WorldWideScience

Sample records for site-specific earthquake response

  1. Y-12 site-specific earthquake response analysis and soil liquefaction assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.B.; Hunt, R.J.; Manrod, W.E. III.

    1995-01-01

    A site-specific earthquake response analysis and soil liquefaction assessment were performed for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The main purpose of these studies was to use the results of the analyses for evaluating the safety of the performance category -1, -2, and -3 facilities against the natural phenomena seismic hazards. Earthquake response was determined for seven (7), one dimensional soil columns (Fig. 12) using two horizontal components of the PC-3 design basis 2000-year seismic event. The computer program SHAKE 91 (Ref. 7) was used to calculate the absolute response accelerations on top of ground (soil/weathered shale) and rock outcrop. The SHAKE program has been validated for horizontal response calculations at periods less than 2.0 second at several sites and consequently is widely accepted in the geotechnical earthquake engineering area for site response analysis

  2. Prediction of site specific ground motion for large earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamae, Katsuhiro; Irikura, Kojiro; Fukuchi, Yasunaga.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, we apply the semi-empirical synthesis method by IRIKURA (1983, 1986) to the estimation of site specific ground motion using accelerograms observed at Kumatori in Osaka prefecture. Target earthquakes used here are a comparatively distant earthquake (Δ=95 km, M=5.6) caused by the YAMASAKI fault and a near earthquake (Δ=27 km, M=5.6). The results obtained are as follows. 1) The accelerograms from the distant earthquake (M=5.6) are synthesized using the aftershock records (M=4.3) for 1983 YAMASAKI fault earthquake whose source parameters have been obtained by other authors from the hypocentral distribution of the aftershocks. The resultant synthetic motions show a good agreement with the observed ones. 2) The synthesis for a near earthquake (M=5.6, we call this target earthquake) are made using a small earthquake which occurred in the neighborhood of the target earthquake. Here, we apply two methods for giving the parameters for synthesis. One method is to use the parameters of YAMASAKI fault earthquake which has the same magnitude as the target earthquake, and the other is to use the parameters obtained from several existing empirical formulas. The resultant synthetic motion with the former parameters shows a good agreement with the observed one, but that with the latter does not. 3) We estimate the source parameters from the source spectra of several earthquakes which have been observed in this site. Consequently we find that the small earthquakes (M<4) as Green's functions should be carefully used because the stress drops are not constant. 4) We propose that we should designate not only the magnitudes but also seismic moments of the target earthquake and the small earthquake. (J.P.N.)

  3. Site-Specific Seismic Site Response Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Reidel, Steve P.

    2005-02-24

    This interim report documents the collection of site-specific geologic and geophysical data characterizing the Waste Treatment Plant site and the modeling of the site-specific structure response to earthquake ground motions.

  4. Development of site specific response spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernreuter, D.L.; Chen, J.C.; Savy, J.B.

    1987-03-01

    For a number of years the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has employed site specific spectra (SSSP) in their evaluation of the adequacy of the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE). These spectra were developed only from the spectra of the horizontal components of the ground motion and from a very limited data set. As the data set has considerably increased for Eastern North America (ENA) and as more relevant data has become available from earthquakes occurring in other parts of the world (e.g., Italy), together with the fact that recent data indicated the importance of the vertical component, it became clear that an update of the SSSP's for ENA was desirable. The methodology used in this study is similar to the previous ones in that it used actual earthquake ground motion data with magnitudes within a certain range and recorded at distances and at sites similar to those that would be chosen for the definition of an SSE. An extensive analysis of the origin and size of the uncertainty is an important part of this study. The results of this analysis of the uncertainties is used to develop criteria for selecting the earthquake records to be used in the derivation of the SSSP's. We concluded that the SSSPs were not very sensitive to the distribution of the source to site distance of the earthquake records used in the analysis. That is, the variability (uncertainty) introduced by the range of distances was relatively small compared to the variability introduced by other factors. We also concluded that the SSSP are somewhat sensitive to the distribution of the magnitudes of these earthquakes, particularly at rock sites and, by inference, at shallow soil sites. We found that one important criterion in selecting records to generate SSSP is the depth of soil at the site

  5. Practical Application of Site-Specific Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Katsuhisa

    2014-01-01

    The development of an on-site warning system was reported. This system improves the timing of warnings and reduces the number of false alarms by improving the method of estimating the JMA seismic intensity using earthquake early warning system information based on site-specific data. Moreover, the development of an application for practical use in a construction company and an integrated system for realizing system shutdown was also reported. The concept of this system is based on the following. Seismic intensity is not distributed concentrically, and the attenuation relationship cannot explain the distribution of seismic intensity precisely. The standard method of seismic intensity prediction is construed as 'attenuation relationship + soil amplification factor', but this may be improved in the reformulation 'original attenuation relationship for each site + correction factors dependent on the epicenter location and depth' using a seismic intensity database that includes data on recent and historical earthquakes. (authors)

  6. Proposed Site-Specific Response Spectra for Surabaya-Madura Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Kusumastuti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a site-specific seismic hazard study to determine the recommended seismic design criteria for Suramadu Bridge. The study is performed using probabilistic seismic hazard approach to determine maximum acceleration and response spectra at bedrock and followed by local site effect analysis to determine maximum acceleration and response spectra at ground surface. The probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA is carried out using 3-dimension (3-D seismic source models (fault source model. Two hazard levels are analysed to represent 150 and 3,300 years return period of ground motion around site location. The local site effect analysis is performed using 1-dimension (1-D shear wave propagation theory to obtain peak ground acceleration and response spectra at ground surface. Finally, the site-specific surface response spectra with 5 percent damping are developed based on the mean plus one standard deviation concept from the result of local site effect analysis.

  7. Using a site-specific technical error to establish training responsiveness: a preliminary explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherwax, Ryan M; Harris, Nigel K; Kilding, Andrew E; Dalleck, Lance C

    2018-01-01

    Even though cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) training elicits numerous health benefits, not all individuals have positive training responses following a structured CRF intervention. It has been suggested that the technical error (TE), a combination of biological variability and measurement error, should be used to establish specific training responsiveness criteria to gain further insight on the effectiveness of the training program. To date, most training interventions use an absolute change or a TE from previous findings, which do not take into consideration the training site and equipment used to establish training outcomes or the specific cohort being evaluated. The purpose of this investigation was to retrospectively analyze training responsiveness of two CRF training interventions using two common criteria and a site-specific TE. Sixteen men and women completed two maximal graded exercise tests and verification bouts to identify maximal oxygen consumption (VO 2 max) and establish a site-specific TE. The TE was then used to retrospectively analyze training responsiveness in comparison to commonly used criteria: percent change of >0% and >+5.6% in VO 2 max. The TE was found to be 7.7% for relative VO 2 max. χ 2 testing showed significant differences in all training criteria for each intervention and pooled data from both interventions, except between %Δ >0 and %Δ >+7.7% in one of the investigations. Training nonresponsiveness ranged from 11.5% to 34.6%. Findings from the present study support the utility of site-specific TE criterion to quantify training responsiveness. A similar methodology of establishing a site-specific and even cohort specific TE should be considered to establish when true cardiorespiratory training adaptations occur.

  8. Site-Specific Multilevel Modeling of Potato Response to Nitrogen Fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge-Étienne Parent

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Technologies of precision agriculture, digital soil maps, and meteorological stations provide a minimum data set to guide precision farming operations. However, determining optimal nutrient requirements for potato (Solanum tuberosum L. crops at subfield scale remains a challenge given specific climatic, edaphic, and managerial conditions. Multilevel modeling can generalize yield response to fertilizer additions using data easily accessible to growers. Our objective was to elaborate a multilevel N fertilizer response model for potato crops using the Mitscherlich equation and a core data set of 93 N fertilizer trials conducted in Québec, Canada. Daily climatic data were collected at 10 × 10 km resolution. Soils were characterized by organic matter content, pH, and texture in the arable layer, and by texture and tools of pedometrics across a gleization-podzolization continuum in subsoil layers. There were five categories of preceding crops and five cultivar maturity orders. The three Mitscherlich parameters (Asymptote, Rate, and Environment were most often site-specific. Sensitivity analysis showed that optimum N dosage increased with non-leguminous high-residue preceding crops, coarser soils, podzolization, drier climatic condition, and late cultivar maturity. The inferential model could guide site-specific N fertilization using an accessible minimum data set to support fertilization decisions. As decision-support system, the model could also provide a range of optimum N doses across a large spectrum of site-specific conditions including climate change.

  9. Site Specific Ground Response Analysis for Quantifying Site Amplification at A Regolith Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Setiawan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.159-167A numerical model has demonstrated that it can simulate reasonably well earthquake motions at the ground level during a seismic event. The most widely used model is an equivalent linear approach. The equivalent linear model was used to compute the free-field response of Adelaide regolith during the 1997 Burra earthquake. The aim of this study is to quantify the amplification at the investigated site. The model computed the ground response of horizontally layered soil deposits subjected to transient and vertically propagating shear waves through a one-dimensional-soil column. Each soil layer was assumed to be homogeneous, visco-elastic, and infinite in the horizontal extent. The results of this study were compared to other studies and forward computation of the geotechnical dynamic parameters of the investigated site. The amplification triggered by the 1997 Burra seismic event was deduced. This study reveals the amplification factor up to 3.6 at the studied site.

  10. Dual and multi-stimuli responsive polymeric nanoparticles for programmed site-specific drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ru; Meng, Fenghua; Deng, Chao; Klok, Harm-Anton; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2013-05-01

    In the past decades, polymeric nanoparticles have emerged as a most promising and viable technology platform for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As vehicles, ideal nanoparticles are obliged to possess high drug loading levels, deliver drug to the specific pathological site and/or target cells without drug leakage on the way, while rapidly unload drug at the site of action. To this end, various "intelligent" polymeric nanoparticles that release drugs in response to an internal or external stimulus such as pH, redox, temperature, magnetic and light have been actively pursued. These stimuli-responsive nanoparticles have demonstrated, though to varying degrees, improved in vitro and/or in vivo drug release profiles. In an effort to further improve drug release performances, novel dual and multi-stimuli responsive polymeric nanoparticles that respond to a combination of two or more signals such as pH/temperature, pH/redox, pH/magnetic field, temperature/reduction, double pH, pH and diols, temperature/magnetic field, temperature/enzyme, temperature/pH/redox, temperature/pH/magnetic, pH/redox/magnetic, temperature/redox/guest molecules, and temperature/pH/guest molecules have recently been developed. Notably, these combined responses take place either simultaneously at the pathological site or in a sequential manner from nanoparticle preparation, nanoparticle transporting pathways, to cellular compartments. These dual and multi-stimuli responsive polymeric nanoparticles have shown unprecedented control over drug delivery and release leading to superior in vitro and/or in vivo anti-cancer efficacy. With programmed site-specific drug delivery feature, dual and multi-stimuli responsive nanoparticulate drug formulations have tremendous potential for targeted cancer therapy. In this review paper, we highlight the recent exciting developments in dual and multi-stimuli responsive polymeric nanoparticles for precision drug delivery applications, with a particular focus

  11. OMG Earthquake! Can Twitter improve earthquake response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, P. S.; Guy, M.; Ostrum, C.; Horvath, S.; Buckmaster, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is investigating how the social networking site Twitter, a popular service for sending and receiving short, public, text messages, can augment its earthquake response products and the delivery of hazard information. The goal is to gather near real-time, earthquake-related messages (tweets) and provide geo-located earthquake detections and rough maps of the corresponding felt areas. Twitter and other social Internet technologies are providing the general public with anecdotal earthquake hazard information before scientific information has been published from authoritative sources. People local to an event often publish information within seconds via these technologies. In contrast, depending on the location of the earthquake, scientific alerts take between 2 to 20 minutes. Examining the tweets following the March 30, 2009, M4.3 Morgan Hill earthquake shows it is possible (in some cases) to rapidly detect and map the felt area of an earthquake using Twitter responses. Within a minute of the earthquake, the frequency of “earthquake” tweets rose above the background level of less than 1 per hour to about 150 per minute. Using the tweets submitted in the first minute, a rough map of the felt area can be obtained by plotting the tweet locations. Mapping the tweets from the first six minutes shows observations extending from Monterey to Sacramento, similar to the perceived shaking region mapped by the USGS “Did You Feel It” system. The tweets submitted after the earthquake also provided (very) short first-impression narratives from people who experienced the shaking. Accurately assessing the potential and robustness of a Twitter-based system is difficult because only tweets spanning the previous seven days can be searched, making a historical study impossible. We have, however, been archiving tweets for several months, and it is clear that significant limitations do exist. The main drawback is the lack of quantitative information

  12. Site-Specific Multilevel Modeling of Potato Response to Nitrogen Fertilization

    OpenAIRE

    Serge-Étienne Parent; Michaël A. Leblanc; Annie-Claude Parent; Zonlehoua Coulibali; Léon E. Parent

    2017-01-01

    Technologies of precision agriculture, digital soil maps, and meteorological stations provide a minimum data set to guide precision farming operations. However, determining optimal nutrient requirements for potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) crops at subfield scale remains a challenge given specific climatic, edaphic, and managerial conditions. Multilevel modeling can generalize yield response to fertilizer additions using data easily accessible to growers. Our objective was to elaborate a multile...

  13. Explanation of earthquake response spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, John

    2017-01-01

    This is a set of five slides explaining how earthquake response spectra are derived from strong-motion records and simple models of structures and their purpose within seismic design and assessment. It dates from about 2002 and I have used it in various introductory lectures on engineering seismology.

  14. Application of the performance-goal based approach for establishing the SSE site specific response spectrum for new nuclear power plants in South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nhleko, Sifiso, E-mail: snhleko@nnr.co.za [National Nuclear Regulator of South Africa (South Africa)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Criteria for import of performance goals defined in ASCE 43-05 are established. ► Derivation of performance goals from radiological safety criteria is demonstrated. ► Evaluation of mean exceedance frequencies from performance goals is illustrated. ► Simple formulae for the definition of a capable fault are presented. -- Abstract: Nuclear installation license holders in South Africa have become increasingly interested in the performance-goal based approach defined in the American Society of Civil Engineering Standard ASCE/SEI 43-05 for establishing the safe shutdown earthquake (SSE) site specific design response spectrum (SSRS) for new nuclear power plants. This approach has been adopted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and has now been followed at more than 20 sites in that country. Quantitative performance goals are required when establishing seismic design basis parameters using the performance-goal based approach. However, the quantitative performance goals recommended in ASCE/SEI 43-05 were established based on country-specific operating experience and seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) applications conducted for existing plants designed and operated to meet specific safety criteria, set by a specific regulatory body. Whilst ASCE/SEI 43-05 provides enough flexibility for the selection of other user-specified quantitative performance goals, there is no guidance on how quantitative performance goals should be established in the absence of extensive operational experience accompanied by data derived from rigorous SPRA applications. This paper presents two practical approaches that can be used to provide a technical basis and to demonstrate the derivation of quantitative values of target performance goals when no data related to past and present operational experience exist to justify technical specifications.

  15. Site Specific Vendor's License

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset contains information of a site-specific vendor's license which is required if an individual sells or offers to sell goods or services from a stationary...

  16. Site specific plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchison, J.; Jernigan, G.

    1989-12-01

    The Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) covers the period for FY 1989 through FY 1995. The plan establishes a Department of Energy -- Headquarters (DOE-HQ) agenda for cleanup and compliance against which overall progress can be measured. The FYP covers three areas: Corrective Activities, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Operations. Corrective Activities are those activities necessary to bring active or standby facilities into compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulations. Environmental restoration activities include the assessment and cleanup of surplus facilities and inactive waste sites. Waste management operations includes the treatment, storage, and disposal of wastes which are generated as a result of ongoing operations. This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show how environmental restoration and waste management activities that were identified during the preparation of the FYP will be implemented, tracked, and reported. The SSP describes DOE Savannah River (DOE-SR) and operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), organizations that are responsible, for undertaking the activities identified in this plan. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. 8 refs., 46 figs., 23 tabs

  17. How to eliminate non-damaging earthquakes from the results of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA)-A comprehensive procedure with site-specific application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluegel, Jens-Uwe

    2009-01-01

    The results of probabilistic seismic hazard analyses are frequently presented in terms of uniform hazard spectra or hazard curves with spectral accelerations as the output parameter. The calculation process is based on the evaluation of the probability of exceedance of specified acceleration levels without consideration of the damaging effects of the causative earthquakes. The same applies to the empirical attenuation equations for spectral accelerations used in PSHA models. This makes interpreting and using the results in engineering or risk applications difficult. Uniform hazard spectra and the associated hazard curves may contain a significant amount of contributions of weak, low-energy earthquakes not able to damage the seismically designed structures of nuclear power plants. For the development of realistic engineering designs and for realistic seismic probabilistic risk assessments (seismic PRA) it is necessary to remove the contribution of non-damaging earthquakes from the results of a PSHA. A detailed procedure for the elimination of non-damaging earthquakes based on the CAV (Cumulative Absolute Velocity)-filtering approach was developed and applied to the results of the large-scale PEGASOS probabilistic seismic hazard study for the site of the Goesgen nuclear power plant. The procedure considers the full scope of epistemic uncertainty and aleatory variability present in the PEGASOS study. It involves the development of a set of empirical correlations for CAV and the subsequent development of a composite distribution for the probability of exceedance of the damaging threshold of 0.16 gs. Additionally, a method was developed to measure the difference in the damaging effects of earthquakes of different strengths by the ratio of a power function of ARIAS-intensity or, in the ideal case, by the ratio of the square roots of the associated strong motion durations. The procedure was applied for the update of the Goesgen seismic PRA and for the confirmation of a

  18. Antioptimization of earthquake exitation and response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zuccaro

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a novel approach to predict the response of earthquake-excited structures. The earthquake excitation is expanded in terms of series of deterministic functions. The coefficients of the series are represented as a point in N-dimensional space. Each available ccelerogram at a certain site is then represented as a point in the above space, modeling the available fragmentary historical data. The minimum volume ellipsoid, containing all points, is constructed. The ellipsoidal models of uncertainty, pertinent to earthquake excitation, are developed. The maximum response of a structure, subjected to the earthquake excitation, within ellipsoidal modeling of the latter, is determined. This procedure of determining least favorable response was termed in the literature (Elishakoff, 1991 as an antioptimization. It appears that under inherent uncertainty of earthquake excitation, antioptimization analysis is a viable alternative to stochastic approach.

  19. Earthquake response of inelastic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parulekar, Y.M.; Vaity, K.N.; Reddy, .R.; Vaze, K.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2004-01-01

    The most commonly used method in the seismic analysis of structures is the response spectrum method. For seismic re-evaluation of existing facilities elastic response spectrum method cannot be used directly as large deformation above yield may be observed under Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE). The plastic deformation, i.e. hysteretic characteristics of various elements of the structure cause dissipation of energy. Hence the values of damping given by the code, which does not account hysteretic energy dissipation cannot be directly used. In this paper, appropriate damping values are evaluated for 5-storey, 10-storey and 15-storey shear beam structures, which deform beyond their yield limit. Linear elastic analysis is performed for the same structures using these damping values and the storey forces are compared with those obtained using inelastic time history analysis. A damping model, which relates ductility of the structure and damping, is developed. Using his damping model, a practical structure is analysed and results are compared with inelastic time history analysis and the comparison is found to be good

  20. Site-Specific Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik; Hemmersam, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Currently, cities across the Northern European region are actively redeveloping their former industrial harbours. Indeed, harbours areas are essential in the long-term transition from industrial to information and experience societies; harbours are becoming sites for new businesses and residences...... question is how innovation may contribute to urban life and site-specific qualities....

  1. Earthquake response observation of isolated buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, O.; Kawai, N.; Ishii, T.; Sawada, Y.; Shiojiri, H.; Mazda, T.

    1989-01-01

    Base isolation system is expected to be a technology for a rational design of FBR plant. In order to apply this system to important structures, accumulation of verification data is necessary. From this point of view, the vibration test and the earthquake response observation of the actual isolated building using laminated rubber bearings and elasto-plastic steel dampers were conducted for the purpose of investigating its dynamic behavior and of proving the reliability of the base isolation system. Since September in 1986, more than thirty earthquakes have been observed. This paper presents the results of the earthquake response observation

  2. pH- and NIR Light-Responsive Polymeric Prodrug Micelles for Hyperthermia-Assisted Site-Specific Chemotherapy to Reverse Drug Resistance in Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuhong; Wang, Haibo; Chen, Yangjun; Wang, Yin; Li, Huan; Han, Haijie; Chen, Tingting; Jin, Qiao; Ji, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Despite the exciting advances in cancer chemotherapy over past decades, drug resistance in cancer treatment remains one of the primary reasons for therapeutic failure. IR-780 loaded pH-responsive polymeric prodrug micelles with near infrared (NIR) photothermal effect are developed to circumvent the drug resistance in cancer treatment. The polymeric prodrug micelles are stable in physiological environment, while exhibit fast doxorubicin (DOX) release in acidic condition and significant temperature elevation under NIR laser irradiation. Phosphorylcholine-based biomimetic micellar shell and acid-sensitive drug conjugation endow them with prolonged circulation time and reduced premature drug release during circulation to conduct tumor site-specific chemotherapy. The polymeric prodrug micelles combined with NIR laser irradiation could significantly enhance intracellular DOX accumulation and synergistically induce the cell apoptosis in DOX-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells. Meanwhile, the tumor site-specific chemotherapy combined with hyperthermia effect induces significant inhibition of MCF-7/ADR tumor growth in tumor-bearing mice. These results demonstrate that the well-designed IR-780 loaded polymeric prodrug micelles for hyperthermia-assisted site-specific chemotherapy present an effective approach to reverse drug resistance. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Experimental study of structural response to earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clough, R.W.; Bertero, V.V.; Bouwkamp, J.G.; Popov, E.P.

    1975-01-01

    The objectives, methods, and some of the principal results obtained from experimental studies of the behavior of structures subjected to earthquakes are described. Although such investigations are being conducted in many laboratories throughout the world, the information presented deals specifically with projects being carried out at the Earthquake Engineering Research Center (EERC) of the University of California, Berkeley. A primary purpose of these investigations is to obtain detailed information on the inelastic response mechanisms in typical structural systems so that the experimentally observed performance can be compared with computer generated analytical predictions. Only by such comparisons can the mathematical models used in dynamic nonlinear analyses be verified and improved. Two experimental procedures for investigating earthquake structural response are discussed: the earthquake simulator facility which subjects the base of the test structure to acceleration histories similar to those recorded in actual earthquakes, and systems of hydraulic rams which impose specified displacement histories on the test components, equivalent to motions developed in structures subjected to actual'quakes. The general concept and performance of the 20ft square EERC earthquake simulator is described, and the testing of a two story concrete frame building is outlined. Correlation of the experimental results with analytical predictions demonstrates that satisfactory agreement can be obtained only if the mathematical model incorporates a stiffness deterioration mechanism which simulates the cracking and other damage suffered by the structure

  4. Differential and site specific impact of B cells in the protective immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egídio Torrado

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated immune responses are known to be critical for control of mycobacterial infections whereas the role of B cells and humoral immunity is unclear. B cells can modulate immune responses by secretion of immunoglobulin, production of cytokines and antigen-presentation. To define the impact of B cells in the absence of secreted immunoglobulin, we analyzed the progression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection in mice that have B cells but which lack secretory immunoglobulin (AID(-/-µS(-/-mice. AID(-/-µS(-/- mice accumulated a population of activated B cells in the lungs when infected and were more susceptible to aerosol Mtb when compared to wild type (C57BL/6 mice or indeed mice that totally lack B cells. The enhanced susceptibility of AID(-/-µS(-/- mice was not associated with defective T cell activation or expression of a type 1 immune response. While delivery of normal serum to AID(-/-µS(-/- mice did not reverse susceptibility, susceptibility in the spleen was dependent upon the presence of B cells and susceptibility in the lungs of AID(-/-µS(-/-mice was associated with elevated expression of the cytokines IL-6, GM-CSF, IL-10 and molecules made by alternatively activated macrophages. Blocking of IL-10 signaling resulted in reversal of susceptibility in the spleens and lungs of AID(-/-µS(-/- mice. These data support the hypothesis that B cells can modulate immunity to Mtb in an organ specific manner via the modulation of cytokine production and macrophage activation.

  5. Dose-response relationship between cigarette smoking and site-specific cancer risk: protocol for a systematic review with an original design combining umbrella and traditional reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Alessandra; Bosetti, Cristina; Peveri, Giulia; Rota, Matteo; Bagnardi, Vincenzo; Gallus, Silvano

    2017-11-01

    Only a limited number of meta-analyses providing risk curve functions of dose-response relationships between various smoking-related variables and cancer-specific risk are available. To identify all relevant original publications on the issue, we will conduct a series of comprehensive systematic reviews based on three subsequent literature searches: (1) an umbrella review, to identify meta-analyses, pooled analyses and systematic reviews published before 28 April 2017 on the association between cigarette smoking and the risk of 28 (namely all) malignant neoplasms; (2) for each cancer site, an updated review of original publications on the association between cigarette smoking and cancer risk, starting from the last available comprehensive review identified through the umbrella review; and (3) a review of all original articles on the association between cigarette smoking and site-specific cancer risk included in the publications identified through the umbrella review and the updated reviews. The primary outcomes of interest will be (1) the excess incidence/mortality of various cancers for smokers compared with never smokers; and (2) the dose-response curves describing the association between smoking intensity, duration and time since stopping and incidence/mortality for various cancers. For each cancer site, we will perform a meta-analysis by pooling study-specific estimates for smoking status. We will also estimate the dose-response curves for other smoking-related variables through random-effects meta-regression models based on a non-linear dose-response relationship framework. Ethics approval is not required for this study. Main results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and will also be included in a publicly available website. We will provide therefore the most complete and updated estimates on the association between various measures of cigarette smoking and site-specific cancer risk. This will allow us to obtain precise estimates on the cancer burden

  6. Statistical and Economic Techniques for Site-specific Nematode Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Griffin, Terry; Kirkpatrick, Terrence L

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in precision agriculture technologies and spatial statistics allow realistic, site-specific estimation of nematode damage to field crops and provide a platform for the site-specific delivery of nematicides within individual fields. This paper reviews the spatial statistical techniques that model correlations among neighboring observations and develop a spatial economic analysis to determine the potential of site-specific nematicide application. The spatial econometric methodology applied in the context of site-specific crop yield response contributes to closing the gap between data analysis and realistic site-specific nematicide recommendations and helps to provide a practical method of site-specifically controlling nematodes.

  7. Net Mineralization Response to Fertilizer Application and Site-Specific Setting in a No-Till Dryland Wheat Agroecosystem in the Pacific Northwest (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Emily A.; Brown, David J.; Carpenter-Boggs, Lynn

    2015-04-01

    Application of nitrogen (N) fertilizers is pivotal to maintaining agricultural productivity. Nutrient management is typically guided by a combined assessment of crop yield requirements, residual soil inorganic N concentration, and predicted N supply from organic matter. However, laboratory assays employed to forecast mineralization potential do not reflect in situ processes occurring in soils, processes that can vary spatially within a field. Furthermore, fertilizer application alters biogeochemical cycles through a variety of mechanisms including priming effects and microbial community alterations. This study investigates in-situ ammonification/nitrification rates utilizing mineralization cores as part of a five-year Site-Specific Climate-Friendly Farming (SCF) project. In-depth accounting of nitrate and ammonium production and flux was possible via a six bag mixed-bed ion exchange resin system. Soil cores (7.5 cm diameter by 15 cm deep) were isolated from the surrounding soil by three resin bags sealed in the top and bottom of individual plastic cylinders. Fifteen locations were selected across a commercial direct-seed wheat field based on statistical clustering of primary and secondary topographic variables. In each location surface soil-resin cores were installed in fertilized and unfertilized plots immediately after spring planting and removed before harvest. In situ ammonification/nitrification rates will be analyzed as a function of both fertilizer application and site-specific environmental characteristics as determined from soil moisture monitoring, soil characterization, and crop analysis at each measurement location. This site-specific information on N transformations and availability can then be used to guide site-specific crop management.

  8. Our response to the earthquake at Onagawa Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakawa, Tomoshi

    2008-01-01

    When the Miyagi Offshore earthquake occurred on August 16, 2005, all three units at the Onagawa NPS were shut down automatically according to the Strong Seismic Acceleration' signal. Our inspection after the earthquake confirmed there was no damage to the equipment of the nuclear power plants, but the analysis of the response spectrum observed at the bedrock showed the earthquake had exceeded the 'design-basis earthquake', at certain periods, so that we implemented a review of the seismic safety of plant facilities. In the review, the ground motion of Miyagi Offshore Earthquake which are predicted to occur in the near future were reexamined based on the observation data, and then 'The Ground Motion for Safety Check' surpassing the supposed ground motion of the largest earthquake was established. The seismic safety of plant facilities, important for safety, was assured. At present, No.1 to No.3 units at Onagawa NPS have returned to normal operation. (author)

  9. Earthquake casualty models within the USGS Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Kishor; Wald, David J.; Earle, Paul S.; Porter, Keith A.; Hearne, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Since the launch of the USGS’s Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system in fall of 2007, the time needed for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to determine and comprehend the scope of any major earthquake disaster anywhere in the world has been dramatically reduced to less than 30 min. PAGER alerts consist of estimated shaking hazard from the ShakeMap system, estimates of population exposure at various shaking intensities, and a list of the most severely shaken cities in the epicentral area. These estimates help government, scientific, and relief agencies to guide their responses in the immediate aftermath of a significant earthquake. To account for wide variability and uncertainty associated with inventory, structural vulnerability and casualty data, PAGER employs three different global earthquake fatality/loss computation models. This article describes the development of the models and demonstrates the loss estimation capability for earthquakes that have occurred since 2007. The empirical model relies on country-specific earthquake loss data from past earthquakes and makes use of calibrated casualty rates for future prediction. The semi-empirical and analytical models are engineering-based and rely on complex datasets including building inventories, time-dependent population distributions within different occupancies, the vulnerability of regional building stocks, and casualty rates given structural collapse.

  10. Biomarker responses of mussels exposed to earthquake disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandurvelan, Rathishri; Marsden, Islay D.; Glover, Chris N.; Gaw, Sally

    2016-12-01

    The green-lipped mussel, Perna canaliculus is recognised as a bioindicator of coastal contamination in New Zealand (NZ). Mussels (shell length 60-80 mm) were collected from three intertidal areas of Canterbury in the South Island of NZ prior to extreme earthquake disturbances on 22nd February 2011, and 9 months later in October 2011. Trace elements, including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn), were measured in the gills, digestive gland, foot and mantle. Metal levels in tissues were site specific, and mostly unaffected by earthquake disturbances. Physiological biomarkers were negatively affected by earthquake disturbances and mussels from the Port of Lyttelton had higher negative scope for growth post-earthquake. Metallothionein-like protein in the digestive gland correlated with metal content of tissues, as did catalase activity in the gill and lipid peroxidation values for the digestive gland. This research demonstrates that physiological and other biomarkers are effective at detecting the effects of multiple stressors following seismic disturbances.

  11. Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    An earthquake happens when two blocks of the earth suddenly slip past one another. Earthquakes strike suddenly, violently, and without warning at any time of the day or night. If an earthquake occurs in a populated area, it may cause ...

  12. Earthquake response analysis of a base isolated building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazda, T.; Shiojiri, H.; Sawada, Y.; Harada, O.; Kawai, N.; Ontsuka, S.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, the seismic isolation has become one of the popular methods in the design of important structures or equipments against the earthquakes. However, it is desired to accumulate the demonstration data on reliability of seismically isolated structures and to establish the analysis methods of those structures. Based on the above recognition, the vibration tests of a base isolated building were carried out in Tsukuba Science City. After that, many earthquake records have been obtained at the building. In order to examine the validity of numerical models, earthquake response analyses have been executed by using both lumped mass model, and finite element model

  13. Earthquake responses of a beam supported by a mechanical snubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmata, Kenichiro; Ishizu, Seiji.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical snubber is an earthquakeproof device for piping systems under particular circumstances such as high temperature and radioactivity. It has nonlinearities in both load and frequency response. In this report, the resisting force characteristics of the snubber and earthquake responses of piping (a simply supported beam) which is supported by the snubber are simulated using Continuous System Simulation Language (CSSL). Digital simulations are carried out for various kinds of physical properties of the snubber. The restraint effect and the maximum resisting force of the snubber during earthquakes are discussed and compared with the case of an oil damper. The earthquake waves used here are E1 Centro N-S and Akita Harbour N-S (Nihonkai-Chubu earthquake). (author)

  14. Site-Specific PEGylation of Therapeutic Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan K. Dozier

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of proteins as therapeutics has a long history and is becoming ever more common in modern medicine. While the number of protein-based drugs is growing every year, significant problems still remain with their use. Among these problems are rapid degradation and excretion from patients, thus requiring frequent dosing, which in turn increases the chances for an immunological response as well as increasing the cost of therapy. One of the main strategies to alleviate these problems is to link a polyethylene glycol (PEG group to the protein of interest. This process, called PEGylation, has grown dramatically in recent years resulting in several approved drugs. Installing a single PEG chain at a defined site in a protein is challenging. Recently, there is has been considerable research into various methods for the site-specific PEGylation of proteins. This review seeks to summarize that work and provide background and context for how site-specific PEGylation is performed. After introducing the topic of site-specific PEGylation, recent developments using chemical methods are described. That is followed by a more extensive discussion of bioorthogonal reactions and enzymatic labeling.

  15. Responses to the 2011 Earthquake on Facebook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    In my investigation of how Japanese ODA policies and practices have engendered global networks, I have frequented the Association of Overseas Technical Scholarships (AOTS)' Facebook group. In the wake of the earthquake on March 11, 2011, many greetings came in from alumni who have within the last...

  16. Guidelines for nuclear plant response to an earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    Guidelines have been developed to assist nuclear plant personnel in the preparation of earthquake response procedures for nuclear power plants. The objectives of the earthquake response procedures are to determine (1) the immediate effects of an earthquake on the physical condition of the nuclear power plant, (2) if shutdown of the plant is appropriate based on the observed damage to the plant or because the OBE has been exceeded, and (3) the readiness of the plant to resume operation following shutdown due to an earthquake. Readiness of a nuclear power plant to restart is determined on the basis of visual inspections of nuclear plant equipment and structures, and the successful completion of surveillance tests which demonstrate that the limiting conditions for operation as defined in the plant Technical Specifications are met. The guidelines are based on information obtained from a review of earthquake response procedures from numerous US and foreign nuclear power plants, interviews with nuclear plant operations personnel, and a review of reports of damage to industrial equipment and structures in actual earthquakes. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Twitter Seismology: Earthquake Monitoring and Response in a Social World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, D. C.; Earle, P. S.; Guy, M.; Smoczyk, G.

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is investigating how the social networking site Twitter, a popular service for sending and receiving short, public, text messages, can augment USGS earthquake response products and the delivery of hazard information. The potential uses of Twitter for earthquake response include broadcasting earthquake alerts, rapidly detecting widely felt events, qualitatively assessing earthquake damage effects, communicating with the public, and participating in post-event collaboration. Several seismic networks and agencies are currently distributing Twitter earthquake alerts including the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre (@LastQuake), Natural Resources Canada (@CANADAquakes), and the Indonesian meteorological agency (@infogempabmg); the USGS will soon distribute alerts via the @USGSted and @USGSbigquakes Twitter accounts. Beyond broadcasting alerts, the USGS is investigating how to use tweets that originate near the epicenter to detect and characterize shaking events. This is possible because people begin tweeting immediately after feeling an earthquake, and their short narratives and exclamations are available for analysis within 10's of seconds of the origin time. Using five months of tweets that contain the word "earthquake" and its equivalent in other languages, we generate a tweet-frequency time series. The time series clearly shows large peaks correlated with the origin times of widely felt events. To identify possible earthquakes, we use a simple Short-Term-Average / Long-Term-Average algorithm similar to that commonly used to detect seismic phases. As with most auto-detection algorithms, the parameters can be tuned to catch more or less events at the cost of more or less false triggers. When tuned to a moderate sensitivity, the detector found 48 globally-distributed, confirmed seismic events with only 2 false triggers. A space-shuttle landing and "The Great California ShakeOut" caused the false triggers. This number of

  18. Simulation analysis of earthquake response of nuclear power plant to the 2003 Miyagi-Oki earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshihiro Ogata; Kiyoshi Hirotani; Masayuki Higuchi; Shingo Nakayama

    2005-01-01

    On May 26, 2003 an earthquake of magnitude scale 7.1 (Japan Meteorological Agency) occurred just offshore of Miyagi Prefecture. This was the largest earthquake ever experienced by the nuclear power plant of Tohoku Electric Power Co. in Onagawa (hereafter the Onagawa Nuclear Power Plant) during the 19 years since it had started operations in 1984. In this report, we review the vibration characteristics of the reactor building of the Onagawa Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 based on acceleration records observed at the building, and give an account of a simulation analysis of the earthquake response carried out to ascertain the appropriateness of design procedure and a seismic safety of the building. (authors)

  19. Comparison of Human Response against Earthquake and Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa, T.; Güler, H. G.; Yalciner, A. C.

    2017-12-01

    The evacuation response against the earthquake and tsunamis is very important for the reduction of human damages against tsunami. But it is very difficult to predict the human behavior after shaking of the earthquake. The purpose of this research is to clarify the difference of the human response after the earthquake shock in the difference countries and to consider the relation between the response and the safety feeling, knowledge and education. For the objective of this paper, the questionnaire survey was conducted after the 21st July 2017 Gokova earthquake and tsunami. Then, consider the difference of the human behavior by comparison of that in 2015 Chilean earthquake and tsunami and 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami. The seismic intensity of the survey points was almost 6 to 7. The contents of the questions include the feeling of shaking, recalling of the tsunami, the behavior after shock and so on. The questionnaire was conducted for more than 20 20 people in 10 areas. The results are the following; 1) Most people felt that it was a strong shake not to stand, 2) All of the questionnaires did not recall the tsunami, 3) Depending on the area, they felt that after the earthquake the beach was safer than being at home. 4) After they saw the sea drawing, they thought that a tsunami would come and ran away. Fig. 1 shows the comparison of the evacuation rate within 10 minutes in 2011 Japan, 2015 Chile and 2017 Turkey.. From the education point of view, education for tsunami is not done much in Turkey. From the protection facilities point of view, the high sea walls are constructed only in Japan. From the warning alert point of view, there is no warning system against tsunamis in the Mediterranean Sea. As a result of this survey, the importance of tsunami education is shown, and evacuation tends to be delayed if dependency on facilities and alarms is too high.

  20. Future Earth: Reducing Loss By Automating Response to Earthquake Shaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes pose a significant threat to society in the U.S. and around the world. The risk is easily forgotten given the infrequent recurrence of major damaging events, yet the likelihood of a major earthquake in California in the next 30 years is greater than 99%. As our societal infrastructure becomes ever more interconnected, the potential impacts of these future events are difficult to predict. Yet, the same inter-connected infrastructure also allows us to rapidly detect earthquakes as they begin, and provide seconds, tens or seconds, or a few minutes warning. A demonstration earthquake early warning system is now operating in California and is being expanded to the west coast (www.ShakeAlert.org). In recent earthquakes in the Los Angeles region, alerts were generated that could have provided warning to the vast majority of Los Angelinos who experienced the shaking. Efforts are underway to build a public system. Smartphone technology will be used not only to issue that alerts, but could also be used to collect data, and improve the warnings. The MyShake project at UC Berkeley is currently testing an app that attempts to turn millions of smartphones into earthquake-detectors. As our development of the technology continues, we can anticipate ever-more automated response to earthquake alerts. Already, the BART system in the San Francisco Bay Area automatically stops trains based on the alerts. In the future, elevators will stop, machinery will pause, hazardous materials will be isolated, and self-driving cars will pull-over to the side of the road. In this presentation we will review the current status of the earthquake early warning system in the US. We will illustrate how smartphones can contribute to the system. Finally, we will review applications of the information to reduce future losses.

  1. Intravenously delivered graphene nanosheets and multiwalled carbon nanotubes induce site-specific Th2 inflammatory responses via the IL-33/ST2 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojia; Podila, Ramakrishna; Shannahan, Jonathan H; Rao, Apparao M; Brown, Jared M

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials (CBN), such as graphene nanosheets (GNS) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), have been proposed for potential nanomedicine applications such as biomedical devices and carriers for drug delivery. However, our current understanding regarding the systemic toxicity of these CBN through intravenous (iv) injection is limited. In this study, we compare the immune response resulting from GNS and MWCNT exposure. We hypothesize that iv administration of GNS and MWCNT would result in divergent systemic inflammatory responses due to physicochemical differences between these two CBN. In the lungs of C57BL/6 mice, GNS actuate a Th2 immune response 1 day following iv administration, which consists of neutrophilic influx and a significant increase in interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, IL-33, and its soluble receptor (sST2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. MWCNT elicited a significant increase in the messenger ribonucleic acid expression of cytokines in the spleen including IL-4 and IL-33, which are associated with an increase in splenic cell differentiation (CD)4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells in C57BL/6 mice following iv injection. The observed Th2 responses in both the lung and spleen are absent in ST2(-/-) mice administrated GNS or MWCNT, suggesting a critical role for IL-33. In conclusion, the use of GNS or MWCNT as nanocarriers for drug delivery may result in Th2 immune responses that are mediated through the IL-33/ST2 axis and therefore may promote adverse allergic reactions.

  2. An Overview of Soil Models for Earthquake Response Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halida Yunita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes can damage thousands of buildings and infrastructure as well as cause the loss of thousands of lives. During an earthquake, the damage to buildings is mostly caused by the effect of local soil conditions. Depending on the soil type, the earthquake waves propagating from the epicenter to the ground surface will result in various behaviors of the soil. Several studies have been conducted to accurately obtain the soil response during an earthquake. The soil model used must be able to characterize the stress-strain behavior of the soil during the earthquake. This paper compares equivalent linear and nonlinear soil model responses. Analysis was performed on two soil types, Site Class D and Site Class E. An equivalent linear soil model leads to a constant value of shear modulus, while in a nonlinear soil model, the shear modulus changes constantly,depending on the stress level, and shows inelastic behavior. The results from a comparison of both soil models are displayed in the form of maximum acceleration profiles and stress-strain curves.

  3. Conventional estimating method of earthquake response of mechanical appendage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shigeru; Suzuki, Kohei

    1981-01-01

    Generally, for the estimation of the earthquake response of appendage structure system installed in main structure system, the method of floor response analysis using the response spectra at the point of installing the appendage system has been used. On the other hand, the research on the estimation of the earthquake response of appendage system by the statistical procedure based on probability process theory has been reported. The development of a practical method for simply estimating the response is an important subject in aseismatic engineering. In this study, the method of estimating the earthquake response of appendage system in the general case that the natural frequencies of both structure systems were different was investigated. First, it was shown that floor response amplification factor was able to be estimated simply by giving the ratio of the natural frequencies of both structure systems, and its statistical property was clarified. Next, it was elucidated that the procedure of expressing acceleration, velocity and displacement responses with tri-axial response spectra simultaneously was able to be applied to the expression of FRAF. The applicability of this procedure to nonlinear system was examined. (Kako, I.)

  4. Error evaluation of inelastic response spectrum method for earthquake design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz, M.; Wong, J.

    1981-01-01

    Two-story, four-story and ten-story shear building-type frames subjected to earthquake excitaion, were analyzed at several levels of their yield resistance. These frames were subjected at their base to the motion recorded for north-south component of the 1940 El Centro earthquake, and to an artificial earthquake which would produce the response spectral charts recommended for design. The frames were first subjected to 25% or 50% of the intensity level of these earthquakes. The resulting maximum relative displacement for each story of the frames was assumed to be yield resistance for the subsequent analyses at 100% of intensity for the excitation. The frames analyzed were uniform along their height with the stiffness adjusted as to result in 0.20 seconds of the fundamental period for the two-story frame, 0.40 seconds for the four-story frame and 1.0 seconds for the ten-story frame. Results of the study provided the following conclusions: (1) The percentage error in floor displacement for linear behavior was less than 10%; (2) The percentage error in floor displacement for inelastic behavior (elastoplastic) could be as high as 100%; (3) In most of the cases analyzed, the error increased with damping in the system; (4) As a general rule, the error increased as the modal yield resistance decreased; (5) The error was lower for the structures subjected to the 1940 E1 Centro earthquake than for the same structures subjected to an artificial earthquake which was generated from the response spectra for design. (orig./HP)

  5. Earthquake accelerations estimation for construction calculating with different responsibility degrees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgaya, A.A.; Uzdin, A.M.; Indeykin, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    The investigation object is the design amplitude of accelerograms, which are used in the evaluation of seismic stability of responsible structures, first and foremost, NPS. The amplitude level is established depending on the degree of responsibility of the structure and on the prevailing period of earthquake action on the construction site. The investigation procedure is based on statistical analysis of 310 earthquakes. At the first stage of statistical data-processing we established the correlation dependence of both the mathematical expectation and root-mean-square deviation of peak acceleration of the earthquake on its prevailing period. At the second stage the most suitable law of acceleration distribution about the mean was chosen. To determine of this distribution parameters, we specified the maximum conceivable acceleration, the excess of which is not allowed. Other parameters of distribution are determined according to statistical data. At the third stage the dependencies of design amplitude on the prevailing period of seismic effect for different structures and equipment were established. The obtained data made it possible to recommend to fix the level of safe-shutdown (SSB) and operating basis earthquakes (OBE) for objects of various responsibility categories when designing NPS. (author)

  6. Human Trafficking in Nepal: Post-Earthquake Risk and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, Bishal; Keeling, June; Kallestrup, Per

    2017-04-01

    As Nepal mourns the 1-year commemoration of the April 2015 earthquake and its aftershocks that killed more than 8500 people and left thousands injured and displaced, other more hidden repercussions of the resultant chaotic environment need attention: the increased risk of human trafficking. Considering that natural disasters provide a milieu for this illicit trade, there is a need for a robust response from stakeholders such as donors, civil society organizations, and government organizations against human trafficking following disasters such as the Nepal earthquake. Responsibility to prevent and fight trafficking should be explicitly included in the mandate of relief and rehabilitation mechanisms set up at the national level to coordinate the disaster relief response, serving to support populations in both rural and urban areas. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:153-154).

  7. Report on the 2010 Chilean earthquake and tsunami response

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2011-01-01

    In July 2010, in an effort to reduce future catastrophic natural disaster losses for California, the American Red Cross coordinated and sent a delegation of 20 multidisciplinary experts on earthquake response and recovery to Chile. The primary goal was to understand how the Chilean society and relevant organizations responded to the magnitude 8.8 Maule earthquake that struck the region on February 27, 2010, as well as how an application of these lessons could better prepare California communities, response partners and state emergency partners for a comparable situation. Similarities in building codes, socioeconomic conditions, and broad extent of the strong shaking make the Chilean earthquake a very close analog to the impact of future great earthquakes on California. To withstand and recover from natural and human-caused disasters, it is essential for citizens and communities to work together to anticipate threats, limit effects, and rapidly restore functionality after a crisis. The delegation was hosted by the Chilean Red Cross and received extensive briefings from both national and local Red Cross officials. During nine days in Chile, the delegation also met with officials at the national, regional, and local government levels. Technical briefings were received from the President’s Emergency Committee, emergency managers from ONEMI (comparable to FEMA), structural engineers, a seismologist, hospital administrators, firefighters, and the United Nations team in Chile. Cities visited include Santiago, Talca, Constitución, Concepción, Talcahuano, Tumbes, and Cauquenes. The American Red Cross Multidisciplinary Team consisted of subject matter experts, who carried out special investigations in five Teams on the (1) science and engineering findings, (2) medical services, (3) emergency services, (4) volunteer management, and (5) executive and management issues (see appendix A for a full list of participants and their titles and teams). While developing this

  8. USGS GNSS Applications to Earthquake Disaster Response and Hazard Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudnut, K. W.; Murray, J. R.; Minson, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid characterization of earthquake rupture is important during a disaster because it establishes which fault ruptured and the extent and amount of fault slip. These key parameters, in turn, can augment in situ seismic sensors for identifying disruption to lifelines as well as localized damage along the fault break. Differential GNSS station positioning, along with imagery differencing, are important methods for augmenting seismic sensors. During response to recent earthquakes (1989 Loma Prieta, 1992 Landers, 1994 Northridge, 1999 Hector Mine, 2010 El Mayor - Cucapah, 2012 Brawley Swarm and 2014 South Napa earthquakes), GNSS co-seismic and post-seismic observations proved to be essential for rapid earthquake source characterization. Often, we find that GNSS results indicate key aspects of the earthquake source that would not have been known in the absence of GNSS data. Seismic, geologic, and imagery data alone, without GNSS, would miss important details of the earthquake source. That is, GNSS results provide important additional insight into the earthquake source properties, which in turn help understand the relationship between shaking and damage patterns. GNSS also adds to understanding of the distribution of slip along strike and with depth on a fault, which can help determine possible lifeline damage due to fault offset, as well as the vertical deformation and tilt that are vitally important for gravitationally driven water systems. The GNSS processing work flow that took more than one week 25 years ago now takes less than one second. Formerly, portable receivers needed to be set up at a site, operated for many hours, then data retrieved, processed and modeled by a series of manual steps. The establishment of continuously telemetered, continuously operating high-rate GNSS stations and the robust automation of all aspects of data retrieval and processing, has led to sub-second overall system latency. Within the past few years, the final challenges of

  9. Earthquake response of heavily damaged historical masonry mosques after restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunışık, Ahmet Can; Fuat Genç, Ali

    2017-10-01

    Restoration works have been accelerated substantially in Turkey in the last decade. Many historical buildings, mosques, minaret, bridges, towers and structures have been restored. With these restorations an important issue arises, namely how restoration work affects the structure. For this reason, we aimed to investigate the restoration effect on the earthquake response of a historical masonry mosque considering the openings on the masonry dome. For this purpose, we used the Hüsrev Pasha Mosque, which is located in the Ortakapı district in the old city of Van, Turkey. The region of Van is in an active seismic zone; therefore, earthquake analyses were performed in this study. Firstly a finite element model of the mosque was constructed considering the restoration drawings and 16 window openings on the dome. Then model was constructed with eight window openings. Structural analyses were performed under dead load and earthquake load, and the mode superposition method was used in analyses. Maximum displacements, maximum-minimum principal stresses and shear stresses are given with contours diagrams. The results are analyzed according to Turkish Earthquake Code (TEC, 2007) and compared between 8 and 16 window openings cases. The results show that reduction of the window openings affected the structural behavior of the mosque positively.

  10. On the Regional Dependence of Earthquake Response Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas , John

    2007-01-01

    International audience; It is common practice to use ground-motion models, often developed by regression on recorded accelerograms, to predict the expected earthquake response spectra at sites of interest. An important consideration when selecting these models is the possible dependence of ground motions on geographical region, i.e., are median ground motions in the (target) region of interest for a given magnitude and distance the same as those in the (host) region where a ground-motion mode...

  11. Earthquake response analysis considering structure-soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiomi, T.; Takahashi, K.; Oguro, E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper proposes a numerical method of earthquake response analysis considering the structure-soil-structure interaction between two adjacent buildings. In this paper an analytical study is presented in order to show some typical features of coupling effects of two reactor buildings of the BWR-type nuclear power plant. The technical approach is a kind of substructure method, which at first evaluates the compliance properties with the foundation-soil-foundation interaction and then uses the compliance in determining seismic responses of two super-structures during earthquake motions. For this purpose, it is assumed that the soil medium is an elastic half space for modeling and that the rigidity of any type of structures such as piping facilities connecting the adjacent buildings is negligible. The technical approach is mainly based on the following procedures. Supersturcture stiffness is calculated by using the method which has been developed in our laboratory based on the Thin-Wall Beam Theory. Soil stiffness is expressed by a matrix with 12 x 12 elements as a function of frequency, which is calculated using the soil compliance functions proposed in Dr. Tajimi's Theory. These stiffness values may be expressed by complex numbers for modeling the damping mechanism of superstructures. We can solve eigenvalue problems with frequency dependent stiffness and the large-scale matrix using our method which is based on condensing the matrix to the suitable size by Rayleigh-Ritz method. Earthquake responses can be solved in the frequency domain by Fourier Transform. (orig./RW)

  12. Assessment of precast beam-column using capacity demand response spectrum subject to design basis earthquake and maximum considered earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Kay Dora Abd.; Tukiar, Mohd Azuan; Hamid, Nor Hayati Abdul

    2017-08-01

    Malaysia is surrounded by the tectonic feature of the Sumatera area which consists of two seismically active inter-plate boundaries, namely the Indo-Australian and the Eurasian Plates on the west and the Philippine Plates on the east. Hence, Malaysia experiences tremors from far distant earthquake occurring in Banda Aceh, Nias Island, Padang and other parts of Sumatera Indonesia. In order to predict the safety of precast buildings in Malaysia under near field ground motion the response spectrum analysis could be used for dealing with future earthquake whose specific nature is unknown. This paper aimed to develop of capacity demand response spectrum subject to Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) and Maximum Considered Earthquake (MCE) in order to assess the performance of precast beam column joint. From the capacity-demand response spectrum analysis, it can be concluded that the precast beam-column joints would not survive when subjected to earthquake excitation with surface-wave magnitude, Mw, of more than 5.5 Scale Richter (Type 1 spectra). This means that the beam-column joint which was designed using the current code of practice (BS8110) would be severely damaged when subjected to high earthquake excitation. The capacity-demand response spectrum analysis also shows that the precast beam-column joints in the prototype studied would be severely damaged when subjected to Maximum Considered Earthquake (MCE) with PGA=0.22g having a surface-wave magnitude of more than 5.5 Scale Richter, or Type 1 spectra.

  13. A STUDY ON THE EARTHQUAKE RESPONSE AND EARTHQUAKE RESISTANT DESIGN METHOD OF AN OPEN TYPE WHARF WITH PNEUMATIC CAISSONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masahiko; Nagao, Takashi; Shigeki, Kouji; Ouchi, Masatoshi; Sato, Yuske; Kinomiya, Osamu

    Seismic response of an open type wharf with pneumatic caisson was clarified using a dynamic finite element method. As a result, rocking behavior of caisson foundations were observed and applicability of a frame model analysis to the earthquake resistant design of a wharf was suggested. Authors proposed the framework of earthquake resistant design method of the wharf including the evaluation method of response acceleration of the wharf.

  14. E-DECIDER Decision Support Gateway For Earthquake Disaster Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasscoe, M. T.; Stough, T. M.; Parker, J. W.; Burl, M. C.; Donnellan, A.; Blom, R. G.; Pierce, M. E.; Wang, J.; Ma, Y.; Rundle, J. B.; Yoder, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquake Data Enhanced Cyber-Infrastructure for Disaster Evaluation and Response (E-DECIDER) is a NASA-funded project developing capabilities for decision-making utilizing remote sensing data and modeling software in order to provide decision support for earthquake disaster management and response. E-DECIDER incorporates earthquake forecasting methodology and geophysical modeling tools developed through NASA's QuakeSim project in order to produce standards-compliant map data products to aid in decision-making following an earthquake. Remote sensing and geodetic data, in conjunction with modeling and forecasting tools, help provide both long-term planning information for disaster management decision makers as well as short-term information following earthquake events (i.e. identifying areas where the greatest deformation and damage has occurred and emergency services may need to be focused). E-DECIDER utilizes a service-based GIS model for its cyber-infrastructure in order to produce standards-compliant products for different user types with multiple service protocols (such as KML, WMS, WFS, and WCS). The goal is to make complex GIS processing and domain-specific analysis tools more accessible to general users through software services as well as provide system sustainability through infrastructure services. The system comprises several components, which include: a GeoServer for thematic mapping and data distribution, a geospatial database for storage and spatial analysis, web service APIs, including simple-to-use REST APIs for complex GIS functionalities, and geoprocessing tools including python scripts to produce standards-compliant data products. These are then served to the E-DECIDER decision support gateway (http://e-decider.org), the E-DECIDER mobile interface, and to the Department of Homeland Security decision support middleware UICDS (Unified Incident Command and Decision Support). The E-DECIDER decision support gateway features a web interface that

  15. Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER): A System for Rapidly Determining the Impact of Earthquakes Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, Paul S.; Wald, David J.; Jaiswal, Kishor S.; Allen, Trevor I.; Hearne, Michael G.; Marano, Kristin D.; Hotovec, Alicia J.; Fee, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Within minutes of a significant earthquake anywhere on the globe, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system assesses its potential societal impact. PAGER automatically estimates the number of people exposed to severe ground shaking and the shaking intensity at affected cities. Accompanying maps of the epicentral region show the population distribution and estimated ground-shaking intensity. A regionally specific comment describes the inferred vulnerability of the regional building inventory and, when available, lists recent nearby earthquakes and their effects. PAGER's results are posted on the USGS Earthquake Program Web site (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/), consolidated in a concise one-page report, and sent in near real-time to emergency responders, government agencies, and the media. Both rapid and accurate results are obtained through manual and automatic updates of PAGER's content in the hours following significant earthquakes. These updates incorporate the most recent estimates of earthquake location, magnitude, faulting geometry, and first-hand accounts of shaking. PAGER relies on a rich set of earthquake analysis and assessment tools operated by the USGS and contributing Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) regional networks. A focused research effort is underway to extend PAGER's near real-time capabilities beyond population exposure to quantitative estimates of fatalities, injuries, and displaced population.

  16. Site-specific weed control technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Svend; Søgaard, Henning Tangen; Kudsk, Per

    2009-01-01

    Site-specific weed control technologies are defined as machinery or equipment embedded with technologies that detect weeds growing in a crop and, taking into account predefined factors such as economics, takes action to maximise the chances of successfully controlling them. In the article, we...... describe the basic parts of site specific weed control technologies, comprising of weed sensing systems, weed management models and precision weed control implements. A review of state-of-the-art technologies shows that several weed sensing systems and precision implements have been developed over the last...... of knowledge about the economic and environmental potential for increasing the resolution of weed control. The integration of site-specific information on weed distribution, weed species composition and density, and the effect on crop yield, is decisive for successful site-specific weed management.   Keywords...

  17. Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franović, Igor, E-mail: franovic@ipb.ac.rs [Scientific Computing Laboratory, Institute of Physics Belgrade, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Kostić, Srdjan [Institute for the Development of Water Resources “Jaroslav Černi,” Jaroslava Černog 80, 11226 Belgrade (Serbia); Perc, Matjaž [Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, University of Maribor, Koroška cesta 160, SI-2000 Maribor (Slovenia); CAMTP—Center for Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Maribor, Krekova 2, SI-2000 Maribor (Slovenia); Klinshov, Vladimir [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov Street, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Nekorkin, Vladimir [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov Street, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Prospekt Gagarina, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Kurths, Jürgen [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov Street, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, 14412 Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Physics, Humboldt University Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    We systematically study effects of external perturbations on models describing earthquake fault dynamics. The latter are based on the framework of the Burridge-Knopoff spring-block system, including the cases of a simple mono-block fault, as well as the paradigmatic complex faults made up of two identical or distinct blocks. The blocks exhibit relaxation oscillations, which are representative for the stick-slip behavior typical for earthquake dynamics. Our analysis is carried out by determining the phase response curves of first and second order. For a mono-block fault, we consider the impact of a single and two successive pulse perturbations, further demonstrating how the profile of phase response curves depends on the fault parameters. For a homogeneous two-block fault, our focus is on the scenario where each of the blocks is influenced by a single pulse, whereas for heterogeneous faults, we analyze how the response of the system depends on whether the stimulus is applied to the block having a shorter or a longer oscillation period.

  18. Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franović, Igor; Kostić, Srdjan; Perc, Matjaž; Klinshov, Vladimir; Nekorkin, Vladimir; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    We systematically study effects of external perturbations on models describing earthquake fault dynamics. The latter are based on the framework of the Burridge-Knopoff spring-block system, including the cases of a simple mono-block fault, as well as the paradigmatic complex faults made up of two identical or distinct blocks. The blocks exhibit relaxation oscillations, which are representative for the stick-slip behavior typical for earthquake dynamics. Our analysis is carried out by determining the phase response curves of first and second order. For a mono-block fault, we consider the impact of a single and two successive pulse perturbations, further demonstrating how the profile of phase response curves depends on the fault parameters. For a homogeneous two-block fault, our focus is on the scenario where each of the blocks is influenced by a single pulse, whereas for heterogeneous faults, we analyze how the response of the system depends on whether the stimulus is applied to the block having a shorter or a longer oscillation period.

  19. Site-Specific Infrared Probes of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianqiang; Pazos, Ileana M.; Zhang, Wenkai; Culik, Robert M.; Gai, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has played an instrumental role in studying a wide variety of biological questions. However, in many cases it is impossible or difficult to rely on the intrinsic vibrational modes of biological molecules of interest, such as proteins, to reveal structural and/or environmental information in a site-specific manner. To overcome this limitation, many recent efforts have been dedicated to the development and application of various extrinsic vibrational probes that can be incorporated into biological molecules and used to site-specifically interrogate their structural and/or environmental properties. In this Review, we highlight some recent advancements of this rapidly growing research area. PMID:25580624

  20. DOE site-specific threat assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, D.J.; Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    A facility manager faced with the challenges of protecting a nuclear facility against potential threats must consider the likelihood and consequences of such threats, know the capabilities of the facility safeguards and security systems, and make informed decisions about the cost-effectivness of safeguards and security upgrades. To help meet these challenges, the San Francisco Operations Office of the Department of Energy, in conjunction with the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, has developed a site-specific threat assessment approach and a quantitative model to improve the quality and consistency of site-specific threat assessment and resultant security upgrade decisions at sensitive Department of Energy facilities. 5 figs

  1. Who is Responsible for Human Suffering due to Earthquakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, M.

    2012-12-01

    A court in L'Aquila, Italy, convicted seven to six years in prison and a combined fine of two million Euros for not following their "obligation to avoid death, injury and damage, or at least to minimize them," as the prosecution alleged. These men lose their jobs and pensions, and are banned from holding public office. Meanwhile, the town of L'Aquila is teeming with furious citizens, who are preparing additional civil suits against the defendants, whom they hold responsible for the deaths of their loved ones, killed by collapsing buildings during the magnitude 6.3 earthquake of April 6, 2009. Before this shock, an earthquake swarm had scared the inhabitants for several weeks. To calm the population, the vice-director of the Department of Civil Protection (DCP) called a meeting of the Italian Commission of Great Risks (CGR) in L'Aquila to assess the situation on March 31. One hour before this meeting, the vice-director stated in a TV interview that the seismic situation in L'Aquila was "certainly normal" and posed "no danger" and he added that "the scientific community continues to assure me that, to the contrary, it's a favorable situation because of the continuous discharge of energy." This statement is untrue in two ways. Firstly, small earthquakes do not release enough strain energy to reduce the potential for a large shock, and secondly no seismologist would make such a statement because we know it is not true. However, the population clung to the idea: "the more tremors, the less danger". People who lost relatives allege that they would have left their homes, had they not been falsely assured of their safety. The court treated all seven alike, although they had very different functions and obligations. Two were leaders in DCP, four were members of the CGR, and one was a seismology expert, who brought the latest seismic data. The minutes of the meeting show that none of the experts said anything wrong. They all stated that the probability of a main shock to

  2. Prospects for site specific weed management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Svend; Rasmussen, Jesper; Pedersen, Søren Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Research on Site Specific Weed Management (SSWM) started in the late 80's. Since that moment, considerable research has been conducted on different aspects of SSWM, from fundamental studies on the spatial ecology of weeds to the applied development and testing of new technologies for weed detection...

  3. The UK medical response to the Sichuan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, A D; Li, J

    2011-06-01

    At 14:48 on 12 May 2008 an earthquake of magnitude 8.0 struck the Wenchuan area of Sichuan province, China. A decision to offer/receive UK medical assistance was agreed at a Sino/British political level and a medical team was despatched to the earthquake area. This study describes the team's experience during the immediate aftermath of the earthquake and the following 18 months, during which there have been joint developments in emergency medicine, disaster planning/preparedness and the management of spinal cord injury. The long-term disability following sudden onset natural disaster and the wider impact on healthcare delivery may prove to be a greater burden to the country than the immediate medical needs, and, accordingly, emergency international aid may need to widen its focus. Although international teams usually arrive too late to support resuscitative measures, they can respond to specific requests for specialised assistance, for example plastic and reconstructive surgery to assist with the ongoing management of complex injury, relieve those who have worked continuously through the disaster, and when required maintain routine day-to-day services while local staff continue to manage the disaster. The timing of this does not necessarily need to be immediate. To maximise its impact, the team planned from the outset to build a relationship with Chinese colleagues that would lead to a sharing of knowledge and experience that would benefit major incident responses in both countries in the future. This has been established, and the linkage of emergency humanitarian assistance to longer term development should be considered by others the next time international emergency humanitarian assistance is contemplated.

  4. A quick earthquake disaster loss assessment method supported by dasymetric data for emergency response in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinghai; An, Jiwen; Nie, Gaozong

    2016-04-01

    Improving earthquake disaster loss estimation speed and accuracy is one of the key factors in effective earthquake response and rescue. The presentation of exposure data by applying a dasymetric map approach has good potential for addressing this issue. With the support of 30'' × 30'' areal exposure data (population and building data in China), this paper presents a new earthquake disaster loss estimation method for emergency response situations. This method has two phases: a pre-earthquake phase and a co-earthquake phase. In the pre-earthquake phase, we pre-calculate the earthquake loss related to different seismic intensities and store them in a 30'' × 30'' grid format, which has several stages: determining the earthquake loss calculation factor, gridding damage probability matrices, calculating building damage and calculating human losses. Then, in the co-earthquake phase, there are two stages of estimating loss: generating a theoretical isoseismal map to depict the spatial distribution of the seismic intensity field; then, using the seismic intensity field to extract statistics of losses from the pre-calculated estimation data. Thus, the final loss estimation results are obtained. The method is validated by four actual earthquakes that occurred in China. The method not only significantly improves the speed and accuracy of loss estimation but also provides the spatial distribution of the losses, which will be effective in aiding earthquake emergency response and rescue. Additionally, related pre-calculated earthquake loss estimation data in China could serve to provide disaster risk analysis before earthquakes occur. Currently, the pre-calculated loss estimation data and the two-phase estimation method are used by the China Earthquake Administration.

  5. Earthquake response of nuclear reactor building deeply embedded in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masao, T.; Hirasawa, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Koori, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Regarding the earthquake response of nuclear reactor building embedded in soil, experimental and theoretical investigations has been performed on a model of height-3.75 meter, bottom cross section-5x5 meter, weight-173 ton made of conrete under the financial support of Japanese government (The Science and Technology Agency). The top of model was excited by an eccentric mass vibration that can generate maximum force of 3 tons. Earthpressures were measured at the bottom and side wall of model, and displacements were also measured at the top of model (6 components) and ground surface changed in the steps which were 0, 20, 47, 73, 100% (against the height of model). Using these experimental results and soil properties, dynamical characteristics were studied, including resonant frequency, radiation damping, vibrational mode, frequency response and earthpressure distribution around the model at varying embedment by lumped model, cyclindrical elastic wave model and FEM models (thin layer elements). (Auth.)

  6. Food, water, and fault lines: Remote sensing opportunities for earthquake-response management of agricultural water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Jenna; Ustin, Susan; Sandoval-Solis, Samuel; O'Geen, Anthony Toby

    2016-01-01

    Earthquakes often cause destructive and unpredictable changes that can affect local hydrology (e.g. groundwater elevation or reduction) and thus disrupt land uses and human activities. Prolific agricultural regions overlie seismically active areas, emphasizing the importance to improve our understanding and monitoring of hydrologic and agricultural systems following a seismic event. A thorough data collection is necessary for adequate post-earthquake crop management response; however, the large spatial extent of earthquake's impact makes challenging the collection of robust data sets for identifying locations and magnitude of these impacts. Observing hydrologic responses to earthquakes is not a novel concept, yet there is a lack of methods and tools for assessing earthquake's impacts upon the regional hydrology and agricultural systems. The objective of this paper is to describe how remote sensing imagery, methods and tools allow detecting crop responses and damage incurred after earthquakes because a change in the regional hydrology. Many remote sensing datasets are long archived with extensive coverage and with well-documented methods to assess plant-water relations. We thus connect remote sensing of plant water relations to its utility in agriculture using a post-earthquake agrohydrologic remote sensing (PEARS) framework; specifically in agro-hydrologic relationships associated with recent earthquake events that will lead to improved water management. - Highlights: • Remote sensing to improve agricultural disaster management • Introduce post-earthquake agrohydrologic remote sensing (PEARS) framework • Apply PEARS framework to 2010 Maule Earthquake in Central Chile

  7. Food, water, and fault lines: Remote sensing opportunities for earthquake-response management of agricultural water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Jenna, E-mail: jmmartin@ucdavis.edu; Ustin, Susan; Sandoval-Solis, Samuel; O' Geen, Anthony Toby

    2016-09-15

    Earthquakes often cause destructive and unpredictable changes that can affect local hydrology (e.g. groundwater elevation or reduction) and thus disrupt land uses and human activities. Prolific agricultural regions overlie seismically active areas, emphasizing the importance to improve our understanding and monitoring of hydrologic and agricultural systems following a seismic event. A thorough data collection is necessary for adequate post-earthquake crop management response; however, the large spatial extent of earthquake's impact makes challenging the collection of robust data sets for identifying locations and magnitude of these impacts. Observing hydrologic responses to earthquakes is not a novel concept, yet there is a lack of methods and tools for assessing earthquake's impacts upon the regional hydrology and agricultural systems. The objective of this paper is to describe how remote sensing imagery, methods and tools allow detecting crop responses and damage incurred after earthquakes because a change in the regional hydrology. Many remote sensing datasets are long archived with extensive coverage and with well-documented methods to assess plant-water relations. We thus connect remote sensing of plant water relations to its utility in agriculture using a post-earthquake agrohydrologic remote sensing (PEARS) framework; specifically in agro-hydrologic relationships associated with recent earthquake events that will lead to improved water management. - Highlights: • Remote sensing to improve agricultural disaster management • Introduce post-earthquake agrohydrologic remote sensing (PEARS) framework • Apply PEARS framework to 2010 Maule Earthquake in Central Chile.

  8. Nanoparticles for Site Specific Genome Editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeer, Nicole Ali

    Triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) can be used to coordinate the recombination of short 50-60 by "donor DNA" fragments into genomic DNA, resulting in site-specific correction of genetic mutations or the introduction of advantageous genetic modifications. Site-specific gene editing in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) could result in treatment or cure of inherited disorders of the blood such as beta-thalassemia. Gene editing in HSPCs and differentiated T cells could help combat HIV/AIDs by modifying receptors, such as CCR5, necessary for R5-tropic HIV entry. However, translation of genome modification technologies to clinical practice is limited by challenges in intracellular delivery, especially in difficult-to-transfect hematolymphoid cells. In vivo gene editing could also provide novel treatment for systemic monogenic disorders such as cystic fibrosis, an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor. Here, we have engineered biodegradable nanoparticles to deliver oligonucleotides for site-specific genome editing of disease-relevant genes in human cells, with high efficiency, low toxicity, and editing of clinically relevant cell types. We designed nanoparticles to edit the human beta-globin and CCR5 genes in hematopoietic cells. We show that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles can delivery PNA and donor DNA for site-specific gene modification in human hematopoietic cells in vitro and in vivo in NOD-scid IL2rgammanull mice. Nanoparticles delivered by tail vein localized to hematopoietic compartments in the spleen and bone marrow of humanized mice, resulting in modification of the beta-globin and CCR5 genes. Modification frequencies ranged from 0.005 to 20% of cells depending on the organ and cell type, without detectable toxicity. This project developed highly versatile methods for delivery of therapeutics to hematolymphoid cells and hematopoietic stem cells, and will help to

  9. A neural network based methodology to predict site-specific spectral acceleration values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamatchi, P.; Rajasankar, J.; Ramana, G. V.; Nagpal, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    A general neural network based methodology that has the potential to replace the computationally-intensive site-specific seismic analysis of structures is proposed in this paper. The basic framework of the methodology consists of a feed forward back propagation neural network algorithm with one hidden layer to represent the seismic potential of a region and soil amplification effects. The methodology is implemented and verified with parameters corresponding to Delhi city in India. For this purpose, strong ground motions are generated at bedrock level for a chosen site in Delhi due to earthquakes considered to originate from the central seismic gap of the Himalayan belt using necessary geological as well as geotechnical data. Surface level ground motions and corresponding site-specific response spectra are obtained by using a one-dimensional equivalent linear wave propagation model. Spectral acceleration values are considered as a target parameter to verify the performance of the methodology. Numerical studies carried out to validate the proposed methodology show that the errors in predicted spectral acceleration values are within acceptable limits for design purposes. The methodology is general in the sense that it can be applied to other seismically vulnerable regions and also can be updated by including more parameters depending on the state-of-the-art in the subject.

  10. Source Spectra and Site Response for Two Indonesian Earthquakes: the Tasikmalaya and Kerinci Events of 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, I.; Cummins, P. R.; Ghasemi, H.; Suhardjono, S.

    2012-12-01

    Indonesia is very prone to natural disasters, especially earthquakes, due to its location in a tectonically active region. In September-October 2009 alone, intraslab and crustal earthquakes caused the deaths of thousands of people, severe infrastructure destruction and considerable economic loss. Thus, both intraslab and crustal earthquakes are important sources of earthquake hazard in Indonesia. Analysis of response spectra for these intraslab and crustal earthquakes are needed to yield more detail about earthquake properties. For both types of earthquakes, we have analysed available Indonesian seismic waveform data to constrain source and path parameters - i.e., low frequency spectral level, Q, and corner frequency - at reference stations that appear to be little influenced by site response.. We have considered these analyses for the main shocks as well as several aftershocks. We obtain corner frequencies that are reasonably consistent with the constant stress drop hypothesis. Using these results, we consider using them to extract information about site response form other stations form the Indonesian strong motion network that appear to be strongly affected by site response. Such site response data, as well as earthquake source parameters, are important for assessing earthquake hazard in Indonesia.

  11. Microzonation and site-specific ground motion modelling for Delhi city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, Imtiyaz A.; Vaccari, F.; Panza, G.F.

    2002-11-01

    Delhi - the capital of India - lies on a severe earthquake hazard threats not only from the local earthquakes but also from Himalayan events just 200-250 km apart. The seismic ground motion in a part of Delhi City is computed with a hybrid technique based (on the based) on the modal summation and the finite difference scheme for site-specific strong ground motion modelling. Complete realistic SH and P-SV wave seismograms are computed along two geological cross-sections, (1) North-South, from Inter State Bus Terminal (ISBT) to Sewanagar and (2) East- West, from Tilak Bridge to Punjabi Bagh. Two real earthquake sources of July 15, 1720 (MMI=IX, M=7.4) and August 27, 1960 (M=6.0) have been used in the modelling. The response spectra ratio (RSR), i.e. the response spectra computed from the signals synthesized along the laterally varying section normalized by the response spectra computed from the corresponding signals, synthesized for the bedrock reference regional model, have been determined. As expected, the sedimentary cover causes an increase of the signal amplitude particularly in the radial and transverse components. To further check the site-effects, we reversed the source location to the other side of the cross-section and re-computed the site amplifications. There are only a few sites where a large amplification is invariant with respect to the two source locations considered. The RSR ranges between 5 to 10 in the frequency range from 2.8 to 3.7 Hz, for the radial and transverse components of motion along the NS cross-section. Along the EW cross-section RSR varies between 3.5 to 7.5 in the frequency range from 3.5 to 4.1 Hz. The amplification of the vertical component is large at high frequency (>4 Hz) whereas it is negligible in lower frequency range. (author)

  12. Earthquake response of nuclear reactor buildings deeply embedded in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masao, T.; Takasaki, Y.; Hirasawa, M.; Okajima, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Kawata, E.; Koori, Y.; Ochiai, S.; Shimizu, N.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is concerned with experimental and analytical studies to investigate dynamic behavior of deeply embedded structures such as nuclear reactor buildings. The principal points studied are as follows: (1) Examination of stiffness and radiation damping effects according to embedded depth, (2) verification for distributions of earth pressure according to embedded depth, (3) differences of response characteristics during oscillation according to embedded depth, and (4) proposal of an analytical method for seismic design. Experimental studies were performed by two ways: forced vibration test, and earthquake observation against a rigid body model embedded in soil. Three analytical procedures were performed to compare experimental results and to examine the relation between each procedure. Finally, the dynamic behavior for nuclear reactor buildings with different embedded depths were evaluated by an analytical method. (orig.)

  13. Chile Earthquake: U.S. and International Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    most regions far from the epicenter did not experience any serious damage. A tsunami caused significant damage to the city of Hilo , Hawaii ...Tsunami Warning Center for Hawaii , Japan, and other regions bordering the Pacific Ocean that may have been vulnerable to a damaging tsunami, although...earthquake. Why the 1960 earthquake generated a tsunami that caused damage and fatalities in Hawaii , Japan, and the Philippines while the 2010 earthquake did

  14. The Technical Efficiency of Earthquake Medical Rapid Response Teams Following Disasters: The Case of the 2010 Yushu Earthquake in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Tang, Bihan; Yang, Hongyang; Liu, Yuan; Xue, Chen; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-12-04

    Performance assessments of earthquake medical rapid response teams (EMRRTs), particularly the first responders deployed to the hardest hit areas following major earthquakes, should consider efficient and effective use of resources. This study assesses the daily technical efficiency of EMRRTs in the emergency period immediately following the 2010 Yushu earthquake in China. Data on EMRRTs were obtained from official daily reports of the general headquarters for Yushu earthquake relief, the emergency office of the National Ministry of Health, and the Health Department of Qinghai Province, for a sample of data on 15 EMRRTs over 62 days. Data envelopment analysis was used to examine the technical efficiency in a constant returns to scale model, a variable returns to scale model, and the scale efficiency of EMRRTs. Tobit regression was applied to analyze the effects of corresponding influencing factors. The average technical efficiency scores under constant returns to scale, variable returns to scale, and the scale efficiency scores of the 62 units of analysis were 77.95%, 89.00%, and 87.47%, respectively. The staff-to-bed ratio was significantly related to global technical efficiency. The date of rescue was significantly related to pure technical efficiency. The type of institution to which an EMRRT belonged and the staff-to-bed ratio were significantly related to scale efficiency. This study provides evidence that supports improvements to EMRRT efficiency and serves as a reference for earthquake emergency medical rapid assistance leaders and teams.

  15. The Technical Efficiency of Earthquake Medical Rapid Response Teams Following Disasters: The Case of the 2010 Yushu Earthquake in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Performance assessments of earthquake medical rapid response teams (EMRRTs, particularly the first responders deployed to the hardest hit areas following major earthquakes, should consider efficient and effective use of resources. This study assesses the daily technical efficiency of EMRRTs in the emergency period immediately following the 2010 Yushu earthquake in China. Methods: Data on EMRRTs were obtained from official daily reports of the general headquarters for Yushu earthquake relief, the emergency office of the National Ministry of Health, and the Health Department of Qinghai Province, for a sample of data on 15 EMRRTs over 62 days. Data envelopment analysis was used to examine the technical efficiency in a constant returns to scale model, a variable returns to scale model, and the scale efficiency of EMRRTs. Tobit regression was applied to analyze the effects of corresponding influencing factors. Results: The average technical efficiency scores under constant returns to scale, variable returns to scale, and the scale efficiency scores of the 62 units of analysis were 77.95%, 89.00%, and 87.47%, respectively. The staff-to-bed ratio was significantly related to global technical efficiency. The date of rescue was significantly related to pure technical efficiency. The type of institution to which an EMRRT belonged and the staff-to-bed ratio were significantly related to scale efficiency. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that supports improvements to EMRRT efficiency and serves as a reference for earthquake emergency medical rapid assistance leaders and teams.

  16. Modelo de respuesta sitio-específica del maíz al nitrógeno y agua edáfica en un haplustol Site-specific corn nitrogen and soil water response model in haplustolls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Celeste Gregoret

    2006-12-01

    , y con los niveles de fertilización a la siembra. Esta variación estuvo comprendida entre 6.632 y 9.735 kg ha-1 en la zona de baja productividad, 6.981 y 10.434 kg ha-1 en la de alta productividad y 8.330 y 14.258 kg ha-1 en las parcelas con riego. El N disponible óptimo agronómico (DOA considerando para N el perfil hasta 60 cm y hasta 200 cm para el agua útil inicial en cada zona manejo, fue de 285, 184 y 162 kg ha-1 para las zonas de mayor a menor productividad. Por otra parte el N disponible óptimo económico (DOE fue de 171, 111 y 90 kg ha-1, respectivamente. Se concluye que la inclusión del agua y N inicial en un suelo Haplustol permitió en principio la obtención de un único modelo de respuesta al N disponible en las diferentes zonas de manejo en secano, y en riego excluyendo el agua inicial como variable, dado que en este caso no fue factor limitante. Este único modelo fue obtenido utilizando como variables N inicial a 200 cm o a 60 cm y agua inicial hasta 200 cm, lo que permitiría la aplicación de recomendaciones de fertilización con dosis variable, maximizar el beneficio económico y/o minimizar riesgos de contaminación del ambiente por la aplicación de sobredosis de insumos. Las conclusiones son preliminares ya que provienen de un solo experimento que no cubrió el rango de todas las condiciones iniciales posibles, siendo necesarios más escenarios para validar el modelo propuesto.Appropriate strategies for nitrogen fertilization in corn production is specially important in semi-arid regions, where soil water and nutrients are limiting factors. Precision agriculture has the potential to adjust fertilizer rates according to soil types and/or other defined conditions within management zones. The objectives were: i to determine the site specific response of corn to nitrogen and available water at planting, and ii to determine the economic and agronomic optimal levels of nitrogen and water. Three management zones with different production

  17. Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering

  18. Seismic response analysis of Wolsung NPP structure and equipment subjected to scenario earthquakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, In Kil; Ahn, Seong Moon; Choun, Young Sun; Seo, Jeong Moon

    2005-03-15

    The standard response spectrum proposed by US NRC has been used as a design earthquake for the design of Korean nuclear power plant structures. However, it does not reflect the characteristic of seismological and geological of Korea. In this study, the seismic response analysis of Wolsung NPP structure and equipment were performed. Three types of input motions, artificial time histories that envelop the US NRC Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum and the probability based scenario earthquake spectra developed for the Korean NPP site and a typical near-fault earthquake recorded at thirty sites, were used as input motions. The acceleration, displacement and shear force responses of Wolsung containment structure due to the design earthquake were larger than those due to the other input earthquakes. But, considering displacement response increases abruptly as Wolsung NPP structure does nonlinear behavior, the reassessment of the seismic safety margin based on the displacement is necessary if the structure does nonlinear behavior; although it has adequate the seismic safety margin within elastic limit. Among the main safety-related devices, electrical cabinet and pump showed the large responses on the scenario earthquake which has the high frequency characteristic. This has great effects of the seismic capacity of the main devices installed inside of the building. This means that the design earthquake is not so conservative for the safety of the safety related nuclear power plant equipments.

  19. Seismic response analysis of Wolsung NPP structure and equipment subjected to scenario earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, In Kil; Ahn, Seong Moon; Choun, Young Sun; Seo, Jeong Moon

    2005-03-01

    The standard response spectrum proposed by US NRC has been used as a design earthquake for the design of Korean nuclear power plant structures. However, it does not reflect the characteristic of seismological and geological of Korea. In this study, the seismic response analysis of Wolsung NPP structure and equipment were performed. Three types of input motions, artificial time histories that envelop the US NRC Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum and the probability based scenario earthquake spectra developed for the Korean NPP site and a typical near-fault earthquake recorded at thirty sites, were used as input motions. The acceleration, displacement and shear force responses of Wolsung containment structure due to the design earthquake were larger than those due to the other input earthquakes. But, considering displacement response increases abruptly as Wolsung NPP structure does nonlinear behavior, the reassessment of the seismic safety margin based on the displacement is necessary if the structure does nonlinear behavior; although it has adequate the seismic safety margin within elastic limit. Among the main safety-related devices, electrical cabinet and pump showed the large responses on the scenario earthquake which has the high frequency characteristic. This has great effects of the seismic capacity of the main devices installed inside of the building. This means that the design earthquake is not so conservative for the safety of the safety related nuclear power plant equipments

  20. Earthquake response of adjacent structures with viscoelastic and friction dampers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žigić Miodrag

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the seismic response of two adjacent structures connected with a dry friction damper. Each of them consists of a viscoelastic rod and a rigid block, which can slide without friction along the moving base. A simplified earthquake model is used for modeling the horizontal ground motion. Energy dissipation is taken by the presence of the friction damper, which is modeled by the set-valued Coulomb friction law. Deformation of viscoelastic rods during the relative motion of the blocks represents another way of energy dissipation. The constitutive equation of a viscoelastic body is described by the fractional Zener model, which includes fractional derivatives of stress and strain. The problem merges fractional derivatives as non-local operators and theory of set-valued functions as the non-smooth ones. Dynamical behaviour of the problem is governed by a pair of coupled multi-valued differential equations. The posed Cauchy problem is solved by use of the Grünwald-Letnikov numerical scheme. The behaviour of the system is analyzed for different values of system parameters.

  1. USGS Imagery Applications During Disaster Response After Recent Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudnut, K. W.; Brooks, B. A.; Glennie, C. L.; Finnegan, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    It is not only important to rapidly characterize surface fault rupture and related ground deformation after an earthquake, but also to repeatedly make observations following an event to forecast fault afterslip. These data may also be used by other agencies to monitor progress on damage repairs and restoration efforts by emergency responders and the public. Related requirements include repeatedly obtaining reference or baseline imagery before a major disaster occurs, as well as maintaining careful geodetic control on all imagery in a time series so that absolute georeferencing may be applied to the image stack through time. In addition, repeated post-event imagery acquisition is required, generally at a higher repetition rate soon after the event, then scaled back to less frequent acquisitions with time, to capture phenomena (such as fault afterslip) that are known to have rates that decrease rapidly with time. For example, lidar observations acquired before and after the South Napa earthquake of 2014, used in our extensive post-processing work that was funded primarily by FEMA, aided in the accurate forecasting of fault afterslip. Lidar was used to independently validate and verify the official USGS afterslip forecast. In order to keep pace with rapidly evolving technology, a development pipeline must be established and maintained to continually test and incorporate new sensors, while adapting these new components to the existing platform and linking them to the existing base software system, and then sequentially testing the system as it evolves. Improvements in system performance by incremental upgrades of system components and software are essential. Improving calibration parameters and thereby progressively eliminating artifacts requires ongoing testing, research and development. To improve the system, we have formed an interdisciplinary team with common interests and diverse sources of support. We share expertise and leverage funding while effectively and

  2. Streamflow responses in Chile to megathrust earthquakes in the 20th and 21st centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Christian; Manga, Michael; Wang, Chi-yuen; Korup, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Both coseismic static stress and dynamic stresses associated with seismic waves may cause responses in hydrological systems. Such responses include changes in the water level, hydrochemistry and streamflow discharge. Earthquake effects on hydrological systems provide a means to study the interaction between stress changes and regional hydrology, which is otherwise rarely possible. Chile is a country of frequent and large earthquakes and thus provides abundant opportunities to study such interactions and processes. We analyze streamflow responses in Chile to several megathrust earthquakes, including the 1943 Mw 8.1 Coquimbo, 1950 Mw 8.2 Antofagasta, 1960 Mw 9.5 Valdivia, 1985 Mw 8.0 Valparaiso, 1995 Mw 8.0 Antofagasta, 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, and the 2014 Mw 8.2 Iquique earthquakes. We use data from 716 stream gauges distributed from the Altiplano in the North to Tierra del Fuego in the South. This network covers the Andes mountain ranges, the central valley, the Coastal Mountain ranges and (mainly in the more southern parts) the Coastal flats. We combine empirical magnitude-distance relationships, machine learning tools, and process-based modeling to characterize responses. We first assess the streamflow anomalies and relate these to topographical, hydro-climatic, geological and earthquake-related (volumetric and dynamic strain) factors using various classifiers. We then apply 1D-groundwater flow modeling to selected catchments in order to test competing hypotheses for the origin of streamflow changes. We show that the co-seismic responses of streamflow mostly involved increasing discharges. We conclude that enhanced vertical permeability can explain most streamflow responses at the regional scale. The total excess water released by a single earthquake, i.e. the Maule earthquake, yielded up to 1 km3. Against the background of megathrust earthquakes frequently hitting Chile, the amount of water released by earthquakes is substantial, particularly for the arid northern

  3. Site specific information in site selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aeikaes, T.; Hautojaervi, A.

    1998-01-01

    The programme for the siting of a deep repository for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel was started already in 1983 and is carried out today by Posiva Oy which continues the work started by Teollisuuden Voima Oy. The programme aims at site selection by the end of the year 2000. The programme has progressed in successive interim stages with defined goals. After an early phase for site identification, five sites were selected in 1987 for preliminary site characterisation. Three of these were selected and judged to be best suited for the more detailed characterisation in 1992. An additional new site was included into the programme based on a separate feasibility study in the beginning of 1997. Since the year 1983 several safety assessments together with technical plans of the facility have been completed. When approaching the site selection the needs for more detailed consideration of the site specific properties in the safety assessment have been increased. The Finnish regulator STUK has published a proposal for general safety requirements for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Finland. This set of requirements has been projected to be used in conjunction of the decision making by the end 2000. Based on the site evaluation all sites can provide a stable environment and there is evidence that the requirements for the longevity of the canister can be fulfilled at each site. In this manner the four candidate sites do not differ too much from each other. The main difference between the sites is in the salinity of the deep groundwater. The significance of differences in the salinity for the long-term safety cannot be defined yet. The differences may contribute to the discussion of the longevity of the bentonite buffer and also to the modelling of the groundwater flow and transport. The use of the geosphere as a transport barrier is basically culminated on the questions about sparse but fast flow routes and 'how bad channeling can be'. To answer these questions

  4. Summary of Great East Japan Earthquake response at Onagawa Nuclear Power Station and further safety improvement measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Toru

    2013-01-01

    A large earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011 and tsunami was generated following it. The East Japan suffered serious damage by the earthquake and tsunami. This is called the Great East Japan Earthquake. Onagawa Nuclear Power Station (NPS) is located closest to the epicenter of Great East Japan Earthquake. We experienced intense shake by the earthquake and some flooding from the tsunami, however, we have succeeded safely cold shutdown of the reactors. In this paper, we introduce summary of Great East Japan Earthquake response a Onagawa NPS and safety improvement measures which are based on both experience of Onagawa NPS and lesson from Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident. (author)

  5. Taxon- and Site-Specific Melatonin Catabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Hardeland

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is catabolized both enzymatically and nonenzymatically. Nonenzymatic processes mediated by free radicals, singlet oxygen, other reactive intermediates such as HOCl and peroxynitrite, or pseudoenzymatic mechanisms are not species- or tissue-specific, but vary considerably in their extent. Higher rates of nonenzymatic melatonin metabolism can be expected upon UV exposure, e.g., in plants and in the human skin. Additionally, melatonin is more strongly nonenzymatically degraded at sites of inflammation. Typical products are several hydroxylated derivatives of melatonin and N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK. Most of these products are also formed by enzymatic catalysis. Considerable taxon- and site-specific differences are observed in the main enzymatic routes of catabolism. Formation of 6-hydroxymelatonin by cytochrome P450 subforms are prevailing in vertebrates, predominantly in the liver, but also in the brain. In pineal gland and non-mammalian retina, deacetylation to 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MT plays a certain role. This pathway is quantitatively prevalent in dinoflagellates, in which 5-MT induces cyst formation and is further converted to 5-methoxyindole-3-acetic acid, an end product released to the water. In plants, the major route is catalyzed by melatonin 2-hydroxylase, whose product is tautomerized to 3-acetamidoethyl-3-hydroxy-5-methoxyindolin-2-one (AMIO, which exceeds the levels of melatonin. Formation and properties of various secondary products are discussed.

  6. Time history nonlinear earthquake response analysis considering materials and geometrical nonlinearity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Yoshikawa, K.; Takaoka, E.; Nakazawa, M.; Shikama, Y.

    2002-01-01

    A time history nonlinear earthquake response analysis method was proposed and applied to earthquake response prediction analysis for a Large Scale Seismic Test (LSST) Program in Hualien, Taiwan, in which a 1/4 scale model of a nuclear reactor containment structure was constructed on sandy gravel layer. In the analysis both of strain-dependent material nonlinearity, and geometrical nonlinearity by base mat uplift, were considered. The 'Lattice Model' for the soil-structure interaction model was employed. An earthquake record on soil surface at the site was used as control motion, and deconvoluted to the input motion of the analysis model at GL-52 m with 300 Gal of maximum acceleration. The following two analyses were considered: (A) time history nonlinear, (B) equivalent linear, and the advantage of time history nonlinear earthquake response analysis method is discussed

  7. Real-time earthquake monitoring: Early warning and rapid response

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    A panel was established to investigate the subject of real-time earthquake monitoring (RTEM) and suggest recommendations on the feasibility of using a real-time earthquake warning system to mitigate earthquake damage in regions of the United States. The findings of the investigation and the related recommendations are described in this report. A brief review of existing real-time seismic systems is presented with particular emphasis given to the current California seismic networks. Specific applications of a real-time monitoring system are discussed along with issues related to system deployment and technical feasibility. In addition, several non-technical considerations are addressed including cost-benefit analysis, public perceptions, safety, and liability.

  8. USGS response to an urban earthquake, Northridge '94

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updike, Randall G.; Brown, William M.; Johnson, Margo L.; Omdahl, Eleanor M.; Powers, Philip S.; Rhea, Susan; Tarr, Arthur C.

    1996-01-01

    The urban centers of our Nation provide our people with seemingly unlimited employment, social, and cultural opportunities as a result of the complex interactions of a diverse population embedded in an highly-engineered environment. Catastrophic events in one or more of the natural earth systems which underlie or envelop urban environment can have radical effects on the integrity and survivability of that environment. Earthquakes have for centuries been the source of cataclysmic events on cities throughout the world. Unlike many other earth processes, the effects of major earthquakes transcend all political, social, and geomorphic boundaries and can have decided impact on cities tens to hundreds of kilometers from the epicenter. In modern cities, where buildings, transportation corridors, and lifelines are complexly interrelated, the life, economic, and social vulnerabilities in the face of a major earthquake can be particularly acute.

  9. Site-Specific, Climate-Friendly Farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. J.; Brooks, E. S.; Eitel, J.; Huggins, D. R.; Painter, K.; Rupp, R.; Smith, J. L.; Stockle, C.; Vierling, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    Of the four most important atmospheric greenhouse gasses (GHG) enriched through human activities, only nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are due primarily to agriculture. However, reductions in the application of synthetic N fertilizers could have significant negative consequences for a growing world population given the crucial role that these fertilizers have played in cereal yield increases since WWII. Increasing N use efficiency (NUE) through precision management of agricultural N in space and time will therefore play a central role in the reduction of agricultural N2O emissions. Precision N management requires a greater understanding of the spatio-temporal variability of factors supporting N management decisions such as crop yield, water and N availability, utilization and losses. We present an overview of a large, collaborative, multi-disciplinary project designed to improve our basic understanding of nitrogen (N), carbon (C) and water (H2O) spatio-temporal dynamics for wheat-based cropping systems on complex landscapes, and develop management tools to optimize water- and nitrogen-use efficiency for these systems and landscapes. Major components of this project include: (a) cropping systems experiments addressing nitrogen application rate and seeding density for different landscape positions; (b) GHG flux experiments and monitoring; (c) soil microbial genetics and stable isotope analyses to elucidate biochemical pathways for N2O production; (d) proximal soil sensing for construction of detailed soil maps; (e) LiDAR and optical remote sensing for crop growth monitoring; (f) hydrologic experiments, monitoring, and modeling; (g) refining the CropSyst simulation model to estimate biophysical processes and GHG emissions under a variety of management and climatic scenarios; and (h) linking farm-scale enterprise budgets to simulation modeling in order to provide growers with economically viable site-specific climate-friendly farming guidance.

  10. Intra-day response of foreign exchange markets after the Tohoku-Oki earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Shuhei; Hirata, Yoshito; Iwayama, Koji; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2015-02-01

    Although an economy is influenced by a natural disaster, the market response to the disaster during the first 24 hours is not clearly understood. Here we show that an earthquake quickly causes temporal changes in a foreign exchange market by examining the case of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. Recurrence plots and statistical change point detection independently show that the United States dollar-Japanese yen market responded to the earthquake activity without delay and with the delay of about 2 minutes, respectively. These findings support that the efficient market hypothesis nearly holds now in the time scale of minutes.

  11. Earthquake prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The state of the art of earthquake prediction is summarized, the possible responses to such prediction are examined, and some needs in the present prediction program and in research related to use of this new technology are reviewed. Three basic aspects of earthquake prediction are discussed: location of the areas where large earthquakes are most likely to occur, observation within these areas of measurable changes (earthquake precursors) and determination of the area and time over which the earthquake will occur, and development of models of the earthquake source in order to interpret the precursors reliably. 6 figures

  12. Site specific modification of the human plasma proteome by methylglyoxal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimzey, Michael J.; Kinsky, Owen R.; Yassine, Hussein N.; Tsaprailis, George; Stump, Craig S.; Monks, Terrence J.; Lau, Serrine S.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence identifies dicarbonyl stress from reactive glucose metabolites, such as methylglyoxal (MG), as a major pathogenic link between hyperglycemia and complications of diabetes. MG covalently modifies arginine residues, yet the site specificity of this modification has not been thoroughly investigated. Sites of MG adduction in the plasma proteome were identified using LC–MS/MS analysis in vitro following incubation of plasma proteins with MG. Treatment of plasma proteins with MG yielded 14 putative MG hotspots from five plasma proteins (albumin [nine hotspots], serotransferrin, haptoglobin [2 hotspots], hemopexin, and Ig lambda-2 chain C regions). The search results revealed two versions of MG-arginine modification, dihydroxyimidazolidine (R + 72) and hydroimidazolone (R + 54) adducts. One of the sites identified was R257 in human serum albumin, which is a critical residue located in drug binding site I. This site was validated as a target for MG modification by a fluorescent probe displacement assay, which revealed significant drug dissociation at 300 μM MG from a prodan–HSA complex (75 μM). Moreover, twelve human plasma samples (six male, six female, with two type 2 diabetic subjects from both genders) were analyzed using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) tandem mass spectrometry and revealed the presence of the MG-modified albumin R257 peptide. These data provide insights into the nature of the site-specificity of MG modification of arginine, which may be useful for therapeutic treatments that aim to prevent MG-mediated adverse responses in patients. - Highlights: • Methylglyoxal (MG) selectively modifies arginine sites in human plasma proteome. • Dihydroxyimidazolidine and hydroimidazolone adducts on serum albumin identified • MG modification on albumin R257 associated with loss of drug site I binding capacity • MRM-tandem mass spectrometry enables sensitive detection of albumin MG-R257. • Site-specific MG modification may

  13. Site specific modification of the human plasma proteome by methylglyoxal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimzey, Michael J.; Kinsky, Owen R. [Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center, Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Yassine, Hussein N. [Department of Medicine, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Tsaprailis, George [Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center, Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Stump, Craig S. [Department of Medicine, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Southern Arizona VA Health Care System, Tucson, AZ 85723 (United States); Monks, Terrence J. [Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center, Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lau, Serrine S., E-mail: lau@pharmacy.arizona.edu [Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center, Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Increasing evidence identifies dicarbonyl stress from reactive glucose metabolites, such as methylglyoxal (MG), as a major pathogenic link between hyperglycemia and complications of diabetes. MG covalently modifies arginine residues, yet the site specificity of this modification has not been thoroughly investigated. Sites of MG adduction in the plasma proteome were identified using LC–MS/MS analysis in vitro following incubation of plasma proteins with MG. Treatment of plasma proteins with MG yielded 14 putative MG hotspots from five plasma proteins (albumin [nine hotspots], serotransferrin, haptoglobin [2 hotspots], hemopexin, and Ig lambda-2 chain C regions). The search results revealed two versions of MG-arginine modification, dihydroxyimidazolidine (R + 72) and hydroimidazolone (R + 54) adducts. One of the sites identified was R257 in human serum albumin, which is a critical residue located in drug binding site I. This site was validated as a target for MG modification by a fluorescent probe displacement assay, which revealed significant drug dissociation at 300 μM MG from a prodan–HSA complex (75 μM). Moreover, twelve human plasma samples (six male, six female, with two type 2 diabetic subjects from both genders) were analyzed using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) tandem mass spectrometry and revealed the presence of the MG-modified albumin R257 peptide. These data provide insights into the nature of the site-specificity of MG modification of arginine, which may be useful for therapeutic treatments that aim to prevent MG-mediated adverse responses in patients. - Highlights: • Methylglyoxal (MG) selectively modifies arginine sites in human plasma proteome. • Dihydroxyimidazolidine and hydroimidazolone adducts on serum albumin identified • MG modification on albumin R257 associated with loss of drug site I binding capacity • MRM-tandem mass spectrometry enables sensitive detection of albumin MG-R257. • Site-specific MG modification may

  14. COMPARING SEA LEVEL RESPONSE AT MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA FROM THE 1989 LOMA PRIETA EARTHQUAKE AND THE 1964 GREAT ALASKAN EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Breaker

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Two of the largest earthquakes to affect water levels in Monterey Bay in recent years were the Loma Prieta Earthquake (LPE of 1989 with a moment magnitude of 6.9, and the Great Alaskan Earthquake (GAE of 1964 with a moment magnitude of 9.2. In this study, we compare the sea level response of these events with a primary focus on their frequency content and how the bay affected it, itself. Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA was employed to extract the primary frequencies associated with each event. It is not clear how or exactly where the tsunami associated with the LPE was generated, but it occurred inside the bay and most likely began to take on the characteristics of a seiche by the time it reached the tide gauge in Monterey Harbor. Results of the SSA decomposition revealed two primary periods of oscillation, 9-10 minutes, and 31-32 minutes. The first oscillation is in agreement with the range of periods for the expected natural oscillations of Monterey Harbor, and the second oscillation is consistent with a bay-wide oscillation or seiche mode. SSA decomposition of the GAE revealed several sequences of oscillations all with a period of approximately 37 minutes, which corresponds to the predicted, and previously observed, transverse mode of oscillation for Monterey Bay. In this case, it appears that this tsunami produced quarter-wave resonance within the bay consistent with its seiche-like response. Overall, the sea level responses to the LPE and GAE differed greatly, not only because of the large difference in their magnitudes but also because the driving force in one case occurred inside the bay (LPE, and in the second, outside the bay (GAE. As a result, different modes of oscillation were excited.

  15. THE RESPONSE OF MONTEREY BAY TO THE 2010 CHILEAN EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence C. Breaker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary frequencies contained in the arrival sequence produced by the tsunami from the Chilean earthquake of 2010 in Monterey Bay were extracted to determine the seiche modes that were produced. Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA and Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD were employed to extract the primary frequencies of interest. The wave train from the Chilean tsunami lasted for at least four days due to multipath arrivals that may not have included reflections from outside the bay but most likely did include secondary undulations, and energy trapping in the form of edge waves, inside the bay. The SSA decomposition resolved oscillations with periods of 52-57, 34-35, 26-27, and 21-22 minutes, all frequencies that have been predicted and/or observed in previous studies. The EEMD decomposition detected oscillations with periods of 50-55 and 21-22 minutes. Periods in the range of 50-57 minutes varied due to measurement uncertainties but almost certainly correspond to the first longitudinal mode of oscillation for Monterey Bay, periods of 34-35 minutes correspond to the first transverse mode of oscillation that assumes a nodal line across the entrance of the bay, a period of 26- 27 minutes, although previously observed, may not represent a fundamental oscillation, and a period of 21-22 minutes has been predicted and observed previously. A period of ~37 minutes, close to the period of 34-35 minutes, was generated by the Great Alaskan Earthquake of 1964 in Monterey Bay and most likely represents the same mode of oscillation. The tsunamis associated with the Great Alaskan Earthquake and the Chilean Earthquake both entered Monterey Bay but initially arrived outside the bay from opposite directions. Unlike the Great Alaskan Earthquake, however, which excited only one resonant mode inside the bay, the Chilean Earthquake excited several modes suggesting that the asymmetric shape of the entrance to Monterey Bay was an important factor and that the

  16. Modelling psychological responses to the Great East Japan earthquake and nuclear incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Robin; Takahashi, Masahito; Sun, Shaojing; Gaines, Stanley O

    2012-01-01

    The Great East Japan (Tōhoku/Kanto) earthquake of March 2011 was followed by a major tsunami and nuclear incident. Several previous studies have suggested a number of psychological responses to such disasters. However, few previous studies have modelled individual differences in the risk perceptions of major events, or the implications of these perceptions for relevant behaviours. We conducted a survey specifically examining responses to the Great Japan earthquake and nuclear incident, with data collected 11-13 weeks following these events. 844 young respondents completed a questionnaire in three regions of Japan; Miyagi (close to the earthquake and leaking nuclear plants), Tokyo/Chiba (approximately 220 km from the nuclear plants), and Western Japan (Yamaguchi and Nagasaki, some 1000 km from the plants). Results indicated significant regional differences in risk perception, with greater concern over earthquake risks in Tokyo than in Miyagi or Western Japan. Structural equation analyses showed that shared normative concerns about earthquake and nuclear risks, conservation values, lack of trust in governmental advice about the nuclear hazard, and poor personal control over the nuclear incident were positively correlated with perceived earthquake and nuclear risks. These risk perceptions further predicted specific outcomes (e.g. modifying homes, avoiding going outside, contemplating leaving Japan). The strength and significance of these pathways varied by region. Mental health and practical implications of these findings are discussed in the light of the continuing uncertainties in Japan following the March 2011 events.

  17. Modelling psychological responses to the Great East Japan earthquake and nuclear incident.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Goodwin

    Full Text Available The Great East Japan (Tōhoku/Kanto earthquake of March 2011 was followed by a major tsunami and nuclear incident. Several previous studies have suggested a number of psychological responses to such disasters. However, few previous studies have modelled individual differences in the risk perceptions of major events, or the implications of these perceptions for relevant behaviours. We conducted a survey specifically examining responses to the Great Japan earthquake and nuclear incident, with data collected 11-13 weeks following these events. 844 young respondents completed a questionnaire in three regions of Japan; Miyagi (close to the earthquake and leaking nuclear plants, Tokyo/Chiba (approximately 220 km from the nuclear plants, and Western Japan (Yamaguchi and Nagasaki, some 1000 km from the plants. Results indicated significant regional differences in risk perception, with greater concern over earthquake risks in Tokyo than in Miyagi or Western Japan. Structural equation analyses showed that shared normative concerns about earthquake and nuclear risks, conservation values, lack of trust in governmental advice about the nuclear hazard, and poor personal control over the nuclear incident were positively correlated with perceived earthquake and nuclear risks. These risk perceptions further predicted specific outcomes (e.g. modifying homes, avoiding going outside, contemplating leaving Japan. The strength and significance of these pathways varied by region. Mental health and practical implications of these findings are discussed in the light of the continuing uncertainties in Japan following the March 2011 events.

  18. Site-specific calibration of the Hanford personnel neutron dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, A.W.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Baumgartner, W.V.; Rathbone, B.A.

    1994-10-01

    A new personnel dosimetry system, employing a standard Hanford thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and a combination dosimeter with both CR-39 nuclear track and TLD-albedo elements, is being implemented at Hanford. Measurements were made in workplace environments in order to verify the accuracy of the system and establish site-specific factors to account for the differences in dosimeter response between the workplace and calibration laboratory. Neutron measurements were performed using sources at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant under high-scatter conditions to calibrate the new neutron dosimeter design to site-specific neutron spectra. The dosimeter was also calibrated using bare and moderated 252 Cf sources under low-scatter conditions available in the Hanford Calibration Laboratory. Dose equivalent rates in the workplace were calculated from spectrometer measurements using tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and multisphere spectrometers. The accuracy of the spectrometers was verified by measurements on neutron sources with calibrations directly traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

  19. Effects of non-uniform embedments on earthquake responses of nuclear reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, Y.; Okamoto, S.; Yoshida, K.; Inove, H.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear reactor buildings have the portion embedded in soil. In the seismic design of such structures, it is essential to consider the effects of the embedment on the earthquake response. Most studies on these effects, however, assume the uniform embedment, i.e. the depth of the embedment is constant, which is convenient for the design and analysis. The behavior of the earthquake response considering the three-dimensional aspects of non-uniform embedment has not been made clear yet. In this paper, the authors evaluate the effects of the non-uniform embedment in an inclined ground surface on the earthquake response of a nuclear reactor building as illustrated. A typical PWR type reactor building is chosen as an analysis structure model. Four different types of embedment are set up for the comparison study. The three-dimensional analysis is carried out considering the geometry of embedment

  20. Response of base isolated structure during strong ground motions beyond design earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabana, Shuichi; Ishida, Katsuhiko; Shiojiri, Hiroo

    1991-01-01

    In Japan, some base isolated structures for fast breeder reactors (FBR) are tried to design. When a base isolated structure are designed, the relative displacement of isolators are generally limited so sa to be remain in linear state of those during design earthquakes. But to estimate safety margin of a base isolated structure, the response of that until the failure must be obtained experimentally to analytically during strong ground motions of beyond design earthquake. The aim of this paper is to investigate the response of a base isolated structure when the stiffness of the isolators hardens and to simulate the response during strong ground motions of beyond design earthquakes. The optimum characteristics of isolators, with which the margin of the structure are increased, are discussed. (author)

  1. First-passage Probability Estimation of an Earthquake Response of Seismically Isolated Containment Buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, Dae-Gi; Park, Kwan-Soon; Koh, Hyun-Moo

    2008-01-01

    The awareness of a seismic hazard and risk is being increased rapidly according to the frequent occurrences of the huge earthquakes such as the 2008 Sichuan earthquake which caused about 70,000 confirmed casualties and a 20 billion U.S. dollars economic loss. Since an earthquake load contains various uncertainties naturally, the safety of a structural system under an earthquake excitation has been assessed by probabilistic approaches. In many structural applications for a probabilistic safety assessment, it is often regarded that the failure of a system will occur when the response of the structure firstly crosses the limit barrier within a specified interval of time. The determination of such a failure probability is usually called the 'first-passage problem' and has been extensively studied during the last few decades. However, especially for the structures which show a significant nonlinear dynamic behavior, an effective and accurate method for the estimation of such a failure probability is not fully established yet. In this study, we presented a new approach to evaluate the first-passage probability of an earthquake response of seismically isolated structures. The proposed method is applied to the seismic isolation system for the containment buildings of a nuclear power plant. From the numerical example, we verified that the proposed method shows accurate results with more efficient computational efforts compared to the conventional approaches

  2. Expanding the Delivery of Rapid Earthquake Information and Warnings for Response and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanpied, M. L.; McBride, S.; Hardebeck, J.; Michael, A. J.; van der Elst, N.

    2017-12-01

    Scientific organizations like the United States Geological Survey (USGS) release information to support effective responses during an earthquake crisis. Information is delivered to the White House, the National Command Center, the Departments of Defense, Homeland Security (including FEMA), Transportation, Energy, and Interior. Other crucial stakeholders include state officials and decision makers, emergency responders, numerous public and private infrastructure management centers (e.g., highways, railroads and pipelines), the media, and the public. To meet the diverse information requirements of these users, rapid earthquake notifications have been developed to be delivered by e-mail and text message, as well as a suite of earthquake information resources such as ShakeMaps, Did You Feel It?, PAGER impact estimates, and data are delivered via the web. The ShakeAlert earthquake early warning system being developed for the U.S. West Coast will identify and characterize an earthquake a few seconds after it begins, estimate the likely intensity of ground shaking, and deliver brief but critically important warnings to people and infrastructure in harm's way. Currently the USGS is also developing a capability to deliver Operational Earthquake Forecasts (OEF). These provide estimates of potential seismic behavior after large earthquakes and during evolving aftershock sequences. Similar work is underway in New Zealand, Japan, and Italy. In the development of OEF forecasts, social science research conducted during these sequences indicates that aftershock forecasts are valued for a variety of reasons, from informing critical response and recovery decisions to psychologically preparing for more earthquakes. New tools will allow users to customize map-based, spatiotemporal forecasts to their specific needs. Hazard curves and other advanced information will also be available. For such authoritative information to be understood and used during the pressures of an earthquake

  3. Earthquake Ground Motion Measures for Seismic Response Evaluation of Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, In-Kil; Ahn, Seong-Moon; Choun, Young-Sun; Seo, Jeong-Moon

    2007-03-15

    This study used the assessment results of failure criteria - base shear, story drift, top acceleration and top displacement - for a PSC containment building subjected to 30 sets of near-fault ground motions to evaluate the earthquake ground motion intensity measures. Seven intensity measures, peak ground acceleration(PGA), peak ground velocity(PGV), spectral acceleration(Sa), velocity(Sv), spectrum intensity for acceleration(SIa), velocity(SIv) and displacement(SId), were used to represent alternative ground motion. The regression analyses of the failure criteria for a PSC containment building were carried out to evaluate a proper intensity measure by using two regression models and seven ground motion parameters. The regression analysis results demonstrate the correlation coefficients of the failure criteria in terms of the candidate IM. From the results, spectral acceleration(Sa) is estimated as the best parameter for a evaluation of the structural safety for a seismic PSA.

  4. Study on earthquake responses of overhead traveling cranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, A.; Fukuda, T.; Veki, T.; Kirata, M.; Hoshii, T.; Kashiwazaki, A.

    1989-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, large-size overhead traveling cranes, such as reactor building crane and turbine building crane, are installed. These overhead cranes are used for transporting heavy loads on the operation floor, and call for safety and reliability even during strong earthquake as well as under the normal operational conditions. The seismic behaviors of overhead traveling cranes, which move on the rails, may be different from those of other structures that are anchored to the building: in the case of cranes, traveling wheels and rails can slip relative to each other when the horizontal seismic force reaches the level of frictional force. In Japan, therefore, a practical guide to the seismic design that considers the sliding has been proposed. However, detailed experimental study on sliding between wheels and rails has not been carried out. In this study, the seismic behaviors of traveling overhead cranes accompanied by sliding between wheels and rails in the traveling direction are examined

  5. Analysis of Taipei Basin Response for Earthquakes of Various Depths and Locations Using Empirical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Sokolov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of Taipei basin upon earthquake excitation was studied using records of recent earthquakes. The strong-motion database includes records obtained at 32 stations of the Taipei TSMIP net work from 83 deep and 142 shallow earthquakes (M > 4.0 that occurred in 1992 - 2004. The characteristics of frequency-de pendent site response were obtained as spectral ratios between the actual earthquake records (horizontal components and those modelled for a hypothetical Very Hard Rock (VHR condition. The models for VHR spectra of Taiwan earthquakes had been recently proposed by Sokolov et al. (2005b, 2006. Analysis of site response characteristics and comparison with simple 1D models of the soil column resulted in the following conclusions: (1 The spectral ratios through out the basin obtained from deep earth quakes (depth > 35 km exhibit good agreement with the theoretical ratios calculated using the 1D models constructed using avail able geological and geotechnical data. (2 The spectral ratios obtained from shallow earth quakes show influence of: (a surface waves generated when travelling from distant sources to the basin and (b relatively low-frequency (< 1 - 2 Hz waves generated within the basin. (3 Some shallow earth quakes pro duce extremely high amplification at frequencies 0.3 - 1 Hz within the basin that may be dangerous for high-rise buildings and high way bridges. (4 The obtained results may be used in probabilistic seismic microzonation of the basin when many possible earth quakes located at various distances are considered. 2D and 3D simulation is necessary to model the seismic influence from particularly large earthquakes.

  6. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989: Societal Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coordinated by Mileti, Dennis S.

    1993-01-01

    Professional Paper 1553 describes how people and organizations responded to the earthquake and how the earthquake impacted people and society. The investigations evaluate the tools available to the research community to measure the nature, extent, and causes of damage and losses. They describe human behavior during and immediately after the earthquake and how citizens participated in emergency response. They review the challenges confronted by police and fire departments and disruptions to transbay transportations systems. And they survey the challenges of post-earthquake recovery. Some significant findings were: * Loma Prieta provided the first test of ATC-20, the red, yellow, and green tagging of buildings. It successful application has led to widespread use in other disasters including the September 11, 2001, New York City terrorist incident. * Most people responded calmly and without panic to the earthquake and acted to get themselves to a safe location. * Actions by people to help alleviate emergency conditions were proportional to the level of need at the community level. * Some solutions caused problems of their own. The police perimeter around the Cypress Viaduct isolated businesses from their customers leading to a loss of business and the evacuation of employees from those businesses hindered the movement of supplies to the disaster scene. * Emergency transbay ferry service was established 6 days after the earthquake, but required constant revision of service contracts and schedules. * The Loma Prieta earthquake produced minimal disruption to the regional economy. The total economic disruption resulted in maximum losses to the Gross Regional Product of $725 million in 1 month and $2.9 billion in 2 months, but 80% of the loss was recovered during the first 6 months of 1990. Approximately 7,100 workers were laid off.

  7. Response spectra for differential motion of structures supports during earthquakes in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed I.S. Elmasry

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Differential motions of ground supports of stiff structures with large plan dimensions and separate foundations under earthquakes were studied by researchers during the last few decades. Such a type of structural response was previously underestimated. The importance of studying such a response comes up from the fact that usually the structures affected are of strategic importance such as bridges. During their expected life, structures may experience vibrations excited by ground waves of short wavelengths during near-source earthquakes, or during amplified earthquake signals, during explosions, or during vibrations induced from nearby strong vibration sources. This is the case when the differential motion of supports becomes considerable. This paper aims to review the effects of seismic signal variations along the structures dimensions with emphasis on Egypt as a case study. The paper shows some patterns of the damage imposed by such differential motion. A replication of the differential motion in the longitudinal direction is applied on a frame bridge model. The resulting straining actions show the necessity for considering the differential motion of supports in the design of special structures in Egypt. Finally, response spectra for the differential motion of supports, based on the available data from previous earthquakes in Egypt, is derived and proposed for designers to include in the design procedure when accounting for such type of structural response, and especially in long-span bridges.

  8. Innovation and Diffusion of Site-specific Crop Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Marcus; Pedersen, Jørgen Lindgaard

    2006-01-01

    Site-specific crop management or precision farming is a highly complex managementsystem for site-specific input application of lime, fertilizers and pesticides in arable farming. The Global Positioning System (GPS)is the backbone of the system. To conduct precision farming several technical systems...

  9. Innovation and diffusion of site-specific crop management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Marcus; Pedersen, Jørgen Lindgaard

    2004-01-01

    Site-specific crop management or precision farming (PF) is a highly complex management system for site-specific input application of lime, fertilizers and pesticides in arable farming. The Global Positioning System (GPS) is the backbone of the system. To conduct PF several technical systems...

  10. Seismic response of the EBR-II to the Mt. Borah earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, J.G.; Lehto, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    On October 28, 1983, an earthquake of magnitude 7.3 occurred in the mountains of central Idaho at a distance of 114-km from the ANL-West site. The earthquake tripped the seismic sensors in the EBR-II reactor shutdown system causing a reactor scram. Visual and operability checks of structures, components, and systems showed no indication of damage or system abnormalities and reactor restart was initiated. As a result of the earthquake, questions arose as to the magnitude of the actual stress levels in critical components and what value of ground acceleration could be experienced without damage to reactor structures. EBR-II was designed prior to implementation of present day requirements for seismic qualification and appropriate analyses had not been conducted. A lumped-mass, finite element model of the primary tank, support structure, and the reactor was generated and analyzed using the response spectrum technique. The analysis showed that the stress levels in the primary tank system were very low during the Mount Borah earthquake and that the system could experience seismic loadings three to four times those of the Mount Borah earthquake without exceeding yield stresses in any of the components

  11. Earthquake response analyses of soil-structure system considering kinematic interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, H.; Yokono, K.; Miura, S.; Ishii, K.

    1985-01-01

    Improvement of soil-structure interaction analysis has been one of major concerns in earthquake engineering field, especially in nuclear industries, to evaluate the safety of structure accurately under earthquake events. This research aims to develop a rational analytical tool which considers effect of the 'kinematic interaction' satisfactory with a proposed simple low-pass filter. In this paper, first the effect of the kinematic interaction is investigated based on earthquake response analysis of a reactor building using the practical design models: the spring-mass-dashpot system and the 'lattice model', in which a building and soil medium are modeled by a system of lumped masses. Next, the filter is developed based on parametrical studies with various sizes of depth and width of foundations embedded in two-layers soil, which represents more general soil condition in practical designs compared with a homogeneous soil medium. (orig.)

  12. Relay chatter and operator response after a large earthquake: An improved PRA methodology with case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnitz, R.J.; Lambert, H.E.; Hill, E.E.

    1987-08-01

    The purpose of this project has been to develop and demonstrate improvements in the PRA methodology used for analyzing earthquake-induced accidents at nuclear power reactors. Specifically, the project addresses methodological weaknesses in the PRA systems analysis used for studying post-earthquake relay chatter and for quantifying human response under high stress. An improved PRA methodology for relay-chatter analysis is developed, and its use is demonstrated through analysis of the Zion-1 and LaSalle-2 reactors as case studies. This demonstration analysis is intended to show that the methodology can be applied in actual cases, and the numerical values of core-damage frequency are not realistic. The analysis relies on SSMRP-based methodologies and data bases. For both Zion-1 and LaSalle-2, assuming that loss of offsite power (LOSP) occurs after a large earthquake and that there are no operator recovery actions, the analysis finds very many combinations (Boolean minimal cut sets) involving chatter of three or four relays and/or pressure switch contacts. The analysis finds that the number of min-cut-set combinations is so large that there is a very high likelihood (of the order of unity) that at least one combination will occur after earthquake-caused LOSP. This conclusion depends in detail on the fragility curves and response assumptions used for chatter. Core-damage frequencies are calculated, but they are probably pessimistic because assuming zero credit for operator recovery is pessimistic. The project has also developed an improved PRA methodology for quantifying operator error under high-stress conditions such as after a large earthquake. Single-operator and multiple-operator error rates are developed, and a case study involving an 8-step procedure (establishing feed-and-bleed in a PWR after an earthquake-initiated accident) is used to demonstrate the methodology

  13. Evaluation and summary of seismic response of above ground nuclear power plant piping to strong motion earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize the observations and experience which has been developed relative to the seismic behavior of above-ground, building-supported, industrial type piping (similar to piping used in nuclear power plants) in strong motion earthquakes. The paper also contains observations regarding the response of piping in experimental tests which attempted to excite the piping to failure. Appropriate conclusions regarding the behavior of such piping in large earthquakes and recommendations as to future design of such piping to resist earthquake motion damage are presented based on observed behavior in large earthquakes and simulated shake table testing

  14. Response of base-isolated nuclear structures to extreme earthquake shaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Manish; Whittaker, Andrew S.; Constantinou, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Response-history analysis of nuclear structures base-isolated using lead–rubber bearings is performed. • Advanced numerical model of lead–rubber bearing is used to capture behavior under extreme earthquake shaking. • Results of response-history analysis obtained using simplified and advanced model of lead–rubber bearings are compared. • Heating of the lead core and variation in buckling load and axial stiffness affect the response. - Abstract: Seismic isolation using low damping rubber and lead–rubber bearings is a viable strategy for mitigating the effects of extreme earthquake shaking on safety-related nuclear structures. The mechanical properties of these bearings are not expected to change substantially in design basis shaking. However, under shaking more intense than design basis, the properties of the lead cores in lead–rubber bearings may degrade due to heating associated with energy dissipation, some bearings in an isolation system may experience net tension, and the compression and tension stiffness may be affected by the lateral displacement of the isolation system. The effects of intra-earthquake changes in mechanical properties on the response of base-isolated nuclear power plants (NPPs) are investigated using an advanced numerical model of a lead–rubber bearing that has been verified and validated, and implemented in OpenSees. A macro-model is used for response-history analysis of base-isolated NPPs. Ground motions are selected and scaled to be consistent with response spectra for design basis and beyond design basis earthquake shaking at the site of the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Generating Station. Ten isolation systems of two periods and five characteristic strengths are analyzed. The responses obtained using simplified and advanced isolator models are compared. Strength degradation due to heating of lead cores and changes in buckling load most significantly affect the response of the base-isolated NPP.

  15. Response of base-isolated nuclear structures to extreme earthquake shaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Manish, E-mail: mkumar2@buffalo.edu; Whittaker, Andrew S.; Constantinou, Michael C.

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Response-history analysis of nuclear structures base-isolated using lead–rubber bearings is performed. • Advanced numerical model of lead–rubber bearing is used to capture behavior under extreme earthquake shaking. • Results of response-history analysis obtained using simplified and advanced model of lead–rubber bearings are compared. • Heating of the lead core and variation in buckling load and axial stiffness affect the response. - Abstract: Seismic isolation using low damping rubber and lead–rubber bearings is a viable strategy for mitigating the effects of extreme earthquake shaking on safety-related nuclear structures. The mechanical properties of these bearings are not expected to change substantially in design basis shaking. However, under shaking more intense than design basis, the properties of the lead cores in lead–rubber bearings may degrade due to heating associated with energy dissipation, some bearings in an isolation system may experience net tension, and the compression and tension stiffness may be affected by the lateral displacement of the isolation system. The effects of intra-earthquake changes in mechanical properties on the response of base-isolated nuclear power plants (NPPs) are investigated using an advanced numerical model of a lead–rubber bearing that has been verified and validated, and implemented in OpenSees. A macro-model is used for response-history analysis of base-isolated NPPs. Ground motions are selected and scaled to be consistent with response spectra for design basis and beyond design basis earthquake shaking at the site of the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Generating Station. Ten isolation systems of two periods and five characteristic strengths are analyzed. The responses obtained using simplified and advanced isolator models are compared. Strength degradation due to heating of lead cores and changes in buckling load most significantly affect the response of the base-isolated NPP.

  16. A dynamic dispatching and routing model to plan/replan the logistical activities in the response phase of an earthquake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Najafi, M.; Eshgi, K.; de Leeuw, S.L.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The unpredictable nature and devastating impact of earthquakes enforce governments of disaster-prone regions to provide practical response plans to minimize damage and losses resulting from earthquakes. Logistics management is one of the key issues that should be considered for an appropriate

  17. Dynamic Response of AP1000 Nuclear Island Due to Safe Shutdown Earthquake Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Buntara S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available AP1000 is a standard nuclear power plant developed by Westinghouse and its partners by using an advanced passive safety feature. Among the five principle building structures, namely the nuclear island, turbine building, annex building, diesel generator building and radwaste building, the safety of the nuclear island building is the most concerned. This paper investigates the dynamic response of the nuclear island building of the AP1000 plant subjected to safe shutdown earthquake loadings. A finite element model for the building, which is assumed to be built in a hard-rock base, is developed and its dynamic response is computed with the aid of the commercial finite element package ANSYS. The dynamic characteristics, including the natural frequencies, the vibration modes, and the time histories for displacements, velocities, and accelerations of the building are obtained for two typical safe shutdown earthquakes, El Centro and Kobe earthquakes. The dynamic behavior of the building due to the earthquakes and its safety is examined and highlighted.

  18. Influence of intensity parameters of earthquake on response of reinforced concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Ciby Jacob; Madhavan Pillai, T. M.; Sajith, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    Earthquake is one of the most frightening and destructive phenomena of nature. The destructive capacity of an earthquake depends on various parameters. Without characterising earthquake time history data to the required intensity parameters, its effect on structures cannot be predicted. The influence of intensity parameter of earthquake on the destructive capacity of a structure is essential in the vibration control scenario also. In the present paper, three reinforced concrete (RC) framed structures with natural frequencies 4.688 Hz, 1.762 Hz, 1.661 Hz are used to investigate the influence between the intensity measures and the response. 20 ground motion time history data were selected with predominant frequency ranging from 1 Hz to 12.5 Hz. Some available intensity measures were used to characterise this data. 3D model of the structure was analysed in ETABSUL 13.1.3 software with diaphragm rigidity at floor level. Modal analysis was used to find the modes and corresponding time periods. Linear time history analysis was done for the three models for all the ground motion data. It is noted that four intensity parameters namely predominant frequency, Peak Ground Acceleration, Velocity Spectrum Intensity, Housner Intensity has an appreciable influence on the response.

  19. E-DECIDER Rapid Response to the M 6.0 South Napa Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasscoe, M. T.; Parker, J. W.; Pierce, M. E.; Wang, J.; Eguchi, R. T.; Huyck, C. K.; Hu, Z.; Chen, Z.; Yoder, M. R.; Rundle, J. B.; Rosinski, A.

    2014-12-01

    E-DECIDER initiated rapid response mode when the California Earthquake Clearinghouse was activated the morning following the M6 Napa earthquake. Data products, including: 1) rapid damage and loss estimates, 2) deformation magnitude and slope change maps, and 3) aftershock forecasts were provided to the Clearinghouse partners within 24 hours of the event via XchangeCore Web Service Data Orchestration sharing. NASA data products were provided to end-users via XchangeCore, EERI and Clearinghouse websites, and ArcGIS online for Napa response, reaching a wide response audience. The E-DECIDER team helped facilitate rapid delivery of NASA products to stakeholders and participated in Clearinghouse Napa earthquake briefings to update stakeholders on product information. Rapid response products from E-DECIDER can be used to help prioritize response efforts shortly after the event has occurred. InLET (Internet Loss Estimation Tool) post-event damage and casualty estimates were generated quickly after the Napa earthquake. InLET provides immediate post-event estimates of casualties and building damage by performing loss/impact simulations using USGS ground motion data and FEMA HAZUS damage estimation technology. These results were provided to E-DECIDER by their collaborators, ImageCat, Inc. and the Community Stakeholder Network (CSN). Strain magnitude and slope change maps were automatically generated when the Napa earthquake appeared on the USGS feed. These maps provide an early estimate of where the deformation has occurred and where damage may be localized. Using E-DECIDER critical infrastructure overlays with damage estimates, decision makers can direct response effort that can be verified later with field reconnaissance and remote sensing-based observations. Earthquake aftershock forecast maps were produced within hours of the event. These maps highlight areas where aftershocks are likely to occur and can also be coupled with infrastructure overlays to help direct response

  20. Facilitators and obstacles in pre-hospital medical response to earthquakes: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Earthquakes are renowned as being amongst the most dangerous and destructive types of natural disasters. Iran, a developing country in Asia, is prone to earthquakes and is ranked as one of the most vulnerable countries in the world in this respect. The medical response in disasters is accompanied by managerial, logistic, technical, and medical challenges being also the case in the Bam earthquake in Iran. Our objective was to explore the medical response to the Bam earthquake with specific emphasis on pre-hospital medical management during the first days. Methods The study was performed in 2008; an interview based qualitative study using content analysis. We conducted nineteen interviews with experts and managers responsible for responding to the Bam earthquake, including pre-hospital emergency medical services, the Red Crescent, and Universities of Medical Sciences. The selection of participants was determined by using a purposeful sampling method. Sample size was given by data saturation. Results The pre-hospital medical service was divided into three categories; triage, emergency medical care and transportation, each category in turn was identified into facilitators and obstacles. The obstacles identified were absence of a structured disaster plan, absence of standardized medical teams, and shortage of resources. The army and skilled medical volunteers were identified as facilitators. Conclusions The most compelling, and at the same time amenable obstacle, was the lack of a disaster management plan. It was evident that implementing a comprehensive plan would not only save lives but decrease suffering and enable an effective praxis of the available resources at pre-hospital and hospital levels. PMID:21575233

  1. Rapid post-earthquake modelling of coseismic landslide intensity and distribution for emergency response decision support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Robinson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Current methods to identify coseismic landslides immediately after an earthquake using optical imagery are too slow to effectively inform emergency response activities. Issues with cloud cover, data collection and processing, and manual landslide identification mean even the most rapid mapping exercises are often incomplete when the emergency response ends. In this study, we demonstrate how traditional empirical methods for modelling the total distribution and relative intensity (in terms of point density of coseismic landsliding can be successfully undertaken in the hours and days immediately after an earthquake, allowing the results to effectively inform stakeholders during the response. The method uses fuzzy logic in a GIS (Geographic Information Systems to quickly assess and identify the location-specific relationships between predisposing factors and landslide occurrence during the earthquake, based on small initial samples of identified landslides. We show that this approach can accurately model both the spatial pattern and the number density of landsliding from the event based on just several hundred mapped landslides, provided they have sufficiently wide spatial coverage, improving upon previous methods. This suggests that systematic high-fidelity mapping of landslides following an earthquake is not necessary for informing rapid modelling attempts. Instead, mapping should focus on rapid sampling from the entire affected area to generate results that can inform the modelling. This method is therefore suited to conditions in which imagery is affected by partial cloud cover or in which the total number of landslides is so large that mapping requires significant time to complete. The method therefore has the potential to provide a quick assessment of landslide hazard after an earthquake and may therefore inform emergency operations more effectively compared to current practice.

  2. Facilitators and obstacles in pre-hospital medical response to earthquakes: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djalali, Ahmadreza; Khankeh, Hamidreza; Öhlén, Gunnar; Castrén, Maaret; Kurland, Lisa

    2011-05-16

    Earthquakes are renowned as being amongst the most dangerous and destructive types of natural disasters. Iran, a developing country in Asia, is prone to earthquakes and is ranked as one of the most vulnerable countries in the world in this respect. The medical response in disasters is accompanied by managerial, logistic, technical, and medical challenges being also the case in the Bam earthquake in Iran. Our objective was to explore the medical response to the Bam earthquake with specific emphasis on pre-hospital medical management during the first days. The study was performed in 2008; an interview based qualitative study using content analysis. We conducted nineteen interviews with experts and managers responsible for responding to the Bam earthquake, including pre-hospital emergency medical services, the Red Crescent, and Universities of Medical Sciences. The selection of participants was determined by using a purposeful sampling method. Sample size was given by data saturation. The pre-hospital medical service was divided into three categories; triage, emergency medical care and transportation, each category in turn was identified into facilitators and obstacles. The obstacles identified were absence of a structured disaster plan, absence of standardized medical teams, and shortage of resources. The army and skilled medical volunteers were identified as facilitators. The most compelling, and at the same time amenable obstacle, was the lack of a disaster management plan. It was evident that implementing a comprehensive plan would not only save lives but decrease suffering and enable an effective praxis of the available resources at pre-hospital and hospital levels.

  3. Immediate behavioural responses to earthquakes in Christchurch, New Zealand, and Hitachi, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindell, Michael K; Prater, Carla S; Wu, Hao Che; Huang, Shih-Kai; Johnston, David M; Becker, Julia S; Shiroshita, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    This study examines people's immediate responses to earthquakes in Christchurch, New Zealand, and Hitachi, Japan. Data collected from 257 respondents in Christchurch and 332 respondents in Hitachi revealed notable similarities between the two cities in people's emotional reactions, risk perceptions, and immediate protective actions during the events. Respondents' physical, household, and social contexts were quite similar, but Hitachi residents reported somewhat higher levels of emotional reaction and risk perception than did Christchurch residents. Contrary to the recommendations of emergency officials, the most frequent response of residents in both cities was to freeze. Christchurch residents were more likely than Hitachi residents to drop to the ground and take cover, whereas Hitachi residents were more likely than Christchurch residents to evacuate immediately the building in which they were situated. There were relatively small correlations between immediate behavioural responses and demographic characteristics, earthquake experience, and physical, social, or household context. © 2016 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2016.

  4. Development of uniform hazard response spectra for rock sites considering line and point sources of earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2001-12-01

    Traditionally, the seismic design basis ground motion has been specified by normalised response spectral shapes and peak ground acceleration (PGA). The mean recurrence interval (MRI) used to computed for PGA only. It is shown that the MRI associated with such response spectra are not the same at all frequencies. The present work develops uniform hazard response spectra i.e. spectra having the same MRI at all frequencies for line and point sources of earthquakes by using a large number of strong motion accelerograms recorded on rock sites. Sensitivity of the number of the results to the changes in various parameters has also been presented. This work is an extension of an earlier work for aerial sources of earthquakes. These results will help to determine the seismic hazard at a given site and the associated uncertainities. (author)

  5. Predicting Dynamic Response of Structures under Earthquake Loads Using Logical Analysis of Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Abd-Elhamed

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, logical analysis of data (LAD is used to predict the seismic response of building structures employing the captured dynamic responses. In order to prepare the data, computational simulations using a single degree of freedom (SDOF building model under different ground motion records are carried out. The selected excitation records are real and of different peak ground accelerations (PGA. The sensitivity of the seismic response in terms of displacements of floors to the variation in earthquake characteristics, such as soil class, characteristic period, and time step of records, peak ground displacement, and peak ground velocity, have also been considered. The dynamic equation of motion describing the building model and the applied earthquake load are presented and solved incrementally using the Runge-Kutta method. LAD then finds the characteristic patterns which lead to forecast the seismic response of building structures. The accuracy of LAD is compared to that of an artificial neural network (ANN, since the latter is the most known machine learning technique. Based on the conducted study, the proposed LAD model has been proven to be an efficient technique to learn, simulate, and blindly predict the dynamic response behaviour of building structures subjected to earthquake loads.

  6. Improving 1D Site Specific Velocity Profiles for the Kik-Net Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, James; Edwards, Benjamin; Pilz, Marco; Fäh, Donat; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Ground motion predication equations (GMPEs) form the cornerstone of modern seismic hazard assessments. When produced to a high standard they provide reliable estimates of ground motion/spectral acceleration for a given site and earthquake scenario. This information is crucial for engineers to optimise design and for regulators who enforce legal minimum safe design capacities. Classically, GMPEs were built upon the assumption that variability around the median model could be treated as aleatory. As understanding improved, it was noted that the propagation could be segregated into the response of the average path from the source and the response of the site. This is because the heterogeneity of the near-surface lithology is significantly different from that of the bulk path. It was then suggested that the semi-ergodic approach could be taken if the site response could be determined, moving uncertainty away from aleatory to epistemic. The determination of reliable site-specific response models is therefore becoming increasingly critical for ground motion models used in engineering practice. Today it is common practice to include proxies for site response within the scope of a GMPE, such as Vs30 or site classification, in an effort to reduce the overall uncertainty of the predication at a given site. However, these proxies are not always reliable enough to give confident ground motion estimates, due to the complexity of the near-surface. Other approaches of quantifying the response of the site include detailed numerical simulations (1/2/3D - linear, EQL, non-linear etc.). However, in order to be reliable, they require highly detailed and accurate velocity and, for non-linear analyses, material property models. It is possible to obtain this information through invasive methods, but is expensive, and not feasible for most projects. Here we propose an alternative method to derive reliable velocity profiles (and their uncertainty), calibrated using almost 20 years of

  7. Earthquake response characteristics of large structure 'JOYO' deeply embedded in quaternary ground, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Hiroshi; Sawada, Yoshihiro; Hanada, Kazutake; Sawada, Makoto.

    1987-01-01

    In order to examine aseismicity of embedded structure and to clarify embedment effect, earthquake observations of the large structure 'JOYO' are carried out which is deeply embedded in quaternary ground, and the results are summarized as follows. (1) Amplification factors of horizontal component in ground surface is about 3 to 4 times against the bedrock. Contrastively on the structure, any amplification is not observed at the underground portion, however, little amplification exists at the ground portion of structure. (2) Transfer function of structure has several predominant peaks at frequencies of 4.3 Hz and 8.0 Hz which are well coincided with values obtained from force excitation tests. It is shown that transfer function between basement and ground surface is similar to that between ground of same level to basement and ground surface, suggesting the behavior of basement to be able to estimate by these under ground earthquake motion. (3) According to earthquake motion analysis using S-R models, without regard to consider or not the side ground stiffness, the calculated response values do not so much differ in each model and mostly correspond with observation data, provided that the underground earthquake motion at same level to basement is used as a input wave. Consequently, the behavior of these deeply embedded structure is subject to setting method of input wave rather than modeling method, and it is very useful in design that the most simple model without side ground stiffness can roughly represent the embedment effect. (author)

  8. Seismic response of the Pickering pressure relief duct to the 1985 Nahanni earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghobarah, A.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the structural response of the Pickering pressure relief duct when subjected to the ground motion records of the 1985 Nahanni earthquake (December 23, 05:16 GMT, Site 1 - Iverson, N.W.T.). It also includes an estimate of the possible impact on the nuclear safety function of the duct. The structural models developed in an earlier study were used in this analysis. The response to the earthquake ground motion was determined on the basis of the estimated capacities of various components of the duct. The ability of the structure to fulfill its nuclear safety function is discussed. (author). 6 refs., 1 tab., 17 figs

  9. Influence of earthquake strong motion duration on nonlinear structural response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meskouris, K.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of motion duration on nonlinear structural response of high-rise, moment resisting frames are studied by subjecting shear beam models of a 10- and a 5-story frame to a series of synthetic accelerograms, all matching the same NEWMARK/HALL design spectrum. Two different hysteretic laws are used for the story springs, and calculations are carried out for target ductility values of 2 and 4. Maximum ductilities reached and energy-based damage indicators (maximum seismically input energy, hysteretically dissipated energy) are evaluated and correlated with the motion characteristics. A reasonable extrapolative determination of structural response characteristics based on these indicators seems possible. (orig.)

  10. Earthquake-induced response and potential for gas mobilization in Hanford waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, H.C.; Deibler, J.E.

    1997-09-01

    Seismic events postulated to occur at Hanford are predicted to cause yielding of the various waste materials in double- and single-shell tanks such that some or most of the waste is driven to completely plastic behavior. The seismic analyses documented in this report evaluated waste response to a 1,000-year design basis earthquake (DBE) event. The three-dimensional finite element computational structural analysis models were used with an assumed nonlinear elastic-plastic material definition

  11. NEAR REAL-TIME GEOREFERENCE OF UMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE IMAGES FOR POST-EARTHQUAKE RESPONSE

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, S.; Wang, X.; Dou, A.; Yuan, X.; Ding, L.; Ding, X.

    2018-01-01

    The rapid collection of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) remote sensing images plays an important role in the fast submitting disaster information and the monitored serious damaged objects after the earthquake. However, for hundreds of UAV images collected in one flight sortie, the traditional data processing methods are image stitching and three-dimensional reconstruction, which take one to several hours, and affect the speed of disaster response. If the manual searching method is employed, we ...

  12. Real-time seismic monitoring of the integrated cape girardeau bridge array and recorded earthquake response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces the state of the art, real-time and broad-band seismic monitoring network implemented for the 1206 m [3956 ft] long, cable-stayed Bill Emerson Memorial Bridge in Cape Girardeau (MO), a new Mississippi River crossing, approximately 80 km from the epicentral region of the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes. The bridge was designed for a strong earthquake (magnitude 7.5 or greater) during the design life of the bridge. The monitoring network comprises a total of 84 channels of accelerometers deployed on the superstructure, pier foundations and at surface and downhole free-field arrays of the bridge. The paper also presents the high quality response data obtained from the network. Such data is aimed to be used by the owner, researchers and engineers to assess the performance of the bridge, to check design parameters, including the comparison of dynamic characteristics with actual response, and to better design future similar bridges. Preliminary analyses of ambient and low amplitude small earthquake data reveal specific response characteristics of the bridge and the free-field. There is evidence of coherent tower, cable, deck interaction that sometimes results in amplified ambient motions. Motions at the lowest tri-axial downhole accelerometers on both MO and IL sides are practically free from any feedback from the bridge. Motions at the mid-level and surface downhole accelerometers are influenced significantly by feedback due to amplified ambient motions of the bridge. Copyright ASCE 2006.

  13. Golden Gate Bridge response: a study with low-amplitude data from three earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebi, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic response of the Golden Gate Bridge, located north of San Francisco, CA, has been studied previously using ambient vibration data and finite element models. Since permanent seismic instrumentation was installed in 1993, only small earthquakes that originated at distances varying between ~11 to 122 km have been recorded. Nonetheless, these records prompted this study of the response of the bridge to low amplitude shaking caused by three earthquakes. Compared to previous ambient vibration studies, the earthquake response data reveal a slightly higher fundamental frequency (shorter-period) for vertical vibration of the bridge deck center span (~7.7–8.3 s versus 8.2–10.6 s), and a much higher fundamental frequency (shorter period) for the transverse direction of the deck (~11.24–16.3 s versus ~18.2 s). In this study, it is also shown that these two periods are dominant apparent periods representing interaction between tower, cable, and deck.

  14. The 2015 Nepal Earthquake(s): Lessons Learned From the Disability and Rehabilitation Sector's Preparation for, and Response to, Natural Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Michel D; Sheppard, Phillip S; Leung, Kit; Retis, Chiara; Salvador, Edwin C; Raman, Sudha R

    2016-11-01

    The frequency of natural disasters appears to be mounting at an alarming rate, and the degree to which people are surviving such traumatic events also is increasing. Postdisaster survival often triggers increases in population and individual disability-related outcomes in the form of impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions, all of which have an important impact on the individual, his or her family, and their community. The increase in postdisaster disability-related outcomes has provided a rationale for the increased role of the disability and rehabilitation sector's involvement in emergency response, including physical therapists. A recent major earthquake that has drawn the world's attention occurred in the spring of 2015 in Nepal. The response of the local and international communities was large and significant, and although the collection of complex health and disability issues have yet to be fully resolved, there has been a series of important lessons learned from the 2015 Nepal earthquake(s). This perspective article outlines lessons learned from Nepal that can be applied to future disasters to reduce overall disability-related outcomes and more fully integrate rehabilitation in preparation and planning. First, information is presented on disasters in general, and then information is presented that focuses on the earthquake(s) in Nepal. Next, field experience in Nepal before, during, and after the earthquake is described, and actions that can and should be adopted prior to disasters as part of disability preparedness planning are examined. Then, the emerging roles of rehabilitation providers such as physical therapists during the immediate and postdisaster recovery phases are discussed. Finally, approaches are suggested that can be adopted to "build back better" for, and with, people with disabilities in postdisaster settings such as Nepal. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  15. Monitoring reservoir response to earthquakes and fluid extraction, Salton Sea geothermal field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Taka’aki; Nayak, Avinash; Brenguier, Florent; Manga, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of in situ reservoir responses to stress transients provides insights into the evolution of geothermal reservoirs. By exploiting the stress dependence of seismic velocity changes, we investigate the temporal evolution of the reservoir stress state of the Salton Sea geothermal field (SSGF), California. We find that the SSGF experienced a number of sudden velocity reductions (~0.035 to 0.25%) that are most likely caused by openings of fractures due to dynamic stress transients (as small as 0.08 MPa and up to 0.45 MPa) from local and regional earthquakes. Depths of velocity changes are estimated to be about 0.5 to 1.5 km, similar to the depths of the injection and production wells. We derive an empirical in situ stress sensitivity of seismic velocity changes by relating velocity changes to dynamic stresses. We also observe systematic velocity reductions (0.04 to 0.05%) during earthquake swarms in mid-November 2009 and late-December 2010. On the basis of volumetric static and dynamic stress changes, the expected velocity reductions from the largest earthquakes with magnitude ranging from 3 to 4 in these swarms are less than 0.02%, which suggests that these earthquakes are likely not responsible for the velocity changes observed during the swarms. Instead, we argue that velocity reductions may have been induced by poroelastic opening of fractures due to aseismic deformation. We also observe a long-term velocity increase (~0.04%/year) that is most likely due to poroelastic contraction caused by the geothermal production. Our observations demonstrate that seismic interferometry provides insights into in situ reservoir response to stress changes. PMID:29326977

  16. Monitoring reservoir response to earthquakes and fluid extraction, Salton Sea geothermal field, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Taka'aki; Nayak, Avinash; Brenguier, Florent; Manga, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of in situ reservoir responses to stress transients provides insights into the evolution of geothermal reservoirs. By exploiting the stress dependence of seismic velocity changes, we investigate the temporal evolution of the reservoir stress state of the Salton Sea geothermal field (SSGF), California. We find that the SSGF experienced a number of sudden velocity reductions (~0.035 to 0.25%) that are most likely caused by openings of fractures due to dynamic stress transients (as small as 0.08 MPa and up to 0.45 MPa) from local and regional earthquakes. Depths of velocity changes are estimated to be about 0.5 to 1.5 km, similar to the depths of the injection and production wells. We derive an empirical in situ stress sensitivity of seismic velocity changes by relating velocity changes to dynamic stresses. We also observe systematic velocity reductions (0.04 to 0.05%) during earthquake swarms in mid-November 2009 and late-December 2010. On the basis of volumetric static and dynamic stress changes, the expected velocity reductions from the largest earthquakes with magnitude ranging from 3 to 4 in these swarms are less than 0.02%, which suggests that these earthquakes are likely not responsible for the velocity changes observed during the swarms. Instead, we argue that velocity reductions may have been induced by poroelastic opening of fractures due to aseismic deformation. We also observe a long-term velocity increase (~0.04%/year) that is most likely due to poroelastic contraction caused by the geothermal production. Our observations demonstrate that seismic interferometry provides insights into in situ reservoir response to stress changes.

  17. Comparison of the inelastic response of steel building frames to strong earthquake and underground nuclear explosion ground motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.C.; Tokarz, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    Analytic studies were made of the adequacy of simulating earthquake effects at the Nevada Test Site for structural testing purposes. It is concluded that underground nuclear explosion ground motion will produce inelastic behavior and damage comparable to that produced by strong earthquakes. The generally longer duration of earthquakes compared with underground nuclear explosions does not appear to significantly affect the structural behavior of the building frames considered. A comparison of maximum ductility ratios, maximum story drifts, and maximum displacement indicate similar structural behavior for both types of ground motion. Low yield (10 - kt) underground nuclear explosions are capable of producing inelastic behavior in large structures. Ground motion produced by underground nuclear explosions can produce inelastic earthquake-like effects in large structures and could be used for testing large structures in the inelastic response regime. The Nevada Test Site is a feasible earthquake simulator for testing large structures

  18. Proposal of new framework in nuclear emergency response based on problem in East Japan Great Earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    In the nuclear emergency response activity in a East Japan great earthquake, the weakness the frame and the activity procedure (scheme) of the emergency response activity of our country that had been constructed after the accident of JCO became clear. Especially, it is necessary to recognize the importance of the enhancement of a prior plan after not only provision to response but also the damage to the environment occurs in the emergency for measures for restoration. Moreover, it is necessary to examine a concrete strategy about the management system strengthening of the radiation exposure at the accident. In this study, the experience and the finding in a East Japan great earthquake are arranged. The accident scenario that should be targeted is rearranged, and it proposes a new frame in the nuclear emergency response field through the requirement examinations such as the points of procedure, equipment, and the capital machine parts that lie a regulations frame of the nuclear emergency response, the activity frame of the nuclear emergency response, and materialized of the nuclear emergency response activity. (author)

  19. Proposal of new framework in nuclear emergency response based on problem in East Japan Great Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In the nuclear emergency response activity in a East Japan great earthquake, the weakness the frame and the activity procedure (scheme) of the emergency response activity of our country that had been constructed after the accident of JCO became clear. Especially, it is necessary to recognize the importance of the enhancement of a prior plan after not only provision to response but also the damage to the environment occurs in the emergency for measures for restoration. Moreover, it is necessary to examine a concrete strategy about the management system strengthening of the radiation exposure at the accident. In this study, the experience and the finding in a East Japan great earthquake are arranged. The accident scenario that should be targeted is rearranged, and it proposes a new frame in the nuclear emergency response field through the requirement examinations such as the points of procedure, equipment, and the capital machine parts that lie a regulations frame of the nuclear emergency response, the activity frame of the nuclear emergency response, and materialized of the nuclear emergency response activity. (author)

  20. Proposal of new framework in nuclear emergency response based on problem in East Japan Great Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    In the nuclear emergency response activity in a East Japan great earthquake, the weakness the frame and the activity procedure (scheme) of the emergency response activity of our country that had been constructed after the accident of JCO became clear. Especially, it is necessary to recognize the importance of the enhancement of a prior plan after not only provision to response but also the damage to the environment occurs in the emergency for measures for restoration. Moreover, it is necessary to examine a concrete strategy about the management system strengthening of the radiation exposure at the accident. In this study, the experience and the finding in a East Japan great earthquake are arranged. The accident scenario that should be targeted is rearranged, and it proposes a new frame in the nuclear emergency response field through the requirement examinations such as the points of procedure, equipment, and the capital machine parts that lie a regulations frame of the nuclear emergency response, the activity frame of the nuclear emergency response, and materialized of the nuclear emergency response activity. (author)

  1. Trial application of guidelines for nuclear plant response to an earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, W.; Oliver, R.; O'Connor, W.

    1993-09-01

    Guidelines have been developed to assist nuclear plant personnel in the preparation of earthquake response procedures for nuclear power plants. These guidelines are published in EPRI report NP-6695, ''Guidelines for Nuclear Plant Response to an Earthquake,'' dated December 1989. This report includes two sets of nuclear plant procedures which were prepared to implement the guidelines of EPRI report NP-6695. The first set were developed by the Toledo Edison Company Davis-Besse plant. Davis-Besse is a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and contains relatively standard seismic monitoring instrumentation typical of many domestic nuclear plants. The second set of procedures were prepared by Yankee Atomic Electric Company for the Vermont Yankee facility. This plant is a boiling water reactor (BWR) with state-of-the-art seismic monitoring and PC-based data processing equipment, software developed specifically to implement the OBE Exceedance Criterion presented in EPRI report NP-5930, ''A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the operating Basis Earthquake.'' The two sets of procedures are intended to demonstrate how two different nuclear utilities have interpreted and applied the EPRI guidance given in report NP-6695

  2. Analysis of recorded earthquake response data at the Hualien large-scale seismic test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, C.H.; Tang, H.T.; Dermitzakis, S.; Esfandiari, S.

    1997-01-01

    A soil-structure interaction (SSI) experiment is being conducted in a seismically active region in Hualien, Taiwan. To obtain earthquake data for quantifying SSI effects and providing a basis to benchmark analysis methods, a 1/4-th scale cylindrical concrete containment model similar in shape to that of a nuclear power plant containment was constructed in the field where both the containment model and its surrounding soil, surface and sub-surface, are extensively instrumented to record earthquake data. In between September 1993 and May 1995, eight earthquakes with Richter magnitudes ranging from 4.2 to 6.2 were recorded. The author focuses on studying and analyzing the recorded data to provide information on the response characteristics of the Hualien soil-structure system, the SSI effects and the ground motion characteristics. An effort was also made to directly determine the site soil physical properties based on correlation analysis of the recorded data. No modeling simulations were attempted to try to analytically predict the SSI response of the soil and the structure. These will be the scope of a subsequent study

  3. Stochastic analysis of the earthquake response of structures with a view to soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, J.

    1980-01-01

    Thesis dealing with the analysis of earthquake response of structures. In order to achieve a reliable risk assessment, the results of the seismic risk analysis have to be seen in an overall view together with the results of stochastic vibrational analyses, and the data on maximum supportable stresses of the structure. Taking into account stochastic seismic focus models and calculation methods is of special significance in this connection. Based upon well-known seismic risk assessment models, the calculation of the annual probability for exceeding the acceleration level is carried out also considering the length of the failure zone, assuming that the energy released during an earthquake is uniformly, distributed over this fracture zone. The strong influence of local parameters on the annual exceeding probability is shown by a sensitivity analysis. (orig./RW) [de

  4. Site Specific Nutrient Management for Maize on Ultisols Lampung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andarias Makka Murni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lampung is the third major maize producing province in Indonesia after East Java and Central Java. In Lampungmaize is cultivated mainly in upland areas with ultisols and only some cultivated on paddy field as a secondary cropin the dry season. The average maize yield in Lampung is still 3.4 Mg ha-1 bellow yield potential of 7 - 10 Mg ha-1. Toincrease the productivity of maize through site-specific nutrient management (SSNM, on-farm trials were conductedin five locations in Lampung i.e. four locations in Central Lampung District (Sidowaras, Binjai Ngagung, Watu Agungand Balai Rejo and one location in South Lampung District (Trimulyo, Tegineneng Sub District during the 2004/2005,2005/2006 and 2006/2007 rainy seasons. The experimental setup followed a standard protocol at all sites and includednutrient omission plots (PK, NK, NP to estimate indigenous nutrient supplies, an NPK plot to measure yield responseto fertilizer application, and a farmers’ fertilizer practice (FFP plot in each farmer’s field. An SSNM treatment plot wasincluded in the second and third seasons. Each of the above treatments was paralleled by a plot with improved cropmanagement practice (ICM, i.e. higher planting density, addition of lime, and addition of magnesium. Results showedthat yield response to fertilizer N, P and K application in these sites were: N = 2.3 - 4.1 Mg ha-1; P = 0.6 - 2.0 Mg ha-1;K = 0.3-2.4 Mg ha-1. Attainable yield in the three seasons on average ranged from 7.6 Mg ha-1 to 10.6 Mg ha-1. Yield inthe SSNM treatment (with or without ICM was significantly higher than the FFP indicating great opportunities forfarmers to increase productivity and profitability with improved nutrient and crop management

  5. Load-Unload Response Ratio and Accelerating Moment/Energy Release Critical Region Scaling and Earthquake Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, X. C.; Mora, P.; Peng, K.; Wang, Y. C.; Weatherley, D.

    The main idea of the Load-Unload Response Ratio (LURR) is that when a system is stable, its response to loading corresponds to its response to unloading, whereas when the system is approaching an unstable state, the response to loading and unloading becomes quite different. High LURR values and observations of Accelerating Moment/Energy Release (AMR/AER) prior to large earthquakes have led different research groups to suggest intermediate-term earthquake prediction is possible and imply that the LURR and AMR/AER observations may have a similar physical origin. To study this possibility, we conducted a retrospective examination of several Australian and Chinese earthquakes with magnitudes ranging from 5.0 to 7.9, including Australia's deadly Newcastle earthquake and the devastating Tangshan earthquake. Both LURR values and best-fit power-law time-to-failure functions were computed using data within a range of distances from the epicenter. Like the best-fit power-law fits in AMR/AER, the LURR value was optimal using data within a certain epicentral distance implying a critical region for LURR. Furthermore, LURR critical region size scales with mainshock magnitude and is similar to the AMR/AER critical region size. These results suggest a common physical origin for both the AMR/AER and LURR observations. Further research may provide clues that yield an understanding of this mechanism and help lead to a solid foundation for intermediate-term earthquake prediction.

  6. Evaluation of potential water conservation using site-specific irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the advent of site-specific variable-rate irrigation (VRI) systems, irrigation can be spatially managed within sub-field-sized zones. Spatial irrigation management can optimize spatial water use efficiency and may conserve water. Spatial VRI systems are currently being managed by consultants ...

  7. 77 FR 22772 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board AGENCY: Office of Environmental Management, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of renewal. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 14(a)(2... Secretariat, General Services Administration, notice is hereby given that the Environmental Management Site...

  8. Determination of site-specific glycan heterogeneity on glycoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarich, Daniel; Jensen, Pia Hønnerup; Altmann, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    and the determination of site-specific glycan heterogeneity. The described workflow takes approximately 3-5 d, including sample preparation and data analysis. The data obtained from analyzing released glycans of rHuEPO and IgG, described in the second protocol of this series (10.1038/nprot.2012.063), provide...

  9. Precision agriculture - from mapping to site-specific application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Marcus; Lind, Kim Martin Hjorth

    2017-01-01

    of each chapter in the book. Each chapter address a different topic starting with an overview of technologies that are currently available, followed by specific Variable-Rate Technologies such as VRT fertilizer application, VRT pesticide application, site-specific irrigation management, Auto...

  10. Recorded earthquake responses from the integrated seismic monitoring network of the Atwood Building, Anchorage, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, M.

    2006-01-01

    An integrated seismic monitoring system with a total of 53 channels of accelerometers is now operating in and at the nearby free-field site of the 20-story steel-framed Atwood Building in highly seismic Anchorage, Alaska. The building has a single-story basement and a reinforced concrete foundation without piles. The monitoring system comprises a 32-channel structural array and a 21-channel site array. Accelerometers are deployed on 10 levels of the building to assess translational, torsional, and rocking motions, interstory drift (displacement) between selected pairs of adjacent floors, and average drift between floors. The site array, located approximately a city block from the building, comprises seven triaxial accelerometers, one at the surface and six in boreholes ranging in depths from 15 to 200 feet (???5-60 meters). The arrays have already recorded low-amplitude shaking responses of the building and the site caused by numerous earthquakes at distances ranging from tens to a couple of hundred kilometers. Data from an earthquake that occurred 186 km away traces the propagation of waves from the deepest borehole to the roof of the building in approximately 0.5 seconds. Fundamental structural frequencies [0.58 Hz (NS) and 0.47 Hz (EW)], low damping percentages (2-4%), mode coupling, and beating effects are identified. The fundamental site frequency at approximately 1.5 Hz is close to the second modal frequencies (1.83 Hz NS and 1.43 EW) of the building, which may cause resonance of the building. Additional earthquakes prove repeatability of these characteristics; however, stronger shaking may alter these conclusions. ?? 2006, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  11. Earthquake Response of Reinforced Concrete Building Retrofitted with Geopolymer Concrete and X-shaped Metallic Damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madheswaran, C. K.; Prakash vel, J.; Sathishkumar, K.; Rao, G. V. Rama

    2017-06-01

    A three-storey half scale reinforced concrete (RC) building is fixed with X-shaped metallic damper at the ground floor level, is designed and fabricated to study its seismic response characteristics. Experimental studies are carried out using the (4 m × 4 m) tri-axial shake-table facility to evaluate the seismic response of a retrofitted RC building with open ground storey (OGS) structure using yielding type X-shaped metallic dampers (also called as Added Damping and Stiffness-ADAS elements) and repairing the damaged ground storey columns using geopolymer concrete composites. This elasto-plastic device is normally incorporated within the frame structure between adjacent floors through chevron bracing, so that they efficiently enhance the overall energy dissipation ability of the seismically deficient frame structure under earthquake loading. Free vibration tests on RC building without and with yielding type X-shaped metallic damper is carried out. The natural frequencies and mode shapes of RC building without and with yielding type X-shaped metallic damper are determined. The retrofitted reinforced concrete building is subjected to earthquake excitations and the response from the structure is recorded. This work discusses the preparation of test specimen, experimental set-up, instrumentation, method of testing of RC building and the response of the structure. The metallic damper reduces the time period of the structure and displacement demands on the OGS columns of the structure. Nonlinear time history analysis is performed using structural analysis package, SAP2000.

  12. Development and use of a master health facility list: Haiti's experience during the 2010 earthquake response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose-Wood, Alyson; Heard, Nathan; Thermidor, Roody; Chan, Jessica; Joseph, Fanor; Lerebours, Gerald; Zugaldia, Antonio; Konkel, Kimberly; Edwards, Michael; Lang, Bill; Torres, Carmen-Rosa

    2014-08-01

    Master health facility lists (MHFLs) are gaining attention as a standards-based means to uniquely identify health facilities and to link facility-level data. The ability to reliably communicate information about specific health facilities can support an array of health system functions, such as routine reporting and emergency response operations. MHFLs support the alignment of donor-supported health information systems with county-owned systems. Recent World Health Organization draft guidance promotes the utility of MHFLs and outlines a process for list development and governance. Although the potential benefits of MHFLs are numerous and may seem obvious, there are few documented cases of MHFL construction and use. The international response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake provides an example of how governments, nongovernmental organizations, and others can collaborate within a framework of standards to build a more complete and accurate list of health facilities. Prior to the earthquake, the Haitian Ministry of Health (Ministère de la Santé Publique et de la Population [MSPP]) maintained a list of public-sector health facilities but lacked information on privately managed facilities. Following the earthquake, the MSPP worked with a multinational group to expand the completeness and accuracy of the list of health facilities, including information on post-quake operational status. This list later proved useful in the response to the cholera epidemic and is now incorporated into the MSPP's routine health information system. Haiti's experience demonstrates the utility of MHFL formation and use in crisis as well as in the routine function of the health information system.

  13. Dynamic buckling and nonlinear response of FBR main vessels under earthquake loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, Yutaka; Kawamoto, Yoji; Nakagawa, Masaki; Akiyama, Hiroshi.

    1991-01-01

    Pseudo-dynamic tests of cylindrical shells under high temperature were performed in order to study elasto-plastic shear-bending buckling and the nonlinear response of FBR main vessels under earthquake loading. The test results showed a response reduction effect due to pre-buckling plasticity, and a large seismic margin due to post-buckling energy absorption of the cylinders. A simple expression of the response reduction effect was proposed, as a contribution to the safe and effective seismic design of FBRs. Two methods for seismic margin evaluation were also proposed, and it was shown that appropriate seismic margins can be ensured, when the response reduction effect is incorporated into the seismic design. (author)

  14. Assessment of soil-structure interaction practice based on synthesized results from Lotung experiment - earthquake response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjian, A.H.; Tseng, W.S.; Tang, Y.K.; Tang, H.T.; Stepp, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    On the assumption that the foundation can be appropriately modeled, it would be difficult to distinguish between the computational capabilities of the SASSI, CLASSI and SUPERALUSH/CLASSI methods of SSI analysis. Given the appropriate model, all three methodologies would produce very similar valid results. However, both CLASSI (Bechtel) and Soil-Spring methods should be used cautiously within their known limitations. The use of FLUSH should be limited to essentially 2D problems. More than the computational methods, the differences in the seismic response results obtained are due to the modeling of the soil-structure system and the characterization of the input motions. A number of insights have been obtained with respect to the validity of SSI analysis methodologies for earthquake response. Among these are the following: vertical wave propagation assumption in performing SSI is adequate to describe the wave field; equivalent linear analysis of soil response for SSI analysis, such as performed by the SHAKE code, provides acceptable results; a significant but non-permanent degradation of soil modulus occurs during earthquakes; the development of soil stiffness degradation and damping curves as a function of strain, based on geophysical and laboratory tests, requires improvement to reduce variability and uncertainty; backfill stiffness plays an important role in determining impedance functions and possibly input motions; scattering of ground motion due to embedment is an important element in performing SSI analysis. (author)

  15. Earthquake response analysis of embedded reactor building considering soil-structure separation and nonlinearity of soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Nakai, S.

    1987-01-01

    In the earthquake response analysis for a rigid and massive structure as a nuclear reactor building, it is important to estimate the effect of soil-structure interaction (SSI) appropriately. In case of strong earthquakes, the nonlinearity, such as the wall-ground separation, the base mat uplift of sliding, makes the behavior of the soil-structure system complex. But, if the nuclear reactor building is embedded in a relatively soft ground with surface layer, the wall-ground separation plays the most important role in the response of soil-structure system. Because, it is expected that the base uplift and slide would be less significant due to the effect of the embedment, and the wall-ground friction is usually neglected in design. But, the nonlinearity of ground may have some effect on the wall-ground separation and the response of the structure. These problems have been studied by use of FEM. Others used joint elements between the ground and the structure which does not resist tensile force. Others studied the effect of wall-ground separation with non-tension springs. But the relationship between the ground condition and the effect of the separation has not been clarified yet. To clarify the effect the analyses by FE model and lumped mass model (sway-rocking model) are performed and compared. The key parameter is the ground profile, namely the stiffness of the side soil

  16. SITE-94. Site specific base data for the performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, J.; Tiren, S.; Dverstorp, B.; Glynn, P.

    1996-06-01

    This report documents the site specific base data that were available, and the utilization of these data within SITE-94. A brief summary is given of SKB's preliminary site investigations for the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), which were the main source of site-specific data for SITE-94, and an overview is given of the field methods and instrumentation for the preliminary investigations. A compilation is given of comments concerning the availability and quality of the data for Aespoe, and specific recommendations are given for future site investigations. It was found that the HRL pre-investigations produced a large quantity of data which were, for the most part, of sufficient quality to be valuable for a performance assessment. However, some problems were encountered regarding documentation, procedural consistency, positional information, and storage of the data from the measurements. 77 refs, 4 tabs

  17. Site specific study for possible ongoing salt dome movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoms, R.L.; Manning, T.A.; Paille, L.K.; Gehle, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    U.S. Gulf Coast salt domes, among other geologic structures, currently are being considered for storage of commercial radioactive wastes. A major concern with dome storage of long lived radioactive wastes lies with the possible tectonic movement of the host dome. Any ongoing movement of a salt dome can be monitored with a site specific complementary system of field instrumentation and finite element modelling. Field instrumentation and accompanying finite element analyses for a study dome in northwest Louisiana are described. Site specific data and early experience associated with tiltmeters over the dome are presented. Also, recommendations are made for modifications and extensions of the field instrumentation and finite element modelling appropriate to the specific site under study

  18. Pinellas Plant FY1990 site specific implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.D.

    1990-02-01

    This Site Specific Implementation Plan describes the Corrective Action, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management activities to be performed at the Pinellas Plant in FY1990 (October 1, 1989 to September 30, 1989). These FY1990 activities are described in the Pinellas Plant FY1991--95 Five-Year Plan. The information used to prepare this plan reflects the best estimate of the project scope, schedules, regulatory, and funding requirements at the time of plan preparation. The Environmental Restoration/Waste Management Five-Year Plan is a dynamic document and will be modified each year; the Site Specific Implementation Plan will, in turn, be modified each year to reflect new findings, information, and knowledge of the various projects. 4 figs., 11 tabs

  19. Site-specific design optimization of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, P.; Bak, C.; Schepers, J.G.

    2002-01-01

    This article reports results from a European project, where site characteristics were incorporated into the design process of wind turbines, to enable site-specific design. Two wind turbines of different concept were investigated at six different sites comprising normal flat terrain, offshore...... and complex terrain wind farms. Design tools based on numerical optimization and aeroelastic calculations were combined with a cost model to allow optimization for minimum cost of energy. Different scenarios were optimized ranging from modifications of selected individual components to the complete design...... of a new wind turbine. Both annual energy yield and design-determining loads depended on site characteristics, and this represented a potential for site-specific design. The maximum variation in annual energy yield was 37% and the maximum variation in blade root fatigue loads was 62%. Optimized site...

  20. Intruder scenarios for site-specific waste classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently revising its low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management requirements and guidelines for waste generated at its facilities that support defense missions. Specifically, draft DOE 5820.2A, Chapter 3, describes the purpose, policy, and requirements necessary for the management of defense LLW. The draft DOE policy calls for DOE LLW operations to be managed to protect the health and safety of the public, preserve the environment, and ensure that no remedial action will be necessary after termination of operations. The requirements and guidelines apply to radioactive wastes but are also intended to apply to mixed hazardous and radioactive wastes as defined in draft DOE 5400.5, Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste. The basic approach used by DOE is to establish overall performance objectives in terms of ground-water protection and public radiation dose limits and to require site-specific performance assessments to determine compliance. As a result of these performance assessments, each site shall develop waste acceptance criteria that define the allowable quantities and concentrations of specific radioisotopes. Additional limitations on waste disposal design, waste form, and waste treatment shall also be developed on a site-specific basis. As a key step in the site-specific performance assessments, an evaluation must be conducted of potential radiation doses to intruders who may inadvertently move onto a closed DOE LLW disposal site after loss of institutional controls must be conducted. This paper describes the types of intruder scenarios that should be considered when performing this step of the site-specific performance assessment

  1. Site-specific Probabilistic Analysis of DCGLs Using RESRAD Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeongju; Yoon, Suk Bon; Sohn, Wook [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In general, DCGLs can be conservative (screening DCGL) if they do not take into account site specific factors. Use of such conservative DCGLs can lead to additional remediation that would not be required if the effort was made to develop site-specific DCGLs. Therefore, the objective of this work is to provide an example on the use of the RESRAD 6.0 probabilistic (site-specific) dose analysis to compare with the screening DCGL. Site release regulations state that a site will be considered acceptable for unrestricted use if the residual radioactivity that is distinguishable from background radiation results in a Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) to an average member of the critical group of less than the site release criteria, for example 0.25 mSv per year in U.S. Utilities use computer dose modeling codes to establish an acceptable level of contamination, the derived concentration guideline level (DCGL) that will meet this regulatory limit. Since the DCGL value is the principal measure of residual radioactivity, it is critical to understand the technical basis of these dose modeling codes. The objective this work was to provide example on nuclear power plant decommissioning dose analysis in a probabilistic analysis framework. The focus was on the demonstration of regulatory compliance for surface soil contamination using the RESRAD 6.0 code. Both the screening and site-specific probabilistic dose analysis methodologies were examined. Example analyses performed with the screening probabilistic dose analysis confirmed the conservatism of the NRC screening values and indicated the effectiveness of probabilistic dose analysis in reducing the conservatism in DCGL derivation.

  2. Site-Specific Biomolecule Labeling with Gold Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, Christopher J.; Powell, Richard D.; Hainfeld, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific labeling of biomolecules in vitro with gold clusters can enhance the information content of electron cryomicroscopy experiments. This chapter provides a practical overview of well-established techniques for forming biomolecule/gold cluster conjugates. Three bioconjugation chemistries are covered: Linker-mediated bioconjugation, direct gold–biomolecule bonding, and coordination-mediated bonding of nickel(II) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-derivatized gold clusters to polyhistidine (His)-tagged proteins. PMID:20887859

  3. Site-Specific Biomolecule Labeling with Gold Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Ackerson, Christopher J.; Powell, Richard D.; Hainfeld, James F.

    2010-01-01

    Site-specific labeling of biomolecules in vitro with gold clusters can enhance the information content of electron cryomicroscopy experiments. This chapter provides a practical overview of well-established techniques for forming biomolecule/gold cluster conjugates. Three bioconjugation chemistries are covered: Linker-mediated bioconjugation, direct gold–biomolecule bonding, and coordination-mediated bonding of nickel(II) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-derivatized gold clusters to polyhistidine (...

  4. Site specific atomic polarizabilities in endohedral fullerenes and carbon onions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zope, Rajendra R., E-mail: rzope@utep.edu; Baruah, Tunna [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79958 (United States); Computational Science Program, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79958 (United States); Bhusal, Shusil; Basurto, Luis [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79958 (United States); Jackson, Koblar [Physics Department and Science of Advanced Materials Ph.D. Program, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan 48859 (United States)

    2015-08-28

    We investigate the polarizability of trimetallic nitride endohedral fullerenes by partitioning the total polarizability into site specific components. This analysis indicates that the polarizability of the endohedral fullerene is essentially due to the outer fullerene cage and has insignificant contribution from the encapsulated unit. Thus, the outer fullerene cages effectively shield the encapsulated clusters and behave like Faraday cages. The polarizability of endohedral fullerenes is slightly smaller than the polarizability of the corresponding bare carbon fullerenes. The application of the site specific polarizabilities to C{sub 60}@C{sub 240} and C{sub 60}@C{sub 180} onions shows that, compared to the polarizability of isolated C{sub 60} fullerene, the encapsulation of the C{sub 60} in C{sub 240} and C{sub 180} fullerenes reduces its polarizability by 75% and 83%, respectively. The differences in the polarizability of C{sub 60} in the two onions is a result of differences in the bonding (intershell electron transfer), fullerene shell relaxations, and intershell separations. The site specific analysis further shows that the outer atoms in a fullerene shell contribute most to the fullerene polarizability.

  5. Site specific atomic polarizabilities in endohedral fullerenes and carbon onions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zope, Rajendra R.; Baruah, Tunna; Bhusal, Shusil; Basurto, Luis; Jackson, Koblar

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the polarizability of trimetallic nitride endohedral fullerenes by partitioning the total polarizability into site specific components. This analysis indicates that the polarizability of the endohedral fullerene is essentially due to the outer fullerene cage and has insignificant contribution from the encapsulated unit. Thus, the outer fullerene cages effectively shield the encapsulated clusters and behave like Faraday cages. The polarizability of endohedral fullerenes is slightly smaller than the polarizability of the corresponding bare carbon fullerenes. The application of the site specific polarizabilities to C 60 @C 240 and C 60 @C 180 onions shows that, compared to the polarizability of isolated C 60 fullerene, the encapsulation of the C 60 in C 240 and C 180 fullerenes reduces its polarizability by 75% and 83%, respectively. The differences in the polarizability of C 60 in the two onions is a result of differences in the bonding (intershell electron transfer), fullerene shell relaxations, and intershell separations. The site specific analysis further shows that the outer atoms in a fullerene shell contribute most to the fullerene polarizability

  6. Site specific atomic polarizabilities in endohedral fullerenes and carbon onions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zope, Rajendra R.; Bhusal, Shusil; Basurto, Luis; Baruah, Tunna; Jackson, Koblar

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the polarizability of trimetallic nitride endohedral fullerenes by partitioning the total polarizability into site specific components. This analysis indicates that the polarizability of the endohedral fullerene is essentially due to the outer fullerene cage and has insignificant contribution from the encapsulated unit. Thus, the outer fullerene cages effectively shield the encapsulated clusters and behave like Faraday cages. The polarizability of endohedral fullerenes is slightly smaller than the polarizability of the corresponding bare carbon fullerenes. The application of the site specific polarizabilities to C60@C240 and C60@C180 onions shows that, compared to the polarizability of isolated C60 fullerene, the encapsulation of the C60 in C240 and C180 fullerenes reduces its polarizability by 75% and 83%, respectively. The differences in the polarizability of C60 in the two onions is a result of differences in the bonding (intershell electron transfer), fullerene shell relaxations, and intershell separations. The site specific analysis further shows that the outer atoms in a fullerene shell contribute most to the fullerene polarizability.

  7. Earthquake response spectra for seismic design of nuclear power plants in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bommer, Julian J.; Papaspiliou, Myrto; Price, Warren

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Seismic design of UK nuclear power plants usually based on PML response spectra. → We review derivation of PML spectra in terms of earthquake data used and procedure. → The data include errors and represent a small fraction of what is now available. → Seismic design loads in current practice are derived as mean uniform hazard spectra. → The need to capture epistemic uncertainty makes use of single equation indefensible. - Abstract: Earthquake actions for the seismic design of nuclear power plants in the United Kingdom are generally based on spectral shapes anchored to peak ground acceleration (PGA) values obtained from a single predictive equation. Both the spectra and the PGA prediction equation were derived in the 1980s. The technical bases for these formulations of seismic loading are now very dated if compared with the state-of-the-art in this field. Alternative spectral shapes are explored and the options, and the associated benefits and challenges, for generating uniform hazard response spectra instead of fixed shapes anchored to PGA are discussed.

  8. [Expression of negative emotional responses to the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake: Analysis of big data from social media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Asako; Komori, Masashi; Matsumura, Naohiro; Maeda, Kazutoshi

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we investigated the expression of emotional responses to the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake by analyzing the frequency of negative emotional terms in tweets posted on Twitter, one of the most popular social media platforms. We focused on differences in time-series variations and diurnal changes between two kinds of disasters: natural disasters (earthquakes and tsunamis) and nuclear accidents. The number of tweets containing negative emotional responses increased sharply shortly after the first huge earthquake and decreased over time, whereas tweets about nuclear accidents showed no correlation with elapsed time. Expressions of anxiety about natural disasters had a circadian rhythm, with a peak at midnight, whereas expressions of anger about the nuclear accident were highly sensitive to critical events related to the accident. These findings were discussed in terms of similarities and differences compared to earlier studies on emotional responses in social media.

  9. Methodology for estimating realistic responses of buildings and components under earthquake motion and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisawa, Katsumi; Abe, Kiyoharu; Kohno, Kunihiko; Nakamura, Hidetaka; Itoh, Mamoru.

    1996-11-01

    Failure probabilities of buildings and components under earthquake motion are estimated as conditional probabilities that their realistic responses exceed their capacities. Two methods for estimating their failure probabilities have already been developed. One is a detailed method developed in the Seismic Safety margins Research Program of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in U.S.A., which is called 'SSMRP method'. The other is a simplified method proposed by Kennedy et al., which is called 'Zion method'. The Zion method is sometimes called 'response factor method'. The authors adopted the response factor method. In order to enhance the estimation accuracy of failure probabilities of buildings and components, however, a new methodology for improving the response factor method was proposed. Based on the improved method, response factors of buildings and components designed to seismic design standard in Japan were estimated, and their realistic responses were also calculated. By using their realistic responses and capacities, the failure probabilities of a reactor building and relays were estimated. In order to identify the difference between new method, SSMRP method and original response factor method, the failure probabilities were compared estimated by these three methods. A similar method of SSMRP was used instead of the original SSMRP for saving time and labor. The viewpoints for selecting the methods to estimate failure probabilities of buildings and components were also proposed. (author). 55 refs

  10. Coupled large earthquakes in the Baikal rift system: Response to bifurcations in nonlinear resonance hysteresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly V. Klyuchevskii

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The current lithospheric geodynamics and tectonophysics in the Baikal rift are discussed in terms of a nonlinear oscillator with dissipation. The nonlinear oscillator model is applicable to the area because stress change shows up as quasi-periodic inharmonic oscillations at rifting attractor structures (RAS. The model is consistent with the space-time patterns of regional seismicity in which coupled large earthquakes, proximal in time but distant in space, may be a response to bifurcations in nonlinear resonance hysteresis in a system of three oscillators corresponding to the rifting attractors. The space-time distribution of coupled MLH > 5.5 events has been stable for the period of instrumental seismicity, with the largest events occurring in pairs, one shortly after another, on two ends of the rift system and with couples of smaller events in the central part of the rift. The event couples appear as peaks of earthquake ‘migration’ rate with an approximately decadal periodicity. Thus the energy accumulated at RAS is released in coupled large events by the mechanism of nonlinear oscillators with dissipation. The new knowledge, with special focus on space-time rifting attractors and bifurcations in a system of nonlinear resonance hysteresis, may be of theoretical and practical value for earthquake prediction issues. Extrapolation of the results into the nearest future indicates the probability of such a bifurcation in the region, i.e., there is growing risk of a pending M ≈ 7 coupled event to happen within a few years.

  11. Study on Earthquake Response of High Voltage Electrical Equipment Coupling System with Flexible Busbar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuncheng; Qu, Da; Wang, Chongyang; Lv, Chunlei; Li, Guoqiang

    2017-12-01

    With the rapid development of technology and society, all walks of life in China are becoming more and more dependent on power systems. When earthquake occurs, the electrical equipment of substation is prone to damage because of its own structural features, top-heavy, and brittleness of main body. At the same time, due to the complex coupling of the soft electrical connection of substation electrical equipment, the negative impact can not be estimated. In this paper, the finite element model of the coupling system of the single unit of high voltage electrical equipment with the connecting soft bus is established and the seismic response is analysed. The results showed that there is a significant difference between the simple analysis for the seismic response of electrical equipment monomer and the analytical results of electrical equipment systems, and the impact on different electrical equipment is different. It lays a foundation for the future development of seismic performance analysis of extra high voltage electrical equipment.

  12. EVALUATION ON THE SEISMIC RESPONSE CHARACTERISTICS OF A ROAD EMBANKMENT BASED ON THE MODERATE EARTHQUAKE OBSERVATION AND THE MICROTREMOR MEASUREMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Yoshiya; Ichii, Koji; Yamada, Masayuki; Tokida, Ken-Ichi; Takezawa, Koichiro; Shibao, Susumu; Mitsushita, Junji; Murata, Akira; Furukawa, Aiko; Koizumi, Keigo

    Accurate evaluation on the seismic response characteristics of a road embankment is very important for the rational seismic assessment. However, in a lot of previous studies, the seismic response characteristics of an embankment were evaluated based on the results of shaking table test, centrifuge model test and dynamic FEM analysis. In this study, the transfer function and the shear wave velocity of a road embankment were evaluated based on the in-situ records of moderate earthquake observation and microtremor measurement. Test results show the possibility that the shear wave velocity of an embankment can be estimated by the earthquake observation or the microtremor measurement and the dynamic linear FEM analysis.

  13. Optimization under Uncertainty of Site-Specific Turbine Configurations: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quick, Julian; Dykes, Katherine; Graf, Peter; Zahle, Frederik

    2016-11-01

    Uncertainty affects many aspects of wind energy plant performance and cost. In this study, we explore opportunities for site-specific turbine configuration optimization that accounts for uncertainty in the wind resource. As a demonstration, a simple empirical model for wind plant cost of energy is used in an optimization under uncertainty to examine how different risk appetites affect the optimal selection of a turbine configuration for sites of different wind resource profiles. If there is unusually high uncertainty in the site wind resource, the optimal turbine configuration diverges from the deterministic case and a generally more conservative design is obtained with increasing risk aversion on the part of the designer.

  14. Site Specific Probable Maximum Precipitation Estimates and Professional Judgement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, B. D.; Kao, S. C.; Kanney, J. F.; Quinlan, K. R.; DeNeale, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    State and federal regulatory authorities currently rely upon the US National Weather Service Hydrometeorological Reports (HMRs) to determine probable maximum precipitation (PMP) estimates (i.e., rainfall depths and durations) for estimating flooding hazards for relatively broad regions in the US. PMP estimates for the contributing watersheds upstream of vulnerable facilities are used to estimate riverine flooding hazards while site-specific estimates for small water sheds are appropriate for individual facilities such as nuclear power plants. The HMRs are often criticized due to their limitations on basin size, questionable applicability in regions affected by orographic effects, their lack of consist methods, and generally by their age. HMR-51 for generalized PMP estimates for the United States east of the 105th meridian, was published in 1978 and is sometimes perceived as overly conservative. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is currently reviewing several flood hazard evaluation reports that rely on site specific PMP estimates that have been commercially developed. As such, NRC has recently investigated key areas of expert judgement via a generic audit and one in-depth site specific review as they relate to identifying and quantifying actual and potential storm moisture sources, determining storm transposition limits, and adjusting available moisture during storm transposition. Though much of the approach reviewed was considered a logical extension of HMRs, two key points of expert judgement stood out for further in-depth review. The first relates primarily to small storms and the use of a heuristic for storm representative dew point adjustment developed for the Electric Power Research Institute by North American Weather Consultants in 1993 in order to harmonize historic storms for which only 12 hour dew point data was available with more recent storms in a single database. The second issue relates to the use of climatological averages for spatially

  15. Optimization Under Uncertainty of Site-Specific Turbine Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, J.; Dykes, K.; Graf, P.; Zahle, F.

    2016-09-01

    Uncertainty affects many aspects of wind energy plant performance and cost. In this study, we explore opportunities for site-specific turbine configuration optimization that accounts for uncertainty in the wind resource. As a demonstration, a simple empirical model for wind plant cost of energy is used in an optimization under uncertainty to examine how different risk appetites affect the optimal selection of a turbine configuration for sites of different wind resource profiles. If there is unusually high uncertainty in the site wind resource, the optimal turbine configuration diverges from the deterministic case and a generally more conservative design is obtained with increasing risk aversion on the part of the designer.

  16. Site-Specific ecological risk assessment. Case-study 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, John

    “Development of a decision support system for sustainable management of contaminated land by linking bioavailability, ecological risk and ground water pollution of organic pollutants”or in short “LIBERATION”. The presentation includes examples on how to scale and integrate the results from various scientific......The decision supporting and integrating assessment tool, TRIAD, is used site-specific on PAH- and heavy metal contaminated sites in Denmark. The various aspects of the TRIAD approach are used on a set of chemistry-, ecotoxicology- and ecology related data collected among others in the EU project...

  17. Appreciating Site-Specific Qualities in Urban Harbours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    of observa-tions from Marseille in southern France. After modernization and dislocation of its harbor territories in the early 20th century already, this city is currently taking important steps from industrial urbanism into cultural planning. This transformation allows for new and unprogrammed experiences......When “site-specificity” becomes a central value in city and harbor transformation, it soon proves necessary to address the ways in which scholars and professionals actually determine site-specific qualities in urban fabrics and social life. This paper delves into the above questions by means...

  18. The ANSS response to the Mw 5.8 Central Virginia Seismic Zone earthquake of August 23, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, D. E.; Horton, S.; Benz, H.; Earle, P. S.; Withers, M. M.; Hayes, G. P.; Kim, W. Y.; Chapman, M. C.; Herrmann, R. B.; Petersen, M. D.; Williams, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    An Mw 5.8 earthquake (depth=6km) occurred on August 23, 2011 (17:51:04 UTC) near Mineral, Virginia, which was widely felt from Maine to Georgia along the eastern seaboard and west to Chicago and western Tennessee. The USGS tallied nearly 142,000 felt reports submitted to the Did You Feel It (DYFI) internet community intensity system, making it the most widely felt earthquake since the web-site began, and demonstrating that more people felt this earthquake than any other in U.S. history. Significant damage was reported in the epicentral area and as far away as Washington D.C. (135 km away); minor damage was reported in Baltimore (200 km). The reverse faulting earthquake occurred on a northeast-striking plane within a region of diffuse seismicity known as the Central Virginia Seismic Zone. Within the first week, the mainshock was followed by 17 aftershocks with magnitude greater than 2, including Mw 4.5, 4.2, and 3.8 events. In the days following the mainshock, 46 portable seismic stations were deployed by several organizations, making this among the best-recorded aftershock sequence in the eastern U.S. Within 24 hours of the mainshock, 8 portable stations were deployed in time to record the largest aftershock to date (M4.5). We will present the results of our post-earthquake response, including attenuation and site amplification observations using portable aftershock station data, details on the initial USGS NEIC post earthquake response products and an assessment of the seismotectonics of the Central Virginia Seismic Zone based on aftershock locations and source parameter modeling of the larger earthquakes.

  19. Deconvolution effect of near-fault earthquake ground motions on stochastic dynamic response of tunnel-soil deposit interaction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hacıefendioğlu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The deconvolution effect of the near-fault earthquake ground motions on the stochastic dynamic response of tunnel-soil deposit interaction systems are investigated by using the finite element method. Two different earthquake input mechanisms are used to consider the deconvolution effects in the analyses: the standard rigid-base input and the deconvolved-base-rock input model. The Bolu tunnel in Turkey is chosen as a numerical example. As near-fault ground motions, 1999 Kocaeli earthquake ground motion is selected. The interface finite elements are used between tunnel and soil deposit. The mean of maximum values of quasi-static, dynamic and total responses obtained from the two input models are compared with each other.

  20. [The 2010 earthquake in Chile: the response of the health system and international cooperation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Tagle, Elizabeth; Santana Nazarit, Paula

    2011-08-01

    Understand the health system and international cooperation response to the catastrophic situation left by the earthquake and tsunami of 27 February 2010 in Chile, and draft proposals for improving strategies to mitigate the devastating effects of natural disasters. Descriptive and qualitative study with a first phase involving the analysis of secondary information-such as news articles, official statements, and technical reports-and a second phase involving semistructured interviews of institutional actors in the public health sector responsible for disaster response and users of the health system who acted as leaders and/or managers of the response. The study was conducted between May and October 2010, and information-gathering focused on the Maule, Bío Bío, and Metropolitan regions. Procedures for recording, distributing, and controlling donations were lacking. The health services suffered significant damage, including the complete destruction of 10 hospitals. The presence of field hospitals and foreign medical teams were appreciated by the community. The family health model and the commitment of personnel helped to ensure the quality of the response. While public health management was generally good, problems dealing with mental health issues were encountered due to a lack of local plans and predisaster simulations. The poor were the most affected. Women became social leaders, organizing the community. Although the health response to the emergency was satisfactory, both the health system and the mobilization of international assistance suffered from weaknesses that exacerbated existing inequities, revealing the need for multisectoral participatory mitigation plans for better disaster preparedness.

  1. Site-specific issues related to structural/seismic design of an underground independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, B.P.

    2005-01-01

    Utilities owning and operating commercial nuclear power plants (NPP) in USA may choose to build an underground Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) to store the spent nuclear fuels. The regulatory requirements and other guidance are based on 10 CFR Part 72, Regulatory Guide RG 3.73, Standard Review Plans NUREG-1536 and NUREG-1567, and Interim staff Guidance (ISG) documents as applicable. Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) classified as important to safety are designed to withstand the effects of site-specific environmental conditions and natural phenomena such as earthquake, tornado, flood, etc. An underground ISFSI for storage of spent nuclear fuel, presents some unique analysis and design challenges. This paper will briefly address some of these challenges and discuss site-specific loads, including seismic for the ISFSI design. (authors)

  2. ShakeCast: Automating and improving the use of shakemap for post-earthquake deeision-making and response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, D.; Lin, K.-W.; Porter, K.; Turner, Loren

    2008-01-01

    When a potentially damaging earthquake occurs, utility and other lifeline managers, emergency responders, and other critical users have an urgent need for information about the impact on their particular facilities so they can make appropriate decisions and take quick actions to ensure safety and restore system functionality. ShakeMap, a tool used to portray the extent of potentially damaging shaking following an earthquake, on its own can be useful for emergency response, loss estimation, and public information. However, to take full advantage of the potential of ShakeMap, we introduce ShakeCast. ShakeCast facilitates the complicated assessment of potential damage to a user's widely distributed facilities by comparing the complex shaking distribution with the potentially highly variable damageability of their inventory to provide a simple, hierarchical list and maps of structures or facilities most likely impacted. ShakeCast is a freely available, post-earthquake situational awareness application that automatically retrieves earthquake shaking data from ShakeMap, compares intensity measures against users' facilities, sends notifications of potential damage to responsible parties, and generates facility damage maps and other Web-based products for both public and private emergency managers and responders. ?? 2008, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  3. Detection of site specific glycosylation in proteins using flow cytometry†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Deepak; Marathe, Dhananjay D.; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2009-01-01

    We tested the possibility that it is possible to express unique peptide probes on cell surfaces and detect site-specific glycosylation on these peptides using flow cytometry. Such development can enhance the application of flow cytometry to detect and quantify post-translational modifications in proteins. To this end, the N-terminal section of the human leukocyte glycoprotein PSGL-1 (P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1) was modified to contain a poly-histidine tag followed by a proteolytic cleavage site. Amino acids preceding the cleavage site have a single O-linked glycosylation site. The recombinant protein called PSGL-1 (HT) was expressed on the surface of two mammalian cell lines, CHO and HL-60, using a lentiviral delivery approach. Results demonstrate that the N-terminal portion of PSGL-1 (HT) can be released from these cells by protease, and the resulting peptide can be readily captured and detected using cytometry-bead assays. Using this strategy, the peptide was immunoprecipitated onto beads bearing mAbs against either the poly-histidine sequence or the human PSGL-1. The carbohydrate epitope associated with the released peptide was detected using HECA-452 and CSLEX-1, monoclonal antibodies that recognize the sialyl Lewis-X epitope. Finally, the peptide released from cells could be separated and enriched using nickel chelate beads. Overall, such an approach that combines recombinant protein expression with flow cytometry, may be useful to quantify changes in site-specific glycosylation for basic science and clinical applications. PMID:19735085

  4. Temporally-controlled site-specific recombination in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hans

    Full Text Available Conventional use of the site-specific recombinase Cre is a powerful technology in mouse, but almost absent in other vertebrate model organisms. In zebrafish, Cre-mediated recombination efficiency was previously very low. Here we show that using transposon-mediated transgenesis, Cre is in fact highly efficient in this organism. Furthermore, temporal control of recombination can be achieved by using the ligand-inducible CreER(T2. Site-specific recombination only occurs upon administration of the drug tamoxifen (TAM or its active metabolite, 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (4-OHT. Cre-mediated recombination is detectable already 4 or 2 hours after administration of TAM or 4-OHT, demonstrating fast recombination kinetics. In addition, low doses of TAM allow mosaic labeling of single cells. Combined, our results show that conditional Cre/lox will be a valuable tool for both, embryonic and adult zebrafish studies. Furthermore, single copy insertion transgenesis of Cre/lox constructs suggest a strategy suitable also for other organisms.

  5. Towards soft robotic devices for site-specific drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alici, Gursel

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research efforts have recently been dedicated to the establishment of various drug delivery systems (DDS) that are mechanical/physical, chemical and biological/molecular DDS. In this paper, we report on the recent advances in site-specific drug delivery (site-specific, controlled, targeted or smart drug delivery are terms used interchangeably in the literature, to mean to transport a drug or a therapeutic agent to a desired location within the body and release it as desired with negligibly small toxicity and side effect compared to classical drug administration means such as peroral, parenteral, transmucosal, topical and inhalation) based on mechanical/physical systems consisting of implantable and robotic drug delivery systems. While we specifically focus on the robotic or autonomous DDS, which can be reprogrammable and provide multiple doses of a drug at a required time and rate, we briefly cover the implanted DDS, which are well-developed relative to the robotic DDS, to highlight the design and performance requirements, and investigate issues associated with the robotic DDS. Critical research issues associated with both DDSs are presented to describe the research challenges ahead of us in order to establish soft robotic devices for clinical and biomedical applications.

  6. Site-specific programming of the host epithelial transcriptome by the gut microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Felix; Nookaew, Intawat; Sommer, Nina

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The intestinal epithelium separates us from the microbiota but also interacts with it and thus affects host immune status and physiology. Previous studies investigated microbiota-induced responses in the gut using intact tissues or unfractionated epithelial cells, thereby limiting....... The microbial impact on host gene expression was highly site specific, as epithelial responses to the microbiota differed between cell fractions. Specific transcriptional regulators were enriched in each fraction. In general, the gut microbiota induced a more rapid response in the colon than in the ileum...

  7. A Molecular Toolbox to Engineer Site-Specific DNA Replication Perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Hickson, Ian D; Mankouri, Hocine W

    2018-01-01

    Site-specific arrest of DNA replication is a useful tool for analyzing cellular responses to DNA replication perturbation. The E. coli Tus-Ter replication barrier can be reconstituted in eukaryotic cells as a system to engineer an unscheduled collision between a replication fork and an "alien" impediment to DNA replication. To further develop this system as a versatile tool, we describe a set of reagents and a detailed protocol that can be used to engineer Tus-Ter barriers into any locus in the budding yeast genome. Because the Tus-Ter complex is a bipartite system with intrinsic DNA replication-blocking activity, the reagents and protocols developed and validated in yeast could also be optimized to engineer site-specific replication fork barriers into other eukaryotic cell types.

  8. A site-specific slurry application technique on grassland and on arable crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellberg, Jürgen; Lock, Reiner

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that unequal slurry application on agricultural land contributes to N losses to the environment. Heterogeneity within fields demands adequate response by means of variable rate application. A technique is presented which allows site-specific application of slurry on grassland and arable land based on pre-defined application maps. The system contains a valve controlling flow rate by an on-board PC. During operation, flow rate is measured and scaled against set point values given in the application map together with the geographic position of the site. The systems worked sufficiently precise at a flow rate between 0 and 25 l s(-1) and an offset of actual slurry flow from set point values between 0.33 and 0.67 l s(-1). Long-term experimentation is required to test if site-specific application de facto reduces N surplus within fields and so significantly contributes to the unloading of N in agricultural areas.

  9. A Molecular Toolbox to Engineer Site-Specific DNA Replication Perturbation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Hickson, Ian D; Mankouri, Hocine W

    2018-01-01

    " impediment to DNA replication. To further develop this system as a versatile tool, we describe a set of reagents and a detailed protocol that can be used to engineer Tus-Ter barriers into any locus in the budding yeast genome. Because the Tus-Ter complex is a bipartite system with intrinsic DNA replication......Site-specific arrest of DNA replication is a useful tool for analyzing cellular responses to DNA replication perturbation. The E. coli Tus-Ter replication barrier can be reconstituted in eukaryotic cells as a system to engineer an unscheduled collision between a replication fork and an "alien......-blocking activity, the reagents and protocols developed and validated in yeast could also be optimized to engineer site-specific replication fork barriers into other eukaryotic cell types....

  10. Climate responsive and safe earthquake construction: a community building a school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Darshan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines environment friendly features, climate responsive features and construction features of a prototype school building constructed using green building technology. The school building has other additional features such as earthquake resistant construction, use of local materials and local technology. The construction process not only establishes community ownership, but also facilitates dissemination of the technology to the communities. Schools are effective media for raising awareness, disseminating technology and up-scaling the innovative approach. The approach is cost effective and sustainable for long-term application of green building technology. Furthermore, this paper emphasizes that such construction technology will be instrumental to build culture of safety in communities and reduce disaster risk.

  11. To enhance effectiveness of response to emergency situations following earthquakes, tsunamis, and nuclear disasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Jiro; Tase, Choichiro; Tsukada, Yasuhiko; Hasegawa, Arifumi; Ikegami, Yukihiro; Iida, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    From the immediate aftermath of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami and the ensuing Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. Fukushima Medical University Hospital urgently needed to operate as both a core disaster hospital and a secondary radiation emergency hospital. The disaster drills and emergency simulation training that had been undertaken to prepare for such a scenario proved to be immensely helpful. However, due to the fact that the disaster caused much more damage than expected putting that preparation perfectly into practice was impossible. In any disaster, it is important to collect human intelligence. Therefore, simulating the collection of human intelligence is necessary in order to supplement drills and training and improve rapid response following a disaster. (author)

  12. Comparative Analysis of Emergency Response Operations: Haiti Earthquake in January 2010 and Pakistan’s Flood in 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Earthquake, Pakistan, Flood, Emergency Response Operations, International Community, HA/DR, United Nations , FRC, NDMA , ICT 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY...Registration Authority NATO North Atlantic Treaty Organization NDMA National Disaster and Management Authority NDMC National Disaster Management...complicates relief efforts. 6 NDMA Pakistan, “Pakistan Floods-Summary of Damages,” No Author. Accessed 24

  13. Floor response spectra of the main process building of a reprocessing plant against earthquake, airplane crash and blast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilpert, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    In the general concept of the planned reprocessing plant for spent fuel elements, the main process building has the central function. This building will be designed to withstand earthquake, airplane crash and blast. This report deals with the stress on components and systems due to vibration of the building, the floor response spectra

  14. Effect of foundation embedment on the response of a multi-story building to earthquake excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamood Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During an earthquake, the behaviour of any structure is affected not only by the superstructure response, but also by the response of the soil beneath. Recent structural failure patterns have indicated the significance of soil-structure interaction (SSI effects. The present study focuses on SSI analysis considering the embedment depth of the foundation of a symmetric six stories reinforced concrete (RCspace bare frame building resting on stiff soil and subjected to seismic loading. The finite element analysis software ANSYS v17.2 is used. Time history (TH analysis has been adopted. The Response in terms of lateral displacements, base shear forces, base moments and variation in natural time periods are calculated from the analysis of the soil foundation structure interaction (SFSI model. Results are compared with that obtained from conventional method assuming rigid support at the base (fixed base of the structure. The results show that the SFSI considering different embedment depths are significant in altering the seismic response of the multi-story building (MSB.

  15. Characterization of reference and site specific humic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.; Buckau, G.

    1988-11-01

    As a contribution to the interlaboratory exercise for the complexation of humic acid and colloid generation (COCO-Club activities) in the CEC project MIRAGE-II, the characterization of selected humic acids have been carried out at TU Muenchen, regarding their elemental compositions, inorganic impurities, spectroscopic properties, size distributions and proton exchange capacities. The commercial humic acid (Na salt) from Aldrich Co. is purified to a protonated form and used as reference material. Furthermore two humic acids extracted from groundwaters from Gorleben (FRG) and Boom Clay (B) are purified to protonated forms and taken as site specific materials. These three humic acids, together with the original Na salt from Aldrich Co., are included in the present characterization exercise. The results of characterization provide basic knowledge supporting the forthcoming study of complexation of actinides and fission products with humic acid and their migration processes in the geosphere. (orig.)

  16. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-06-24

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies.

  17. Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-08-01

    This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

  18. Drainage filter technologies to mitigate site-specific phosphorus losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Heckrath, Goswin Johann; Iversen, Bo Vangsø

    2014-01-01

    -specific nutrient losses in drainage. The “SUPREME-TECH” project (2010-2015), funded by the Danish Strategic Research Council, aims at providing the scientific basis for developing cost-effective drainage filter technologies to retain P in agricultural drainage waters. The project studies different approaches...... high risks areas of P loss and applying site-specific measures therefore seems a more cost-efficient approach. The Danish Commission for Nature and Agriculture has now called for a shift of paradigm towards targeted mitigation and development of new, cost-efficient technologies to mitigate site......-scale surface-flow constructed wetland. In the former, various natural and industrial P filter substrates have been tested for their ability to reduce inlet P concentrations to below environmental threshold values (

  19. Characterization of reference and site specific human acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.; Buckau, G.

    1988-01-01

    As a part of the interlaboratory exercise for the complexation of humic acid and colloid generation (COCO-Club activities) in the CEC project MIRAGE-II, the characterization of humic acids have been carried out, as for their elemental compositions, inorganic impurities, spectroscopic properties, size distributions and proton exchange capacities. The commercial humic acid (Na salt) from Aldrich Co. is purified to a protonated form and used as a reference material, and the humic acid extracted from one of Gorleben groundwaters is also purified to a protonated form and taken as a site specific material. These two humic acids, together with the original Na salt from Aldrich Co., are included for the characterization exercise. The results of characterization provide a basic knowledge that supports the forthcoming study of complexation of humic acids with actinides and fission products in their migration processes in the geosphere. (orig.)

  20. The extent of soft tissue and musculoskeletal injuries after earthquakes; describing a role for reconstructive surgeons in an emergency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clover, A J P; Jemec, B; Redmond, A D

    2014-10-01

    Earthquakes are the leading cause of natural disaster-related mortality and morbidity. Soft tissue and musculoskeletal injuries are the predominant type of injury seen after these events and a major reason for admission to hospital. Open fractures are relatively common; however, they are resource-intense to manage. Appropriate management is important in minimising amputation rates and preserving function. This review describes the pattern of musculoskeletal and soft-tissue injuries seen after earthquakes and explores the manpower and resource implications involved in their management. A Medline search was performed, including terms "injury pattern" and "earthquake," "epidemiology injuries" and "earthquakes," "plastic surgery," "reconstructive surgery," "limb salvage" and "earthquake." Papers published between December 1992 and December 2012 were included, with no initial language restriction. Limb injuries are the commonest injuries seen accounting for 60 % of all injuries, with fractures in more than 50 % of those admitted to hospital, with between 8 and 13 % of these fractures open. After the first few days and once the immediate lifesaving phase is over, the management of these musculoskeletal and soft-tissue injuries are the commonest procedures required. Due to the predominance of soft-tissue and musculoskeletal injuries, plastic surgeons as specialists in soft-tissue reconstruction should be mobilised in the early stages of a disaster response as part of a multidisciplinary team with a focus on limb salvage.

  1. Site-specific DNA Inversion by Serine Recombinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Reversible site-specific DNA inversion reactions are widely distributed in bacteria and their viruses. They control a range of biological reactions that most often involve alterations of molecules on the surface of cells or phage. These programmed DNA rearrangements usually occur at a low frequency, thereby preadapting a small subset of the population to a change in environmental conditions, or in the case of phages, an expanded host range. A dedicated recombinase, sometimes with the aid of additional regulatory or DNA architectural proteins, catalyzes the inversion of DNA. RecA or other components of the general recombination-repair machinery are not involved. This chapter discusses site-specific DNA inversion reactions mediated by the serine recombinase family of enzymes and focuses on the extensively studied serine DNA invertases that are stringently controlled by the Fis-bound enhancer regulatory system. The first section summarizes biological features and general properties of inversion reactions by the Fis/enhancer-dependent serine invertases and the recently described serine DNA invertases in Bacteroides. Mechanistic studies of reactions catalyzed by the Hin and Gin invertases are then discussed in more depth, particularly with regards to recent advances in our understanding of the function of the Fis/enhancer regulatory system, the assembly of the active recombination complex (invertasome) containing the Fis/enhancer, and the process of DNA strand exchange by rotation of synapsed subunit pairs within the invertasome. The role of DNA topological forces that function in concert with the Fis/enhancer controlling element in specifying the overwhelming bias for DNA inversion over deletion and intermolecular recombination is emphasized. PMID:25844275

  2. Site Specific Analyses of a Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biwer, B. M.; Chen, S. Y.

    2003-01-01

    The number of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) shipments is expected to increase significantly during the time period that the United States' inventory of SNF is sent to a final disposal site. Prior work estimated that the highest accident risks of a SNF shipping campaign to the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain were in the corridor states, such as Illinois. The largest potential human health impacts would be expected to occur in areas with high population densities such as urban settings. Thus, our current study examined the human health impacts from the most plausible severe SNF transportation accidents in the Chicago metropolitan area. The RISKIND 2.0 program was used to model site-specific data for an area where the largest impacts might occur. The results have shown that the radiological human health consequences of a severe SNF rail transportation accident on average might be similar to one year of exposure to natural background radiation for those persons living a nd working in the most affected areas downwind of the actual accident location. For maximally exposed individuals, an exposure similar to about two years of exposure to natural background radiation was estimated. In addition to the accident probabilities being very low (approximately 1 chance in 10,000 or less during the entire shipping campaign), the actual human health impacts are expected to be lower if any of the accidents considered did occur, because the results are dependent on the specific location and weather conditions, such as wind speed and direction, that were selected to maximize the results. Also, comparison of the results of longer duration accident scenarios against U.S. Environmental Protection Agency guidelines was made to demonstrate the usefulness of this site-specific analysis for emergency planning purposes

  3. Development of the U.S. Geological Survey's PAGER system (Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, D.J.; Earle, P.S.; Allen, T.I.; Jaiswal, K.; Porter, K.; Hearne, M.

    2008-01-01

    The Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) System plays a primary alerting role for global earthquake disasters as part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) response protocol. We provide an overview of the PAGER system, both of its current capabilities and our ongoing research and development. PAGER monitors the USGS’s near real-time U.S. and global earthquake origins and automatically identifies events that are of societal importance, well in advance of ground-truth or news accounts. Current PAGER notifications and Web pages estimate the population exposed to each seismic intensity level. In addition to being a useful indicator of potential impact, PAGER’s intensity/exposure display provides a new standard in the dissemination of rapid earthquake information. We are currently developing and testing a more comprehensive alert system that will include casualty estimates. This is motivated by the idea that an estimated range of possible number of deaths will aid in decisions regarding humanitarian response. Underlying the PAGER exposure and loss models are global earthquake ShakeMap shaking estimates, constrained as quickly as possible by finite-fault modeling and observed ground motions and intensities, when available. Loss modeling is being developed comprehensively with a suite of candidate models that range from fully empirical to largely analytical approaches. Which of these models is most appropriate for use in a particular earthquake depends on how much is known about local building stocks and their vulnerabilities. A first-order country-specific global building inventory has been developed, as have corresponding vulnerability functions. For calibrating PAGER loss models, we have systematically generated an Atlas of 5,000 ShakeMaps for significant global earthquakes during the last 36 years. For many of these, auxiliary earthquake source and shaking intensity data are also available. Refinements to the loss models are ongoing

  4. Streptococci Engage TLR13 on Myeloid Cells in a Site-Specific Fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolter, Julia; Feuerstein, Reinhild; Spoeri, Evelyne; Gharun, Kourosh; Elling, Roland; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Goldmann, Tobias; Waskow, Claudia; Chen, Zhijian J; Kirschning, Carsten J; Deshmukh, Sachin D; Henneke, Philipp

    2016-03-15

    Streptococci are common human colonizers with a species-specific mucocutaneous distribution. At the same time, they are among the most important and most virulent invasive bacterial pathogens. Thus, site-specific cellular innate immunity, which is predominantly executed by resident and invading myeloid cells, has to be adapted with respect to streptococcal sensing, handling, and response. In this article, we show that TLR13 is the critical mouse macrophage (MΦ) receptor in the response to group B Streptococcus, both in bone marrow-derived MΦs and in mature tissue MΦs, such as those residing in the lamina propria of the colon and the dermis, as well as in microglia. In contrast, TLR13 and its chaperone UNC-93B are dispensable for a potent cytokine response of blood monocytes to group B Streptococcus, although monocytes serve as the key progenitors of intestinal and dermal MΦs. Furthermore, a specific role for TLR13 with respect to MΦ function is supported by the response to staphylococci, where TLR13 and UNC-93B limit the cytokine response in bone marrow-derived MΦs and microglia, but not in dermal MΦs. In summary, TLR13 is a critical and site-specific receptor in the single MΦ response to β-hemolytic streptococci. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. 3-dimensional earthquake response analysis of embedded reactor building using hybrid model of boundary elements and finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, K.; Motosaka, M.; Kamata, M.; Masuda, K.; Urao, K.; Mameda, T.

    1985-01-01

    In order to investigate the 3-dimensional earthquake response characteristics of an embedded structure with consideration for soil-structure interaction, the authors have developed an analytical method using 3-dimensional hybrid model of boundary elements (BEM) and finite elements (FEM) and have conducted a dynamic analysis of an actual nuclear reactor building. This paper describes a comparative study between two different embedment depths in soil as elastic half-space. As the results, it was found that the earthquake response intensity decreases with the increase of the embedment depth and that this method was confirmed to be effective for investigating the 3-D response characteristics of embedded structures such as deflection pattern of each floor level, floor response spectra in high frequency range. (orig.)

  6. Site Response in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada from NTS Explosions and Earthquake Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Arthur; Tkalcic, Hrvoje; McCallen, David; Larsen, Shawn; Snelson, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    We report site response in Las Vegas Valley (LVV) from historical recordings of Nevada Test Site (NTS) nuclear explosions and earthquake recordings from permanent and temporary seismic stations. Our data set significantly improves the spatial coverage of LVV over previous studies, especially in the northern, deeper parts of the basin. Site response at stations in LVV was measured for frequencies in the range 0.2 5.0 Hz using Standard Spectral Ratios (SSR) and Horizontal-Vertical Spectral Ratios (HVR). For the SSR measurements we used a reference site (approximately NEHRP B ``rock'' classification) located on Frenchman Mountain outside the basin. Site response at sedimentary sites is variable in LVV with average amplifications approaching a factor of 10 at some frequencies. We observed peaks in the site response curves at frequencies clustered near 0.6, 1.2 and 2.0 Hz, with some sites showing additional lower amplitude peaks at higher frequencies. The spatial pattern of site response is strongly correlated with the reported depth to basement for frequencies between 0.2 and 3.0 Hz, although the frequency of peak amplification does not show a similar correlation. For a few sites where we have geotechnical shear velocities, the amplification shows a correlation with the average upper 30-meter shear velocities, V 30. We performed two-dimensional finite difference simulations and reproduced the observed peak site amplifications at 0.6 and 1.2 Hz with a low velocity near-surface layer with shear velocities 600 750 m/s and a thickness of 100 200 m. These modeling results indicate that the amplitude and frequencies of site response peaks in LVV are strongly controlled by shallow velocity structure.

  7. The changing health priorities of earthquake response and implications for preparedness: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, C; Hall, M; Lee, A C K

    2017-09-01

    Earthquakes have substantial impacts on mortality in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). The academic evidence base to support Disaster Risk Reduction activities in LMIC settings is, however, limited. We sought to address this gap by identifying the health and healthcare impacts of earthquakes in LMICs and to identify the implications of these findings for future earthquake preparedness. Scoping review. A scoping review was undertaken with systematic searches of indexed databases to identify relevant literature. Key study details, findings, recommendations or lessons learnt were extracted and analysed across individual earthquake events. Findings were categorised by time frame relative to earthquakes and linked to the disaster preparedness cycle, enabling a profile of health and healthcare impacts and implications for future preparedness to be established. Health services need to prepare for changing health priorities with a shift from initial treatment of earthquake-related injuries to more general health needs occurring within the first few weeks. Preparedness is required to address mental health and rehabilitation needs in the medium to longer term. Inequalities of the impact of earthquakes on health were noted in particular for women, children, the elderly, disabled and rural communities. The need to maintain access to essential services such as reproductive health and preventative health services were identified. Key preparedness actions include identification of appropriate leaders, planning and training of staff. Testing of plans was advocated within the literature with evidence that this is possible in LMIC settings. Whilst there are a range of health and healthcare impacts of earthquakes, common themes emerged in different settings and from different earthquake events. Preparedness of healthcare systems is essential and possible, in order to mitigate the adverse health impacts of earthquakes in LMIC settings. Preparedness is needed at the community

  8. Wavelet-based blind identification of the UCLA Factor building using ambient and earthquake responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazra, B; Narasimhan, S

    2010-01-01

    Blind source separation using second-order blind identification (SOBI) has been successfully applied to the problem of output-only identification, popularly known as ambient system identification. In this paper, the basic principles of SOBI for the static mixtures case is extended using the stationary wavelet transform (SWT) in order to improve the separability of sources, thereby improving the quality of identification. Whereas SOBI operates on the covariance matrices constructed directly from measurements, the method presented in this paper, known as the wavelet-based modified cross-correlation method, operates on multiple covariance matrices constructed from the correlation of the responses. The SWT is selected because of its time-invariance property, which means that the transform of a time-shifted signal can be obtained as a shifted version of the transform of the original signal. This important property is exploited in the construction of several time-lagged covariance matrices. The issue of non-stationary sources is addressed through the formation of several time-shifted, windowed covariance matrices. Modal identification results are presented for the UCLA Factor building using ambient vibration data and for recorded responses from the Parkfield earthquake, and compared with published results for this building. Additionally, the effect of sensor density on the identification results is also investigated

  9. Near Real-Time Georeference of Umanned Aerial Vehicle Images for Post-Earthquake Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Wang, X.; Dou, A.; Yuan, X.; Ding, L.; Ding, X.

    2018-04-01

    The rapid collection of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) remote sensing images plays an important role in the fast submitting disaster information and the monitored serious damaged objects after the earthquake. However, for hundreds of UAV images collected in one flight sortie, the traditional data processing methods are image stitching and three-dimensional reconstruction, which take one to several hours, and affect the speed of disaster response. If the manual searching method is employed, we will spend much more time to select the images and the find images do not have spatial reference. Therefore, a near-real-time rapid georeference method for UAV remote sensing disaster data is proposed in this paper. The UAV images are achieved georeference combined with the position and attitude data collected by UAV flight control system, and the georeferenced data is organized by means of world file which is developed by ESRI. The C # language is adopted to compile the UAV images rapid georeference software, combined with Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL). The result shows that it can realize rapid georeference of remote sensing disaster images for up to one thousand UAV images within one minute, and meets the demand of rapid disaster response, which is of great value in disaster emergency application.

  10. NEAR REAL-TIME GEOREFERENCE OF UMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE IMAGES FOR POST-EARTHQUAKE RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The rapid collection of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV remote sensing images plays an important role in the fast submitting disaster information and the monitored serious damaged objects after the earthquake. However, for hundreds of UAV images collected in one flight sortie, the traditional data processing methods are image stitching and three-dimensional reconstruction, which take one to several hours, and affect the speed of disaster response. If the manual searching method is employed, we will spend much more time to select the images and the find images do not have spatial reference. Therefore, a near-real-time rapid georeference method for UAV remote sensing disaster data is proposed in this paper. The UAV images are achieved georeference combined with the position and attitude data collected by UAV flight control system, and the georeferenced data is organized by means of world file which is developed by ESRI. The C # language is adopted to compile the UAV images rapid georeference software, combined with Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL. The result shows that it can realize rapid georeference of remote sensing disaster images for up to one thousand UAV images within one minute, and meets the demand of rapid disaster response, which is of great value in disaster emergency application.

  11. Micro-tattoo guided OCT imaging of site specific inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Choudhury, Niloy; Samatham, Ravikant V.; Singh, Harvinder; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-02-01

    Epithelial biologists studying human skin diseases such as cancer formation and psoriasis commonly utilize mouse models to characterize the interplay among cells and intracellular signal transduction pathways that result in programmed changes in gene expression and cellular behaviors. The information obtained from animal models is useful only when phenotypic presentations of disease recapitulate those observed in humans. Excision of tissues followed by histochemical analysis is currently the primary means of establishing the morphological presentation. Non invasive imaging of animal models provides an alternate means to characterize tissue morphology associated with the disease of interest in vivo. While useful, the ability to perform in vivo imaging at different time points in the same tissue location has been a challenge. This information is key to understanding site specific changes as the imaged tissue can now be extracted and analyzed for mRNA expression. We present a method employing a micro-tattoo to guide optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of ultraviolet induced inflammation over time in the same tissue locations.

  12. The Application of TAPM for Site Specific Wind Energy Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlinde Kay

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The energy industry uses weather forecasts for determining future electricity demand variations due to the impact of weather, e.g., temperature and precipitation. However, as a greater component of electricity generation comes from intermittent renewable sources such as wind and solar, weather forecasting techniques need to now also focus on predicting renewable energy supply, which means adapting our prediction models to these site specific resources. This work assesses the performance of The Air Pollution Model (TAPM, and demonstrates that significant improvements can be made to only wind speed forecasts from a mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP model. For this study, a wind farm site situated in North-west Tasmania, Australia was investigated. I present an analysis of the accuracy of hourly NWP and bias corrected wind speed forecasts over 12 months spanning 2005. This extensive time frame allows an in-depth analysis of various wind speed regimes of importance for wind-farm operation, as well as extreme weather risk scenarios. A further correction is made to the basic bias correction to improve the forecast accuracy further, that makes use of real-time wind-turbine data and a smoothing function to correct for timing-related issues. With full correction applied, a reduction in the error in the magnitude of the wind speed by as much as 50% for “hour ahead” forecasts specific to the wind-farm site has been obtained.

  13. Site-Specific Antibody Functionalization Using Tetrazine-Styrene Cycloaddition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umlauf, Benjamin J; Mix, Kalie A; Grosskopf, Vanessa A; Raines, Ronald T; Shusta, Eric V

    2018-05-03

    Biologics, such as antibody-drug conjugates, are becoming mainstream therapeutics. Consequently, methods to functionalize biologics without disrupting their native properties are essential for identifying, characterizing, and translating candidate biologics from the bench to clinical practice. Here, we present a method for site-specific, carboxy-terminal modification of single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs). ScFvs displayed on the surface of yeast were isolated and functionalized by combining intein-mediated expressed protein ligation (EPL) with inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) cycloaddition using a styrene-tetrazine pair. The high thiol concentration required to trigger EPL can hinder the subsequent chemoselective ligation reactions; therefore, the EPL reaction was used to append styrene to the scFv, limiting tetrazine exposure to damaging thiols. Subsequently, the styrene-functionalized scFv was reacted with tetrazine-conjugated compounds in an IEDDA cycloaddition to generate functionalized scFvs that retain their native binding activity. Rapid functionalization of yeast surface-derived scFv in a site-directed manner could find utility in many downstream laboratory and preclinical applications.

  14. Site-specific meteorology identification for DOE facility accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, S.B.

    1995-01-01

    Currently, chemical dispersion calculations performed for safety analysis of DOE facilities assume a Pasquill D-Stability Class with a 4.5 m/s windspeed. These meteorological conditions are assumed to conservatively address the source term generation mechanism as well as the dispersion mechanism thereby resulting in a net conservative downwind consequence. While choosing this Stability Class / Windspeed combination may result in an overall conservative consequence, the level of conservative can not be quantified. The intent of this paper is to document a methodology which incorporates site-specific meteorology to determine a quantifiable consequence of a chemical release. A five-year meteorological database, appropriate for the facility location, is utilized for these chemical consequence calculations, and is consistent with the approach used for radiological releases. The hourly averages of meteorological conditions have been binned into 21 groups for the chemical consequence calculations. These 21 cases each have a probability of occurrence based on the number of times each case has occurred over the five year sampling period. A code has been developed which automates the running of all the cases with a commercially available air modeling code. The 21 cases are sorted by concentration. A concentration may be selected by the user for a quantified level of conservatism. The methodology presented is intended to improve the technical accuracy and defensability of Chemical Source Term / Dispersion Safety Analysis work. The result improves the quality of safety analyses products without significantly increasing the cost

  15. A dynamic model of liquid containers (tanks) with legs and probability analysis of response to simulated earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Takafumi; Shimosaka, Haruo

    1980-01-01

    This paper is described on the results of analysis of the response of liquid containers (tanks) to earthquakes. Sine wave oscillation was applied experimentally to model tanks with legs. A model with one degree of freedom is good enough for the analysis. To investigate the reason of this fact, the response multiplication factor of tank displacement was analysed. The shapes of the model tanks were rectangular and cylindrical. Analyses were made by a potential theory. The experimental studies show that the characteristics of attenuation of oscillation was non-linear. The model analysis of this non-linear attenuation was also performed. Good agreement between the experimental and the analytical results was recognized. The probability analysis of the response to earthquake with simulated shock waves was performed, using the above mentioned model, and good agreement between the experiment and the analysis was obtained. (Kato, T.)

  16. Localised Effects of a Mega-Disturbance: Spatiotemporal Responses of Intertidal Sandy Shore Communities to the 2010 Chilean Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, Roger D; Valdivia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    . Therefore, our results suggest that the effects of the Maule mega-earthquake on the ecological communities were spatially heterogeneous and highly localised. We suggest that high mobility and other species' adaptations to the dynamic environmental conditions of sandy beaches might explain the comparatively high resilience of these assemblages. With this work we hope to motivate further experimental research on the role of individual- and population-level properties in the response of sandy-beach communities to interacting sources of disturbances.

  17. Localised Effects of a Mega-Disturbance: Spatiotemporal Responses of Intertidal Sandy Shore Communities to the 2010 Chilean Earthquake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger D Sepúlveda

    tsunami. Therefore, our results suggest that the effects of the Maule mega-earthquake on the ecological communities were spatially heterogeneous and highly localised. We suggest that high mobility and other species' adaptations to the dynamic environmental conditions of sandy beaches might explain the comparatively high resilience of these assemblages. With this work we hope to motivate further experimental research on the role of individual- and population-level properties in the response of sandy-beach communities to interacting sources of disturbances.

  18. Extreme earthquake response of nuclear power plants isolated using sliding bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Manish, E-mail: mkumar@iitgn.ac.in [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Gandhinagar, Gandhinagar 382355 (India); Whittaker, Andrew S.; Constantinou, Michael C. [Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Response-history analysis of a nuclear power plant (NPP) isolated using sliding bearings. • Two models of the NPP, five friction models and four seismic hazard levels considered. • Isolation system displacement can be obtained using a macro NPP model subjected to only horizontal ground motions. • Temperature dependence of friction should be considered in isolation-system displacement calculations. • The effect of friction model on floor spectral ordinates is rather small, especially near the basemat. - Abstract: Horizontal seismic isolation is a viable approach to mitigate risk to structures, systems and components (SSCs) in nuclear power plants (NPPs) under extreme ground shaking. This paper presents a study on an NPP seismically isolated using single concave Friction Pendulum™ (FP) bearings subjected to ground motions representing seismic hazard at two US sites: Diablo Canyon and Vogtle. Two models of the NPP, five models to describe friction at the sliding surface of the FP bearings, and four levels of ground shaking are considered for response-history analysis, which provide insight into the influence of 1) the required level of detail of an NPP model, 2) the vertical component of ground motion on response of isolated NPPs, and 3) the pressure-, temperature- and/or velocity-dependencies of the coefficient of friction, on the response of an isolated NPP. The isolation-system displacement of an NPP can be estimated using a macro model subjected to only the two orthogonal horizontal components of ground motion. The variation of the coefficient of friction with temperature at the sliding surface during earthquake shaking should be accounted for in the calculation of isolation-system displacements, particularly when the shaking intensity is high; pressure and velocity dependencies are not important. In-structure floor spectra should be computed using a detailed three-dimensional model of an isolated NPP subjected to all three components of

  19. Immunomodulatory Nature and Site Specific Affinity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: a Hope in Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Lotfinegad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunosuppressive ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, their differentiation properties to various specialized tissue types, ease of in vitro and in vivo expansion and specific migration capacity, make them to be tested in different clinical trials for the treatment of various diseases. The immunomodulatory effects of MSCs are less identified which probably has high clinically significance. The clinical trials based on primary research will cause better understanding the ability of MSCs in immunomodulatory applications and site specific migration in the optimization of therapy. So, this review focus on MSCs functional role in modulating immune responses, their ability in homing to tumor, their potency as delivery vehicle and their medical importance.

  20. Immunomodulatory Nature and Site Specific Affinity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: a Hope in Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfinegad, Parisa; Shamsasenjan, karim; Movassaghpour, Aliakbar; Majidi, Jafar; Baradaran, Behzad

    2014-01-01

    Immunosuppressive ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), their differentiation properties to various specialized tissue types, ease of in vitro and in vivo expansion and specific migration capacity, make them to be tested in different clinical trials for the treatment of various diseases. The immunomodulatory effects of MSCs are less identified which probably has high clinically significance. The clinical trials based on primary research will cause better understanding the ability of MSCs in immunomodulatory applications and site specific migration in the optimization of therapy. So, this review focus on MSCs functional role in modulating immune responses, their ability in homing to tumor, their potency as delivery vehicle and their medical importance. PMID:24409403

  1. Response and recovery lessons from the 2010-2011 earthquake sequence in Canterbury, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierepiekarz, Mark; Johnston, David; Berryman, Kelvin; Hare, John; Gomberg, Joan S.; Williams, Robert A.; Weaver, Craig S.

    2014-01-01

    The impacts and opportunities that result when low-probability moderate earthquakes strike an urban area similar to many throughout the US were vividly conveyed in a one-day workshop in which social and Earth scientists, public officials, engineers, and an emergency manager shared their experiences of the earthquake sequence that struck the city of Christchurch and surrounding Canterbury region of New Zealand in 2010-2011. Without question, the earthquake sequence has had unprecedented impacts in all spheres on New Zealand society, locally to nationally--10% of the country's population was directly impacted and losses total 8-10% of their GDP. The following paragraphs present a few lessons from Christchurch.

  2. Improving Site-Specific Radiological Performance Assessments - 13431

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauxe, John; Black, Paul; Catlett, Kate; Lee, Robert; Perona, Ralph; Stockton, Tom; Sully, Mike

    2013-01-01

    An improved approach is presented for conducting complete and defensible radiological site-specific performance assessments (PAs) to support radioactive waste disposal decisions. The basic tenets of PA were initiated some thirty years ago, focusing on geologic disposals and evaluating compliance with regulations. Some of these regulations were inherently probabilistic (i.e., addressing uncertainty in a quantitative fashion), such as the containment requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) 40 CFR 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, Chap. 191.13 [1]. Methods of analysis were developed to meet those requirements, but at their core early PAs used 'conservative' parameter values and modeling approaches. This limited the utility of such PAs to compliance evaluation, and did little to inform decisions about optimizing disposal, closure and long-term monitoring and maintenance, or, in general, maintaining doses 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). This basic approach to PA development in the United States was employed essentially unchanged through the end of the 20. century, principally by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Performance assessments developed in support of private radioactive waste disposal operations, regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its agreement states, were typically not as sophisticated. Discussion of new approaches to PA is timely, since at the time of this writing, the DOE is in the midst of revising its Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management [2], and the NRC is revising 10 CFR 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste [3]. Over the previous decade, theoretical developments and improved computational technology have provided the foundation for integrating decision analysis (DA) concepts and objective-focused thinking, plus a Bayesian approach to

  3. Improving Site-Specific Radiological Performance Assessments - 13431

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauxe, John; Black, Paul; Catlett, Kate; Lee, Robert; Perona, Ralph; Stockton, Tom; Sully, Mike [Neptune and Company, Inc., Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    An improved approach is presented for conducting complete and defensible radiological site-specific performance assessments (PAs) to support radioactive waste disposal decisions. The basic tenets of PA were initiated some thirty years ago, focusing on geologic disposals and evaluating compliance with regulations. Some of these regulations were inherently probabilistic (i.e., addressing uncertainty in a quantitative fashion), such as the containment requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) 40 CFR 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, Chap. 191.13 [1]. Methods of analysis were developed to meet those requirements, but at their core early PAs used 'conservative' parameter values and modeling approaches. This limited the utility of such PAs to compliance evaluation, and did little to inform decisions about optimizing disposal, closure and long-term monitoring and maintenance, or, in general, maintaining doses 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). This basic approach to PA development in the United States was employed essentially unchanged through the end of the 20. century, principally by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Performance assessments developed in support of private radioactive waste disposal operations, regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its agreement states, were typically not as sophisticated. Discussion of new approaches to PA is timely, since at the time of this writing, the DOE is in the midst of revising its Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management [2], and the NRC is revising 10 CFR 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste [3]. Over the previous decade, theoretical developments and improved computational technology have provided the foundation for integrating decision analysis (DA) concepts and objective-focused thinking, plus

  4. Network Structure and Community Evolution on Twitter: Human Behavior Change in Response to the 2011 Japanese Earthquake and Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin; Brelsford, Christa

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the dynamics of social networks and the formation and evolution of online communities in response to extreme events, we collected three datasets from Twitter shortly before and after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan. We find that while almost all users increased their online activity after the earthquake, Japanese speakers, who are assumed to be more directly affected by the event, expanded the network of people they interact with to a much higher degree than English speakers or the global average. By investigating the evolution of communities, we find that the behavior of joining or quitting a community is far from random: users tend to stay in their current status and are less likely to join new communities from solitary or shift to other communities from their current community. While non-Japanese speakers did not change their conversation topics significantly after the earthquake, nearly all Japanese users changed their conversations to earthquake-related content. This study builds a systematic framework for investigating human behaviors under extreme events with online social network data and our findings on the dynamics of networks and communities may provide useful insight for understanding how patterns of social interaction are influenced by extreme events.

  5. THE RESPONSE OF MONTEREY BAY TO THE GREAT TOHOKU EARTHQUAKE OF 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Carroll

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of Monterey Bay to the Great Tohoku earthquake of 2011 is examined in this study. From a practical standpoint, although the resulting tsunami did not cause any damage to the open harbors at Monterey and Moss Landing, it caused extensive damage to boats and infrastructure in Santa Cruz Harbor, which is closed to surrounding waters. From a scientific standpoint, the observed and predicted amplitudes of the tsunami at 1 km from the source were 21.3 and 22.5 m based on the primary arrival from one DART bottom pressure recorder located 986 km ENE of the epicenter. The predicted and observed travel times for the tsunami to reach Monterey Bay agreed within 3%. The predicted and observed periods of the tsunami-generated wave before it entered the bay yielded periods that approached 2 hours. Once the tsunami entered Monterey Bay it was transformed into a seiche with a primary period of 36-37 minutes, corresponding to quarter-wave resonance within the bay. Finally, from a predictive standpoint, major tsunamis that enter the bay from the northwest, as in the present case, are the ones most likely to cause damage to Santa Cruz harbor.

  6. Practical guidelines to select and scale earthquake records for nonlinear response history analysis of structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Erol; Chopra, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    Earthquake engineering practice is increasingly using nonlinear response history analysis (RHA) to demonstrate performance of structures. This rigorous method of analysis requires selection and scaling of ground motions appropriate to design hazard levels. Presented herein is a modal-pushover-based scaling (MPS) method to scale ground motions for use in nonlinear RHA of buildings and bridges. In the MPS method, the ground motions are scaled to match (to a specified tolerance) a target value of the inelastic deformation of the first-'mode' inelastic single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system whose properties are determined by first-'mode' pushover analysis. Appropriate for first-?mode? dominated structures, this approach is extended for structures with significant contributions of higher modes by considering elastic deformation of second-'mode' SDF system in selecting a subset of the scaled ground motions. Based on results presented for two bridges, covering single- and multi-span 'ordinary standard' bridge types, and six buildings, covering low-, mid-, and tall building types in California, the accuracy and efficiency of the MPS procedure are established and its superiority over the ASCE/SEI 7-05 scaling procedure is demonstrated.

  7. 75 FR 7577 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... areas of environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda: Call to...

  8. 75 FR 65615 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... areas of environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda Call to...

  9. 76 FR 57981 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda Call to Order...

  10. 77 FR 2283 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda Call to Order...

  11. 76 FR 36100 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda Call to Order...

  12. 76 FR 17118 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB) Chairs. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub... areas of environmental restoration, waste management, and related activities. Tentative Agenda Topics...

  13. 76 FR 62054 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs AGENCY... of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB) Chairs. The Federal Advisory... environmental restoration, waste management, and related activities. Tentative Agenda Topics [cir] EM Program...

  14. 77 FR 29997 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda Call to Order...

  15. 77 FR 37390 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda: Call to Order...

  16. 75 FR 82003 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... areas of environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda: Call to...

  17. 75 FR 19379 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... areas of environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda Call to...

  18. 76 FR 78909 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... the areas of environmental restoration, waste management, and related activities. Tentative Agenda...

  19. 76 FR 50204 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada AGENCY...-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Committee of the Environmental Management Site- Specific... management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management, and related activities. Purpose of...

  20. 77 FR 6790 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda Call to Order...

  1. 76 FR 55370 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada AGENCY...-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Committee of the Environmental Management Site- Specific... the areas of environmental restoration, waste management, and related activities. Purpose of the...

  2. 75 FR 51026 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... the areas of environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda...

  3. 77 FR 51789 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... management and related activities. Tentative Agenda Call to Order, Introductions, Review of Agenda... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act...

  4. Rotational Response of Toe-Restrained Retaining Walls to Earthquake Ground Motions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ebeling, Robert M; White, Barry C

    2006-01-01

    .... The PC software CorpsWallRotate (sometimes referred to as CWRotate) was developed to perform an analysis of permanent wall rotation for each proposed retaining wall section to a user-specified earthquake acceleration time-history...

  5. Hydrothermal response to a volcano-tectonic earthquake swarm, Lassen, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Shelly, David R.; Hsieh, Paul A.; Clor, Laura; P.H. Seward,; Evans, William C.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing capability of seismic, geodetic, and hydrothermal observation networks allows recognition of volcanic unrest that could previously have gone undetected, creating an imperative to diagnose and interpret unrest episodes. A November 2014 earthquake swarm near Lassen Volcanic National Park, California, which included the largest earthquake in the area in more than 60 years, was accompanied by a rarely observed outburst of hydrothermal fluids. Although the earthquake swarm likely reflects upward migration of endogenous H2O-CO2 fluids in the source region, there is no evidence that such fluids emerged at the surface. Instead, shaking from the modest sized (moment magnitude 3.85) but proximal earthquake caused near-vent permeability increases that triggered increased outflow of hydrothermal fluids already present and equilibrated in a local hydrothermal aquifer. Long-term, multiparametric monitoring at Lassen and other well-instrumented volcanoes enhances interpretation of unrest and can provide a basis for detailed physical modeling.

  6. Responses of a tall building in Los Angeles, California as inferred from local and distant earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebi, Mehmet; Hasan Ulusoy,; Nori Nakata,

    2016-01-01

    Increasing inventory of tall buildings in the United States and elsewhere may be subjected to motions generated by near and far seismic sources that cause long-period effects. Multiple sets of records that exhibited such effects were retrieved from tall buildings in Tokyo and Osaka ~ 350 km and 770 km from the epicenter of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. In California, very few tall buildings have been instrumented. An instrumented 52-story building in downtown Los Angeles recorded seven local and distant earthquakes. Spectral and system identification methods exhibit significant low frequencies of interest (~0.17 Hz, 0.56 Hz and 1.05 Hz). These frequencies compare well with those computed by transfer functions; however, small variations are observed between the significant low frequencies for each of the seven earthquakes. The torsional and translational frequencies are very close and are coupled. Beating effect is observed in at least two of the seven earthquake data.

  7. Site Specific Probabilistic Seismic Hazard and Risk Analysis for Surrounding Communities of The Geysers Geothermal Development Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, M.; Hutchings, L. J.; Savy, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    We conduct a probabilistic seismic hazard and risk analysis from induced and tectonic earthquakes for a 50 km radius area centered on The Geysers, California and for the next ten years. We calculate hazard with both a conventional and physics-based approach. We estimate site specific hazard. We convert hazard to risk of nuisance and damage to structures per year and map the risk. For the conventional PSHA we assume the past ten years is indicative of hazard for the next ten years from Mnoise. Then, we interpolate within each geologic unit in finely gridded points. All grid points within a unit are weighted by distance from each data collection point. The entire process is repeated for all of the other types of geologic units until the entire area is gridded and assigned a hazard value for every grid points. We found that nuisance and damage risks calculated by both conventional and physics-based approaches provided almost identical results. This is very surprising since they were calculated by completely independent means. The conventional approach used the actual catalog of the past ten years of earthquakes to estimate the hazard for the next ten year. While the physics-based approach used geotechnical modeling to calculate the catalog for the next ten years. Similarly, for the conventional PSHA, we utilized attenuation relations from past earthquakes recorded at the Geysers to translate the ground motion from the source to the site. While for the physics-based approach we calculated ground motion from simulation of actual earthquake rupture. Finally, the source of the earthquakes was the actual source for the conventional PSHA. While, we assumed random fractures for the physics-based approach. From all this, we consider the calculation of the conventional approach, based on actual data, to validate the physics-based approach used.

  8. Significance of earthquake and weapons-test ground motion to structure response and NRC licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blume, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The author feels that of all the problems to be resolved before a nuclear power plant can be licensed to operate, the earthquake problem is the most difficult from the emotional and public relations point of view, as well as technically. It is the one that intervenors and their lawyers thrive upon, as do the demonstrators. These earthquakes can be tectonic, reservoir induced, and/or imaginary. 9 references, 29 figures

  9. Coping with the challenges of early disaster response: 24 years of field hospital experience after earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Elhanan; Abargel, Avi; Peleg, Kobi; Kreiss, Yitshak

    2013-10-01

    To propose strategies and recommendations for future planning and deployment of field hospitals after earthquakes by comparing the experience of 4 field hospitals deployed by The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) Medical Corps in Armenia, Turkey, India and Haiti. Quantitative data regarding the earthquakes were collected from published sources; data regarding hospital activity were collected from IDF records; and qualitative information was obtained from structured interviews with key figures involved in the missions. The hospitals started operating between 89 and 262 hours after the earthquakes. Their sizes ranged from 25 to 72 beds, and their personnel numbered between 34 and 100. The number of patients treated varied from 1111 to 2400. The proportion of earthquake-related diagnoses ranged from 28% to 67% (P earthquakes, patient caseload and treatment requirements varied widely. The variables affecting the patient profile most significantly were time until deployment, total number of injured, availability of adjacent medical facilities, and possibility of evacuation from the disaster area. When deploying a field hospital in the early phase after an earthquake, a wide variability in patient caseload should be anticipated. Customization is difficult due to the paucity of information. Therefore, early deployment necessitates full logistic self-sufficiency and operational versatility. Also, collaboration with local and international medical teams can greatly enhance treatment capabilities.

  10. Proactive vs. reactive learning on buildings response and earthquake risks, in schools of Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela DOBRE

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available During the last 20 years, many specific activities of earthquake education and preparedness were initiated and supported in Romania by drafting materials for citizens, students, professors etc. (Georgescu et al., 2004, 2006. The education, training and information on earthquake disaster potential are important factors to mitigate the earthquake effects. Such activities, however, need time to be developed and may take different forms of presentation in order to capture the attention, to increase interest, to develop skills and attitudes in order to induce a proper behavior towards safety preparedness. It shall also be based on the accumulation of concerns and knowledge, which are, in principle, a consequence of the motivation, but which depend on the methods applied and actions taken for efficient earthquake preparedness, assessed and updated following actual earthquakes (Masuda, Midorikawa, Miki and Ohmachi, 1988. We are now at a crossroad and the proactive attitude and behavior (anticipative and participative needs to be extended in learning, within institutional framework, but correlated with the usual targets of schools and teenagers proactive issue (ROEDUSEIS-NET; Page and Page, 2003, by encouraging students in activities closer to earthquake engineering.

  11. Modeling the poroelastic response to megathrust earthquakes: A look at the 2012 Mw 7.6 Costa Rican event

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Kimberly A.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2018-04-01

    We model the subsurface hydrologic response to the 7.6 Mw subduction zone earthquake that occurred on the plate interface beneath the Nicoya peninsula in Costa Rica on September 5, 2012. The regional-scale poroelastic model of the overlying plate integrates seismologic, geodetic and hydrologic data sets to predict the post-seismic poroelastic response. A representative two-dimensional model shows that thrust earthquakes with a slip width less than a third of their depth produce complex multi-lobed pressure perturbations in the shallow subsurface. This leads to multiple poroelastic relaxation timescales that may overlap with the longer viscoelastic timescales. In the three-dimensional model, the complex slip distribution of 2012 Nicoya event and its small width to depth ratio lead to a pore pressure distribution comprising multiple trench parallel ridges of high and low pressure. This leads to complex groundwater flow patterns, non-monotonic variations in predicted well water levels, and poroelastic relaxation on multiple time scales. The model also predicts significant tectonically driven submarine groundwater discharge off-shore. In the weeks following the earthquake, the predicted net submarine groundwater discharge in the study area increases, creating a 100 fold increase in net discharge relative to topography-driven flow over the first 30 days. Our model suggests the hydrological response on land is more complex than typically acknowledged in tectonic studies. This may complicate the interpretation of transient post-seismic surface deformations. Combined tectonic-hydrological observation networks have the potential to reduce such ambiguities.

  12. Responses of a 58-story RC dual core shear wall and outrigger frame building inferred from two earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebi, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Responses of a dual core shear-wall and outrigger-framed 58-story building recorded during the Mw6.0 Napa earthquake of 24 August 2014 and the Mw3.8 Berkeley earthquake of 20 October 2011 are used to identify its dynamic characteristics and behavior. Fundamental frequencies are 0.28 Hz (NS), 0.25 Hz (EW), and 0.43 Hz (torsional). Rigid body motions due to rocking are not significant. Average drift ratios are small. Outrigger frames do not affect average drift ratios or mode shapes. Local site effects do not affect the response; however, response associated with deeper structure may be substantial. A beating effect is observed from data of both earthquakes but beating periods are not consistent. Low critical damping ratios may have contributed to the beating effect. Torsion is relatively larger above outriggers as indicated by the time-histories of motions at the roof, possibly due to the discontinuity of the stiffer shear walls above level 47.

  13. Study of responses of 64-story Rincon Building to Napa, Fremont, Piedmont, San Ramon earthquakes and ambient motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebi, Mehmet; Hooper, John; Klemencic, Ron

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the recorded responses of a 64-story, instrumented, concrete core shear wall building in San Francisco, California, equipped with tuned sloshing liquid dampers (TSDs) and buckling restraining braces (BRBs). Previously, only ambient data from the 72-channel array in the building were studied (Çelebi et al. 2013). Recently, the 24 August 2014 Mw 6.0 Napa and three other earthquakes were recorded. The peak accelerations of ambient and the larger Napa earthquake responses at the basement are 0.12 cm/s/s and 5.2 cm/s/s respectively—a factor of ~42. At the 61st level, they are 0.30 cm/s/s (ambient) and 16.8 cm/s/s (Napa), respectively—a factor of ~56. Fundamental frequencies (NS ~ 0.3, EW ~ 0.27 Hz) from earthquake responses vary within an insignificant frequency band of ~0.02–0.03 Hz when compared to those from ambient data. In the absence of soil-structure interaction (SSI), these small and insignificant differences may be attributed to (1) identification errors, (2) any nonlinear behavior, and (3) shaking levels that are not large enough to activate the BRBs and TSDs to make significant shifts in frequencies and increase damping.

  14. Analysis methods for predicting the behaviour of isolators and formulation of simplified models for use in predicting response of structures to earthquake type input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the simplified models for predicting the response of high-damping natural rubber bearings (HDNRB) to earthquake ground motions and benchmark problems for assessing the accuracy of finite element analyses in designing base-isolators. (author)

  15. Cascadia Onshore-Offshore Site Response, Submarine Sediment Mobilization, and Earthquake Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, J.

    2018-02-01

    Local geologic structure and topography may modify arriving seismic waves. This inherent variation in shaking, or "site response," may affect the distribution of slope failures and redistribution of submarine sediments. I used seafloor seismic data from the 2011 to 2015 Cascadia Initiative and permanent onshore seismic networks to derive estimates of site response, denoted Sn, in low- and high-frequency (0.02-1 and 1-10 Hz) passbands. For three shaking metrics (peak velocity and acceleration and energy density) Sn varies similarly throughout Cascadia and changes primarily in the direction of convergence, roughly east-west. In the two passbands, Sn patterns offshore are nearly opposite and range over an order of magnitude or more across Cascadia. Sn patterns broadly may be attributed to sediment resonance and attenuation. This and an abrupt step in the east-west trend of Sn suggest that changes in topography and structure at the edge of the continental margin significantly impact shaking. These patterns also correlate with gravity lows diagnostic of marginal basins and methane plumes channeled within shelf-bounding faults. Offshore Sn exceeds that onshore in both passbands, and the steepest slopes and shelf coincide with the relatively greatest and smallest Sn estimates at low and high frequencies, respectively; these results should be considered in submarine shaking-triggered slope stability failure studies. Significant north-south Sn variations are not apparent, but sparse sampling does not permit rejection of the hypothesis that the southerly decrease in intervals between shaking-triggered turbidites and great earthquakes inferred by Goldfinger et al. (2012, 2013, 2016) and Priest et al. (2017) is due to inherently stronger shaking southward.

  16. Aftershock communication during the Canterbury Earthquakes, New Zealand: implications for response and recovery in the built environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julia Becker,; Wein, Anne; Sally Potter,; Emma Doyle,; Ratliff, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    On 4 September 2010, a Mw7.1 earthquake occurred in Canterbury, New Zealand. Following the initial earthquake, an aftershock sequence was initiated, with the most significant aftershock being a Mw6.3 earthquake occurring on 22 February 2011. This aftershock caused severe damage to the city of Christchurch and building failures that killed 185 people. During the aftershock sequence it became evident that effective communication of aftershock information (e.g., history and forecasts) was imperative to assist with decision making during the response and recovery phases of the disaster, as well as preparedness for future aftershock events. As a consequence, a joint JCDR-USGS research project was initiated to investigate: • How aftershock information was communicated to organisations and to the public; • How people interpreted that information; • What people did in response to receiving that information; • What information people did and did not need; and • What decision-making challenges were encountered relating to aftershocks. Research was conducted by undertaking focus group meetings and interviews with a range of information providers and users, including scientists and science advisors, emergency managers and responders, engineers, communication officers, businesses, critical infrastructure operators, elected officials, and the public. The interviews and focus group meetings were recorded and transcribed, and key themes were identified. This paper focuses on the aftershock information needs for decision-making about the built environment post-earthquake, including those involved in response (e.g., for building assessment and management), recovery/reduction (e.g., the development of new building standards), and readiness (e.g. between aftershocks). The research has found that the communication of aftershock information varies with time, is contextual, and is affected by interactions among roles, by other information, and by decision objectives. A number

  17. Using the INEL site-specific plan as a community relations tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, Michael; Macdonald, Don; Couch, Brad; Reuel Smith, M.

    1992-01-01

    Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) activities have affected, or have the potential to affect the environment. For this reason) the issues surrounding INEL activities are of interest to a broad range of people. The preparation of the INEL Site-Specific Plan (SSP) reflects the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Field Office's (DOE-ID'S) initiative for open and clear communications with the public. The INEL SSP describes for the public DOE-ID'S plan to clean up inactive facilities and locations that were contaminated due to past waste management practices. It also discusses waste management strategies for avoiding future contamination by active operations. The SSP is an over-arching document and supplies 'the big picture' of environmental restoration and waste management activities to the public, including budget information and long-range plans. DOE-ID has been using the INEL Site-Specific Plan and its associated public comment period as a primary tool for public involvement and as way to get meaningful citizen input into DOE-ID planning. Public involvement in the INBL Site-Specific Plan has four main objectives: To inform public officials, Indian Tribes, interest groups, businesses, and individuals about current plans for environmental restoration and waste management activities at INEL; To ensure that public concerns and interests relating to environmental restoration and waste management are reflected in the SSP and DOE-ID planning; To provide flexibility so modifications can be made to DOE-ID plans and the SSP in response to changing concerns within the community, and; To ensure that DOE-ID and INEL contractors are given feedback regarding public interest in, and concerns about, the DOE-ID'S plans. To carry out these objectives, DOE-ID has implemented an aggressive public outreach effort that provides multiple opportunities for public participation in cleanup and waste management decisions. (author)

  18. Hydrogeochemical response of groundwater springs during central Italy earthquakes (24 August 2016 and 26-30 October 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Claire; Binda, Gilberto; Terrana, Silvia; Gambillara, Roberto; Michetti, Alessandro; Noble, Paula; Petitta, Marco; Rosen, Michael; Pozzi, Andrea; Bellezza, Paolo; Brunamonte, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    Co-seismic hydrological and chemical response at groundwater springs following strong earthquakes is a significant concern in the Apennines, a region in central Italy characterized by regional karstic groundwater systems interacting with active normal faults capable of producing Mw 6.5 to 7.0 seismic events. These aquifers also provide water supply to major metropolitan areas in the region. On August 24, 2016, a Mw 6.0 earthquake hit Central Italy in the area where Latium joins Umbria, Marche and Abruzzi; this was immediately followed one hour later by a Mw 5.4 shock. The epicenter of the event was located at the segment boundary between the Mt. Vettore and Mt. Laga faults. On October 26, 2016 and on October 30, 2016, three other big shocks (Mw 5.5, Mw 6.0 and Mw 6.5) ruptured again the Vettore Fault and its NW extension. Immediately after Aug. 24, we sampled springs discharging different aquifers in the Rieti area, including the Peschiera spring, which feeds the aqueduct of Rome. Thermal springs connected with deep groundwater flowpaths were also sampled. These springs, sampled previously in 2014 and 2015, provide some pre-earthquake data. Moreover, we sampled 4 springs along the Mt. Vettore fault system: 3 small springs at Forca di Presta, close to the trace of the earthquake surface ruptures, and two in Castel Sant'Angelo sul Nera. The latter are feeding the Nera aqueduct and the Nerea S.p.A. mineral water plant, which also kindly allowed us to collect bottled water samples from the pre-seismic period. The aim of this study is to evaluate the strong earthquake sequence effects on the hydrochemistry and flow paths of groundwater from different aquifer settings based on analysis before and after seismic events. The comparison between the responses of springs ca. 40 km from the epicenter (Rieti basin) and the springs located near the epicenter (Castelsantangelo sul Nera and Forca di Presta) is especially significant for understanding the resilience of groundwater

  19. Modified TCLP test for evaluating the leachability of site-specific wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pier, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) has developed a site-specific test to assess the leachability of wastes that will be placed in its on-site disposal cell. This test is modelled after the TCLP, but examines an expanded list of parameters and uses an extraction solution that is representative of conditions that are expected to exist in the disposal facility. Following the same logic that guided development of TCLP protocols, the WSSRAP developed concentration guidelines for non-TCLP parameters that were contaminants of concern in its wastes. Response actions, specific to the WSSRAP cell and wastes, were also developed to address constituents that failed to meet these guides. From 1955 to 1966, the US Atomic Energy Commission operated a uranium feed materials plant on this site. Nitroaromatic, and later, radiological wastes were disposed of in the quarry from 1945 until 1970. This paper describes testing to determine whether contaminant concentrations in leachates derived from the major waste-types that will be placed in its on-site disposal cell conform with the Department of Energy's (DOE) as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) policy. Although the WSSRAP will continue to use the TCLP test to determine if any waste is classified RCRA-hazardous, the site-specific test described in this paper will be used to further assess whether leachate from any waste-type has the potential to adversely impact groundwater

  20. The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center's Response to the Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, S. A.; Becker, N. C.; Shiro, B.; Koyanagi, K. K.; Sardina, V.; Walsh, D.; Wang, D.; McCreery, C. S.; Fryer, G. J.; Cessaro, R. K.; Hirshorn, B. F.; Hsu, V.

    2011-12-01

    The largest Pacific basin earthquake in 47 years, and also the largest magnitude earthquake since the Sumatra 2004 earthquake, struck off of the east coast of the Tohoku region of Honshu, Japan at 5:46 UTC on 11 March 2011. The Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0) generated a massive tsunami with runups of up to 40m along the Tohoku coast. The tsunami waves crossed the Pacific Ocean causing significant damage as far away as Hawaii, California, and Chile, thereby becoming the largest, most destructive tsunami in the Pacific Basin since 1960. Triggers on the seismic stations at Erimo, Hokkaido (ERM) and Matsushiro, Honshu (MAJO), alerted Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) scientists 90 seconds after the earthquake began. Four minutes after its origin, and about one minute after the earthquake's rupture ended, PTWC issued an observatory message reporting a preliminary magnitude of 7.5. Eight minutes after origin time, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) issued its first international tsunami message in its capacity as the Northwest Pacific Tsunami Advisory Center. In accordance with international tsunami warning system protocols, PTWC then followed with its first international tsunami warning message using JMA's earthquake parameters, including an Mw of 7.8. Additional Mwp, mantle wave, and W-phase magnitude estimations based on the analysis of later-arriving seismic data at PTWC revealed that the earthquake magnitude reached at least 8.8, and that a destructive tsunami would likely be crossing the Pacific Ocean. The earthquake damaged the nearest coastal sea-level station located 90 km from the epicenter in Ofunato, Japan. The NOAA DART sensor situated 600 km off the coast of Sendai, Japan, at a depth of 5.6 km recorded a tsunami wave amplitude of nearly two meters, making it by far the largest tsunami wave ever recorded by a DART sensor. Thirty minutes later, a coastal sea-level station at Hanasaki, Japan, 600 km from the epicenter, recorded a tsunami wave amplitude of

  1. Rapid Modeling of and Response to Large Earthquakes Using Real-Time GPS Networks (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, B. W.; Bock, Y.; Squibb, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    Real-time GPS networks have the advantage of capturing motions throughout the entire earthquake cycle (interseismic, seismic, coseismic, postseismic), and because of this, are ideal for real-time monitoring of fault slip in the region. Real-time GPS networks provide the perfect supplement to seismic networks, which operate with lower noise and higher sampling rates than GPS networks, but only measure accelerations or velocities, putting them at a supreme disadvantage for ascertaining the full extent of slip during a large earthquake in real-time. Here we report on two examples of rapid modeling of recent large earthquakes near large regional real-time GPS networks. The first utilizes Japan’s GEONET consisting of about 1200 stations during the 2003 Mw 8.3 Tokachi-Oki earthquake about 100 km offshore Hokkaido Island and the second investigates the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake recorded by more than 100 stations in the California Real Time Network. The principal components of strain were computed throughout the networks and utilized as a trigger to initiate earthquake modeling. Total displacement waveforms were then computed in a simulated real-time fashion using a real-time network adjustment algorithm that fixes a station far away from the rupture to obtain a stable reference frame. Initial peak ground displacement measurements can then be used to obtain an initial size through scaling relationships. Finally, a full coseismic model of the event can be run minutes after the event, given predefined fault geometries, allowing emergency first responders and researchers to pinpoint the regions of highest damage. Furthermore, we are also investigating using total displacement waveforms for real-time moment tensor inversions to look at spatiotemporal variations in slip.

  2. Comparison of test and earthquake response modeling of a nuclear power plant containment building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, M.G.; Kot, C.A.; Hsieh, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    The reactor building of a BWR plant was subjected to dynamic testing, a minor earthquake, and a strong earthquake at different times. Analytical models simulating each of these events were devised by previous investigators. A comparison of the characteristics of these models is made in this paper. The different modeling assumptions involved in the different simulation analyses restrict the validity of the models for general use and also narrow the comparison down to only a few modes. The dynamic tests successfully identified the first mode of the soil-structure system.

  3. Comparison of test and earthquake response modeling of a nuclear power plant containment building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.G.; Kot, C.A.; Hsieh, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    The reactor building of a BWR plant was subjected to dynamic testing, a minor earthquake, and a strong earthquake at different times. Analytical models simulating each of these events were devised by previous investigators. A comparison of the characteristics of these models is made in this paper. The different modeling assumptions involved in the different simulation analyses restrict the validity of the models for general use and also narrow the comparison down to only a few modes. The dynamic tests successfully identified the first mode of the soil-structure system

  4. Rapid Response Products of The ARIA Project for the M6.0 August 24, 2014 South Napa Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, S. H.; Owen, S. E.; Hua, H.; Milillo, P.; Fielding, E. J.; Hudnut, K. W.; Dawson, T. E.; Mccrink, T. P.; Jo, M. J.; Barnhart, W. D.; Manipon, G. J. M.; Agram, P. S.; Moore, A. W.; Jung, H. S.; Webb, F.; Milillo, G.; Rosinski, A.

    2014-12-01

    A magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck southern Napa county northeast of San Francisco, California, on Aug. 24, 2014, causing significant damage in the city of Napa and nearby areas. One day after the earthquake, the Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team produced and released observations of coseismic ground displacement measured with continuous GPS stations of the Plate Boundary Observatory (operated by UNAVCO for the National Science Foundation) and the Bay Area Rapid Deformation network (operated by Berkeley Seismological Laboratory). Three days after the earthquake (Aug. 27), the Italian Space Agency's (ASI) COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) satellite acquired their first post-event data. On the same day, the ARIA team, in collaboration with ASI and University of Basilicata, produced and released a coseismic interferogram that revealed ground deformation and surface rupture. The depiction of the surface rupture - discontinuities of color fringes in the CSK interferogram - helped guide field geologists from the US Geological Survey and the California Geological Survey (CGS) to features that may have otherwise gone undetected. Small-scale cracks were found on a runway of the Napa County Airport, as well as bridge damage and damaged roads. ARIA's response to this event highlighted the importance of timeliness for mapping surface deformation features. ARIA's rapid response products were shared through Southern California Earthquake Center's response website and the California Earthquake Clearinghouse. A damage proxy map derived from InSAR coherence of CSK data was produced and distributed on Aug. 27. Field crews from the CGS identified true and false positives, including mobile home damage, newly planted grape vines, and a cripple wall failure of a house. Finite fault slip models constrained from CSK interferograms and continuous GPS observations reveal a north-propagating rupture with well-resolved slip from 0-10.5 km depth. We also measured along-track coseismic

  5. Prediction and evaluation of nonlinear site response with potentially liquefiable layers in the area of Nafplion (Peloponnesus, Greece for a repeat of historical earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Karastathis

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We examine the possible non-linear behaviour of potentially liquefiable layers at selected sites located within the expansion area of the town of Nafplion, East Peloponnese, Greece. Input motion is computed for three scenario earthquakes, selected on the basis of historical seismicity data, using a stochastic strong ground motion simulation technique, which takes into account the finite dimensions of the earthquake sources. Site-specific ground acceleration synthetics and soil profiles are then used to evaluate the liquefaction potential at the sites of interest. The activation scenario of the Iria fault, which is the closest one to Nafplion (M=6.4, is found to be the most hazardous in terms of liquefaction initiation. In this scenario almost all the examined sites exhibit liquefaction features at depths of 6–12 m. For scenario earthquakes at two more distant seismic sources (Epidaurus fault – M6.3; Xylokastro fault – M6.7 strong ground motion amplification phenomena by the shallow soft soil layer are expected to be observed.

  6. Crowdsourcing for Natural Disaster Response: An Evaluation of Crisis Mapping the 2010 Haitian Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feighery, Annie

    2014-01-01

    On January 12, 2010, a magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck Haiti, causing catastrophic damages that resulted in at least 300,000 dead, 300,000 serious injuries, and 1.8 million homeless. The destruction was so complete that roads were no longer visible. While buildings, roads, power, and other infrastructure have taken years to restore, mobile phone…

  7. Disaster response under One Health in the aftermath of Nepal earthquake, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asokan, G V; Vanitha, A

    2017-03-01

    Until now, an estimate quotes that 1100 healthcare facilities were damaged and over 100,000 livestock lost in the two earthquakes that occurred in April and May of 2015 in Nepal. Threats of infectious diseases, mostly zoonoses, could affect Nepal's economy, trade, and tourism, and reaching the targets of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. Historically, outbreaks of infectious diseases, including zoonoses, were largely associated with the aftereffects of the earthquakes. It has been documented that zoonoses constitute 61% of all known infectious diseases. Therefore, the purpose of this communication was to examine the infectious disease outbreaks after earthquakes around the world and explore the risk assessment of the zoonoses threats reported in Nepal and highlight adopting One Health. Our summaries on reported zoonoses in Nepal have shown that parasitic zoonoses were predominant, but other infectious disease outbreaks can occur. The fragile public health infrastructure and inadequately trained public health personnel can accelerate the transmission of infections, mostly zoonoses, in the post impact phase of the earthquake in Nepal. Therefore, we believe that with the support of aid agencies, veterinarians and health professionals can team up to resolve the crisis under One Health. Copyright © 2016 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A multi-objective robust optimization model for logistics planning in the earthquake response phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Najafi, M.; Eshghi, K.; Dullaert, W.E.H.

    2013-01-01

    Usually, resources are short in supply when earthquakes occur. In such emergency situations, disaster relief organizations must use these scarce resources efficiently to achieve the best possible emergency relief. This paper therefore proposes a multi-objective, multi-mode, multi-commodity, and

  9. Earthquake response of storey building in Jakarta using accelerographs data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julius, Admiral Musa; Sunardi, Bambang

    2015-01-01

    As seismotectonic, the Jakarta city will be greatly affected by the earthquake which originated from the subduction zone of the Sunda Strait and south of Java. Some occurrences of earthquakes in these location are often perceived by the occupants in the upper floors of multi-storey buildings in Jakarta but was not perceived by the occupants on the ground floor. The case shows the difference in ground-motion parameters on each floor height. The analysis of the earthquake data recorded by accelerographs on different floors need to be done to know the differences in ground-motion parameters. Data used in this research is accelerograph data installed on several floors in the main building of Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics Agency with a case study of Kebumen earthquake on January 25 th 2014. Parameters analyzed include the Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA), Peak Ground Displacement (PGD), Peak Spectral Acceleration (PSA), Amplification (Ag), and the Effective Duration of earthquake (t e ). Research stages include accelerographs data acquisition in three (3) different floors, conversion and data partition for each component, conversion to units of acceleration, determination of PGA, PGD, PSA, Ag and t e as well as data analysis. The study shows the value of PGA on the ground floor, 7 th floor and 15 th floors, respectively are 0.016 g, 0.053 g and 0.116 g. PGD on the ground floor, 7 th floor and 15 th floor respectively are 2.15 cm, 2.98 cm and 4.92 cm. PSA on the ground floor, 7 th floor and 15 th floor respectively are 0.067 g, 0.308 g and 0.836 g. Amplification of the peak acceleration value on the ground floor, 7 th floor and 15 th floor to the surface rock are 4.37, 6.07 and 7.30. Effective duration of the earthquake on the ground floor, 7 th floor and 15 th floor respectively are 222.28 s, 202.28 s and 91.58 s. In general, with increasing floor of the building, the value of the peak ground acceleration, peak ground displacement, peak spectral

  10. Earthquake response of storey building in Jakarta using accelerographs data analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julius, Admiral Musa, E-mail: admiralmusajulius@yahoo.com [Study Program of Geophysics, Indonesia State College of Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics (STMKG), Jl. Perhubungan 1 No. 5, Bintaro 15221 (Indonesia); Jakarta Geophysics Observatory, Indonesia Agency of Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG), Jl. Angkasa 1 No. 2, Kemayoran, Jakarta 10720 (Indonesia); Sunardi, Bambang, E-mail: b.sunardi@gmail.com [Research and Development Center, Indonesia Agency of Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG), Jl. Angkasa 1 No. 2, Kemayoran, Jakarta 10720 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    As seismotectonic, the Jakarta city will be greatly affected by the earthquake which originated from the subduction zone of the Sunda Strait and south of Java. Some occurrences of earthquakes in these location are often perceived by the occupants in the upper floors of multi-storey buildings in Jakarta but was not perceived by the occupants on the ground floor. The case shows the difference in ground-motion parameters on each floor height. The analysis of the earthquake data recorded by accelerographs on different floors need to be done to know the differences in ground-motion parameters. Data used in this research is accelerograph data installed on several floors in the main building of Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics Agency with a case study of Kebumen earthquake on January 25{sup th} 2014. Parameters analyzed include the Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA), Peak Ground Displacement (PGD), Peak Spectral Acceleration (PSA), Amplification (Ag), and the Effective Duration of earthquake (t{sub e}). Research stages include accelerographs data acquisition in three (3) different floors, conversion and data partition for each component, conversion to units of acceleration, determination of PGA, PGD, PSA, Ag and t{sub e} as well as data analysis. The study shows the value of PGA on the ground floor, 7{sup th} floor and 15{sup th} floors, respectively are 0.016 g, 0.053 g and 0.116 g. PGD on the ground floor, 7{sup th} floor and 15{sup th} floor respectively are 2.15 cm, 2.98 cm and 4.92 cm. PSA on the ground floor, 7{sup th} floor and 15{sup th} floor respectively are 0.067 g, 0.308 g and 0.836 g. Amplification of the peak acceleration value on the ground floor, 7{sup th} floor and 15{sup th} floor to the surface rock are 4.37, 6.07 and 7.30. Effective duration of the earthquake on the ground floor, 7{sup th} floor and 15{sup th} floor respectively are 222.28 s, 202.28 s and 91.58 s. In general, with increasing floor of the building, the value of the

  11. ShakeCast: Automating and Improving the Use of ShakeMap for Post-Earthquake Decision- Making and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, K.; Wald, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    ShakeCast is a freely available, post-earthquake situational awareness application that automatically retrieves earthquake shaking data from ShakeMap, compares intensity measures against users" facilities, sends notifications of potential damage to responsible parties, and generates facility damage maps and other Web-based products for emergency managers and responders. ShakeMap, a tool used to portray the extent of potentially damaging shaking following an earthquake, provides overall information regarding the affected areas. When a potentially damaging earthquake occurs, utility and other lifeline managers, emergency responders, and other critical users have an urgent need for information about the impact on their particular facilities so they can make appropriate decisions and take quick actions to ensure safety and restore system functionality. To this end, ShakeCast estimates the potential damage to a user's widely distributed facilities by comparing the complex shaking distribution with the potentially highly variable damageability of their inventory to provide a simple, hierarchical list and maps showing structures or facilities most likely impacted. All ShakeMap and ShakeCast files and products are non-propriety to simplify interfacing with existing users" response tools and to encourage user-made enhancement to the software. ShakeCast uses standard RSS and HTTP requests to communicate with the USGS Web servers that host ShakeMaps, which are widely-distributed and heavily mirrored. The RSS approach allows ShakeCast users to initiate and receive selected ShakeMap products and information on software updates. To assess facility damage estimates, ShakeCast users can combine measured or estimated ground motion parameters with damage relationships that can be pre-computed, use one of these ground motion parameters as input, and produce a multi-state discrete output of damage likelihood. Presently three common approaches are being used to provide users with an

  12. Pile foundation response in liquefiable soil deposit during strong earthquakes. ; Centrifugal test for pile foundation model and correlation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Y.; Miura, K. (Kajima Corp., Tokyo (Japan)); Scott, R.; Hushmand, B. (California Inst. of Technology, California, CA (United States))

    1992-09-30

    For the purpose of studying the pile foundation response in liquefiable soil deposit during earthquakes, a centrifugal loading system is employed which can reproduce the stress conditions of the soil in the actual ground, and earthquake wave vibration tests are performed in dry and saturated sand layers using a pile foundation model equipped with 4 piles. In addition, the result of the tests is analyzed by simulation using an analytic method for which effective stress is taken into consideration to investigate the effectiveness of this analytical model. It is clarified from the result of the experiments that the bending moment of the pile and the response characteristics of the foundation in the pile foundation response in saturated sand are greatly affected by the longer period of acceleration wave form of the ground and the increase in the ground displacement due to excess pore water pressure buildup. It is shown that the analytical model of the pile foundation/ground system is appropriate, and that this analytical method is effective in evaluating the seismic response of the pile foundation in nonlinear liquefiable soil. 23 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Behavioral Response in the Immediate Aftermath of Shaking: Earthquakes in Christchurch and Wellington, New Zealand, and Hitachi, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihnji Jon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examines people’s response actions in the first 30 min after shaking stopped following earthquakes in Christchurch and Wellington, New Zealand, and Hitachi, Japan. Data collected from 257 respondents in Christchurch, 332 respondents in Hitachi, and 204 respondents in Wellington revealed notable similarities in some response actions immediately after the shaking stopped. In all four events, people were most likely to contact family members and seek additional information about the situation. However, there were notable differences among events in the frequency of resuming previous activities. Actions taken in the first 30 min were weakly related to: demographic variables, earthquake experience, contextual variables, and actions taken during the shaking, but were significantly related to perceived shaking intensity, risk perception and affective responses to the shaking, and damage/infrastructure disruption. These results have important implications for future research and practice because they identify promising avenues for emergency managers to communicate seismic risks and appropriate responses to risk area populations.

  14. Statistical uncertainty of response characteristic of building-appendage system for spectrum-compatible artificial earthquake motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, A.; Kozeki, M.

    1981-01-01

    Spectrum-compatible artificial time histories of ground motions are frequently used for the seismic design of nuclear power plant structures and components. However, statistical uncertainty of the responses of building structures and mechanical components mounted on the building (building-appendage systems) are anticipated, since an artificial time history is no more than one sample from a population of such time histories that match a specified design response spectrum. This uncertainty may spoil the reliability of the seismic design and therefore the extent of the uncertainty of the response characteristic is a matter of great concern. In this paper, above-mentioned uncertainty of the dynamic response characteristics of the building-appendage system to the spectrum-compatible artificial earthquake is investigated. (orig./RW)

  15. Design principle of TVO's final repository and preliminary adaptation to site specific conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salo, J-P.; Reikkola, R.

    1995-01-01

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) is responsible for the management of spent fuel produced by the Olkiluoto power plant. TVO's current programme of spent fuel management is based on the guidelines and time schedule set by the Finnish Government. TVO has studied a final disposal concept in which the spent fuel bundles are encapsulated in copper canisters and emplaced in Finnish bedrock. According to the plan the final repository for spent fuel will be in operation by 2020. TVO's updated technical plans for the disposal of spent fuel together with a performance analysis (TVO-92) were submitted to the authorities in 1992. The paper describes the design principle of TVO's final repository and preliminary adaptation of the repository to site specific conditions. (author). 10 refs., 5 figs

  16. Failure behavior of concrete pile and super-structure dynamic response as a result of soil liquefaction during earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Shogo; Hayashi, Kazuhiro; Hachimori, Wataru; Tamura, Shuji; Saito, Taiki

    2017-10-01

    In past earthquake disasters, numerous building structure piles were damaged by soil liquefaction occurring during the earthquake. Damage to these piles, because they are underground, is difficult to find. The authors aim to develop a monitoring method of pile damage based on superstructure dynamic response. This paper investigated the relationship between the damage of large cross section cementitious piles and the dynamic response of the super structure using a centrifuge test apparatus. A dynamic specimen used simple cross section pile models consisting of aluminum rod and mortar, a saturated soil (Toyoura sand) of a relative density of 40% and a super structure model of a natural period of 0.63sec. In the shaking table test under a 50G field (length scale of 1/50), excitation was a total of 3 motions scaled from the Rinkai wave at different amplitudes. The maximum acceleration of each of the excitations was 602gal, 336gal and 299gal. The centrifuge test demonstrated the liquefaction of saturated soil and the failure behavior of piles. In the test result, the damage of piles affected the predominant period of acceleration response spectrum on the footing of the superstructure.

  17. Site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and damage in Los Gatos, California, from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, S.; Carver, D.; Williams, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Aftershock records of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake are used to calculate site response in the frequency band of 0.5-10 Hz at 24 locations in Los Gatos, California, on the edge of the Santa Clara Valley. Two different methods are used: spectral ratios relative to a reference site on rock and a source/site spectral inversion method. These two methods complement each other and give consistent results. Site amplification factors are compared with surficial geology, thickness of alluvium, shallow shear-wave velocity measurements, and ground deformation and structural damage resulting from the Loma Prieta earthquake. Higher values of site amplification are seen on Quaternary alluvium compared with older Miocene and Cretaceous units of Monterey and Franciscan Formation. However, other more detailed correlations with surficial geology are not evident. A complex pattern of alluvial sediment thickness, caused by crosscutting thrust faults, is interpreted as contributing to the variability in site response and the presence of spectral resonance peaks between 2 and 7 Hz at some sites. Within the range of our field measurements, there is a correlation between lower average shear-wave velocity of the top 30 m and 50% higher values of site amplification. An area of residential homes thrown from their foundations correlates with high site response. This damage may also have been aggravated by local ground deformation. Severe damage to commercial buildings in the business district, however, is attributed to poor masonry construction.

  18. Evaluation of Soil-Structure Interaction on the Seismic Response of Liquid Storage Tanks under Earthquake Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Farajian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil-structure interaction (SSI could affect the seismic response of structures. Since liquid storage tanks are vital structures and must continue their operation under severe earthquakes, their seismic behavior should be studied. Accordingly, the seismic response of two types of steel liquid storage tanks (namely, broad and slender, with aspect ratios of height to radius equal to 0.6 and 1.85 founded on half-space soil is scrutinized under different earthquake ground motions. For a better comparison, the six considered ground motions are classified, based on their pulse-like characteristics, into two groups, named far and near fault ground motions. To model the liquid storage tanks, the simplified mass-spring model is used and the liquid is modeled as two lumped masses known as sloshing and impulsive, and the interaction of fluid and structure is considered using two coupled springs and dashpots. The SSI effect, also, is considered using a coupled spring and dashpot. Additionally, four types of soils are used to consider a wide variety of soil properties. To this end, after deriving the equations of motion, MATLAB programming is employed to obtain the time history responses. Results show that although the SSI effect leads to a decrease in the impulsive displacement, overturning moment, and normalized base shear, the sloshing (or convective displacement is not affected by such effects due to its long period.

  19. Evaluation of Fourier and Response Spectra at Ichihasama and Koromogawa Seismic Intensity Observation Sites During the Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku Earthquake in 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hayato; Miyajima, Masakatsu

    In this study, we evaluate an acceleration Fourier and response spectra at Ichihasama and Koromogawa seismic intensity observation sites which observed JMA seismic intensity of 6 upper but seismic waveform records don't exist during the Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake in 2008. Firstly, formula to evaluate acceleration Fourier and response spectra are developed using peak ground acceleration, JMA seismic intensity and predominant period of earthquake spectra based on records obtained from crustal earthquakes with Magnitude of 6 to 7. Acceleration Fourier and response spectra are evaluated for another local government site which are not chosen for development of the formula. The evaluated values mostly agree with the observed ones. Finally, acceleration Fourier and response spectra are evaluated for Ichihasama and Koromogawa observation sites. It is clarified that short period below 1 second was predominated in the evaluated spectra.

  20. The role of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake in topographic evolution: seismically induced landslides and the associated isostatic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zheng, W.; Zhang, P. Z.

    2017-12-01

    The widely held understanding that reverse-faulting earthquakes play an important role in building mountains has been challenged by recent studies suggesting that co-seismic landslides of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake led to a net co-seismic lowering of surface height. We use precise estimates of co-seismic landslide volumes to calculate the long-term isostatic response to landsliding during the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. The total isostatic respond volume is 2.0 km3 which did not change much associated with thickness of Te, however, the distribution of the rebound changes associated with thickness of Te. The total co-seismic mass change could be 1.8 km3. The maximum isostatic response due to Wenchuan earthquake may have been as high as 0.9 meters in the highest Pengguan massif of the central Longmen Shan. We also find that the average net uplift is 0.16 meters within the total landslide region due to the Wenchuan earthquake. Our findings suggest that the local topographic evolution of the middle Longmen Shan region is closely related to repeated tectonic events such as the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake.

  1. Variations of local seismic response in Benevento (Southern Italy) using earthquakes and ambient noise recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improta, Luigi; di Giulio, Giuseppe; Rovelli, Antonio

    The city of Benevento (Southern Italy) has been repeatedly struck by large historical earthquakes. A heterogeneous geologic structure and widespread soft soil conditions make the estimation of site effects crucial for the seismic hazard assessment of the city. From 2000 until 2004, we installed seismic stations to collect earthquake data over zones with different geological conditions. Despite the high level of urban noise, we recorded more than 150 earthquakes at twelve sites. This data set yields the first, well documented experimental evidence for weak to moderate local amplifications. We investigated site effects primarily by the classical spectral ratio technique (CSR) using a rock station placed on the Benevento hill as reference. All sites in the Calore river valley and in the eastern part of the Benevento hill show a moderate high-frequency (f > 4 Hz) amplification peak. Conversely, sites in the Sabato river valley share weak-to-moderate amplification in a wide frequency band (from 1-2 to 7-10 Hz), without evident frequency peaks. Application of no-reference-site techniques to earthquake and noise data confirms the results of the CSRs in the sites of the Calore river valley and of the eastern part of the Benevento hill, but fails in providing indications for site effects in the Sabato river valley, being the H/V ratios nearly flat. One-dimensional modeling indicates that the ground motion amplification can be essentially explained in terms of a vertically varying geologic structure. High-frequency narrow peaks are caused by the strong impedance contrast existing between near-surface soft deposits and stiff cemented conglomerates. Conversely, broad-band amplifications in the Sabato river valley are likely due to a more complex layering with weak impedance contrasts both in the shallow and deep structure of the valley.

  2. In vivo tumor angiogenesis imaging with site-specific labeled 99mTc-HYNIC-VEGF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenberg, Francis G.; Backer, Marina V.; Patel, Vimalkumar; Backer, Joseph M.; Levashova, Zoia

    2006-01-01

    We recently developed a cysteine-containing peptide tag (C-tag) that allows for site-specific modification of C-tag-containing fusion proteins with a bifunctional chelator, HYNIC (hydrazine nicotinamide)-maleimide. We then constructed and expressed C-tagged vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and labeled it with HYNIC. We wished to test 99m Tc-HYNIC-C-tagged VEGF ( 99m Tc-HYNIC-VEGF) for the imaging of tumor vasculature before and after antiangiogenic (low continuous dosing, metronomic) and tumoricidal (high-dose) cyclophosphamide treatment. HYNIC-maleimide was reacted with the two thiol groups of C-tagged VEGF without any effect on biologic activity in vitro. 99m Tc-HYNIC-VEGF was prepared using tin/tricine as an exchange reagent, and injected via the tail vein (200-300 μCi, 1-2 μg protein) followed by microSPECT imaging 1 h later. Sequencing analysis of HYNIC-containing peptides obtained after digestion confirmed the site-specific labeling of the two accessible thiol groups of C-tagged VEGF. Tumor vascularity was easily visualized with 99m Tc/VEGF in Balb/c mice with 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma 10 days after implantation into the left axillary fat pad in controls (12.3±5.0 tumor/bkg, n=27) along with its decrease following treatment with high (150 mg/kg q.o.d. x 4; 1.14±0.48 tumor/bkg, n=9) or low (25 mg/kg q.d. x 7; 1.03±0.18 tumor/bkg, n=9) dose cyclophosphamide. Binding specificity was confirmed by observing a 75% decrease in tumor uptake of 99m Tc/biotin-inactivated VEGF, as compared with 99m Tc-HYNIC-VEGF. 99m Tc can be loaded onto C-tagged VEGF in a site-specific fashion without reducing its bioactivity. 99m Tc-HYNIC-VEGF can be rapidly prepared for the imaging of tumor vasculature and its response to different types of chemotherapy. (orig.)

  3. Nanostructured interfaces with site-specific bioreceptors for immunosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Telmo O.; Almeida, Inês; Marquês, Joaquim T. [Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Edifício C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Liu, Wei [NML, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Institute of Microelectronics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Niu, Yu [NML, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Jin, Gang, E-mail: gajin@imech.ac.cn [NML, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); School of Engineering Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Viana, Ana S., E-mail: anaviana@fc.ul.pt [Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Edifício C8, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Innovative and simple strategy to create sensitive immunosensing platforms. • Gold surface modification with dithiocarbamate nanoconjugates of protein A. • CS{sub 2} strongly adsorbed on gold able to block protein nonspecific adsorption. • High performance for antigen detection by properly oriented antibodies. - Abstract: In this work, we propose a simple and effective approach to build nanostructured immunosensor platforms. The one-step strategy relies on i) the in situ formation of dithiocarbamates from the reaction between carbon disulfide and amine groups, present on protein A, ii) their attachment to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), and iii) the linkage of the modified AuNPs to the electrode surface, which depends on the strong interaction between gold substrates and sulfur moieties. AuNPs and protein A are used to increase the surface coverage of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and promote the oriented immobilization of the antibodies on the immunosensing interface. The modified gold surfaces with biomolecules were thoroughly characterized by a combination of techniques: UV–vis spectrophotometry, conventional ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy. The immunosensor performance was assessed in real-time, by surface plasmon resonance and by the highly sensitive total internal reflection imaging ellipsometry, through the specific biorecognition between anti-IgG and the immobilized IgG molecules. We demonstrate that the presence of AuNPs improves the sensitivity of the anti-IgG specific detection, whereas the presence of co-adsorbed CS{sub 2} is responsible for blocking the undesired protein nonspecific adsorption to the gold substrate. Overall, we report a simple and innovative one-step method, to chemically modify gold surfaces with protein A and AuNPs, able to specifically detect antigen/antibody interactions with capability of preventing protein nonspecific adsorption.

  4. Fukushima after the Great East Japan Earthquake: lessons for developing responsive and resilient health systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Shingo; Ahmed, Shahira; Goto, Rei; Inui, Thomas S; Atun, Rifat; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2017-01-01

    Background On 11 March 2011, the Great East Japan Earthquake, followed by a tsunami and nuclear–reactor meltdowns, produced one of the most severe disasters in the history of Japan. The adverse impact of this ‘triple disaster’ on the health of local populations and the health system was substantial. In this study we examine population–level health indicator changes that accompanied the disaster, and discuss options for re–designing Fukushima’s health system, and by extension that of Japan, to enhance its responsiveness and resilience to current and future shocks. Methods We used country–level (Japan–average) or prefecture–level data (2005–2014) available from the portal site of Official Statistics of Japan for Fukushima, Miyagi, and Iwate, the prefectures that were most affected by the disaster, to compare trends before (2005–2010) and after (2011–2014) the ‘disaster’. We made time–trend line plots to describe changes over time in age–adjusted cause–specific mortality rates in each prefecture. Findings All three prefectures, and in particular Fukushima, had lower socio–economic indicators, an older population, lower productivity and gross domestic product per capita, and less higher–level industry than the Japan average. All three prefectures were ‘medically underserved’, with fewer physicians, nurses, ambulance calls and clinics per 100 000 residents than the Japan average. Even before the disaster, age–adjusted all–cause mortality in Fukushima was in general higher than the national rates. After the triple disaster we found that the mortality rate due to myocardial infarction increased substantially in Fukushima while it decreased nationwide. Compared to Japan average, spikes in mortality due to lung disease (all three prefectures), stroke (Iwate and Miyagi), and all–cause mortality (Miyagi and Fukushima) were also observed post–disaster. The cause–specific mortality rate from cancer followed similar trends in

  5. Organizational changes at Earthquakes & Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David W.

    1992-01-01

    Primary responsibility for the preparation of Earthquakes & Volcanoes within the Geological Survey has shifted from the Office of Scientific Publications to the Office of Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Engineering (OEVE). As a consequence of this reorganization, Henry Spall has stepepd down as Science Editor for Earthquakes & Volcanoes(E&V).

  6. Networks in disasters: Multidisciplinary communication and coordination in response and recovery to the 2010 Haiti Earthquake (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdoo, B. G.; Augenstein, J.; Comfort, L.; Huggins, L.; Krenitsky, N.; Scheinert, S.; Serrant, T.; Siciliano, M.; Stebbins, S.; Sweeney, P.; University Of Pittsburgh Haiti Reconnaissance Team

    2010-12-01

    The 12 January 2010 earthquake in Haiti demonstrates the necessity of understanding information communication between disciplines during disasters. Armed with data from a variety of sources, from geophysics to construction, water and sanitation to education, decision makers can initiate well-informed policies to reduce the risk from future hazards. At the core of this disaster was a natural hazard that occurred in an environmentally compromised country. The earthquake itself was not solely responsible for the magnitude of the disaster- poor construction practices precipitated by extreme poverty, a two centuries of post-colonial environmental degradation and a history of dysfunctional government shoulder much of the responsibility. Future policies must take into account the geophysical reality that future hazards are inevitable and may occur within the very near future, and how various institutions will respond to the stressors. As the global community comes together in reconstruction efforts, it is necessary for the various actors to take into account what vulnerabilities were exposed by the earthquake, most vividly seen during the initial response to the disaster. Responders are forced to prioritize resources designated for building collapse and infrastructure damage, delivery of critical services such as emergency medical care, and delivery of food and water to those in need. Past disasters have shown that communication lapses between the response and recovery phases results in many of the exposed vulnerabilities not being adequately addressed, and the recovery hence fails to bolster compromised systems. The response reflects the basic characteristics of a Complex Adaptive System, where new agents emerge and priorities within existing organizations shift to deal with new information. To better understand how information is shared between actors during this critical transition, we are documenting how information is communicated between critical sectors during the

  7. Proceedings of preparing for a significant Central United States earthquake-Science needs of the response and recovery community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Emitt C.

    2010-01-01

    Preface Imagine waking up at 2 o'clock in the morning by a violent rumbling that causes ceilings to fall, furniture to topple over, and windows to break. Your home is crumbling, it is dark, and by the time you realize what is going on the shaking stops. You quickly determine that your family members are okay, but you also realize your power is out, all the windows are broken, and there is substantial damage to your home possibly making it unsafe to remain inside. The temperature outside is in the 20s, there is a heavy snow on the ground, and the flu season is at its peak with two of your family members affected. Unfortunately your family is one of thousands in a similar circumstance and the response to your needs may not be immediate, if at all. Could an earthquake like this happen unannounced? It did in the Central United States during the great New Madrid earthquake of 1811-12. A resident of New Madrid, Missouri writes (Martin, 1848 ): 'On the 16th of December 1811, about 2 o'clock, AM, we were visited by a violent shock of an earthquake accompanied by a very awful noise resembling loud but distant thunder, but more hoarse and vibrating, which was followed in a few minutes by the complete saturation of the atmosphere with sulphurious vapor, causing total darkness. The screams of the affrighted inhabitants running to and fro, not knowing where to go, or what to do-the cries of the fowls and beasts of every species-the crackling of trees falling, and the roar of the Mississippi-the current of which was retrograde for a few minutes, owing as is supposed to an irruption in its bed-formed a scene truly horrible.' Eliza Bryan, March 22, 1816 The residents of the Central United States during the great New Madrid earthquake were accustomed to living rugged life styles. Electrical power was not a reality, water was drawn from shallow hand-dug wells or retrieved from streams, food was hunted or grown, and the homes typically were log structures with dirt floors. Though

  8. Local Delivery Is Critical for Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 Mediated Site-Specific Murine Aneurysm Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourani, Siham; Motwani, Kartik; Wajima, Daisuke; Fazal, Hanain; Jones, Chad H; Doré, Sylvain; Hosaka, Koji; Hoh, Brian L

    2018-01-01

    Local delivery of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) via our drug-eluting coil has been shown to promote intrasaccular aneurysm healing via an inflammatory pathway. In this study, we validate the importance of local MCP-1 in murine aneurysm healing. Whether systemic, rather than local, delivery of MCP-1 can direct site-specific aneurysm healing has significant translational implications. If systemic MCP-1 is effective, then MCP-1 could be administered as a pill rather than by endovascular procedure. Furthermore, we confirm that MCP-1 is the primary effector in our MCP-1 eluting coil-mediated murine aneurysm healing model. We compare aneurysm healing with repeated intraperitoneal MCP-1 versus vehicle injection, in animals with control poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA)-coated coils. We demonstrate elimination of the MCP-1-associated tissue-healing response by knockout of MCP-1 or CCR2 (MCP-1 receptor) and by selectively inhibiting MCP-1 or CCR2. Using immunofluorescent probing, we explore the cell populations found in healed aneurysm tissue following each intervention. Systemically administered MCP-1 with PLGA coil control does not produce comparable aneurysm healing, as seen with MCP-1 eluting coils. MCP-1-directed aneurysm healing is eliminated by selective inhibition of MCP-1 or CCR2 and in MCP-1-deficient or CCR2-deficient mice. No difference was detected in M2 macrophage and myofibroblast/smooth muscle cell staining with systemic MCP-1 versus vehicle in aneurysm wall, but a significant increase in these cell types was observed with MCP-1 eluting coil implant and attenuated by MCP-1/CCR2 blockade or deficiency. We show that systemic MCP-1 concurrent with PLGA-coated platinum coil implant is not sufficient to produce site-specific aneurysm healing. MCP-1 is a critical, not merely complementary, actor in the aneurysm healing pathway.

  9. Characterization and validation of new tools for measuring site-specific cardiac troponin I phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoemmes, Stephen F; Stutzke, Crystal A; Du, Yanmei; Browning, Michael D; Buttrick, Peter M; Walker, Lori A

    2014-01-31

    Phosphorylation of cardiac troponin I is a well established mechanism by which cardiac contractility is modulated. However, there are a number of phosphorylation sites on TnI which contribute singly or in combination to influence cardiac function. Accordingly, methods for accurately measuring site-specific TnI phosphorylation are needed. Currently, two strategies are employed: mass spectrometry, which is costly, difficult and has a low throughput; and Western blotting using phospho-specific antibodies, which is limited by the availability of reagents. In this report, we describe a cohort of new site-specific TnI phosphoantibodies, generated against physiologically relevant phosphorylation sites, that are superior to the current commercially available antibodies: to phospho-serine 22/23 which shows a >5-fold phospho-specificity for phosphorylated TnI; to phospho-serine 43, which has >3-fold phospho-specificity for phosphorylated TnI; and phospho-serine 150 which has >2-fold phospho-specificity for phosphorylated TnI. These new antibodies demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity for the phosphorylated TnI than the most widely used commercially available reagents. For example, at a protein load of 20 μg of total cardiac extract, a commercially available antibody recognized both phosphorylated and dephosphorylated TnI to the same degree. At the same protein load our phospho-serine 22/23 antibody exhibited no cross-reactivity with dephosphorylated TnI. These new tools should allow a more accurate assessment and a better understanding of the role of TnI phosphorylation in the response of the heart to pathologic stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Seismic Response and Evaluation of SDOF Self-Centering Friction Damping Braces Subjected to Several Earthquake Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Wan Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly deals with seismic response and performance for self-centering friction damping braces (SFDBs subjected to several maximum- or design-leveled earthquake ground motions. The self-centering friction damping brace members consist of core recentering components fabricated with superelastic shape memory alloy wires and energy dissipation devices achieved through shear friction mechanism. As compared to the conventional brace members for use in the steel concentrically braced frame structure, these self-centering friction damping brace members make the best use of their representative characteristics to minimize residual deformations and to withstand earthquake loads without member replacement. The configuration and response mechanism of self-centering friction damping brace systems are firstly described in this study, and then parametric investigations are conducted through nonlinear time-history analyses performed on numerical single degree-of-freedom spring models. After observing analysis results, adequate design methodologies that optimally account for recentering capability and energy dissipation according to their comparative parameters are intended to be suggested in order to take advantage of energy capacity and to minimize residual deformation simultaneously.

  11. Stress modulation of earthquakes: A study of long and short period stress perturbations and the crustal response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher W.

    Decomposing fault mechanical processes advances our understanding of active fault systems and properties of the lithosphere, thereby increasing the effectiveness of seismic hazard assessment and preventative measures implemented in urban centers. Along plate boundaries earthquakes are inevitable as tectonic forces reshape the Earth's surface. Earthquakes, faulting, and surface displacements are related systems that require multidisciplinary approaches to characterize deformation in the lithosphere. Modern geodetic instrumentation can resolve displacements to millimeter precision and provide valuable insight into secular deformation in near real-time. The expansion of permanent seismic networks as well as temporary deployments allow unprecedented detection of microseismic events that image fault interfaces and fracture networks in the crust. The research presented in this dissertation is at the intersection of seismology and geodesy to study the Earth's response to transient deformation and explores research questions focusing on earthquake triggering, induced seismicity, and seasonal loading while utilizing seismic data, geodetic data, and modeling tools. The focus is to quantify stress changes in the crust, explore seismicity rate variations and migration patterns, and model crustal deformation in order to characterize the evolving state of stress on faults and the migration of fluids in the crust. The collection of problems investigated all investigate the question: Why do earthquakes nucleate following a low magnitude stress perturbation? Answers to this question are fundamental to understanding the time dependent failure processes of the lithosphere. Dynamic triggering is the interaction of faults and triggering of earthquakes represents stress transferring from one system to another, at both local and remote distances [Freed, 2005]. The passage of teleseismic surface waves from the largest earthquakes produce dynamic stress fields and provides a natural

  12. 29 CFR 1926.752 - Site layout, site-specific erection plan and construction sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Site layout, site-specific erection plan and construction... Steel Erection § 1926.752 Site layout, site-specific erection plan and construction sequence. (a... strength or sufficient strength to support the loads imposed during steel erection. (c) Site layout. The...

  13. 76 FR 5147 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management and...

  14. 77 FR 59598 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management and...

  15. 75 FR 13269 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Hanford. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... is to make recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration...

  16. 75 FR 65310 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Nevada Test Site. The Federal Advisory... Board is to make recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration...

  17. 75 FR 54600 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management and...

  18. 75 FR 66074 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management and...

  19. 75 FR 8050 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Hanford. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... is to make recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration...

  20. 75 FR 24686 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management and...

  1. 76 FR 80355 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... make recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste...

  2. 75 FR 9404 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management and...

  3. 75 FR 56526 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Initiative Workshop of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The... recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management and...

  4. 75 FR 82004 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Nevada. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub... recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management, and...

  5. 77 FR 4027 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Nevada. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub... recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management, and...

  6. 77 FR 43583 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management and...

  7. 75 FR 61711 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management and...

  8. 76 FR 80354 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Nevada. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub... recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management, and...

  9. 75 FR 82002 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management and...

  10. 76 FR 61350 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... make recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste...

  11. 76 FR 4645 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Hanford. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management, and...

  12. 77 FR 2282 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah AGENCY... the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah. This notice announces the... Management Officer. [FR Doc. 2012-831 Filed 1-12-12; 4:15 pm] BILLING CODE 6405-01-P ...

  13. 76 FR 20651 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs AGENCY... a meeting on April 13-14, 2011 of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs... R. Butler, Acting Deputy Committee Management Officer. [FR Doc. 2011-8970 Filed 4-8-11; 4:15 pm...

  14. 75 FR 6018 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Hanford (known locally as the Hanford Advisory... and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management, and related...

  15. 77 FR 12044 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Nevada. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub... Board is to make recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration...

  16. 76 FR 48148 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management and...

  17. FLP recombinase-mediated site-specific recombination in silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comprehensive understanding of gene function and the production of site-specific genetically modified mutants are two major goals of genetic engineering in the post-genomic era. Although site-specific recombination systems have been powerful tools for genome manipulation of many organisms, they h...

  18. Long-period amplification in deep alluvial basins and consequences for site-specific probabilistic seismic-hazard: the case of Castelleone in the Po Plain (Northern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barani, S.; Mascandola, C.; Massa, M.; Spallarossa, D.

    2017-12-01

    The recent Emilia seismic sequence (Northern Italy) occurred at the end of the first half of 2012 with main shock of Mw6.1 highlighted the importance of studying site effects in the Po Plain, the larger and deeper sedimentary basin in Italy. As has long been known, long-period amplification related to deep sedimentary basins can significantly affect the characteristics of the ground-motion induced by strong earthquakes. It follows that the effects of deep sedimentary deposits on ground shaking require special attention during the definition of the design seismic action. The work presented here analyzes the impact of deep-soil discontinuities on ground-motion amplification, with particular focus on long-period probabilistic seismic-hazard assessment. The study focuses on the site of Castelleone, where a seismic station of the Italian National Seismic Network has been recording since 2009. Our study includes both experimental and numerical site response analyses. Specifically, extensive active and passive geophysical measurements were carried out in order to define a detailed shear-wave velocity (VS) model to be used in the numerical analyses. These latter are needed to assess the site-specific ground-motion hazard. Besides classical seismic refraction profiles and multichannel analysis of surface waves, we analyzed ambient vibration measurements in both single and array configurations. The VS profile was determined via joint inversion of the experimental phase-velocity dispersion curve with the ellipticity curve derived from horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios. The profile shows two main discontinuities at depths of around 160 and 1350 m, respectively. The probabilistic site-specific hazard was assessed in terms of both spectral acceleration and displacement. A partially non-ergodic approach was adopted. We have found that the spectral acceleration hazard is barely sensitive to long-period (up to 10 s) amplification related to the deeper discontinuity whereas the

  19. Determination of Design Basis Earthquake ground motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Muneaki

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes principle of determining of Design Basis Earthquake following the Examination Guide, some examples on actual sites including earthquake sources to be considered, earthquake response spectrum and simulated seismic waves. In sppendix of this paper, furthermore, seismic safety review for N.P.P designed before publication of the Examination Guide was summarized with Check Basis Earthquake. (J.P.N.)

  20. Determination of Design Basis Earthquake ground motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Muneaki [Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This paper describes principle of determining of Design Basis Earthquake following the Examination Guide, some examples on actual sites including earthquake sources to be considered, earthquake response spectrum and simulated seismic waves. In sppendix of this paper, furthermore, seismic safety review for N.P.P designed before publication of the Examination Guide was summarized with Check Basis Earthquake. (J.P.N.)

  1. Long-term change of site response after the M W 9.0 Tohoku earthquake in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunquan; Peng, Zhigang

    2012-12-01

    The recent M W 9.0 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku earthquake is the largest recorded earthquake in Japan's history. The Tohoku main shock and its aftershocks generated widespread strong shakings as large as ~3000 Gal along the east coast of Japan. Wu and Peng (2011) found clear drop of resonant frequency of up to 70% during the Tohoku main shock at 6 sites and correlation of resonance (peak) frequency and peak ground acceleration (PGA) during the main shock. Here we follow that study and systematically analyze long-term changes of material properties in the shallow crust from one year before to 5 months after the Tohoku main shock, using seismic data recorded by the Japanese Strong Motion Network KiK-Net. We use sliding window spectral ratios computed from a pair of surface and borehole stations to track the temporal changes in the site response of 6 sites. Our results show two stages of logarithmic recovery after a sharp drop of resonance frequency during the Tohoku main shock. The first stage is a rapid recovery within several hundred seconds to several hours, and the second stage is a slow recovery of more than five months. We also investigate whether the damage caused by the Tohoku main shock could make the near surface layers more susceptible to further damages, but we do not observe clear changes in susceptibility to further damage before and after the Tohoku main shock.

  2. [Response of primary care teams to manage mental health problems after the 2010 earthquake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitriol, Verónica; Minoletti, Alberto; Alvarado, Rubén; Sierralta, Paula; Cancino, Alfredo

    2014-09-01

    Thirty to 50% of people exposed to a natural disaster suffer psychological problems in the ensuing months. To characterize the activities in mental health developed by Primary Health Care centers after the earthquake that affected Chile on february 27th, 2010. A cross-sectional study analyzing 16 urban centers of Maule Region, was carried out. A questionnaire was developed to know the preparatory and supportive activities directed to the community and the training and self-care activities directed to Health Care personnel that were made during the 12 months following the catastrophe. In addition, a questionnaire evaluating structural aspects was designed. Only 1/3 of the centers made some preparatory activity and none of them made a diagnosis of population vulnerability. The average of protective Mental Health interventions coverage reached 35% of the population estimated to be most affected. The activities lasted 31 to 62% of the optimal duration standards set by experts (according to the type of action). Important differences between centers in economic and geographical accessibility, construction and professional resources were found. This study shows the difficulties faced by urban centers of Maule Region to deal with mental health problems caused by the earthquake, which were attributable to the absence of local planning and drills, and to the lack of intra and inter sectorial coordination.

  3. The orientation of disaster donations: differences in the global response to five major earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiuchang; Marinova, Dora

    2016-07-01

    This study analyses the influence of gift giving, geographical location, political regime, and trade openness on disaster donation decisions, using five severe earthquakes that occurred between 2008 and 2012 as case studies. The results show that global disaster donation is not dominated by only philanthropy or trade interests, and that the determinants of donation decisions vary with the scale of the natural disaster and the characteristics of the disaster-affected countries. While gift giving exists in the case of middle-size earthquakes, political regimes play a very important part in the overall donation process. Countries with higher perceived corruption may donate more frequently, but those that are more democratic may be more generous in their donations. Generosity based on geographical proximity to the calamity is significant in the decision-making process for most natural disasters, yet it may have a negative effect on donations in Latin America and the Caribbean. © 2016 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2016.

  4. FLP recombinase-mediated site-specific recombination in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-Pei Long

    Full Text Available A comprehensive understanding of gene function and the production of site-specific genetically modified mutants are two major goals of genetic engineering in the post-genomic era. Although site-specific recombination systems have been powerful tools for genome manipulation of many organisms, they have not yet been established for use in the manipulation of the silkworm Bombyx mori genome. In this study, we achieved site-specific excision of a target gene at predefined chromosomal sites in the silkworm using a FLP/FRT site-specific recombination system. We first constructed two stable transgenic target silkworm strains that both contain a single copy of the transgene construct comprising a target gene expression cassette flanked by FRT sites. Using pre-blastoderm microinjection of a FLP recombinase helper expression vector, 32 G3 site-specific recombinant transgenic individuals were isolated from five of 143 broods. The average frequency of FLP recombinase-mediated site-specific excision in the two target strains genome was approximately 3.5%. This study shows that it is feasible to achieve site-specific recombination in silkworms using the FLP/FRT system. We conclude that the FLP/FRT system is a useful tool for genome manipulation in the silkworm. Furthermore, this is the first reported use of the FLP/FRT system for the genetic manipulation of a lepidopteran genome and thus provides a useful reference for the establishment of genome manipulation technologies in other lepidopteran species.

  5. Earthquake Ground Motion Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Nonlinear analyses of soils, structures, and soil-structure systems offer the potential for more accurate characterization of geotechnical and structural response under strong earthquake shaking. The increasing use of advanced performance-based desig...

  6. Simple procedure for evaluating earthquake response spectra of large-event motions based on site amplification factors derived from smaller-event records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, Kazuo; Miyakoshi, Jun-ichi; Yashiro, Kazuhiko.

    1996-01-01

    A primitive procedure was proposed for evaluating earthquake response spectra of large-event motions to make use of records from smaller events. The result of the regression analysis of the response spectra was utilized to obtain the site amplification factors in the proposed procedure, and the formulation of the seismic-source term in the regression analysis was examined. A linear form of the moment magnitude, Mw, is good for scaling the source term of moderate earthquakes with Mw of 5.5 to 7.0, while a quadratic form of Mw and the ω-square source-spectrum model is appropriate for scaling the source term of smaller and greater earthquakes, respectively. (author). 52 refs

  7. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-04-21

    The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable

  8. Continuous borehole strain and pore pressure in the near field of the 28 September 2004 M 6.0 parkfield, California, earthquake: Implications for nucleation, fault response, earthquake prediction and tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M.J.S.; Borcherdt, R.D.; Linde, A.T.; Gladwin, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Near-field observations of high-precision borehole strain and pore pressure, show no indication of coherent accelerating strain or pore pressure during the weeks to seconds before the 28 September 2004 M 6.0 Parkfield earthquake. Minor changes in strain rate did occur at a few sites during the last 24 hr before the earthquake but these changes are neither significant nor have the form expected for strain during slip coalescence initiating fault failure. Seconds before the event, strain is stable at the 10-11 level. Final prerupture nucleation slip in the hypocentral region is constrained to have a moment less than 2 ?? 1012 N m (M 2.2) and a source size less than 30 m. Ground displacement data indicate similar constraints. Localized rupture nucleation and runaway precludes useful prediction of damaging earthquakes. Coseismic dynamic strains of about 10 microstrain peak-to-peak were superimposed on volumetric strain offsets of about 0.5 microstrain to the northwest of the epicenter and about 0.2 microstrain to the southeast of the epicenter, consistent with right lateral slip. Observed strain and Global Positioning System (GPS) offsets can be simply fit with 20 cm of slip between 4 and 10 km on a 20-km segment of the fault north of Gold Hill (M0 = 7 ?? 1017 N m). Variable slip inversion models using GPS data and seismic data indicate similar moments. Observed postseismic strain is 60% to 300% of the coseismic strain, indicating incomplete release of accumulated strain. No measurable change in fault zone compliance preceding or following the earthquake is indicated by stable earth tidal response. No indications of strain change accompany nonvolcanic tremor events reported prior to and following the earthquake.

  9. Ground motion for the design basis earthquake at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina based on a deterministic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngs, R.R.; Coppersmith, K.J.; Silva, W.J.; Stephenson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    Ground motion assessments are presented for evaluation of the seismic safety of K-Reactor at the Savannah River Site. Two earthquake sources were identified as the most significant to seismic hazard at the site, a M 7.5 earthquake occurring at Charleston, South Carolina, and a M 5 event occurring in the site vicinity. These events control the low frequency and high frequency portions of the spectrum, respectively. Three major issues were identified in the assessment of ground motions for the Savannah River site; specification of the appropriate stress drop for the Charleston source earthquake, specification of the appropriate levels of soil damping at large depths for site response analyses, and the appropriateness of western US recordings for specification of ground motions in the eastern US

  10. 76 FR 59392 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... Welcome and Introductions, Committee Business Items: [cir] Approve October 12, 2011, Meeting Agenda, [cir... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico... meeting of the Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance and Remediation Committee and Waste Management...

  11. Design and integration of components for site specific control of fertilizer application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergeijk, van J.

    2001-01-01

    Keywords: Precision Agriculture, Site Specific Agriculture, Global Positioning System, GPS, Fertilizer Application, Information System.

    Spatial and temporal variability in soil, crop and climate characteristics results in non optimal use of fertilizers when the application

  12. 78 FR 14088 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  13. METHOD FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF SITE-SPECIFIC TAUTOMERIC AND ZWITTERIONIC MICROSPECIES EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe a method for the individual measurement of simultaneously occurring, unimolecular, site-specific “microequilibrium” constants as in, for example, prototropic tautomerism and zwitterionic equilibria. Our method represents an elaboration of that of Nygren et al. (Anal. ...

  14. Risks of all-cause and site-specific fractures among hospitalized patients with COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Kuang-Ming; Liang, Fu-Wen; Li, Chung-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high prevalence of osteoporosis. The clinical sequel of osteoporosis is fracture. Patients with COPD who experience a fracture also have increased morbidity and mortality. Currently, the types of all-cause and site-specific fracture among patients with COPD are unknown. Thus, we elucidated the all-cause and site-specific fractures among patients with COPD. A retrospective, population-based, cohort study was conducted u...

  15. Site-specific data confirm arsenic exposure predicted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, S; Griffin, S

    1998-01-01

    The EPA uses an exposure assessment model to estimate daily intake to chemicals of potential concern. At the Anaconda Superfund site in Montana, the EPA exposure assessment model was used to predict total and speciated urinary arsenic concentrations. Predicted concentrations were then compared to concentrations measured in children living near the site. When site-specific information on concentrations of arsenic in soil, interior dust, and diet, site-specific ingestion rates, and arsenic abso...

  16. Microbial profile comparisons of saliva, pooled and site-specific subgingival samples in periodontitis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Belstrøm

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare microbial profiles of saliva, pooled and site-specific subgingival samples in patients with periodontitis. We tested the hypotheses that saliva can be an alternative to pooled subgingival samples, when screening for presence of periopathogens.Site specific subgingival plaque samples (n = 54, pooled subgingival plaque samples (n = 18 and stimulated saliva samples (n = 18 were collected from 18 patients with generalized chronic periodontitis. Subgingival and salivary microbiotas were characterized by means of HOMINGS (Human Oral Microbe Identification using Next Generation Sequencing and microbial community profiles were compared using Spearman rank correlation coefficient.Pronounced intraindividual differences were recorded in site-specific microbial profiles, and site-specific information was in general not reflected by pooled subgingival samples. Presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Prevotella intermedia, Filifactor alocis, Tannerella forsythia and Parvimona micra in site-specific subgingival samples were detected in saliva with an AUC of 0.79 (sensitivity: 0.61, specificity: 0.94, compared to an AUC of 0.76 (sensitivity: 0.56, specificity: 0.94 in pooled subgingival samples.Site-specific presence of periodontal pathogens was detected with comparable accuracy in stimulated saliva samples and pooled subgingival plaque samples. Consequently, saliva may be a reasonable surrogate for pooled subgingival samples when screening for presence of periopathogens. Future large-scale studies are needed to confirm findings from this study.

  17. Site-Specific Covalent Conjugation of Modified mRNA by tRNA Guanine Transglycosylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, Fabian; Zhou, Cun Yu; Alexander, Seth C; Zhang, Dongyang; Devaraj, Neal K

    2018-03-05

    Modified mRNA (mod-mRNA) has recently been widely studied as the form of RNA useful for therapeutic applications due to its high stability and lowered immune response. Herein, we extend the scope of the recently established RNA-TAG (transglycosylation at guanosine) methodology, a novel approach for genetically encoded site-specific labeling of large mRNA transcripts, by employing mod-mRNA as substrate. As a proof of concept, we covalently attached a fluorescent probe to mCherry encoding mod-mRNA transcripts bearing 5-methylcytidine and/or pseudouridine substitutions with high labeling efficiencies. To provide a versatile labeling methodology with a wide range of possible applications, we employed a two-step strategy for functionalization of the mod-mRNA to highlight the therapeutic potential of this new methodology. We envision that this novel and facile labeling methodology of mod-RNA will have great potential in decorating both coding and noncoding therapeutic RNAs with a variety of diagnostic and functional moieties.

  18. Hanford Integrated Planning Process: 1993 Hanford Site-specific science and technology plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This document is the FY 1993 report on Hanford Site-specific science and technology (S ampersand T) needs for cleanup of the Site as developed via the Hanford Integrated Planning Process (HIPP). It identifies cleanup problems that lack demonstrated technology solutions and technologies that require additional development. Recommendations are provided regarding allocation of funding to address Hanford's highest-priority technology improvement needs, technology development needs, and scientific research needs, all compiled from a Sitewide perspective. In the past, the S ampersand T agenda for Hanford Site cleanup was sometimes driven by scientists and technologists, with minimal input from the ''problem owners'' (i.e., Westinghouse Hanford Company [WHC] staff who are responsible for cleanup activities). At other times, the problem-owners made decisions to proceed with cleanup without adequate scientific and technological inputs. Under both of these scenarios, there was no significant stakeholder involvement in the decision-making process. One of the key objectives of HIPP is to develop an understanding of the integrated S ampersand T requirements to support the cleanup mission, (a) as defined by the needs of the problem owners, the values of the stakeholders, and the technology development expertise that exists at Hanford and elsewhere. This requires a periodic, systematic assessment of these needs and values to appropriately define a comprehensive technology development program and a complementary scientific research program. Basic to our success is a methodology that is defensible from a technical perspective and acceptable to the stakeholders

  19. Site-specific waste management instruction for the field sampling organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Site-Specific Waste Management Instruction (SSWMI) provides guidance for the management of waste generated from field-sampling activities performed by the Environment Restoration Contractor (ERC) Sampling Organization that are not managed as part of a project SSWMI. Generally, the waste is unused preserved groundwater trip blanks, used and expired calibration solutions, and other similar waste that cannot be returned to an ERC project for disposal. The specific waste streams addressed by this SSWMI are identified in Section 2.0. This SSWMI was prepared in accordance with BHI-EE-02, Environmental Requirements. Waste generated from field sample collection activities should be returned to the project and managed in accordance with the applicable project-specific SSWMI whenever possible. However, returning all field sample collection and associated waste to a project for disposal may not always be practical or cost effective. Therefore, the ERC field sampling organization must manage and arrange to dispose of the waste using the (Bechtel Hanford, Inc. [BHI]) Field Support Waste Management (FSWM) services. This SSWMI addresses those waste streams that are the responsibility of the field sampling organization to manage and make arrangements for disposal

  20. Site specific plan. [Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchison, J.; Jernigan, G.

    1989-12-01

    The Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) covers the period for FY 1989 through FY 1995. The plan establishes a Department of Energy -- Headquarters (DOE-HQ) agenda for cleanup and compliance against which overall progress can be measured. The FYP covers three areas: Corrective Activities, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Operations. Corrective Activities are those activities necessary to bring active or standby facilities into compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulations. Environmental restoration activities include the assessment and cleanup of surplus facilities and inactive waste sites. Waste management operations includes the treatment, storage, and disposal of wastes which are generated as a result of ongoing operations. This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show how environmental restoration and waste management activities that were identified during the preparation of the FYP will be implemented, tracked, and reported. The SSP describes DOE Savannah River (DOE-SR) and operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), organizations that are responsible, for undertaking the activities identified in this plan. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. 8 refs., 46 figs., 23 tabs.

  1. Long-term responses of sandy beach crustaceans to the effects of coastal armouring after the 2010 Maule earthquake in South Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodil, Iván F.; Jaramillo, Eduardo; Acuña, Emilio; Manzano, Mario; Velasquez, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    Earthquakes and tsunamis are large physical disturbances frequently striking the coast of Chile with dramatic effects on intertidal habitats. Armouring structures built as societal responses to beach erosion and shoreline retreat are also responsible of coastal squeeze and habitat loss. The ecological implications of interactions between coastal armouring and earthquakes have recently started to be studied for beach ecosystems. How long interactive impacts persist is still unclear because monitoring after disturbance generally extends for a few months. During five years after the Maule earthquake (South Central Chile, February 27th 2010) we monitored the variability in population abundances of the most common crustacean inhabitants of different beach zones (i.e. upper, medium, and lower intertidal) at two armoured (one concrete seawall and one rocky revetment) and one unarmoured sites along the sandy beach of Llico. Beach morphology changed after the earthquake-mediated uplift, restoring upper- and mid-shore armoured levels that were rapidly colonized by typical crustacean species. However, post-earthquake increasing human activities affected the colonization process of sandy beach crustaceans in front of the seawall. Lower-shore crab Emerita analoga was the less affected by armouring structures, and it was the only crustacean species present at the three sites before and after the earthquake. This study shows that field sampling carried out promptly after major disturbances, and monitoring of the affected sites long after the disturbance is gone are effective approaches to increase the knowledge on the interactive effects of large-scale natural phenomena and artificial defences on beach ecology.

  2. Implications of the World Trade Center Health Program (WTCHP) for the public health response to the Great East Japan Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crane, Michael A.; Cho, Hyunje G.; Landrigan, Phillip J.

    2014-01-01

    The attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001 resulted in a serious burden of physical and mental illness for the 50,000 rescue workers that responded to 9/11 as well as the 400,000 residents and workers in the surrounding areas of New York City. The Zadroga Act of 2010 established the WTC Health Program (WTCHP) to provide monitoring and treatment of WTC exposure-related conditions and health surveillance for the responder and survivor populations. Several reports have highlighted the applicability of insights gained from the WTCHP to the public health response to the Great East Japan Earthquake. Optimal exposure monitoring processes and attention to the welfare of vulnerable exposed sub-groups are critical aspects of the response to both incidents. The ongoing mental health care concerns of 9/11 patients accentuate the need for accessible and appropriately skilled mental health care in Fukushima. Active efforts to demonstrate transparency and to promote community involvement in the public health response will be highly important in establishing successful long-term monitoring and treatment programs for the exposed populations in Fukushima. (author)

  3. Site-specific differences of insulin action in adipose tissue derived from normal prepubertal children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grohmann, Malcolm; Stewart, Claire; Welsh, Gavin; Hunt, Linda; Tavare, Jeremy; Holly, Jeff; Shield, Julian; Sabin, Matt; Crowne, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Body fat distribution determines obesity-related morbidity in adults but little is known of the aetiology or pathophysiology in children. This study investigates differences in insulin-mediated metabolism in primary cell cultures of subcutaneous and visceral preadipocytes derived from prepubertal children. The impact of differentiation and responses to TNFα exposure was also investigated. Proliferation rates were greater in subcutaneous versus visceral preadipocytes (41 h(3) versus 69 h(4); P = 0.008). Insulin caused a dose-dependent increase in GSK-3 phosphorylation and an increase in MAPK phosphorylation over time, with increased sensitivity in subcutaneous preadipocytes. Post-differentiation, dose-dependent increases in GSK-3 phosphorylation were maintained, while MAPK phosphorylation was identical in both subtypes. No changes were observed in insulin receptor abundance pre-/post-differentiation. GLUT4 abundance was significantly increased in visceral versus subcutaneous adipocytes by 76(4)%; P = 0.03), coincidental with increased insulin-stimulated 2-deoxy-glucose transport (+150(26)% versus +79(10)%; P = 0.014) and further elevated by acute exposure to TNFα (+230(52)%; P = 0.019 versus +123(24)%; P = 0.025, respectively). TNFα also significantly increased basal glucose transport rates (+44(14)%; P = 0.006 versus +34(11)%; P = 0.007) and GLUT1 localisation to the plasma membrane. These data establish site-specific differences in subcutaneous and visceral fat cells from children. Responses to insulin varied with differentiation and TNFα exposure in the two depots, consistent with parallel changes in GLUT1/4 abundance and localisation

  4. The role of complex site and basin response in Wellington city, New Zealand, during the 2016 Mw 7.8 Kaikōura earthquake and other recent earthquake sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, A. E.; McVerry, G.; Wotherspoon, L.; Bradley, B.; Gerstenberger, M.; Benites, R. A.; Bruce, Z.; Bourguignon, S.; Giallini, S.; Hill, M.

    2017-12-01

    We present analysis of ground motion and complex amplification characteristics in Wellington during recent earthquake sequences and an overview of the 3D basin characterization and ongoing work to update site parameters for seismic design. Significant damage was observed in central Wellington, New Zealand's capital city, following the 2016 Mw7.8 Kaikōura earthquake. Damage was concentrated in mid-rise structures (5 - 15 storeys) and was clearly exacerbated by the particular characteristics of ground motion and the presence of basin effects. Due to the distance of the source (50 - 60km) from the central city, peak ground accelerations were moderate (up to 0.28g) and well within ultimate limit state (ULS) design levels. However, spectral accelerations within the 1 -2 s period range, exceeded 1 in 500 year design level spectra (ULS) in deeper parts of the basin. Amplification with respect to rock at these locations reached factors of up to 7, and was also observed with factors up to at least three across all central city soil recording sites. The ground motions in Wellington were the strongest recorded in the modern era of instrumentation. While similar amplification was observed during the 2013 Mw 6.6 Cook Strait and Grassmere earthquakes, which struck close to the termination of the Kaikōura earthquake rupture, these sources were not sufficiently large to excite significant long-period motions. However, other M7.2+ sources in the region that dominate the seismic hazard, e.g. Wellington Fault, Hikurangi subduction interface and other large proximal crustal faults, are also potentially capable of exciting significant long-period basin response in Wellington. These observations and the expectation of ongoing heightened seismicity have prompted re-evaluation of the current seismic demand levels. Additional field campaigns have also been undertaken to update geotechnical properties and the 3D basin model, in order to inform ongoing research and seismic design practice.

  5. Seismic response and resistance capacity of 'as built' WWER 440-230 NPP Kozloduy: Verification of the results by experiments and real earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachanski, S.

    1993-01-01

    Although Kozloduy NPP units 1 and 2 were not designed for earthquakes they have withstood successfully the Vrancea Earthquake in 1977 with sire peak ground acceleration of 83 sm/s 2 . Both units as well as units 3 and 4 were later recalculated for maximum peak acceleration of 0.1 g. According to values calculated by two-dimensional model, in 1980 reactor buildings had sufficient earthquake resistance capacity for the accepted design seismic excitation. The non symmetric design of WWER-440 structures in plan and elevation, the large eccentricity between the center of rigidities and masses as well as technological connections between the separate substructures and units led to complicated space response and rotational effects which cannot be calculated by two-dimensional models. Three dimensional detailed 'as built' mathematical models were established and verified by series of experiments and real earthquake for: detailed analysis of 'as built' structural response, comparing the results of two and three dimensional models, detailed analyses of seismic safety margins

  6. Emergency response of Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station during the Great East Japan Earthquake and its lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    At the time of the occurrence of the Great East Japan Earthquake, Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station (hereinafter, Fukushima Daini) was operating four units of BWRS-5 type plants with an output of 1,100 MWe/unit. Among these plants, No. 1, 2, and 4 Units lost all the functions of heat removal equipment of reactors affected by tsunami. However, ad-hoc activities such as the exchange of submerged motors and temporary power installation allowed the recovery of residual heat removal (RHR) system, leading to a success in cold shutdown. This is a success story more than expectation in dealing with emergency situations, but not necessarily all of the correspondences were successfully carried out, leaving some problems. As lessons, the following are pointed out: (1) confirmation of the damage situation of the site and setting of priority rank of recovery, (2) securement of the means that do not depend on initial on-site activities, and (3) possession at the site of the skills of emergency restoration, equipment diagnostic technology, and repair technology. With reflecting lessons and challenges in these correspondences, Tokyo Electric Power Company is working to improve the accident response capability of the organization including Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station. As an example of effort of emergency response capability strengthening, there is an application of the US Incident Management System (IMS). The company is continuously making efforts for improving safety through training. (A.O.)

  7. Bifunctional chelating agent for the design and development of site specific radiopharmaceuticals and biomolecule conjugation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Prabhu, Kandikere R.; Gali, Hariprasad; Pillarsetty, Nagavara Kishore; Volkert, Wynn A.

    2003-10-21

    There is provided a method of labeling a biomolecule with a transition metal or radiometal in a site specific manner to produce a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical compound by synthesizing a P.sub.2 N.sub.2 -bifunctional chelating agent intermediate, complexing the intermediate with a radio metal or a transition metal, and covalently linking the resulting metal-complexed bifunctional chelating agent with a biomolecule in a site specific manner. Also provided is a method of synthesizing the --PR.sub.2 containing biomolecules by synthesizing a P.sub.2 N.sub.2 -bifunctional chelating agent intermediate, complexing the intermediate with a radiometal or a transition metal, and covalently linking the resulting radio metal-complexed bifunctional chelating agent with a biomolecule in a site specific manner. There is provided a therapeutic or diagnostic agent comprising a --PR.sub.2 containing biomolecule.

  8. Site-Specific Bioorthogonal Labeling for Fluorescence Imaging of Intracellular Proteins in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tao; Hang, Howard C

    2016-11-02

    Over the past years, fluorescent proteins (e.g., green fluorescent proteins) have been widely utilized to visualize recombinant protein expression and localization in live cells. Although powerful, fluorescent protein tags are limited by their relatively large sizes and potential perturbation to protein function. Alternatively, site-specific labeling of proteins with small-molecule organic fluorophores using bioorthogonal chemistry may provide a more precise and less perturbing method. This approach involves site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) into proteins via genetic code expansion, followed by bioorthogonal chemical labeling with small organic fluorophores in living cells. While this approach has been used to label extracellular proteins for live cell imaging studies, site-specific bioorthogonal labeling and fluorescence imaging of intracellular proteins in live cells is still challenging. Herein, we systematically evaluate site-specific incorporation of diastereomerically pure bioorthogonal UAAs bearing stained alkynes or alkenes into intracellular proteins for inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions with tetrazine-functionalized fluorophores for live cell labeling and imaging in mammalian cells. Our studies show that site-specific incorporation of axial diastereomer of trans-cyclooct-2-ene-lysine robustly affords highly efficient and specific bioorthogonal labeling with monosubstituted tetrazine fluorophores in live mammalian cells, which enabled us to image the intracellular localization and real-time dynamic trafficking of IFITM3, a small membrane-associated protein with only 137 amino acids, for the first time. Our optimized UAA incorporation and bioorthogonal labeling conditions also enabled efficient site-specific fluorescence labeling of other intracellular proteins for live cell imaging studies in mammalian cells.

  9. Environmental restoration and waste management site-specific plan for Richland Operations Office. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    This document was prepared to implement and support the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) national plan. The national plan, entitled Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (DOE 1990b) (hereinafter referred to as the DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan) is the cornerstone of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) long-term strategy in environmental restoration and waste management. The DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan addresses overall philosophy and environmental and waste-related activities under the responsibilities of the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. The plan also reaffirms DOE-HQ goals to bring its nuclear sites into environmental compliance in cooperation with its regulators and the public, and to clean up and restore the environment by 2019 (the commitment for the Hanford Site is for one year sooner, or 2018). This document is part of the site-specific plan for the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). It is the first revision of the original plan, which was dated December 1989 (DOE-RL 1989a). This document is a companion document to the Overview of the Hanford Cleanup Five-Year Plan (DOE-RL 1989d) and The Hanford Site Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan Activity Data Sheets (DOE-RL 1991). Although there are three documents that make up the complete DOE-RL plan, this detailed information volume was prepared so it could be used as a standalone document. 71 refs., 40 figs., 28 tabs.

  10. Environmental restoration and waste management site-specific plan for Richland Operations Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This document was prepared to implement and support the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) national plan. The national plan, entitled Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (DOE 1990b) (hereinafter referred to as the DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan) is the cornerstone of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) long-term strategy in environmental restoration and waste management. The DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan addresses overall philosophy and environmental and waste-related activities under the responsibilities of the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. The plan also reaffirms DOE-HQ goals to bring its nuclear sites into environmental compliance in cooperation with its regulators and the public, and to clean up and restore the environment by 2019 (the commitment for the Hanford Site is for one year sooner, or 2018). This document is part of the site-specific plan for the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). It is the first revision of the original plan, which was dated December 1989 (DOE-RL 1989a). This document is a companion document to the Overview of the Hanford Cleanup Five-Year Plan (DOE-RL 1989d) and The Hanford Site Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan Activity Data Sheets (DOE-RL 1991). Although there are three documents that make up the complete DOE-RL plan, this detailed information volume was prepared so it could be used as a standalone document. 71 refs., 40 figs., 28 tabs

  11. A method to determine site-specific, anisotropic fracture toughness in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtle, Sabine; Özcoban, Hüseyin; Yilmaz, Ezgi D.; Fett, Theo; Rizzi, Gabriele; Lilleodden, Erica T.; Huber, Norbert; Schreyer, Andreas; Swain, Michael V.; Schneider, Gerold A.

    2012-01-01

    Many biological materials are hierarchically structured, with highly anisotropic structures and properties on several length scales. To characterize the mechanical properties of such materials, detailed testing methods are required that allow precise and site-specific measurements on several length scales. We propose a fracture toughness measurement technique based on notched focused ion beam prepared cantilevers of lower and medium micron size scales. Using this approach, site-specific fracture toughness values in dental enamel were determined. The usefulness and challenges of the method are discussed.

  12. Site-Specific Atmospheric Dispersion Characteristics of Korean Nuclear Power Plant Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, M. H.; Kim, E. H.; Suh, K. S.; Hwang, W. T.; Choi, Y. G.

    2001-01-01

    Site-specific atmospheric dispersion characteristics have been analyzed. The northwest and the southwest wind prevail on nuclear sites of Korea. The annual isobaric surface averaged for twenty years around Korean peninsula shows that west wind prevails. The prevailing west wind is profitable in the viewpoint of radiation protection because three of four nuclear sites are located in the east side. Large scale field tracer experiments over nuclear sites have been conducted for the purpose of analyzing the atmospheric dispersion characteristics and validating a real-time atmospheric dispersion and dose assessment system FADAS. To analyze the site-specific atmospheric dispersion characteristics is essential for making effective countermeasures against a nuclear emergency

  13. Versatile and Efficient Site-Specific Protein Functionalization by Tubulin Tyrosine Ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Dominik; Helma, Jonas; Mann, Florian A; Pichler, Garwin; Natale, Francesco; Krause, Eberhard; Cardoso, M Cristina; Hackenberger, Christian P R; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2015-11-09

    A novel chemoenzymatic approach for simple and fast site-specific protein labeling is reported. Recombinant tubulin tyrosine ligase (TTL) was repurposed to attach various unnatural tyrosine derivatives as small bioorthogonal handles to proteins containing a short tubulin-derived recognition sequence (Tub-tag). This novel strategy enables a broad range of high-yielding and fast chemoselective C-terminal protein modifications on isolated proteins or in cell lysates for applications in biochemistry, cell biology, and beyond, as demonstrated by the site-specific labeling of nanobodies, GFP, and ubiquitin. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Drainage filter technologies to mitigate site-specific phosphorus losses in agricultural drainage discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Heckrath, Goswin Johann; Canga, Eriona

    in drainage. The Danish “SUPREME-TECH” project (2010-2016) (www.supreme-tech.dk) aims at providing the scientific basis for developing cost-effective filter technologies for P in agricultural drainage waters. The project studies different approaches of implementing filter technologies including drainage well....... Targeting high risk areas of P loss and applying site-specific measures promises to be a cost-efficient approach. The Danish Commission for Nature and Agriculture has, therefore, now called for a paradigm shift towards targeted, cost-efficient technologies to mitigate site-specific nutrient losses...... environmental threshold values (

  15. Accounting for both local aquatic community composition and bioavailability in setting site-specific quality standards for zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Adam; Simpson, Peter; Moccia, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen considerable improvement in water quality standards (QS) for metals by taking account of the effect of local water chemistry conditions on their bioavailability. We describe preliminary efforts to further refine water quality standards, by taking account of the composition of the local ecological community (the ultimate protection objective) in addition to bioavailability. Relevance of QS to the local ecological community is critical as it is important to minimise instances where quality classification using QS does not reconcile with a quality classification based on an assessment of the composition of the local ecology (e.g. using benthic macroinvertebrate quality assessment metrics such as River InVertebrate Prediction and Classification System (RIVPACS)), particularly where ecology is assessed to be at good or better status, whilst chemical quality is determined to be failing relevant standards. The alternative approach outlined here describes a method to derive a site-specific species sensitivity distribution (SSD) based on the ecological community which is expected to be present at the site in the absence of anthropogenic pressures (reference conditions). The method combines a conventional laboratory ecotoxicity dataset normalised for bioavailability with field measurements of the response of benthic macroinvertebrate abundance to chemical exposure. Site-specific QSref are then derived from the 5%ile of this SSD. Using this method, site QSref have been derived for zinc in an area impacted by historic mining activities. Application of QSref can result in greater agreement between chemical and ecological metrics of environmental quality compared with the use of either conventional (QScon) or bioavailability-based QS (QSbio). In addition to zinc, the approach is likely to be applicable to other metals and possibly other types of chemical stressors (e.g. pesticides). However, the methodology for deriving site-specific targets requires

  16. Facilitating Site Specific and Citizens Advisory Boards: Running Effective Meetings that Involve Complex Technical Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental cleanup issues at federal sites are more often than not on the agendas of meetings of the Site Specific Advisory Boards (SSABs), also called Citizens Advisory Boards (CABs), that exist at most U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites with an Environmental Management (EM) mission. In 1994, when Congress established these committees comprised of local citizens, it enabled community stakeholders to become more directly involved in DOE EM cleanup decisions. This involvement is to help the agency make cost-effective and environmentally sound decisions which lead to faster, safer cleanups. Eight local Boards that fall under the Federal Advisory Committee Act-chartered EM SSAB charter are found in Hanford, Washington; Idaho; Northern New Mexico; Nevada; Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. These boards provide advice and recommendations about EM site-specific issues such as cleanup standards (how clean is clean?), environmental restoration, waste management, the stabilization and disposal of non-stockpile nuclear materials, future land use and long-term stewardship, risk assessment and management, and cleanup science and technology activities. These issues are, by their very nature, loaded with complicated technical terms and strategies, scientific data and interpretations, and long histories of studies and reports. The members of SSABs and CABs rotate on and off the Boards according to defined terms of office, thereby routinely opening the Boards' ranks to new members, many of whom are new to the issues. In addition, members of the public who have access to public comment periods at each Board meeting run up against the same daunting menu of obscure acronyms, scientific terms and notations, and an historical trail which is not always evident except to those involved with the issues over many years. How does a facilitator effectively guide such a group of citizens, each of whom arrives to

  17. Seismic Responses of Shot Span Bridge under Three Different Patterns of Earthquake Excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Daochuan; Chen Guorong; Lu Yan

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the influence of three different types of seismic input methods on the longitudinal seismic response of a short, three-span, variable cross-section, reinforced concrete bridge. Research progress of the seismic model is introduced briefly. Finite element model is created for the bridge and time history analysis conducted. Three different types of illustrative excitations are considered: 1) the EI-Centro seismic wave is used as uniform excitations at all bridge supports; 2) fixed apparent wave velocity is used for response analysis of traveling wave excitations on the bridge; 3) conforming to a selected coherency model, the multiple seismic excitation time histories considering spatially variable effects are generated. The contrast study of the response analysis result under the three different seismic excitations is conducted and the influence of different seismic input methods is studied. The comparative analysis of the bridge model shows that the uniform ground motion input can not provide conservative seismic demands-in a number of cases it results in lower response than that predicted by multiple seismic excitations. The result of uniform excitation and traveling wave excitation shows very small difference. Consequently, multiple seismic excitations needs to be applied at the bridge supports for response analysis of short span bridge.

  18. 76 FR 24831 - Site-Specific Analyses for Demonstrating Compliance With Subpart C Performance Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ...-level radioactive waste disposal facilities to conduct site-specific analyses to demonstrate compliance... public health and safety, these amendments would enhance the safe disposal of low-level radioactive waste... would be to enhance the safe disposal of low-level radioactive waste. The NRC is also proposing...

  19. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Site Specific Management Plan for the Hellsgate Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Matthew T.; Judd, Steven L.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains a detailed site-specific management plan for the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project. The report provides background information about the mitigation process, the review process, mitigation acquisitions, Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) and mitigation crediting, current habitat conditions, desired future habitat conditions, restoration/enhancements efforts and maps.

  20. Recent advances in covalent, site-specific protein immobilization [version 1; referees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meldal, Morten Peter; Schoffelen, Sanne

    2016-01-01

    The properties of biosensors, biomedical implants, and other materials based on immobilized proteins greatly depend on the method employed to couple the protein molecules to their solid support. Covalent, site-specific immobilization strategies are robust and can provide the level of control...

  1. 30 CFR 46.11 - Site-specific hazard awareness training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 46.11 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND... workers; (4) Customers, including commercial over-the-road truck drivers; (5) Construction workers or... procedures. The training must address site-specific health and safety risks, such as unique geologic or...

  2. Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe past, present, and future activities undertaken to implement Environmental Restoration and Waste Management goals at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Environmental Restoration description of activities, resources, and milestones

  3. 75 FR 64718 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... Test Site including decontamination, closure, re-use and/or demolition. Purpose of the Soils Committee: The purpose of the Committee is to focus on issues related to soil contamination at the Nevada Test... Industrial Sites and Soils Committees of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB...

  4. 76 FR 5365 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... Industrial Sites and Soils Committees of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB... sites at the Nevada National Security Site including decontamination, closure, re-use and/or demolition. Purpose of the Soils Committee: The purpose of the Committee is to focus on issues related to soil...

  5. 75 FR 71677 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... Industrial Sites and Soils Committees of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB... sites at the Nevada Test Site including decontamination, closure, re-use and/or demolition. Purpose of the Soils Committee: The purpose of the Committee is to focus on issues related to soil contamination...

  6. Deconstructing thermodynamic parameters of a coupled system from site-specific observables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sandipan; Chanda, Baron

    2010-11-02

    Cooperative interactions mediate information transfer between structural domains of a protein molecule and are major determinants of protein function and modulation. The prevalent theories to understand the thermodynamic origins of cooperativity have been developed to reproduce the complex behavior of a global thermodynamic observable such as ligand binding or enzyme activity. However, in most cases the measurement of a single global observable cannot uniquely define all the terms that fully describe the energetics of the system. Here we establish a theoretical groundwork for analyzing protein thermodynamics using site-specific information. Our treatment involves extracting a site-specific parameter (defined as χ value) associated with a structural unit. We demonstrate that, under limiting conditions, the χ value is related to the direct interaction terms associated with the structural unit under observation and its intrinsic activation energy. We also introduce a site-specific interaction energy term (χ(diff)) that is a function of the direct interaction energy of that site with every other site in the system. When combined with site-directed mutagenesis and other molecular level perturbations, analyses of χ values of site-specific observables may provide valuable insights into protein thermodynamics and structure.

  7. 40 CFR 170.232 - Knowledge of labeling and site-specific information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Knowledge of labeling and site-specific information. 170.232 Section 170.232 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS WORKER PROTECTION STANDARD Standard for Pesticide Handlers § 170.232 Knowledge...

  8. Integration of aerial imaging and variable-rate technology for site-specific aerial herbicide application

    Science.gov (United States)

    As remote sensing and variable rate technology are becoming more available for aerial applicators, practical methodologies on effective integration of these technologies are needed for site-specific aerial applications of crop production and protection materials. The objectives of this study were to...

  9. Microbial profile comparisons of saliva, pooled and site-specific subgingival samples in periodontitis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Sembler-Møller, Maria Lynn; Grande, Maria Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    by pooled subgingival samples. Presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Prevotella intermedia, Filifactor alocis, Tannerella forsythia and Parvimona micra in site-specific subgingival samples were detected in saliva with an AUC of 0.79 (sensitivity: 0.61, specificity: 0.94), compared...

  10. Potentials for site-specific design of MW sized wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, K.; Fuglsang, P.; Schepers, G.

    2001-01-01

    The potential for site specific design of MW sized wind turbines is quantified by comparing design loads for wind turbines installed at a range of different sites. The sites comprise on-shore normal flat terrain stand-alone conditions and wind farm conditions together with offshore and mountainous...

  11. 78 FR 26005 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  12. 78 FR 73519 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  13. 78 FR 45518 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  14. 78 FR 58294 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  15. 78 FR 38969 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  16. 78 FR 23760 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Nevada. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  17. 78 FR 61348 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ...On September 16, 2013, in FR Doc. 2013-22453, on page 56871, the Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice of open meeting announcing a meeting on October 2, 2013 of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth (78 FR 56871). This notice announces the cancellation of this meeting.

  18. 78 FR 65979 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  19. 77 FR 50488 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  20. 78 FR 12746 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Oak Ridge Reservation. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  1. 78 FR 40130 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. No. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  2. 78 FR 75552 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Oak Ridge Reservation. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  3. 77 FR 65374 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  4. 78 FR 17192 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Nevada. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  5. 78 FR 44942 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Oak Ridge Reservation. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  6. 77 FR 31837 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. No. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  7. 78 FR 63172 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  8. 77 FR 2713 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Hanford. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  9. 77 FR 26273 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  10. 77 FR 24695 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. . 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  11. 77 FR 55813 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB) Chairs. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  12. 77 FR 47047 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  13. 78 FR 49738 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Oak Ridge Reservation. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  14. 78 FR 64208 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB) Chairs. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. No. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  15. 77 FR 28368 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Hanford. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  16. 77 FR 18243 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Oak Ridge Reservation. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  17. 78 FR 54460 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  18. 77 FR 60688 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  19. 78 FR 17648 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Oak Ridge Reservation. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  20. 77 FR 18242 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB) Chairs. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  1. 78 FR 23241 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Oak Ridge Reservation. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  2. 78 FR 46330 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Nevada. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  3. 78 FR 25064 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-29

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  4. 78 FR 38305 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  5. 78 FR 69657 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  6. 77 FR 49442 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Oak Ridge Reservation. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  7. 77 FR 13104 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  8. 77 FR 53192 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  9. 77 FR 39235 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  10. 77 FR 58364 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Oak Ridge Reservation. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  11. 78 FR 78952 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  12. 77 FR 16021 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  13. 78 FR 16260 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. No. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  14. 77 FR 76475 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  15. 78 FR 30911 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Oak Ridge Reservation. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. No. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  16. 78 FR 22255 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  17. 78 FR 716 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  18. 78 FR 32640 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  19. 77 FR 45345 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Oak Ridge Reservation. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  20. 77 FR 24694 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Nevada. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  1. 78 FR 49739 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  2. 78 FR 16260 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ...On March 4, 2013, the Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice of open meeting announcing a meeting on March 25-26, 2013 of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site (78 FR 14088). This document makes a correction to that notice.

  3. 78 FR 10611 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  4. 78 FR 68431 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Hanford. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. No. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  5. 78 FR 54461 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  6. 77 FR 2714 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Oak Ridge Reservation. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  7. 77 FR 4799 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  8. 77 FR 53193 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Savannah River Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Savannah River Site. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  9. 78 FR 26635 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ...On April 29, 2013, the Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice of open meeting announcing a meeting on May 16, 2013 of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah (78 FR 25064). This document makes a correction to that notice.

  10. 78 FR 7767 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  11. 78 FR 53135 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Nevada. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  12. 77 FR 49442 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Nevada. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. No. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  13. 77 FR 63300 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-16

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  14. 78 FR 3890 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Oak Ridge Reservation. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  15. 78 FR 4139 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Hanford. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  16. 78 FR 20311 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ...This notice announces a webinar of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB) Chairs. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this webinar be announced in the Federal Register.

  17. 77 FR 64112 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Hanford. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. No. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  18. 78 FR 63171 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Oak Ridge Reservation; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Oak Ridge Reservation. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  19. 77 FR 39234 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Nevada. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  20. 78 FR 58292 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Oak Ridge Reservation. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  1. 77 FR 74836 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Oak Ridge Reservation. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  2. 77 FR 22566 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  3. 78 FR 64932 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Nevada. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  4. 78 FR 63171 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  5. 78 FR 28207 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Hanford. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  6. 78 FR 49738 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Hanford. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  7. 77 FR 39234 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  8. 78 FR 30910 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  9. 78 FR 36543 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  10. 77 FR 16021 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Nevada. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  11. 78 FR 23759 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  12. 78 FR 59012 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB) Chairs. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  13. 78 FR 56871 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  14. 77 FR 76475 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  15. 76 FR 18921 - Land Disposal Restrictions: Nevada and California; Site Specific Treatment Variances for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... final actions to both issue a site- specific treatment variance to U.S. Ecology Nevada (USEN) in Beatty... Facility is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays. The... action and anticipate no adverse comment. Based on the information and data submitted by the petitioner...

  16. Creating prescription maps from satellite imagery for site-specific management of cotton root rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton root rot is a century-old cotton disease that can now be controlled with Topguard Terra Fungicide. However, as this disease tends to occur in the same general areas within fields year after year, site-specific treatment can be more effective and economical. The objective of this study was to ...

  17. Site-specific management of cotton root rot using historical remote sensing imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton root rot can now be effectively controlled with Topguard Terra Fungicide, but site-specific application of the fungicide can greatly reduce treatment cost as only portions of the field are infested with the disease. The overall goal of this three-year project was to demonstrate how to use his...

  18. Summary of some feasibility studies for site-specific solar industrial process heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    Some feasibility studies for several different site specific solar industrial process heat applications are summarized. The followng applications are examined. Leather Tanning; Concrete Production: Lumber and Paper Processing; Milk Processing; Molding, Curing or Drying; Automobile Manufacture; and Food Processing and Preparation. For each application, site and process data, system design, and performance and cost estimates are summarized.

  19. Site Specific Waste Management Instruction for the 116-F-4 soil storage unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, G.G.

    1996-08-01

    This Site Specific Waste Management Instruction provides guidance for management of waste generated during the excavation and remediation of soil and debris from the 116-4 soil storage unit located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This document outlines the waste management practices that will be performed in the field to implement federal, state, and US Department of Energy requirements

  20. Development and application of bioassays for a site-specific risk assessment of contaminated soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rila, J.-P.

    2008-01-01

    Soil risk assessment based on generic approaches is accompanied by a large number of uncertainties. In site-specific risk assessment aimed at identifying the actual effects on the ecosystem by using e.g. bioassays in soil elutriates and taking into account land-use these uncertainties can be largely

  1. Appreciating "Thirdspace": An Alternative Way of Viewing and Valuing Site-Specific Dance Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munjee, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Site-specific dance performance involves the presentation of choreography in connection with a site. The context of the site combined with a viewer's personal history, beliefs, and identity impact the reading and appreciation of the performance. Although both stage and site dance performance valuing elicit multiple interpretations of artistic…

  2. Selective pressures to maintain attachment site specificity of integrative and conjugative elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla L Menard

    Full Text Available Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs are widespread mobile genetic elements that are usually found integrated in bacterial chromosomes. They are important agents of evolution and contribute to the acquisition of new traits, including antibiotic resistances. ICEs can excise from the chromosome and transfer to recipients by conjugation. Many ICEs are site-specific in that they integrate preferentially into a primary attachment site in the bacterial genome. Site-specific ICEs can also integrate into secondary locations, particularly if the primary site is absent. However, little is known about the consequences of integration of ICEs into alternative attachment sites or what drives the apparent maintenance and prevalence of the many ICEs that use a single attachment site. Using ICEBs1, a site-specific ICE from Bacillus subtilis that integrates into a tRNA gene, we found that integration into secondary sites was detrimental to both ICEBs1 and the host cell. Excision of ICEBs1 from secondary sites was impaired either partially or completely, limiting the spread of ICEBs1. Furthermore, induction of ICEBs1 gene expression caused a substantial drop in proliferation and cell viability within three hours. This drop was dependent on rolling circle replication of ICEBs1 that was unable to excise from the chromosome. Together, these detrimental effects provide selective pressure against the survival and dissemination of ICEs that have integrated into alternative sites and may explain the maintenance of site-specific integration for many ICEs.

  3. Response of a 42-storey steel-frame building to the Ms = 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, E.

    1993-01-01

    A set of 14 acceleration records was obtained from a 42-storey steel-frame building, the Chevron Building, in San Francisco during the Ms = 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake of 17 October 1989. Data were analysed using a system identification method based on the discretetime linear filtering, and the least-squares estimation techniques. The results show that the response of the building is dominated by two modes: a translational mode in the weaker (southwest-northeast) principal direction of the building at 0.16 Hz with 5% damping, and a translational-torsional mode along the east-west diagonal of the building's cross-section at 0.20 Hz with 7% damping. There are significant contributions from higher modes at 0.54 Hz, 0.62 Hz, 1.02 Hz and 1.09 Hz. All the modes incorporate some torsion, but the amplitudes of torsional components are small, about 10% of translational amplitudes. Soil-structure interaction influences the vibrations near 1.0 Hz. The contribution of soil-structure interaction to the peak displacements of the building is significant, particularly at lower floors. ?? 1993.

  4. Damping scaling factors for elastic response spectra for shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions: "average" horizontal component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Bozorgnia, Yousef; Idriss, I.M.; Abrahamson, Norman; Campbell, Kenneth; Silva, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) for elastic response spectra are typically developed at a 5% viscous damping ratio. In reality, however, structural and nonstructural systems can have other damping ratios. This paper develops a new model for a damping scaling factor (DSF) that can be used to adjust the 5% damped spectral ordinates predicted by a GMPE for damping ratios between 0.5% to 30%. The model is developed based on empirical data from worldwide shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions. Dependencies of the DSF on potential predictor variables, such as the damping ratio, spectral period, ground motion duration, moment magnitude, source-to-site distance, and site conditions, are examined. The strong influence of duration is captured by the inclusion of both magnitude and distance in the DSF model. Site conditions show weak influence on the DSF. The proposed damping scaling model provides functional forms for the median and logarithmic standard deviation of DSF, and is developed for both RotD50 and GMRotI50 horizontal components. A follow-up paper develops a DSF model for vertical ground motion.

  5. The immune response to corneal allograft requires a site-specific draininglymph node

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plšková, Jarmila; Duncan, L.; Holáň, Vladimír; Filipec, M.; Kraal, G.; Forrester, J. V.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 2 (2002), s. 210-215 ISSN 0041-1337 R&D Projects: GA MZd NI6019 Grant - others:NATO CRG(GB) LG972853 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM 111100005 Keywords : corneal allograft * lymph nodes Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.265, year: 2002

  6. Health education and promotion at the site of an emergency: experience from the Chinese Wenchuan earthquake response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiangyang; Zhao, Genming; Cao, Dequan; Wang, Duoquan; Wang, Liang

    2016-03-01

    Theories and strategies of social mobilization, capacity building, mass and interpersonal communication, as well as risk communication and behavioral change were used to develop health education and promotion campaigns to decrease and prevent injuries and infectious diseases among the survivors of the Wenchuan earthquake in May 2008. We evaluated the effectiveness of the campaigns and short-term interventions using mixed-methods. The earthquake survivors' health knowledge, skills, and practice improved significantly with respect to injury protection, food and water safety, environmental and personal hygiene, and disease prevention. No infectious disease outbreaks were reported after the earthquake, and the epidemic level was lower than before the earthquake. After a short-term intervention among the students of Leigu Township Primary and Junior School, the proportion of those with personal hygiene increased from 59.7% to 98.3% (pearthquakes play an important role in preventing injuries and infectious diseases among survivors. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Simulating Earthquake Rupture and Off-Fault Fracture Response: Application to the Safety Assessment of the Swedish Nuclear Waste Repository

    KAUST Repository

    Falth, B.; Hokmark, H.; Lund, B.; Mai, Paul Martin; Roberts, R.; Munier, R.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the long-term safety of a deep repository of spent nuclear fuel, upper bound estimates of seismically induced secondary fracture shear displacements are needed. For this purpose, we analyze a model including an earthquake fault, which

  8. Dynamic characteristics and structural response of the SWR 1000 under earthquake loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielor, E.; Brettschuh, W.; Krutzik, N.J.; Tropp, R.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the conceptual design documentation of the SWR 1000 reactor building as well as specified representative seismological, and soil-dynamic input data, corresponding to prospective sites as a basis, the dynamic characteristics, as well as the in-structure dynamic response of the coupled vibrating structures have been elaborated. The structural design analysis was based on a 3-dimensional mathematical model of the building in which all details of the internal structures as well as the containment including the water in the pools were represented adequately. In order to demonstrate the influence of the soil-structure interaction effects on the dynamic response results, the soil was represented by two different assumptions. At first, considering the state of the art procedures, assuming frequency independent soil capabilities (equivalent stiffnesses and damping values), time domain calculations were carried out. In the second step, based on the frequency-dependency of the soil capabilities, frequency domain calculations were performed. The structural responses obtained by means of both procedures and the same mathematical model of the structures were evaluated and compared. The suitability of the preliminary design concept are discussed and the structural response results obtained on the basis of the bearing capacity and the stresses in the characteristic regions of the structure

  9. Towards smart building structures : adaptive structures in earthquake and wind loading control response – a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales-Beltran, M.; Teuffel, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    This article is a review about applications for non-passive control response of buildings (namely active, hybrid and semi-active systems), wherein the degree of integration between control devices and structural system is explored. The purpose is to establish the current state-of-the-art in the

  10. Strong Earthquake Motion Estimates for Three Sites on the U.C. Riverside Campus; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archuleta, R.; Elgamal, A.; Heuze, F.; Lai, T.; Lavalle, D.; Lawrence, B.; Liu, P.C.; Matesic, L.; Park, S.; Riemar, M.; Steidl, J.; Vucetic, M.; Wagoner, J.; Yang, Z.

    2000-01-01

    The approach of the Campus Earthquake Program (CEP) is to combine the substantial expertise that exists within the UC system in geology, seismology, and geotechnical engineering, to estimate the earthquake strong motion exposure of UC facilities. These estimates draw upon recent advances in hazard assessment, seismic wave propagation modeling in rocks and soils, and dynamic soil testing. The UC campuses currently chosen for application of our integrated methodology are Riverside, San Diego, and Santa Barbara. The procedure starts with the identification of possible earthquake sources in the region and the determination of the most critical fault(s) related to earthquake exposure of the campus. Combined geological, geophysical, and geotechnical studies are then conducted to characterize each campus with specific focus on the location of particular target buildings of special interest to the campus administrators. We drill and geophysically log deep boreholes next to the target structure, to provide direct in-situ measurements of subsurface material properties, and to install uphole and downhole 3-component seismic sensors capable of recording both weak and strong motions. The boreholes provide access below the soil layers, to deeper materials that have relatively high seismic shear-wave velocities. Analyses of conjugate downhole and uphole records provide a basis for optimizing the representation of the low-strain response of the sites. Earthquake rupture scenarios of identified causative faults are combined with the earthquake records and with nonlinear soil models to provide site-specific estimates of strong motions at the selected target locations. The predicted ground motions are shared with the UC consultants, so that they can be used as input to the dynamic analysis of the buildings. Thus, for each campus targeted by the CEP project, the strong motion studies consist of two phases, Phase 1-initial source and site characterization, drilling, geophysical logging

  11. Earthquake engineering for nuclear facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Kuno, Michiya

    2017-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive compilation of earthquake- and tsunami-related technologies and knowledge for the design and construction of nuclear facilities. As such, it covers a wide range of fields including civil engineering, architecture, geotechnical engineering, mechanical engineering, and nuclear engineering, for the development of new technologies providing greater resistance against earthquakes and tsunamis. It is crucial both for students of nuclear energy courses and for young engineers in nuclear power generation industries to understand the basics and principles of earthquake- and tsunami-resistant design of nuclear facilities. In Part I, "Seismic Design of Nuclear Power Plants", the design of nuclear power plants to withstand earthquakes and tsunamis is explained, focusing on buildings, equipment's, and civil engineering structures. In Part II, "Basics of Earthquake Engineering", fundamental knowledge of earthquakes and tsunamis as well as the dynamic response of structures and foundation ground...

  12. Analog earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    Analogs are used to understand complex or poorly understood phenomena for which little data may be available at the actual repository site. Earthquakes are complex phenomena, and they can have a large number of effects on the natural system, as well as on engineered structures. Instrumental data close to the source of large earthquakes are rarely obtained. The rare events for which measurements are available may be used, with modfications, as analogs for potential large earthquakes at sites where no earthquake data are available. In the following, several examples of nuclear reactor and liquified natural gas facility siting are discussed. A potential use of analog earthquakes is proposed for a high-level nuclear waste (HLW) repository

  13. Seismic Response of Tunnel Lining for Shallow-Bias Tunnel with a Small Clear Distance under Wenchuan Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hui

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the internal force characteristics of shallow-bias tunnel with a small clear distance in earthquake, a large-scale shaking table slope model test was designed, and the geometric scale was 1 : 10. In the model test, the Wenchuan (WC seismic wave was used as the excitation wave. Then, the three-dimensional numerical model was established by using MIDAS-NX, and the reliability of the numerical model was verified by comparing the acceleration of the test results. The axial force, bending moment, and shear force of the tunnel cross section and longitudinal direction were calculated by the numerical model under different excitation directions included the horizontal direction (X, the vertical direction (Z, and the horizontal and vertical direction (XZ. The results show the following. (1 The internal force of right arch foot of left hole and the left arch foot of right hole is larger than other part of the tunnels because the distance between the two tunnels is smaller and they interact with each other. (2 The loading direction of single direction loading method is different and the variation trend of tunnel force are different, so the loading direction of seismic wave has a significant influence on the seismic force response of the tunnel. (3 All of the internal force values of tunnel lining under the seismic wave action in bidirection are larger than those in single direction. The value is not a simple superposition of two directions and has some coupling effect. The influence of the vertical seismic wave cannot be ignored in dynamic response research. These results improve the understanding of the rock slope with small spacing tunnel under seismic action.

  14. Determination of a site-specific reference dose for methylmercury for fish-eating populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, A M; Gentry, P R; Lawrence, G; Van Landingham, C; Covington, T; Clewell, H J; Gribben, K; Crump, K

    2000-11-01

    Environmental risk-management decisions in the U.S. involving potential exposures to methylmercury currently use a reference dose (RfD) developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). This RfD is based on retrospective studies of an acute poisoning incident in Iraq in which grain contaminated with a methylmercury fungicide was inadvertently used in the baking of bread. The exposures, which were relatively high but lasted only a few months, were associated with neurological effects in both adults (primarily paresthesia) and infants (late walking, late talking, etc.). It is generally believed that the developing fetus represents a particularly sensitive subpopulation for the neurological effects of methylmercury. The USEPA derived an RfD of 0.1 microg/kg/day based on benchmark dose (BMD) modeling of the combined neurological endpoints reported for children exposed in utero. This RfD included an uncertainty factor of 10 to consider human pharmacokinetic variability and database limitations (lack of data on multigeneration effects or possible long-term sequelae of perinatal exposure). Alcoa signed an Administrative Order of Consent for the conduct of a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) at their Point Comfort Operations and the adjacent Lavaca Bay in Texas to address the effects of historical discharges of mercury-containing wastewater. In cooperation with the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission and USEPA Region VI, Alcoa conducted a baseline risk assessment to assess potential risk to human health and the environment. As a part of this assessment. Alcoa pursued the development of a site-specific RfD for methylmercury to specifically address the potential human health effects associated with the ingestion of contaminated finfish and shellfish from Lavaca Bay. Application of the published USEPA RfD to this site is problematic; while the study underlying the RfD represented acute exposure to relatively high concentrations of

  15. Earthquake response analysis of embedded reactor building considering soil-structure separation and nonlinearity of soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Nakai, S.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of the wall-ground separation depends on the relation between the fundamental frequency of the SSI system and that of the surface layer. The maximum accelerations of the upper floors are increased if the side soil is soft. The building shear force is decreased below the ground level if the fundamental frequency of the SSI system is nearly equal to that of the surface layer. The floor response spectra are slightly increased in the high frequency range. Yielding of the soil occurred only in case that the side soil is soft, and the yield zone was restricted in the upper part of the surface layer. Therefore, the material nonlinearity did not affect the results so much. The results of the sway-rocking model (lumped mass model) analysis showed good agreements with those of the FEM models. (orig./HP)

  16. Development of a site specific environmental radiation assessment model for Youngkwang NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yang Geun; Song, Myung Jae; Shon, Soon Hwan; Shin, Sang Woon; Lee, Gap Bock; Yang, Kyung Hwa [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Pyung; Kim, Jeong Kyu; Shin, Dae Yoon; Kim, Hyun Ku; Lee, Kyung Jin [Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    During the normal operation of nuclear power plants, a very small amount of radionuclide materials is released to the environment. The radionuclide releases to the environment may give rise to some additional radiation dose through a number of pathways. With a few exception, radionuclide transports are highly dependent on the environmental conditions such as topological features, atmospheric and oceanic conditions and socio-environmental characteristics, etc. The dose calculation in Korea are presently being performed using the models in US NRC Reg. Guide. However, these models which were originally released by the US NRC in 1977 are inadequate to deal with environmental movement of radionuclides in consideration of complex terrain, tidal condition of the Yellow Sea, and Youngkwang site specific conditions. KEPRI has developed the models to consider the site specific characteristics around Youngkwang NPPs, to give the realistic dose assessment, and to improve assurance and reliability in public dose calculation. (author). 41 figs., 70 refs.

  17. Recent Developments in the Site-Specific Immobilization of Proteins onto Solid Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A

    2007-02-21

    Immobilization of proteins onto surfaces is of great importance in numerous applications, including protein analysis, drug screening, and medical diagnostics, among others. The success of all these technologies relies on the immobilization technique employed to attach a protein to the corresponding surface. Non-specific physical adsorption or chemical cross-linking with appropriate surfaces results in the immobilization of the protein in random orientations. Site-specific covalent attachment, on the other hand, leads to molecules being arranged in a definite, orderly fashion and allows the use of spacers and linkers to help minimize steric hindrances between the protein and the surface. The present work reviews the latest chemical and biochemical developments for the site-specific covalent attachment of proteins onto solid supports.

  18. Tus-Ter as a tool to study site-specific DNA replication perturbation in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Hickson, Ian D; Mankouri, Hocine W

    2014-01-01

    The high-affinity binding of the Tus protein to specific 21-bp sequences, called Ter, causes site-specific, and polar, DNA replication fork arrest in E coli. The Tus-Ter complex serves to coordinate DNA replication with chromosome segregation in this organism. A number of recent and ongoing studies...... have demonstrated that Tus-Ter can be used as a heterologous tool to generate site-specific perturbation of DNA replication when reconstituted in eukaryotes. Here, we review these recent findings and explore the molecular mechanism by which Tus-Ter mediates replication fork (RF) arrest in the budding...... yeast, S. cerevisiae. We propose that Tus-Ter is a versatile, genetically tractable, and regulatable RF blocking system that can be utilized for disrupting DNA replication in a diverse range of host cells....

  19. Tus-Ter as a tool to study site-specific DNA replication perturbation in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Hickson, Ian D; Mankouri, Hocine W

    2014-01-01

    The high-affinity binding of the Tus protein to specific 21-bp sequences, called Ter, causes site-specific, and polar, DNA replication fork arrest in E coli. The Tus-Ter complex serves to coordinate DNA replication with chromosome segregation in this organism. A number of recent and ongoing studies have demonstrated that Tus-Ter can be used as a heterologous tool to generate site-specific perturbation of DNA replication when reconstituted in eukaryotes. Here, we review these recent findings and explore the molecular mechanism by which Tus-Ter mediates replication fork (RF) arrest in the budding yeast, S. cerevisiae. We propose that Tus-Ter is a versatile, genetically tractable, and regulatable RF blocking system that can be utilized for disrupting DNA replication in a diverse range of host cells.

  20. Site-specifically modified oligodeoxyribonucleotides as templates for Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, D.; Stoehrer, G.

    1985-01-01

    Oligodeoxyribonucleotides with site-specific modifications have been used as substrates for Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I holoenzyme and Klenow fragment. Modifications included the bulky guanine-8-aminofluorene adduct and a guanine oxidation product resembling the product of photosensitized DNA oxidation. By a combination of primers and nick-mers, conditions of single-strand-directed DNA synthesis and nick-translation could be created. The results show that the polymerase can bypass both types of lesions. Bypass occurs on a single-stranded template but is facilitated on a nicked, double-stranded template. Only purines, with guanine more favored than adenine, are incorporated across both lesions. The results indicate that site-specifically modified oligonucleotides can be sensitive probes for the action of polymerases on damaged templates. They also suggest a function for polymerase I, in its nick-translation capacity, during DNA repair and mutagenesis

  1. Site-specific growth of Au particles on ZnO nanopyramids under ultraviolet illumination

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Kexin

    2011-01-01

    In this work, wurtzite ZnO nanocrystals with unique "pyramid" morphology were firstly prepared via solvothermal synthesis. It was determined that the ZnO nanopyramids are grown along the polar c-axis with the vertexes pointing to the [001] direction. When the mixture of ZnO nanopyramids and Au precursor (HAuCl4) was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) illumination, Au particles were site-specifically formed on the vertexes of ZnO nanopyramids. The obtained Au/ZnO nanocomposite showed significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity as compared to the bare ZnO nanopyramids. First-principles based calculations well explained the formation of ZnO nanopyramids as well as the site-specific growth of Au, and revealed that during the photocatalysis process the Au particles can accommodate photoelectrons and thus facilitate the charge separation. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. Site-Specific Integration of Exogenous Genes Using Genome Editing Technologies in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuo Kawahara

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The zebrafish (Danio rerio is an ideal vertebrate model to investigate the developmental molecular mechanism of organogenesis and regeneration. Recent innovation in genome editing technologies, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9 system, have allowed researchers to generate diverse genomic modifications in whole animals and in cultured cells. The CRISPR/Cas9 and TALEN techniques frequently induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs at the targeted gene, resulting in frameshift-mediated gene disruption. As a useful application of genome editing technology, several groups have recently reported efficient site-specific integration of exogenous genes into targeted genomic loci. In this review, we provide an overview of TALEN- and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated site-specific integration of exogenous genes in zebrafish.

  3. Site specific health and safety plan for drilling in support of in situ redox manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuttle, B.G.

    1997-02-01

    This document contains the Site Specific Health and Safety Plan for Drilling in support of the In Situ REDOX Manipulation in the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. Approximately eight wells will be drilled in the 100-D/DR Area using rotary, sonic, or cable tool drilling methods. Split-spoon sampling will be done in conjunction with the drilling. The drilling may be spread out over several months. Included in this document are checklists for health and safety procedures

  4. Site-Specific Waste Management Instruction - 100-DR-1 Group 2 Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    This site-specific waste management instruction (SSWMI) provides guidance for the management of wastes that may be generated during the excavation and remediation of the 100-DR-1 Group 2 sites. The management of waste generated as a result of these activities will be as directed in this SSWMI. This SSWMI will be revised to incorporate guidance for management of wastes encountered that are not addressed in this SSWMI

  5. Site-specific cancer risk in the Baltic cohort of Chernobyl cleanup workers, 1986–2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahu, Kaja; Hakulinen, Timo; Smailyte, Giedre; Stengrevics, Aivars; Auvinen, Anssi; Inskip, Peter D.; Boice, John D.; Rahu, Mati

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess site-specific cancer risk in the Baltic cohort of Chernobyl cleanup workers 1986–2007. Methods The Baltic cohort includes 17,040 men from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania who participated in the environmental cleanup after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station in 1986–1991, and who were followed for cancer incidence until the end of 2007. Cancer cases diagnosed in the cohort and in the male population of each country were identified from the respective national cancer registers. The proportional incidence ratio (PIR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to estimate the site-specific cancer risk in the cohort. For comparison and as it was possible, the site-specific standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was calculated for the Estonian sub-cohort, which was not feasible for the other countries. Results Overall, 756 cancer cases were reported during 1986–2007. A higher proportion of thyroid cancers in relation to the male population was found (PIR=2.76; 95%CI 1.63–4.36), especially among those who started their mission shortly after the accident, in April–May 1986 (PIR=6.38; 95% CI 2.34–13.89). Also, an excess of oesophageal cancers was noted (PIR=1.52; 95% CI 1.06–2.11). No increased PIRs for leukaemia or radiation-related cancer sites combined were observed. PIRs and SIRs for the Estonian sub-cohort demonstrated the same site-specific cancer risk pattern. Conclusion Consistent evidence of an increase in radiation-related cancers in the Baltic cohort was not observed with the possible exception of thyroid cancer, where conclusions are hampered by known medical examination including thyroid screening among cleanup workers. PMID:23683549

  6. Development of the NUMO pre-selection, site-specific safety case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiyama, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Satoru; Deguchi, Akira; Umeki, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Key conclusions: ◆ “The NUMO pre-selection, site-specific safety case” provides the basic structure for subsequent safety cases that will be applied to any selected site, emphasising practical approaches and methodology which will be applicable for the conditions/constraints during an actual siting process. ◆ The preliminary results of the design and safety assessment would underpin the feasibility and safety of geological disposal in Japan.

  7. Site-specific waste management instruction for the 100-KR-4 Operable Unit drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadley, J.T.

    1996-07-01

    This site-specific waste management instruction provides guidance for the management of waste generated as a result of groundwater well installations in the 100-KR-4 Operable Unit (OU). The well installations are necessary to implement the Remedial Action (RA) option (pump-and-treat using ion exchange) to prevent discharge of hexavalent chromium at levels above those considered protective of aquatic life in the Columbia River and riverbed sediments

  8. Site-specific waste management instruction for the 100-KR-4 Operable Unit drilling. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadley, J.T.

    1996-08-01

    This site-specific waste management instruction provides guidance for the management of waste generated as a result of groundwater well installations in the 100-KR-4 Operable Unit (OU). The well installations are necessary to implement the Remedial Action (RA) option (pump-and-treat using ion exchange) to prevent discharge of hexavalent chromium at levels above those considered protective of aquatic life in the Columbia River and riverbed sediments

  9. 77 FR 74838 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ...This notice announces a combined meeting of the Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance and Remediation Committee and Waste Management Committee of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico (known locally as the Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board [NNMCAB]). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  10. 78 FR 10612 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ...This notice announces a combined meeting of the Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance and Remediation Committee and Waste Management Committee of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico (known locally as the Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board [NNMCAB]). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  11. 77 FR 64800 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ...This notice announces a combined meeting of the Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance and Remediation Committee and Waste Management Committee of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico (known locally as the Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board [NNMCAB]). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  12. 78 FR 4140 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ...This notice announces a combined meeting of the Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance and Remediation Committee and Waste Management Committee of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico (known locally as the Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board [NNMCAB]). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  13. Site-specific cancer risk in the Baltic cohort of Chernobyl cleanup workers, 1986-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahu, Kaja; Hakulinen, Timo; Smailyte, Giedre; Stengrevics, Aivars; Auvinen, Anssi; Inskip, Peter D; Boice, John D; Rahu, Mati

    2013-09-01

    To assess site-specific cancer risk in the Baltic cohort of Chernobyl cleanup workers, 1986-2007. The Baltic cohort includes 17,040 men from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania who participated in the environmental cleanup after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station in 1986-1991 and who were followed up for cancer incidence until the end of 2007. Cancer cases diagnosed in the cohort and in the male population of each country were identified from the respective national cancer registers. The proportional incidence ratio (PIR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to estimate the site-specific cancer risk in the cohort. For comparison and as it was possible, the site-specific standardised incidence ratio (SIR) was calculated for the Estonian sub-cohort, which was not feasible for the other countries. Overall, 756 cancer cases were reported during 1986-2007. A higher proportion of thyroid cancers in relation to the male population was found (PIR=2.76; 95%CI 1.63-4.36), especially among those who started their mission shortly after the accident, in April-May 1986 (PIR=6.38; 95%CI 2.34-13.89). Also, an excess of oesophageal cancers was noted (PIR=1.52; 95% CI 1.06-2.11). No increased PIRs for leukaemia or radiation-related cancer sites combined were observed. PIRs and SIRs for the Estonian sub-cohort demonstrated the same site-specific cancer risk pattern. Consistent evidence of an increase in radiation-related cancers in the Baltic cohort was not observed with the possible exception of thyroid cancer, where conclusions are hampered by known medical examination including thyroid screening among cleanup workers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Determining site-specific background level with geostatistics for remediation of heavy metals in neighborhood soils

    OpenAIRE

    Tammy M. Milillo; Gaurav Sinha; Joseph A. Gardella Jr.

    2017-01-01

    The choice of a relevant, uncontaminated site for the determination of site-specific background concentrations for pollutants is critical for planning remediation of a contaminated site. The guidelines used to arrive at concentration levels vary from state to state, complicating this process. The residential neighborhood of Hickory Woods in Buffalo, NY is an area where heavy metal concentrations and spatial distributions were measured to plan remediation. A novel geostatistics based decision ...

  15. DAFS study of site-specific local structure of Mn in manganese ferrite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtsov, E.; Haskel, D.; Cady, A.; Yang, A.; Vittoria, C.; Zuo, X.; Harris, V.G.

    2006-01-01

    Manganese ferrite (MnFe 2 O 4 ) is a well-known magnetic material widely used in electronics for many years. It is well established that its magnetic behavior is strongly influenced by local structural properties of Mn ions, which are distributed between crystallographically inequivalent tetrahedral and octahedral sites in the unit cell. In order to understand and be able to tune properties of these structures, it is necessary to have detailed site-specific structural information on the system. Here we report on the application of diffraction-anomalous fine structure (DAFS) spectroscopy to resolve site-specific Mn local structures in manganese ferrite films. The DAFS measurements were done at undulator beamline 4-ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The DAFS spectra (Fig. 1) were measured at several Bragg reflections in the vicinity of the Mn absorption K-edge, having probed separately contributions from tetrahedrally and octahedrally coordinated Mn sites. The DAFS data analysis done with an iterative Kramers-Kroenig algorithm made it possible to solve separately the local structure around different inequivalent Mn sites in the unit cell. The reliability of the data treatment was checked carefully, and it was showed that the site-specific structural parameters obtained with DAFS allow us to describe fluorescence EXAFS spectrum measured independently. Fig. 2 shows individual site contributions to the imaginary part of the resonant scattering amplitude obtained from the treatment of the data of Fig. 1. The analysis of the refined site-specific absorption spectra was done using EXAFS methods based on theoretical standards. We provided direct evidence for the tetrahedral Mn-O bond distance being increased relative to the corresponding Fe-O distance in bulk manganese ferrites. The first coordination shell number was found to be reduced significantly for Mn atoms at these sites. This finding is consistent with the well-known tendency of Mn

  16. Protein and Site Specificity of Fucosylation in Liver-Secreted Glycoproteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pompach, Petr; Ashline, David J.; Brnáková, Z.; Benicky, J.; Sanda, M.; Goldman, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 12 (2014), s. 5561-5569 ISSN 1535-3893 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13051; GA ČR GAP206/12/0503 Grant - others:Charles Univ.(CZ) UNCE_204025/2012 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : fucose * glycoproteins * liver * site specificity Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.245, year: 2014

  17. Effect of Interaction and Rocking Motion on The Earthquake Response of Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Havaei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Usually structures are designed under codes based on the assumption that the soil stiffness is infinite, so the foundation rests firmly on the soil. In many cases, the overturning moment due to the lateral forces may exceed the resisting moment due to the gravity forces. Thus, this may cause a foundation uplift because in reality the soil stiffness is not infinite and the structure stands up under gravity forces. The phenomenon of foundation uplifting and its impact on the soil are known as the rocking motion.This study investigates the influence of the rocking motion and interaction by the yielding base plates on the nonlinear behavior of steel structures under dynamic analysis. More specifically, Three- five and seven -storied structuresare designed with ordinary ductility, then the structuresare analyzed in rigid and deformable base plate cases with using the ABAQUS software.The results show that the rocking motion and Interaction decrease the response of buildings such as the base shear, the axial force of columns and the strain energy but also increase the natural period.

  18. Simulating Earthquake Rupture and Off-Fault Fracture Response: Application to the Safety Assessment of the Swedish Nuclear Waste Repository

    KAUST Repository

    Falth, B.

    2014-12-09

    To assess the long-term safety of a deep repository of spent nuclear fuel, upper bound estimates of seismically induced secondary fracture shear displacements are needed. For this purpose, we analyze a model including an earthquake fault, which is surrounded by a number of smaller discontinuities representing fractures on which secondary displacements may be induced. Initial stresses are applied and a rupture is initiated at a predefined hypocenter and propagated at a specified rupture speed. During rupture we monitor shear displacements taking place on the nearby fracture planes in response to static as well as dynamic effects. As a numerical tool, we use the 3Dimensional Distinct Element Code (3DEC) because it has the capability to handle numerous discontinuities with different orientations and at different locations simultaneously. In tests performed to benchmark the capability of our method to generate and propagate seismic waves, 3DEC generates results in good agreement with results from both Stokes solution and the Compsyn code package. In a preliminary application of our method to the nuclear waste repository site at Forsmark, southern Sweden, we assume end-glacial stress conditions and rupture on a shallow, gently dipping, highly prestressed fault with low residual strength. The rupture generates nearly complete stress drop and an M-w 5.6 event on the 12 km(2) rupture area. Of the 1584 secondary fractures (150 m radius), with a wide range of orientations and locations relative to the fault, a majority move less than 5 mm. The maximum shear displacement is some tens of millimeters at 200 m fault-fracture distance.

  19. Non-site-specific allosteric effect of oxygen on human hemoglobin under high oxygen partial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Masayoshi; Kurisaki, Ikuo; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2014-04-08

    Protein allostery is essential for vital activities. Allosteric regulation of human hemoglobin (HbA) with two quaternary states T and R has been a paradigm of allosteric structural regulation of proteins. It is widely accepted that oxygen molecules (O2) act as a "site-specific" homotropic effector, or the successive O2 binding to the heme brings about the quaternary regulation. However, here we show that the site-specific allosteric effect is not necessarily only a unique mechanism of O2 allostery. Our simulation results revealed that the solution environment of high O2 partial pressure enhances the quaternary change from T to R without binding to the heme, suggesting an additional "non-site-specific" allosteric effect of O2. The latter effect should play a complementary role in the quaternary change by affecting the intersubunit contacts. This analysis must become a milestone in comprehensive understanding of the allosteric regulation of HbA from the molecular point of view.

  20. Comparisons of CAP88PC version 2.0 default parameters to site specific inputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, M. A.; Courtney, J. C.; Charter, N.; Egan, T.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of varying the input for the CAP88PC Version 2.0 program on the total effective dose equivalents (TEDEs) were determined for hypothetical releases from the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Argonne National Laboratory site on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Values for site specific meteorological conditions and agricultural production parameters were determined for the 80 km radius surrounding the HFEF. Four nuclides, 3 H, 85 Kr, 129 I, and 137 Cs (with its short lived progeny, 137m Ba) were selected for this study; these are the radioactive materials most likely to be released from HFEF under normal or abnormal operating conditions. Use of site specific meteorological parameters of annual precipitation, average temperature, and the height of the inversion layer decreased the TEDE from 137 Cs- 137m Ba up to 36%; reductions for other nuclides were less than 3%. Use of the site specific agricultural parameters reduced TEDE values between 7% and 49%, depending on the nuclide. Reductions are associated with decreased committed effective dose equivalents (CEDEs) from the ingestion pathway. This is not surprising since the HFEF is located well within the INEEL exclusion area, and the surrounding area closest to the release point is a high desert with limited agricultural diversity. Livestock and milk production are important in some counties at distances greater than 30 km from the HFEF