gas plant, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Portland cement and slaked lime were used to activate the persulfate and to stabilize/encapsulate the contaminants that were not chemically oxidized. Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded residual contaminants using the sulfate left after persulfate activation. The ability of the combined remedy to reduce contaminant mass and leachability was compared with NaOH-activated persulfate, stabilization, and sulfate-reducing bioremediation as stand-alone technologies. The stabilization amendments increased pH and temperature sufficiently to activate the persulfate within 1 week. Activation with both stabilization amendments and NaOH removed between 55% and 70% of PAH and BTEX. However, combined persulfate and stabilization significantly reduced the leachability of residual BTEX and PAH compared with NaOH activation. Sulfide, 2-naphthoic acid, and the abundance of subunit A of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) were used to monitor native sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were negatively impacted by activated persulfate, but recovered completely within weeks.

  12. Combining in situ chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to reduce contaminant mass and leachability in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassidy, Daniel P.; Srivastava, Vipul J.; Dombrowski, Frank J.; Lingle, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Portland cement and lime activated persulfate by increasing pH and temperature. • Chemical oxidation achieved BTEX and PAH removal ranging from 55% to 75%. • Activating persulfate with ISS amendments reduced leachability more than NaOH. • Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded PAHs within weeks after ISCO finished. • ISCO, ISS, and anaerobic bioremediation were combined in a single application. - Abstract: Laboratory batch reactors were maintained for 32 weeks to test the potential for an in situ remedy that combines chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to treat soil from a manufactured gas plant, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Portland cement and slaked lime were used to activate the persulfate and to stabilize/encapsulate the contaminants that were not chemically oxidized. Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded residual contaminants using the sulfate left after persulfate activation. The ability of the combined remedy to reduce contaminant mass and leachability was compared with NaOH-activated persulfate, stabilization, and sulfate-reducing bioremediation as stand-alone technologies. The stabilization amendments increased pH and temperature sufficiently to activate the persulfate within 1 week. Activation with both stabilization amendments and NaOH removed between 55% and 70% of PAH and BTEX. However, combined persulfate and stabilization significantly reduced the leachability of residual BTEX and PAH compared with NaOH activation. Sulfide, 2-naphthoic acid, and the abundance of subunit A of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) were used to monitor native sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were negatively impacted by activated persulfate, but recovered completely within weeks

  13. Responses of selected biota after biostimulation of a vegetable oil spill in the Con Joubert Bird Sanctuary wetland: a pilot study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Selala, MC

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on the effect of a vegetable oil spill was conducted on the biological diversity of the Con Joubert Bird Sanctuary wetland in South Africa before and after biostimulation with different concentrations of fertilizer during 2008...

  14. Microwave-assisted in situ synthesis of reduced graphene oxide-BiVO4 composite photocatalysts and their enhanced photocatalytic performance for the degradation of ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Sun, Shaofang; Song, Yang; Yan, Xu; Guan, Weisheng; Liu, Xinlin; Shi, Weidong

    2013-04-15

    To improve the photodegradation efficiency for ciprofloxacin (CIP), a new-type microwave-assisted in situ growth method is developed for the preparation of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) -BiVO4 composite photocatalysts. The as-produced RGO-BiVO4 composite photocatalysts show extremely high enhancement of CIP degradation ratio over the pure BiVO4 photocatalyst under visible light. Specially, the 2 wt% RGO-BiVO4 composite photocatalyst exhibits the highest CIP degradation ratio (68.2%) in 60 min, which is over 3 times than that (22.7%) of the pure BiVO4 particles. The enhancement of photocatalytic activities of RGO-BiVO4 photocatalysts can be attributed to the effective separation of electron-hole pairs rather than the improvement of light absorption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fe2O3/Reduced Graphene Oxide/Fe3O4 Composite in Situ Grown on Fe Foil for High-Performance Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chongjun; Shao, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yuxiao; Qian, Xiuzhen

    2016-11-09

    A Fe 2 O 3 /reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/Fe 3 O 4 nanocomposite in situ grown on Fe foil was synthesized via a simple one-step hydrothermal growth process, where the iron foil served as support, reductant of graphene oxide, Fe source of Fe 3 O 4 , and also the current collector of the electrode. When it directly acted as the electrode of a supercapacitor, as-synthesized Fe 2 O 3 /RGO/Fe 3 O 4 @Fe exhibited excellent electrochemical performance with a high capability of 337.5 mF/cm 2 at 20 mA/cm 2 and a superior cyclability with 2.3% capacity loss from the 600th to the 2000th cycle.

  16. Biorremediation of soil polluted by 75000 ppm of waste motor oil applying biostimulation and phytoremediation with Sorghum vulgare and Bacillus cereus or Burkholderia cepacia

    OpenAIRE

    Balderas-León Iván; Sánchez-Yáñez Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Waste motor oil (WMO) pollutes soil and causing lost soil fertility. An alternative to solve this problem its bioremediation (BR) by double and following biostimulation (BS) with mineral solution (MS) and a legume as green manure (GM) then using phytoremediation (PR) with growth promoting vegetal bacteria (GPVB) like Bacillus cereus and Burkholderia cepacia to minimize remaining WMO. The aims of this research were: a) bioremediation of polluted soil by 75000 ppm of WMO by biostimulation and t...

  17. Laser induced biostimulation: A possible healing prospect in endo-perio lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithra N Hegde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The health of the tooth is governed by both endodontic tissue and periodontal apparatus. "Endo-perio lesion" is the term used to describe the lesions in which inflammatory products involves both pulpal and periodontal tissues in varying degrees. The disease of endodontium may lead to the involvement of the periodontium and vice versa. Endo-perio lesions are the clinical conditions that are often difficult to diagnose and persistent if not treated appropriately. Lasers have been used successfully in endodontic as well as periodontal procedures. With endodontic treatment alone, only part of the lesion will heal to the level of the secondary periodontal lesion. Overall prognosis depends upon the severity of periodontal damage and the efficacy of the periodontal treatment. Laser can be considered as an efficacious tool and an adjunct to conventional periodontal therapy both for its decontaminating and biostimulating effects.

  18. Bioremediation of crude oil-contaminated soil: comparison of different biostimulation and bioaugmentation treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yaohui; Lu, Mang

    2010-11-15

    Biostimulation with inorganic fertilizer and bioaugmentation with hydrocarbon utilizing indigenous bacteria were employed as remedial options for 12 weeks in a crude oil-contaminated soil. To promote oil removal, biocarrier for immobilization of indigenous hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria was developed using peanut hull powder. Biodegradation was enhanced with free-living bacterial culture and biocarrier with a total petroleum hydrocarbon removal ranging from 26% to 61% after a 12-week treatment. Oil removal was also enhanced when peanut hull powder was only used as a bulking agent, which accelerated the mass transfer rate of water, oxygen, nutrients and hydrocarbons, and provided nutrition for the microflora. Dehydrogenase activity in soil was remarkably enhanced by the application of carrier material. Metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were identified by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Foliar application of microbial and plant based biostimulants increases growth and potassium uptake in almond (Prunus dulcis [Mill.] D. A. Webb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saa, Sebastian; Olivos-Del Rio, Andres; Castro, Sebastian; Brown, Patrick H

    2015-01-01

    The use of biostimulants has become a common practice in agriculture. However, there is little peer-reviewed research on this topic. In this study we tested, under controlled and replicated conditions, the effect of one biostimulant derived from seaweed extraction (Bio-1) and another biostimulant derived from microbial fermentation (Bio-2). This experiment utilized 2-years-old almond plants over two growing seasons in a randomized complete design with a full 2 × 4 factorial structure with two soil potassium treatments (125 μg g(-1) of K vs. 5 μg g(-1)) and four foliar treatments (No spray, Foliar-K, Bio-1, Bio-2). Rubidium was utilized as a surrogate for short-term potassium uptake and plant growth, nutrient concentration, and final plant biomass were evaluated. There was a substantial positive effect of both biostimulant treatments on total shoot leaf area, and significant increases in shoot length and biomass under adequate soil potassium supply with a positive effect of Bio-1 only under low K supply. Rubidium uptake was increased by Bio-1 application an effect that was greater under the low soil K treatment. Though significant beneficial effects of the biostimulants used on plant growth were observed, it is not possible to determine the mode of action of these materials. The results presented here illustrate the promise and complexity of research involving biostimulants.

  20. Foliar application of microbial and plant based biostimulants increases growth and potassium uptake in almond (Prunus dulcis [Mill.] D. A. Webb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eSaa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of biostimulants has become a common practice in agriculture. However, there is little peer-reviewed research on this topic. In this study we tested, under controlled and replicated conditions, the effect of one biostimulant derived from seaweed extraction (Bio-1 and another biostimulant derived from microbial fermentation (Bio-2. This experiment utilized two-year-old almond plants over two growing seasons in a randomized complete design with a full 2 x 4 factorial structure with two soil potassium treatments (125 µg g-1 of K vs 5 µg g-1 and four foliar treatments (No spray, Foliar-K, Bio-1, Bio-2. Rubidium was utilized as a surrogate for short-term potassium uptake and plant growth, nutrient concentration, and final plant biomass were evaluated. There was a substantial positive effect of both biostimulant treatments on total shoot leaf area, and significant increases in shoot length and biomass under adequate soil potassium supply with a positive effect of Bio-1 only under low K supply. Rubidium uptake was increased by Bio-1 application an effect that was greater under the low soil K treatment. Though significant beneficial effects of the biostimulants used on plant growth were observed, it is not possible to determine the mode of action of these materials. The results presented here illustrate the promise and complexity of research involving biostimulants.

  1. In Situ Synthesis of Monomer Casting Nylon-6/Graphene-Polysiloxane Nanocomposites: Intercalation Structure, Synergistic Reinforcing, and Friction-Reducing Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengjie; Xiang, Meng; Zhao, Xiaowen; Ye, Lin

    2017-09-27

    On the basis of the industrialized graphene nanosheets (GNs) product, we synthesized monomer casting nylon-6 (MC PA6)/GN-3-aminopropyl-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (APDMS) nanocomposite in situ through the anchoring effect of APDMS onto the GN surface. APDMS/PA6 molecules were confirmed to intercalate into the GN layers by the formation of strong interfacial interactions. The intercalation ratio and the average layer thickness of the grafted GN sample decreased in the presence of APDMS. Moreover, for MC PA6/GN-APDMS nanocomposite, GN-APDMS was uniformly distributed in the matrix and no phase separation was observed. The size of spherical APDMS particles was obviously reduced compared with that of MC PA6/APDMS composite, revealing a strong interaction between APDMS and GN and the enhancement of compatibility in the composite system. Compared with neat MC PA6, the addition of GN-APDMS resulted in 12% increase in the tensile strength and 37% increase in the impact strength; meanwhile, increase in both the storage modulus (E') and the glass transition temperature (T g ) indicated synergistic reinforcing and toughening effect of GN-APDMS on MC PA6. Furthermore, over 81 and 48% reduction in the friction coefficient and the specific wear rate, respectively, was achieved for the nanocomposite, and the worn surface displayed flat and smooth features with a uniform depth distribution, a low annealing effect, and a reduced friction heat, further confirming the synergistic friction-reducing effect of GN-APDMS on MC PA6.

  2. An inter-laboratory study to test the ability of amendments to reduce the availability of Cd, Pb, and Zn in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Sally [Box 352100 University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)]. E-mail: slb@u.washington.edu; Christensen, Barbara [Box 352100 University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Lombi, Enzo [CSIRO Land and Water PMB, 2 Glen Osmond, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia)]. E-mail: enzo.lombi@csiro.au; McLaughlin, Mike [CSIRO Land and Water PMB, 2 Glen Osmond, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia)]. E-mail: mike.mclaughlin@csiro.au; McGrath, Steve [Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Herts AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: steve.mcgrath@bbsrc.ac.uk; Colpaert, Jan [Limburgs Universitair, Centrum Universitaire Campus, Building D, BE 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Vangronsveld, Jaco [Limburgs Universitair, Centrum Universitaire Campus, Building D, BE 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)]. E-mail: jvangron@luc.ac.be

    2005-11-15

    An international inter-laboratory research program investigated the effectiveness of in situ remediation of soils contaminated by cadmium, lead and zinc, measuring changes in soil and soil solution chemistry, plants and soil microbiota. A common soil, from mine wastes in Jasper County MO, was used. The soil was pH 5.9, had low organic matter (1.2 g kg{sup -1} C) and total Cd, Pb, and Zn concentrations of 92, 5022, and 18 532 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively. Amendments included lime, phosphorus (P), red mud (RM), cyclonic ashes (CA), biosolids (BIO), and water treatment residuals (WTR). Both soil solution and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} extractable metals were decreased by all treatments. Phytotoxicity of metals was reduced, with plants grown in P treatments having the highest yields and lowest metal concentration (0.5, 7.2 and 406 mg kg{sup -1} Cd, Pb, and Zn). Response of soil micro-organisms was similar to plant responses. Phosphorus addition reduced the physiologically based extraction test Pb from 84% of total Pb extracted in the untreated soil to 34.1%. - Addition of phosphorus to Pb, Zn and Cd contaminated mine waste was able to reduce metal toxicity for a range of biological endpoints.

  3. An inter-laboratory study to test the ability of amendments to reduce the availability of Cd, Pb, and Zn in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Sally; Christensen, Barbara; Lombi, Enzo; McLaughlin, Mike; McGrath, Steve; Colpaert, Jan; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2005-01-01

    An international inter-laboratory research program investigated the effectiveness of in situ remediation of soils contaminated by cadmium, lead and zinc, measuring changes in soil and soil solution chemistry, plants and soil microbiota. A common soil, from mine wastes in Jasper County MO, was used. The soil was pH 5.9, had low organic matter (1.2 g kg -1 C) and total Cd, Pb, and Zn concentrations of 92, 5022, and 18 532 mg kg -1 , respectively. Amendments included lime, phosphorus (P), red mud (RM), cyclonic ashes (CA), biosolids (BIO), and water treatment residuals (WTR). Both soil solution and NH 4 NO 3 extractable metals were decreased by all treatments. Phytotoxicity of metals was reduced, with plants grown in P treatments having the highest yields and lowest metal concentration (0.5, 7.2 and 406 mg kg -1 Cd, Pb, and Zn). Response of soil micro-organisms was similar to plant responses. Phosphorus addition reduced the physiologically based extraction test Pb from 84% of total Pb extracted in the untreated soil to 34.1%. - Addition of phosphorus to Pb, Zn and Cd contaminated mine waste was able to reduce metal toxicity for a range of biological endpoints

  4. Effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on mineral transformation and biomass accumulation during biostimulation experiments at Rifle, Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Steefel, Carl I; Kowalsky, Michael B; Englert, Andreas; Hubbard, Susan S

    2010-03-01

    Electron donor amendment for bioremediation often results in precipitation of secondary minerals and the growth of biomass, both of which can potentially change flow paths and the efficacy of bioremediation. Quantitative estimation of precipitate and biomass distribution has remained challenging, partly due to the intrinsic heterogeneities of natural porous media and the scarcity of field data. In this work, we examine the effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on the spatial distributions of mineral precipitates and biomass accumulated during a biostimulation field experiment near Rifle, Colorado. Field bromide breakthrough data were used to infer a heterogeneous distribution of hydraulic conductivity through inverse transport modeling, while the solid phase Fe(III) content was determined by assuming a negative correlation with hydraulic conductivity. Validated by field aqueous geochemical data, reactive transport modeling was used to explicitly keep track of the growth of the biomass and to estimate the spatial distribution of precipitates and biomass. The results show that the maximum mineral precipitation and biomass accumulation occurs in the vicinity of the injection wells, occupying up to 5.4vol.% of the pore space, and is dominated by reaction products of sulfate reduction. Accumulation near the injection wells is not strongly affected by heterogeneities present in the system due to the ubiquitous presence of sulfate in the groundwater. However, accumulation in the down-gradient regions is dominated by the iron-reducing reaction products, whose spatial patterns are strongly controlled by both physical and geochemical heterogeneities. Heterogeneities can lead to localized large accumulation of mineral precipitates and biomass, increasing the possibility of pore clogging. Although ignoring the heterogeneities of the system can lead to adequate prediction of the average behavior of sulfate-reducing related products, it can also lead to an

  5. Electromagnetic Biostimulation of Living Cultures for Biotechnology, Biofuel and Bioenergy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav C. Das

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The surge of interest in bioenergy has been marked with increasing efforts in research and development to identify new sources of biomass and to incorporate cutting-edge biotechnology to improve efficiency and increase yields. It is evident that various microorganisms will play an integral role in the development of this newly emerging industry, such as yeast for ethanol and Escherichia coli for fine chemical fermentation. However, it appears that microalgae have become the most promising prospect for biomass production due to their ability to grow fast, produce large quantities of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins, thrive in poor quality waters, sequester and recycle carbon dioxide from industrial flue gases and remove pollutants from industrial, agricultural and municipal wastewaters. In an attempt to better understand and manipulate microorganisms for optimum production capacity, many researchers have investigated alternative methods for stimulating their growth and metabolic behavior. One such novel approach is the use of electromagnetic fields for the stimulation of growth and metabolic cascades and controlling biochemical pathways. An effort has been made in this review to consolidate the information on the current status of biostimulation research to enhance microbial growth and metabolism using electromagnetic fields. It summarizes information on the biostimulatory effects on growth and other biological processes to obtain insight regarding factors and dosages that lead to the stimulation and also what kind of processes have been reportedly affected. Diverse mechanistic theories and explanations for biological effects of electromagnetic fields on intra and extracellular environment have been discussed. The foundations of biophysical interactions such as bioelectromagnetic and biophotonic communication and organization within living systems are expounded with special consideration for spatiotemporal aspects of electromagnetic topology

  6. Allochthonous bioaugmentation in ex situ treatment of crude oil-polluted sediments in the presence of an effective degrading indigenous microbiome

    KAUST Repository

    Fodelianakis, Stylianos

    2015-04-01

    Oil-polluted sediment bioremediation depends on both physicochemical and biological parameters, but the effect of the latter cannot be evaluated without the optimization of the former. We aimed in optimizing the physicochemical parameters related to biodegradation by applying an ex-situ landfarming set-up combined with biostimulation to oil-polluted sediment, in order to determine the added effect of bioaugmentation by four allochthonous oil-degrading bacterial consortia in relation to the degradation efficiency of the indigenous community. We monitored hydrocarbon degradation, sediment ecotoxicity and hydrolytic activity, bacterial population sizes and bacterial community dynamics, characterizing the dominant taxa through time and at each treatment. We observed no significant differences in total degradation, but increased ecotoxicity between the different treatments receiving both biostimulation and bioaugmentation and the biostimulated-only control. Moreover, the added allochthonous bacteria quickly perished and were rarely detected, their addition inducing minimal shifts in community structure although it altered the distribution of the residual hydrocarbons in two treatments. Therefore, we concluded that biodegradation was mostly performed by the autochthonous populations while bioaugmentation, in contrast to biostimulation, did not enhance the remediation process. Our results indicate that when environmental conditions are optimized, the indigenous microbiome at a polluted site will likely outperform any allochthonous consortium.

  7. Impacts of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria-based Biostimulants on Wheat Growth under Greenhouse and Field Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Minh; Ongena, Marc; Colinet, Gilles; Vandenbol, Micheline; Spaepen, Stijn; Bodson, Bernard; Jijakli, Haissam; du Jardin, Patrick; Delaplace, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) are one of the main biostimulant classes due to their capacity of stimulating root growth and enhancing soil mineral availability, hence increasing nutrient use efficiency in crops. The aim of this study is to screen commercially PGPR-containing products to enhance wheat growth and yield in combination with an optimized nitrogen (N) fertilizer application scheme. This could lead to a significant reduction of N fertilizer application without affectin...

  8. Biostimulation effects on wheat seeds (Triticum Aestivum L) caused by low level red laser radiation with λ = 660 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, M.; Michtchenko, A.

    2009-01-01

    The principal objective is to study the biostimulation effects caused by a semiconductor low level laser radiation with ? = 660 nm on wheat seeds (Triticum Aestivum L). Seeds were treated before sowing with this laser light source. An increase in the growth of the stem of 12% with respect to control seeds was registered for seeds radiated by an intensity of 15mW/cm 2 and an irradiation time of 60 seconds. (Author)

  9. In situ bioremediation using horizontal wells. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    In Situ Bioremediation (ISB) is the term used in this report for Gaseous Nutrient Injection for In Situ Bioremediation. This process (ISB) involves injection of air and nutrients (sparging and biostimulation) into the ground water and vacuum extraction to remove Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from the vadose zone concomitant with biodegradation of the VOCs. This process is effective for remediation of soils and ground water contaminated with VOCs both above and below the water table. A full-scale demonstration of ISB was conducted as part of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration: VOCs in Soils and Ground Water at Nonarid Sites. This demonstration was performed at the Savannah River Site from February 1992 to April 1993

  10. Biostimulants from food processing by-products: agronomic, quality and metabolic impacts on organic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Chehade, Lara; Al Chami, Ziad; De Pascali, Sandra Angelica; Cavoski, Ivana; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo

    2018-03-01

    Biostimulants have recently gained increased attention due to their multiple benefits for sustainable agriculture. In this study, three food processing by-products - fennel processing residues (FPR), lemon processing residues (LPR) and brewer's spent grain (BSG) - were investigated as potential sources of biostimulants. Their aqueous extracts as individual and associated applications were assessed for their effects on agronomic, quality and metabolic performance of organic tomato in comparison to extract of humic substances (HS) and untreated control (CTRL). Only FPR extracts stimulated shoot growth and tomato dry matter content, whereas all candidates improved tomato yield. FPR and BSG increased fruit mineral content and BSG-FPR-LPR in combination enhanced titratable acidity. FPR-treated fruits had also 20% more vitamin C than CTRL, and higher phenol content was obtained in those of BSG-LPR. Fruit metabolomic profile showed the tendency of all extracts, except BSG-LPR, to increase tomato citric acid and to decrease β-glucose and methanol concentrations. The analysis revealed accordingly the indispensable role of FPR in combined applications for inducing an HS-like response in fruits. The results were indicative of the biostimulant activity of these extracts and demonstrated them, particularly FPR, as promising candidates for enhancing plant productivity and fruit quality. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Degradation of Nitrobenzene Using Bio-Reduced Fe-Clays: Progress Towards the Development of an in-situ Groundwater Remediation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M. L.; Fialips, C. I.

    2008-12-01

    Clay minerals are widely used in agricultural, industrial and environmental engineering applications due to their specific physical and chemical properties and their high abundance in soils in sediments. Currently however, Fe-bearing clays are not widely exploited in these applied fields. Fe-rich smectites, such as nontronite, can contain up to 20wt% of Fe2O3 as structural Fe(III) and if a suitable electron donor is available, this Fe(III) can be utilized by Fe-reducing bacteria as a terminal electron acceptor. When reduced, the overall reactivity of Fe-smectites changes, particularly where interactions with water and various organic compounds are involved. For instance, the presence of reduced Fe-smectites has been found to induce the degradation of certain organic contaminants found in groundwaters and the subsurface, e.g. chlorinated aliphatics and nitroaromatic compounds. The goal of this study is to develop an in-situ groundwater remediation technology that targets redox- sensitive organics, in the form of a permeable Bio Fe-clay barrier. To achieve this, the iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella algae BrY was first used to reduce structural FeIII in <2micron fractions of the Fe- rich smectite nontronite (NAu-2, 41.74wt% Fe2O3) and a Fe-bearing montmorrillonite (Speeton Clay, Yorkshire, UK, ~8wt% Fe2O3). S. algae BrY was able to reduce structural FeIII within these clays to maximum Fe(II)/Fe(II)+Fe(III) ratios 0.34 and 0.19 for the nontronite and Speeton Clay, respectively, in the presence and absence of the electron shuttle, AQDS (9, 10-anthraquinone-2, 6-disulfonic acid). These results are novel because the capability of S. algae BrY to reduce structural Fe(III) in smectite clays has not previously been tested. Nitrobenzene was selected as the test redox-sensitive organic compound as it is a common subsurface contaminant and is of global ecotoxicological concern. To test the capability of bio- reduced Fe-clays to transform nitrobenzene to aniline (the less

  12. Structural evaluation of reduced graphene oxide in graphene oxide during ion irradiation: X-ray absorption spectroscopy and in-situ sheet resistance studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, K.; Jayalakshmi, G.; Suresh, K.; Sundaravel, B.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Phase, D. M.

    2018-03-01

    We report the structural evolution of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in graphene oxide (GO) flakes during 1 MeV Si+ ion irradiation. In-situ electrical resistivity measurements facilitate monitoring the sheet resistance with the increase in the fluence. The electrical sheet resistance of the GO flake shows the exponential decay behaviour with the increasing ion fluence. Raman spectra of the GO flake reveal the increase in the ID/IG ratio, indicating restoration of the sp2 network upon irradiation. The C/O ratio estimated from resonant Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analysis directly evidenced the reduction of oxygen moieties upon irradiation. C K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra reveal the restoration of C=C sp2-hybridized carbon atoms and the removal of oxygen-containing functional groups in the GO flake. STM data reveal the higher conductance in the rGO regime in comparison with the regime, where the oxygen functional groups are present. The experimental investigation demonstrates that the ion irradiation can be employed for efficient reduction of GO with tunable electrical and structural properties.

  13. Semipolar (202̅1) III-Nitride P-Down LEDs with in situ anneal to reduce the Mg memory effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, C.; Leonard, J.; Yonkee, B.; Pynn, C.; Mates, T.; Cohen, D.; Farrell, R.; Margalith, T.; DenBaars, S.; Speck, J.; Nakamura, S.

    2017-04-01

    P-down LEDs (PDLEDs) have the potential to open up new design schemes for III-nitride LEDs compared to conventional n-down LEDs (NDLEDs). For light emitters operating above 480 nm, the PDLED design enables the epitaxial advantages of semipolar (202̅1) and gains the polarization benefits of semipolar (202̅1̅). Here, we investigated semipolar (202̅1) InGaN-based PDLEDs in terms of their photoluminescence (PL) spectra and compositional profile. Despite concerns of the Mg memory effect degrading PDLED performance due to Mg-related non-radiative recombination centers, the PL intensities were nearly identical between the NDLED and PDLEDs, which emitted at wavelengths centered near 500 nm. Secondary ion mass spectrometry revealed that the Mg doping levels in the multiple quantum well (MQW) active region were comparable for each structure, with average values of 2.9×1018 cm-3 for the NDLED and 1.8×1018 cm-3 for the PDLED. Prior to growing the active region MQW, a 700 °C in situ anneal was carried out to reduce the average Mg concentration in the PDLED MQW to 3.7×1017 cm-3. Its hydrogen concentration remained at 5×1019 cm-3 in the p-type GaN region, which suggests that hydrogen passivation occurs during the growth of subsequent epitaxial layers in ammonia.

  14. In Situ Determination of Bisphenol A in Beverage Using a Molybdenum Selenide/Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanoparticle Composite Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongguang Shi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the endocrine disturbing effects of bisphenol A (BPA on organisms, rapid detection has become one of the most important techniques for monitoring its levels in the aqueous solutions associated with plastics and human beings. In this paper, a glassy carbon electrode (GCE modified with molybdenum selenide/reduced graphene oxide (MoSe2/rGO was fabricated for in situ determination of bisphenol A in several beverages. The surface area of the electrode dramatically increases due to the existence of ultra-thin nanosheets in a flower-like structure of MoSe2. Adding phosphotungstic acid in the electrolyte can significantly enhance the repeatability (RSD = 0.4% and reproducibility (RSD = 2.2% of the electrode. Under the optimized condition (pH = 6.5, the linear range of BPA was from 0.1 μM–100 μM and the detection limit was 0.015 μM (S/N = 3. When using the as-prepared electrode for analyzing BPA in beverage samples without any pretreatments, the recoveries ranged from 98–107%, and the concentrations were from below the detection limit to 1.7 μM, indicating its potential prospect for routine analysis of BPA.

  15. In Situ Determination of Bisphenol A in Beverage Using a Molybdenum Selenide/Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanoparticle Composite Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rongguang; Liang, Jing; Zhao, Zongshan; Liu, Yi; Liu, Aifeng

    2018-05-22

    Due to the endocrine disturbing effects of bisphenol A (BPA) on organisms, rapid detection has become one of the most important techniques for monitoring its levels in the aqueous solutions associated with plastics and human beings. In this paper, a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with molybdenum selenide/reduced graphene oxide (MoSe₂/rGO) was fabricated for in situ determination of bisphenol A in several beverages. The surface area of the electrode dramatically increases due to the existence of ultra-thin nanosheets in a flower-like structure of MoSe₂. Adding phosphotungstic acid in the electrolyte can significantly enhance the repeatability (RSD = 0.4%) and reproducibility (RSD = 2.2%) of the electrode. Under the optimized condition (pH = 6.5), the linear range of BPA was from 0.1 μM⁻100 μM and the detection limit was 0.015 μM (S/ N = 3). When using the as-prepared electrode for analyzing BPA in beverage samples without any pretreatments, the recoveries ranged from 98⁻107%, and the concentrations were from below the detection limit to 1.7 μM, indicating its potential prospect for routine analysis of BPA.

  16. Evaluation of Borage Extracts As Potential Biostimulant Using a Phenomic, Agronomic, Physiological, and Biochemical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgari, Roberta; Morgutti, Silvia; Cocetta, Giacomo; Negrini, Noemi; Farris, Stefano; Calcante, Aldo; Spinardi, Anna; Ferrari, Enrico; Mignani, Ilaria; Oberti, Roberto; Ferrante, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Biostimulants are substances able to improve water and nutrient use efficiency and counteract stress factors by enhancing primary and secondary metabolism. Premise of the work was to exploit raw extracts from leaves (LE) or flowers (FE) of Borago officinalis L., to enhance yield and quality of Lactuca sativa 'Longifolia,' and to set up a protocol to assess their effects. To this aim, an integrated study on agronomic, physiological and biochemical aspects, including also a phenomic approach, has been adopted. Extracts were diluted to 1 or 10 mL L -1 , sprayed onto lettuce plants at the middle of the growing cycle and 1 day before harvest. Control plants were treated with water. Non-destructive analyses were conducted to assess the effect of extracts on biomass with an innovative imaging technique, and on leaf photosynthetic efficiency (chlorophyll a fluorescence and leaf gas exchanges). At harvest, the levels of ethylene, photosynthetic pigments, nitrate, and primary (sucrose and total sugars) and secondary (total phenols and flavonoids) metabolites, including the activity and levels of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) were assessed. Moreover, a preliminary study of the effects during postharvest was performed. Borage extracts enhanced the primary metabolism by increasing leaf pigments and photosynthetic activity. Plant fresh weight increased upon treatments with 10 mL L -1 doses, as correctly estimated by multi-view angles images. Chlorophyll a fluorescence data showed that FEs were able to increase the number of active reaction centers per cross section; a similar trend was observed for the performance index. Ethylene was three-fold lower in FEs treatments. Nitrate and sugar levels did not change in response to the different treatments. Total flavonoids and phenols, as well as the total protein levels, the in vitro PAL specific activity, and the levels of PAL-like polypeptides were increased by all borage extracts, with particular regard to FEs. FEs also proved

  17. Evaluation of Borage Extracts As Potential Biostimulant Using a Phenomic, Agronomic, Physiological, and Biochemical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Bulgari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Biostimulants are substances able to improve water and nutrient use efficiency and counteract stress factors by enhancing primary and secondary metabolism. Premise of the work was to exploit raw extracts from leaves (LE or flowers (FE of Borago officinalis L., to enhance yield and quality of Lactuca sativa ‘Longifolia,’ and to set up a protocol to assess their effects. To this aim, an integrated study on agronomic, physiological and biochemical aspects, including also a phenomic approach, has been adopted. Extracts were diluted to 1 or 10 mL L–1, sprayed onto lettuce plants at the middle of the growing cycle and 1 day before harvest. Control plants were treated with water. Non-destructive analyses were conducted to assess the effect of extracts on biomass with an innovative imaging technique, and on leaf photosynthetic efficiency (chlorophyll a fluorescence and leaf gas exchanges. At harvest, the levels of ethylene, photosynthetic pigments, nitrate, and primary (sucrose and total sugars and secondary (total phenols and flavonoids metabolites, including the activity and levels of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL were assessed. Moreover, a preliminary study of the effects during postharvest was performed. Borage extracts enhanced the primary metabolism by increasing leaf pigments and photosynthetic activity. Plant fresh weight increased upon treatments with 10 mL L–1 doses, as correctly estimated by multi-view angles images. Chlorophyll a fluorescence data showed that FEs were able to increase the number of active reaction centers per cross section; a similar trend was observed for the performance index. Ethylene was three-fold lower in FEs treatments. Nitrate and sugar levels did not change in response to the different treatments. Total flavonoids and phenols, as well as the total protein levels, the in vitro PAL specific activity, and the levels of PAL-like polypeptides were increased by all borage extracts, with particular regard to FEs

  18. Biostimulative effects of 809 nm diode laser on cutaneous skin wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmaz, Hakan; Gülsoy, Murat; Ülgen, Yekta

    2015-03-01

    The use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for therapeutic purposes in medicine has become widespread recently. There are many studies in literature supporting the idea of therapeutic effects of laser irradiation on biological tissues. The aim of this study is to investigate the biostimulative effect of 809nm infrared laser irradiation on the healing process of cutaneous incisional skin wounds. 3-4 months old male Wistar Albino rats weighing 300 to 350 gr were used throughout this study. Lowlevel laser therapy was applied through local irradiation of 809nm infrared laser on open skin incisional wounds of 1 cm length. Each animal had six identical incisions on their right and left dorsal region symmetrical to each other. The wounds were separated into three groups of control, 1 J/cm2 and 3 J/cm2 of laser irradiation. Two of these six wounds were kept as control group and did not receive any laser application. Rest of the incisions was irradiated with continuous diode laser of 809nm in wavelength and 20mW power output. Two of them were subjected to laser irradiation of 1 J/cm2 and the other two were subjected to laser light with energy density of 3 J/cm2. Biostimulation effects of irradiation were studied by means of tensile strength tests and histological examinations. Wounded skin samples were morphologically examined and removed for mechanical and histological examinations at days 3, 5 and 7 following the laser applications. Three of the six fragments of skin incisions including a portion of peripheral healthy tissue from each animal were subjected to mechanical tests by means of a universal tensile test machine, whereas the other three samples were embedded in paraffin and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological examinations. The findings of the study show that tissue repair following laser irradiation of 809nm has been accelerated in terms of tissue morphology, strength and cellular content. These results seem to be consistent with the results of many

  19. Remediation of explosive-polluted soil in slurry phase by aerobic biostimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin, Baoping; Shen, Mengyue; Aslam, Hina; Wu, Feng

    2013-01-01

    There is a great volume of polluted soil by 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) manufacturing wastewater containing dozen of nitrocompounds in China. In this study, biostimulation was used for remediating the explosive-polluted soil in aerobic bioslurry by monitoring the removal of total organic carbon (TOC). The results showed that the pulp density had almost no effect on TOC removal; whereas the acetone addition evidently improved remediation efficiency of the polluted soil by intrinsic microorganism, and the TOC removal increased from 25% to 38.4% when dose of acetone increased from 0% to 4% (v/v). The maximum TOC removal of 49.1% was achieved through further adjusting pH at 9.0 and temperature at 30 °C. The second order reaction fits well removal dynamics of TOC under the optimum conditions. With the average conditions, liquid phase TOC decreased from 3404 to 3144 mg/L and solid phase TOC dropped from 1022 to 104 mg/L, leading to toxicity decline by 35%; the optimum condition witnessed 48.9% of TOC removal from 4500 to 2300 mg/L in liquid phase, causing toxicity drop by 62%.

  20. Plant Growth Biostimulants, Dietary Feed Supplements and Cosmetics Formulated with Supercritical CO2 Algal Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Michalak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The review paper presents the use of algal extracts as safe and solvent-free components of plant growth biostimulants, dietary feed additives and cosmetics. Innovative technology that uses extracts obtained by supercritical CO2 extraction, as a method of isolation of biologically active compounds from algal biomass, is presented. An important part of the complete technology is the final formulation of the product. This enabled realization of the further step which was assessment of the utilitarian properties of the extract-based products. The extracts were analysed for the presence of biologically active molecules (e.g., plant hormones, polyphenols which provide useful properties such as antioxidant, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial. The bio-products were tested in germination tests and underwent field trials to search for plant growth biostimulatory properties. Tests on animals (laying hens experiments were conducted to assess pro-health properties of new dietary feed supplement. Another application were cosmetic formulations (dermatological tests. The results of the application tests were very promising, however further studies are required for the registration of the products and successful implementation to the market.

  1. Use Of Biodegradation Ratios In Monitoring Trend Of Biostimulated Biodegradation In Crude Oil Polluted Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okorondu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with biodegradation experiment on soil contaminated with crude oil. The soil sample sets A BC D E F G were amended with inorganic fertilizer to enhance microbial growth and hydrocarbon degradation moisture content of some of the sets were as well varied. Biodegradation ratios nC17Pr nC18Ph and nC17nC18PrPh were used to monitor biodegradation of soil sets A BC D E F G for a period of 180. The soil samples were each contaminated with the same amount of crude oil and exposed to specific substrate treatment regarding the amount of nutrients and water content over the same period of time. The trend in biodegradation of the different soil sample sets shows that biodegradation ratio nC17nC18PrPh was more reflective of and explains the biodegradation trend in all the sample sets throughout the period of the experiment hence a better parameter ratio for monitoring trend of biostimulated biodegradation. The order of preference of the biodegradation ratios is expressed as nC18Ph nC17Pr nC17nC18 PrPh. This can be a relevant support tool when designing bioremediation plan on field.

  2. Enteromorpha intestinalis Derived Seaweed Liquid Fertilizers as Prospective Biostimulant for Glycine max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetna Mathur

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present study, the potential of seaweed liquid fertilizer (SLF of marine algae Enteromorpha intestinalis was evaluated for its effect on seed germination, yield, biochemical parameters and pigment characteristics of Glycine maxE. intestinalis was collected form Mandapam coast of Gulf of Mannar, Tamil Nadu, and the dried seaweeds were used for the preparation of SLF. G. max seeds were germinated with four different concentrations (20, 40, 60, and 100% of SLF; its growth and yield parameters were evaluated and compared with chemical fertilizer and control. The morphological and bio-chemical parameters such as seed germination (100%, root (6.6cm and shoot length (5.4 cm, carbohydrates (0.098 mg/g, protein (0.56 mg/g, pigment (0.444 mg/g chl a; 1.073 mg/g chl b; 3.70 mg/g carotenoids of the plant was found maximum at a concentration of 60% SLF. The phenol content (3.25 mg/g was maximum in 40% SLF. The GC-MS analysis of SLF revealed the presence of notable benzoic compounds involved in plant growth promotion. Results showed thatE. intestinalis derived SLF was potential biostimulant forG. max. Thus, marine algae based fertilizer could be an effective and alternate to the chemical fertilizers emphasizing the need for systematic evaluation programme for SLF on various crops.

  3. Transcriptome Analysis of Gelatin Seed Treatment as a Biostimulant of Cucumber Plant Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. T. Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of gelatin capsule seed treatment on enhanced plant growth and tolerance to abiotic stress have been reported in a number of crops, but the molecular mechanisms underlying such effects are poorly understood. Using mRNA sequencing based approach, transcriptomes of one- and two-week-old cucumber plants from gelatin capsule treated and nontreated seeds were characterized. The gelatin treated plants had greater total leaf area, fresh weight, frozen weight, and nitrogen content. Pairwise comparisons of the RNA-seq data identified 620 differentially expressed genes between treated and control two-week-old plants, consistent with the timing when the growth related measurements also showed the largest differences. Using weighted gene coexpression network analysis, significant coexpression gene network module of 208 of the 620 differentially expressed genes was identified, which included 16 hub genes in the blue module, a NAC transcription factor, a MYB transcription factor, an amino acid transporter, an ammonium transporter, a xenobiotic detoxifier-glutathione S-transferase, and others. Based on the putative functions of these genes, the identification of the significant WGCNA module and the hub genes provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms of gelatin seed treatment as a biostimulant to enhance plant growth.

  4. Electrochemiluminescence quenching of luminol by CuS in situ grown on reduced graphene oxide for detection of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojian; Lu, Peng; Wu, Bin; Wang, Yaoguang; Wang, Huan; Du, Bin; Pang, Xuehui; Wei, Qin

    2018-07-30

    A novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) signal-off strategy based on CuS in situ grown on reduced graphene oxide (CuS-rGO) quenching luminol/H 2 O 2 system was firstly proposed. Luminol was grafted on the surface of Au@Fe 3 O 4 -Cu 3 (PO 4 ) 2 nanoflowers (Luminol-Au@Fe 3 O 4 -Cu 3 (PO 4 ) 2 ) which exhibited excellent catalytic effect towards the reduction of H 2 O 2 to enhance the ECL intensity of luminol. Cu 3 (PO 4 ) 2 nanoflowers showed large surface area which can immobilize more Fe 3 O 4 and Au nanoparticles. The quenching mechanism of CuS-rGO was due to ECL resonance energy transfer (RET). The spectral overlap between fluorescence spectrum of Luminol-Au@Fe 3 O 4 -Cu 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and UV-vis absorption spectrum of CuS-rGO revealed that resonance energy transfer was possible. Au nanoparticles were immobilized on the surface of CuS-rGO to capture secondary antibodies. After a sandwich-type immunoreaction, a remarkable decrease of ECL signal was observed. Under the optimal conditions, the immunosensor showed excellent performance for N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) detection with a wide detection range from 0.5 pg mL -1 to 20 ng mL -1 and a low detection limit of 0.12 pg mL -1 (S/N = 3). The prepared NT-proBNP immunosensor displayed high sensitivity, excellent stability and good specificity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Tratamento de sementes de soja com inseticidas e um bioestimulante Soybean seed treatment with insecticides and biostimulant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Spadotti Amaral Castro

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito do tratamento de sementes com inseticidas e um bioestimulante na germinação no crescimento da planta e raiz de soja. Foram realizados dois experimentos em delineamento de blocos ao acaso, em que as sementes foram tratadas com aldicarb, thiametoxan, imidacloprid e duas testemunhas: uma sem produto e uma com bioestimulante. Em laboratório, as unidades experimentais constituíram-se de rolos de papel toalha com sementes de soja, para avaliar o vigor, a germinação, as plantas anormais e mortas, o comprimento de radículas e de plântulas. Nos testes em casa de vegetação, as unidades experimentais constituíram-se de tubos de PVC, com volume de 16 dm³, e foram avaliados: os teores de N, P e K; a matéria seca; o comprimento, a área e o raio médio radicular; a eficiência de absorção de N, P e K; e a taxa de crescimento radicular da soja. Os tratamentos de sementes de soja com os inseticidas e o bioestimulante levam à formação de raízes mais finas, o que caracteriza um efeito tônico. O produto aldicarb, na dose empregada, prejudica o vigor e a germinação das sementes de soja. O tratamento de sementes com inseticidas e bioestimulante não proporciona maior crescimento das raízes das plantas de soja.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of seed treatment with insecticides and biostimulant on soybean germination and plant and root growth. Two experiments were performed in complete randomized blocks, in which seeds were treated with aldicarb, thiamethoxan, imidacloprid and two checks: one without treatment and one treated with biostimulant. The experimental units at the laboratory were germination sheet rolls with soybean seeds. Plantlet vigor, germination, normal and abnormal plantlets, root and hypocotyl lengths were evaluated. For the greenhouse study PVC pots with 16 dm-3 were used, and determinations were made for: N, P and K contents; dry matter yield; root length

  6. Biostimulant action of a plant-derived protein hydrolysate produced through enzymatic hydrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe eColla

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the biostimulant action (hormone like activity, nitrogen uptake, and growth stimulation of a plant-derived protein hydrolysate by means of two laboratory bioassays: a corn (Zea mays L. coleoptile elongation rate test (experiment 1, a rooting test on tomato cuttings (experiment 2; and two greenhouse experiments: a dwarf pea (Pisum sativum L. growth test (experiment 3, and a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. nitrogen uptake trial (experiment 4. Protein hydrolysate treatments of corn caused an increase in coleoptile elongation rate when compared to the control, in a dose-dependent fashion, with no significant differences between the four concentrations tested (0.375, 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 ml/L, and inodole-3-acetic acid (IAA treatment. The auxin-like effect of the protein hydrolysate on corn has been also observed in the rooting experiment of tomato cuttings. The shoot, root dry weight, root length, and root area were significantly higher by 21%, 35%, 24%, and 26%, respectively in tomato treated plants with the protein hydrolysate at 6 ml/L than untreated plants. In experiment 3, the application of the protein hydrolysate at all doses (0.375, 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 ml/L significantly increased the shoot length of the giberellin (GA-deficient dwarf pea plants by an average value of 33% in comparison with the control treatment. Increasing the concentration of the protein hydrolysate from 0 to 10 ml/L increased the total dry biomass, SPAD index, and leaf nitrogen content by 20.5%, 15% and 21.5%, respectively. Thus the application of plant-derived protein hydrolysate containing amino acids and small peptides elicited a hormone-like activity, enhanced nitrogen uptake and consequently crop performances.

  7. Biostimulant Action of Protein Hydrolysates: Unraveling Their Effects on Plant Physiology and Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colla, Giuseppe; Hoagland, Lori; Ruzzi, Maurizio; Cardarelli, Mariateresa; Bonini, Paolo; Canaguier, Renaud; Rouphael, Youssef

    2017-01-01

    Plant-derived protein hydrolysates (PHs) have gained prominence as plant biostimulants because of their potential to increase the germination, productivity and quality of a wide range of horticultural and agronomic crops. Application of PHs can also alleviate the negative effects of abiotic plant stress due to salinity, drought and heavy metals. Recent studies aimed at uncovering the mechanisms regulating these beneficial effects indicate that PHs could be directly affecting plants by stimulating carbon and nitrogen metabolism, and interfering with hormonal activity. Indirect effects could also play a role as PHs could enhance nutrient availability in plant growth substrates, and increase nutrient uptake and nutrient-use efficiency in plants. Moreover, the beneficial effects of PHs also could be due to the stimulation of plant microbiomes. Plants are colonized by an abundant and diverse assortment of microbial taxa that can help plants acquire nutrients and water and withstand biotic and abiotic stress. The substrates provided by PHs, such as amino acids, could provide an ideal food source for these plant-associated microbes. Indeed, recent studies have provided evidence that plant microbiomes are modified by the application of PHs, supporting the hypothesis that PHs might be acting, at least in part, via changes in the composition and activity of these microbial communities. Application of PHs has great potential to meet the twin challenges of a feeding a growing population while minimizing agriculture's impact on human health and the environment. However, to fully realize the potential of PHs, further studies are required to shed light on the mechanisms conferring the beneficial effects of these products, as well as identify product formulations and application methods that optimize benefits under a range of agro-ecological conditions.

  8. Evaluation of Supercritical Extracts of Algae as Biostimulants of Plant Growth in Field Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Izabela; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Dmytryk, Agnieszka; Wilk, Radosław; Gramza, Mateusz; Rój, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the field trials was to determine the influence of supercritical algal extracts on the growth and development of winter wheat (variety Akteur ). As a raw material for the supercritical fluid extraction, the biomass of microalga Spirulina plantensis , brown seaweed - Ascophyllum nodosum and Baltic green macroalgae was used. Forthial and Asahi SL constituted the reference products. It was found that the tested biostimulants did not influence statistically significantly the plant height, length of ear, and shank length. The ear number per m 2 was the highest in the group where the Baltic macroalgae extract was applied in the dose 1.0 L/ha (statistically significant differences). Number of grains in ear (statistically significant differences) and shank length was the highest in the group treated with Spirulina at the dose 1.5 L/ha. In the group with Ascophyllum at the dose 1.0 L/ha, the highest length of ear was observed. The yield was comparable in all the experimental groups (lack of statistically significant differences). Among the tested supercritical extracts, the best results were obtained for Spirulina (1.5 L/ha). The mass of 1000 grains was the highest for extract from Baltic macroalgae and was 3.5% higher than for Asahi, 4.0% higher than for Forthial and 18.5% higher than for the control group (statistically significant differences). Future work is needed to fully characterize the chemical composition of the applied algal extracts. A special attention should be paid to the extracts obtained from Baltic algae because they are inexpensive source of naturally occurring bioactive compounds, which can be used in sustainable agriculture and horticulture.

  9. Evaluation of supercritical extracts of algae as biostimulants of plant growth in field trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Michalak

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the field trials was to determine the influence of supercritical algal extracts on the growth and development of winter wheat (variety Akteur. As a raw material for the supercritical fluid extraction (SFE, the biomass of microalga Spirulina plantensis, brown seaweed – Ascophyllum nodosum and Baltic green macroalgae was used. Forthial and Asahi SL constituted the reference products. It was found that the tested biostimulants did not influence statistically significantly the plant height, length of ear and shank length. The ear number per square meter was the highest in the group where the Baltic macroalgae extract was applied in the dose 1.0 L/ha (statistically significant differences. Number of grains in ear (statistically significant differences and shank length was the highest in the group treated with Spirulina at the dose 1.5 L/ha. In the group with Ascophyllum at the dose 1.0 L/ha, the highest length of ear was observed. The yield was comparable in all the experimental groups (lack of statistically significant differences.Among the tested supercritical extracts, the best results were obtained for Spirulina (1.5 L/ha. The mass of 1000 grains was the highest for extract from Baltic macroalgae and was 3.5% higher than for Asahi, 4.0% higher than for Forthial and 18.5% higher than for the control group (statistically significant differences. Future work is needed to fully characterize the chemical composition of the applied algal extracts. A special attention should be paid to the extracts obtained from Baltic algae because they are inexpensive source of naturally occurring bioactive compounds, which can be used in sustainable agriculture and horticulture.

  10. A nutrient injection scheme for in situ bio-remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C H; Kuo, M C Tom; Su, C Y; Liang, K F; Han, Y L

    2012-01-01

    Geological layers often have different hydraulic conductivities. This paper presents an innovative design for delivering aqueous substrates and nutrients to various stratified layers at desired rates during in-situ bio-stimulation. The new delivery system consists of intermittent porous tubes connected in series with impermeable polyethylene tubes that run horizontally in each stratified layer of a contaminated aquifer. Results of the tracer test indicated that the distribution of tritium through each porous tube was fairly uniform. A mathematical model was also developed to calculate the distribution of water flow through each porous tube. By controlling the permeability and the length of porous tubes placed in stratified layers, the new design provides a means to selectively deliver nutrients to various layers at desired rates according to aquifer heterogeneity.

  11. Positive impact of bio-stimulators on growth and physiological activity of willow in climate change conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Duda, Zdzisława

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the physiological activity and growth of willow (Salix viminalis L.) plants cultivated under the conditions of adverse temperature and soil moisture content, and to assess the effect of the foliar application of Biojodis (1.0%) and Asahi SL (0.03%) bio-stimulators, or a mixture of Microcistis aeruginosa MKR 0105 and Anabaena PCC 7120 cyanobacteria under such changing growth conditions. The obtained results showed different reactions to the applied constant or periodically changed temperature and soil moisture content. The plants which grew at periodically changed adverse temperature (from -5 to 40oC) or in scantily (20% m.c.) or excessively (60% m.c.) watered soils, grew slowly, in comparison with those growing at 20oC and in optimally moistened soil (30% m.c.). Foliar application of Biojodis and Asahi SL cyanobacteria increased the growth of willow at optimal and adverse temperature or in scantily and excessively moistened soil. The changes in plant growth were associated with the changes in electrolyte leakage, activity of acid or alkaline phosphatases, RNase, index of chlorophyll content in leaves and gas exchange. The above indicates that the foliar application of the studied cyanobacteria and bio-stimulators partly alleviates the harmful impact of adverse temperature and water stress on growth and physiological activity of willow plants

  12. Effect of the New Plant Growth Biostimulants Based on Amino Acids on Yield and Grain Quality of Winter Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popko, Małgorzata; Michalak, Izabela; Wilk, Radosław; Gramza, Mateusz; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Górecki, Henryk

    2018-02-21

    Field and laboratory experiments were carried out in 2012-2013, aimed at evaluating the influence of new products stimulating plant growth based on amino acids on crop yield, characteristics of grain and content of macro- and micronutrients in winter wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.). The tests included two formulations produced in cooperation with INTERMAG Co. (Olkusz, Poland)-AminoPrim and AminoHort, containing 15% and 20% amino acids, respectively, and 0.27% and 2.1% microelements, respectively. Field experiments showed that the application of products based on amino acids influenced the increase of grain yield of winter wheat (5.4% and 11%, respectively, for the application of AminoPrim at a dose 1.0 L/ha and AminoHort at dose 1.25 L/ha) when compared to the control group without biostimulant. Laboratory tests showed an increase of technological characteristics of grain such as ash content, Zeleny sedimentation index and content of protein. The use of the tested preparations at different doses also contributed to the increase of the nutrients content in grains, in particular copper (ranging 31-50%), as well as sodium (35-43%), calcium (4.3-7.9%) and molybdenum (3.9-16%). Biostimulants based on amino acids, tested in the present study, can be recommended for an efficient agricultural production.

  13. Laser biostimulation effects on invertebral disks: histological evidence on intra-observer samples. Retrospective double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramontana, Alfonso; Sorge, Roberto; Page, Juan Carlos Miangolarra

    2016-12-30

    Background and aims: The intervertebral disk degeneration is a pathological process determined by a decrease of mucopolysaccharides in the nucleus pulposus with the consequent dehydration and degeneration of the elastic fibers in the annulus fibrosus of the disk. The laser is a therapeutic tool that has, on the treated tissues, biostimulation effects with an increase of oxidative phosphorylation and production of ATP with an acceleration of the mucopolysaccharides synthesis with a consequent rehydration, biostimulation and production of new elastic fibers. The goal of this project is studying whether the laser stimulation may treat degenerated intervertebral disks. Materials and methods: 60 subjects with the same anthropometric parameters were selected and divided into two randomized groups. 30 subjects underwent laser stimulation, whereas 30 underwent placebo. All 60 subjects underwent a discectomy surgery and the intraoperative findings were examined in a lab, studying the positivity of the PAS reaction and the presence of potential newly formed elastic fibers. Results: It has been shown a higher number of mucopolysaccharides and young newly formed elastic fibers in the group that was treated with laser irradiation with a statistically significant difference, compared to the placebo group (pdisks.

  14. Body condition and stage of seasonal anestrus interact to determine the ovulatory response after male biostimulation in anovulatory Criollo × Nubian goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Avila, Hector R; Urrutia-Morales, Jorge; Espinosa-Martinez, Mario A; Gamez-Vazquez, Hector G; Jimenez-Severiano, Hector; Villagomez-Amezcua, Eugenio

    2017-06-01

    The effect of goat nutritional condition on the response to biostimulation with sexually active males during different stages of anestrus was determined. Fifty-eight Criollo × Nubian females on high and low body mass index (BMI) diets were used. Each BMI group was divided into two for biostimulation with sexually active males during May (mid-anestrus) or July (transition period). Ovulatory responses to biostimulation were characterized from serum progesterone, as well as the delay for response (first and second ovulations followed by a normal length luteal phase, O-WNLP). The percentage of goats showing one O-WNLP was greater in the high BMI group than in the low BMI group and greater during the transition period than in the mid-anestrus. However, the interaction between factors revealed that the difference between BMI groups was only significant in the transition period and the difference between stages was only significant in goats with high BMI. Occurrence of a second O-WNLP tended to be greater in the high BMI group than in the low BMI group. Response delay was shorter in the transition period than in mid-anestrus. In conclusion, female nutritional status interacting with the stage of anestrus determined the ovulatory response to male biostimulation in crossbred Criollo goats. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  15. Capsicum chinensis L. growth and nutraceutical properties are enhanced by biostimulants in a long-term period: chemical and metabolomic approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREA eERTANI

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Two biostimulants, one derived from alfalfa plants (AH and the other obtained from red grape (RG, were chemically characterised using enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assays, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and Raman spectroscopies. Two doses (50 and 100 mL L-1 for RG, and 25 and 50 mL L-1 for AH of biostimulants were applied to Capsicum chinensis L. plants cultivated in pots inside a tunnel. The experimental design consisted of the factorial combination of treatment (no biostimulant, plus AH, plus RG at three doses (zero, low and high and two time-course applications (at the second and fourth week after transplantation and the effects were recorded at flowering and maturity. Both biostimulants contained different amounts of indoleacetic acid and isopentenyladenosine; the AH spectra exhibited amino acid functional groups in the peptidic structure, while the RG spectra showed the presence of polyphenols, such as resveratrol. These results revealed that at flowering, RG and AH increased the weights of fresh leaves and fruits and the number of green fruits, whereas at maturity, the biostimulants most affected the fresh weight and number of red fruits. At flowering, the leaves of the treated plants contained high amounts of epicatechin, ascorbic acid, quercetin and dihydrocapsaicin. At maturity, the leaves of the treated plants exhibited elevated amounts of fructose, glucose, chlorogenic and ferulic acids. Moreover, green fruits exhibited a high content of chlorogenic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, p-coumaric acid and antioxidant activity, while both AH- and RG-treated red fruits were highly endowed in capsaicin. The 1H high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectra of red fruits revealed that both products induced a high amount of NADP+, whereas RG also increased glucose, fumarate, ascorbate, thymidine and high molecular weight species. Our results suggested that AH and RG promoted plant growth and the production of

  16. Effective removal of microorganisms and biostimulants of wastewater by the application of various electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Jatin [Department of Environmental Sciences, Institute of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Chhatrapati Shahu Ji Maharaj University, Kalyanpur, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh (India); Singh, Nandita [Biomass-Biology and Eco-Auditing Division, National Botanical Research Institute, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2007-04-15

    A variety of electrolytes FeCl{sub 3}, CaCl{sub 2}, CuSO{sub 4}, Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, and LaCl{sub 3} was investigated for their efficiency in removing biostimulants (phosphorous and nitrogen) to improve the water quality. Results show that the removal of PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} was achieved below the detection limit (BDL) by two electrolytes, CuSO{sub 4} and Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, and up to 1.0 {+-} 0.0 mg/L by LaCl{sub 3} from a value of 15.0 mg/L, of the concentration of PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} in amended water. The turbidity was found to be removed significantly by FeCl{sub 3}, CuSO{sub 4}, and Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} by about 5.8 {+-} 2.6, 9.7 {+-} 1.0, and 5.4 {+-} 1.1 nephalometric turbidity unit (NTU), respectively. The removal of the members of Enterobacteriaceae viz., Escherichia coli, Enterobacter spp. Pseudomonas fluorescence, and Pseudomonas spp. was found almost in all the chemical precipitants but their removal was more significant in the water samples treated with CuSO{sub 4}, Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, and LaCl{sub 3}. To achieve a complete removal and to sustain the after effects of precipitation, such as recurrence of algal growth, the combination of CuSO{sub 4} and Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} was investigated. Reduction in the turbidity from 30.83 to <2 NTU, phosphate ion from a value of 1.28 mg/L to BDL and ammonia ion from a value of 44.71 to 36.48 mg/L of natural pond water were observed after the treatment with CuSO{sub 4} and Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} in combination. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Qualidade fisiológica de sementes de milho na presença de bioestimulantes Physiological quality of corn seeds in the presence of biostimulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanismare Tatiana de Almeida Silva

    2008-06-01

    tests of germination, accelerated ageing and cold and seedling emergence tests. In addition, mass of dry matter of seedlings, shoot and roots and the activities of the enzymes á-amylase, catalase, esterase and peroxidase were evaluated. In the biostimulanttreated seeds, there were no improvements in the quality of seeds and under stressful conditions, the use of the biostimulants Stimulate®+Cellerate® and Cellerate® reduced the physiological quality of corn seeds. Increased activity of the peroxidase enzyme was found in seeds treated with Stimulate®, Cellerate® and Stimulate®+Cellerate® . Increased activity of the enzyme esterase was observed in seeds treated with Stimulate®+ Cellerate® pointing out phytotoxicity of them.

  18. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J; Downing, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Comolli, Luis R; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-02-01

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III)-bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Furthermore, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA, close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated two- and three-dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The outer membranes of most cells were decorated with aggregates up to 150 nm in diameter composed of ∼3 nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well-studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L(2,3) absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)-Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed-valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension.

  19. Agronomical response of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L., variety “Black Seed Simpson”, to Enerplant biostimulant aplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Baldoquin Hernandez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The research was done at the school vegetable garden of Los Indios in the municipality of Rio Cauto, Granma, from March through April, 2014. The objective was to evaluate the agronomical response of the cultivation of the lettuce (Lactuca sativa. L variety “Black Seeded Simpson to the foliar application of three doses of Enerplant. The biostimulant was applied in the morning 7 days after transplantation. The doses used were 0.5 mL.ha-1, 1 mL.ha-1 and 1.5 mL.ha-1. The yield components were evaluated. The obtained data were statistically processed using the software package STASTISTICA 6.0 for Windows. Results showed that the three doses had a positive effect on the cultivation yield. Best results were obtained with the application of the 1.5 mL.ha-1 dose. The majority of the evaluated indicators significantly increased.

  20. Obtaining edaphic biostimulants/biofertilizers from sewage sludge using fermentative processes. Short-time effects on soil biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Morgado, Bruno; Caballero, Pablo; Paneque, Patricia; Gómez, Isidoro; Parrado, Juan; Tejada, Manuel

    2017-10-28

    In this manuscript, we study the manufacture and effect on soils of different edaphic biostimulants/biofertilizers (BS) obtained from sewage sludge using Bacillus licheniformis as biological tool. These BS consist of different combinations of organic matter, bacteria and enzymes that were subjected to several treatments. These BS were applied in soil in order to observe their influence on the biochemical properties (enzymatic activities and ergosterol content). Dehydrogenase, urease, β-glucosidase, phosphatase activities and ergosterol content were measured at different incubation days. Only dehydrogenase activity and ergosterol content were significantly stimulated after the application of BS1 and BS4. Rest of the extracellular activities were not stimulated probably because B. licheniformis practically has digested all organic substrates during fermentation process.

  1. Ex situ bioremediation of oil-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ta-Chen; Pan, Po-Tsen; Cheng, Sheng-Shung

    2010-04-15

    An innovative bioprocess method, Systematic Environmental Molecular Bioremediation Technology (SEMBT) that combines bioaugmentation and biostimulation with a molecular monitoring microarray biochip, was developed as an integrated bioremediation technology to treat S- and T-series biopiles by using the landfarming operation and reseeding process to enhance the bioremediation efficiency. After 28 days of the bioremediation process, diesel oil (TPH(C10-C28)) and fuel oil (TPH(C10-C40)) were degraded up to approximately 70% and 63% respectively in the S-series biopiles. When the bioaugmentation and biostimulation were applied in the beginning of bioremediation, the microbial concentration increased from approximately 10(5) to 10(6) CFU/g dry soil along with the TPH biodegradation. Analysis of microbial diversity in the contaminated soils by microarray biochips revealed that Acinetobacter sp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the predominant groups in indigenous consortia, while the augmented consortia were Gordonia alkanivorans and Rhodococcus erythropolis in both series of biopiles during bioremediation. Microbial respiration as influenced by the microbial activity reflected directly the active microbial population and indirectly the biodegradation of TPH. Field experimental results showed that the residual TPH concentration in the complex biopile was reduced to less than 500 mg TPH/kg dry soil. The above results demonstrated that the SEMBT technology is a feasible alternative to bioremediate the oil-contaminated soil. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. AmF/NaF/SnCl2 solution reduces in situ enamel erosion – profilometry and cross-sectional nanoindentation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thayanne Monteiro RAMOS-OLIVEIRA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This in situ study aimed to investigate the effect of a tin-containing fluoride solution in preventing enamel erosion. Also, its effects on the partly demineralized zone were assessed for the first time. Thirteen volunteers participated in this 2-phase study, wearing removable intra-oral appliances containing four sterilized bovine enamel slabs, for 8 days, where 2 treatment protocols were tested using samples in replicas (n = 13: CO - no treatment (negative control and FL - AmF/NaF/SnCl2 solution (500 ppm F-, 800 ppm Sn2+, pH = 4.5. Samples were daily exposed to an erosive challenge (0.65% citric acid, pH 3.6, 4 min, 2x/day. In the 2nd phase, volunteers switched to the other treatment protocol. Samples were evaluated for surface loss using a profilometer (n = 13 and a cross-sectional nanohardness (CSNH test (n = 13 was carried out in order to determine how deep the partly demineralized zone reaches below the erosive lesion. The data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA. Erosive challenges lead to smaller enamel surface loss (p < 0.001 in the FL group when compared to group CO. Data from CSNH showed that there was no significant difference in demineralized enamel zone underneath erosion lesions between the groups. An amorphous layer could be observed on the surface of enamel treated with tin-containing solution alone. Under the experimental conditions of this in situ study, it can be concluded that AmF/NaF/SnCl2 solution prevents enamel surface loss but does not change the hardness of the partly demineralized zone near-surface enamel.

  3. In Situ Community Control of the Stability of Bioreduced Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, David C.

    2006-01-01

    The overall objective of this research is to understand the mechanisms for maintenance of bio-reduced uranium in an aerobic to microaerophylic aquifer under actual field conditions after electron donor addition for biostimulation has ended. Primary Objectives: (1) Determine the relative importance of microbial communities and/or chemical and physical environments mediating uranium reduction/oxidation after cessation of donor addition in an aerobic aquifer. (2) Determine, after cessation of donor addition, the linkages between microbial functions and abiotic processes mediating. Initial Hypotheses: (1) The typical bio-reduced subsurface environments that maintain U(VI) reduction rates after biostimulation contain limited amounts of oxidized iron on mineral surfaces. Therefore, the non sulfate-reducing dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria will move to more conducive areas or be out-competed by more versatile microbes. (2) Microbes capable of sulfate reduction play an important role in the post-treatment maintenance of bio-reduced uranium because these bacteria either directly reduce U(VI) or generate H2S, and/or FeS0.9 which act as oxygen sinks maintaining U(IV) in a reduced state. (3) The presence of bioprecipitated amorphous FeS0.9 in sediments will maintain low U(IV) reoxidation rates under conditions of low biomass, but FeS0.9 by itself is not sufficient to remove U(VI) from groundwater by abiotic reduction. FIELD SCALE EXPERIMENTS: Field-scale electron donor amendment experiments were conducted in 2002, 2003, and 2004 at the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site in Rifle, Colorado

  4. In Situ Bioreduction of Uranium (VI) to Submicromolar Levels and Reoxidation by Dissolved Oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Weimin; Carley, Jack M.; Luo, Jian; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A.; Cardenas, Erick; Leigh, Mary Beth; Hwang, Chaichi; Kelly, Shelly D.; Ruan, Chuanmin; Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy; Gentry, Terry J.; Lowe, Kenneth Alan; Mehlhorn, Tonia L.; Carroll, Sue L.; Luo, Wensui; Fields, Matthew Wayne; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David B.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong; Fendorf, Scott; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Jardine, Philip M.; Criddle, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Groundwater within Area 3 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, TN (ORFRC) contains up to 135 (micro)M uranium as U(VI). Through a series of experiments at a pilot scale test facility, we explored the lower limits of groundwater U(VI) that can be achieved by in-situ biostimulation and the effects of dissolved oxygen on immobilized uranium. Weekly 2 day additions of ethanol over a 2-year period stimulated growth of denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and immobilization of uranium as U(IV), with dissolved uranium concentrations decreasing to low levels. Following sulfite addition to remove dissolved oxygen, aqueous U(VI) concentrations fell below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant limit (MCL) for drinking water ( -1 or 0.126 (micro)M). Under anaerobic conditions, these low concentrations were stable, even in the absence of added ethanol. However, when sulfite additions stopped, and dissolved oxygen (4.0-5.5 mg L -1 ) entered the injection well, spatially variable changes in aqueous U(VI) occurred over a 60 day period, with concentrations increasing rapidly from <0.13 to 2.0 (micro)M at a multilevel sampling (MLS) well located close to the injection well, but changing little at an MLS well located further away. Resumption of ethanol addition restored reduction of Fe(III), sulfate, and U(VI) within 36 h. After 2 years of ethanol addition, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) analyses indicated that U(IV) comprised 60-80% of the total uranium in sediment samples. At the completion of the project (day 1260), U concentrations in MLS wells were less than 0.1 (micro)M. The microbial community at MLS wells with low U(VI) contained bacteria that are known to reduce uranium, including Desulfovibrio spp. and Geobacter spp., in both sediment and groundwater. The dominant Fe(III)-reducing species were Geothrix spp

  5. Effect of sucralose and biostimulant on pre-and postharvest of blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L. cv. Elliot under organic and conventional production systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Eduardo loyola lópez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L. cv. Elliot from organic and conventional sources were subjected to either a pre-harvest application with an organic biostimulant or a post-harvest coverage with sucralose. Fruits were assessed in terms of firmness, dry matter, ascorbic acid, soluble solids, sensory attributes and color, during storage at 0 °C and RH of 90%, for a period of 21 days. Each trial with three treatments: T0correspondingto the control, T1to an application of biostimulant,22 days before harvest, and T2 to a post-harvest coverage with sucralose. Fruits were evaluated in sensory aspect, with the participation of thirteen panelists, on day fifteen after being harvested and stored. Evaluations of both maturity and quality parameters were performed on days 1,7, 14and 21post-harvest.Pre-harvest treatment with the organic biostimulant showed a higher variation in dry matter and soluble solids, but these variations are not significant. The group with a coverage of Sucralose showed a significant increase in fruit firmness. The best sensory evaluation, was given by the panelists to the organic farming. Fruit measurements, such as color, ascorbic acid and colorimetry showed no significant differences in the results.

  6. Mechanical, tribological and biological properties of novel 45S5 Bioglass® composites reinforced with in situ reduced graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Khun, Nay Win; Tang, Xiu-Zhi; Liu, Erjia; Khor, Khiam Aik

    2017-01-01

    45S5 Bioglass ® (45S5) is one of the most widely used biomaterials in ceramic-based bone graft substitutes by virtue of its excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity. However, the fracture toughness and wear resistance of 45S5 have to be improved to extend its applications in load bearing orthopedic implants. The current study reports the first use of graphene nanoplatelet (GNP) to enhance the fracture toughness and wear resistance of 45S5. Composite powders with four different loadings of graphene oxide (GO), i.e. 0, 0.1, 0.5 and 1wt%, were sintered by spark plasma sintering (SPS) at a relatively low temperature of 550°C, during which in situ thermal reduction of GO took place. It was found that by adding 0.5wt% GO to the 45S5 powder, the fracture toughness of the sintered pellets was increased by 130.2% while friction coefficient and specific wear rate were decreased by 21.3% and 62.0%, respectively. Furthermore, the viability of MG63 cells grown on the GNP-incorporated pellets was comparably high to that of the cells grown on the pure 45S5 pellets. As compared with the pure 45S5 leachates, the media conditioned by the GNP/45S5 pellets fabricated from the composite powder with 1wt% GO could enhance both the proliferation and viability of MG63 cells. It is thus envisioned that the GNP-reinforced 45S5 is a highly promising material for fabricating mechanically strong and biocompatible load-bearing bone implants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. In-situ synthesis of reduced graphene oxide modified lithium vanadium phosphate for high-rate lithium-ion batteries via microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhaozhi; Guo, Haifu; Yan, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphene-decorated Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 is synthesized via microwave irradiation. • Both Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 and RGO can be simultaneously achieved through this route. • The GO is reduced by microwave irradiation not the carbon. • Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 /RGO displays excellent high-rate ability and cyclic stability. - Abstract: We report a simple and rapid method to synthesize graphene-modified Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 as cathode material for lithium-ion batteries via microwave irradiation. By treating graphene oxide and the precursor of Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 in a commercial microwave oven, both reduced graphene oxide and Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 could be simultaneously synthesized within 5 min. The structure, morphology and electrochemical performances of as-synthesized graphene-modified Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 are investigated systematically by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, charge/discharge tests, electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The XRD result indicates that single-phase graphene-modified Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 with monoclinic structure can be obtained. Both SEM and TEM images show that Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 nanocrystals are embedded in the reduced graphene oxide sheets which could provide an easy path for the electrons and Li-ions during the cycling process. Compared with the pristine Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 electrode, graphene-modified Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 exhibits a better high-rate ability and cyclic stability. These superior electrochemical performances are attributed to the good conductivity of reduced graphene oxide which enhances the electrons and Li-ions transport on the surface of Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 . Thus, this simple and rapid method could be promising to synthesize graphene-modified electrode materials

  8. In situ measurements of krypton in xenon gas with a quadrupole mass spectrometer following a cold-trap at a temporarily reduced pumping speed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Ethan; Rosendahl, Stephan; Huhmann, Christian; Kettling, Hans; Schlak, Martin; Weinheimer, Christian [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2013-07-01

    Liquid xenon detectors have risen to be extremely competitive for dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay searches. In order to achieve the required sensitivity, backgrounds must be reduced substantially. One important background is the beta-decay of {sup 85}Kr, which constitutes a uniform internal background in liquid xenon detectors. Cryogenic distillation can be used to reduce the krypton concentration to acceptable levels, but gas diagnostics become incredibly difficult at these ultra-pure levels. A new method for measuring the concentration of krypton in xenon has been developed, expanding on the existing technique of a cold trap and a Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA). By using a liquid nitrogen cold trap, one can take advantage of the difference in vapor pressures of krypton in xenon to freeze most of the xenon gas while allowing the krypton to pass to the measurement chamber. Here, only a few milliliters of xenon is expended in the measurement, while achieving a sensitivity of sub ppb (parts per billion). The key change is the use of a butterfly valve to partially close the opening in front of the turbomolecular pump, thereby reducing the effective pumping speed and enhancing the RGA signal.

  9. In situ evaluation of water and energy consumptions at the end use level: The influence of flow reducers and temperature in baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, C; Briga-Sá, A; Bentes, I; Faria, D; Pereira, S

    2017-05-15

    Nowadays, water and energy consumption is intensifying every year in most of the countries. This perpetual increase will not be supportable in the long run, making urgently to manage these resources on a sustainable way. Domestic consumptions of water and electric energy usually are related and it's important to study that relation, identifying opportunities for use efficient improvement. In fact, without an understanding of water-energy relations, there are water efficiency measures that may lead to unintentional costs in the energy efficiency field. In order to take full advantage of combined effect between water and energy water management methodologies, it is necessary to collect data to ensure that the efforts are directed through the most effective paths. This paper presents a study based in the characterization, measurement and analysis of water and electricity consumption in a single family house (2months period) in order to find an interdependent relationship between consumptions at the end user level. The study was carried out on about 200 baths, divided in four different scenarios where the influence of two variables was tested: the flow reducer valve and the bath temperature. Data showed that the presence of flow reducer valve decreased electric energy consumption and water consumption, but increased the bath duration. Setting a lower temperature in water-heater, decreased electric consumption, water consumption and bath duration. Analysing the influence of the flow reducer valve and 60°C temperature simultaneously, it was concluded that it had a significant influence on electric energy consumption and on the baths duration but had no influence on water consumption. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. In situ reduction of WS{sub 2} nanosheets for WS{sub 2}/reduced graphene oxide composite with superior Li-ion storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Liyan [Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Yan, Shancheng, E-mail: yansc@njupt.edu.cn [School of Geography and Biological Information, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing, 210023 (China); National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Lin, Zixia [Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Shi, Yi, E-mail: yshi@nju.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China)

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides, such as tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}), have been actively studied as suitable candidates for anode materials used in lithium ion batteries recently, due to their remarkable ion intercalation properties. However, the difficulties in the synthesis of phase-pure WS{sub 2}, restacking between WS{sub 2} nanosheets, low electronic conductivity and brittle nature of WS{sub 2} severely limit its Li-ion batteries application. Here, we adopt a one-pot method for synthesizing of WS{sub 2}/reduced Graphene Oxide (rGO) composite to improve the battery performance dramatically. The WS{sub 2}/rGO anode shows a stable discharge capacity of 431.2 mAh/g, at a current density of 0.1 A/g after 100 cycles, while the capacity of bare WS{sub 2} is only 65.5 mAh/g under the same condition. The added graphene oxide is reduced to rGO in reaction process and constitute stable composite with WS{sub 2}, not only avoiding the restacking between WS{sub 2} nanosheets and improving the conductive properties, but also promoting the reduction of WO{sub 3} effectively. Our work may provide a possible route to avoid oxygen impurities in transition metal dichalcogenides. - Highlights: • The WS{sub 2}/rGO composite were synthesized to improve the battery performance. • The WS{sub 2}/rGO anode shows a capacity of 431.2 mAh/g, much higher than WS{sub 2}. • The added graphene oxide is reduced to rGO, improving the conductive properties. • The rGO can avoid the restacking, and promote the reduction of WO{sub 3}.

  11. Bioleaching of arsenic in contaminated soil using metal-reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So-Ra; Lee, Jong-Un; Chon, Hyo-Taek

    2014-05-01

    A study on the extraction of arsenic in the contaminated soil collected from an old smelting site in Korea was carried out using metal-reducing bacteria. Two types of batch-type experiments, biostimulation and bioaugmentation, were conducted for 28 days under anaerobic conditions. The biostimulation experiments were performed through activation of indigenous bacteria by supply with glucose or lactate as a carbon source. The contaminated, autoclaved soil was inoculated with metal-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and S. algae BrY, in the bioaugmentation experiments. The results indicated that the maximum concentration of the extracted As was 11.2 mg/L at 4 days from the onset of the experiment when 20 mM glucose was supplied and the extraction efficiency of As ranged 60~63% in the biostimulation experiments. In the case of bioaugmentation, the highest dissolved As concentration was 24.4 mg/L at 2 days, though it dramatically decreased over time through re-adsorption onto soil particles. After both treatments, mode of As occurrence in the soil appeared to be changed to readily extractable fractions. This novel technique of bioleaching may be practically applied for remediation of As-contaminated soil after determination of optimum operational conditions such as operation time and proper carbon source and its concentration.

  12. In situ measurements of krypton in xenon gas with a quadrupole mass spectrometer following a cold-trap at a temporarily reduced pumping speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, E; Rosendahl, S; Huhmann, C; Weinheimer, C; Kettling, H

    2013-01-01

    A new method for measuring trace amounts of krypton in xenon using a cold trap with a residual gas analyzer has been developed, which achieves an increased sensitivity by temporarily reducing the pumping speed while expending a minimal amount of xenon. By partially closing a custom built butterfly valve between the measurement chamber and the turbomolecular pump, a sensitivity of 40 ppt has been reached. This method has been tested on an ultra-pure gas sample from Air Liquide with an unknown intrinsic krypton concentration, yielding a krypton concentration of 330±200 ppt.

  13. In situ iron-57 Moessbauer spectroscopic investigations of the effect of titania surface area on the reducibility of titania-supported iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, F.J.; Du Hongzhang

    1990-01-01

    Iron-57 Moessbauer spectroscopy has been used to monitor the reducibility in hydrogen of iron oxides supported on titania of differing surface areas. The results show that although Fe 3+ in the iron oxide supported on low surface area titania (11 m 2 g -1 ) is not amenable to facile reduction at low temperatures, complete reduction to metallic iron is achieved by treatment at 600deg C. The data also show that the extent of reduction at elevated temperatures exceeds that which is obtained on similar silica- and alumina-supported systems. Fe 3+ in iron oxide supported on higher surface area titania (50 m 2 g -1 and 240 m 2 g -1 ) is partially reduced in hydrogen at 235deg C to Fe 2+ but fails to attain complete reduction to the metallic state following treatment at 600deg C. The results are related to the different dispersions of iron oxide which can be attained on titania of differing surface area and the consequent interactions between the support and the supported phases. (orig.)

  14. Unilateral NMR: a Noninvasive Tool for Monitoring In Situ the Effectiveness of Intervention to Reduce the Capillary Raise of Water in an Ancient Deteriorated Wall Painting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Di Tullio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Portable unilateral NMR was used to quantitatively map in a fully noninvasive way the moisture distribution in an ancient deteriorated wall painting before and after an intervention to reduce the capillary raise of water through the wall. Maps obtained at a depth of 0.5 cm clearly showed the path of the capillary raise and indicated that, after the intervention, the moisture level was reduced. Maps obtained by measuring the first layers of the wall painting were affected by the critical environmental conditions of the second hypogeous level of St. Clement Basilica, Rome, and by the presence of salts efflorescence and encrustations on the surface of the wall painting. The morphology and the elemental composition of salts investigated by SEM-EDS indicated that efflorescences and encrustations were mostly constituted of gypsum and calcite. The presence of these salts is explained with the presence of high concentration of carbon dioxide and sulphur-rich particles due to pollution which, along with the high-moisture level and the extremely feeble air circulation, cause recarbonation and sulphation processes on the plaster surface.

  15. Utilization of niobium pentoxide as additive for reducing the ''in situ'' reaction temperature of ceramic composites in the system mullite-zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, F.C.L. de; Cairo, C.A.A.; Piorino Neto, F.; Cunha, P.A.; Devezas, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    Ceramics Composites of the system mullite-zirconia were produced trough reaction sintering, following the equation: 2ZrSiO 4 +3Al 2 O 3 +x(Al 2 O 3 +Nb 2 O 5 )--> 2ZrO 2 +Al 6 Si 2 O 13 +2xAlNbO 4 , with different x values (0.05,0.1 e 0.25), trying to investigate the role of niobia as sintering aid. Through x-ray diffraction was evaluated the fraction of zirconia tetragonal phase retained in the ceramic matrix, and the produced composites were caracterized as to the apparent porosity and density, sintering shrinkage and rupture strenght. The reaction sintering temperature was reduced from 1600 0 C (x=0) to 1400 0 C (with x=0.1). (author) [pt

  16. The combined effects of phytoremediation and biostimulation in enhancing habitat restoration and oil degradation of petroleum contaminated wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Qianxin; Mendelssohn, Irving A [Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute, Center for Coastal, Energy, and Environmental Resources, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    1998-06-30

    The combined effects of biostimulation and phytoremediation as a means of post-oil spill habitat restoration and enhancement of oil degradation in the soil were evaluated. Marsh sods of Spartina alterniflora and Spartina patens were dosed with 0, 4, 8, 16 and 24 l m{sup -2} of south Louisiana crude oil in the greenhouse. Plants were killed at oil dosages of 8 l m{sup -2} in the growing season following oil application. Two years after application of the oil, S. alterniflora and S. patens individuals were transplanted into the oiled and unoiled sods. Fertilizer was applied 1 and 7 months after transplantation. Application of the fertilizer significantly increased biomass of the transplants within 6 months and regrowth biomass of the transplants 1 year after transplantation for both plant species. The residual oil in the soil did not significantly affect the biomass of the S. patens transplants compared with that in the no oil treatment, except at the highest oil level. However, regrowth biomass of the S. alterniflora transplants treated with fertilizer was significantly higher at all oil levels up to 250 mg g{sup -1} than in the unoiled treatment, with or without fertilizer. The oil degradation rate in the soil was significantly enhanced by the application of fertilizer in conjunction with the presence of transplants. These results suggest that vegetative transplantation, when implemented with fertilization, can simultaneously restore oil contaminated wetlands and accelerate oil degradation in the soil

  17. Surface roughening of undoped and in situ B-doped SiGe epitaxial layers deposited by using reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngmo; Park, Jiwoo; Sohn, Hyunchul

    2018-01-01

    Si1- x Ge x (:B) epitaxial layers were deposited by using reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition with SiH4, GeH4, and B2H6 source gases, and the dependences of the surface roughness of undoped Si1- x Ge x on the GeH4 flow rate and of Si1- x Ge x :B on the B2H6 flow rate were investigated. The root-mean-square (RMS) roughness value of the undoped Si1- x Ge x at constant thickness increased gradually with increasing Ge composition, resulting from an increase in the amplitude of the wavy surface before defect formation. At higher Ge compositions, the residual strain in Si1- x Ge x significantly decreased through the formation of defects along with an abrupt increase in the RMS roughness. The variation of the surface roughness of Si1- x Ge x :B depended on the boron (B) concentration. At low B concentrations, the RMS roughness of Si1- x Ge x remained constant regardless of Ge composition, which is similar to that of undoped Si1- x Ge x . However, at high B concentrations, the RMS roughness of Si1- x Ge x :B increased greatly due to B islanding. In addition, at very high B concentrations ( 9.9 at%), the RMS roughness of Si1- x Ge x :B decreased due to non-epitaxial growth.

  18. Fabrication of Electrochemically Reduced Graphene Oxide Modified Gas Diffusion Electrode for In-situ Electrochemical Advanced Oxidation Process under Mild Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Heng; Su, Huimin; Chen, Ze; Yu, Han; Yu, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    With aim to develop an efficient heterogeneous metal-free cathodic electrochemical advance oxidation process (CEAOP) for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) removal from wastewater under mild conditions, electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO)-modified gas diffusion electrode (GDE) was prepared for oxygen-containing radicals production via electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). A detailed physical characterization was carried out by SEM, Raman spectroscopy, XRD and XPS. The electrocatalytic behavior for ORR was investigated by electrochemical measurements and electrolysis experiments under constant current density. Bisphenol A (BPA) of 20 mg L −1 was used as a model of POPs to evaluate the performance of the CEAOP with ERGO-modified GDE. The results showed that the defects concentration and electrochemical active sites of the ERGO was increased as the reduction time (30 min, 60 min and 120 min), leading to different catalysis on ORR. ·O 2 generation via one-electron ORR was found under the electrocatalysis of ERGO (60 min and 120 min), contributing to a complete degradation of BPA within 20 min and a mineralization current efficiency (MCE) of 74.60%. An alternative metal-free CEAOP independent of Fenton reaction was established based on ERGO-modified GDE for POPs removal from wastewater under mild conditions.

  19. In situ grown hierarchical 50%BiOCl/BiOI hollow flowerlike microspheres on reduced graphene oxide nanosheets for enhanced visible-light photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiangde; Yang, Jinjin; Yu, Xiang; Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Yuanming

    2018-03-01

    50%BiOCl/BiOI/reduced graphene oxide (50%BiOCl/BiOI/rGO) composite photocatalyst was synthesized successfully by a facile one-step solvothermal route in this work. Reduction of graphene oxide (GO) took place in the process of solvothermal reaction and a new Bi-C bond between rGO and 50%BiOCl/BiOI was formed. The introduction of rGO affected the morphology of 50%BiOCl/BiOI, resulting in the transformation of 50%BiOCl/BiOI from solid microspheres to hollow microspheres. Both the introduction of rGO and formation of 50%BiOCl/BiOI hollow microspheres can facilitate the light absorption. The strong interaction between 50%BiOCl/BiOI and rGO and the electrical conductivity of rGO greatly improved the effective separation of photogenerated carriers. Hence, GOB-5 demonstrated the highest photocatalytic activity which was over twice of the pristine 50%BiOCl/BiOI in the presence of visible light. Mechanism study revealed that 50%BiOCl/BiOI generated electrons and holes in the presence of visible light, and holes together with rad O2- generated from reduction of O2 by electrons degraded the pollutant directly. Overall, this work provides an excellent reference to the synthesis of chemically bonded BiOX/BiOY (X, Y = Cl, Br, I)/rGO nanocomposite and helps to promote their applications in environmental protection and photoelectric conversion.

  20. Influence of biostimulants-seed-priming on Ceratotheca triloba germination and seedling growth under low temperatures, low osmotic potential and salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masondo, Nqobile A; Kulkarni, Manoj G; Finnie, Jeffrey F; Van Staden, Johannes

    2018-01-01

    Extreme temperatures, drought and salinity stress adversely affect seed germination and seedling growth in crop species. Seed priming has been recognized as an indispensable technique in the production of stress-tolerant plants. Seed priming increases seed water content, improves protein synthesis using mRNA and DNA and repair mitochondria in seeds prior to germination. The current study aimed to determine the role of biostimulants-seed-priming during germination and seedling growth of Ceratotheca triloba (Bernh.) Hook.f. (an indigenous African leafy vegetable) under low temperature, low osmotic potential and salinity stress conditions. Ceratotheca triloba seeds were primed with biostimulants [smoke-water (SW), synthesized smoke-compound karrikinolide (KAR 1 ), Kelpak ® (commercial seaweed extract), phloroglucinol (PG) and distilled water (control)] for 48h at 25°C. Thereafter, primed seeds were germinated at low temperatures, low osmotic potential and high NaCl concentrations. Low temperature (10°C) completely inhibited seed germination. However, temperature shift to 15°C improved germination. Smoke-water and KAR 1 enhanced seed germination with SW improving seedling growth under different stress conditions. Furthermore, priming seeds with Kelpak ® stimulated percentage germination, while PG and the control treatment improved seedling growth at different PEG and NaCl concentrations. Generally, high concentrations of PEG and NaCl brought about detrimental effects on seed germination and seedling growth. Findings from this study show the potential role of seed priming with biostimulants in the alleviation of abiotic stress conditions during seed germination and seedling growth in C. triloba plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. BIODEGRADATION OF DIESEL OIL IN SOIL AND ITS ENHANCEMENT BY APPLICATION OF BIOVENTING AND AMENDMENT WITH BREWERY WASTE EFFLUENTS AS BIOSTIMULATION-BIOAUGMENTATION AGENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Agarry

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate and evaluate the effects of natural bioattenuation, bioventing, and brewery waste effluents amendment as biostimulation-bioaugmentation agent on biodegradation of diesel oil in unsaturated soil. A microcosm system was constructed consisting of five plastic buckets containing 1 kg of soil, artificially contaminated or spiked with 10% w/w of diesel oil. Biodegradation was monitored over 28 days by determining the total petroleum hydrocarbon content of the soil and total hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. The results showed that combination of brewery waste effluents amendment and bioventing technique was the most effective, reaching up to 91.5% of diesel removal from contaminated soil; with the brewery waste effluents amendment (biostimulation-bioaugmentation, the percentage of diesel oil removal was 78.7%; with bioventing, diesel oil percentage degradation was 61.7% and the natural bioattenuation technique resulted in diesel oil removal percentage be not higher than 40%. Also, the total hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria (THDB count in all the treatments increased throughout the remediation period. The highest bacterial growth was observed for combined brewery waste effluents amendment with bioventing treatment strategy. A first-order kinetic model was fitted to the biodegradation data to evaluate the biodegradation rate and the corresponding half-life time was estimated. The model revealed that diesel oil contaminated-soil microcosms under combined brewery waste effluents amendment with bioventing treatment strategy had higher biodegradation rate constants, k as well as lower half-life times, t1/2 than other remediation systems. This study showed that the microbial consortium, organic solids, nitrogen and phosphorus present in the brewery waste effluents proved to be efficient as potential biostimulation-bioaugmentation agents for bioremediation processes of soils contaminated with diesel oil

  2. Technology summary of the in situ bioremediation demonstration (methane biostimulation) via horizontal wells at the Savannah River Site Integrated Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazen, T.C.; Looney, B.B.; Fliermans, C.B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.; Lombard, K.H.; Enzien, M.V.; Dougherty, J.M.; Wear, J.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development, has been sponsoring full-scale environmental restoration technology demonstrations for the past 4 years. The Savannah River Site Integrated Demonstration focuses on ''Clean-up of Soils ad Groundwater Contaminated with Chlorinated VOCs.'' Several laboratories including our own had demonstrated the ability of methanotrophic bacteria to completely degrade or mineralize chlorinated solvents, and these bacteria were naturally found in soil and aquifer material. Thus the test consisted of injection of methane mixed with air into the contaminated aquifer via a horizontal well and extraction from the vadose zone via a parallel horizontal well

  3. Facile in-situ reduction: Crystal growth and magnetic studies of reduced vanadium (III/IV) silicates CaxLn1-xVSiO5 (Ln = Ce-Nd, Sm-Lu, Y)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysinghe, Dileka; Smith, Mark D.; Morrison, Gregory; Yeon, Jeongho; zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2018-04-01

    A series of lanthanide containing mixed-valent vanadium (III/IV) silicates of the type CaxLn1-xVSiO5 (Ln = Ce-Nd, Sm-Lu, Y) was synthesized as high quality single crystals from a molten chloride eutectic flux, BaCl2/NaCl. Utilizing Ca metal as the reducing agent, an in-situ reduction of V5+ to V3+/4+ as well as of Ce4+ to Ce3+ was achieved. The structures of 14 reported isostructural compounds were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. They crystallize in the tilasite (CaMgAsO4F) structure type in the monoclinic space group C2/c. The extended structure contains 1D chains of VO6 octahedra that are connected to each other via SiO4 groups and (Ca/Ln)O7 polyhedra. The magnetic susceptibility and the field dependent magnetization data were measured for CaxLn1-xVSiO5 (Ln = Ce-Nd, Sm, Gd-Lu, Y), and support the existence of antiferromagnetic behavior at low temperatures.

  4. In Situ Synthesis of MnS Hollow Microspheres on Reduced Graphene Oxide Sheets as High-Capacity and Long-Life Anodes for Li- and Na-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xijun; Ji, Shaomin; Gu, Mingzhe; Liu, Jun

    2015-09-23

    Uniform MnS hollow microspheres in situ crystallized on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets via a facile hydrothermal method. The MnS/RGO composite material was used as the anode for Na-ion batteries for the first time and exhibited excellent cycling performance, superior specific capacity, and great cycle stability and rate capability for both Li- and Na-ion batteries. Compared with nonencapsulated pure MnS hollow microspheres, these MnS/RGO nanocomposites demonstrated excellent charge-discharge stability and long cycle life. Li-ion storage testing revealed that these MnS/RGO nanocomposites deliver high discharge-charge capacities of 640 mAh g(-1) at 1.0 A g(-1) after 400 cycles and 830 mAh g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1) after 100 cycles. The MnS/RGO nanocomposites even retained a specific capacity of 308 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 0.1 A g(-1) after 125 cycles as the anode for Na-ion batteries. The outstanding electrochemical performance of the MnS/RGO composite attributed to the RGO nanosheets greatly improved the electronic conductivity and efficiently mitigated the stupendous volume expansion during the progress of charge and discharge.

  5. In situ generation of silver nanoparticles in poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) polymer membranes in the absence of reducing agent and their effect on pervaporation of a water/acetic acid mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhard, Shvshankar; Kwon, Yong Sung; Moon, MyungJun; Shon, Min Young [Dept. of Industrial Chemistry, Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, You In; Nam, Seung Eun [Center for membranes, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The in situ generation of silver nanoparticles in a poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) (PVA/PAA) polymer matrix in the absence of any additional reducing agent is reported and tends to the membrane fabrication using solution-casting. Its effect on the separation of a water/acetic acid mixture by pervaporation is described. The results of UV spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses showed that the silver nanoparticles were successfully prepared and well dispersed in the polymer matrix. The increased hydrophilicity of the PVA/PAA membrane due to the presence of silver nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurements, and membrane absorption studies. Pervaporation data for composite membranes showed a three-fold increase in the flux value, while the initially decreased separation factor subsequently showed a constant value. Overall, the pervaporation data suggested that the presence of silver nanoparticles benefited the dehydration process.

  6. In situ generation of silver nanoparticles in poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) polymer membranes in the absence of reducing agent and their effect on pervaporation of a water/acetic acid mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhard, Shvshankar; Kwon, Yong Sung; Moon, MyungJun; Shon, Min Young; Park, You In; Nam, Seung Eun

    2016-01-01

    The in situ generation of silver nanoparticles in a poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) (PVA/PAA) polymer matrix in the absence of any additional reducing agent is reported and tends to the membrane fabrication using solution-casting. Its effect on the separation of a water/acetic acid mixture by pervaporation is described. The results of UV spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses showed that the silver nanoparticles were successfully prepared and well dispersed in the polymer matrix. The increased hydrophilicity of the PVA/PAA membrane due to the presence of silver nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurements, and membrane absorption studies. Pervaporation data for composite membranes showed a three-fold increase in the flux value, while the initially decreased separation factor subsequently showed a constant value. Overall, the pervaporation data suggested that the presence of silver nanoparticles benefited the dehydration process

  7. Behaviour of oxyfluorfen in soils amended with edaphic biostimulants/biofertilizers obtained from sewage sludge and chicken feathers. Effects on soil biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Morgado, Bruno; Gómez, Isidoro; Parrado, Juan; Tejada, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    We studied the behaviour of oxyfluorfen herbicide at a rate of 4 l ha(-1) on biological properties of a Calcaric Regosol amended with two edaphic biostimulants/biofertilizers (SS, derived from sewage sludge; and CF, derived from chicken feathers). Oxyfluorfen was surface broadcast on 11 March 2013. Two days after application of oxyfluorfen to soil, both biostimulants/biofertilizers (BS) were also applied to the soil. An unamended soil without oxyfluorfen was used as control. For 2, 4, 7, 9, 20, 30, 60, 90 and 120 days of the application of herbicide to the soil and for each treatment, the soil dehydrogenase, urease, β-glucosidase and phosphatase activities were measured. For 2, 7, 30 and 120 days of the application of herbicide to the soil and for each treatment, soil microbial community was determined. The application of both BS to soil without the herbicide increased the enzymatic activities and soil biodiversity, mainly at 7 days of beginning the experiment. However, this stimulation was higher in the soil amended with SS than for CF. The application of herbicide in organic-amended soils decreased the inhibition of soil enzymatic activities and soil biodiversity. Possibly, the low-molecular-weight protein content easily assimilated by soil microorganisms is responsible for less inhibition of these soil biological properties.

  8. Meta-analysis of the application effects of a biostimulant based on extracts of yeast and amino acids on off-season corn yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis da Silva

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The tests were performed with a biostimulant (GAAP containing yeast extract and amino acids. The yield data of the off-season corn for meta-analysis were collected from 41 trials conducted in the states of Paraná, São Paulo, Mato Grosso, Minas Gerais, and Goiás during the 2013/2014 crop season. The tests consisted of eight treatments, with four replicates per treatment, and were conducted on 3.6 × 6.0 m plots. The treatments consisted of application of biostimulant at 2.0 L ha-1 at different times and the control (no biostimulant. The time of application corresponded to the growth stages, V8, VT, R1, (V8 + VT, (V8 + R1, (VT + R1, and (V8 + VT + R1. The influence of biostimulant application was quantified as the difference in yield, expressed as kilogram per hectare (kg ha-1, between treatments and the control (effect measurements. Meta-analysis was used to study the effects of the treatments and to calculate the probability of yield increase with product use. The meta-analysis was performed using the software R. The random effects model was used for meta-analysis because of the high heterogeneity among the studies. Next, the mixed effect model was applied to explain the high heterogeneity, considering the following subgroups: the number of applications, the timing of applications, the presence of water stress, and the region where the tests were conducted. The probability of yield increase was calculated at the levels of 2, 5, and 10 bags, each of 60 kg ha-1. The meta-analysis results for the variable "General" and the subgroups were significantly positive (p < 0.0001, with a meta-analytic estimate of 342.1 kg ha-1 and the confidence interval for 95% probability ranging between 301.2 kg ha-1 and 383.0 kg ha-1. The probability for yield greater than zero or equal to 2, 5, and 10 bags of 60 kg ha-1 in subgroup "three applications" was 91.7%, 85.4%, 71.0%, and 38.9%, respectively. These same values were estimated at 91.7%, 85.4%, 71.0%, and 39

  9. Buckwheat yield and its quality as affected by laser biostimulation of its seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koper, R.; Mikos-Bielak, M.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of various doses of laser radiation applied to buckwheat seed bio stimulation on the yield, and changes of chemical composition was analysed. A 12-25 percent increase of yield was observed in bio stimulated plants. The most positive effects were achieved after seed triple radiation using a laser of 30 mW power for 0.1 s. Bio stimulation caused a slight increase of protein, fat and fiber content a large increase of soluble and reducing sugars and a decrease of starch level

  10. Application of MCPA herbicide on soils amended with biostimulants: short-time effects on soil biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Manuel; García-Martínez, Ana M; Gómez, Isidoro; Parrado, Juan

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we studied in the laboratory the effect of MCPA herbicide at a rate of 1.5lha(-1) (manufactures rate recommended) on biological properties of a Plagic Antrosol amended with four biostimulants (WCDS, wheat condensed distillers soluble; PA-HE, hydrolyzed poultry feathers; CGHE, carob germ enzymatic extract; and RB, rice bran extract). Seven hundred grams of soil were mixed with WCDS at a rate of 10%, CGHE at a rate of 4.7%, PA-HE at a rate of 4.3%, and RB at a rate of 4.4%, respectively, in order to applying the same amount of organic matter to the soil (16.38 g organic matter). An unamended polluted and amended non-polluted soil were used as control. For all treatments, the soil ergosterol, dehydrogenase, urease, and phosphatase activities were measured at two incubation times (0 and 60 d). The 16S rDNA-DGGE profiles in all treatments were determined at the beginning and end of the incubation period. The results indicated that at the end of the incubation period and compared with the control soil, the dehydrogenase, urease and phosphatase activities and ergosterol decreased 39.3%, 20%, 15.7% and 56.5%, respectively in the non-organic amended polluted soil. The application of organic matter to unpolluted soil increased the enzymatic activities and ergosterol. However, this stimulation was higher in the soil amended with RB, followed by PA-HE, WCDS and CGHE. The application of herbicide in organic-amended soils decreased the enzymatic activities and ergosterol content. However, this decrease was lower than for the non-amended herbicide polluted soil. Possibly the low molecular weight protein content easily assimilated by soil microorganisms and the adsorption capacity of humic substances are responsible for less inhibition of these enzyme activities and soil ergosterol. The 16S rDNA-DGGE profiles indicated that herbicide did not negatively affect soil bacterial biodiversity. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biosurfactants during in situ bioremediation: factors that influence the production and challenges in evalution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decesaro, Andressa; Machado, Thaís Strieder; Cappellaro, Ângela Carolina; Reinehr, Christian Oliveira; Thomé, Antônio; Colla, Luciane Maria

    2017-09-01

    Research on the influence of biosurfactants on the efficiency of in situ bioremediation of contaminated soil is continuously growing. Despite the constant progress in understanding the mechanisms involved in the effects of biosurfactants, there are still many factors that are not sufficiently elucidated. There is a lack of research on autochthonous or exogenous microbial metabolism when biostimulation or bioaugmentation is carried out to produce biosurfactants at contaminated sites. In addition, studies on the application of techniques that measure the biosurfactants produced in situ are needed. This is important because, although the positive influence of biosurfactants is often reported, there are also studies where no effect or negative effects have been observed. This review aimed to examine some studies on factors that can improve the production of biosurfactants in soils during in situ bioremediation. Moreover, this work reviews the methodologies that can be used for measuring the production of these biocomposts. We reviewed studies on the potential of biosurfactants to improve the bioremediation of hydrocarbons, as well as the limitations of methods for the production of these biomolecules by microorganisms in soil.

  12. Development of specific oligonucleotide probes for the identification and in situ detection of hydrocarbon-degrading Alcanivorax strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syutsubo, K; Kishira, H; Harayama, S

    2001-06-01

    The genus Alcanivorax comprises diverse hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria. Novel 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide DNA probes (ALV735 and ALV735-b) were developed to quantify two subgroups of the Alcanivorax/Fundibacter group by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and the conditions for the single-mismatch discrimination of the probes were optimized. The specificity of the probes was improved further using a singly mismatched oligonucleotide as a competitor. The growth of Alcanivorax cells in crude oil-contaminated sea water under the biostimulation condition was investigated by FISH with the probe ALV735, which targeted the main cluster of the Alcanivorax/Fundibacter group. The size of the Alcanivorax population increased with increasing incubation time and accounted for 91% of the 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) count after incubation for 2 weeks. The probes developed in this study are useful for detecting Alcanivorax populations in petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading microbial consortia.

  13. Interação entre salinidade e bioestimulante na cultura do feijão caupi Interaction between water salinity and biostimulant in the cowpea plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de A. de Oliveira

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, neste trabalho, avaliar a interação entre salinidade e o uso de bioestimulante (Stimulate® sobre o desenvolvimento do feijão caupi. A semeadura foi feita em vasos utilizando-se, como substrato, um Argissolo Vermelho Amarelo. O experimento obedeceu a um delineamento inteiramente casualizado em esquema fatorial 2 x 7. Os tratamentos se constituíram da combinação de dois níveis de sais da água de irrigação e seis formas de aplicação de bioestimulante (Ausência, Tratamento de sementes, Foliar aos 20 dias após semeadura (DAS, Foliar aos 40 DAS, Tratamentos de sementes + Foliar aos 20 DAS, Tratamento de sementes + foliar aos 40 DAS e Aplicação foliar aos 20 e 40 DAS. Foram realizadas duas avaliações não destrutivas (20 e 40 DAS e uma destrutiva (60 DAS e avaliados a altura, o número de folhas, a área foliar e a massa seca de folhas, de caule e da parte aérea. Todos os parâmetros fisiológicos avaliados foram afetados pela salinidade. Nas formas de aplicação adotadas o bioestimulante não proporcionou melhorias no desenvolvimento das plantas quando submetidas ao estresse salino; a salinidade inibiu o efeito benéfico do bioestimulante sobre o desenvolvimento do feijão caupi; enfim, o uso de bioestimulante não é viável em plantas cultivadas sob estresse salino.The objective of this study was to evaluate the interaction between salinity levels of the water and the use of biostimulant (Stimulate® in the initial development stage of cowpea plants. The sowing of seeds was done in pots, using as a substrate Alfissol and two plants per pot. The experimental design was completely randomized in a 2 x 7 factorial scheme. The treatments consisted of combination of two salinity levels (0.5 and 5.0 dS m-1 with seven biostimulant application forms (without application, seed treatment, sprinkled 20 days after sowing (DAS, sprinkled 40 DAS, seed treatment + sprinkled 20 DAS, seed treatment + sprinkled 40 DAS and sprinkled

  14. Optimization of biostimulant for bioremediation of contaminated coastal sediment by response surface methodology (RSM) and evaluation of microbial diversity by pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subha, Bakthavachallam; Song, Young Chae; Woo, Jung Hui

    2015-09-15

    The present study aims to optimize the slow release biostimulant ball (BSB) for bioremediation of contaminated coastal sediment using response surface methodology (RSM). Different bacterial communities were evaluated using a pyrosequencing-based approach in contaminated coastal sediments. The effects of BSB size (1-5cm), distance (1-10cm) and time (1-4months) on changes in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and volatile solid (VS) reduction were determined. Maximum reductions of COD and VS, 89.7% and 78.8%, respectively, were observed at a 3cm ball size, 5.5cm distance and 4months; these values are the optimum conditions for effective treatment of contaminated coastal sediment. Most of the variance in COD and VS (0.9291 and 0.9369, respectively) was explained in our chosen models. BSB is a promising method for COD and VS reduction and enhancement of SRB diversity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. In situ green synthesis of MnFe_2O_4/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite and its usage for fabricating high-performance LiMn_1_/_3Fe_2_/_3PO_4/reduced graphene oxide/carbon cathode material for Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Kaipeng; Hu, Guorong; Peng, Zhongdong; Cao, Yanbing; Du, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • MnFe_2O_4/rGO was prepared by an in situ green reduction-coprecipitation method. • LiMn_1_/_3Fe_2_/_3PO_4/rGO/C was synthesized by using MnFe_2O_4/rGO as precursor. • Both pyrolytic carbon and rGO could construct an interconnected conductive network. • LiMn_1_/_3Fe_2_/_3PO_4/rGO/C shows excellent electrochemical performance. - Abstract: MnFe_2O_4/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (MnFe_2O_4/rGO) has been synthesized via a green reduction-coprecipitation method for the first time, which involved in situ reduction of GO in presence of Fe"2"+ and the ensuing coprecipitation of Fe"3"+ and Mn"2"+ onto the surface of rGO. The resultant MnFe_2O_4/rGO was then employed as the precursor to fabricate LiMn_1_/_3Fe_2_/_3PO_4/reduced graphene oxide/carbon composite (LiMn_1_/_3Fe_2_/_3PO_4/rGO/C) cathode material for Li-ion batteries. The composite consists of homogeneous Mn-Fe distributed LiMn_1_/_3Fe_2_/_3PO_4 with its primary particles (∼200 nm) covered and connected by both pyrolytic carbon and rGO sheets, which could prevent the aggregation of the particles as well as construct an interconnected conductive network for rapid transmission of electrons during charging and discharging process. The fabricated LiMn_1_/_3Fe_2_/_3PO_4/rGO/C can deliver a discharge capacity of 94.8 mAh g"−"1 even at the high rate of 20C, and shows a capacity decay rate of only 6.25% after 900 long-term charge-discharge cycles. Moreover, the proposed synthesis strategy can also be applied to prepare other graphene-decorated multi-component cathode/anode materials for the Li-ion batteries.

  16. Effect of biostimulation using sewage sludge, soybean meal and wheat straw on oil degradation and bacterial community composition in a contaminated desert soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumaiya eAl-Kindi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Waste materials have a strong potential in the bioremediation of oil-contaminated sites, because of their richness in nutrients and their economical feasibility. We used sewage sludge, soybean meal and wheat straw to biostimulate oil degradation in a heavily contaminated desert soil. While oil degradation was assessed by following the produced CO2 and by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS, shifts in bacterial community composition were monitored using illumina MiSeq. The addition of sewage sludge and wheat straw to the desert soil stimulated the respiration activities more than the addition of soybean meal. GC-MS analysis revealed that the addition of addition of sewage sludge and wheat straw resulted in 1.7 to 1.8 fold increase in the degraded C14 to C30 alkanes, compared to only 1.3 fold increase in the case of soybean meal addition. The degradation of ≥ 90% of the C14 to C30 alkanes were measured in the soils treated with sewage sludge and wheat straw. MiSeq sequencing revealed that the majority (76.5-86.4% of total sequences of acquired sequences from the original soil belonged to Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes. Multivariate analysis of operational taxonomic units (OTUs placed the bacterial communities of the soils after the treatments in separate clusters (ANOSIM R=0.66, P=0.0001. The most remarkable shift in bacterial communities was in the wheat straw treatment, where 95-98% of the total sequences belonging to Bacilli. We conclude that sewage sludge and wheat straw are useful biostimulating agents for the cleanup of oil-contaminated desert soils.

  17. Effect of Biostimulation Using Sewage Sludge, Soybean Meal, and Wheat Straw on Oil Degradation and Bacterial Community Composition in a Contaminated Desert Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kindi, Sumaiya; Abed, Raeid M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Waste materials have a strong potential in the bioremediation of oil-contaminated sites, because of their richness in nutrients and their economical feasibility. We used sewage sludge, soybean meal, and wheat straw to biostimulate oil degradation in a heavily contaminated desert soil. While oil degradation was assessed by following the produced CO2 and by using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS), shifts in bacterial community composition were monitored using illumina MiSeq. The addition of sewage sludge and wheat straw to the desert soil stimulated the respiration activities to reach 3.2–3.4 times higher than in the untreated soil, whereas the addition of soybean meal resulted in an insignificant change in the produced CO2, given the high respiration activities of the soybean meal alone. GC–MS analysis revealed that the addition of sewage sludge and wheat straw resulted in 1.7–1.8 fold increase in the degraded C14 to C30 alkanes, compared to only 1.3 fold increase in the case of soybean meal addition. The degradation of ≥90% of the C14 to C30 alkanes was measured in the soils treated with sewage sludge and wheat straw. MiSeq sequencing revealed that the majority (76.5–86.4% of total sequences) of acquired sequences from the untreated soil belonged to Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Multivariate analysis of operational taxonomic units placed the bacterial communities of the soils after the treatments in separate clusters (ANOSIM R = 0.66, P = 0.0001). The most remarkable shift in bacterial communities was in the wheat straw treatment, where 95–98% of the total sequences were affiliated to Bacilli. We conclude that sewage sludge and wheat straw are useful biostimulating agents for the cleanup of oil-contaminated desert soils. PMID:26973618

  18. [Effects of pesticides and plant bio-stimulants on the germination of chlamydospores and in vitro development of the nematophagous fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceiro, Wilson G; Arévalo, Jersys; Hidalgo-Díaz, Leopoldo

    2015-01-01

    The effects of pesticides and plant bio-stimulants used in protected vegetable production systems on the fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia are unknown. The effectiveness of P. chlamydosporia against Meloidogyne spp. could be affected by products used in protected vegetable production systems. Two in vitro assays were carried out to evaluate any potential effect that pesticides and bio-stimulants often used in these systems could have on the fungus. The effect on chlamydospore germination was evaluated in a first assay, and mycelia growth and sporulation in a second. With these results, the compatibility of each product with the fungus was determined. Chlamydospores germination was over 50% with the control, FitoMas E, Biobras-16 and Amidor. Lower results were observed with other products, with some of them even inhibiting germination completely. Fungal growth was potentiated by Biobras-16 to 106.23%, promoted up to 50-100% by the control, FitoMas E and Cuproflow, and was below 50% with the rest of the products.Cipermetrina, Benomilo, Zineb, Mitigan, Karate, FitoMas E and Amidor promoted fungal sporulation, which was below 50% with Cuproflow and completely inhibited by the other products. Fifty-four percent of the products evaluated were compatible with P. chlamydosporia, while 8% were toxic and 38%, very toxic. Cipermetrina, Karate, Amidor, Benomilo, Zineb, Mitigan and FitoMas E were compatible with P. chlamydosporia. If it is necessary to use any of the other products for integrated pest management in protected vegetable production systems, it is recommended to avoid direct contact with P. chlamydosporia. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Biostimulative effects of Nd:YAG Q-switch dye on normal human fibroblast cultures: study of a new chemosensitizing agent for the Nd:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, D.J.; Saxton, R.E.; Fetterman, H.R.; Castro, D.J.; Ward, P.H.

    1987-01-01

    Kodak Q-switch II is a new chemical with an absorption maxima at 1051 nm, designed to be used as an Nd:YAG dye laser. The potential for this dye as a new chemosensitizing agent in the treatment of connective tissue diseases and wound healing with low energy Nd:YAG laser was examined. Two normal fibroblast cell lines were tested for sensitivity to various levels of this dye in vitro. These cells were exposed to Q-switch II dye at concentrations of 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, 50, and 100 micrograms/ml for 1 and 24 hours. Cell viability was assessed by the trypan blue exclusion test. Cell duplication and DNA synthesis were measured by the incorporation of [ 3 H]-thymidine at 6 and 24 hours postexposure to Q-switch II dye. At concentrations up to 10 micrograms/ml, both cell lines tested showed no changes in cell viability. However, at concentrations equal or higher than 50 micrograms/ml, more than 40% of the fibroblasts incorporated trypan blue after 24 hours of exposure to this dye, indicating significant cell destruction. The results indicate that Q-switch II dye is nontoxic to normal human fibroblast cultures and showed significant biostimulative effects on cell duplication at concentrations equal to or lower than 10 micrograms/ml. Further studies will be required to determine the usefulness of Q-switch II dye as a new photochemosensitizing agent for potential biostimulation of wound healing and/or treatment of connective tissue diseases with the Nd:YAG laser (near infrared, 1060 nm) at nonthermal levels of energies

  20. Understanding Uranium Behavior in a Reduced Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janot, N.; Lezama-Pacheco, J. S.; Williams, K. H.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Long, P. E.; Davis, J. A.; Fox, P. M.; Yang, L.; Giammar, D.; Cerrato, J. M.; Bargar, J.

    2012-12-01

    Uranium contamination of groundwater is a concern at several US Department of Energy sites, such Old Rifle, CO. Uranium transport in the environment is mainly controlled by its oxidation state, since oxidized U(VI) is relatively mobile, whereas U(IV) is relatively insoluble. Bio-remediation of contaminated aquifers aims at immobilizing uranium in a reduced form. Previous laboratory and field studies have shown that adding electron donor (lactate, acetate, ethanol) to groundwater stimulates the activity of metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria, which promotes U(VI) reduction in contaminated aquifers. However, obtaining information on chemical and physical forms of U, Fe and S species for sediments biostimulated in the field, as well as kinetic parameters such as U(VI) reduction rate, is challenging due to the low concentration of uranium in the aquifers (typically bio-remediation experiment at the Old Rifle site, CO, from early iron-reducing conditions to the transition to sulfate-reducing conditions. Several in-well chromatographic columns packed with sediment were deployed and were sampled at different days after the start of bio-reduction. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray microscopy were used to obtain information on Fe, S and U speciation and distribution. Chemical extractions of the reduced sediments have also been performed, to determine the rate of Fe(II) and U(IV) accumulation.

  1. Evaluation of a Biostimulant (Pepton Based in Enzymatic Hydrolyzed Animal Protein in Comparison to Seaweed Extracts on Root Development, Vegetative Growth, Flowering, and Yield of Gold Cherry Tomatoes Grown under Low Stress Ambient Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Polo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this experiment were to determine the effects of different application rates of an enzyme hydrolyzed animal protein biostimulant (Pepton compared to a standard application rate of a biostimulant derived from seaweed extract (Acadian on plant growth parameters and yield of gold cherry tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.. Biostimulant treatments were applied starting at 15 days after transplant and every 2 weeks thereafter for a total of 5 applications. One treatment group received no biostimulant (Control. Three treatment groups (Pepton-2, Pepton-3, Pepton-4 received Pepton at different application rates equivalent to 2, 3, or 4 kg/ha applied by foliar (first 2 applications and by irrigation (last 3 applications. Another treatment group (Acadian received Acadian at 1.5 L/ha by irrigation for all five applications. All groups received the regular fertilizer application for this crop at transplantation, flowering, and fruiting periods. There were four plots per treatment group. Each plot had a surface area of 21 m2 that consisted of two rows that were 7 m long and 1.5 m wide. Plant height, stem diameter, distance from head to bouquet flowering, fruit set distance between the entire cluster and cluster flowering fruit set, leaf length, and number of leaves per plant was recorded for 20 plants (5 plants per plot at 56 and 61 days after the first application. Root length and diameter of cherry tomatoes were determined at harvest from 20 randomly selected plants. Harvesting yield per plot was registered and production per hectare was calculated. Both biostimulants improved (P < 0.05 all vegetative parameters compared with the control group. There was a positive linear (P < 0.001 effect of Pepton application rate for all parameters. The calculated yield was 7.8 and 1 Ton/ha greater that represent 27 and 2.9% higher production for Pepton applied at 4 kg/ha compared to the control and to Acadian, respectively. In conclusion, Pepton was

  2. Evaluation of Seaweed Extracts From Laminaria and Ascophyllum nodosum spp. as Biostimulants in Zea mays L. Using a Combination of Chemical, Biochemical and Morphological Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ertani

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Seaweed extracts can be employed as biostimulants during crop cultivation owing to their positive effects on plant performance. Therefore, in this study one extract from Laminaria (A and five extracts from Ascophyllum nodosum (B–F were assayed on maize (Zea mays L. plants supplied for 2 days with 0.5 mL L−1 of single products to evaluate their capacity to stimulate root growth and morphology, nutrition, and sugars accumulation. Firstly, extracts were chemically characterized via Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies, and their content in carbon, nitrogen, phenolic acids and hormones (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA, and Isopentenyladenosine, IPA was quantified. The auxin like- and gibberellic acid -like activities of all extracts were also determined. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra provided complementary information depicting distinct spectral pattern for each extract. Bands assigned to alginic and uronic acids were dominant in FT-IR spectra, while those corresponding to polyaromatic rings were evident in FT-Raman spectra. In general, extracts stimulated root growth, nutrition, esterase activity, and sugar content. However, they showed high variation in chemical features, which may explain their different capacity in triggering physiological responses in maize. Among A. nodosum extracts for instance, E was the most efficient in promoting root morphology traits, likely because of its elevate content in IAA (32.43 nM, while F extract was the highest in phenol content (1,933 mg L−1 and the most successful in improving plant nutrition. On the other hand, C extract was very effective in stimulating root elongation, but did not influence plant nutrition. B and D extracts induced similar positive effects on plants, although they greatly varied in chemical composition. Laminaria extract (A differed from A. nodosum extracts, because of its low content in total phenols and the presence of both IAA- and GA-like activity. We conclude

  3. SERDP ER-1376 Enhancement of In Situ Bioremediation of Energetic Compounds by Coupled Abiotic/Biotic Processes:Final Report for 2004 - 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Comfort, Steve; Fredrickson, Herbert L.; Boparai, Hardiljeet K.; Devary, Brooks J.; Thompson, Karen T.; Phillips, Jerry L.; Crocker, Fiona H.; Girvin, Donald C.; Resch, Charles T.; Shea, Patrick; Fischer, Ashley E.; Durkin, Lisa M.

    2007-08-07

    This project was initiated by SERDP to quantify processes and determine the effectiveness of abiotic/biotic mineralization of energetics (RDX, HMX, TNT) in aquifer sediments by combinations of biostimulation (carbon, trace nutrient additions) and chemical reduction of sediment to create a reducing environment. Initially it was hypothesized that a balance of chemical reduction of sediment and biostimulation would increase the RDX, HMX, and TNT mineralization rate significantly (by a combination of abiotic and biotic processes) so that this abiotic/biotic treatment may be a more efficient for remediation than biotic treatment alone in some cases. Because both abiotic and biotic processes are involved in energetic mineralization in sediments, it was further hypothesized that consideration for both abiotic reduction and microbial growth was need to optimize the sediment system for the most rapid mineralization rate. Results show that there are separate optimal abiotic/biostimulation aquifer sediment treatments for RDX/HMX and for TNT. Optimal sediment treatment for RDX and HMX (which have chemical similarities and similar degradation pathways) is mainly chemical reduction of sediment, which increased the RDX/HMX mineralization rate 100 to150 times (relative to untreated sediment), with additional carbon or trace nutrient addition, which increased the RDX/HMX mineralization rate an additional 3 to 4 times. In contrast, the optimal aquifer sediment treatment for TNT involves mainly biostimulation (glucose addition), which stimulates a TNT/glucose cometabolic degradation pathway (6.8 times more rapid than untreated sediment), degrading TNT to amino-intermediates that irreversibly sorb (i.e., end product is not CO2). The TNT mass migration risk is minimized by these transformation reactions, as the triaminotoluene and 2,4- and 2,6-diaminonitrotoluene products that irreversibly sorb are no longer mobile in the subsurface environment. These transformation rates are increased

  4. Efeitos bioestimulantes do laser de baixa potência no processo de reparo Biostimulation effects of low-power laser in the repair process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruthinéia Diógenes Alves Uchôa Lins

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Os lasers de baixa potência promovem efeitos biológicos benéficos, de caráter analgésico, antiinflamatório e cicatrizante, por meio de um fenômeno de bioestimulação. A radiação emitida pelo laser terapêutico afeta os processos metabólicos das células-alvo, produzindo efeitos bioestimulantes que resultam na ocorrência de eventos celulares e vasculares, os quais parecem interferir diretamente no processo de reparo. Este trabalho visa estudar o fenômeno da bioestimulação e destacar os principais efeitos bioestimulantes do laser de baixa potência na reparação tecidual.The wound healing process has always been an excellent subject for researchers. The use of low-power laser on wounds during the postoperative phase has increased the speed of the healing process. It has been implied that low power radiation affects cellular metabolic processes and promotes beneficial biological effects (analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and healing. Laser biostimulation appears to influence the behavior of the repair process. This paper aims at reviewing the most interesting aspects of the use of low-power laser in the tissue-repair process.

  5. USO DE ANTI-HELMÍNTICOS E BIOESTIMULANTES NO DESEMPENHO DE BOVINOS DE CORTE SUPLEMENTADOS A PASTO NO ESTADO DO PARÁ EFFECTS OF VERMIFUGES AND BIOSTIMULANTS ON BEEF CATTLE PERFORMANCE UNDER PASTURE SUPPLEMENTATION IN PARÁ STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sâmia Rubielle Silva de Castro

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available O experimento avaliou o efeito da vermifugação e da utilização de bioestimulantes no ganho de peso e no escore de condição corporal (ECC de bovinos de corte, criados em sistema de pastejo rotacionado com suplementação a pasto, no Estado do Pará, durante 160 dias. Foram utilizados 132 bovinos machos não castrados, com idade média de 24 meses, da raça Nelore (Bos taurus indicus. Os grupos experimentais compreenderam o grupo G1 (controle; n=33, G2 (moxidectina 1%; n=33, G3 (moxidectina 10%; n=33 e G4 (ivermectina 3,15%; n=33. Em todos os grupos foram estabelecidas três subparcelas, a fim de serem testados dois bioestimulantes de crescimento animal (bioestimulante 1 e bioestimulante 2. Não houve diferença estatística significativa no ganho de peso médio, no ECC e nas contagens de OPG entre animais do G1, G2, G3 e G4, independentemente dos anti-helmínticos e/ou bioestimulantes usados. Contudo, o tratamento baseado na associação de moxidectina 1% e o bioestimulante 2 apresentou maior receita líquida e incrementou a lucratividade da terminação em 1,24%. Os resultados sugerem que não há necessidade de um controle contra nematódeos durante a terminação, desde que os animais apresentem uma baixa carga parasitária, porém o uso de fármacos pode, sob certas condições, apresentar resultado econômico favorável.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVES: Anti-helmíntico, bovinocultura, crescimento, rentabilidade, sistema de produção.
    The experiment evaluated the effect of vermifuges and biostimulants on weight gain and body condition score (BCS of beef cattle, created in pasture supplementation system, in the State of Pará, during 160 days. Experimental animal were 132 Nelore (Bos taurus indicus, non-castrated male, with average age of 24 months. Experimental groups were: G1 group (control; n=33, G2 (1% moxidectin; n=33, G3 (10% moxidectin; n=33 and G4 (3.15% ivermectin; n=33. Each group was divided in three plots, in order to test

  6. In-Situ Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Anders Thais; Slot, Susanne; Paltved, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    , and organisational characteristic. Therefore, it might fail to fully mimic real clinical team processes. Though research on in situ simulation in healthcare is in its infancy, literature is abundant on patient safety and team training1. Patient safety reporting systems that identify risks to patients can improve......Introduction: In situ simulation offers on-site training to healthcare professionals. It refers to a training strategy where simulation technology is integrated into the clinical encounter. Training in the simulation laboratory does not easily tap into situational resources, e.g. individual, team...... patient safety if coupled with training and organisational support. This study explored the use of critical incidents and adverse events reports for in situ simulation and short-term observations were used to create learning objectives and training scenarios. Method: This study used an interventional case...

  7. Evaluation of a Genome-Scale In Silico Metabolic Model for Geobacter metallireducens by Using Proteomic Data from a Field Biostimulation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yilin; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Lipton, Mary S.; Long, Philip E.

    2012-01-01

    Accurately predicting the interactions between microbial metabolism and the physical subsurface environment is necessary to enhance subsurface energy development, soil and groundwater cleanup, and carbon management. This study was an initial attempt to confirm the metabolic functional roles within an in silico model using environmental proteomic data collected during field experiments. Shotgun global proteomics data collected during a subsurface biostimulation experiment were used to validate a genome-scale metabolic model of Geobacter metallireducens—specifically, the ability of the metabolic model to predict metal reduction, biomass yield, and growth rate under dynamic field conditions. The constraint-based in silico model of G. metallireducens relates an annotated genome sequence to the physiological functions with 697 reactions controlled by 747 enzyme-coding genes. Proteomic analysis showed that 180 of the 637 G. metallireducens proteins detected during the 2008 experiment were associated with specific metabolic reactions in the in silico model. When the field-calibrated Fe(III) terminal electron acceptor process reaction in a reactive transport model for the field experiments was replaced with the genome-scale model, the model predicted that the largest metabolic fluxes through the in silico model reactions generally correspond to the highest abundances of proteins that catalyze those reactions. Central metabolism predicted by the model agrees well with protein abundance profiles inferred from proteomic analysis. Model discrepancies with the proteomic data, such as the relatively low abundances of proteins associated with amino acid transport and metabolism, revealed pathways or flux constraints in the in silico model that could be updated to more accurately predict metabolic processes that occur in the subsurface environment. PMID:23042184

  8. Implications of polluted soil biostimulation and bioaugmentation with spent mushroom substrate (Agaricus bisporus) on the microbial community and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Delgado, Carlos; D'Annibale, Alessandro; Pesciaroli, Lorena; Yunta, Felipe; Crognale, Silvia; Petruccioli, Maurizio; Eymar, Enrique

    2015-03-01

    Different applications of spent Agaricus bisporus substrate (SAS), a widespread agro-industrial waste, were investigated with respect to the remediation of a historically polluted soil with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH). In one treatment, the waste was sterilized (SSAS) prior to its application in order to assess its ability to biostimulate, as an organic amendment, the resident soil microbiota and ensuing contaminant degradation. For the other treatments, two bioaugmentation approaches were investigated; the first involved the use of the waste itself and thus implied the application of A. bisporus and the inherent microbiota of the waste. In the second treatment, SAS was sterilized and inoculated again with the fungus to assess its ability to act as a fungal carrier. All these treatments were compared with natural attenuation in terms of their impact on soil heterotrophic and PAH-degrading bacteria, fungal growth, biodiversity of soil microbiota and ability to affect PAH bioavailability and ensuing degradation and detoxification. Results clearly showed that historically PAH contaminated soil was not amenable to natural attenuation. Conversely, the addition of sterilized spent A. bisporus substrate to the soil stimulated resident soil bacteria with ensuing high removals of 3-ring PAH. Both augmentation treatments were more effective in removing highly condensed PAH, some of which known to possess a significant carcinogenic activity. Regardless of the mode of application, the present results strongly support the adequacy of SAS for environmental remediation purposes and open the way to an attractive recycling option of this waste. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Planetary Volatiles Extractor for In Situ Resource Utilization, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) or ?living off the land relies on exploiting local resources and in turn reducing burden of transporting supplies. NASA has...

  10. Sex in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøgholt, Ida

    2017-01-01

    Sex er en del af vores sociale praksis og centralt for det, vi hver især er. Men bortset fra pornoindustrien, har vi ikke mange muligheder for at få adgang til billeder af sex. Teater Nordkrafts forestilling Sex in situ vil gøre seksuelle billeder til noget, der kan deles, udveksles og tales om, og...

  11. An overview of in situ waste treatment technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, S.; Hyde, R.A.; Piper, R.B.; Roy, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    In situ technologies are becoming an attractive remedial alternative for eliminating environmental problems. In situ treatments typically reduce risks and costs associated with retrieving, packaging, and storing or disposing-waste and are generally preferred over ex situ treatments. Each in situ technology has specific applications, and, in order to provide the most economical and practical solution to a waste problem, these applications must be understood. This paper presents an overview of thirty different in situ remedial technologies for buried wastes or contaminated soil areas. The objective of this paper is to familiarize those involved in waste remediation activities with available and emerging in situ technologies so that they may consider these options in the remediation of hazardous and/or radioactive waste sites. Several types of in situ technologies are discussed, including biological treatments, containment technologies, physical/chemical treatments, solidification/stabilization technologies, and thermal treatments. Each category of in situ technology is briefly examined in this paper. Specific treatments belonging to these categories are also reviewed. Much of the information on in situ treatment technologies in this paper was obtained directly from vendors and universities and this information has not been verified

  12. Enzymatic antioxidant responses to biostimulants in maize and soybean subjected to drought Respostas de enzimas antioxidantes a bioestimulantes em plantas de milho e de soja sob estresse hídrico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Feitosa de Vasconcelos

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Water stress is one of the most important environmental factors inducing physiological changes in plants, such as decrease in the water potential of the cells, the stomatal closure; and the development of oxidative processes mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS. Antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and ascorbate peroxidase (APX are efficient scavengers of ROS. The aim of this research was to examine how the application of biostimulant based on humic substances and aminoacids may affect activity levels of SOD, CAT, and APX of maize and soybean plants under well-watered or drought stress conditions. Pots (4.5 L were filled with a Typic Hapludult soil where the biostimulants doses were applied. It was taken leaf samples in order to analyze SOD, CAT, and APX activities in plants. SOD and APX activity levels were increased by application of biostimulant 1 in maize subjected to stress. Catalase activity was not enhanced in plants by using the biostimulants. The composition of the biostimulants was not able to enhance stress tolerance in maize and soybean plants subjected to water stress.O estresse hídrico é um dos mais importantes fatores ambientais que induz mudanças fisiológicas, como diminuição do potencial de água na célula, o fechamento dos estômatos e o desenvolvimento de processos oxidativos mediante a formação das espécies reativas de oxigênio (ROS. As enzimas antioxidantes superóxido dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT e ascorbato peroxidase (APX são eficientes eliminadores das ROS. O objetivo deste estudo foi examinar como a aplicação de bioestimulantes com substâncias húmicas e aminoácidos em sua composição afeta os níveis de SOD, CAT e APX nos tecidos das folhas de plantas de milho e de soja cultivadas com ou sem estresse hídrico. Amostras de um Argissolo foram colocadas em vasos (4,5 L onde foram adicionadas as doses dos bioestimulantes. Foram retiradas amostras de folhas para análise da

  13. Use of bioreactor landfill for nitrogen removal to enhance methane production through ex situ simultaneous nitrification-denitrification and in situ denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaojie; Zhang, Hongxia; Cheng, Zhaowen

    2017-08-01

    High concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen (NO 3 - -N) derived from ex situ nitrification phase can inhibit methane production during ex situ nitrification and in situ denitrification bioreactor landfill. A combined process comprised of ex situ simultaneous nitrification-denitrification (SND) in an aged refuse bioreactor (ARB) and in situ denitrification in a fresh refuse bioreactor (FRB) was conducted to reduce the negative effect of high concentrationsof NO 3 - -N. Ex situ SND can be achieved because NO 3 - -N concentration can be reduced and the removal rate of ammonium-nitrogen (NH 4 + -N) remains largely unchanged when the ventilation rate of ARB-A2 is controlled. The average NO 3 - -N concentrations of effluent were 470mg/L in ex situ nitrification ARB-A1 and 186mg/L in ex situ SND ARB-A2. The average NH 4 + -N removal rates of ARB-A1 and ARB-A2 were 98% and 94%, respectively. Based on the experimental data from week 4 to week 30, it is predicted that NH 4 + -N concentration in FRB-F1 of the ex situ nitrification and in situ denitrification process would reach 25mg/L after 63weeks, and about 40weeks for the FRB-F2 of ex situ SND and in situ denitrification process . Ex situ SND and in situ denitrification process can improve themethane production of FRB-F2. The lag phase time of methane production for the FRB-F2 was 11weeks. This phase was significantly shorter than the 15-week phases of FRB-F1 in ex situ nitrification and in situ denitrification process. A seven-week stabilizationphase was required to increase methane content from 5% to 50% for FRB-F2. Methane content in FRB-F1 did not reach 50% but reached the 45% peak after 20weeks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. In Situ Generation of Pd-Pt Core-Shell Nanoparticles on Reduced Graphene Oxide (Pd@Pt/rGO) Using Microwaves: Applications in Dehalogenation Reactions and Reduction of Olefins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Anandarup; Rathi, Anuj K; Aparicio, Claudia; Tomanec, Ondrej; Petr, Martin; Pocklanova, Radka; Gawande, Manoj B; Varma, Rajender S; Zboril, Radek

    2017-01-25

    Core-shell nanocatalysts are a distinctive class of nanomaterials with varied potential applications in view of their unique structure, composition-dependent physicochemical properties, and promising synergism among the individual components. A one-pot microwave (MW)-assisted approach is described to prepare the reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-supported Pd-Pt core-shell nanoparticles, (Pd@Pt/rGO); spherical core-shell nanomaterials (∼95 nm) with Pd core (∼80 nm) and 15 nm Pt shell were nicely distributed on the rGO matrix in view of the choice of reductant and reaction conditions. The well-characterized composite nanomaterials, endowed with synergism among its components and rGO support, served as catalysts in aromatic dehalogenation reactions and for the reduction of olefins with high yield (>98%), excellent selectivity (>98%) and recyclability (up to 5 times); both Pt/rGO and Pd/rGO and even their physical mixtures showed considerably lower conversions (20 and 57%) in dehalogenation of 3-bromoaniline. Similarly, in the reduction of styrene to ethylbenzene, Pd@Pt core-shell nanoparticles (without rGO support) possess considerably lower conversion (60%) compared to Pd@Pt/rGO. The mechanism of dehalogenation reactions with Pd@Pt/rGO catalyst is discussed with the explicit premise that rGO matrix facilitates the adsorption of the reducing agent, thus enhancing its local concentration and expediting the hydrazine decomposition rate. The versatility of the catalyst has been validated via diverse substrate scope for both reduction and dehalogenation reactions.

  15. In situ reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Corey William; Blackwelder, David Bradley

    2004-01-27

    An in situ reactor for use in a geological strata, is described and which includes a liner defining a centrally disposed passageway and which is placed in a borehole formed in the geological strata; and a sampling conduit is received within the passageway defined by the liner and which receives a geological specimen which is derived from the geological strata, and wherein the sampling conduit is in fluid communication with the passageway defined by the liner.

  16. The Prevention of Tipburn on Chinese Cabbage (Brassica rapa L. var. pekinensis (Lour. Olson with Foliar Fertilizers and Biostimulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borkowski Jan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were carried out in 2008-2010 on Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. var. pekinensis (Lour. Olson. The main problem in cultivation of this vegetable is physiological disorder – tipburn. It is connected with low level of calcium in young leaves and with water deficiency. In 2008, seeds of Chinese cabbage were sown twice, in April and July. In July, the day temperature was high (25-30 °C and relative air humidity was low (35-50%. In these conditions, the young leaves were injured heavily. Rotting was caused by the activity of bacteria Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Jones Hauben et al. However, three times foliar application of 1.5% calcium nitrate or 1.5% Wapnovit significantly reduced the tipburn. Also spraying with 0.03% of Tytanit (containing ions of titanium or with 2.5% of Biochikol 020 PC (containing chitosan gave similar effect. In these conditions, application of 1.5% K-300 (containing potassium oxide and ammonium nitrate exacerbated symptoms of tipburn. Application of Wapnovit or Tytanit reduced instantly rotting of heads contrary to the application of their mixture. In autumn cultivation, when the relative air humidity was 80-100%, spraying with 1.5% solution of K-300 significantly decreased injuries in comparison to control. Application of Wapnovit, K-300, Biochikol, Tytanit or the mixture of Biochikol and calcium nitrate eliminated rotting. In experiments done in the springs of 2009 and 2010, when weather conditions were less favorable for tipburn appearance, a severity of it was lower but application of K-300 increased it appearance. In these experiments, Biochikol and Wapnovit eliminated rotting of heads. The results of three years of study have shown that calcium nitrate, Wapnovit, Tytanit and Biochikol limited occurrence of tipburn and bacterial rotting of Chinese cabbage, but the weather conditions during cultivation had the greatest impact on the severity of tipburn.

  17. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  18. Remediation of soil co-contaminated with petroleum and heavy metals by the integration of electrokinetics and biostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhi-Yong; Huang, Wen-Hui; Xing, Ding-Feng; Zhang, Hong-Feng

    2013-09-15

    Successful remediation of soil co-contaminated with high levels of organics and heavy metals is a challenging task, because that metal pollutants in soil can partially or completely suppress normal heterotrophic microbial activity and thus hamper biodegradation of organics. In this study, the benefits of integrating electrokinetic (EK) remediation with biodegradation for decontaminating soil co-contaminated with crude oil and Pb were evaluated in laboratory-scale experiments lasting for 30 days. The treated soil contained 12,500 mg/kg of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and 450 mg/kg Pb. The amendments of EDTA and Tween 80, together with a regular refreshing of electrolyte showed the best performance to remediate this contaminated soil. An important function of EDTA-enhanced EK treatment was to eliminate heavy metal toxicity from the soil, thus activating microbial degradation of oil. Although Tween 80 reduced current, it could serve as a second substrate for enhancing microbial growth and biodegradation. It was found that oil biodegradation degree and microbial numbers increased toward the anode and cathode. Microbial metabolism was found to be beneficial to metal release from the soil matrix. Under the optimum conditions, the soil Pb and TPH removal percentages after 30 days of running reached 81.7% and 88.3%, respectively. After treatment, both the residual soil Pb and TPH concentrations met the requirement of the Chinese soil environmental quality standards. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Bacterial Community Succession During in situ Uranium Bioremediation: Spatial Similarities Along Controlled Flow Paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Chiachi; Wu, Weimin; Gentry, Terry J.; Carley, Jack; Corbin, Gail A.; Carroll, Sue L.; Watson, David B.; Jardine, Phil M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial community succession was investigated in a field-scale subsurface reactor formed by a series of wells that received weekly ethanol additions to re-circulating groundwater. Ethanol additions stimulated denitrification, metal reduction, sulfate reduction, and U(VI) reduction to sparingly soluble U(IV). Clone libraries of SSU rRNA gene sequences from groundwater samples enabled tracking of spatial and temporal changes over a 1.5 y period. Analyses showed that the communities changed in a manner consistent with geochemical variations that occurred along temporal and spatial scales. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the levels of nitrate, uranium, sulfide, sulfate, and ethanol strongly correlated with particular bacterial populations. As sulfate and U(VI) levels declined, sequences representative of sulfate-reducers and metal-reducers were detected at high levels. Ultimately, sequences associated with sulfate-reducing populations predominated, and sulfate levels declined as U(VI) remained at low levels. When engineering controls were compared to the population variation via canonical ordination, changes could be related to dissolved oxygen control and ethanol addition. The data also indicated that the indigenous populations responded differently to stimulation for bio-reduction; however, the two bio-stimulated communities became more similar after different transitions in an idiosyncratic manner. The strong associations between particular environmental variables and certain populations provide insight into the establishment of practical and successful remediation strategies in radionuclide-contaminated environments with respect to engineering controls and microbial ecology.

  20. Bacterial Community Succession During in situ Uranium Bioremediation: Spatial Similarities Along Controlled Flow Paths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Chiachi; Wu, Weimin; Gentry, Terry J.; Carley, Jack; Corbin, Gail A.; Carroll, Sue L.; Watson, David B.; Jardine, Phil M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2009-05-22

    Bacterial community succession was investigated in a field-scale subsurface reactor formed by a series of wells that received weekly ethanol additions to re-circulating groundwater. Ethanol additions stimulated denitrification, metal reduction, sulfate reduction, and U(VI) reduction to sparingly soluble U(IV). Clone libraries of SSU rRNA gene sequences from groundwater samples enabled tracking of spatial and temporal changes over a 1.5 y period. Analyses showed that the communities changed in a manner consistent with geochemical variations that occurred along temporal and spatial scales. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the levels of nitrate, uranium, sulfide, sulfate, and ethanol strongly correlated with particular bacterial populations. As sulfate and U(VI) levels declined, sequences representative of sulfate-reducers and metal-reducers were detected at high levels. Ultimately, sequences associated with sulfate-reducing populations predominated, and sulfate levels declined as U(VI) remained at low levels. When engineering controls were compared to the population variation via canonical ordination, changes could be related to dissolved oxygen control and ethanol addition. The data also indicated that the indigenous populations responded differently to stimulation for bio-reduction; however, the two bio-stimulated communities became more similar after different transitions in an idiosyncratic manner. The strong associations between particular environmental variables and certain populations provide insight into the establishment of practical and successful remediation strategies in radionuclide-contaminated environments with respect to engineering controls and microbial ecology.

  1. Malignant mesothelioma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churg, Andrew; Hwang, Harry; Tan, Larry; Qing, Gefei; Taher, Altaf; Tong, Amy; Bilawich, Ana M; Dacic, Sanja

    2018-05-01

    The existence of malignant mesothelioma in situ (MIS) is often postulated, but there are no accepted morphological criteria for making such a diagnosis. Here we report two cases that appear to be true MIS on the basis of in-situ genomic analysis. In one case the patient had repeated unexplained pleural unilateral effusions. Two thoracoscopies 9 months apart revealed only visually normal pleura. Biopsies from both thoracoscopies showed only a single layer of mildly reactive mesothelial cells. However, these cells had lost BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) and showed loss of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2 (CDKN2A) (p16) by fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH). NF2 was not deleted by FISH but 28% of the mesothelial cells showed hyperploidy. Six months after the second biopsy the patient has persisting effusions but no evidence of pleural malignancy on imaging. The second patient presented with ascites and minimal omental thickening on imaging, but no visual evidence of tumour at laparoscopy. Omental biopsy showed a single layer of minimally atypical mesothelial cells with rare tiny foci of superficial invasion of fat. BAP1 immunostain showed loss of nuclear BAP1 in all the surface mesothelial cells and the invasive cells. There was CDKN2A deletion, but no deletion of NF2 by FISH. These cases show that morphologically bland single-layered surface mesothelial proliferations with molecular alterations seen previously only in invasive malignant mesotheliomas exist, and presumably represent malignant MIS. More cases are need to understand the frequency of such changes and the time-course over which invasive tumour develops. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. In situ breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, Luis

    2004-01-01

    In situ breast cancer, particularly the ductal type, is increasing in frequency in the developed countries as well as in Ecuador, most probably. These lesions carry a higher risk of developing a subsequent invasive cancer. Treatment has changed recently due to results of randomized studies, from classical mastectomy to conservative surgery associated to radiotherapy. The Van Nuys Prognostic Index is currently the most usual instrument to guide diagnosis and treatment. Tamoxifen seems to decrease significantly the risk of tumor recurrence after initial treatment. (The author)

  3. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

  4. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed

  5. Resposta da soja (Glycine max (L. Merrill à ação de bioestimulante = Soybean (Glycine max (L. Merrill response to biostimulant action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celestina Alflen Klahold

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivando verificar o efeito do bioestimulante, Stimulate®, aplicado via semente e pulverização foliar, na cultura da soja, conduziu-se um experimento sob ambiente protegido, em vasos. O delineamento foi de blocos casualizados, com 4 repetições. Os tratamentos constaram da combinação de doses de bioestimulate, aplicadas via semente (0, 3 e 5 mL kg-1 de sementes na semeadura e via foliar (0,0; 0,075; 0,150 e 0,225 mL L-1, aos 58 dias após a emergência (DAE. Realizaram-se coletas de plantas aos 73 e 129 DAE.Para algumas das variáveis estudadas, nas doses utilizadas, houve efeito negativo na resposta à aplicação de bioestimulante, para algumas doses testadas. Respostas positivas foram verificadas para massa seca de flores, raízes, razão raiz/parte aérea, número de flores, vagens e grãos e produção por planta. Destacaram-se positivamente os tratamentos: 0,0 mL 0,5 kg-1 (AS + 0,150 mL L-1 (APF; 3,0 mL 0,5 kg-1 (AS + 0,0 mL L-1 (APF; 3,0 mL 0,5 kg-1 (AS+ 0,225 mL L-1 (APF e 5,0 mL 0,5 kg-1 (AS + 0,075 mL L-1 (APF.Aiming to verify the effect of the bioestimulant, Stimulate®, applied saw by seed and leaf pulverization, in the culture of the soybean. It behaved an experiment under greenhouse, in vases. Randomized block experimental design was used, with four repetitions. The treatments consisted of the combination of bioestimulant doses: seed application (SA (0; 3; and 5 mL kg-1 of seeds in the sowing and leaf spray (LS (0.0; 0.075; 0.150; and 0.225 mL L- 1, to the 58 days after the emergency (DAE. Collections of plants were accomplished to the 73 and 129 DAE. For some of the studied variables, in the used doses, there was negative effect in the response of the biostimulant application, for some tested doses. Positives responses were verified for flowers and roots dry mass; root/shoot relation; flowers; beans and grains number; and yield for plant. They stood out the treatments: 0,0 mL 0.5 kg-1 (SA + 0.150 mL L-1 (LS; 3.0 mL 0.5 kg

  6. In Situ Cleanable Alternative HEPA Filter Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, D. J.; Terry, M. T.

    2002-01-01

    Energy's Hazardous Facilities'', found that conventional glass fiber HEPA filters are structurally weak and easily damaged by water or fire. The structurally stronger sintered metal and ceramic filters would reduce the potential of a catastrophic HEPA filter failure due to filter media breakthrough in the process ventilation system. An in situ regenerable system may also find application in recovering nuclear materials, such as plutonium, collected on glove box exhaust HEPA filters. This innovative approach of the in situ regenerative filtration system may be a significant improvement upon the shortfalls of conventional disposable HEPA filters

  7. In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications

  8. In situ zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sarah J; Johnson, Jason L

    2010-01-01

    In situ zymography is a unique laboratory technique that enables the localisation of matrix-degrading metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in histological sections. Frozen sections are placed on glass slides coated with fluorescently labelled matrix proteins. After incubation MMP activity can be observed as black holes in the fluorescent background due to proteolysis of the matrix protein. Alternatively frozen sections can be incubated with matrix proteins conjugated to quenched fluorescein. Proteolysis of the substrate by MMPs leads to the release of fluorescence. This technique can be combined with immunohistochemistry to enable co-location of proteins such as cell type markers or other proteins of interest. Additionally, this technique can be adapted for use with cell cultures, permitting precise location of MMP activity within cells, time-lapse analysis of MMP activity and analysis of MMP activity in migrating cells.

  9. Ex-situ and in-situ mineral carbonation as a means to sequester carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin, David C.; O' Connor, William K.; Penner, Larry R.; Rush, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Albany Research Center is investigating mineral carbonation as a method of sequestering CO2 from coal-fired-power plants. Magnesium-silicate minerals such as serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4] and olivine (Mg2SiO4) react with CO2 to produce magnesite (MgCO3), and the calcium-silicate mineral, wollastonite (CaSiO3), reacts to form calcite (CaCO3). It is possible to carry out these reactions either ex situ (above ground in a traditional chemical processing plant) or in situ (storage underground and subsequent reaction with the host rock to trap CO2 as carbonate minerals). For ex situ mineral carbonation to be economically attractive, the reaction must proceed quickly to near completion. The reaction rate is accelerated by raising the activity of CO2 in solution, heat (but not too much), reducing the particle size, high-intensity grinding to disrupt the crystal structure, and, in the case of serpentine, heat-treatment to remove the chemically bound water. All of these carry energy/economic penalties. An economic study illustrates the impact of mineral availability and process parameters on the cost of ex situ carbon sequestration. In situ carbonation offers economic advantages over ex situ processes, because no chemical plant is required. Knowledge gained from the ex situ work was applied to long-term experiments designed to simulate in situ CO2 storage conditions. The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), a multi-layered basaltic lava formation, has potentially favorable mineralogy (up to 25% combined concentration of Ca, Fe2+, and Mg cations) for storage of CO2. However, more information about the interaction of CO2 with aquifers and the host rock is needed. Core samples from the CRBG, as well as samples of olivine, serpentine, and sandstone, were reacted in an autoclave for up to 2000 hours at elevated temperatures and pressures. Changes in core porosity, secondary mineralizations, and both solution and solid chemistry were measured.

  10. Modeling in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecham, D.C.; MacKinnon, R.J.; Murray, P.E.; Johnson, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    In Situ Vitrification (ISV) process is being assessed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to determine its applicability to transuranic and mixed wastes buried at INEL'S Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). This process uses electrical resistance heating to melt waste and contaminated soil in place to produce a durable glasslike material that encapsulates and immobilizes buried wastes. This paper outlines the requirements for the model being developed at the INEL which will provide analytical support for the ISV technology assessment program. The model includes representations of the electric potential field, thermal transport with melting, gas and particulate release, vapor migration, off-gas combustion and process chemistry. The modeling objectives are to help determine the safety of the process by assessing the air and surrounding soil radionuclides and chemical pollution hazards, the nuclear criticality hazard, and the explosion and fire hazards, help determine the suitability of the ISV process for stabilizing the buried wastes involved, and help design laboratory and field tests and interpret results. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Influence of fracture extension on in-situ stress in tight reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongping; Wei, Xu; Zhang, Ye; Xing, Libo; Xu, Jianjun

    2018-01-01

    Currently, hydraulic fracturing is an important way to develop low permeability reservoirs. The fractures produced during the fracturing process are the main influencing factors of changing in-situ stress. In this paper, the influence of fracture extension on in-situ stress is studied by establishing a mathematical model to describe the relationship between fracture length and in-situ stress. The results show that the growth rate gradually decreases after the fracture reaches a certain length with the increase of fracturing time; the continuous extension of the fracture is the main factor to change the in-situ stress. In order to reduce the impact on the subsequent fracture extension due to the changing of in-situ stress, controlling fracturing time and fracture length without affecting the stimulated reservoir effect is an important way. The results presented in this study can effectively reduce the impact of changing of in-situ stress on subsequent fracturing construction.

  12. In-situ uranium leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dotson, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    This invention provides a method for improving the recovery of mineral values from ore bodies subjected to in-situ leaching by controlling the flow behaviour of the leaching solution. In particular, the invention relates to an in-situ leaching operation employing a foam for mobility control of the leaching solution. A foam bank is either introduced into the ore bed or developed in-situ in the ore bed. The foam then becomes a diverting agent forcing the leaching fluid through the previously non-contacted regions of the deposit

  13. Plant biostimulant associated with a resistance inducer in the production components of the common bean = Bioestimulante vegetal associado a indutor de resistência nos componentes da produção de feijoeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João William Bossolani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the search for increased productivity in the common bean and in various other crops of economic interest, much research has been carried out using growth regulators, hormones and nutrients, especially in foliar application, with the aim of accelerating plant development, improving agronomic characteristics, and ensuring better plant health and performance in the field. The application of biostimulant plant regulators with the purpose of increasing crop productivity is a still not a common practice in agriculture. The aim of this study therefore, was to evaluate the effect of the application of plant biostimulants together with a resistance inducer on the production components of the common bean. Five doses of a biostimulant (indolebutyric acid, kinetin and gibberellic acid were used (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 L ha-1, combined with four doses of a resistance inducer (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 L ha-1 in the common bean “IAC Formoso” under a no-tillage system. The experiment was carried out in Selvíria, in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, during the 2013/14 agricultural year. The experimental design was of randomised blocks, in a 5x4 factorial scheme, with four replications. Production components and seed productivity were evaluated in the crop. The resistance inducer gave higher values for green matter (52.08 g plant-1 and dry matter (17.29 g plant-1 in the common bean at a dose of 2.04 L ha-1 and 2.15 L ha-1 respectively. The greatest productivity (3,756 kg ha-1 was obtained with a dose of 0.78 L ha-1 of biostimulant. The use of vegetable biostimulant can be a viable alternative for increasing productivity in the common bean. Em busca do aumento da produtividade do feijoeiro e de várias outras culturas de interesse econômico, foram realizadas inúmeras pesquisas utilizando reguladores de crescimento, hormônios e nutrientes, principalmente em aplicações foliares com a finalidade de acelerar o desenvolvimento da planta, melhorar suas

  14. In situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, B.

    1980-01-01

    A process is described for the in-situ leaching of uranium-containing ores employing an acidic leach liquor containing peroxymonosulphuric acid. Preferably, additionally, sulphuric acid is present in the leach liquor. (author)

  15. Composition-driven Cu-speciation and reducibility in Cu-CHA zeolite catalysts: a multivariate XAS/FTIR approach to complexity† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Sample description and synthesis details, experimental setup for in situ XAS and FTIR spectroscopy, details on the MCR-ALS method, details on DFT-assisted XANES simulations, details on the determination of N pure by PCA, MCR-ALS results for downsized and upsized component spaces, additional information to support the assignment of theoretical XANES curves, details on EXAFS analysis, details on IR spectral deconvolution. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc02266b Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, A.; Lomachenko, K. A.; Pankin, I. A.; Negri, C.; Berlier, G.; Beato, P.; Falsig, H.; Bordiga, S.; Lamberti, C.

    2017-01-01

    The small pore Cu-CHA zeolite is attracting increasing attention as a versatile platform to design novel single-site catalysts for deNOx applications and for the direct conversion of methane to methanol. Understanding at the atomic scale how the catalyst composition influences the Cu-species formed during thermal activation is a key step to unveil the relevant composition–activity relationships. Herein, we explore by in situ XAS the impact of Cu-CHA catalyst composition on temperature-dependent Cu-speciation and reducibility. Advanced multivariate analysis of in situ XANES in combination with DFT-assisted simulation of XANES spectra and multi-component EXAFS fits as well as in situ FTIR spectroscopy of adsorbed N2 allow us to obtain unprecedented quantitative structural information on the complex dynamics during the speciation of Cu-sites inside the framework of the CHA zeolite. PMID:29147509

  16. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. In situ physical/chemical treatment technologies for remediation of contaminated sites: Applicability, developing status, and research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegrist, R.L.; Gates, D.D.; West, O.R.; Liang, L.; Donaldson, T.L.; Webb, O.F.; Corder, S.L.; Dickerson, K.S.

    1994-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was established in June 1991 to facilitate the development and implementation of in situ remediation technologies for environmental restoration within the DOE complex. Within the ISR IP, four subareas of research have been identified: (1) in situ containment, (2) in situ physical/chemical treatment (ISPCT), (3) in situ bioremediation, and (4) subsurface manipulation/electrokinetics. Although set out as individual focus areas, these four are interrelated, and successful developments in one will often necessitate successful developments in another. In situ remediation technologies are increasingly being sought for environmental restoration due to the potential advantages that in situ technologies can offer as opposed to more traditional ex situ technologies. These advantages include limited site disruption, lower cost, reduced worker exposure, and treatment at depth under structures. While in situ remediation technologies can offer great advantages, many technology gaps exist in their application. This document presents an overview of ISPCT technologies and describes their applicability to DOE-complex needs, their development status, and relevant ongoing research. It also highlights research needs that the ISR IP should consider when making funding decisions

  17. In Situ TEM Electrical Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canepa, Silvia; Alam, Sardar Bilal; Ngo, Duc-The

    2016-01-01

    understanding of complex physical and chemical interactions in the pursuit to optimize nanostructure function and device performance. Recent developments of sample holder technology for TEM have enabled a new field of research in the study of functional nanomaterials and devices via electrical stimulation...... influence the sample by external stimuli, e.g. through electrical connections, the TEM becomes a powerful laboratory for performing quantitative real time in situ experiments. Such TEM setups enable the characterization of nanostructures and nanodevices under working conditions, thereby providing a deeper...... and measurement of the specimen. Recognizing the benefits of electrical measurements for in situ TEM, many research groups have focused their effort in this field and some of these methods have transferred to ETEM. This chapter will describe recent advances in the in situ TEM investigation of nanostructured...

  18. Triplex in-situ hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresco, Jacques R.; Johnson, Marion D.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for detecting in situ the presence of a target sequence in a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment, which comprises: a) contacting in situ under conditions suitable for hybridization a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment with a detectable third strand, said third strand being capable of hybridizing to at least a portion of the target sequence to form a triple-stranded structure, if said target sequence is present; and b) detecting whether hybridization between the third strand and the target sequence has occured.

  19. In-situ burning: NIST studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    In-situ burning of spilled oil has distinct advantages over other countermeasures. It offers the potential to convert rapidly large quantities of oil into its primary combustion products, carbon dioxide and water, with a small percentage of other unburned and residue byproducts. Because the oil is converted to gaseous products of combustion by burning, the need for physical collection, storage, and transport of recovered fluids is reduced to the few percent of the original spill volume that remains as residue after burning. Burning oil spills produces a visible smoke plume containing smoke particulate and other products of combustion which may persist for many kilometers from the burn. This fact gives rise to public health concerns, related to the chemical content of the smoke plume and the downwind deposition of particulate, which need to be answered. In 1985, a joint Minerals Management Service (MMS) and Environment Canada (EC) in-situ burning research program was begun at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). This research program was designed to study the burning of large crude oil spills on water and how this burning would affect air quality by quantifying the products of combustion and developing methods to predict the downwind smoke particulate deposition. To understand the important features of in-situ burning, it is necessary to perform both laboratory and mesoscale experiments. Finally, actual burns of spilled oil at sea will be necessary to evaluate the method at the anticipated scale of actual response operations. In this research program there is a continuing interaction between findings from measurements on small fire experiments performed in the controlled laboratory environments of NIST and the Fire Research Institute (FRI) in Japan, and large fire experiments at facilities like the USCG Fire Safety and Test Detachment in Mobile, Alabama where outdoor liquid fuel burns in large pans are possible

  20. Reaction and Transport Processes Controlling In Situ Chemical Oxidation of DNAPLs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siegrist, Robert L; Crimi, Michelle; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Illangasekare, Tissa; Dugan, Pamela; Heiderscheidt, Jeff; Jackson, Shannon; Petri, Ben; Sahl, Jason; Seitz, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation involves the introduction of chemical oxidants into the subsurface to destroy organic contaminants in soil and ground water, with the goal being to reduce the mass, mobility...

  1. In Situ Magnetic Separation for Extracellular Protein Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappler, T.; Cerff, Martin; Ottow, Kim Ekelund

    2009-01-01

    A new approach for in situ product removal from bioreactors is presented in which high-gradient magnetic separation is used. This separation process was used for the adsorptive removal of proteases secreted by Bacillus licheniformis. Small, non-porous bacitracin linked magnetic adsorbents were...... was not influenced by the in situ product removal step. Protease production also remained the same after the separation step. Furthermore, degradation of the protease, which followed first order kinetics, was reduced by using the method. Using a theoretical modeling approach, we Could show that protease yield...... in total was enhanced by using in situ magnetic separation. The process described here is a promising technique to improve overall yield in No production processes which are often limited due to weak downstream operations, Potential limitations encountered during a bioprocess can be overcome...

  2. Detector calibration for in-situ gamma ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Balea, G

    2002-01-01

    The power in the technique of in-situ spectrometry lies in the fact that a detector placed on ground measures gamma radiation from sources situated over an area of several hundred square meters. The 'field of view' for the detector would be larger for high energy radiation sources and for sources closer to the soil surface. In contrast, a soil sample would represent an area of a few tens of hundreds of square centimeters. In practice, an effective characterization of a site would involve in-situ gamma ray spectrometry in conjunction with soil sampling. As part of an overall program, in-situ gamma ray spectrometry provides a means to assess the degree of contamination in areas during the course of operations in the field, thus guiding the investigator on where to collect samples. It can also substantially reduce the number of samples need to be collected and subsequently analyzed. (author)

  3. In situ solution mining technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Learmont, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    A method of in situ solution mining is disclosed in which a primary leaching process employing an array of 5-spot leaching patterns of production and injection wells is converted to a different pattern by converting to injection wells all the production wells in alternate rows

  4. 'In situ' expanded graphite extinguishant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qixin; Shou Yuemei; He Bangrong

    1987-01-01

    This report is concerning the development of the extinguishant for sodium fire and the investigation of its extinguishing property. The experiment result shows that 'in situ' expanded graphite developed by the authors is a kind of extinguishant which extinguishes sodium fire quickly and effectively and has no environment pollution during use and the amount of usage is little

  5. In Situ Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talacua, H

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, the feasibility of in situ TE for vascular and valvular purposes were tested with the use of different materials, and animal models. First, the feasibility of a decellularized biological scaffold (pSIS-ECM) as pulmonary heart valve prosthesis is examined in sheep (Chapter 2). Next,

  6. In situ precipitation and sorption of arsenic from groundwater: Laboratory and ex situ field tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whang, J.M.; Adu-Wusu, K.; Frampton, W.H.; Staib, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    Permeable, reactive walls may provide long term, low-maintenance prevention of off-site migration of contaminated groundwater. Laboratory and ex situ field tests conducted on several arsenic-contaminated groundwaters indicate that both precipitation and sorption can remove arsenic to levels of less than 10 ppb. Precipitation has been induced by adjusting pH, adding selected cations, and/or reducing the oxidation-reduction potential. Adjusting pH or adding cations was most effective when there were high levels of other ionic species with which arsenic could coprecipitate. Reducing the oxidation-reduction potential was effective on a variety of groundwaters. Humate was an effective sorbent at low pH; aluminum and iron materials were effective over a large range of conditions. Long term performance of precipitation systems can be limited by formation of precipitate on reactive surfaces. Long term sorption can be reduced by competing ions, such as phosphate. Laboratory and ex situ field tests indicate that reactive walls may have lifetimes of decades or more

  7. In Situ Immobilization of Uranium in Structured Porous Media via Biomineralization at the Fracture/Matrix Interface - Subproject to Co-PI Eric E. Roden. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roden, Eric E.

    2007-01-01

    layer would induce formation of a redox barrier in the less conductive materials above and below the gravel, resulting in decreased mass transfer of uranium out these materials and attendant declines in groundwater U(VI) concentration. Details regarding the planning, execution, and results of the in situ biostimulation experiment will be provided in separate peer-reviewed publications by the project PIs and colleagues. This report summarizes research activities conducted at The University of Alabama (2002-2005) and the University of Wisconsin (2005-2007) in support of the field experiment, which included (1) chemical and microbiological characterization of sediment cores from Area 2; (2) sediment slurry experiments with Area 2 materials which evaluated the biogeochemical response to ethanol amendment and the potential for U(VI) reduction; (3) analysis of the response of groundwater microbial communities to in situ biostimulation. In addition, biogeochemical reaction models of microbial metabolism in ethanol-stimulated sediments, developed based on sediment slurry experiments, are described.

  8. In Situ Immobilization of Uranium in Structured Porous Media via Biomineralization at the Fracture/Matrix Interface – Subproject to Co-PI Eric E. Roden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric E. Roden

    2007-11-02

    this layer would induce formation of a redox barrier in the less conductive materials above and below the gravel, resulting in decreased mass transfer of uranium out these materials and attendant declines in groundwater U(VI) concentration. Details regarding the planning, execution, and results of the in situ biostimulation experiment will be provided in separate peer-reviewed publications by the project PIs and colleagues. This report summarizes research activities conducted at The University of Alabama (2002-2005) and the University of Wisconsin (2005-2007) in support of the field experiment, which included (1) chemical and microbiological characterization of sediment cores from Area 2; (2) sediment slurry experiments with Area 2 materials which evaluated the biogeochemical response to ethanol amendment and the potential for U(VI) reduction; (3) analysis of the response of groundwater microbial communities to in situ biostimulation. In addition, biogeochemical reaction models of microbial metabolism in ethanol-stimulated sediments, developed based on sediment slurry experiments, are described.

  9. Mitigating in situ oil sands carbon costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theriault, D.J.; Peterson, J. [Laricina Energy Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Heinrichs, H. [Canadian Chemical Technology Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Carbon capture and sequestration is a complex problem with a variety of dimensions that need to be considered. The political, social, and regulatory pressures are forcing carbon costs on the oil sands industry in an effort to reduce the carbon footprint of oil sands operations. This paper reviewed the political, social, and regulatory pressures and obligations for the in-situ oil sands industry. It presented the views and insights of Laricina Energy on the carbon challenge. It also described the initiatives that Laricina Energy is taking to manage these imperatives and outlined the challenges the industry is facing. The purpose of the paper was to encourage dialogue and collaboration by the oil sands industry. The paper also described the dimensions of the carbon problem and how the industry can contribute to a solution. Last, the paper reviewed the parameters of carbon dioxide or greenhouse gas containment and storage issues. It was concluded that the regulatory and policy requirements need to be clarified so that industry understands the new business landscape as well as the requirements that influence the economics of in-situ oil sands development. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Environmental monitoring with in-situ gamma spectrometer; Umweltueberwachung mit in-situ-Gamma-Spektrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, S. [ENVINET GmbH, Haar (Germany)

    2014-01-20

    The in-situ gamma spectroscopy allows large area and continuous monitoring of the radio nuclides and there composition in the environment. In comparison to the gamma dose rate measurement the additional spectral information gives the possibility for a quick and effective action in the case of a man-made radiation exposition in the environment. The knowledge respectively localization of the possible nuclides, which a responsible for the increased dose rate, supports responsible organization in the quick identification of the situation, definition of the actions and tracking of the temporal and local process of the radiation exposition. Due to dedicate actions the risk for people and environment is reduced.

  11. Ex situ Flora of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwen Huang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of living collections-based research and discovery has been a prominent feature throughout the history of evolution and advance of botanical science: such research is the core and soul of the botanical gardens. Currently, there are c. 162 Chinese botanical gardens, harboring c. 20,000 species in China. As an example of initiatives to utilize the garden cultivated flora to address plant diversity conservation and germplasm discovery for sustainable agriculture and the bio-industries, the Ex situ Flora of China project aims to catalog and document this mega-diversity of plants that are cultivated in the Chinese botanical gardens. The concept of Ex situ Flora of China is a complete new formulation of species, based on garden cultivated individuals and populations, to obtain better morphological descriptions, provide multi-purpose applicability and a fundamental data service that will support national bio-strategies and bio-industries. It emphasises integrative information, accurately collected from living collections across different Chinese botanical gardens, on biology, phenology, cultivation requirements and uses of plant resources, which are normally not available from traditional Floras based on herbarium specimens. The ex situ flora should provide better information coverage for taxonomy, biological and introduction and collection data and color photos of stems, leaves, flowers, fruits and seed, as well as useful information of cultivation key points and main use of each plant. In general, the Ex situ Flora of China provides more useful information than the traditional Flora Reipublicae Popularis Sinicae. The project of Ex situ Flora of China is planned to be one of the most important initiatives of the plant diversity research platform for sustainable economic and social development in China.

  12. Allochthonous bioaugmentation in ex situ treatment of crude oil-polluted sediments in the presence of an effective degrading indigenous microbiome

    KAUST Repository

    Fodelianakis, Stylianos; Antoniou, E. A.; Mapelli, Francesca; Magagnini, Mirko; Nikolopoulou, Maria; Marasco, Ramona; Barbato, Marta; Tsiola, Areti; Tsikopoulou, I.; Giaccaglia, L.; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Jaouani, Atef; Amer, R.; Hussein, Emad I.; Al-Horani, Fuad A.; Benzha, Fatiha; Blaghen, Mohamed; Malkawi, Hanan Issa; Abdel-Fattah, Yasser Refaat; Cherif, Ameur; Daffonchio, Daniele; Kalogerakis, Nicolas E.

    2015-01-01

    by the autochthonous populations while bioaugmentation, in contrast to biostimulation, did not enhance the remediation process. Our results indicate that when environmental conditions are optimized, the indigenous microbiome at a polluted site will likely outperform

  13. Noise canceling in-situ detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David O.

    2014-08-26

    Technologies applicable to noise canceling in-situ NMR detection and imaging are disclosed. An example noise canceling in-situ NMR detection apparatus may comprise one or more of a static magnetic field generator, an alternating magnetic field generator, an in-situ NMR detection device, an auxiliary noise detection device, and a computer.

  14. In-situ SEM electrochemistry and radiolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Nilsen, Rolf Erling Robberstad; Norby, Poul

    are backscattered and an image is reconstructed by the microscope. But the high energy electrons are a form of ionising radiation which can significantly affect the chemistry in liquid experiments. Ionising radiation can split water, produce radicals, reduce dissolved metal ions to metal particles, and more...... experiments. During the course of these studies it has also been possible to improve on the EC-SEM system. This has resulted in pyrolysed carbon electrodes, which offer the benefit of stability at 0.75 V higher potentials than traditional gold thin-film electrodes. With the quantitative insight...... microelectrodes on the windows to enable studies of electrohcemical processes. In this way it is possible to perform in-situ electrochemical experiments such as electroplating and charge and discharge analysis of battery electrodes. In a typical liquid cell, electrons are accelerated to sufficiently high energies...

  15. Reverse osmosis membrane allows in situ regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonhomme, N.; Menjeaud, C.; Poyet, C.

    1989-01-01

    The use of mineral membranes on metallic supports has provided a novel solution to the problem of filtration by the reverse osmosis process. A new reverse osmosis membrane is described which is capable of resisting high operational temperatures (120 0 C), fluctuations in pH(3 to 12) and high pressure (100 bar), as well as significant chlorine concentrations. In addition, the membrane can be regenerated in-situ on the same porous metal support. Numerous membranes can thus be used over the multi-year life of the porous support. Moreover, accidental damage to the membrane is of no great consequence as the membrane itself can be easily replaced. The life of the installation can thus be extended and the overall cost of filtration reduced. The membrane's various applications include water and effluent treatment in the nuclear power industry. (author)

  16. Polyolefin nanocomposites in situ polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galland, Griselda Barrera; Fim, Fabiana de C.; Milani, Marceo A.; Silva, Silene P. da; Forest, Tadeu; Radaelli, Gislaine, E-mail: griselda.barrera@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande de Sul - UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Basso, Nara R.S. [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Quijada, Raul [Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-07-01

    Polyethylene and polypropylene nanocomposites using grapheme nanosheets and treated chrysotile have been synthesized by in situ polymerization using metallocene catalysts. The fillers have been submitted to acid, thermal and/ou ultrasound treatments before to introduce them into the polymerization reactor. A complete characterization of the fillers has been done. The nanocomposites have been characterized by SEM, TEM, DRX and AFM. The thermal, mechanic -dynamic, mechanical and electrical properties of the nanocomposites are discussed. (author)

  17. Polyolefin nanocomposites in situ polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galland, Griselda Barrera; Fim, Fabiana de C.; Milani, Marceo A.; Silva, Silene P. da; Forest, Tadeu; Radaelli, Gislaine; Basso, Nara R.S.; Quijada, Raul

    2011-01-01

    Polyethylene and polypropylene nanocomposites using grapheme nanosheets and treated chrysotile have been synthesized by in situ polymerization using metallocene catalysts. The fillers have been submitted to acid, thermal and/ou ultrasound treatments before to introduce them into the polymerization reactor. A complete characterization of the fillers has been done. The nanocomposites have been characterized by SEM, TEM, DRX and AFM. The thermal, mechanic -dynamic, mechanical and electrical properties of the nanocomposites are discussed. (author)

  18. Nuclear waste management by in-situ melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, J.A. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A systematic assessment of the in-situ melting concept as an ultimate waste disposal option shows that the placement of solidifed, high-level radioactive wastes in an in-situ melting cavity with a crushed rock backfill not only eliminates the major deficiencies inherent in other in-situ melting schemes, but also satisfies reasonable criteria for ultimate disposal. In-situ melting reduces the waste isolation time requirements to several hundred years. Calculated spent fuel and processing waste afterheat values assess the role of actinide and cladding material nuclides in creating the total afterheat and provide quantitative variation with time for these values for contamporary and advanced-design fission reactors. The dominant roles of 134 Cs in thermal spectrum reactor afterheats during the first decade of cooling of the actinide nuclides in all typical waste after-heats following a century or two of cooling are identified. The spatial and temporal behavior of a spherically symmetric waste repository experiencing in-situ melting in an equal density, homogeneous medium for silicate rock and salt is controlled primarily by the overall volumetric thermal source strength, the time-dependent characteristics of the high-level wastes, and the thermophysical properties of the surrounding rock environment. Calculations were verified by experimental data. The hazard index for typical high-level wastes is dominated by the fission product nuclides for the first three centuries of decay. It is then controlled by the actinides, especially americium, which dominates for 10,000 years. With in-situ melting, the hazard index for the re-solidifed rock/waste matrix deepunderground falls below the hazard index of naturally occurring uranium ore bodies within a few hundred years, whether or not the more hazardous actinide nuclides are selectively removed from the wastes prior to storage

  19. In situ biodenitrification of nitrate surface water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, G.C.; Ballew, M.B.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project has successfully operated a full-scale in situ biodenitrification system to treat water with elevated nitrate levels in abandoned raffinate pits. Bench- and pilot-scale studies were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the process and to support its full-scale design and application. Bench testing evaluated variables that would influence development of an active denitrifying biological culture. The variables were carbon source, phosphate source, presence and absence of raffinate sludge, addition of a commercially available denitrifying microbial culture, and the use of a microbial growth medium. Nitrate levels were reduced from 750 mg/L NO 3 -N to below 10 mg/L NO 3 -N within 17 days. Pilot testing simulated the full-scale process to determine if nitrate levels could be reduced to less than 10 mg/L NO 3 -N when high levels are present below the sludge surface. Four separate test systems were examined along with two control systems. Nitrates were reduced from 1,200 mg/L NO 3 -N to below 2 mg/L NO 3 -N within 21 days. Full-scale operation has been initiated to denitrify 900,000-gal batches alternating between two 1-acre ponds. The process used commercially available calcium acetate solution and monosodium/disodium phosphate solution as a nutrient source for indigenous microorganisms to convert nitrates to molecular nitrogen and water

  20. Scaling considerations for modeling the in situ vitrification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langerman, M.A.; MacKinnon, R.J.

    1990-09-01

    Scaling relationships for modeling the in situ vitrification waste remediation process are documented based upon similarity considerations derived from fundamental principles. Requirements for maintaining temperature and electric potential field similarity between the model and the prototype are determined as well as requirements for maintaining similarity in off-gas generation rates. A scaling rationale for designing reduced-scale experiments is presented and the results are assessed numerically. 9 refs., 6 figs

  1. Monitoring the bio-stimulation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by measurements of soil electrical properties, and CO2 content and its 13C/12C isotopic signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, C.; Gourry, J.; Ignatiadis, I.; Colombano, S.; Dictor, M.; Guimbaud, C.; Chartier, M.; Dumestre, A.; Dehez, S.; Naudet, V.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbon contaminated soils represent an environmental issue as it impacts on ecosystems and aquifers. Where significant subsurface heterogeneity exists, conventional intrusive investigations and groundwater sampling can be insufficient to obtain a robust monitoring of hydrocarbon contaminants, as the information they provide is restricted to vertical profiles at discrete locations, with no information between sampling points. In order to obtain wider information in space volume on subsurface modifications, complementary methods can be used like geophysics. Among geophysical methods, geoelectrical techniques such as electrical resistivity (ER) and induced polarization (IP) seem the more promising, especially to study the effects of biodegradation processes. Laboratory and field geoelectrical experiments to characterize soils contaminated by oil products have shown that mature hydrocarbon-contaminated soils are characterized by enhanced electrical conductivity although hydrocarbons are electrically resistive. This high bulk conductivity is due to bacterial impacts on geological media, resulting in changes in the chemical and physical properties and thus, to the geophysical properties of the ground. Moreover, microbial activity induced CO2 production and isotopic deviation of carbon. Indeed, produced CO2 will reflect the pollutant isotopic signature. Thus, the ratio δ13C(CO2) will come closer to δ13C(hydrocarbon). BIOPHY, project supported by the French National Research Agency (ANR), proposes to use electrical methods and gas analyses to develop an operational and non-destructive method for monitoring in situ biodegradation of hydrocarbons in order to optimize soil treatment. Demonstration field is located in the South of Paris (France), where liquid fuels (gasoline and diesel) leaked from some tanks in 1997. In order to stimulate biodegradation, a trench has been dug to supply oxygen to the water table and thus stimulate aerobic metabolic bioprocesses. ER and

  2. Four Models of In Situ Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter; Krogh, Kristian; Paltved, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In situ simulation is characterized by being situated in the clinical environment as opposed to the simulation laboratory. But in situ simulation bears a family resemblance to other types of on the job training. We explore a typology of in situ simulation and suggest that there are f......Introduction In situ simulation is characterized by being situated in the clinical environment as opposed to the simulation laboratory. But in situ simulation bears a family resemblance to other types of on the job training. We explore a typology of in situ simulation and suggest...... that there are four fruitful approaches to in situ simulation: (1) In situ simulation informed by reported critical incidents and adverse events from emergency departments (ED) in which team training is about to be conducted to write scenarios. (2) In situ simulation through ethnographic studies at the ED. (3) Using...... the following processes: Transition processes, Action processes and Interpersonal processes. Design and purpose This abstract suggests four approaches to in situ simulation. A pilot study will evaluate the different approaches in two emergency departments in the Central Region of Denmark. Methods The typology...

  3. In situ measurement of diffusivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berne, F.; Pocachard, J.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of molecular diffusion controls the migration of contaminants in very low-permeability porous media, like underground facilities for the storage of hazardous waste. Determining of relevant diffusion coefficients is therefore of prime importance. A few techniques exist for in situ measurement of the quantity, but they suffer from many handicaps (duration, complexity and cost of the experiments). We propose here two innovative methods that have some potential to improve the situation. So far, we have found them feasible on the basis of design calculations and laboratory experiments. This work is presently protected by a patent. (author)

  4. In situ measurement of diffusivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berne, Ph.; Pocachard, J.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of molecular diffusion controls the migration of contaminants in very low-permeability porous media, like underground facilities for the storage of hazardous waste. Determining the relevant diffusion coefficients is, therefore, of prime importance. A few techniques exist for the in situ measurement of that quantity, but they suffer from many handicaps (duration, complexity and cost of the experiments). We propose here two innovative methods that have some potential to improve this situation. So far, we have found them feasible on the basis of design calculations and laboratory experiments. This work is presently protected by a patent. (author)

  5. In situ dehydration of yugawaralite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artioli, G.; Ståhl, Kenny; Cruciani, G.

    2001-01-01

    The structural response of the natural zeolite yugawaralite (CaAl2Si6O16. 4H(2)O) upon thermally induced dehydration has been studied by Rietveld analysis of temperature-resolved powder diffraction data collected in situ in the temperature range 315-791 K using synchrotron radiation. The room...... progressively disappearing as the dehydration proceeds. The yugawaralite structure reacts to the release of water molecules with small changes in the Ca-O bond distances and minor distortions of the tetrahedral framework up to about 695 K. Above this temperature the Ca coordination falls below 7 (four framework...

  6. DOE In Situ Remediation Integrated Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISRP) supports and manages a balanced portfolio of applied research and development activities in support of DOE environmental restoration and waste management needs. ISRP technologies are being developed in four areas: containment, chemical and physical treatment, in situ bioremediation, and in situ manipulation (including electrokinetics). the focus of containment is to provide mechanisms to stop contaminant migration through the subsurface. In situ bioremediation and chemical and physical treatment both aim to destroy or eliminate contaminants in groundwater and soils. In situ manipulation (ISM) provides mechanisms to access contaminants or introduce treatment agents into the soil, and includes other technologies necessary to support the implementation of ISR methods. Descriptions of each major program area are provided to set the technical context of the ISM subprogram. Typical ISM needs for major areas of in situ remediation research and development are identified

  7. Reducing Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindell, Johanna

    care may influence decisions on antibiotic use. Based on video-and audio recordings of physician-patient consultations it is investigated how treatment recommendations are presented, can be changed, are forecast and explained, and finally, how they seemingly meet resistance and how this resistance......Antibiotic resistance is a growing public health problem both nationally and internationally, and efficient strategies are needed to reduce unnecessary use. This dissertation presents four research studies, which examine how communication between general practitioners and patients in Danish primary...... is responded to.The first study in the dissertation suggests that treatment recommendations on antibiotics are often done in a way that encourages patient acceptance. In extension of this, the second study of the dissertation examines a case, where acceptance of such a recommendation is changed into a shared...

  8. In Situ Hybridization Pada Kanker Payudara

    OpenAIRE

    Diah Witari, Ni Putu

    2014-01-01

    Kesulitan yang dijumpai pada penanganan kanker payudara adalah terjadinya kekambuhan atau relaps. Deteksi status HER2 pada pasien merupakan salah satu upaya untuk mendeteksi terjadinya relaps dan juga untuk menentukan jenis terapi yang ada diberikan. Ekspresi protein HER2 dapat dideteksi dengan immunohistochemistry (IHC), sedangkan mutasi gen HER2 dapat dideteksi dengan teknik in situ hybridization baik berupa fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) ataupun chromogenic in situ hy...

  9. Training for teamwork through in situ simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Asta; Poehlman, Jon; Bollenbacher, John; Riggan, Scott; Davis, Stan; Miller, Kristi; Ivester, Thomas; Kahwati, Leila

    2015-01-01

    In situ simulations allow healthcare teams to practice teamwork and communication as well as clinical management skills in a team's usual work setting with typically available resources and equipment. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate how to plan and conduct in situ simulation training sessions, with particular emphasis on how such training can be used to improve communication and teamwork. The video features an in situ simulation conducted at a labour and delivery unit in response to postpartum hemorrhage. PMID:26294962

  10. The SENSEI Generic In Situ Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayachit, Utkarsh [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Whitlock, Brad [Intelligent Light, Rutherford, NJ (United States); Wolf, Matthew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Loring, Burlen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Geveci, Berk [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Lonie, David [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Bethel, E. Wes [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-11

    The SENSEI generic in situ interface is an API that promotes code portability and reusability. From the simulation view, a developer can instrument their code with the SENSEI API and then make make use of any number of in situ infrastructures. From the method view, a developer can write an in situ method using the SENSEI API, then expect it to run in any number of in situ infrastructures, or be invoked directly from a simulation code, with little or no modification. This paper presents the design principles underlying the SENSEI generic interface, along with some simplified coding examples.

  11. Biostimulation of soil impacted by 45000 ppm waste motor oil and Phytoremediation with Zea mays by Burkholderia cepacia and Rhizobium elti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saucedo-Martínez Blanca Celeste

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil contaminated with 45000 ppm of waste motor oil (WMO is a relatively high concentration of a mixture of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons (HC, inhibits mineralization of organic matter and its fertility. This WMO´ concentration is high according to mexican regulation: NOM-138-SEMARNAT/ SSA1-2012 (NOM-138 related to when it exceeds 4400 ppm/Kg of soil. The aims of the study were: i BS of contaminated soil by 45000 ppm of WMO with vermicompost and bovine compost 3%, and ii PR using Zea mays inoculated with B. cepacia and R. etli at value below the maximum allowable by NOM-138. The main response variable of the trial was initial and final concentration of WMO after BS. In PR by Z. mays and PGPB to reduce remain-ing WMO, were phenological response variables as: plant height and root length and biomass: aerial and root fresh and dry weight. Experimental data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey. Results showed that the BS of soil by 45000 ppm of WMO was reduced to 21000 ppm; subsequent FR sowing Z. mays inoculated by B. cepacia decreased to 1822.5 ppm, value below the maximum allowable by NOM-138. BS of contaminated soil by relatively high concentration of WMO and later FR sowing Z. mays and PGPR. Both are an alternative in its remediation that to apply each one alone.

  12. EM-54 Technology Development In Situ Remediation Integrated Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) as an element of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in November 1989. EM manages remediation of all DOE sites as well as wastes from current operations. The goal of the EM program is to minimize risks to human health, safety and the environment, and to bring all DOE sites into compliance with Federal, state, and local regulations by 2019. EM-50 is charged with developing new technologies that are safer, more effective and less expensive than current methods. The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (the subject of this report) is part of EM-541, the Environmental Restoration Research and Development Division of EM-54. The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: Significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces; in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP tends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years

  13. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: FY 1994 program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) as an element of the Office of Environmental Management (EM) in November 1989. In an effort to focus resources and address priority needs, EM-50 introduced the concept of integrated programs (IPs) and integrated demonstrations (IDs). The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) focuses research and development on the in-place treatment of contaminated environmental media, such as soil and groundwater, and the containment of contaminants to prevent the contaminants from spreading through the environment. Using in situ remediation technologies to clean up DOE sites minimizes adverse health effects on workers and the public by reducing contact exposure. The technologies also reduce cleanup costs by orders of magnitude. This report summarizes project work conducted in FY 1994 under the ISR IP in three major areas: treatment (bioremediation), treatment (physical/chemical), and containment technologies. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized waste are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive waste, volatile and nonvolatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials.

  14. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: FY 1994 program summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) as an element of the Office of Environmental Management (EM) in November 1989. In an effort to focus resources and address priority needs, EM-50 introduced the concept of integrated programs (IPs) and integrated demonstrations (IDs). The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) focuses research and development on the in-place treatment of contaminated environmental media, such as soil and groundwater, and the containment of contaminants to prevent the contaminants from spreading through the environment. Using in situ remediation technologies to clean up DOE sites minimizes adverse health effects on workers and the public by reducing contact exposure. The technologies also reduce cleanup costs by orders of magnitude. This report summarizes project work conducted in FY 1994 under the ISR IP in three major areas: treatment (bioremediation), treatment (physical/chemical), and containment technologies. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized waste are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive waste, volatile and nonvolatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials

  15. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eGieg

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contibuting to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more benefical technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments.

  16. Aquifer restoration at uranium in situ leach sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastasi, F.S.; Williams, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    In situ mining of uranium involves injection of a leaching solution (lixiviant) into an ore-bearing aquifer. Frequently, the ground water in the mined aquifer is a domestic or livestock water supply. As the lixiviant migrates through the ore body, uranium and various associated elements such as arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, vanadium and radium-226 are mobilized in the ground water. Aquifer restoration after in situ mining is not fully understood. Several methods have been developed to restore mined aquifers to pre-mining (baseline) quality. Commonly used methods include ground water sweeping, clean water injection, and treatment by ion exchange and reverse osmosis technologies. Ammonium carbonate lixiviant was used at one RandD in situ mine. Attempts were made to restore the aquifer using a variety of methods. Efforts were successful in reducing concentrations of the majority of contaminants to baseline levels. Concentrations of certain parameters, however, remained at levels above baseline six months after restoration ceased. Relatively large quantities of ground water were processed in the restoration attempt considering the small size of the project (1.25 acre). More thorough characterization of the hydrogeology of the site may have enhanced the effectiveness of restoration and reduced potential environmental impacts associated with the project. This paper presents some of the findings of a research project conducted by the Mineral Resources Waste Management Team at the University of Idaho in Moscow, Idaho. Views contained herein do not reflect U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission policy

  17. Assessment of microbial in situ activity in contaminated aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaestner, M. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Bioremediation, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Fischer, A.; Nijenhuis, I.; Stelzer, N.; Bombach, P.; Richnow, H.H. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Isotopenbiogeochemie, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Geyer, R. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Umweltmikrobiologie, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Tebbe, C.C. [Institut fuer Agraroekologie, Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft (FAL), D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    unspecific for a community analysis at species level, the composition of the microbial communities was analyzed by genetic profiling and sequencing of partial 16S rRNA genes PCR-amplified from total DNA extracted directly from the microcosms. Sequences retrieved from the microcosms indicated a dominance of not yet cultivated bacteria. Several sequences were phylogenetically closely related to sequences of bacteria known to be iron and sulfate reducers, typically found at sites polluted with BTEX and/or mineral oil. The results show that the current methods for monitoring microbial in situ activity at present stage are valuable tools for improving environmental control of compound turnover and will speed up engineering approaches. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Reducing costs by reducing size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayns, M.R.; Shepherd, J.

    1991-01-01

    The present paper discusses briefly the many factors, including capital cost, which have to be taken into account in determining whether a series of power stations based on a small nuclear plant can be competitive with a series based on traditional large unit sizes giving the guaranteed level of supply. The 320 MWe UK/US Safe Integral Reactor is described as a good example of how the factors discussed can be beneficially incorporated into a design using proven technology. Finally it goes on to illustrate how the overall costs of a generating system can indeed by reduced by use of the 320 MWe Safe Integral Reactor rather than conventional units of around 1200 MWe. (author). 9 figs

  19. In-situ leach mining: the next quantum leap?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, S.

    1988-01-01

    The opportunities and problems which in-situ leach mining technology presents to the mining industry are considered. These are exemplified by concerns addressed in the development of a proposal to mine uranium by in-situ leach techniques at Beverley in South Australia. The technique proposed at Beverley will use sulphuric acid with hydrogen peroxide or dissolved oxygen as the lixivient. Pre-treatment of the aquifer will be necessary to remove excess calcium carbonate, and the system will employ a slightly overpumped output of fluid through the wellfield to reduce the risk of excursions of mining solutions. The input and output patterns will also be varied to take account of the hydrogeological conditions such as confining bed thickness and permeability. Much study has been directed towards the post mining condition of the ore zone and the threat it may pose to the water resources of the region. 10 refs., 1 fig

  20. In situ bypass og diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Panduro; Schroeder, T V; Lorentzen, J E

    1993-01-01

    decreased survival rate was found in diabetics (p useful in the treatment of critical ischaemia of the lower limb in diabetic patients. The overall results in diabetic patients, whether insulin-dependent or not, were equal to those in non-diabetic......From 1986 through to 1990 a total of 483 in situ bypass procedures were performed in 444 patients. Preoperative risk-factors were equally distributed among diabetic (DM) and non-diabetic (NDM) patients, except for smoking habits (DM:48%, NDM:64%, p = 0.002) and cardiac disease (DM:45%, NDM:29%, p...... = 0.005). Critical limb-ischaemia was more often present in diabetic than non-diabetic patients (DM:57%, NDM:36%, p = 0.0002). Diabetic patients had a significantly lower distal anastomosis than non-diabetic patients (p = 0.00001). There were no differences among diabetic and non-diabetic patients...

  1. In situ treatability test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This document describes the plans for the in situ treatment zone (ISTZ) treatability test for groundwater contaminated with strontium-90. The treatability test is to be conducted at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, in a portion of the 100-N Area adjacent to the Columbia River referred to as N-Springs. The purpose of the treatability test is to evaluate the effectiveness of an innovative technology to prevent the discharge of strontium-90 contaminated groundwater into the Columbia River. The ISTZ is a passive technology that consists of placing a treatment agent in the path of the groundwater. The treatment agent must restrict target radioactive contaminants and provide time for the contaminant to decay to acceptable levels. The permeability of the treatment zone must be greater than or equal to that of the surrounding sediments to ensure that the contaminated groundwater flows through the treatment zone agent and not around the agent

  2. PRINS and in situ PCR protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gosden, John R

    1997-01-01

    ... mapping of DNA sequences on chromosomes and location of gene expression followed the invention and refinement of in situ hybridization. Among the most recent technical developments has been the use of oligonucleotide primers to detect and amplify or extend complementary sequences in situ, and it is to this novel field that PRINS and In S...

  3. Technology assessment of in situ uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of the PNL portion of the Technology Assessment project is to provide a description of the current in situ uranium mining technology; to evaluate, based on available data, the environmental impacts and, in a limited fashion, the health effects; and to explore the impediments to development and deployment of the in situ uranium mining technology

  4. In situ grouting of buried transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, B.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This task is a demonstration and evaluation of the in situ hydrologic stabilization of buried transuranic waste at a humid site via grout injection. Two small trenches, containing buried transuranic waste, were filled with 34,000 liters of polyacrylamide grout. Initial field results have indicated that voids within the trenches were totally filled by the grout and that the intratrench hydraulic conductivity was reduced to below field-measurable values. The grout was also completely contained within the two trenches as no grout constituents were observed in the 12 perimeter ground water monitoring wells. Polyacrylamide grout was selected for field demonstration over polyacrylate grout because of its superior performance in laboratory degradation studies. Also supporting the selection of polyacrylamide was the difficulty of controlling the set time of the acrylate polymerization process in the presence of potassium ferricyanide. Based on preliminary degradation monitoring, polyacrylamide was estimated to have a microbiological half-life of 115 years in the test soil. However, this calculated value is likely to be conservatively low because microbial degradation of the grout set accelerator or residual monomer may be contributing most to the measured microbial respiration. Addition work, using 14 C-labeled acrylate and acrylamide grouts, is being carried out to more accurately estimate the grouts' microbiological half-life

  5. Performance parameters for ex situ bioremediation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    The potential of biotechnology to reduce the concentration of undesirable hydrocarbons, i.e. gasoline and diesel fuel pollution, is very attractive due to its apparent benign nature and potentially low cost. When good industrial practices are used in the design, construction, and administration of the bioremediation system, the performance of the technology can be predicted and monitored. Some of the principles behind the design, construction, and operation of ex situ bioremediation systems and facilities are described. Biological considerations include creation of a favorable environment for hydrocarbon degrading bacteria in the soils, selection of bacteria, and bacterial byproducts. Chemical considerations include nutrient augmentation, oxygen availability, and the use of surfactants and dispersants. Physical considerations include soil textures and structures, soil temperatures, moisture content, and the use of bulking agents. Experience has shown that indigenous microbes will usually be sufficient to implement bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons if encouraged through the application of fertilizers. The introduction of additional carbon sources may be considered if rapid bioremediation rates are desired or if soil conditions are poor. Adjustments to a bioremediation system may be made to enhance the performance of the bacterial community by introducing bulking agents and external temperature sources. Surfactants may be helpful in promoting bacteria-hydrocarbon contact and may be particularly useful for mobilization of free-phase hydrocarbons. 7 refs

  6. In-situ combustion with solvent injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Silva, J.; Kakade, G. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)]|[Maharashtra Inst. of Technology, Pune (India)

    2008-10-15

    The effects of combining in situ combustion and heavy hydrocarbon naphtha vapor injection techniques in a heavy oil reservoir were investigated. Oil production rates and steam injection efficiencies were considered. The technique was also combined with toe-to-heel air injection (THAI) processes. The study showed that the modified THAI process achieved high rates of recovery for both primary production and as a follow-up technique in partially depleted reservoirs after cyclic steam and cold production. Oil produced using the modified THAI technique was also partially upgraded by the process. Results of the vapour chamber pressure calculations showed that the volume of oil produced by naphtha assisted gravity drainage was between 1 to 3 times higher than amounts of oil produced by SAGD processes during the same amount of time. The naphtha injection process produced more oil than the steam only process. However, high amounts of naphtha were needed to produce oil. Injection and production rates during the naphtha injection process were higher. Naphtha vapor was injected near the heel of a horizontal producer well. The vapor acted as a thermal and diluent mechanism in order to reduce the viscosity of the heavy oil . 9 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs.

  7. MENDING THE IN SITU MANIPULATION BARRIER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN, S.W.

    2006-02-06

    In early 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland and Fluor Hanford requested technical assistance from the DOE Headquarters EM-23 Technical Assistance Program to provide a team of technical experts to develop recommendations for mending the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Barrier in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site in Washington State. To accommodate this request, EM-23 provided support to convene a group of technical experts from industry, a national laboratory, and a DOE site to participate in a 2 1/2-day workshop with the objective of identifying and recommending options to enhance the performance of the 100-D Area reactive barrier and of a planned extension to the northeast. This report provides written documentation of the team's findings and recommendations. In 1995, a plume of dissolved hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], which resulted from operation of the D/DR Reactors at the Hanford site, was discovered along the Columbia River shoreline and in the 100-D Area. Between 1999 and 2003, a reactive barrier using the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology, was installed a distance of 680 meters along the river to reduce the Cr(VI) in the groundwater. The ISRM technology creates a treatment zone within the aquifer by injection of sodium dithionite, a strong reducing agent that scavenges dissolved oxygen (DO) from the aquifer and reduces ferric iron [Fe(III)], related metals, and oxy-ions. The reduction of Fe(III) to ferrous [Fe(II)] iron provides the primary reduction capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to the +3 state, which is less mobile and less toxic. Bench-scale and field-scale treatability tests were initially conducted to demonstrate proof-of principle and to provide data for estimation of barrier longevity. These calculations estimated barrier longevity in excess of twenty years. However, several years after initial and secondary treatment, groundwater in a number of wells has been found to contain elevated chromium (Cr) concentrations

  8. The In Situ Vitrification Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.

    1988-10-01

    The Columbia Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) is pleased to submit the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) Project to the Pacific Northwest Council for consideration as the Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement. The ISV process, developed by Battelle-Northwest researchers beginning in 1980, converts contaminated soils and sludges to a glass and crystalline product. In this way it stabilizes hazardous chemical and radioactive wastes and makes them chemically inert. This report describes the process. A square array of four molybdenum electrodes is inserted into the ground to the desired treatment depth. Because soil is not electrically conductive when the moisture has been driven off, a conductive mixture of flaked graphite and glass frit is placed among the electrodes as a starter path. An electrical potential is applied to the electrodes to establish an electric current in the starter path. The resultant power heats the starter path and surrounding soil to 2000/degree/C, well above the initial soil-melting temperature of 1100/degree/C to 1400/degree/C. The graphite starter path is eventually consumed by oxidation, and the current is transferred to the molten soil, which is electrically conductive. As the molten or vitrified zone grows, it incorporates radionuclides and nonvolatile hazardous elements, such as heavy metals, and destroys organic components by pyrolysis. 2 figs

  9. In situ vitrification: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, L.L.; Fields, D.E.

    1989-11-01

    The in situ vitrification process (ISV) converts contaminated soils and sludges to a glass and crystalline product. The process appears to be ideally suited for on site treatment of both wet and dry wastes. Basically, the system requires four molybdenum electrodes, an electrical power system for vitrifying the soil, a hood to trap gaseous effluents, an off-gas treatment system, an off-gas cooling system, and a process control station. Mounted in three transportable trailers, the ISV process can be moved from site to site. The process has the potential for treating contaminated soils at most 13 m deep. The ISV project has won a number of outstanding achievement awards. The process has also been patented with exclusive worldwide rights being granted to Battelle Memorial Institute for nonradioactive applications. While federal applications still belong to the Department of Energy, Battelle transferred the rights of ISV for non-federal government, chemical hazardous wastes to a separate corporation in 1989 called Geosafe. This report gives a review of the process including current operational behavior and applications

  10. Distillation of shale in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Ganahl, C F

    1922-07-04

    To distill buried shale or other carbon containing compounds in situ, a portion of the shale bed is rendered permeable to gases, and the temperature is raised to the point of distillation. An area in a shale bed is shattered by explosives, so that it is in a relatively finely divided form, and the tunnel is then blocked by a wall, and fuel and air are admitted through pipes until the temperature of the shale is raised to such a point that a portion of the released hydrocarbons will burn. When distillation of the shattered area takes place and the lighter products pass upwardly through uptakes to condensers and scrubbers, liquid oil passes to a tank and gas to a gasometer while heavy unvaporized products in the distillation zone collect in a drain, flow into a sump, and are drawn off through a pipe to a storage tank. In two modifications, methods of working are set out in cases where the shale lies beneath a substantially level surface.

  11. In-situ dismantling of plutonium-contaminated glove box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numata, Koji; Watanabe, Hisashi; Ishikawa, Hisashi; Miyo, Hiroaki; Ohtsuka, Katsuyuki

    1980-01-01

    A plutonium-contaminated glove box was dismantled along with the development of the treatment techniques for plutonium-bearing wastes. The objectives of this in-situ dismantling of the glove box are to reuse the Plutonium Fuel Fabrication Facility more efficiently, to reduce the volume of wastes generated during the dismantling, and to acquire dismantling techniques for decommissioning the Plutonium Fuel Fabrication Facility in the future. Prior to the dismantling works, a greenhouse for decontamination was installed, and the decontamination with surfactants was performed. Unremovable contamination was coated with paint. After this greenhouse was removed, the main greenhouse for dismantling and three greenhouses for contamination control were assembled. The main workers wearing protective devices engaged in dismantling works in the greenhouse. As the protective devices, anorak type PVC suits with air line masks, Howell type pressurized suits, and respirators were used. The tools used for the dismantling are a plasma cutter, an electric nibbler, an electric disk grinder, an electric circular saw and an electric jig saw. The results of the dismantling in-situ were compared with two previous cases of dismantling carried out by different procedures. In the case of in-situ dismantling, the volume of wastes was 1.6 - 1.8 m 3 /m 3 of glove box, and considerable reduction was realized. (Kako, I.)

  12. In-situ bioremediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travis, B.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Rosenberg, N.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A barrier to wider use of in situ bioremediation technology is that results are often variable and difficult to predict. In situ bioremediation has shown some very notable and well publicized successes, but implementation of the technology is complex. An incomplete understanding of the effects of variable site characteristics and the lack of adequate tools to predict and measure success have made the design, control and validation of bioremediation more empirical than desired. The long-term objective of this project is to improve computational tools used to assess and optimize the expected performance of bioremediation at a site. An important component of the approach is the explicit inclusion of uncertainties and their effect on the end result. The authors have extended their biokinetics model to include microbial competition and predation processes. Predator species can feed on the microbial species that degrade contaminants, and the simulation studies show that species interactions must be considered when designing in situ bioremediation systems. In particular, the results for TCE indicate that protozoan grazing could reduce the amount of biodegradation by about 20%. These studies also indicate that the behavior of barrier systems can become complex due to predator grazing.

  13. Technique for in situ leach simulation of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, D.C.; Seidel, D.C.; Nichols, I.L.

    1985-01-01

    In situ uranium mining offers the advantages of minimal environmental disturbance, low capital and operating costs, and reduced mining development time. It is becoming an increasingly attractive mining method for the recovery of uranium from secondary ore deposits. In order to better understand the process, a laboratory technique was developed and used to study and simulate both the chemical and physical phenomena occurring in ore bodies during in situ leaching. The laboratory simulation technique has been used to determine effects of leaching variables on permeability, uranium recovery, and post-leach aquifer restoration. This report describes the simulation system and testing procedure in sufficient detail to allow the construction of the system, and to perform the desired leaching tests. With construction of such a system, in situ leaching of a given ore using various leach conditions can be evaluated relatively rapidly in the laboratory. Not only could optimum leach conditions be selected for existing ore bodies, but also exploitation of new ore bodies could be accelerated. 8 references, 8 figures, 2 tables

  14. Phosphate interference during in situ treatment for arsenic in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsting, Joseph H; McBean, Edward A

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by arsenic is a problem in many areas of the world, particularly in West Bengal (India) and Bangladesh, where reducing conditions in groundwater are the cause. In situ treatment is a novel approach wherein, by introduction of dissolved oxygen (DO), advantages over other treatment methods can be achieved through simplicity, not using chemicals, and not requiring disposal of arsenic-rich wastes. A lab-scale test of in situ treatment by air sparging, using a solution with approximately 5.3 mg L(-1) ferrous iron and 200 μg L(-1) arsenate, showed removal of arsenate in the range of 59%. A significant obstacle exists, however, due to the interference of phosphate since phosphate competes for adsorption sites on oxidized iron precipitates. A lab-scale test including 0.5 mg L(-1) phosphate showed negligible removal of arsenate. In situ treatment by air sparging demonstrates considerable promise for removal of arsenic from groundwater where iron is present in considerable quantities and phosphates are low.

  15. Ex-situ bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minier, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    The use of stress acclimated bacteria and nutrient supplements to enhance the biodegradation of petroleum contaminated soil can be a cost effective and reliable treatment technology to reduce organic contaminant levels to below established by local, state, and federal regulatory clean-up criteria. This paper will summarize the results of a field study in which 12,000 yds 3 of petroleum contaminated soil was successfully treated via ex-situ bioremediation and through management of macro and micronutrient concentrations, as well as, other site specific environmental factors that are essential for optimizing microbial growth

  16. Pumice stones as potential in-situ burning enhancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas Alva, U.; Andersen, Bjørn Skjønning; Jomaas, Grunde

    2018-01-01

    Small-scale and mid-scale experiments were conducted in order to evaluate pumice stones as a potential enhancement for in-situ burning (ISB). Four oil types, several emulsification degrees of one crude oil were studied. In general, it was observed that the pumice stones did not improve the burning...... and after the burn, thus bringing the oil into the water column. Finally, the species production of CO and CO2 was not reduced. Based on the presented results, pumice stones have a negative impact on the efficiency of ISB, and they are ruled out as an ISB enhancer and should not be used in relation to ISB....

  17. Ignition procedure for in situ burning in oil reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1971-04-14

    An ignition procedure for an in situ burning process is described. Hydrogen peroxide is used, with a compound to decompose the hydrogen peroxide. The decomposition increases the temperature, and the generated oxygen ignites the oil. The following can be used to decompose the hydrogen peroxide: (1) catalytic compounds having a large surface area, manganese oxide, salts of 2-valent iron, fine platinum, and methals on inert materials; (2) oxidizing agents such as permanganate; and (3) reducing agents such as hydrazine, hydroxylamine and their derivatives. (14 claims)

  18. Design and optimization of hybrid ex situ/in situ steam generation recovery processes for heavy oil and bitumen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X.; Gates, I.D. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; Larter, S.R. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Geoscience]|[Alberta Ingenuity Centre for In Situ Energy, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Hybrid steam-air based oil recovery techniques were investigated using advanced 3-D reactive thermal reservoir simulations. The hybrid techniques combined ex situ steam and in situ steam generation processes in order to raise efficiency, lower natural gas consumption, and reduce gas emissions. The steam-air based processes used 70 per cent of the energy of conventional steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) techniques to recover the same amount of oil. The process used an SAGD wellpair arrangement, where steam and air were injected through the top injection well. The kinetic parameters used in the study were developed by history matching a combustion tube experiments with Athabasca bitumen conducted to predict cumulative bitumen and gas production volumes and compositions. A total of 6 SAGD and 6 in situ combustion simulations were conducted with steam oxygen volume ratios set at 50 per cent steam and 50 per cent oxygen. Various case studies were considered over a 5 year period. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions were also measured as well as cumulative water and methane consumption rates. Results of the study were used to develop an optimized hybrid operation that consisted of a SAGD well pair arrangement operating with cyclic steam-oxygen injection at high pressures. It was concluded that the high pressure operation increased the steam partial pressure within the reservoir and enhanced combustion performance. A 29 per cent improvement in the cumulative energy to oil ratio was obtained. 23 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  19. Development of an in situ fatigue sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A prototype in situ fatigue sensor has been designed, constructed and evaluated experimentally for its ability to monitor the accumulation of fatigue damage in a cyclically loaded steel structure, e.g., highway bridge. The sensor consists of multiple...

  20. In Situ Aerosol Detector, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is developing new platform systems that have the potential to benefit Earth science research activities, which include in situ instruments for atmospheric...

  1. Past In-Situ Burning Possibilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoshioka, Gary

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of conducting in-situ burning (ISB) using current technology on post 1967 major oil spills over 10,00 barrels in North America and over 50,00 barrels in South America and Europe...

  2. Observatory Magnetometer In-Situ Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Marusenkov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental validation of the in-situ calibration procedure, which allows estimating parameters of observatory magnetometers (scale factors, sensor misalignment without its operation interruption, is presented. In order to control the validity of the procedure, the records provided by two magnetometers calibrated independently in a coil system have been processed. The in-situ estimations of the parameters are in very good agreement with the values provided by the coil system calibration.

  3. In-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Helps researchers develop new catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production Reviewing the latest developments in the field, this book explores the in-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts, enabling readers to take full advantage of the sophisticated techniques used to study heterogeneous catalysts and reaction mechanisms. In using these techniques, readers can learn to improve the selectivity and the performance of catalysts and how to prepare catalysts as efficiently as possible, with minimum waste. In-situ Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts feat

  4. Unintended and in situ amorphisation of pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priemel, P A; Grohganz, H; Rades, T

    2016-05-01

    Amorphisation of poorly water-soluble drugs is one approach that can be applied to improve their solubility and thus their bioavailability. Amorphisation is a process that usually requires deliberate external energy input. However, amorphisation can happen both unintentionally, as in process-induced amorphisation during manufacturing, or in situ during dissolution, vaporisation, or lipolysis. The systems in which unintended and in situ amorphisation has been observed normally contain a drug and a carrier. Common carriers include polymers and mesoporous silica particles. However, the precise mechanisms by which in situ amorphisation occurs are often not fully understood. In situ amorphisation can be exploited and performed before administration of the drug or possibly even within the gastrointestinal tract, as can be inferred from in situ amorphisation observed during in vitro lipolysis. The use of in situ amorphisation can thus confer the advantages of the amorphous form, such as higher apparent solubility and faster dissolution rate, without the disadvantage of its physical instability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Laser biostimulation therapy planning supported by imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mester, Adam R.

    2018-04-01

    Ultrasonography and MR imaging can help to identify the area and depth of different lesions, like injury, overuse, inflammation, degenerative diseases. The appropriate power density, sufficient dose and direction of the laser treatment can be optimally estimated. If required minimum 5 mW photon density and required optimal energy dose: 2-4 Joule/cm2 wouldn't arrive into the depth of the target volume - additional techniques can help: slight compression of soft tissues can decrease the tissue thickness or multiple laser diodes can be used. In case of multiple diode clusters light scattering results deeper penetration. Another method to increase the penetration depth is a second pulsation (in kHz range) of laser light. (So called continuous wave laser itself has inherent THz pulsation by temporal coherence). Third solution of higher light intensity in the target volume is the multi-gate technique: from different angles the same joint can be reached based on imaging findings. Recent developments is ultrasonography: elastosonography and tissue harmonic imaging with contrast material offer optimal therapy planning. While MRI is too expensive modality for laser planning images can be optimally used if a diagnostic MRI already was done. Usual DICOM images offer "postprocessing" measurements in mm range.

  6. Laser in dentistry: Biostimulation and surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzè, Franco; Palmieri, Beniamino; Scalise, Lorenzo; Rottigni, Valentina

    2012-09-01

    Laser therapy has achieved an important rule in cosmetic dentistry especially in the treatment of several complications such as leukoplakia, oral lichen planus, glossitis, oral mucositis, labial herpes virus, stomatitis, frenulum and oral hemangioma. In our study we enrolled 40 patients affected by these diseases to treat them with a new infrared dental laser demonstrating that it is extremely safe and effective in pain and postoperative discomforts reduction.

  7. Parallel In Situ Indexing for Data-intensive Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinoh; Abbasi, Hasan; Chacon, Luis; Docan, Ciprian; Klasky, Scott; Liu, Qing; Podhorszki, Norbert; Shoshani, Arie; Wu, Kesheng

    2011-09-09

    As computing power increases exponentially, vast amount of data is created by many scientific re- search activities. However, the bandwidth for storing the data to disks and reading the data from disks has been improving at a much slower pace. These two trends produce an ever-widening data access gap. Our work brings together two distinct technologies to address this data access issue: indexing and in situ processing. From decades of database research literature, we know that indexing is an effective way to address the data access issue, particularly for accessing relatively small fraction of data records. As data sets increase in sizes, more and more analysts need to use selective data access, which makes indexing an even more important for improving data access. The challenge is that most implementations of in- dexing technology are embedded in large database management systems (DBMS), but most scientific datasets are not managed by any DBMS. In this work, we choose to include indexes with the scientific data instead of requiring the data to be loaded into a DBMS. We use compressed bitmap indexes from the FastBit software which are known to be highly effective for query-intensive workloads common to scientific data analysis. To use the indexes, we need to build them first. The index building procedure needs to access the whole data set and may also require a significant amount of compute time. In this work, we adapt the in situ processing technology to generate the indexes, thus removing the need of read- ing data from disks and to build indexes in parallel. The in situ data processing system used is ADIOS, a middleware for high-performance I/O. Our experimental results show that the indexes can improve the data access time up to 200 times depending on the fraction of data selected, and using in situ data processing system can effectively reduce the time needed to create the indexes, up to 10 times with our in situ technique when using identical parallel settings.

  8. Using in situ bioventing to minimize soil vapor extraction costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downey, D.C.; Frishmuth, R.A.; Archabal, S.R.; Pluhar, C.J.; Blystone, P.G.; Miller, R.N.

    1995-01-01

    Gasoline-contaminated soils may be difficult to remediate with bioventing because high concentrations of gasoline vapors become mobile when air is injected into the soil. Because outward vapor migration is often unacceptable on small commercial sites, soil vapor extraction (SVE) or innovative bioventing techniques are required to control vapors and to increase soil gas oxygen levels to stimulate hydrocarbon biodegradation. Combinations of SVE, off-gas treatment, and bioventing have been used to reduce the costs normally associated with remediation of gasoline-contaminated sites. At Site 1, low rates of pulsed air injection were used to provide oxygen while minimizing vapor migration. At Site 2, a period of high-rate SVE and off-gas treatment was followed by long-term air injection. Site 3 used an innovative approach that combined regenerative resin for ex situ vapor treatment with in situ bioventing to reduce the overall cost of site remediation. At each of these Air Force sites, bioventing provided cost savings when compared to more traditional SVE methods

  9. On bacteria oxidizing enlargement scale test for uranium in-situ leaching at. 381 mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Kaiguang; Wang Qingliang; Liu Yingjiu; Shi Wenge; Hu Shihe; Hu Yincai; Fang Qiu

    1999-01-01

    The results of enlarged scale test of bacteria as oxidizer for uranium in-situ leaching at No 381 mine showed that redox potential of the oxidized absorbed tailing water by bacteria is more than 510 mV, without any effects on after treatments by using bacteria as oxidizer and reduce oxidizer costs 70% compared with H 2 O 2 as oxidizer

  10. Oriented Arrays of Graphene in a Polymer Matrix by in situ Reduction of Graphite Oxide Nanosheets

    KAUST Repository

    Ansari, Seema; Kelarakis, Antonios; Estevez, Luis; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2010-01-01

    Graphite oxide-Nafion hybrids with a high degree of alignment are cast from aqueous solution in the absence of any external field and reduced in situ by exposure to hydrazine to produce graphene-Nafion hybrids. Dramatic enhancement of electrical

  11. ADVANTAGES/DISADVANTAGES FOR ISCO METHODS IN-SITU FENTON OXIDATION IN-SITU PERMANGANATE OXIDATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The advantages and disadvantages of in-situ Fenton oxidation and in-situ permanganate oxidation will be presented. This presentation will provide a brief overview of each technology and a detailed analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of each technology. Included in the ...

  12. In-situ bioremediation via horizontal wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazen, T.C.; Looney, B.B.; Enzien, M.; Franck, M.M.; Fliermans, C.B.; Eddy, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    This project is designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of groundwater and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms were stimulated to degrade TCE, PCE and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated zone. In situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency and public and regulatory acceptability. Bioremediation has been found to be among the least costly technologies in applications where it will work (Radian 1989). Subsurface soils and water adjacent to an abandoned process sewer line at the SRS have been found to have elevated levels of TCE (Marine and Bledsoe 1984). This area of subsurface and groundwater contamination is the focus of a current integrated demonstration of new remediation technologies utilizing horizontal wells. Bioremediation has the potential to enhance the performance of in situ air stripping as well as offering stand-alone remediation of this and other contaminated sites (Looney et al. 1991). Horizontal wells could also be used to enhance the recovery of groundwater contaminants for bioreactor conversions from deep or inaccessible areas (e.g., under buildings) and to enhance the distribution of nutrient or microbe additions in an in situ bioremediation

  13. Efficacy monitoring of in situ fuel bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.; Borchert, S.; Heard, C.

    1996-01-01

    The wide-scale, multiple-purpose use of fossil fuels throughout the industrialized world has resulted in the inadvertent contamination of myriad environments. Given the scope and magnitude of these environmental contamination problems, bioremediation often represents the only practical and economically feasible solution. This is especially true when depth of contamination, magnitude of the problem, and nature of contaminated material preclude other remedial actions, short of the no-response alternative. From the perspective, the effective, safe and scientifically valid use of in situ bioremediation technologies requires cost-efficient and effective implementation strategies in combination with unequivocal approaches for monitoring efficacy of performance. Accordingly, with support from the SERDP program, the authors are field-testing advanced in situ bioremediation strategies and new approaches in efficacy monitoring that employ techniques instable carbon and nitrogen isotope biogeochemistry. One field demonstration has been initiated at the NEX site in Port Hueneme, CA (US Navy's National Test Site). The objectives are: (1) to use stable isotopes as a biogeochemical monitoring tool for in situ bioremediation of refined petroleum (i.e., BTEX), and (2) to use vertical groundwater circulation technology to effect in situ chemical containment and enhanced in situ bioremediation

  14. Aluminum chloride restoration of in situ leached uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, D.C.; Burgman, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    During in situ uranium mining using ammonium bicarbonate lixiviant, the ammonium exchanges with cations on the ore's clay. After mining is complete, the ammonium may desorb into post-leach ground water. For the particular ore studied, other chemicals (i.e., uranium and selenium) which are mobilized during the leach process, have also been found in the post-leach ground water. Laboratory column tests, used to simulate the leaching process, have shown that aluminum chloride can rapidly remove ammonium from the ore and thus greatly reduce the subsequent ammonium leakage level into ground water. The aluminum chloride has also been found to reduce the leakage levels of uranium and selenium. In addition, the aluminum chloride treatment produces a rapid improvement in permeability

  15. Method for in situ or ex situ bioremediation of hexavalent chromium contaminated soils and/or groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turick, Charles E.; Apel, William W.

    1997-10-28

    A method of reducing the concentration of Cr(VI) in a liquid aqueous residue comprises the steps of providing anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria, mixing the liquid aqueous residue with a nutrient medium to form a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria such that Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III). The anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria appear to be ubiquitous in soil and can be selected by collecting a soil sample, diluting the soil sample with a sterile diluent to form a diluted sample, mixing the diluted sample with an effective amount of a nutrient medium and an effective amount of Cr(VI) to form a mixture, and incubating the mixture in the substantial absence of oxygen such that growth of Cr(VI) sensitive microorganisms is inhibited and growth of the anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria is stimulated. A method of in situ bioremediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soil and/or groundwater is also disclosed.

  16. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L; Aishima, Jun; Foadi, James; Morgan, Ann W; Robinson, James I; Nettleship, Joanne E; Owens, Raymond J; Moraes, Isabel; Fry, Elizabeth E; Grimes, Jonathan M; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S; Stuart, David I; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-05-01

    Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography

  17. Unintended and in situ amorphisation of pharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priemel, P A; Grohganz, H; Rades, T

    2016-01-01

    Amorphisation of poorly water-soluble drugs is one approach that can be applied to improve their solubility and thus their bioavailability. Amorphisation is a process that usually requires deliberate external energy input. However, amorphisation can happen both unintentionally, as in process......-induced amorphisation during manufacturing, or in situ during dissolution, vaporisation, or lipolysis. The systems in which unintended and in situ amorphisation has been observed normally contain a drug and a carrier. Common carriers include polymers and mesoporous silica particles. However, the precise mechanisms...... of in situ amorphisation can thus confer the advantages of the amorphous form, such as higher apparent solubility and faster dissolution rate, without the disadvantage of its physical instability....

  18. In situ vitrification: Application to buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callow, R.A.; Thompson, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Two in situ vitrification field tests were conducted in June and July 1990 at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In situ vitrification is a technology for in-place conversion of contaminated soils into a durable glass and crystalline waste form and is being investigated as a potential remediation technology for buried waste. The overall objective of the two tests was to assess the general suitability of the process to remediate buried waste structures found at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In particular, these tests were designed as part of a treatability study to provide essential information on field performance of the process under conditions of significant combustible and metal wastes, and to test a newly developed electrode feed technology. The tests were successfully completed, and the electrode feed technology provided valuable operational control for successfully processing the high metal content waste. The results indicate that in situ vitrification is a feasible technology for application to buried waste. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Oil companies push in-situ recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, H.

    1977-01-01

    Possibly, a third Athabaska tar-sand plant using surface mining will be built in the 1980's, but future development beyond that point will probably depend on in-situ recovery. The discussion of in-situ recovery focusses on the effect it will have on the Canadian chemical industry, for example, the market for sodium hydroxide. To obtain the highest yields of oil from bitumen, an external source of hydrogen is necessary; for example Syncrude imports natural gas to make hydrogen for desulphurization. Gasification of coal is a possible source of hydrogen. Research on hydrocracking is progressing. Use of a prototype CANDU OCR reactor to raise the hot steam necessary for in-situ recovery has been suggested. Venezuela is interested in Canadian upgrading technology. (N.D.H.)

  20. Oriented Arrays of Graphene in a Polymer Matrix by in situ Reduction of Graphite Oxide Nanosheets

    KAUST Repository

    Ansari, Seema

    2010-01-18

    Graphite oxide-Nafion hybrids with a high degree of alignment are cast from aqueous solution in the absence of any external field and reduced in situ by exposure to hydrazine to produce graphene-Nafion hybrids. Dramatic enhancement of electrical conductivity indicates sufficient accessibility of the inorganic nanosheets to the reducing agent, through the nanochannels formed by the polymeric ionic domains. © 2010 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  1. Latex-modified grouts for in-situ stabilization of buried transuranic/mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, M.L.

    1996-06-01

    The Department of Applied Science at Brookhaven national Laboratory was requested to investigate latex-modified grouts for in-situ stabilization of buried TRU/mixed waste for INEL. The waste exists in shallow trenches that were backfilled with soil. The objective was to formulate latex-modified grouts for use with the jet grouting technique to enable in-situ stabilization of buried waste. The stabilized waste was either to be left in place or retrieved for further processing. Grouting prior to retrieval reduces the potential release of contaminants. Rheological properties of latex-modified grouts were investigated and compared with those of conventional neat cement grouts used for jet grouting

  2. Development of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor for In-Situ Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome L. Wright

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW sensor that is designed to be operated continuously and in situ to detect volatile organic compounds. A ruggedized stainless-steel package that encases the SAW device and integrated circuit board allows the sensor to be deployed in a variety of media including air, soil, and even water. Polymers were optimized and chosen based on their response to chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene, which are common groundwater contaminants. Initial testing indicates that a running-average data-logging algorithm can reduce the noise and increase the sensitivity of the in-situ sensor.

  3. Taoshan uranium ore fields in situ blasting heap leaching rate influence factors to investigate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Wangnan; Dong Chunming

    2014-01-01

    Taoshan ore field ore in situ blasting heap leaching out build industrial test and production process, stope leaching rate and leaching cycle is large than that, after analysis, blasting method and cloth liquid way is to affect leaching rate and leaching cycle of the main factors. This paper holds that as far as possible using stratified deep hole blasting of squeezing up ways to reduce the building pile of in-situ leaching ore block rate; Adopting effective cloth tube way, increase the leaching agent and ore contact comprehensive; Introduction of bacterial leaching, and other means to improve leaching rate, shorten production cycle, etc to solve it. (authors)

  4. In situ viscometry by optical trapping interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzmán, C.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Köszali, R.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate quantitative in situ viscosity measurements by tracking the thermal fluctuations of an optically trapped microsphere subjected to a small oscillatory flow. The measured power spectral density of the sphere's positions displays a characteristic peak at the driving frequency of the f......We demonstrate quantitative in situ viscosity measurements by tracking the thermal fluctuations of an optically trapped microsphere subjected to a small oscillatory flow. The measured power spectral density of the sphere's positions displays a characteristic peak at the driving frequency...

  5. In situ soil remediation using electrokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehler, M.F.; Surma, J.E.; Virden, J.W.

    1994-11-01

    Electrokinetics is emerging as a promising technology for in situ soil remediation. This technique is especially attractive for Superfund sites and government operations which contain large volumes of contaminated soil. The approach uses an applied electric field to induce transport of both radioactive and hazardous waste ions in soil. The transport mechanisms include electroosmosis, electromigration, and electrophoresis. The feasibility of using electrokinetics to move radioactive 137 Cs and 60 Co at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, is discussed. A closed cell is used to provide in situ measurements of 137 Cs and 60 Co movement in Hanford soil. Preliminary results of ionic movement, along with the corresponding current response, are presented

  6. In-situ burning of Orimulsion : small scale burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.F.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of burning Orimulsion. In-situ burning has always been a viable method for cleaning oil spills on water because it can effectively reduce the amount of spilled oil and eliminate the need to collect, store, transport and dispose of recovered oil. Orimulsion, however, behaves very differently from conventional oil when it is spilled because of its composition of 70 per cent bitumen in 30 per cent water. In-situ burning of this surfactant-stablized oil-in-water emulsion has never been seriously considered because of the perception that Orimulsion could not be ignited, and if it could, ignition would not be sustained. In this study, burn tests were conducted on 3 scales in a Cleveland Open Cup apparatus of 5 cm, 10 cm and 50 cm diameters. Larger scale burns were conducted in specially built pans. All tests were conducted on salt water which caused the bitumen to separate from the water. The objective was to determine if sufficient vapours could be generated to ignite the Orimulsion. The study also measured if a sustained flame would result in successful combustion. Both objectives were successfully accomplished. Diesel fuel was used to ignite the Orimulsion in the specially designed pan for large scale combustion. Quantitative removal of Orimulsion was achieved in all cases, but in some burns it was necessary to re-ignite the Orimulsion. It was noted that when Orimulsion burns, some trapped water droplets in the bitumen explode with enough force to extinguish a small flame. This did not occur on large-scale burns. It was concluded that the potential for successful in-situ burning increases with size. It was determined that approximately 1 mm in thickness of diesel fuel is needed to ignite a burn. 5 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  7. Evaluation of gamma ray fields by HPGE spectrometry in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krnac, S; Slugen, V [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia); Ragan, P; Fueloep, M [Inst. of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the in situ spectrometric measurement for application in gamma radiation dosimetry with portability and flexibility in use was studied. In order to allow operation of the detector in any orientation without liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) spillage, a multi-attitude cryostat (MAC) has been used which consists of a Dewar with LN{sub 2} capacity of 7.0 litres and a holding time of 5 days. This allows the Dewar to be operated in the horizontal position, pointing vertically upward or vertically downward, without loss of LN{sub 2}. The MAC detector has been positioned in a 4{sup p}i{sup -}goniometer and, therefore is movable to any measurable angle. Pulses from the detector have been fed into a portable multichannel analyzer (Canberra 35+) with connection to a PC/AT compatible computer system. The main results and findings of present contribution may be summarized as follows: 1. A technique called the scaling confirmatory factor analysis (SCFA) presented else can be advantageously employed for determination of the response operator characterizing an influence of measuring device on physical gamma-spectra obtained. The in situ response operator has been reproduced only from the internal factors of appropriate latent structure that do not depend upon materials surrounding the detector. 2. The photon fluence rate response operator for in situ application has been obtained from the reduced response operator by a correction according to the geometric factor 4{sup p}i{sup (}r{sub 0}+r){sup 2}.The effective distance r{sub 0} has been determined via a performance of the radial calibration which yields a condition of, minimally, 10 cm distance of the detector cover from the potential sources. 3. The real incident gamma ray spectra achieved by application of the SCFA response allow direct evaluation of spectral distributions of the fundamental photon dosimetric quantities. (Abstract Truncated)

  8. Resource impact evaluation of in-situ uranium groundwater restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbeneau, R.J.; Rohlich, G.A.

    1981-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of restoration on the groundwater following in-situ uranium solution mining in South Texas. Restoration is necessary in order to reduce the amounts of undesired chemical constituents left in solution after mining operations have ceased, and thus return the groundwater to a quality consistent with pre-mining use and potential use. Various restoration strategies have been proposed and are discussed. Of interest are the hydrologic, environmental, social, and economic impacts of these restoration alternatives. Much of the discussion concerning groundwater restoration is based on the use of an ammonium carbonate-bicarbonate leach solution in the mining process. This has been the principal leach solution used during the early period of mining in South Texas. Recently, because of apparent difficulties in restoring ammonium to proposed or required levels, many of the companies have changed to the use of other leach solutions. Because little is known about restoration with these other leach solutions they have not been specifically addressed in this report. Likewise, we have not addressed the question of the fate of heavy metals. Following a summary of the development of South Texas in-situ mining in Chapter Two, Chapter Three describes the surface and groundwater resources of the uranium mining district. Chapter Four addresses the economics of water use, and Chapter Five is concerned with regulation of the in-situ uranium industry in Texas. A discussion of groundwater restoration alternatives and impacts is presented in Chapter Six. Chapter Seven contains a summary and a discussion, and conclusions derived from this study. Two case histories are presented in Appendices A and B

  9. Constraining processes of landscape change with combined in situ cosmogenic 14C-10Be analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippe, Kristina

    2017-10-01

    Reconstructing Quaternary landscape evolution today frequently builds upon cosmogenic-nuclide surface exposure dating. However, the study of complex surface exposure chronologies on the 102-104 years' timescale remains challenging with the commonly used long-lived radionuclides (10Be, 26Al, 36Cl). In glacial settings, key points are the inheritance of nuclides accumulated in a rock surface during a previous exposure episode and (partial) shielding of a rock surface after the main deglaciation event, e.g. during phases of glacier readvance. Combining the short-lived in situ cosmogenic 14C isotope with 10Be dating provides a valuable approach to resolve and quantify complex exposure histories and burial episodes within Lateglacial and Holocene timescales. The first studies applying the in situ14C-10Be pair have demonstrated the great benefit from in situ14C analysis for unravelling complex glacier chronologies in various glacial environments worldwide. Moreover, emerging research on in situ14C in sedimentary systems highlights the capacity of combined in situ14C-10Be analysis to quantify sediment transfer times in fluvial catchments or to constrain changes in surface erosion rates. Nevertheless, further methodological advances are needed to obtain truly routine and widely available in situ14C analysis. Future development in analytical techniques has to focus on improving the analytical reproducibility, reducing the background level and determining more accurate muonic production rates. These improvements should allow extending the field of applications for combined in situ14C-10Be analysis in Earth surface sciences and open up a number of promising applications for dating young sedimentary deposits and the quantification of recent changes in surface erosion dynamics.

  10. Prediction of Groundwater Quality Improvement Down-Gradient of In Situ Permeable Treatment Barriers and Fully-Remediated Source Zones. ESTCP Cost and Performance Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Paul C; Carlson, Pamela M; Dahlen, Paul

    2008-01-01

    In situ permeable treatment barriers (PTB) are designed so that contaminated groundwater flows through an engineered treatment zone within which contaminants are eliminated or the concentrations are significantly reduced...

  11. Electrochemical cell for in situ x-ray diffraction under ultrapure conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koop, T.; Schindler, W.; Kazimirov, A.

    1998-01-01

    within a few seconds. The oxygen level in the electrolyte is reduced by continuous N(2) flow to less than 0.2% compared to that of a fresh electrolyte. This can be done while rotating the cell by 360 degrees about the surface normal. The electrode potential is accurately measured at the position......An electrochemical cell has been developed for in situ x-ray diffraction from a working electrode under clean conditions equivalent to ultrahigh vacuum conditions of 5 x 10(-10) mbar. The substrate crystals can be prepared ex situ and transferred into the cell under protection of ultrapure water...... of the crystal using a Luggin capillary and a standard reference electrode. We demonstrate the performance of our cell by in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements on ultrathin Co layers electrodeposited on Cu(001) in an aqueous H(2)SO(4)/CoSO(4) solution. (C) 1998 American Institute of Physics....

  12. Contemporary management of ductal carcinoma in situ and lobular carcinoma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeng-Gyasi, Samilia; Ong, Cecilia; Hwang, E Shelley

    2016-06-01

    The management of in situ lesions ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) continues to evolve. These diagnoses now comprise a large burden of mammographically diagnosed cancers, and with a global trend towards more population-based screening, the incidence of these lesions will continue to rise. Because outcomes following treatment for DCIS and LCIS are excellent, there is emerging controversy about what extent of treatment is optimal for both diseases. Here we review the current approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of both DCIS and LCIS. In addition, we will consider potential directions for future management of these lesions.

  13. Paleozoic in situ spores and pollen. Lycopsida

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bek, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 296, 1/6 (2017), s. 1-111 ISSN 0375-0299 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/12/2053 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : in situ spores * reproductive organs * Lycopsida * Paleozoic Sub ject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Paleontology Impact factor: 1.333, year: 2016

  14. Smoothsort, an alternative for sorting in situ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, E.W.

    1982-01-01

    Like heapsort - which inspired it - smoothsort is an algorithm for sorting in situ. It is of order N · log N in the worst case, but of order N in the best case, with a smooth transition between the two. (Hence its name.)

  15. Recovering uranium from coal in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    An underground carbonaceous deposit containing other mineral values is burned in situ. The underground hot zone is cooled down to temperature below the boiling point of a leachig solution. The leaching solution is percolated through the residial ash, with the pregnant solution recovered for separation of the mineral values in surface facilities

  16. In Situ TEM Creation of Nanowire Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Sardar Bilal

    Integration of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) as active components in devices requires that desired mechanical, thermal and electrical interfaces can be established between the nanoscale geometry of the SiNW and the microscale architecture of the device. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM),...

  17. In Situ Flash Pyrolysis of Straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Niels

    In-Situ Flash Pyrolysis of Straw Ph.D. dissertation by Niels Bech Submitted: April 2007. Supervisors: Professor Kim Dam-Johansen, Associate Professor Peter Arendt Jensen Erfaringerne med forbrænding af halm opnået gennem et årti har vist, at en proces der kan koncentrere energien på marken, fjerne...

  18. IN SITU LEAD IMMOBILIZATION BY APATITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead contamination is of environmental concern due to its effect on human health. The purpose of this study was to develop a technology to immobilize Pb in situ in contaminated soils and wastes using apatite. Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(O...

  19. Nanoscale size effect in in situ titanium based composites with cell viability and cytocompatibility studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklaszewski, Andrzej, E-mail: andrzej.miklaszewski@put.poznan.pl [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Poznan University of Technology, Jana Pawla II 24, 61-138 Poznan (Poland); Jurczyk, Mieczysława U. [Division Mother' s and Child' s Health, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Polna 33, 60-535 Poznan (Poland); Kaczmarek, Mariusz [Department of Immunology, Chair of Clinical Immunology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Rokietnicka 5D, 60-806 Poznan (Poland); Paszel-Jaworska, Anna; Romaniuk, Aleksandra; Lipińska, Natalia [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Przybyszewskiego 49, 60-355 Poznan (Poland); Żurawski, Jakub [Department of Immunobiochemistry, Chair of Biology and Environmental Sciences, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Rokietnicka 8, 60-806 Poznan (Poland); Urbaniak, Paulina [Department of Cell Biology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Rokietnicka 5D, 60-806 Poznan (Poland); Jurczyk, Mieczyslaw [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Poznan University of Technology, Jana Pawla II 24, 61-138 Poznan (Poland)

    2017-04-01

    Novel in situ Metal Matrix Nanocomposite (MMNC) materials based on titanium and boron, revealed their new properties in the nanoscale range. In situ nanocomposites, obtained through mechanical alloying and traditional powder metallurgy compaction and sintering, show obvious differences to their microstructural analogue. A unique microstructure connected with good mechanical properties reliant on the processing conditions favour the nanoscale range of results of the Ti-TiB in situ MMNC example. The data summarised in this work, support and extend the knowledge boundaries of the nanoscale size effect that influence not only the mechanical properties but also the studies on the cell viability and cytocompatibility. Prepared in the same bulk, in situ MMNC, based on titanium and boron, could be considered as a possible candidate for dental implants and other medical applications. The observed relations and research conclusions are transferable to the in situ MMNC material group. Aside from all the discussed relations, the increasing share of these composites in the ever-growing material markets, heavily depends on the attractiveness and a possible wider application of these composites as well as their operational simplicity presented in this work. - Highlights: • Nano and microscale size precursor influence the final composite microstructure and properties. • Obtained from the nanoscale precursor sinters, characterise with a uniform and highly dispersed microstructure • Mechanical properties favoured Nano scale size precursor • Boron addition could be significantly reduced for moderate properties range. • A possible candidate for dental implants and other medical applications.

  20. Engineered and subsequent intrinsic in situ bioremediation of a diesel fuel contaminated aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunkeler, Daniel; Höhener, Patrick; Zeyer, Josef

    2002-12-01

    A diesel fuel contaminated aquifer in Menziken, Switzerland was treated for 4.5 years by injecting aerated groundwater, supplemented with KNO 3 and NH 4H 2PO 4 to stimulate indigenous populations of petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) degrading microorganisms. After dissolved PHC concentrations had stabilized at a low level, engineered in situ bioremediation was terminated. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intrinsic in situ bioremediation as a follow-up measure to remove PHC remaining in the aquifer after terminating engineered in situ bioremediation. In the first 7 months of intrinsic in situ bioremediation, redox conditions in the source area became more reducing as indicated by lower concentrations of SO 42- and higher concentrations of Fe(II) and CH 4. In the core of the source area, strongly reducing conditions prevailed during the remaining study period (3 years) and dissolved PHC concentrations were higher than during engineered in situ bioremediation. This suggests that biodegradation in the core zone was limited by the availability of oxidants. In lateral zones of the source area, however, gradually more oxidized conditions were reestablished again, suggesting that PHC availability increasingly limited biodegradation. The total DIC production rate in the aquifer decreased within 2 years to about 25% of that during engineered in situ bioremediation and remained at that level. Stable carbon isotope analysis confirmed that the produced DIC mainly originated from PHC mineralization. The total rate of DIC and CH 4 production in the source area was more than 300 times larger than the rate of PHC elution. This indicates that biodegradation coupled to consumption of naturally occurring oxidants was an important process for removal of PHC which remained in the aquifer after terminating engineered measures.

  1. In situ diesel fuel bioremediation: A case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, D.K.; Burke, G.K.; Smith, N.; Clark, D.

    1995-01-01

    As a result of a ruptured fuel line, the study site had diesel fuel soil contamination and free product more than 2 ft (0.75 m) thick on the groundwater surface. Diesel fuel, which is composed of a high percentage of nonvolatile compounds, has proven difficult to remediate using conventional extraction remediation techniques. A number of remedial alternatives were reviewed, and the patented in situ biodegradation BioSparge SM technology was selected for the site and performed under license by a specialty contractor. BioSparge SM is a field-proven closed-loop (no vapor emissions) system that supplies a continuous, steady supply of oxygen, moisture, and additional heat to enhance microorganism activity. The system injects an enriched airstream beneath the groundwater surface elevation and/or within the contaminant plume and removes residual vapors from vadose zone soil within and above the contaminant plume. The technology has no air discharge, which is critical in areas where strict air discharge regulations apply. The focus of this paper is the viability of in situ biodegradation as an effective remediation alternative for reducing nonvolatile petroleum products

  2. In situ deposition of hydroxyapatite on graphene nanosheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neelgund, Gururaj M.; Oki, Aderemi; Luo, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A facile chemical precipitation method is reported for effective in situ deposition of hydroxyapatite on graphene nanosheets. Prior to grafting of hydroxyapatite, chemically modified graphene nanosheets were obtained by the reduction of graphene oxide in presence of ethylenediamine. Display Omitted Highlights: ► It is a facile and effective method for deposition of HA on GR nanosheets. ► It avoids the use of harmful reducing agents like hydrazine, NaBH 4 etc. ► GR nanosheets were produced using bio-compatible, ethylenediamine. ► The graphitic structure of synthesized GR nanosheets was high ordered. ► The ratio of Ca to P in HA was 1.64, which is close to ratio in natural bone. -- Abstract: Graphene nanosheets were effectively functionalized by in situ deposition of hydroxyapatite through a facile chemical precipitation method. Prior to grafting of hydroxyapatite, chemically modified graphene nanosheets were obtained by the reduction of graphene oxide in presence of ethylenediamine. The resulting hydroxyapatite functionalized graphene nanosheets were characterized by attenuated total reflection IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. These characterization techniques revealed the successful grafting of hydroxyapatite over well exfoliated graphene nanosheets without destroying their structure.

  3. In situ deposition of hydroxyapatite on graphene nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neelgund, Gururaj M. [Department of Chemistry, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, TX 77446 (United States); Oki, Aderemi, E-mail: aroki@pvamu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, TX 77446 (United States); Luo, Zhiping [Microscopy and Imaging Center and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: A facile chemical precipitation method is reported for effective in situ deposition of hydroxyapatite on graphene nanosheets. Prior to grafting of hydroxyapatite, chemically modified graphene nanosheets were obtained by the reduction of graphene oxide in presence of ethylenediamine. Display Omitted Highlights: ► It is a facile and effective method for deposition of HA on GR nanosheets. ► It avoids the use of harmful reducing agents like hydrazine, NaBH{sub 4} etc. ► GR nanosheets were produced using bio-compatible, ethylenediamine. ► The graphitic structure of synthesized GR nanosheets was high ordered. ► The ratio of Ca to P in HA was 1.64, which is close to ratio in natural bone. -- Abstract: Graphene nanosheets were effectively functionalized by in situ deposition of hydroxyapatite through a facile chemical precipitation method. Prior to grafting of hydroxyapatite, chemically modified graphene nanosheets were obtained by the reduction of graphene oxide in presence of ethylenediamine. The resulting hydroxyapatite functionalized graphene nanosheets were characterized by attenuated total reflection IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. These characterization techniques revealed the successful grafting of hydroxyapatite over well exfoliated graphene nanosheets without destroying their structure.

  4. Chattanooga shale: uranium recovery by in situ processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.D.

    1977-01-01

    The increasing demand for uranium as reactor fuel requires the addition of sizable new domestic reserves. One of the largest potential sources of low-grade uranium ore is the Chattanooga shale--a formation in Tennessee and neighboring states that has not been mined conventionally because it is expensive and environmentally disadvantageous to do so. An in situ process, on the other hand, might be used to extract uranium from this formation without the attendant problems of conventional mining. We have suggested developing such a process, in which fracturing, retorting, and pressure leaching might be used to extract the uranium. The potential advantages of such a process are that capital investment would be reduced, handling and disposing of the ore would be avoided, and leaching reagents would be self-generated from air and water. If successful, the cost reductions from these factors could make the uranium produced competitive with that from other sources, and substantially increase domestic reserves. A technical program to evaluate the processing problems has been outlined and a conceptual model of the extraction process has been developed. Preliminary cost estimates have been made, although it is recognized that their validity depends on how successfully the various processing steps are carried out. In view of the preliminary nature of this survey (and our growing need for uranium), we have urged a more detailed study on the feasibility of in situ methods for extracting uranium from the Chattanooga shale

  5. A new FSA approach for in situ γ ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caciolli, A.; Baldoncini, M.; Bezzon, G.P.; Broggini, C.; Buso, G.P.; Callegari, I.; Colonna, T.; Fiorentini, G.; Guastaldi, E.; Mantovani, F.; Massa, G.; Menegazzo, R.; Mou, L.; Alvarez, C. Rossi

    2012-01-01

    An increasing demand of environmental radioactivity monitoring comes both from the scientific community and from the society. This requires accurate, reliable and fast response preferably from portable radiation detectors. Thanks to recent improvements in the technology, γ spectroscopy with sodium iodide scintillators has been proved to be an excellent tool for in-situ measurements for the identification and quantitative determination of γ ray emitting radioisotopes, reducing time and costs. Both for geological and civil purposes not only 40 K, 238 U, and 232 Th have to be measured, but there is also a growing interest to determine the abundances of anthropic elements, like 137 Cs and 131 I, which are used to monitor the effect of nuclear accidents or other human activities. The Full Spectrum Analysis (FSA) approach has been chosen to analyze the γ spectra. The Non Negative Least Square (NNLS) and the energy calibration adjustment have been implemented in this method for the first time in order to correct the intrinsic problem related with the χ 2 minimization which could lead to artifacts and non physical results in the analysis. A new calibration procedure has been developed for the FSA method by using in situ γ spectra instead of calibration pad spectra. Finally, the new method has been validated by acquiring γ spectra with a 10.16 cm × 10.16 cm sodium iodide detector in 80 different sites in the Ombrone basin, in Tuscany. The results from the FSA method have been compared with the laboratory measurements by using HPGe detectors on soil samples collected particular, the 137 Cs isotopes has been implemented in the analysis since it has been found not negligible during the in-situ measurements. - Highlights: ► The Full Spectrum Analysis technique is investigated with sodium iodide scintillator. ► Artifacts due to the free chi 2 minimization in standard FSA are solved applying the NNLS. ► New calibration approach has been developed without using

  6. Mars Oxygen In-Situ Resource Utilization Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Mars Oxygen In-Situ Resource Utilization Experiment (MOXIE) will be the first in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) technology demonstration on Mars. Competitively...

  7. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: IN SITU ELECTROKINETIC EXTRACTION SYSTEM - SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed an in situ soil remediation system that uses electrokinetic principles to remediate hexavalent chromium-contaminated unsaturated or partially saturated soils. The technology involves the in situ application of direct current to the...

  8. In situ grouting of buried transuranic waste with polyacrylamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, B.P.; Lee, S.Y.; Farmer, C.D.; Hyder, L.K.; Supaokit, P.

    1987-01-01

    This project is a demonstration and evaluation of the in situ hydrologic stabilization of buried transuranic waste at a humid site via grout injection. Two small trenches, containing buried transuranic waste, were filled with 34.000 L of polyacrylamide grout. Initial field results have indicated that voids within the trenches were totally filled by the grout and that the intratrench hydraulic conductivity was reduced to below field-measurable values. No evidence of grout constituents were observed in twelve perimeter groundwater monitoring wells indicating that grout was contained completely within the two trenches. Polyacrylamide grout was selected for field demonstration over the polyacrylate grout due to its superior performance in laboratory degradation studies. Also supporting the selection of polyacrylamide was the difficulty in controlling the set time of the acrylate polymerization. Based on preliminary degradation monitoring, the polyacrylamide was estimated to have a microbiological half-life of 362 years in the test soil. 15 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs

  9. An evaluation of in-situ bioremediation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, L.L.; Rashidi, M.

    1996-08-01

    Remediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater was the primary focus in the initial application of in-situ bioremediation which, from its development in the 1970s, has grown to become one of the most promising technologies for the degradation of a wide variety of organic contaminants. The degradation of contaminants in subsurface soils is the current new focus of the technology. While the need for improvements in the technology does exist, the indisputable fact remains that this technology is by far the least expensive and that it has the capability to provide long term reduced levels of contaminants or long term complete remediation of contaminated sites. The aim of this paper is to disclose pertinent information related to current conditions and current feelings in the area of new research, novel applications, new government regulations, and an overview of new topics on the horizon that relate to the overall technology

  10. Time resolved electron microscopy for in situ experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Geoffrey H.; McKeown, Joseph T.; Santala, Melissa K.

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has functioned for decades as a platform for in situ observation of materials and processes with high spatial resolution. Yet, the dynamics often remain elusive, as they unfold too fast to discern at these small spatial scales under traditional imaging conditions. Simply shortening the exposure time in hopes of capturing the action has limitations, as the number of electrons will eventually be reduced to the point where noise overtakes the signal in the image. Pulsed electron sources with high instantaneous current have successfully shortened exposure times (thus increasing the temporal resolution) by about six orders of magnitude over conventional sources while providing the necessary signal-to-noise ratio for dynamic imaging. We describe here the development of this new class of microscope and the principles of its operation, with examples of its application to problems in materials science

  11. Time resolved electron microscopy for in situ experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Geoffrey H., E-mail: ghcampbell@llnl.gov; McKeown, Joseph T.; Santala, Melissa K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Transmission electron microscopy has functioned for decades as a platform for in situ observation of materials and processes with high spatial resolution. Yet, the dynamics often remain elusive, as they unfold too fast to discern at these small spatial scales under traditional imaging conditions. Simply shortening the exposure time in hopes of capturing the action has limitations, as the number of electrons will eventually be reduced to the point where noise overtakes the signal in the image. Pulsed electron sources with high instantaneous current have successfully shortened exposure times (thus increasing the temporal resolution) by about six orders of magnitude over conventional sources while providing the necessary signal-to-noise ratio for dynamic imaging. We describe here the development of this new class of microscope and the principles of its operation, with examples of its application to problems in materials science.

  12. An evaluation of in-situ bioremediation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, L.L. [Prairie View A and M Univ., TX (United States); Rashidi, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Programs Directorate

    1996-08-01

    Remediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater was the primary focus in the initial application of in-situ bioremediation which, from its development in the 1970s, has grown to become one of the most promising technologies for the degradation of a wide variety of organic contaminants. The degradation of contaminants in subsurface soils is the current new focus of the technology. While the need for improvements in the technology does exist, the indisputable fact remains that this technology is by far the least expensive and that it has the capability to provide long term reduced levels of contaminants or long term complete remediation of contaminated sites. The aim of this paper is to disclose pertinent information related to current conditions and current feelings in the area of new research, novel applications, new government regulations, and an overview of new topics on the horizon that relate to the overall technology.

  13. In situ reacted rare-earth hexaaluminate interphases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, M.G.; Cain, R.L.; Lewis, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    A novel in situ reaction between a ceria-doped zirconia interphase coating on Saphikon fibers and an outer alumina coating has resulted in the formation of oriented hexaaluminate platelets which can act as a low fracture energy interface barrier for crack deflection in oxide-oxide ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs). The reaction proceeds only in reducing environments where the reduction of the cerium and zirconium ions to their 3+ valent state causes a destabilization phenomenon consistent with previously reported findings. The diffusion of the cerium from the zirconia into solid solution with the alumina can stabilize the layered hexaaluminate structure. Preferred orientational growth of the hexaaluminate parallel to the coating interface was observed which is the required orientation for enhanced debonding at the fiber/matrix interface in long-fiber-reinforced CMCs

  14. In situ grouting of buried transuranic waste with polyacrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, B.P.; Lee, S.Y.; Farmer, C.D.; Hyder, L.K.; Supaokit, P.

    1987-01-01

    This project is a demonstration and evaluation of the in situ hydrologic stabilization of buried transuranic waste at a humid site via grout injection. Two small trenches, containing buried transuranic waste, were filled with 34.000 L of polyacrylamide grout. Initial field results have indicated that voids within the trenches were totally filled by the grout and that the intratrench hydraulic conductivity was reduced to below field-measurable values. No evidence of grout constituents were observed in twelve perimeter groundwater monitoring wells indicating that grout was contained completely within the two trenches. Polyacrylamide grout was selected for field demonstration over the polyacrylate grout due to its superior performance in laboratory degradation studies. Also supporting the selection of polyacrylamide was the difficulty in controlling the set time of the acrylate polymerization. Based on preliminary degradation monitoring, the polyacrylamide was estimated to have a microbiological half-life of 362 years in the test soil. 15 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. Initial tests on in situ vitrification using electrode feeding techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Oma, K.H.; Bigelow, C.E.

    1990-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of an engineering-scale in situ vitrification (ISV) test conducted to demonstrate the potential for electrode feeding in soils with a high concentration of metals. The engineering-scale test was part of a Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) program to assist Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in conducting treatability studies of the potential for applying ISV to the mixed transuranic waste buried at the INEL subsurface disposal area. The purpose of this test was to evaluate the effectiveness of both gravity fed and operator-controlled electrode feeding in reducing or eliminating many of the potential problems associated with fixed-electrode processing of soils with high concentrations of metal. Actual site soils from INEL were mixed with representative concentrations of carbon steel and stainless steel for this engineering-scale test. 18 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Use of Ultrasound and Co-solvents to improve the in-situ Transesterification of Microalgae Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehimen, Ehiazesebhor Augustine; Sun, Zhifa; Carrington, Gerry C.

    2012-01-01

    and transesterification process. To further improve the feasibility of the use of the in-situ method, this paper investigates modifications to reduce the large process methanol requirements, and potentially improve the oil to methyl esters conversion and biodiesel yields. The results obtained showed that use...... of ultrasound agitation for the in-situ process, as well as combining this stirring regime with co-solvent use (n-pentane and diethyl ether) significantly improved the Chlorella oil to methyl esters conversion with reduced reacting methanol volumes....

  17. Bioremediation of a crude oil polluted tropical rain forest soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These results suggest that Biostimulation with tilling (nutrient enhanced in-situ bioremediation) and or the combination ofBiostimulation and Bioaugumentation with indigenous hydrocarbon utilizers would be effective in the remediation of crude oil polluted tropical soils. Key Words: Bioremediation, Bioaugumentation, ...

  18. Cross-check of ex-situ and in-situ metrology of a bendable temperature stabilized KB mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Sheng; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Celestre, Richard; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory; Macdougall, James; Mochi, Iacopo; Warwick, Tony

    2011-01-01

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in-situ, at-wavelength wavefront slope measurement techniques for Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror nano-focusing. In this paper, we report an initial cross-check of ex-situ and in-situ metrology of a bendable temperature stabilized KB mirror. This cross-check provides a validation of the in-situ shearing interferometry, currently under development at the ALS.

  19. In situ hydrogen loading on zirconium powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maimaitiyili, Tuerdi, E-mail: tuerdi.maimaitiyili@mah.se; Blomqvist, Jakob [Malmö University, Östra Varvsgatan 11 A, Malmö, Skane 20506 (Sweden); Steuwer, Axel [Lund University, Ole Römers väg, Lund, Skane 22100 (Sweden); Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Gardham Avenue, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Bjerkén, Christina [Malmö University, Östra Varvsgatan 11 A, Malmö, Skane 20506 (Sweden); Zanellato, Olivier [Ensam - Cnam - CNRS, 151 Boulevard de l’Hôpital, Paris 75013 (France); Blackmur, Matthew S. [Materials Performance Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Andrieux, Jérôme [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue J Horowitz, Grenoble 38043 (France); Université de Lyon, 43 Bd du 11 novembre 1918, Lyon 69100 (France); Ribeiro, Fabienne [Institut de Radioprotection et Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN, BP 3, 13115 Saint-Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-06-26

    Commercial-grade Zr powder loaded with hydrogen in situ and phase transformations between various Zr and ZrH{sub x} phases have been monitored in real time. For the first time, various hydride phases in a zirconium–hydrogen system have been prepared in a high-energy synchrotron X-ray radiation beamline and their transformation behaviour has been studied in situ. First, the formation and dissolution of hydrides in commercially pure zirconium powder were monitored in real time during hydrogenation and dehydrogenation, then whole pattern crystal structure analysis such as Rietveld and Pawley refinements were performed. All commonly reported low-pressure phases presented in the Zr–H phase diagram are obtained from a single experimental arrangement.

  20. In situ synthesis of protein arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyue; Stoevesandt, Oda; Taussig, Michael J

    2008-02-01

    In situ or on-chip protein array methods use cell free expression systems to produce proteins directly onto an immobilising surface from co-distributed or pre-arrayed DNA or RNA, enabling protein arrays to be created on demand. These methods address three issues in protein array technology: (i) efficient protein expression and availability, (ii) functional protein immobilisation and purification in a single step and (iii) protein on-chip stability over time. By simultaneously expressing and immobilising many proteins in parallel on the chip surface, the laborious and often costly processes of DNA cloning, expression and separate protein purification are avoided. Recently employed methods reviewed are PISA (protein in situ array) and NAPPA (nucleic acid programmable protein array) from DNA and puromycin-mediated immobilisation from mRNA.

  1. In situ bioremediation of Hanford groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeen, R.S.; Roberson, K.R.; Workman, D.J.; Petersen, J.N.; Shouche, M.

    1992-04-01

    Liquid wastes containing radioactive, hazardous, and regulated chemicals have been generated throughout the 40+ years of operations at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. Some of these wastes were discharged to the soil column and many of the waste components, including nitrate, carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ), and several radionuclides, have been detected in the Hanford groundwater. Current DOE policy prohibits the disposal of contaminated liquids directly to the environment, and remediation of existing contaminated groundwaters may be required. In situ bioremediation is one technology currently being developed at Hanford to meet the need for cost effective technologies to clean groundwater contaminated with CCl 4 , nitrate, and other organic and inorganic contaminants. This paper focuses on the latest results of an on going effort to develop effective in situ remediation strategies through the use of predictive simulations

  2. WIPP/SRL in-situ tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamsey, W.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Materials Interface Interactions Test (MIIT) is the only in-situ program involving the burial of simulated high-level waste forms operating in the United States. Fifteen glass and waste form compositions and their proposed package materials, supplied by 7 countries, are interred in salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. A joint effort between Sandia National Laboratories and Savannah River Laboratory, MIIT is the largest international cooperative in-situ venture yet undertaken. The objective of the current study is to document the waste form compositions used in the MIIT program and then to examine compositional correlations based on structural considerations, bonding energies, and surface layer formation. These correlations show important similarities between the many different waste glass compositions studied world wide and suggest that these glasses would be expected to perform well and in a similar manner

  3. In situ hydrogen loading on zirconium powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maimaitiyili, Tuerdi; Blomqvist, Jakob; Steuwer, Axel; Bjerkén, Christina; Zanellato, Olivier; Blackmur, Matthew S.; Andrieux, Jérôme; Ribeiro, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Commercial-grade Zr powder loaded with hydrogen in situ and phase transformations between various Zr and ZrH x phases have been monitored in real time. For the first time, various hydride phases in a zirconium–hydrogen system have been prepared in a high-energy synchrotron X-ray radiation beamline and their transformation behaviour has been studied in situ. First, the formation and dissolution of hydrides in commercially pure zirconium powder were monitored in real time during hydrogenation and dehydrogenation, then whole pattern crystal structure analysis such as Rietveld and Pawley refinements were performed. All commonly reported low-pressure phases presented in the Zr–H phase diagram are obtained from a single experimental arrangement

  4. In situ health monitoring of piezoelectric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Scott L. (Inventor); Drouant, George J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An in situ health monitoring apparatus may include an exciter circuit that applies a pulse to a piezoelectric transducer and a data processing system that determines the piezoelectric transducer's dynamic response to the first pulse. The dynamic response can be used to evaluate the operating range, health, and as-mounted resonance frequency of the transducer, as well as the strength of a coupling between the transducer and a structure and the health of the structure.

  5. Squamous cell carcinoma in situ after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kambara, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Takafumi; Yamada, Rie; Nagatani, Tetsuo; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Asami

    1997-01-01

    We report two cases with Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) in situ caused by irradiation to hand eczemas, resistant to any topical therapies. Both of our cases clinically show palmer sclerosis and flexor restriction of the fingers, compatible to chronic radiation dermatitis. Although SCC arising in chronic radiation dermatitis is usually developed ten to twenty years after irradiation, in our cases SCC were found more than forty years after irradiation. (author)

  6. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: The Whole Truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Ujas; Chhor, Chloe M; Mercado, Cecilia L

    2018-02-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a noninvasive malignant breast disease traditionally described as a precursor lesion to invasive breast cancer. With screening mammography, DCIS now accounts for approximately 20% of newly diagnosed cancer cases. DCIS is not well understood because of its heterogeneous nature. Studies have aimed to assess prognostic factors to characterize its risk of invasive potential; however, there still remains a lack of uniformity in workup and treatment. We summarize current knowledge of DCIS and the ongoing controversies.

  7. In-Situ Burn Gaps Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This Report) UNCLAS//Public 20. Security Class (This Page) UNCLAS//Public 21. No of Pages 76 22. Price UNCLAS//Public | CG-926 RDC | Merrick...surveillance and spotting techniques/equipment to keep responders in the heaviest oil concentrations where their operation to skim , burn, or disperse...Offshore Oil Skim And Burn System For Use With Vessels Of Opportunity. UNCLAS//Public | CG-926 RDC | Merrick, et al. Public | June 2015 In-Situ Burn Gaps

  8. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L.; Aishima, Jun [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Foadi, James [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Morgan, Ann W.; Robinson, James I. [University of Leeds, Leeds LS9 7FT (United Kingdom); Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J. [Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory R92, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Moraes, Isabel [Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Fry, Elizabeth E.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S. [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Stuart, David I. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-17

    A sample environment for mounting crystallization trays has been developed on the microfocus beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source. The technical developments and several case studies are described. Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams.

  9. A Novel in situ Trigger Combination Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzatu, Adrian; Warburton, Andreas; Krumnack, Nils; Yao, Wei-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Searches for rare physics processes using particle detectors in high-luminosity colliding hadronic beam environments require the use of multi-level trigger systems to reject colossal background rates in real time. In analyses like the search for the Higgs boson, there is a need to maximize the signal acceptance by combining multiple different trigger chains when forming the offline data sample. In such statistically limited searches, datasets are often amassed over periods of several years, during which the trigger characteristics evolve and their performance can vary significantly. Reliable production cross-section measurements and upper limits must take into account a detailed understanding of the effective trigger inefficiency for every selected candidate event. We present as an example the complex situation of three trigger chains, based on missing energy and jet energy, to be combined in the context of the search for the Higgs (H) boson produced in association with a W boson at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We briefly review the existing techniques for combining triggers, namely the inclusion, division, and exclusion methods. We introduce and describe a novel fourth in situ method whereby, for each candidate event, only the trigger chain with the highest a priori probability of selecting the event is considered. The in situ combination method has advantages of scalability to large numbers of differing trigger chains and of insensitivity to correlations between triggers. We compare the inclusion and in situ methods for signal event yields in the CDF WH search.

  10. In situ rheology of yeast biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnoni, Lorena I; Tarifa, María C; Lozano, Jorge E; Genovese, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the in situ rheological behavior of yeast biofilms growing on stainless steel under static and turbulent flow. The species used (Rhodototula mucilaginosa, Candida krusei, Candida kefyr and Candida tropicalis) were isolated from a clarified apple juice industry. The flow conditions impacted biofilm composition over time, with a predominance of C. krusei under static and turbulent flow. Likewise, structural variations occurred, with a tighter appearance under dynamic flow. Under turbulent flow there was an increase of 112 μm in biofilm thickness at 11 weeks (p < 0.001) and cell morphology was governed by hyphal structures and rounded cells. Using the in situ growth method introduced here, yeast biofilms were determined to be viscoelastic materials with a predominantly solid-like behavior, and neither this nor the G'0 values were significantly affected by the flow conditions or the growth time, and at large deformations their weak structure collapsed beyond a critical strain of about 1.5-5%. The present work could represent a starting point for developing in situ measurements of yeast rheology and contribute to a thin body of knowledge about fungal biofilm formation.

  11. In situ Raman mapping of art objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondeel, Ph.; Moens, L.; Vandenabeele, P.

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has grown to be one of the techniques of interest for the investigation of art objects. The approach has several advantageous properties, and the non-destructive character of the technique allowed it to be used for in situ investigations. However, compared with laboratory approaches, it would be useful to take advantage of the small spectral footprint of the technique, and use Raman spectroscopy to study the spatial distribution of different compounds. In this work, an in situ Raman mapping system is developed to be able to relate chemical information with its spatial distribution. Challenges for the development are discussed, including the need for stable positioning and proper data treatment. To avoid focusing problems, nineteenth century porcelain cards are used to test the system. This work focuses mainly on the post-processing of the large dataset which consists of four steps: (i) importing the data into the software; (ii) visualization of the dataset; (iii) extraction of the variables; and (iv) creation of a Raman image. It is shown that despite the challenging task of the development of the full in situ Raman mapping system, the first steps are very promising. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology’. PMID:27799424

  12. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L.; Aishima, Jun; Foadi, James; Morgan, Ann W.; Robinson, James I.; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Moraes, Isabel; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S.; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-01-01

    A sample environment for mounting crystallization trays has been developed on the microfocus beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source. The technical developments and several case studies are described. Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams

  13. Human activity and rest in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roenneberg, Till; Keller, Lena K; Fischer, Dorothee; Matera, Joana L; Vetter, Céline; Winnebeck, Eva C

    2015-01-01

    Our lives are structured by the daily alternation of activity and rest, of wake and sleep. Despite significant advances in circadian and sleep research, we still lack answers to many of the most fundamental questions about this conspicuous behavioral pattern. We strongly believe that investigating this pattern in entrained conditions, real-life and daily contexts-in situ-will help the field to elucidate some of these central questions. Here, we present two common approaches for in situ investigation of human activity and rest: the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire (MCTQ) and actimetry. In the first half of this chapter, we provide detailed instructions on how to use and interpret the MCTQ. In addition, we give an overview of the main insights gained with this instrument over the past 10 years, including some new findings on the interaction of light and age on sleep timing. In the second half of this chapter, we introduce the reader to the method of actimetry and share our experience in basic analysis techniques, including visualization, smoothing, and cosine model fitting of in situ recorded data. Additionally, we describe our new approach to automatically detect sleep from activity recordings. Our vision is that the broad use of such easy techniques in real-life settings combined with automated analyses will lead to the creation of large databases. The resulting power of big numbers will promote our understanding of such fundamental biological phenomena as sleep. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Monitoring of electrokinetic in-situ-decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldmann, T. [INTUS Inst. fuer Technologie und Umweltschutz e.V., Berlin (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    The need for a monitoring system for in-situ soil decontamination is two-fold: Firstly, to ensure that remediation is attained and secondly to minimize costs and treatment time. A further reason is the potential risk of unexpected mobilization or chemical generation of hazardous compounds which could result in an extension of the contamination into other regions of soil, the ground water or the atmosphere. Electrokinetic in-situ decontamination is based on transport processes in the ground that proceed with relatively low velocity. This results in treatment times of several months. Since the transport processes can be described by a mathematical model, monitoring should always be combined with qualified mathematical processing. This makes it possible to estimate treatment time and costs to be expected. The challenge of in-situ monitoring is to identify relevant parameters describing the state of the ground. These parameters must be independent from influences like weather but they must be sensitive to changes of soil characteristics. In the case of electrokinetic soil remediation, probes and sensors must be resistant to influences of electric fields. The function of sensors or measuring systems can be disturbed or even damaged or destroyed by electric fields (for example by electro-corrosion). (orig.)

  15. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition: Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, M.J.; Callister, S.J.; Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; Nicora, C.D.; Lovley, D.R.; Long, P.E.; Lipton, M.S.

    2010-02-15

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the US Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

  16. Novel in-situ lamella fabrication technique for in-situ TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavan, Megan; Daly, Dermot; Rummel, Andreas; McCarthy, Eoin K; McAuley, Cathal; Nicolosi, Valeria

    2018-03-29

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy is rapidly emerging as the premier technique for characterising materials in a dynamic state on the atomic scale. The most important aspect of in-situ studies is specimen preparation. Specimens must be electron transparent and representative of the material in its operational state, amongst others. Here, a novel fabrication technique for the facile preparation of lamellae for in-situ transmission electron microscopy experimentation using focused ion beam milling is developed. This method involves the use of rotating microgrippers during the lift-out procedure, as opposed to the traditional micromanipulator needle and platinum weld. Using rotating grippers, and a unique adhesive substance, lamellae are mounted onto a MEMS device for in-situ TEM annealing experiments. We demonstrate how this technique can be used to avoid platinum deposition as well as minimising damage to the MEMS device during the thinning process. Our technique is both a cost effective and readily implementable alternative to the current generation of preparation methods for in-situ liquid, electrical, mechanical and thermal experimentation within the TEM as well as traditional cross-sectional lamella preparation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of In-situ Biogeochemical Reduction of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater by Reduced Iron Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogeochemical transformation is a process in which chlorinated solvents are degraded abiotically by reactive minerals formed by, at least in part or indirectly from, anaerobic biological processes. Five mulch biowall and/or vegetable oil-based bioremediation applications for tr...

  18. Influence of ammonium availability on expression of nifD and amtB genes during biostimulation of a U(VI) contaminated aquifer: implications for U(VI) removal and monitoring the metabolic state of Geobacteraceae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouser, Paula J.; N' Guessan, A. Lucie; Elifantz, Hila; Holmes, Dawn E.; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2009-03-25

    The influence of ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the physiological status of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by 2 orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 ?M) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences suggested that ammonium may have been one factor influencing the community composition prior to acetate amendment with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species with higher ammonium and Dechloromonas species dominating at the site with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI) reduction appeared to be more related to acetate concentrations rather than ammonium levels. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium transporter gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during uranium reduction. The abundance of amtB was inversely correlated to ammonium levels, whereas nifD transcript levels were similar across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB transcript expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of subsurface Geobacter species. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical and physiological interactions at the field scale in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes during bioremediation.

  19. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of redox molecules. Coherent electron transfer at large bias voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Theories of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) of molecules with redox levels near the substrate and tip Fermi levels point to 'spectroscopic' current-overpotential features. Prominent features require a narrow 'probing tip', i.e. a small bias voltage, eV(bias), compared...... a broad tunnelling current-overpotential range at a constant (large) bias voltage of +0.2 V. The current is found to be constant over a 0.25 V overpotential range, which covers roughly the range where the oxidised and reduced redox levels are located within the energy tip. STM contrast and apparent...... of previous theoretical work on in situ STM of redox molecules, to large bias voltages, \\eV(bias)\\ > E-r. Large bias voltages give tunnelling contrasts independent of the overpotential over a broad range, as both the oxidised and reduced redox levels are located within the 'energy tip' between the substrate...

  20. IPCS: An integrated process control system for enhanced in-situ bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y.F.; Wang, G.Q.; Huang, G.H.; Xiao, H.N.; Chakma, A.

    2008-01-01

    To date, there has been little or no research related to process control of subsurface remediation systems. In this study, a framework to develop an integrated process control system for improving remediation efficiencies and reducing operating costs was proposed based on physical and numerical models, stepwise cluster analysis, non-linear optimization and artificial neural networks. Process control for enhanced in-situ bioremediation was accomplished through incorporating the developed forecasters and optimizers with methods of genetic algorithm and neural networks modeling. Application of the proposed approach to a bioremediation process in a pilot-scale system indicated that it was effective in dynamic optimization and real-time process control of the sophisticated bioremediation systems. - A framework of process control system was developed to improve in-situ bioremediation efficiencies and reducing operating costs

  1. Reduced Rank Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The reduced rank regression model is a multivariate regression model with a coefficient matrix with reduced rank. The reduced rank regression algorithm is an estimation procedure, which estimates the reduced rank regression model. It is related to canonical correlations and involves calculating...

  2. Pattern classification by memristive crossbar circuits using ex situ and in situ training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibart, Fabien; Zamanidoost, Elham; Strukov, Dmitri B.

    2013-06-01

    Memristors are memory resistors that promise the efficient implementation of synaptic weights in artificial neural networks. Whereas demonstrations of the synaptic operation of memristors already exist, the implementation of even simple networks is more challenging and has yet to be reported. Here we demonstrate pattern classification using a single-layer perceptron network implemented with a memrisitive crossbar circuit and trained using the perceptron learning rule by ex situ and in situ methods. In the first case, synaptic weights, which are realized as conductances of titanium dioxide memristors, are calculated on a precursor software-based network and then imported sequentially into the crossbar circuit. In the second case, training is implemented in situ, so the weights are adjusted in parallel. Both methods work satisfactorily despite significant variations in the switching behaviour of the memristors. These results give hope for the anticipated efficient implementation of artificial neuromorphic networks and pave the way for dense, high-performance information processing systems.

  3. Voltammetric, in-situ spectroelectrochemical and in-situ electrocolorimetric characterization of phthalocyanines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koca, Atif [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Marmara University, Goeztepe, 34722 Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: akoca@eng.marmara.edu.tr; Bayar, Serife; Dincer, Hatice A. [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Istanbul, Maslak, 34469 Istanbul (Turkey); Gonca, Erguen [Department of Chemistry, Fatih University, TR34500 B.Cekmece, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2009-04-01

    In this work, electrochemical, and in-situ spectroelectrochemical characterization of the metallophthalocyanines bearing tetra-(1,1-(dicarbethoxy)-2-(2-methylbenzyl))-ethyl 3,10,17,24-tetra chloro groups were performed. Voltammetric and in-situ spectroelectrochemical measurements show that while cobalt phthalocyanine complex gives both metal-based and ring-based redox processes, zinc and copper phthalocyanines show only ring-based reduction and oxidation processes. The redox processes are generally diffusion-controlled, reversible and one-electron transfer processes. Differently lead phthalocyanine demetallized during second oxidation reaction while it was stable during reduction processes. An in-situ electrocolorimetric method, based on the 1931 CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage) system of colorimetry, has been applied to investigate the color of the electro-generated anionic and cationic forms of the complexes for the first time in this study.

  4. Automated Image Analysis for Quantitative Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Environmental Samples▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Zhi; Pons, Marie Noëlle; Raskin, Lutgarde; Zilles, Julie L.

    2007-01-01

    When fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses are performed with complex environmental samples, difficulties related to the presence of microbial cell aggregates and nonuniform background fluorescence are often encountered. The objective of this study was to develop a robust and automated quantitative FISH method for complex environmental samples, such as manure and soil. The method and duration of sample dispersion were optimized to reduce the interference of cell aggregates. An au...

  5. In Situ Raman Spectroscopy of Supported Chromium Oxide Catalysts: Reactivity Studies with Methanol and Butane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    1996-01-01

    The interactions of methanol and butane with supported chromium oxide catalysts under oxidizing and reducing conditions were studied by in situ Raman spectroscopy as a function of the specific oxide support (Al2O3, ZrO2, TiO2, SiO2, Nb2O5, 3% SiO2/TiO2, 3% TiO2/SiO2, and a physical mixture of SiO2

  6. Performance Indicators for Uranium Bioremediation in the Subsurface: Basis and Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Philip E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Yabusaki, Steven B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2006-12-29

    The purpose of this letter report is to identify performance indicators for in situ engineered bioremediation of subsurface uranium (U) contamination. This report focuses on in situ treatment of groundwater by biostimulation of extant in situ microbial populations (see http://128.3.7.51/NABIR/generalinfo/primers_guides/03_NABIR_primer.pdf for background information on bioremediation of metals and radionuclides). The treatment process involves amendment of the subsurface with an electron donor such as acetate, lactate, ethanol or other organic compound such that in situ microorganisms mediate the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). U(VI) precipitates as uraninite or other insoluble U phase. Uranium is thus immobilized in place by such processes and is subject to reoxidation that may remobilize the reduced uranium. Related processes include augmenting the extant subsurface microbial populations, addition of electron acceptors, and introduction of chemically reducing materials such as zero-valent Fe. While metrics for such processes may be similar to those for in situ biostimulation, these related processes are not directly in the scope of this letter report.

  7. In situ X-ray investigations of oxygen precipitation in semiconductor silicon; In-situ-Roentgenuntersuchungen der Sauerstoffpraezipitation in Halbleitersilizium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillenberger, Hannes

    2011-03-04

    not only the ex situ verified BMD parameters but their temporal development can detected by SFD for the first time with a laboratory setup. An other difference to TEM is the number of BMDs detected. Measurements of the BMD parameters of a small number of BMDs can be done with TEM at a very high resolution to deduce the properties of the total BMD ensemble. The SFD signal is influenced directly by all BMDs in the analyzed sample volume being in the order of 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 3}. Correlations of the EII and BMD parameters are made for the first and the third series. A linear relation is found between the EII level and the BMD diameter if the BMD density is constant as in series 1. The influence of the BMD density on the EII signal is considerably in series 3. The final EII level is mainly depending on the density of the BMDs. The BMD diameters in the series may be assumed as constant in most of the samples, as the distribution of the diameters within one sample is wider than between the samples. A correlation of the BMD density measured with TEM with the maximum of the slope of the EII shows a strong linear relationship for first and third series. Values of the second series reduce the correlation coefficient, as the EII signal depends on the BMD diameter which is in a different order of magnitude in this series. (orig.)

  8. High-reliability emergency response teams in the hospital: improving quality and safety using in situ simulation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Derek S; Geis, Gary; Mack, Elizabeth H; LeMaster, Tom; Patterson, Mary D

    2013-06-01

    In situ simulation training is a team-based training technique conducted on actual patient care units using equipment and resources from that unit, and involving actual members of the healthcare team. We describe our experience with in situ simulation training in a major children's medical centre. In situ simulations were conducted using standardised scenarios approximately twice per month on inpatient hospital units on a rotating basis. Simulations were scheduled so that each unit participated in at least two in situ simulations per year. Simulations were conducted on a revolving schedule alternating on the day and night shifts and were unannounced. Scenarios were preselected to maximise the educational experience, and frequently involved clinical deterioration to cardiopulmonary arrest. We performed 64 of the scheduled 112 (57%) in situ simulations on all shifts and all units over 21 months. We identified 134 latent safety threats and knowledge gaps during these in situ simulations, which we categorised as medication, equipment, and/or resource/system threats. Identification of these errors resulted in modification of systems to reduce the risk of error. In situ simulations also provided a method to reinforce teamwork behaviours, such as the use of assertive statements, role clarity, performance of frequent updating, development of a shared mental model, performance of independent double checks of high-risk medicines, and overcoming authority gradients between team members. Participants stated that the training programme was effective and did not disrupt patient care. In situ simulations can identify latent safety threats, identify knowledge gaps, and reinforce teamwork behaviours when used as part of an organisation-wide safety programme.

  9. TSSM: The in situ exploration of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coustenis, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Lebreton, J. P.; Matson, D.; Reh, K.; Beauchamp, P.; Erd, C.

    2008-09-01

    The Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) mission was born when NASA and ESA decided to collaborate on two missions independently selected by each agency: the Titan and Enceladus mission (TandEM), and Titan Explorer, a 2007 Flagship study. TandEM, the Titan and Enceladus mission, was proposed as an L-class (large) mission in response to ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 Call. The mission concept is to perform remote and in situ investigations of Titan primarily, but also of Enceladus and Saturn's magentosphere. The two satellites are tied together by location and properties, whose remarkable natures have been partly revealed by the ongoing Cassini-Huygens mission. These bodies still hold mysteries requiring a complete exploration using a variety of vehicles and instruments. TSSM will study Titan as a system, including its upper atmosphere, the interactions with the magnetosphere, the neutral atmosphere, surface, interior, origin and evolution, as well as the astrobiological potential of Titan. It is an ambitious mission because its targets are two of the most exciting and challenging bodies in the Solar System. It is designed to build on but exceed the scientific and technological accomplishments of the Cassini- Huygens mission, exploring Titan and Enceladus in ways that are not currently possible (full close-up and in situ coverage over long periods of time for Titan, several close flybys of Enceladus). One overarching goal of the TSSM mission is to explore in situ the atmosphere and surface of Titan. In the current mission architecture, TSSM consists of an orbiter (under NASA's responsibility) with a large host of instruments which would perform several Enceladus and Titan flybys before stabilizing in an orbit around Titan alone, therein delivering in situ elements (a Montgolfière, or hot air balloon, and a probe/lander). The latter are being studied by ESA. The balloon will circumnavigate Titan above the equator at an altitude of about 10 km for several months. The

  10. Design of an electrochemical cell for in situ XAS studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, N. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Box 6154, CEP 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Morais, J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Avenida Bento Goncalves, 9500, Bairro Agronomia, CP 15051, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Alves, M.C.M. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Avenida Bento Goncalves, 9500, Bairro Agronomia, CP 15003, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)], E-mail: maria@iq.ufrgs.br

    2007-05-15

    In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies have been carried out on the electrochemical insertion of Co metal particles in polypyrrole. This has become possible due to the development of an electrochemical cell to allow XAS studies in fluorescence geometry under steady-state conditions. The experimental set-up allows the in situ monitoring of the structural and electronic changes of the selected atom in a matrix. The project of the electrochemical cell is presented with the results obtained at different stages of the electrochemical process. XANES and EXAFS results showed that the initial stage of the cobalt insertion in polypyrrole took place in an ionic form, like [-[(C{sub 4}H{sub 2}N){sub 3}CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}OSO{sub 3}{sup -}]{sub 6}Co{sup 2+}] with posterior reduction to a metallic form. The quantitative analysis of the first shell shows that, at -0.60 V, the cobalt atoms are surrounded by 6 ({+-}0.5) atoms located at 2.12 ({+-}0.05) A with a large Debye-Waller factor ({sigma}{sup 2}) value of 0.0368 ({+-}0.0074). At -0.80 V, two distances of R = 1.99 ({+-}0.01) and R = 2.50 ({+-}0.01) A show the coexistence of cobalt in the oxidized and reduced (Co{sup 0}) forms. The Co-Co distance corresponds to that of bulk cobalt. At -1.20 V, the obtained values of N = 12 ({+-}0.5) and R = 2.56 ({+-}0.01) A and a Debye-Waller factor of 0.0176 ({+-}0.0004) suggest the formation of metallic cobalt in a quite disordered form.

  11. Sediment pollution characteristics and in situ control in a deep drinking water reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zizhen; Huang, Tinglin; Li, Yang; Ma, Weixing; Zhou, Shilei; Long, Shenghai

    2017-02-01

    Sediment pollution characteristics, in situ sediment release potential, and in situ inhibition of sediment release were investigated in a drinking water reservoir. Results showed that organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) in sediments increased from the reservoir mouth to the main reservoir. Fraction analysis indicated that nitrogen in ion exchangeable form and NaOH-extractable P (Fe/Al-P) accounted for 43% and 26% of TN and TP in sediments of the main reservoir. The Risk Assessment Code for metal elements showed that Fe and Mn posed high to very high risk. The results of the in situ reactor experiment in the main reservoir showed the same trends as those observed in the natural state of the reservoir in 2011 and 2012; the maximum concentrations of total OC, TN, TP, Fe, and Mn reached 4.42mg/L, 3.33mg/L, 0.22mg/L, 2.56mg/L, and 0.61mg/L, respectively. An in situ sediment release inhibition technology, the water-lifting aerator, was utilized in the reservoir. The results of operating the water-lifting aerator indicated that sediment release was successfully inhibited and that OC, TN, TP, Fe, and Mn in surface sediment could be reduced by 13.25%, 15.23%, 14.10%, 5.32%, and 3.94%, respectively. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. In-situ burning of heavy oils and Orimulsion : mid-scale burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.F.; Fieldhouse, B.; Brown, C.E.; Gamble, L.

    2004-01-01

    In-situ burning is considered to be a viable means to clean oil spills on water. In-situ burning, when performed under the right conditions, can reduce the volume of spilled oil and eliminate the need to collect, store, transport and dispose of the recovered oil. This paper presented the results of bench-scale in-situ burning tests in which Bunker C, Orimulsion and weathered bitumen were burned outdoors during the winter in burn pans of approximately 1 square metre. Each test was conducted on salt water which caused the separation of the bitumen from the water in the Orimulsion. Small amounts of diesel fuel was used to ignite the heavy oils. Quantitative removal of the fuels was achieved in all cases, but re-ignition was required for the Orimulsion. Maximum efficiency was in the order of 70 per cent. The residue was mostly asphaltenes and resins which cooled to a solid, glass like material that could be readily removed. The study showed that the type of oil burned influences the behaviour of the burns. Bunker C burned quite well and Orimulsion burned efficiently, but re-ignition was necessary. It was concluded that there is potential for burning heavy oils of several types in-situ. 6 refs., 7 tabs., 18 figs

  13. Cholecystectomy or gallbladder in situ after endoscopic sphincterotomy and bile duct stone removal in Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, James Y W; Leow, Chon-Kar; Fung, Terence M K; Suen, Bing-Yee; Yu, Ly-Mee; Lai, Paul B S; Lam, Yuk-Hoi; Ng, Enders K W; Lau, Wan Yee; Chung, Sydney S C; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2006-01-01

    In patients with stones in their bile ducts and gallbladders, cholecystectomy is generally recommended after endoscopic sphincterotomy and clearance of bile duct stones. However, only approximately 10% of patients with gallbladders left in situ will return with further biliary complications. Expectant management is alternately advocated. In this study, we compared the treatment strategies of laparoscopic cholecystectomy and gallbladders left in situ. We randomized patients (>60 years of age) after endoscopic sphincterotomy and clearance of their bile duct stones to receive early laparoscopic cholecystectomy or expectant management. The primary outcome was further biliary complications. Other outcome measures included adverse events after cholecystectomy and late deaths from all causes. One hundred seventy-eight patients entered into the trial (89 in each group); 82 of 89 patients who were randomized to receive laparoscopic cholecystectomy underwent the procedure. Conversion to open surgery was needed in 16 of 82 patients (20%). Postoperative complications occurred in 8 patients (9%). Analysis was by intention to treat. With a median follow-up of approximately 5 years, 6 patients (7%) in the cholecystectomy group returned with further biliary events (cholangitis, n = 5; biliary pain, n = 1). Among those with gallbladders in situ, 21 (24%) returned with further biliary events (cholangitis, n = 13; acute cholecystitis, n = 5; biliary pain, n = 2; and jaundice, n = 1; log rank, P = .001). Late deaths were similar between groups (cholecystectomy, n = 19; gallbladder in situ, n = 11; P = .12). In the Chinese, cholecystectomy after endoscopic treatment of bile duct stones reduces recurrent biliary events and should be recommended.

  14. Review of in situ derivatization techniques for enhanced bioanalysis using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdady, Yehia Z; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and specific analysis of target molecules in complex biological matrices remains a significant challenge, especially when ultra-trace detection limits are required. Liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry is often the method of choice for bioanalysis. Conventional sample preparation and clean-up methods prior to the analysis of biological fluids such as liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction, or protein precipitation are time-consuming, tedious, and can negatively affect target recovery and detection sensitivity. An alternative or complementary strategy is the use of an off-line or on-line in situ derivatization technique. In situ derivatization can be incorporated to directly derivatize target analytes in their native biological matrices, without any prior sample clean-up methods, to substitute or even enhance the extraction and preconcentration efficiency of these traditional sample preparation methods. Designed appropriately, it can reduce the number of sample preparation steps necessary prior to analysis. Moreover, in situ derivatization can be used to enhance the performance of the developed liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry-based bioanalysis methods regarding stability, chromatographic separation, selectivity, and ionization efficiency. This review presents an overview of the commonly used in situ derivatization techniques coupled to liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry-based bioanalysis to guide and to stimulate future research. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Ultrasonication aided in-situ transesterification of microbial lipids to biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Yan, Song; Tyagi, Rajeshwar Dayal; Surampalli, Rao Y; Valéro, Jose R

    2014-10-01

    In-situ transesterification of microbial lipid to biodiesel has been paid substantial attention due to the fact that the lipid extraction and transesterification can be conducted in one-stage process. To improve the feasibility of in-situ transesterification, ultrasonication was employed to reduce methanol requirement and reaction time. The results showed that the use of ultrasonication could achieve high conversion of lipid to FAMEs (92.1% w lipid conversion/w total lipids) with methanol to lipid molar ratio 60:1 and NaOH addition 1% w/w lipid in 20 min, while methanol to lipid molar ratio 360:1, NaOH addition 1% w/w lipid, and reaction time 12h was required to obtain similar yield in in-situ transesterification without ultrasonication. The compositions of FAMEs obtained in case of ultrasonication aided in-situ transesterification were similar as that of two-stage extraction followed by transesterification processes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. In-situ thermal testing program strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    In the past year the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project has implemented a new Program Approach to the licensing process. The Program Approach suggests a step-wise approach to licensing in which the early phases will require less site information than previously planned and necessitate a lesser degree of confidence in the longer-term performance of the repository. Under the Program Approach, the thermal test program is divided into two principal phases: (1) short-term in situ tests (in the 1996 to 2000 time period) and laboratory thermal tests to obtain preclosure information, parameters, and data along with bounding information for postclosure performance; and (2) longer-term in situ tests to obtain additional data regarding postclosure performance. This effort necessitates a rethinking of the testing program because the amount of information needed for the initial licensing phase is less than previously planned. This document proposes a revised and consolidated in situ thermal test program (including supporting laboratory tests) that is structured to meet the needs of the Program Approach. A customer-supplier model is used to define the Project data needs. These data needs, along with other requirements, were then used to define a set of conceptual experiments that will provide the required data within the constraints of the Program Approach schedule. The conceptual thermal tests presented in this document represent a consolidation and update of previously defined tests that should result in a more efficient use of Project resources. This document focuses on defining the requirements and tests needed to satisfy the goal of a successful license application in 2001, should the site be found suitable

  17. The treatment of in situ breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fentiman, I.S.

    1989-01-01

    Carcinoma in situ is the earliest histologically recognisable form of malignancy and as such provides an opportunity to treat the disease in a curative way. The two major variants, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) will be considered separately as the two conditions have divergent natural histories. DCIS is increasing in incidence since microcalcification may be detected radiologically in the screening of asymptomatic women. The extent of microcalcification may not indicate the extent of disease. It has yet to be determined whether there is a difference in behaviour of the tumour forming and the asymptomatic types of DCIS. After a biopsy has shown DCIS there will be residual DCIS at the biopsy site in one-third of patients, and multifocal DCIS in another third. A coexistent infiltrating carcinoma may be present in up to 16%. Due to sampling problems areas of invasion may be missed. Axillary nodal metastases are found in only 1% of patients with histological DCIS. Radical surgery by total or modified mastectomy is almost curative, but 3% of patients will die of metastases. Taking results of uncontrolled trials, local relapse rates are as follows: excision alone 50%, wide excision 30%, wide excision plus radiotherapy 20%. Two prospective trials are underway run by the EORTC and NSABP in which patients with DCIS are treated by wide excision with or without external radiotherapy. LCIS is usually an incidental finding with a bilateral predisposition to subsequent infiltrating carcinomas. Curative procedures such as bilateral mastectomy with reconstruction may represent overtreatment. A systemic rather than local approach would seem appropriate and a trial is now underway run by the EORTC in which patients with histologically confirmed LCIS are randomised to observation alone or to receive tamoxifen 20 mg daily for 5 years. (orig./MG)

  18. ANALISIS FAKTOR PENYEBAB JEBOLNYA TANGGUL SITU GINTUNG

    OpenAIRE

    Harsoyo, Budi

    2018-01-01

    Spatial and hidrology analysis has been done to find out the main factor of causing the burst of Situ Gintung dam incident on March 27, 2009. Spatial analysis was done to get some parameters that needs as input for hidrology analysis. The analysis results indicating that rain fall actually was be one of cause factors that incident, but not as the main factor. The condition of dike which already broken as the consequence of its life time and also the condition of  spill way which has not funct...

  19. Development of in-situ monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bong Soo; Cho, Dong Hyun; Yoo, Wook Jae; Heo, Ji Yeon

    2010-03-01

    Development of in-situ monitoring system using an optical fiber to measure the real time temperature variation of subsurface water for the evaluation of flow characteristics. We describe the feasibility of developing a fiber-optic temperature sensor using a thermochromic material. A sensor-tip is fabricated by mixing of a thermochromic material powder. The relationships between the temperatures and the output voltages of detectors are determined to measure the temperature of water. It is expected that the fiber-optic temperature monitoring sensor using thermochromic material can be used to measure the real time temperature variation of subsurface water

  20. Reasonable assurance and in-situ testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoderick, J.E.; Nelson, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Department of Energy is currently preparing site characterization plans for sites being considered for the first geologic repository. The site investigations described in these plans will be aimed at providing ''reasonable assurance'' to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission that the performance objectives and criteria specified in 10 CFR Part 60 will be met. The in-situ testing being planned by the DOE for site characterization, and the subsequent testing conducted as part of performance confirmation, reflects how the basis for ''reasonable assurance'' will change through the licensing process

  1. In-Situ Wire Damage Detection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Tate, Lanetra C. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Gibson, Tracy L. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An in-situ system for detecting damage in an electrically conductive wire. The system includes a substrate at least partially covered by a layer of electrically conductive material forming a continuous or non-continuous electrically conductive layer connected to an electrical signal generator adapted to delivering electrical signals to the electrically conductive layer. Data is received and processed to identify damage to the substrate or electrically conductive layer. The electrically conductive material may include metalized carbon fibers, a thin metal coating, a conductive polymer, carbon nanotubes, metal nanoparticles or a combination thereof.

  2. Computer Aided in situ Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chongtay, Rocio A.; Hansen, John Paulin; Decker, Lone

    . One of the most common and successfully used treatments for phobic conditions has been Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), which helps people learn to detect thinking patterns that trigger the irrational fear and to replace them with more realistic ideas. The health and financial impacts in society...... presented here is being designed in a modular and scalable fashion. The web-based module can be accessed anywhere any time from a PC connected to the internet and can be used alone or as supplement for a location-based module for in situ gradual exposure therapy....

  3. In Situ Preservation of Historic Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, R.; Brooks, R.

    The loss of the Mir space station is shown to symbolize a new consciousness of the value of space artefacts. The reasons why such artefacts as Mir become historic objects worthy of preservation are examined. Preservation of space vehicles in situ is discussed, with particular reference to safety, monitoring and long term costs. An argument is made for a wider definition for World Heritage designations to include material beyond the surface of the Earth, and for international bodies to assess, monitor and oversee these projects. Such heritage sites are seen as an economic driver for the development of space tourism in the 21st century.

  4. PAEDIATRIC URETERIC CALCULI: IN-SITU EXTRACORPOREAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Il navait ni obstruction urétérale ni infection urinaire. De légères hématuries et coliques transitoires ont été observées après la lithotripsie. Conclusion Chez lenfant, la lithotripsie extra-corporelle in situ est une procédure efficace dans le traitement des calculs urétéraux quelque soit le siège. Il ny a aucune morbidité liée à la ...

  5. Approach to first principles model prediction of measured WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant] in situ room closure in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, D.E.; Fossum, A.F.; Senseny, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    The discrepancies between predicted and measured WIPP in situ Room D closures are markedly reduced through the use of a Tresca flow potential, an improved small strain constitutive model, an improved set of material parameters, and a modified stratigraphy. 17 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  6. A PEM fuel cell for in situ XAS studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltshire, Richard J.K.; King, Colin R.; Rose, Abigail; Wells, Peter P.; Hogarth, Martin P.; Thompsett, David; Russell, Andrea E.

    2005-01-01

    A miniature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has been designed to enable in situ XAS investigations of the anode catalyst using fluorescence detection. The development of the cell is described, in particular the modifications required for elevated temperature operation and humidification of the feed gasses. The impact of the operating conditions is observed as an increase in the catalyst utilisation, which is evident in the EXAFS collected at the Pt L III and Ru K edges for a PtRu/C catalyst. The Pt component of the catalyst was found to be readily reduced by hydrogen in the fuel, while the Ru was only fully reduced under conditions of good gas flow and electrochemical contact. Under such conditions no evidence of O neighbours were found at the Ru edge. The results are interpreted in relation to the lack of surface sensitivity of the EXAFS method and indicate that the equilibrium coverage of O species on the Ru surface sites is too low to be observed using EXAFS

  7. Effect of silica particles modified by in-situ and ex-situ methods on the reinforcement of silicone rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yingze; Yu, Jinhong; Dai, Dan; Song, Lixian; Jiang, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • In-situ and ex-situ methods were applied to modify silica particles. • In-situ method was more beneficial to preparing silica particles with high BET surface area. • Silicone rubber filled with in-situ modified silica exhibits excellent mechanical and thermal properties. - Abstract: In-situ and ex-situ methods were applied to modify silica particles in order to investigate their effects on the reinforcement of silicone rubber. Surface area and pore analyzer, laser particle size analyzer, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), contact-angle instrument, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate the structure and properties of the modified silica particles. Dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer (DMTA) was employed to characterize the vulcanizing behavior and mechanical properties of the composites. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was performed to test the thermal stability of the composites. FTIR and contact angle analysis indicated that silica particles were successfully modified by these two methods. The BET surface area and TEM results reflected that in-situ modification was more beneficial to preparing silica particles with irregular shape and higher BET surface area in comparison with ex-situ modification. The DMTA and TGA data revealed that compared with ex-situ modification, the in-situ modification produced positive influence on the reinforcement of silicone rubber

  8. In situ and ex situ modifications of bacterial cellulose for applications in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Taisa Regina; Yang, Xiuying; Zhang, Jingchang; Cao, Xudong

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is secreted by a few strains of bacteria and consists of a cellulose nanofiber network with unique characteristics. Because of its excellent mechanical properties, outstanding biocompatibilities, and abilities to form porous structures, BC has been studied for a variety of applications in different fields, including the use as a biomaterial for scaffolds in tissue engineering. To extend its applications in tissue engineering, native BC is normally modified to enhance its properties. Generally, BC modifications can be made by either in situ modification during cell culture or ex situ modification of existing BC microfibers. In this review we will first provide a brief introduction of BC and its attributes; this will set the stage for in-depth and up-to-date discussions on modified BC. Finally, the review will focus on in situ and ex situ modifications of BC and its applications in tissue engineering, particularly in bone regeneration and wound dressing. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Integrating In-Situ and Ex-Situ Data Management Processes for Biodiversity Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin R. Schwartz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing need for a “one plan approach” for conservation strategies that integrate in-situ and ex-situ management processes. Zoological institutions contribute directly to threatened species conservation through paradigms, such as reintroduction, head-starting, supplementation, or rescue/rehabilitation/release. This in-situ/ex-situ integration necessitates collaboration at all levels of conservation action including planning, implementation, monitoring and assessment to drive adaptive management processes. Each component is dependent on the availability and accuracy of data for evidence to facilitate evaluation and adaptive management processes. The Zoological Information Management System (ZIMS, managed by Species360, is a centralized web-based information system used in zoological institutions worldwide to pool life history, behavior and health data and facilitate animal husbandry, health, and breeding management processes. Currently used for few integrated conservation programs, ZIMS is an innovative tool that offers a new opportunity to link data management processes for animals that spend a part of their lives under human care and part in their natural environment and has great potential for use in managed wild populations.

  10. Alternatieve in situ bodemsaneringstechnieken; literatuuronderzoek bij het project "In Situ Biorestauratie" Asten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheuter AJ; LBG

    1997-01-01

    In developing in situ remediation most of the focus used to be on techniques using infiltration water to supply oxygen to the location. Later, techniques were developed in which soil was flushed with air to enhance the oxygen availability to microorganisms. The aim of the study reported here was to

  11. Reduced abrasion drilling fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    A reduced abrasion drilling fluid system and method of drilling a borehole by circulating the reduced abrasion drilling fluid through the borehole is disclosed. The reduced abrasion drilling fluid comprises a drilling fluid, a first additive and a weighting agent, wherein the weighting agent has a

  12. Reduced abrasion drilling fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    A reduced abrasion drilling fluid system and method of drilling a borehole by circulating the reduced abrasion drilling fluid through the borehole is disclosed. The reduced abrasion drilling fluid comprises a drilling fluid, a first additive and a weighting agent, wherein the weighting agent has a

  13. Design of Hybrid Steam-In Situ Combustion Bitumen Recovery Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaomeng; Gates, Ian D.

    2009-01-01

    Given enormous capital costs, operating expenses, flue gas emissions, water treatment and handling costs of thermal in situ bitumen recovery processes, improving the overall efficiency by lowering energy requirements, environmental impact, and costs of these production techniques is a priority. Steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is the most widely used in situ recovery technique in Athabasca reservoirs. Steam generation is done on surface and consequently, because of heat losses, the energy efficiency of SAGD can never be ideal with respect to the energy delivered to the sandface. An alternative to surface steam generation is in situ combustion (ISC) where heat is generated within the formation through injection of oxygen at a sufficiently high pressure to initiate combustion of bitumen. In this manner, the heat from the combustion reactions can be used directly to mobilize the bitumen. As an alternative, the heat can be used to generate steam within the formation which then is the agent to move heat in the reservoir. In this research, alternative hybrid techniques with simultaneous and sequential steam-oxygen injection processes are examined to maximize the thermal efficiency of the recovery process. These hybrid processes have the advantage that during ISC, steam is generated within the reservoir from injected and formation water and as a product of oxidation. This implies that ex situ steam generation requirements are reduced and if there is in situ storage of combustion gases, that overall gas emissions are reduced. In this research, detailed reservoir simulations are done to examine the dynamics of hybrid processes to enable design of these processes. The results reveal that hybrid processes can lower emitted carbon dioxide-to-oil ratio by about 46%, decrease the consumed natural gas-to-oil ratio by about 73%, reduce the cumulative energy-to-oil ratio by between 40% and 70% compared to conventional SAGD, and drop water consumption per unit oil produced

  14. Bioaugmentation of anaerobic sludge digestion with iron-reducing bacteria: process and microbial responses to variations in hydraulic retention time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Gahyun; Kim, Jaai; Shin, Seung Gu; Lee, Changsoo

    2016-01-01

    Although anaerobic digestion (AD) is a widely used option to manage waste activated sludge (WAS), there are some drawbacks related to its slow reaction rate and low energy productivity. This study examined an anaerobic WAS digester, augmented with an iron-reducing microbial consortium, relative to changes in microbial community structure and process performance at decreasing hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 20 to 10 days. The enhanced methanation performance (approximately 40 % increase in methane yield) by the bioaugmentation was sustained until the HRT was decreased to 12.5 days, under Fe(3+)-rich conditions (ferric oxyhydroxide, 20 mM Fe). Enhanced iron-reducing activity was evidenced by the increased Fe(2+) to total Fe ratio maintained above 50 % during the stable operational phases. A further decrease in HRT to 10 days resulted in a significant performance deterioration, along with a drop in the Fe(2+) to total Fe ratio to bacteria (IRBs) was identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), with Spirochaetaceae- and Thauera-related organisms being dominant members, and clear dominance shifts among them with respect to decrease in HRT were observed. Lowering HRT led to evident shifts in bacterial community structure likely associated with washout of IRBs, leading to decreases in iron respiration activity and AD performance at a lower HRT. The bacterial community structure shifted dynamically over phases, and the community transitions correlated well with the changes in process performance. Overall, the combined biostimulation and bioaugmentation investigated in this study proved effective for enhanced methane recovery from anaerobic WAS digestion, which suggests an interesting potential for high-rate AD.

  15. Disappearance of the in situ component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvet, B.; Le Pechoux, C.; Calais, G.; Reynaud-Bougnoux, A.; Bougnoux, P.; Le Floch, O.; Fetisoff, F.; Lemseffer, A.; Body, G.; Lansac, J.

    1992-01-01

    Local recurrence after conservative treatment of breast cancer is associated with a significant risk for metastasis. In order to identify criteria predictive of metastasis in this subset of women, a series of 35 patients with local relapse was analyzed among 512 consecutive patients treated with tumorectomy and radiotherapy. When relapse occurred within 2 years of initial treatment, overall 2-year survival from the time of local relapse was 39.5%. When local relapse occurred more than 2 years from initial therapy, 2-year survival was 80.5% (p<0.001). Pathological slides of both initial and recurrent tumors were reviewed and compared. In 17 patients, local relapse and initial tumor had the same morphological features, with an in-situ component either absent or present in the same proportion. Metastasis occurred in two of these patients. In contrast, 9 of 12 patients in whom the proportion of non-invasive carcinoma had decreased at the time of local recurrence developed metastasis. Overall 2-year survival from the time of relapse was significantly better in the former group of patients (93.3% versus 52.5%, p<0.05). It is concluded that early relapses have a poor prognostic significance and that disappearance of the in-situ component or increase of the invasive component at the time of relapse is a feature predictive of tumor-related death and that more intensive therapy might benefit to this subset of women. (author). 26 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  16. Enzyme Engineering for In Situ Immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Fabian B H; Chen, Shuxiong; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2016-10-14

    Enzymes are used as biocatalysts in a vast range of industrial applications. Immobilization of enzymes to solid supports or their self-assembly into insoluble particles enhances their applicability by strongly improving properties such as stability in changing environments, re-usability and applicability in continuous biocatalytic processes. The possibility of co-immobilizing various functionally related enzymes involved in multistep synthesis, conversion or degradation reactions enables the design of multifunctional biocatalyst with enhanced performance compared to their soluble counterparts. This review provides a brief overview of up-to-date in vitro immobilization strategies while focusing on recent advances in enzyme engineering towards in situ self-assembly into insoluble particles. In situ self-assembly approaches include the bioengineering of bacteria to abundantly form enzymatically active inclusion bodies such as enzyme inclusions or enzyme-coated polyhydroxyalkanoate granules. These one-step production strategies for immobilized enzymes avoid prefabrication of the carrier as well as chemical cross-linking or attachment to a support material while the controlled oriented display strongly enhances the fraction of accessible catalytic sites and hence functional enzymes.

  17. In situ bioremediation under high saline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosshard, B.; Raumin, J.; Saurohan, B.

    1995-01-01

    An in situ bioremediation treatability study is in progress at the Salton Sea Test Base (SSTB) under the NAVY CLEAN 2 contract. The site is located in the vicinity of the Salon Sea with expected groundwater saline levels of up to 50,000 ppm. The site is contaminated with diesel, gasoline and fuel oils. The treatability study is assessing the use of indigenous heterotrophic bacteria to remediate petroleum hydrocarbons. Low levels of significant macro nutrients indicate that nutrient addition of metabolic nitrogen and Orthophosphate are necessary to promote the process, requiring unique nutrient addition schemes. Groundwater major ion chemistry indicates that precipitation of calcium phosphorus compounds may be stimulated by air-sparging operations and nutrient addition, which has mandated the remedial system to include pneumatic fracturing as an option. This presentation is tailored at an introductory level to in situ bioremediation technologies, with some emphasize on innovations in sparge air delivery, dissolved oxygen uptake rates, nutrient delivery, and pneumatic fracturing that should keep the expert's interest

  18. In situ migration experiment in argillaceous formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hidekazu

    1990-01-01

    International cooperative R and D has been performed within the five years framework of the bilateral agreement between PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation) and SCK/CEN (Studiecentrum voor Kernergie/Centre D'etude de L'energie Nucleaire, Mol, Belgium) which is focused on 'The Migration Experiment in argillaceous formation.' This Tertiary argillaceous formation, called Boom clay, is located at about 230m depth in Mol-Dessel area, Belgium. The argillaceous rock is considered to have a high capability for retardation to radionuclides when they migrate in geosphere because of a high content of clay minerals and dissolved carbon-rich pore water. The main purpose of this collaboration work is to characterize the migration phenomena in sedimentary rock through understanding of the behaviour of radionuclides migration in the argillaceous formation. The present report describes the preliminary results of in situ one-dimensional migration experiment with labelled clay core emplaced in borehole under advective condition. In the experiment, radioactive tracer Sr-85 and Eu-152+154 have been used in order to determine the apparent dispersion coefficient and retardation factor of Boom clay. Finally, the following conclusions were obtained by in situ measurement and calculation based on a appropriate migration model; a) From the Sr-85 experiment, diffusive behavior is interpreted to be a dominant phenomena on radionuclides transportation. b) From the Eu-152+154 experiment, very small non-retarded fraction is observed. (author)

  19. In situ SU-8 silver nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren V. Fischer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite materials containing metal nanoparticles are of considerable interest in photonics and optoelectronics applications. However, device fabrication of such materials always encounters the challenge of incorporation of preformed nanoparticles into photoresist materials. As a solution to this problem, an easy new method of fabricating silver nanocomposites by an in situ reduction of precursors within the epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 has been developed. AgNO3 dissolved in acetonitrile and mixed with the epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 forms silver nanoparticles primarily during the pre- and post-exposure soft bake steps at 95 °C. A further high-temperature treatment at 300 °C resulted in the formation of densely homogeneously distributed silver nanoparticles in the photoresist matrix. No particle growth or agglomeration of nanoparticles is observed at this point. The reported new in situ silver nanocomposite materials can be spin coated as homogeneous thin films and structured by using UV lithography. A resolution of 5 µm is achieved in the lithographic process. The UV exposure time is found to be independent of the nanoparticle concentration. The fabricated silver nanocomposites exhibit high plasmonic responses suitable for the development of new optoelectronic and optical sensing devices.

  20. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  1. Solution (in situ leach) mining of uranium: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhaida, A.J. Jr.; Kelly, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    Increases in the demand for and price of uranium have made in-situ mining an attractive alternative to the open-pit and underground U mining methods. Up to 50% of the known ore-bearing sandstone in the western U.S. can be mined using the in-situ mining method. In-situ mining also offers a significant environmental advantage. Restoration of the contaminated groundwater is discussed

  2. In-situ gelling polymers for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the research involving in situ gelling polymers and can be used as a guidebook for academics, industrialists and postgraduates interested in this area. This work summaries the academic contributions from the top authorities in the field and explore the fundamental principles of in situ gelling polymeric networks, along with examples of their major applications. This book aims to provide an up-to-date resource of in situ gelling polymer research.

  3. In-situ x-ray absorption study of copper films in ground water solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvashnina, K.O.; Butorin, S.M.; Modin, A.; Soroka, I.; Marcellini, M.; Nordgren, J.; Guo, J.-H.; Werme, L.

    2007-01-01

    This study illustrates how the damage from copper corrosion can be reduced by modifying the chemistry of the copper surface environment. The surface modification of oxidized copper films induced by chemical reaction with Cl - and HCO 3 - in aqueous solutions was monitored by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that corrosion of copper can be significantly reduced by adding even a small amount of sodium bicarbonate. The studied copper films corroded quickly in chloride solutions, whereas the same solution containing 1.1 mM HCO 3 - prevented or slowed down the corrosion processes

  4. Intrinsic stress in ZrN thin films: Evaluation of grain boundary contribution from in situ wafer curvature and ex situ x-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutsokeras, L. E.; Abadias, G.

    2012-01-01

    Low-mobility materials, like transition metal nitrides, usually undergo large residual stress when sputter-deposited as thin films. While the origin of stress development has been an active area of research for high-mobility materials, atomistic processes are less understood for low-mobility systems. In the present work, the contribution of grain boundary to intrinsic stress in reactively magnetron-sputtered ZrN films is evaluated by combining in situ wafer curvature measurements, providing information on the overall biaxial stress, and ex situ x-ray diffraction, giving information on elastic strain (and related stress) inside crystallites. The thermal stress contribution was also determined from the in situ stress evolution during cooling down, after deposition was stopped. The stress data are correlated with variations in film microstructure and growth energetics, in the 0.13-0.42 Pa working pressure range investigated, and discussed based on existing stress models. At low pressure (high energetic bombardment conditions), a large compressive stress is observed due to atomic peening, which induces defects inside crystallites but also promotes incorporation of excess atoms in the grain boundary. Above 0.3-0.4 Pa, the adatom surface mobility is reduced, leading to the build-up of tensile stress resulting from attractive forces between under-dense neighbouring column boundary and possible void formation, while crystallites can still remain under compressive stress.

  5. Eliminating "ductal carcinoma in situ" and "lobular carcinoma in situ" (DCIS and LCIS) terminology in clinical breast practice: The cognitive psychology point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravettoni, Gabriella; Yoder, Whitney R; Riva, Silvia; Mazzocco, Ketti; Arnaboldi, Paola; Galimberti, Viviana

    2016-02-01

    There is evidence from the literature that the terms "ductal carcinoma in situ" and "lobular carcinoma in situ" (DCIS and LCIS) should be eliminated in clinical breast cancer practice and replaced with the new "ductal intraepithelial neoplasia" (DIN) and "lobular intraepithelial neoplasia" (LIN) terminology. The main purpose of the present article is to expand on this argument from a cognitive psychology perspective and offer suggestions for further research, emphasizing how the elimination of the term "carcinoma" in "in situ" breast cancer diagnoses has the potential to reduce both patient and health care professional confusion and misperceptions that are often associated with the DCIS and LCIS diagnoses, as well as limit the adverse psychological effects of women receiving a DCIS or LCIS diagnosis. We comment on the recent peer-reviewed literature on the clinical implications and psychological consequences for breast cancer patients receiving a DCIS or LCIS diagnosis and we use a cognitive perspective to offer new insight into the benefits of embracing the new DIN and LIN terminology. Using cognitive psychology and cognitive science in general, as a foundation, further research is advocated in order to yield data in support of changing the terminology and therefore, offer a chance to significantly improve the lives and psychological sequelae of women facing such a diagnosis. Typology: Controversies/Short Commentary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Response And Recovery Of Sulfate-Reducing Biochemical Reactors From Aerobic Stress Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbially-mediated treatment of mining-influenced water (MIW) through the implementation of sulfate-reducing biochemical reactors (BCRs) is an attractive option for passive, in situ remediation with low operating costs and reduced maintenance requirements. However, BCRs can be...

  7. Response And Recovery Of Sulfate-Reducing Biochemical Reactors From Aerobic Stress Events (Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbially-mediated treatment of mining-influenced water (MIW) through the implementation of sulfate-reducing biochemical reactors (BCR) is an attractive option for passive, in situ remediation with low operating costs and reduced maintenance requirements. However, BCRs can be ...

  8. In Situ Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticle Embedded Hybrid Soft Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, Kizhmuri P; Miroshnikov, Mikhail; Dutta, Debjit; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Ajayan, Pulickel M; John, George

    2016-09-20

    The allure of integrating the tunable properties of soft nanomaterials with the unique optical and electronic properties of metal nanoparticles has led to the development of organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials. A promising method for the synthesis of such organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials is afforded by the in situ generation of metal nanoparticles within a host organic template. Due to their tunable surface morphology and porosity, soft organic materials such as gels, liquid crystals, and polymers that are derived from various synthetic or natural compounds can act as templates for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles of different shapes and sizes. This method provides stabilization to the metal nanoparticles by the organic soft material and advantageously precludes the use of external reducing or capping agents in many instances. In this Account, we exemplify the green chemistry approach for synthesizing these materials, both in the choice of gelators as soft material frameworks and in the reduction mechanisms that generate the metal nanoparticles. Established herein is the core design principle centered on conceiving multifaceted amphiphilic soft materials that possess the ability to self-assemble and reduce metal ions into nanoparticles. Furthermore, these soft materials stabilize the in situ generated metal nanoparticles and retain their self-assembly ability to generate metal nanoparticle embedded homogeneous organic-inorganic hybrid materials. We discuss a remarkable example of vegetable-based drying oils as host templates for metal ions, resulting in the synthesis of novel hybrid nanomaterials. The synthesis of metal nanoparticles via polymers and self-assembled materials fabricated via cardanol (a bioorganic monomer derived from cashew nut shell liquid) are also explored in this Account. The organic-inorganic hybrid structures were characterized by several techniques such as UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and

  9. The adhesion behavior of carbon coating studied by re-indentation during in situ TEM nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Xue; Diao, Dongfeng, E-mail: dfdiao@szu.edu.cn

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: Nanoscale adhesion induced response in terms of re-indentation was directly observed. During unloading (start from B), the re-indentation phenomenon with the displacement sudden drop and the external loading force change from tension (C) to compression (D) within 0.1 s was captured by in situ TEM nanoindentation. - Highlights: • In situ TEM nanoindentation was performed on carbon coating. • Adhesion induced nano-response of re-indentation was directly observed. • Adhesive forces were measured from the load–displacement curves. • Adhesion energies released for re-indentation were quantitatively analyzed. • Carbon coating reduced the impact of adhesion for silicon substrate. - Abstract: We report a nanoscale adhesion induced nano-response in terms of re-indentation during in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) nanoindentation on the carbon coating with silicon substrate. The adhesive force generated with nanoindentation was measured, and re-indentation phenomenon during unloading with displacement sudden drop and external loading force change from tension to compression was found. The occurrence of re-indentation during unloading was ascribed to the adhesive force of the contact interface between the indenter and the coating surface. Adhesion energies released for re-indentation processes were quantitatively analyzed from the re-indentation load–displacement curves, and carbon coating reduced the impact of adhesion for silicon substrate. The adhesion induced nano-response of contact surfaces would affect the reliability and performance of nano devices.

  10. In-situ uranium mining: reservoir engineering aspects of leaching and restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, M.I.

    1982-01-01

    To establish the feasibility of in-situ mining of uranium, a push-pull test of an in-situ uranium leaching process, which consists of a single injection/production test well and two observation wells, was designed to evaluate the parameters which govern the uranium production and restorability of a solution mined zone. The test procedure itself consists of injection (push cycle) of a preflush followed by lixiviant, a brief soak period (soak cycle), and subsequent production (pull cycle) into the same well. Based on computer modeling, procedures are defined which permit, for a properly designed test, the determination of both restoration and leaching parameters. The test procedure and design recommendations are also outlined. Two numerical simulators which model field scale uranium production and restoration operations are presented. These simulators are able to accommodate various well patterns and irregular reservoir boundaries, physical dispersion, directional permeability variations (if present), and a variety of injection/production strategies. A streamline-concentration balance technique has been used to develop the models. The assumption of time invariant boundary conditions and no transverse dispersion between the streamlines reduces the two dimensional problem to a bundle of one dimensional ones. It has been further shown that the production well effluent histories can easily be obtained by superposing the solution of the concentration balance equations for a single streamline, and thus reducing computation time significantly. Finally, the simulators have been used to study various reservoir engineering aspects to optimize in-situ uranium production from field scale operations

  11. In-situ uranium mining: reservoir engineering aspects of leaching and restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabir, M.I.

    1982-01-01

    To establish the feasibility of in-situ mining of uranium, a push-pull test of an in-situ uranium leaching process, which consists of a single injection/production test well and two observation wells, was designed to evaluate the parameters which govern the uranium production and restorability of a solution mined zone. The test procedure itself consists of injection (push cycle) of a preflush followed by lixiviant, a brief soak period (soak cycle), and subsequent production (pull cycle) into the same well. Based on computer modeling, procedures are defined which permit, for a properly designed test, the determination of both restoration and leaching parameters. The test procedure and design recommendations are also outlined. Two numerical simulators which model field scale uranium production and restoration operations are presented. These simulators are able to accommodate various well patterns and irregular reservoir boundaries, physical dispersion, directional permeability variations (if present), and a variety of injection/production strategies. A streamline-concentration balance technique has been used to develop the models. The assumption of time invariant boundary conditions and no transverse dispersion between the streamlines reduces the two dimensional problem to a bundle of one dimensional ones. It has been further shown that the production well effluent histories can easily be obtained by superposing the solution of the concentration balance equations for a single streamline, and thus reducing computation time significantly. Finally, the simulators have been used to study various reservoir engineering aspects to optimize in-situ uranium production from field scale operations.

  12. Application of meta-transcriptomics and –proteomics to analysis of in situ physiological state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan eKonopka

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the growth-limiting factor or environmental stressors affecting microbes in situ is of fundamental importance but analytically difficult. Microbes can reduce in situ limiting nutrient concentrations to sub-micromolar levels, and contaminated ecosystems may contain multiple stressors. The patterns of gene or protein expression by microbes in nature can be used to infer growth limitations, because they are regulated in response to environmental conditions. Experimental studies under controlled conditions in the laboratory provide the physiological underpinnings for developing these physiological indicators. Although regulatory networks may differ among specific microbes, there are some broad principles that can be applied, related to limiting nutrient acquisition, resource allocation, and stress responses. As technologies for transcriptomics and proteomics mature, the capacity to apply these approaches to complex microbial communities will accelerate. In particular, global proteomics reflect expressed catalytic activities. Furthermore, the high mass accuracy of some proteomic approaches allows mapping back to specific microbial strains. For example, at the Rifle IFRC field site in Western Colorado, the physiological status of Fe(III-reducing populations has been tracked over time. Members of a subsurface clade within the Geobacter predominated during carbon amendment to the subsurface environment. At the functional level, proteomic identifications produced inferences regarding (i temporal changes in anabolism and catabolism of acetate, (ii the onset of N2 fixation when N became limiting, and (iii expression of phosphate transporters during periods of intense growth. The application of these approaches in situ can lead to discovery of novel physiological adaptations.

  13. The main causes of in situ internal pipeline painting failures; Fatores que podem implicar em falhas prematuras de pintura interna in situ de dutos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintela, Joaquim P.; Vieira, Magda M.; Vieira, Gerson V. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Fragata, Fernando de L.; Amorim, Cristina da C. [Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Eletrica (CEPEL), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    Resources in coating technology have been used to increase the useful life of pipelines, to guarantee the carried product quality, to increase the operational trustworthiness, to reduce the maintenance costs, the personal and patrimonial risks and environmental damages. Parallel, in virtue of the pipelines natural ageing and operational problems, more advanced technologies, as the internal coating process in situ, have become an important method of pipelines rehabilitation. The aim of this work is to study the main factors that may influence the performance of an internal coating project, allowing the premature damages occurrence in pipelines, used in gas, oil and derivatives transport. (author)

  14. In-situ Planetary Subsurface Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Weber, R. C.; Dimech, J. L.; Kedar, S.; Neal, C. R.; Siegler, M.

    2017-12-01

    Geophysical and seismic instruments are considered the most effective tools for studying the detailed global structures of planetary interiors. A planet's interior bears the geochemical markers of its evolutionary history, as well as its present state of activity, which has direct implications to habitability. On Earth, subsurface imaging often involves massive data collection from hundreds to thousands of geophysical sensors (seismic, acoustic, etc) followed by transfer by hard links or wirelessly to a central location for post processing and computing, which will not be possible in planetary environments due to imposed mission constraints on mass, power, and bandwidth. Emerging opportunities for geophysical exploration of the solar system from Venus to the icy Ocean Worlds of Jupiter and Saturn dictate that subsurface imaging of the deep interior will require substantial data reduction and processing in-situ. The Real-time In-situ Subsurface Imaging (RISI) technology is a mesh network that senses and processes geophysical signals. Instead of data collection then post processing, the mesh network performs the distributed data processing and computing in-situ, and generates an evolving 3D subsurface image in real-time that can be transmitted under bandwidth and resource constraints. Seismic imaging algorithms (including traveltime tomography, ambient noise imaging, and microseismic imaging) have been successfully developed and validated using both synthetic and real-world terrestrial seismic data sets. The prototype hardware system has been implemented and can be extended as a general field instrumentation platform tailored specifically for a wide variety of planetary uses, including crustal mapping, ice and ocean structure, and geothermal systems. The team is applying the RISI technology to real off-world seismic datasets. For example, the Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment (LSPE) deployed during the Apollo 17 Moon mission consisted of four geophone instruments

  15. Radiological aspects of in situ uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BROWN, STEVEN H.

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium in situ leaching in situ recovery (ISL / ISR), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and may make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since 1975. Solution mining involves the pumping of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing and complexing agents into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant. Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which Radon gas is evolved in

  16. Progress in reducing the environmental impacts of offshore drilling wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flemming, D; Candler, J.E.

    2002-01-01

    Full text:Over the past several years, great progress has been made in understanding and reducing the environmental impacts of offshore drilling wastes. Our understanding of sea floor impacts has been helped along by new environmental assessment tools such us computer modeling of sea floor deposition of drilling discharges, sediment profile imaging, and in situ sediment toxicity bioassays. To further reduce environmental impacts, new pollution prevention technologies have been developed that can shrink the environmental footprint of offshore drilling. These technologies reduce the total amount of drilling wastes discharged and include cuttings dryers and centrifuges that can reduce the drilling fluid content of drill cuttings to below 10 percent. In conclusion, the oil and gas industry is adopting more environmentally compatible drilling fluids, new environmental assessment tools and pollution prevention technologies that dramatically reduce the amount of drilling wastes discharged. Together, all of these elements have the potential to reduce environmental impacts of offshore drilling

  17. In-situ plasma processing to increase the accelerating gradients of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doleans, M.; Tyagi, P. V.; Afanador, R.; McMahan, C. J.; Ball, J. A.; Barnhart, D. L.; Blokland, W.; Crofford, M. T.; Degraff, B. D.; Gold, S. W.; Hannah, B. S.; Howell, M. P.; Kim, S.-H.; Lee, S.-W.; Mammosser, J.; Neustadt, T. S.; Saunders, J. W.; Stewart, S.; Strong, W. H.; Vandygriff, D. J.; Vandygriff, D. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new in-situ plasma processing technique is being developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to improve the performance of the cavities in operation. The technique utilizes a low-density reactive oxygen plasma at room temperature to remove top surface hydrocarbons. The plasma processing technique increases the work function of the cavity surface and reduces the overall amount of vacuum and electron activity during cavity operation; in particular it increases the field emission onset, which enables cavity operation at higher accelerating gradients. Experimental evidence also suggests that the SEY of the Nb surface decreases after plasma processing which helps mitigating multipacting issues. In this article, the main developments and results from the plasma processing R&D are presented and experimental results for in-situ plasma processing of dressed cavities in the SNS horizontal test apparatus are discussed.

  18. In-situ calibration of RTDs and pressure sensors in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    New techniques have been developed and validated for in-situ calibration of pressure transmitters as installed in nuclear power plants. These new techniques originate from a desire within the nuclear industry to monitor the calibration of pressure sensors during normal power operation by monitoring the DC output of the sensors for any significant draft and other anomalies. Currently, the calibration of pressure sensors is performed once every fuel cycle (18-24 months). The work involves significant manpower, radiation exposure to plant personnel, and potential damage to the plant equipment. In-situ calibration offers the potential to identify the sensors that need to be replaced or require calibration during normal plant operation, and reduce the calibration effort during outages to those sensors that need to be calibrated, as opposed to calibrating all the sensors

  19. Facile In Situ Fabrication of Nanostructured Graphene–CuO Hybrid with Hydrogen Sulfide Removal Capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunil P.Lonkar; Vishnu V.Pillai; Samuel Stephen; Ahmed Abdala; Vikas Mittal

    2016-01-01

    A simple and scalable synthetic approach for one-step synthesis of graphene–Cu O(TRGC) nanocomposite by an in situ thermo-annealing method has been developed.Using graphene oxide(GO) and copper hydroxide as a precursors reagent,the reduction of GO and the uniform deposition of in situ formed Cu O nanoparticles on graphene was simultaneously achieved.The method employed no solvents,toxic-reducing agents,or organic modifiers.The resulting nanostructured hybrid exhibited improved H2 S sorption capacity of 1.5 mmol H2S/g-sorbent(3 g S/100 g-sorbent).Due to its highly dispersed sub-20 nm Cu O nanoparticles and large specific surface area,TRGC nanocomposite exhibits tremendous potential for energy and environment applications.

  20. Ion scattering spectroscopy studies of zirconium dioxide thin films prepared in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.J.; Netterfield, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Low energy Ion Scattering Spectroscopy has been used to investigate, in situ, thin films of zirconium dioxide deposited by evaporation and ion-assisted deposition. It is shown that when a film is deposited to an average thickness of 0.3 nm +- 0.03, as measured by in situ ellipsometry, complete coverage of the sub