WorldWideScience

Sample records for site workshop ii

  1. 2016 FACET-II Science Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Mark J., ed.

    2017-07-19

    The second in a series of FACET-II Science Workshops was held at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory on October 17-19, 2016 [1]. The workshop drew thirty-five participants from eighteen different institutions including CERN, DESY, Ecole Polytechnique, FNAL, JAI, LBNL, LLNL, Radiabeam, Radiasoft, SLAC, Stony Brook, Strathclyde, Tech-X, Tsinghua, UC Boulder, UCLA and UT Austin. The 2015 workshop [2, 3] helped prioritize research directions for FACET-II. The 2016 workshop was focused on understanding what improvements are needed at the facility to support the next generation of experiments. All presentations are linked to the workshop website as a permanent record.

  2. Site selection handbook: Workshop on site selection for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide technical assistance to ''...those compact regions, host States and nonmember States determined by the Secretary to require assistance.'' Technical assistance has been defined to include, but not be limited to, ''technical guidelines for site selection.'' This site selection workshop was developed to assist States and Compacts in developing new low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in accordance with the requirements of the LLRWPAA. The workshop comprises a series of lectures, discussion topics, and exercises, supported by this Site Selection Workshop Handbook, designed to examine various aspects of a comprehensive site selection program. It is not an exhaustive treatment of all aspects of site selection, nor is it prescriptive. The workshop focuses on the major elements of site selection and the tools that can be used to implement the site selection program

  3. Transparency, citizen participation, organisation and roles. Report from the third RISCOM-II Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Kjell; Paeivioe, Josefin

    2003-10-01

    This workshop was the final one in a series of three workshops within the RISCOM II project. It was an event where the RISCOM group of researchers disseminated the results to a wider circle of the nuclear waste management community in Europe with the focus on their own 'peers' in participating countries. However, the aim was not just to present RISCOM II results but also to see them in the context of adjacent projects. Especially, the workshop was set up in cooperation with the NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) since this was seen as a good opportunity for exchange of experiences between the two activities. There was also participation by representatives from the EC COWAM Concerted Action and one presentation was devoted to this activity. There was thus an opportunity to discuss the three activities together. A draft of the RISCOM II Final Report had been made available for workshop participants before the meeting. The first part of the workshop entitled Transparency and citizen participation was moderated by Yves Le Bars, FSC chairman, and president of ANDRA. The second part dealt with Outcomes of the RISCOM Project and was moderated by Elizabeth Atherton from UK Nirex. Magnus Westerlind (SKI), the RISCOM-II coordinator, moderated the third part that dealt with Organisation and roles

  4. Transparency, citizen participation, organisation and roles. Report from the third RISCOM-II Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Kjell [Karinta-Konsult, Taeby (Sweden); Paeivioe, Josefin [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-10-01

    This workshop was the final one in a series of three workshops within the RISCOM II project. It was an event where the RISCOM group of researchers disseminated the results to a wider circle of the nuclear waste management community in Europe with the focus on their own 'peers' in participating countries. However, the aim was not just to present RISCOM II results but also to see them in the context of adjacent projects. Especially, the workshop was set up in cooperation with the NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) since this was seen as a good opportunity for exchange of experiences between the two activities. There was also participation by representatives from the EC COWAM Concerted Action and one presentation was devoted to this activity. There was thus an opportunity to discuss the three activities together. A draft of the RISCOM II Final Report had been made available for workshop participants before the meeting. The first part of the workshop entitled Transparency and citizen participation was moderated by Yves Le Bars, FSC chairman, and president of ANDRA. The second part dealt with Outcomes of the RISCOM Project and was moderated by Elizabeth Atherton from UK Nirex. Magnus Westerlind (SKI), the RISCOM-II coordinator, moderated the third part that dealt with Organisation and roles.

  5. International workshop on site investigation and evaluation based on the siting process in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Johan; Stroem, A.

    2001-06-01

    SKB's goal is to commence surface based site investigations in 2002. Extensive preparations are now being made for this transition to the next phase in the siting process for the deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The purpose of the international workshop on site characterisation held at Aespoe April 2001 was to: present the SKB site investigation and evaluation programme to a group of international experts; discuss whether the available toolbox of investigation methods for surface based site investigations is appropriate and state-of-the-art in an international perspective; and by working group sessions discuss the level of ambition in the programme for site investigation for each discipline. This report summarises the conclusions of the workshop in general terms. Many of the detailed comments and ideas obtained at the workshop have already inspired and will also directly inspire the on-going planning work for site characterisation. The core activity at the workshop was the work performed by working groups. They addressed what should be considered for a site characterisation programme, based on the generic planning made so far by SKB. The working groups also outlined site specific characterisation programmes for the sites suggested by SKB. The tasks were strictly confined to technical and scientific modelling issues. The working group chairmen presented the working group results at the workshop and have also submitted short memos to SKB. The present document is a compilation of these memos. The SKB generic programme as presented in the existing top level documents, 'Requirements and Criteria and Overall Programme', received general endorsement and was appreciated for being comprehensive and systematic. For example, it contains comprehensive lists of parameters to be measured. However, there is need for prioritisation and sequencing. This is actually included in the current planning process at SKB where the generic programme later this year will be adapted to

  6. Mars Exploration Study Workshop II. Report of a workshop, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (USA), 24 - 25 May 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, M. B.; Budden, N. A.

    1993-11-01

    This report, which summarizes the Mars Exploration Study Workshop II, provides an overview of the status of the Mars Exploration Study, material presented at the workshop, and discussions of open items being addressed by the study team. The workshop assembled three teams of experts to discuss cost, dual-use technology, and international involvement, and to generate a working group white paper addressing these issues.

  7. Minutes of the workshop on off-site release criteria for contaminated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.P.N.

    1989-11-01

    A one and one-half-day workshop was held May 2-3, 1989, at the Pollard Auditorium in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, with the objective of formulating a strategy for developing reasonable and uniform criteria for releasing radioactively contaminated materials from the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. This report contains the minutes of the workshop. At the conclusion of the workshop, a plan was formulated to facilitate the development of the above-mentioned off-site release criteria

  8. Performance assessment, participative processes and value judgements. Report from the first RISCOM II workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Kjell [Karinta-Konsult, Taeby (Sweden); Lilja, Christina [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)] (eds.)

    2001-12-01

    This workshop was the first one in a series of three workshops within the RISCOM-II project. The aim was to gather the status of the project as a starting point to enhance discussions between project participants and with a number of invited participants. The seminar also included two presentations from the OECD/NEA on NEA work related to stake holder participation, as well as the EC Concerted Action COWAM. Discussions were held in direct connection to the talks and in special sessions. The first day of the workshop entitled Value judgements,risk communication and performance assessment was moderated by Magnus Westerlind (SKI), the RISCOM-II coordinator. The second day was entitled Case studies exploring implications for the practical development of risk communication and was moderated by Anna Littleboy, UK Nirex Ltd. The workshop was opened by Thierry Devries, EDF. He welcomed the participants to Paris and gave some remarks about the French nuclear waste management situation and highlighted the significant French and EDF participation in RISCOM-II. He meant that the project should have possibilities to enhance transparency in nuclear waste programmes and noted that the new concept of stretching, introduced by RISCOM, is already is use. In the following the talks given at the workshop and the discussion that took place are summarized. Appendix 3 gives a brief overview of the RISCOM-II project.

  9. Performance assessment, participative processes and value judgements. Report from the first RISCOM II workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Kjell; Lilja, Christina

    2001-12-01

    This workshop was the first one in a series of three workshops within the RISCOM-II project. The aim was to gather the status of the project as a starting point to enhance discussions between project participants and with a number of invited participants. The seminar also included two presentations from the OECD/NEA on NEA work related to stake holder participation, as well as the EC Concerted Action COWAM. Discussions were held in direct connection to the talks and in special sessions. The first day of the workshop entitled Value judgements,risk communication and performance assessment was moderated by Magnus Westerlind (SKI), the RISCOM-II coordinator. The second day was entitled Case studies exploring implications for the practical development of risk communication and was moderated by Anna Littleboy, UK Nirex Ltd. The workshop was opened by Thierry Devries, EDF. He welcomed the participants to Paris and gave some remarks about the French nuclear waste management situation and highlighted the significant French and EDF participation in RISCOM-II. He meant that the project should have possibilities to enhance transparency in nuclear waste programmes and noted that the new concept of stretching, introduced by RISCOM, is already is use. In the following the talks given at the workshop and the discussion that took place are summarized. Appendix 3 gives a brief overview of the RISCOM-II project

  10. LCLS-II New Instruments Workshops Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baradaran, Samira; Bergmann, Uwe; Durr, Herrmann; Gaffney, Kelley; Goldstein, Julia; Guehr, Markus; Hastings, Jerome; Heimann, Philip; Lee, Richard; Seibert, Marvin; Stohr, Joachim; /SLAC

    2012-08-08

    The LCLS-II New Instruments workshops chaired by Phil Heimann and Jerry Hastings were held on March 19-22, 2012 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The goal of the workshops was to identify the most exciting science and corresponding parameters which will help define the LCLS-II instrumentation. This report gives a synopsis of the proposed investigations and an account of the workshop. Scientists from around the world have provided short descriptions of the scientific opportunities they envision at LCLS-II. The workshops focused on four broadly defined science areas: biology, materials sciences, chemistry and atomic, molecular and optical physics (AMO). Below we summarize the identified science opportunities in the four areas. The frontiers of structural biology lie in solving the structures of large macromolecular biological systems. Most large protein assemblies are inherently difficult to crystallize due to their numerous degrees of freedom. Serial femtosecond protein nanocrystallography, using the 'diffraction-before-destruction' approach to outrun radiation damage has been very successfully pioneered at LCLS and diffraction patterns were obtained from some of the smallest protein crystals ever. The combination of femtosecond x-ray pulses of high intensity and nanosized protein crystals avoids the radiation damage encountered by conventional x-ray crystallography with focused beams and opens the door for atomic structure determinations of the previously largely inaccessible class of membrane proteins that are notoriously difficult to crystallize. The obtained structures will allow the identification of key protein functions and help in understanding the origin and control of diseases. Three dimensional coherent x-ray imaging at somewhat lower resolution may be used for larger objects such as viruses. The chemistry research areas of primary focus are the predictive understanding of catalytic mechanisms, with particular emphasis on photo- and

  11. LCLS-II New Instruments Workshops Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baradaran, Samira; Bergmann, Uwe; Durr, Herrmann; Gaffney, Kelley; Goldstein, Julia; Guehr, Markus; Hastings, Jerome; Heimann, Philip; Lee, Richard; Seibert, Marvin; Stohr, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The LCLS-II New Instruments workshops chaired by Phil Heimann and Jerry Hastings were held on March 19-22, 2012 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The goal of the workshops was to identify the most exciting science and corresponding parameters which will help define the LCLS-II instrumentation. This report gives a synopsis of the proposed investigations and an account of the workshop. Scientists from around the world have provided short descriptions of the scientific opportunities they envision at LCLS-II. The workshops focused on four broadly defined science areas: biology, materials sciences, chemistry and atomic, molecular and optical physics (AMO). Below we summarize the identified science opportunities in the four areas. The frontiers of structural biology lie in solving the structures of large macromolecular biological systems. Most large protein assemblies are inherently difficult to crystallize due to their numerous degrees of freedom. Serial femtosecond protein nanocrystallography, using the 'diffraction-before-destruction' approach to outrun radiation damage has been very successfully pioneered at LCLS and diffraction patterns were obtained from some of the smallest protein crystals ever. The combination of femtosecond x-ray pulses of high intensity and nanosized protein crystals avoids the radiation damage encountered by conventional x-ray crystallography with focused beams and opens the door for atomic structure determinations of the previously largely inaccessible class of membrane proteins that are notoriously difficult to crystallize. The obtained structures will allow the identification of key protein functions and help in understanding the origin and control of diseases. Three dimensional coherent x-ray imaging at somewhat lower resolution may be used for larger objects such as viruses. The chemistry research areas of primary focus are the predictive understanding of catalytic mechanisms, with particular emphasis on photo- and

  12. Proceedings of the CNRA Workshop on New Reactor Siting, Licensing and Construction Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the proceedings from the 'Workshop on New Reactor Siting, Licensing and Construction Experience', held in Prague, Czech Republic on 15-17 September 2010. A total of 59 specialists from 16 countries and international organisations attended. The Meeting was sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities and hosted by the State Office for Nuclear Safety (SUJB) in Czech Republic. The objectives of the workshop were to review and discuss recent and past construction experience lessons learned including perspectives from regulatory authorities, as well as vendors, and licensee. The workshop addressed issues associated with project management resources including: a) overall human resources, expertise, experience and organisation available to the licensee, b) capability of each potential vendor (in-house knowledge and skills versus planned subcontracting and subcontractor management). The workshop also discussed the lessons learned in the regulation of site selection, evaluation and site preparation as well as the review of regulatory practices for the licensing of new reactors, including the regulatory body infrastructure, staffing and expertise needed. The workshop provided an excellent opportunity to communicate recent experience on these topics to a wider audience, including participants from OECD member countries as well as New Entrants from non-OECD member countries. The workshop allowed the WGRNR group to introduce and discuss the current programme of work and products under development in order to gain insights from workshop participants on each of the programme of work areas, and get feedback on additional focus areas. The workshop was structured in 4 technical sessions, each followed by ample time for panel discussions. The first technical session was devoted to presentations of the licensing process for new reactors followed by different member countries. The second technical session was

  13. Workshop on methods for siting groundwater monitoring wells: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, E.

    1992-02-01

    The primary purpose of this workshop was to identify methods for the optimum siting of groundwater monitoring wells to minimize the number required that will provide statistically and physically representative samples. In addition, the workshop served to identify information and data gaps, stimulated discussion and provided an opportunity for exchange of ideas between regulators and scientists interested in siting groundwater monitoring wells. These proceedings should serve these objectives and provide a source of relevant information which may be used to evaluate the current state of development of methods for siting groundwater monitoring wells and the additional research needs. The proceedings contain the agenda and list of attendees in the first section. The abstract and viewgraphs for each presentation are given in the second section. For several presentations, abstracts and viewgraphs were not received. After the presentations, four working groups were organized and met for approximately a day. The working group leaders then gave a verbal summary of their sessions. This material was transcribed and is included in the next section of these proceedings. The appendices contain forms describing various methods discussed in the working groups

  14. On-site and off-site atmospheric PBDEs in an electronic dismantling workshop in south China: Gas-particle partitioning and human exposure assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Taicheng; Zhang Delin; Li Guiying; Mai Bixian; Fu Jiamo

    2011-01-01

    Gas samples and total suspended particle during work and off work time were investigated on-site and off-site electronic waste dismantling workshop (I- and O-EWDW), then compared with plastic recycling workshop (PRW) and waste incineration plant (WIP). TSP concentrations and total PBDE were 0.36-2.21 mg/m 3 and 27-2975 ng/m 3 at different workshops, respectively. BDE-47, -99, and -209 were major ΣPBDE congeners at I-EWDW and WIP, while BDE-209 was only dominant congener in PRW and control sites during work time and all sites during off work time. The gas-particle partitioning result was well correlated with the subcooled liquid vapor pressure for all samples, except for WIP and I-EDWD, at park during work time, and residential area during off work time. The predicted urban curve fitted well with measured φ values at O-DEWD during work time, whereas it was slightly overestimated or underestimated for others. Exposure assessment revealed the highest exposure site was I-EDWD. - Highlights: → On- and off-site atmospheric PBDEs was monitored in e-waste dismantling workshops in south China. → The gas-particle partitioning result was well correlated with the subcooled liquid vapor pressure for some samples. → Exposure assessment revealed that workers in I-EDWD were the highest exposure population. - The findings of this study may serve as a valuable reference for future risk assessment and environmental management in Guiyu, South China.

  15. Workshops for state review of site suitability criteria for high-level radioactive waste repositories. Discussion Group reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    The NRC Waste Management Program and the Office of State Programs held three regional workshops to solicit ideas from State executives and legislators on the siting and licensing procedures for high level waste repositories and to solicit comments on the NRC preliminary site suitability criteria. The workshops were held in Denver, Colorado; New Orleans, Louisiana; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania during the period 19-30 September 1977. The reports from these workshops are contained herein. The workshops were attended by 170 invited State executives and legislators from 46 states. In addition, there were over 80 observers from diverse backgrounds including the general public, government, industry, professional consultants and university faculty. The workshops were announced in the Federal Register on September 1, 1977

  16. IFPA Meeting 2013 Workshop Report II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, W E; Adamson, L; Carter, Anthony Michael

    2013-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At the IFPA meeting 2013 twelve themed workshops were presented, five of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology but collecti...

  17. Proceedings of the workshop on LAMPF II synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.K.

    1983-01-01

    Topics covered at the workshop include: considerations for a staged approach to synchrotron construction; consideration of energy and cost for a kaon and/or antiproton factory; changing the transition energy in the main ring for the Fermilab antiproton beam; a lattice with 50% undispersed straight sections; bunch width considerations in a stretcher ring; a self-consistent longitudinal distribution; rapid-cycling tuned rf cavity for synchrotron use; considerations on a high-shunt impedance tunable RF cavity; rotating condensers; low extraction from the stretcher ring; an antiproton source for LAMPF II; synchrotron magnet circuit; power supply and ring magnet options; and notes for a kaon factory design

  18. Workshop on instrumentation of the disassembled BER II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jauch, W.; Steiner, M.

    1982-01-01

    A workshop on the instrumentation of a disassembled BER II-reactor took place in the Hahn-Meitner-Institute in Berlin on April 19 and 20, 1982. Invited were all groups that are promoted by the associations 'Neutron Scattering for Investigation of Condensed Substance' and 'Neutron Scattering and Complementary Methods in Chemistry and Biology', along with experts for neutron spectrometers. 40 foreign scientists from 22 different institutes had accepted the invitation. The actual questions were treated in 13 presentations and a certain number of posters, with the latter also comprising activation analysis. The present report contains the presentations submitted, the final discussion minutes and a summary from HMI-view. (orig./RW) [de

  19. Midwest Transmission Workshop II Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Bryan

    2002-12-05

    OAK-B135 After introductions of all participants, Abby Arnold, RESOLVE, reviewed the purpose of the meeting and the agenda. The purpose of the workshop was to share the results of the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) scenario development for wind and other fuel sources and the corresponding implications for transmission throughout the MISO control area. The workshop agenda is included in Attachment A.

  20. Action research Toolkit II: The Scenario Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2003-01-01

    The article describes the scenario workshop within the action research paradigm. In addtion, the maina phases and the functions of the facilitator and the participants are outlined. Finally,it describes and analyses the experiences of using the scenario workshop in practice.......The article describes the scenario workshop within the action research paradigm. In addtion, the maina phases and the functions of the facilitator and the participants are outlined. Finally,it describes and analyses the experiences of using the scenario workshop in practice....

  1. Establishing Ozone Critical Levels II. UNECE Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Per Erik; Sellden, Gun; Pleijel, Haakan [eds.

    2003-06-01

    This document is the final report from the workshop. It contains the overall summary of the conclusions from the workshop, the reports from the three working groups that were active during the workshop as well as all background papers presented at the workshop.

  2. IAEA workshop and field trial at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hembree, D.M. Jr.; Ross, H.H.; Carter, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    In March 1994, members of the International Safeguards Department in the National Security Program Office (NSPO) hosted an environmental monitoring field trial workshop for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors. The workshop was held at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site and its primary purpose was to train the inspectors in the techniques needed for effective environmental sample collection and handling. The workshop emphasized both sampling theory and practice. First, detailed techniques for swipe, vegetation, soil, biota, and water-associated sampling were covered in the classroom. Subsequently, the inspectors were divided into three groups for actual sample collection in and around the K-25 locale. The collected samples were processed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Network of Analytical Laboratories using established analytical techniques. This activity is part of the IAEA ''Programme 93+2 in. assessment of measures to enhance IAEA safeguards

  3. Report on the workshop to review waste inventory, waste characteristics and reference site candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    There is a need of co-operation among Regional Co-operative Agreement (RCA) Member States in the field of low and intermediate level waste (LILW) disposal. An integrated approach is essential for successful establishment of LILW disposal facilities in RCA Member States. This would include: a) identification of waste inventory and characteristics; b) guidelines for implementation of LILW disposal; c) regulatory guidelines; d) safety assessment; e) quality assurance; and f) public acceptance. This project will focus on technical issues. The overall objective of the project, established in the project formulation meeting, is to assist RCA Member States in establishing national disposal activities for radioactive waste from nuclear applications by providing expert advice and training on techniques and methodology associated with planning and establishment of disposal facilities and to obtain improved knowledge of key staff members for the implementation of LILW disposal. The purpose of this workshop was to identify waste inventories, waste characteristics, site characteristics (generic or site specific) for disposal of LILW in RCA Member States of the project and identify conceptual reference site conditions and consider reference repository concepts preliminarily. Also the workshop was to establish an action plan of the next step. The workshop was held in Shanghai, China from 7 to 9 July 1997 and attended by 7 countries, i.e. Australia, China, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka and Thailand. Refs, figs, tabs

  4. New Reactor Siting, Licensing and Construction Experience. Proceedings of the 2. CNRA International Workshop on 'New Reactor Siting, Licensing and Construction Experience'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the proceedings from the 2. Workshop on New Reactor Siting, Licensing and Construction Experience. A total of 45 specialists from 16 countries and international organisations attended. The meeting was sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities and hosted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S.NRC). The objectives of the workshop were to provide a forum to exchange information on lessons learned from siting, licensing and constructing new nuclear power plants around the world. Key focus areas included siting practices and regulatory positions that have been enhanced as a result of the Fukushima accident; lessons learned from licensing and design review approaches and challenges, construction experience and recommendations for regulatory oversight; and regulatory cooperation on generic and design specific issues through the MDEP specific working groups. The workshop was structured in 4 technical sessions, each followed by ample time for panel discussions. The first technical session was devoted to regulatory cooperation on generic and design specific issues, MDEP working groups (EPR, AP1000), vendor inspection co-operation, digital I and C, and codes and standards. The second technical session was intended to discuss and share regulatory positions on siting practices and enhancements as a result of lessons learned from Fukushima accident. The third technical session addressed the construction experience and regulatory oversight of new reactor construction activities. And the fourth technical session included presentations on the lessons learned from regulatory licensing reviews of new reactor designs

  5. REPORT OF ON-SITE INSPECTION WORKSHOP-16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweeney, J J

    2009-07-07

    The central issue addressed by this workshop was the task of making the on-site inspection (OSI) part of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty verification system operationally ready at entry into force of the Treaty. It is recognized, and this was emphasized by the 2008 OSI Integrated Field Exercise (IFE), that it is not possible to develop every part of the OSI regime simultaneously. Therefore, it is necessary to prioritize the approach to OSI readiness. The reviews of the IFE have pointed to many elements of OSI readiness that still need development. The objective of this workshop was to provide priorities for the path forward for Working Group B to consider. Several critical areas have been identified that are related to the development of OSI readiness: (1) Technology development: Priorities are radionuclide and noble gas sampling and analysis, visual observation, multispectral/infrared imaging methods, active seismic methods and the recognition of the importance of signatures. (2) Organizational development: Priorities are health and safety, the Operations Support Centre, the Equipment Storage and Maintenance Facility, information technology data flow and communications. (3) Resources: The expertise to develop key parts of the OSI regime is not available within the current OSI Division staff. To develop these aspects of the regime will require more staff or supplements to the staff with cost-free experts or other means. Aspects of the system that could benefit from more staff include radionuclide and noble gas detection methods, data flow and communications, visual observation, multispectral/infrared methods and health and safety. As the path forward, participants of this workshop recognized a need to optimize the development of OSI priorities. The outcome of this workshop is to suggest for consideration an operational approach to OSI readiness that utilizes results of an evaluation of the relative effectiveness of OSI elements versus their relative

  6. LAMPF II workshop, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, February 1-4, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the first LAMPF II Workshop held at Los Alamos February 1 to 4, 1982. Included are the talks that were available in written form. The conclusion of the participants was that there are many exciting areas of physics that will be addressed by such a machine

  7. SERDP/ESTCP Expert Panel Workshop on Research and Development Needs for Cleanup of Chlorinated Solvent Sites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    ...) perform its mission. These programs together conducted an expert panel workshop on August 6-7, 2001 to evaluate the needs for research and development in the general area of chlorinated solvent site cleanup...

  8. Communication & Negotiation Skills Workshop for Women II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This workshop is designed to provide women physics students and postdocs with the professional skills they need to effectively perform research, including: negotiating a position in academia, industry or at a national lab, interacting positively on teams and with a mentor or advisor, thinking tactically, articulating goals, enhancing their personal presence, and developing alliances. We will discuss negotiation strategies and tactics that are useful for achieving professional goals. This is a highly interactive workshop where participants are invited to bring examples of difficult professional situations to discuss.

  9. IPCC workshop on impacts of ocean acidification on marine biology and ecosystems. Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, C.B.; Barros, V.; Stocker, T.F.; Dahe, Q.; Mach, K.J.; Plattner, G.-K.; Mastrandrea, M.D.; Tignor, M.; Ebi, K.L.

    2011-09-15

    Understanding the effects of increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations on ocean chemistry, commonly termed ocean acidification, as well as associated impacts on marine biology and ecosystems, is an important component of scientific knowledge about global change. The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will include comprehensive coverage of ocean acidification and its impacts, including potential feedbacks to the climate system. To support ongoing AR5 assessment efforts, Working Group II and Working Group I (WGII and WGI) of the IPCC held a joint Workshop on Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Marine Biology and Ecosystems in Okinawa, Japan, from 17 to 19 January 2011. The workshop convened experts from the scientific community, including WGII and WGI AR5 authors and review editors, to synthesise scientific understanding of changes in ocean chemistry due to increased CO{sub 2} and of impacts of this changing chemistry on marine organisms, ecosystems, and ecosystem services. This workshop report summarises the scientific content and perspectives presented and discussed during the workshop. It provides syntheses of these perspectives for the workshop's core topics: (i) the changing chemistry of the oceans, (ii) impacts of ocean acidification for individual organisms, and (iii) scaling up responses from individual organisms to ecosystems. It also presents summaries of workshop discussions of key cross-cutting themes, ranging from detection and attribution of ocean acidification and its impacts to understanding ocean acidification in the context of other stressors on marine systems. Additionally, the workshop report includes extended abstracts for keynote and poster presentations at the workshop. (Author)

  10. Biocuration workflows and text mining: overview of the BioCreative 2012 Workshop Track II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhiyong; Hirschman, Lynette

    2012-01-01

    Manual curation of data from the biomedical literature is a rate-limiting factor for many expert curated databases. Despite the continuing advances in biomedical text mining and the pressing needs of biocurators for better tools, few existing text-mining tools have been successfully integrated into production literature curation systems such as those used by the expert curated databases. To close this gap and better understand all aspects of literature curation, we invited submissions of written descriptions of curation workflows from expert curated databases for the BioCreative 2012 Workshop Track II. We received seven qualified contributions, primarily from model organism databases. Based on these descriptions, we identified commonalities and differences across the workflows, the common ontologies and controlled vocabularies used and the current and desired uses of text mining for biocuration. Compared to a survey done in 2009, our 2012 results show that many more databases are now using text mining in parts of their curation workflows. In addition, the workshop participants identified text-mining aids for finding gene names and symbols (gene indexing), prioritization of documents for curation (document triage) and ontology concept assignment as those most desired by the biocurators. DATABASE URL: http://www.biocreative.org/tasks/bc-workshop-2012/workflow/.

  11. Canadian Site Visit and Workshop - Summary and International Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The third workshop of the OECD/NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was hosted by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) for three days in Ottawa, following a one-day visit of the Port Hope area which included meetings with community representatives and project managers and a tour of low-level waste management facilities. The Ottawa workshop examined social concerns regarding radioactive waste management: what the concerns are, how they are identified, and how they can be addressed. Sixty-nine people attended the workshop from fourteen countries and forty-five organizations. They ranged from representatives of municipal governments, non-governmental organizations and private citizens to government policy makers, regulators, implementers, consultants and university, social and media researchers. The participants included stakeholders in large-scale industrial projects (both nuclear and nonnuclear) and stakeholders directly affected by nuclear projects. About one half came from FSC member organisations; the remainders were Canadian stakeholders. The workshop was structured with five half-day sessions. The opening half-day described Canadian policy and the regulatory environment for radioactive waste management and the two central case studies for the workshop: the Port Hope Area Initiative and the Nuclear Fuel Waste Act. Three sessions addressed the topics 'What are the social concerns?', 'How to address social concerns?' and 'Development opportunities for communities'. Each of the sessions began with plenary presentations by five stakeholders. These 'stakeholder voices' were followed by roundtable discussions. The participants were divided into eight tables, each including a mix of Canadian and other attendees. Each table discussed a set of pre-defined questions under the direction of a facilitator/Rapporteur. The discussions from each round table were reported in a follow-up plenary. The final half-day of the workshop was

  12. Session II-A. Site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntosh, W.

    1981-01-01

    Section II-A on Site Characterization consists of the following papers which describe the progress made during the past fiscal year toward identifying sites for high-level radioactive waste repositories in deep geologic formations: (1) progress in expanded studies for repository sites; (2) evaluation of geologic and hydrologic characteristics in the Basin and Range Province relative to high-level nuclear waste disposal; (3) siting progress: Permian region; (4) Paradox Basin site exploration: a progress report; (5) progress toward recommending a salt site for an exploratory shaft; (6) status of geologic investigations for nuclear waste disposal at the Nevada Test Site; (7) geohydrologic investigation of the Hanford Site, Washington: basalt waste isolation project. Highlights include: expanding studies in crystalline rocks, both in the Appalachian and Lake Superior regions; laying the ground work with the states in the Basin and Range Province to kick off a joint USGS-state province study; narrowing areas of the Permian and Paradox bedded salt regions to a few promising locations; issuing a Gulf Coast Salt Dome Evaluation report (ONWI-109) for public review and comment; narrowing the Nevada Test Site area and Hanford Site area to locations for detailed site investigations and exploratory shafts; progress in developing the subseabed and space disposals alternatives

  13. Workshops for state review of site suitability criteria for high-level radioactive waste repositories: analysis and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    The responses from various discussion groups on site suitability criteria for high-level radioactive waste repositories are presented. The consensus, principal concern, and minority opinion on each issue are given. The visual aids used in the workshop are included

  14. Geomorphic assessment of uranium mill tailings disposal sites. Summary report of the workshop by the panel of geomorphologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumm, S.A.; Costa, J.E.; Toy, T.; Knox, J.; Warner, R.; Scott, J.

    1982-01-01

    The following report of the panel of geomorphologists is a summary of the principal findings of the geomorphological Workshop with respect to its three objectives: 1) examination of geomorphic controls on site stability, 2) demonstration of the application of the principles of geomorphology to the siting (and design) of stable tailings disposal containment systems, 3) development (in outline) of a procedure for the evaluation of long-term stability of tailing disposal sites

  15. Workshop material for state review of USNRC site suitability criteria for high-level radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is developing criteria on which to judge whether a proposed site for a geologic repository is suitable for disposal of high-level nuclear wastes. To aid in its analysis and assessment, NRC is planning three early independent reviews of the site suitability criteria development effort: a peer review by experts outside of NRC; a review by the National Academy of Sciences; and a review by State officials. This document has been prepared to aid workshop participants in understanding the Preliminary Site Suitability Criteria and to prepare them to contribute to an evaluation of those criteria

  16. Proceedings of the second workshop on thermal-non-thermal interactions in solar flares [TNT-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, K.J.H.

    1989-09-01

    The Second Workshop on the theme of Thermal-Non-thermal Interactions in Solar Flares (TNT-II) was held at Somerville College, University of Oxford, England, during the week of April 10-14, 1989. The keynote address, gave a view of the problems still outstanding with regard to soft and hard X-ray observations of flares. The gathering broke up into four subgroups. The subjects under discussion were: large-scale magnetic field phenomena, flare dynamics, energy release and deposition, and global energy balance. (author)

  17. Workshops for state review of site suitability criteria for high-level radioactive waste repositories: analysis and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the views and recommendations of invited State officials and legislators participating in a workshop concerned with preliminary site suitability criteria for high level radioactive waste repositories. The workshops were open to the public and were conducted by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) during September 1977 in three regional locations across the United States. This contractor report is the second of two reports and consolidates the discussion by State officials on the role of a State in siting a repository, NRC's waste management program, the transportation of high level wastes, the number and location of repositories and concerns with the socio-economic impacts of siting a repository in a community. The recommendations to the NRC can be categorized into four areas. These were: (1) general recommendations, (2) procedural recommendations, (3) recommendations for improving communications, and (4) specific recommendations on the preliminary siting criteria. The recommendations emphasized the need for early State involvement in the siting process, the need for an impacted State to assess repository operations, the need for early solution of waste transportation concerns, and the requirement that any repository developed insure the protection of the public health and safety as its most important characteristic. Other participant recommendations are included in the body of the report

  18. Proceedings of the DOE/Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Radionuclde Adsorption Workshop at Los Alamos National Laboratory, September 11--12, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canepa, J.A.

    1992-08-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory hosted a workshop on radionuclide adsorption for the Department of Energy (DOE)/Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project on September 11 and 12, 1990. The purpose of the workshop was to respond to a recommendation by the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board that the DOE organize a radionuclide adsorption workshop to be attended by the DOE and its contractors involved in the measurement and modeling of such adsorption. The workshop would have two general purposes: (a) to determine the applicability of available radionuclide adsorption data on tuff and models for predicting such adsorption under existing and postclosure conditions at Yucca Mountain and (b) to establish what additional radionuclide adsorption research and model development are needed. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases

  19. On-site meteorological instrumentation requirements to characterize diffusion from point sources: workshop report. Final report Sep 79-Sep 80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strimaitis, D.; Hoffnagle, G.; Bass, A.

    1981-04-01

    Results of a workshop entitled 'On-Site Meteorological Instrumentation Requirements to Characterize Diffusion from Point Sources' are summarized and reported. The workshop was sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Raleigh, North Carolina, on January 15-17, 1980. Its purpose was to provide EPA with a thorough examination of the meteorological instrumentation and data collection requirements needed to characterize airborne dispersion of air contaminants from point sources and to recommend, based on an expert consensus, specific measurement technique and accuracies. Secondary purposes of the workshop were to (1) make recommendations to the National Weather Service (NWS) about collecting and archiving meteorological data that would best support air quality dispersion modeling objectives and (2) make recommendations on standardization of meteorological data reporting and quality assurance programs

  20. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management in 2013 at six uranium mill tailings disposal sites reclaimed under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title II disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE manages six UMTRCA Title II disposal sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established at Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.28. Reclamation and site transition activities continue at other sites, and DOE ultimately expects to manage approximately 27 Title II disposal sites. Long-term surveillance and maintenance activities and services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective action; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder services, and other regulatory functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific long-term surveillance plans (LTSPs) and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up inspections, or corrective action. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available online at http://www.lm.doe.gov

  1. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-11-01

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management in 2013 at six uranium mill tailings disposal sites reclaimed under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title II disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE manages six UMTRCA Title II disposal sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established at Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.28. Reclamation and site transition activities continue at other sites, and DOE ultimately expects to manage approximately 27 Title II disposal sites. Long-term surveillance and maintenance activities and services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective action; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder services, and other regulatory functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific long-term surveillance plans (LTSPs) and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up inspections, or corrective action. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available online at http://www.lm.doe.gov

  2. FACILITIES PLANNING WORKSHOP FOR BLASTING SUPPORT THE ACTIVITY OF DEVELOPMENT AND REPAIR SHIP IN PT. JASA MARINA INDAH UNIT II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Samuel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Blasting in the process of planning the workshop production of new building and ship repair to play a role in providing blasting and paint on the block that will be of erection. As a result of blasting workshop facilities that do not have resulted in low production capacity that can be achieved by this workshop, namely three block ships per month. Capacity blasting and paint shop in this low resulted in low productivity process stage (stage the previous workshops which of course result in a decrease in vessel productivity in general.                 In penelitiaan aims to plan for blasting and paint shop facility which has been adjusted to the planned production capacity of PT. JASA MARINA INDAH II units.                 In this study it - thing to note is to understand the data - the data field for research conducted in terms of both technical and economic terms, with the blasting and paint shop facilities on the construction or repair of ships that have been planned, then the effectiveness of the work and production flow at. Jasa Marina Indah II units can be known.                 Based on the analysis and calculation of both technical and economical it can be identified by the workshop on the process of blasting Blasting efficiency is obtained for 2.55 hours, at 10.16 hours during the painting process, while economical in terms of labor costs can be reduced blasting cost is Rp.930000    for          paint       and         Rp.1.23million

  3. Rigorous Screening Technology for Identifying Suitable CO2 Storage Sites II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George J. Koperna Jr.; Vello A. Kuuskraa; David E. Riestenberg; Aiysha Sultana; Tyler Van Leeuwen

    2009-06-01

    This report serves as the final technical report and users manual for the 'Rigorous Screening Technology for Identifying Suitable CO2 Storage Sites II SBIR project. Advanced Resources International has developed a screening tool by which users can technically screen, assess the storage capacity and quantify the costs of CO2 storage in four types of CO2 storage reservoirs. These include CO2-enhanced oil recovery reservoirs, depleted oil and gas fields (non-enhanced oil recovery candidates), deep coal seems that are amenable to CO2-enhanced methane recovery, and saline reservoirs. The screening function assessed whether the reservoir could likely serve as a safe, long-term CO2 storage reservoir. The storage capacity assessment uses rigorous reservoir simulation models to determine the timing, ultimate storage capacity, and potential for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. Finally, the economic assessment function determines both the field-level and pipeline (transportation) costs for CO2 sequestration in a given reservoir. The screening tool has been peer reviewed at an Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) technical meeting in March 2009. A number of useful observations and recommendations emerged from the Workshop on the costs of CO2 transport and storage that could be readily incorporated into a commercial version of the Screening Tool in a Phase III SBIR.

  4. 76 FR 17657 - Medical Device Epidemiology Network 2011: Second Annual Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... priorities for MDEpiNet. II. Who is the target audience for this public workshop? Who should attend this public workshop? This workshop is open to all interested parties. The target audience is comprised of...

  5. Beta Cell Workshop 2013 Kyoto

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, R Scott; Madsen, Ole D; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2013-01-01

    The very modern Kyoto International Conference Center provided the site for the 8th workshop on Beta cells on April 23-26, 2013. The preceding workshops were held in Boston, USA (1991); Kyoto, Japan (1994); Helsingør, Denmark (1997); Helsinki, Finland (2003); El Perello, Spain (2006); Peebles...

  6. An overview of the Department of Energy's soil washing workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The Soil Washing Workshop was convened in Las Vegas, Nevada, on August 28--29, 1990 at the request of C.W. Frank, Associate Director, Office of Technology Development, US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of the workshop was to determine the status of existing soil washing technologies and their applicability to specific soil contamination problems at DOE sites and at Superfund sites of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). From the workshop deliberations, a course of action would be recommended in developing soil washing technologies. Presentations were given describing the soil contamination problems at various DOE sites. The factors addressed for each site included: type of contamination (organic, heavy metals, radionuclides, etc.), sources of contamination (leaking tanks, ponds, soil columns, pipes, etc.), types of soils that are contaminated, magnitude of the problem, current site activities (remediation), other considerations that impact the use of soil washing technology (e.g., environmental, site policies, etc.), and regulations and standards the sites are required to meet. Major findings and presentations of the workshop are presented

  7. Site Environmental Report for 1998 Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Volume II of the Site Environment Report for 1998 is provided by Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a supplemental appendix to the report printed in volume I. Volume II contains the environmental monitoring and sampling data used to generate summary results in the main report for routine and non routine activities at the Laboratory (except for groundwater sampling data, which may be found in the reports referred to in chapter 6). Data presented in the tables are given in International System of Units (SI) units of measure

  8. Summary of comments received at workshop on use of a Site Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) to facilitate public participation in decommissioning cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caplin, J.; Padge, G.; Smith, D.; Wiblin, C.

    1995-06-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for the decommissioning of NRC-licensed facilities. As part of this rulemaking, On August 20, 1994 the NRC published a proposed rule for public comment. Paragraph 20.1406(b) of the proposed rule would require that the licensee convene a Site Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) if the licensee proposed release of the site for restricted use after decommissioning. To encourage comment the NRC held a workshop on the subject of $SABs on December 6, 7, and 8, 1994. This report summarizes the 567 comments categorized from the transcript of the workshop. The commenters at the workshop generally supported public participation in decommissioning cases. Many participants favored promulgating requirements in the NRC's rules. Some industry participants favored relying on voluntary exchanges between the public and the licensees. Many participants indicated that a SSAB or something functionally equivalent is needed in controversial decommissioning cases, but that some lesser undertaking can achieve meaningful public participation in other cases. No analysis or response to the comments is included in this report

  9. Rotational Seismology Workshop of February 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John R.; Cochard, A.; Graizer, Vladimir; Huang, Bor-Shouh; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Hutt, Charles R.; Igel, H.; Lee, William H.K.; Liu, Chun-Chi; Majewski, Eugeniusz; Nigbor, Robert; Safak, Erdal; Savage, William U.; Schreiber, U.; Teisseyre, Roman; Trifunac, Mihailo; Wassermann, J.; Wu, Chien-Fu

    2007-01-01

    Introduction A successful workshop titled 'Measuring the Rotation Effects of Strong Ground Motion' was held simultaneously in Menlo Park and Pasadena via video conference on 16 February 2006. The purpose of the Workshop and this Report are to summarize existing data and theory and to explore future challenges for rotational seismology, including free-field strong motion, structural strong motion, and teleseismic motions. We also forged a consensus on the plan of work to be pursued by this international group in the near term. At this first workshop were 16 participants in Menlo Park, 13 in Pasadena, and a few on the telephone. It was organized by William H. K. Lee and John R. Evans and chaired by William U. Savage in Menlo Park and by Kenneth W. Hudnut in Pasadena. Its agenda is given in the Appendix. This workshop and efforts in Europe led to the creation of the International Working Group on Rotational Seismology (IWGoRS), an international volunteer group providing forums for exchange of ideas and data as well as hosting a series of Workshops and Special Sessions. IWGoRS created a Web site, backed by an FTP site, for distribution of materials related to rotational seismology. At present, the FTP site contains the 2006 Workshop agenda (also given in the Appendix below) and its PowerPoint presentations, as well as many papers (reasonable-only basis with permission of their authors), a comprehensive citations list, and related information. Eventually, the Web site will become the sole authoritative source for IWGoRS and shared information: http://www.rotational-seismology.org ftp://ehzftp.wr.usgs.gov/jrevans/IWGoRS_FTPsite/ With contributions from various authors during and after the 2006 Workshop, this Report proceeds from the theoretical bases for making rotational measurements (Graizer, Safak, Trifunac) through the available observations (Huang, Lee, Liu, Nigbor), proposed suites of measurements (Hudnut), a discussion of broadband teleseismic rotational

  10. Connecting with the Arts: A Workshop for Middle Grades Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenberg Media, 2005

    2005-01-01

    "Connecting with the Arts: A Workshop for Middle Grades Teachers" is a video workshop for middle school teachers of the arts and other subjects. The workshop includes eight hour-long video programs and a companion workshop guide and Web site. The workshop shows middle school teachers why and how to integrate the arts (dance, music, theatre, and…

  11. Copper(II) Binding Sites in N-Terminally Acetylated α-Synuclein: A Theoretical Rationalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, Rafael; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Vilanova, Bartolomé; Adrover, Miquel; Frau, Juan

    2017-08-03

    The interactions between N-terminally acetylated α-synuclein and Cu(II) at several binding sites have been studied with DFT calculations, specifically with the M06 hybrid functional and the ωB97X-D DFT-D functional. In previous experimental studies, Cu(II) was shown to bind several α-synuclein residues, including Met1-Asp2 and His50, forming square planar coordination complexes. Also, it was determined that a low-affinity binding site exists in the C-terminal domain, centered on Asp121. However, in the N-terminally acetylated protein, present in vivo, the Met1 site is blocked. In this work, we simplify the representation of the protein by modeling each experimentally found binding site as a complex between an N-terminally acetylated α-synuclein dipeptide (or several independent residues) and a Cu(II) cation, and compare the results with a number of additional, structurally analogous sites not experimentally found. This way of representing the binding sites, although extremely simple, allows us to reproduce experimental results and to provide a theoretical rationale to explain the preference of Cu(II) for certain sites, as well as explicit geometrical structures for the complexes formed. These results are important to understand the interactions between α-synuclein and Cu(II), one of the factors inducing structural changes in the protein and leading to aggregated forms of it which may play a role in neurodegeneration.

  12. ARCSACC '99: Workshop Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahir, M.; Biggar, K.

    1999-01-01

    The assessment and remediation of contaminated sites in cold and Arctic environments is an area of increasing concern, primarily because of the unique problems associated with northern regions. Not only the obvious effects of the cold temperatures on the operation of many systems, but also remedial effectiveness of measures under extreme cold conditions are of interest. Accordingly, this workshop was organized to provide a means of exchange of information among people responsible for cleaning-up contaminated sites in cold and Arctic environments, researchers, and providers of remediation services with experience in dealing with such conditions. Speakers at the workshop addressed problems concerning risk assessment and site characterization, contaminant migration in permafrost, contamination caused by mining and associated clean-up problems, assessed bioremediation as a means of contaminant control, reviewed various remediation technologies and techniques, and presented a number of bioremediation case studies. refs., tabs., figs

  13. Japanese contributions to IAEA INTOR workshop, phase two A, part 2, chapter I: introduction, and chapter II: summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Sigeru; Tomabechi, Ken; Fujisawa, Noboru; Iida, Hiromasa; Sugihara, Masayoshi; Seki, Masahiro; Honda, Tsutomu; Kasai, Masao; Itoh, Shin-ichi.

    1985-07-01

    This report corresponds to Chapters I and II of Japanese contribution report to IAEA INTOR Workshop, Phase Two A, Part 2. The major objectives of the INTOR workshop, Phase Two A, Part 2 are to study critical technical issues, and to assess scientific and technical data bases, and to finally upgrade the INTOR design concept. To study critical technical issues that affect the feasibility or practicability of the INTOR design concept, the following five groups are organized; (A) Impurity control, (B) RF heating and current drive, (C) Transient electromagnetics, (D) Maintainability, (E) Technical benefit. In addition to those groups, the three disciplinary groups are organized to assess the worldiode scientific and technical data bases that exist now and that will exist 4-5 years to support the detailed design and construction of an INTOR-like machine, and to identify additional R D that is required; (F) Physics, (G) Engineering, (H) Nuclear. (author)

  14. Vadose Zone Modeling Workshop proceedings, March 29--30, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleel, R.

    1993-08-01

    At the Hanford Site, the record of decision for remediation of CERCLA sites is largely based on results of the baseline risk and performance assessment of the remedial action alternatives. These assessments require the ability to predict the fate and transport of contaminants along appropriate exposure pathways which, in case of the Hanford Site, includes the migration of contaminants through the vadose zone to the water table. Listed below are some of the requirements, as prescribed by the regulators, relative to CERCLA risk and performance assessment at Hanford. A workshop was organized by the Environmental Risk and Performance Assessment Group, Westinghouse Hanford Company on March 29--30, 1993 at the Richland Best Western Tower Inn. During the workshop, an assessment was made of the need for and scope of various tasks being conducted or planned as part of the Hanford Site waste isolation performance assessment/risk assessment activities. Three external, nationally-recognized experts served as part of a review panel for the workshop: (a) Professor Lynn Gelhar of MIT; (b) Professor Peter Wierenga of University of Arizona; and (c) Dr. Rien van Genuchten of US Salinity Laboratory, Riverside, California. The technical experts provided their perspectives on the current state-of-the-art in vadose zone flow and transport modeling. In addition, the technical experts provided an outside independent assessment of the work being performed or planned in support of various activities identified in TPA Milestone M-29-02. This document includes the following: Recommendations from the three peer reviewers; areas of expertise of the three peer reviewers; workshop agenda; copies of viewgraphs (where available) from presenters at the workshop; workshop minutes; and list of workshop attendees

  15. Report of On-Site Inspection Workshop-19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweeney, J. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-07-12

    The objective of this workshop was to carry out discussions on the OSI Equipment List for the initial period techniques and to provide further contribution to the development of the OSI Equipment List. The report of the 36th session of WGB included guidance to develop corresponding concepts of operations for the equipment, identify logistics and infrastructure requirements, and to address software issues related to the equipment.

  16. Planning for environmental restoration of radioactively contaminated sites in central and eastern Europe. V. 3: Technologies for, and the implementation of, environmental restoration of contaminated sites. Proceedings of a workshop held within the technical co-operation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The radioactive contaminant materials resulting from diverse activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, defence related operations, and various industries in addition to medical and research facilities represent perhaps the most severe and immense pollution left from a past era. The political changes in central and eastern Europe (CEE) not only brought some disclosure of the radioactively contaminated sites, but also resulted in a political condition in which this region became receptive to co-operation from a range of outside countries. The subjects of the first workshop held in Budapest, 4-8 October 1993, was the identification and characterization of radioactively contaminated sites in the region. The second part of the project and the second workshop (Piestany, Slovak Republic, 12-16 April 1994) involved planning and preparing the identified sites for restoration. This included items such as the restoration objectives, dose and environmental assessment, cost analysis, strategy and prioritization. Eventually, the third part of the project covered technologies for, and the implementation of, environmental restoration. The third and final workshop was held in Rez, Czech Republic, 12-16 December 1994. Refs, figs, tabs.

  17. Planning for environmental restoration of radioactively contaminated sites in central and eastern Europe. V. 3: Technologies for, and the implementation of, environmental restoration of contaminated sites. Proceedings of a workshop held within the technical co-operation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The radioactive contaminant materials resulting from diverse activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, defence related operations, and various industries in addition to medical and research facilities represent perhaps the most severe and immense pollution left from a past era. The political changes in central and eastern Europe (CEE) not only brought some disclosure of the radioactively contaminated sites, but also resulted in a political condition in which this region became receptive to co-operation from a range of outside countries. The subjects of the first workshop held in Budapest, 4-8 October 1993, was the identification and characterization of radioactively contaminated sites in the region. The second part of the project and the second workshop (Piestany, Slovak Republic, 12-16 April 1994) involved planning and preparing the identified sites for restoration. This included items such as the restoration objectives, dose and environmental assessment, cost analysis, strategy and prioritization. Eventually, the third part of the project covered technologies for, and the implementation of, environmental restoration. The third and final workshop was held in Rez, Czech Republic, 12-16 December 1994. Refs, figs, tabs

  18. Report on July 2015 Additional Protocol Coordinators Best Practices Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitau, Ernest T.N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burbank, Roberta L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Finch, Valerie A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-07-31

    After 10 years of implementation experience, the Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control (NPAC) within the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) conducted the Additional Protocol (AP) Coordinators Best Practices Workshop at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from July 29-30, 2015. The goal of this workshop was to identify implementation best practices, lessons learned, and compliance challenges from the various Additional Protocol Coordinators (APCs) at each laboratory in the DOE/NNSA complex and associated sites. The workshop provided the opportunity for participants to share their insights and establish networks that APCs can utilize to continue to discuss challenges (new and old), identify best practices, and enhance communication and coordination for reporting multi-lab research projects during review activities. Workshop participants included DOE/NNSA HQ, laboratory and site APCs, seasoned experts, members of the original implementation outreach team, and Field Element and site security representatives.

  19. Proceedings of the 2nd Annual Tank Integrity Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelson, M.C.; Thompson, R. Bruce

    2001-01-01

    The production of nuclear weapons in the United States to help defeat the Axis Powers in World War II and to maintain national security during the Cold War required the construction of a vast nuclear facility complex in the 1940's and 1950's. These facilities housed nuclear reactors needed for the production of plutonium and chemical plants required to separate the plutonium from fission products and to convert plutonium compounds to pure plutonium metal needed for weapons. The chemical separation processes created ''high-level waste'' that was eventually stored in metal tanks at each site. These wastes and other nuclear wastes still reside at sites throughout the United States. At the Savannah River Site, a facility (the Defense Waste Processing Facility) has been constructed to vitrify stored high-level waste that will be transferred to the national high-level waste repository. The liquid wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory have largely been stabilized as a mixture of oxide particles (calcines) but liquid wastes remain to be treated and the calcined waste will probably require further processing into a final, stable form. The Hanford Site is now in the initial stages of waste treatment facility design and has a large number of single-shell tanks, many of which are known to be leaking into the subsurface. The Oak Ridge Site, which did not produce ''high level waste'' as defined by DOE, continues to rely upon tank storage for nuclear wastes although most of its older liquid wastes have been successfully stabilized. The site at West Valley, near Buffalo, NY, marks the location of the nation's only commercial fuel reprocessing facility. As a result of an agreement with the state of New York, the DOE assumed a major role in the stabilization of the high-level waste stored at this site and its eventual closure. A feature common to many of these sites is that they must continue to rely upon large underground tanks to store dangerously

  20. Competitiveness Improvement Project Informational Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Karin C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Preus, Robert W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dana, Scott [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Van Dam, Jeroen J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Damiani, Rick R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jackson, Kyndall R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Baring-Gould, Edward I [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jain, Anant [Intertek

    2018-02-27

    This presentation was given at the Competitiveness Improvement Project (CIP) Informational Workshop on December 6, 2017. Topics covered during the workshop include an overview of the CIP, past projects, scoring criteria, technical support opportunities, certification body requirements, standards applicable to distributed wind generators, information on the National Electric Code, certification testing requirements, test site requirements, National Environmental Policy Act, design review, levelized cost of energy, procurement/contracting, project management/deliverables, and outreach materials.

  1. Workshop on fundamental geochemistry needs for nuclear waste isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, J.H. (ed.)

    1985-09-01

    In their deliberations, workshop participants did not attempt to incorporate the constraints that the 1982 National Nuclear Waste Management Policy Act placed upon the site-specific investigations. In particular, there was no attempt to (1) identify the research areas that apply most strongly to a particular potential repository site, (2) identify the chronological time when the necessary data or knowledge could be available, or (3) include a sensitivity analysis to prioritize and limit data needs. The workshop participants felt these are the purview of the site-specific investigations; the purpose of the workshop was to discuss the generic geochemistry research needs for a nuclear waste repository among as broad spectrum of individual scientists as possible and to develop a consensus of what geochemical information is important and why.

  2. Workshop on fundamental geochemistry needs for nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiken, J.H.

    1985-09-01

    In their deliberations, workshop participants did not attempt to incorporate the constraints that the 1982 National Nuclear Waste Management Policy Act placed upon the site-specific investigations. In particular, there was no attempt to (1) identify the research areas that apply most strongly to a particular potential repository site, (2) identify the chronological time when the necessary data or knowledge could be available, or (3) include a sensitivity analysis to prioritize and limit data needs. The workshop participants felt these are the purview of the site-specific investigations; the purpose of the workshop was to discuss the generic geochemistry research needs for a nuclear waste repository among as broad spectrum of individual scientists as possible and to develop a consensus of what geochemical information is important and why

  3. Workshop on Seismic Performance of Underground Facilities: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine, I.W.

    1982-01-01

    A workshop entitled Seismic Performance of Underground Facilities was held in Augusta, GA, February 11-13, 1981. The Workshop was organized and conducted by The Savannah River Laboratory of E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. and was sponsored by The Department of Energy and The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation of Battelle. The objective of the Workshop was to review and assess the state of the science of determining and predicting damage to underground facilities from earthquakes, with particular emphasis on the ultimate goal of developing criteria for siting and design of mined geologic nuclear waste repositories. The Workshop consisted of a day of presentations in the categories of Introduction, Data Collection and Analysis, Modeling, and Design. The second day consisted of assessments of the science by subgroups in the subjects of Seismology; Rock Mechanics and Hydrology; Modeling; Licensing, Siting, and Tectonics; and Design. Most Scientists in attendance believed that enough was known of the subsurface effects of earthquakes to proceed with site selection, design, and licensing of a waste repository. There was, however, recognition of several items of research that would enhance the understanding of the subsurface effects of seismicity

  4. Proceedings of Pulsed Magnet Design and Measurement Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaftan, T.; Heese, R.; Ozaki,S.

    2010-01-19

    The goals of the Workshop are to assess the design of pulsed system at the NSLS-II and establish mitigation strategies for critical issues during development. The focus of the Workshop is on resolving questions related to the set-up of the pulsed magnet laboratory, on measuring the pulsed magnet's current waveforms and fields, and on achieving tight tolerances on the magnet's alignment and field quality.

  5. Workshop on Women of Applied Mathematics: Research and Leadership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dianne P. O' Leary; Tamara G. Kolda

    2004-09-28

    We held a two and a half day workshop on Women of Applied Mathematics: Research and Leadership at the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland, October 8--10, 2003. The workshop provided a technical and professional forum for eleven senior women and twenty-four early-career women in applied mathematics. Each participant committed to an outreach activity and publication of a report on the workshop's web site. The final session of the workshop produced recommendations for future action.

  6. Homology modeling and docking of AahII-Nanobody complexes reveal the epitope binding site on AahII scorpion toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksouri, Ayoub; Ghedira, Kais; Ben Abderrazek, Rahma; Shankar, B A Gowri; Benkahla, Alia; Bishop, Ozlem Tastan; Bouhaouala-Zahar, Balkiss

    2018-02-19

    Scorpion envenoming and its treatment is a public health problem in many parts of the world due to highly toxic venom polypeptides diffusing rapidly within the body of severely envenomed victims. Recently, 38 AahII-specific Nanobody sequences (Nbs) were retrieved from which the performance of NbAahII10 nanobody candidate, to neutralize the most poisonous venom compound namely AahII acting on sodium channels, was established. Herein, structural computational approach is conducted to elucidate the Nb-AahII interactions that support the biological characteristics, using Nb multiple sequence alignment (MSA) followed by modeling and molecular docking investigations (RosettaAntibody, ZDOCK software tools). Sequence and structural analysis showed two dissimilar residues of NbAahII10 CDR1 (Tyr27 and Tyr29) and an inserted polar residue Ser30 that appear to play an important role. Indeed, CDR3 region of NbAahII10 is characterized by a specific Met104 and two negatively charged residues Asp115 and Asp117. Complex dockings reveal that NbAahII17 and NbAahII38 share one common binding site on the surface of the AahII toxin divergent from the NbAahII10 one's. At least, a couple of NbAahII10 - AahII residue interactions (Gln38 - Asn44 and Arg62, His64, respectively) are mainly involved in the toxic AahII binding site. Altogether, this study gives valuable insights in the design and development of next generation of antivenom. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Workshop 96. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Part II of the seminar proceedings contains contributions in various areas of science and technology, among them materials science in mechanical engineering, materials science in electrical, chemical and civil engineering, and electronics, measuring and communication engineering. In those areas, 6 contributions have been selected for INIS. (P.A.).

  8. Workshop 96. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    Part II of the seminar proceedings contains contributions in various areas of science and technology, among them materials science in mechanical engineering, materials science in electrical, chemical and civil engineering, and electronics, measuring and communication engineering. In those areas, 6 contributions have been selected for INIS. (P.A.)

  9. Obesity Prevention from Conception: A Workshop to Guide the Development of a Pan-Canadian Trial Targeting the Gestational Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi B. Adamo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This report summarizes a meeting, Obesity Prevention from Conception , held in Ottawa in 2012. This planning workshop was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR to bring together researchers with expertise in the area of maternal obesity (OB and weight gain in pregnancy and pregnancy-related disease to attend a one-day workshop and symposium to discuss the development of a cross-Canada lifestyle intervention trial for targeting pregnant women. This future intervention will aim to reduce downstream OB in children through encouraging appropriate weight gain during the mother's pregnancy. The workshop served to (i inform the development of a lifestyle intervention for women with a high pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI, (ii identify site investigators across Canada, and (iii guide the development of a grant proposal focusing on the health of mom and baby. A brief summary of the presentations as well as the focus groups is presented for use in planning future research.

  10. 78 FR 5765 - Wireline Competition Bureau Releases Connect America Phase II Cost Model Virtual Workshop...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... virtual workshop topics related to the development and adoption of the forward-looking cost model for...://www.fcc.gov/blog/wcb-cost-model-virtual-workshop-2012 . [ssquf] People with Disabilities: Contact the.../wcb-cost-model-virtual-workshop-2012 . I. Introduction 1. On November 18, 2011, the Federal...

  11. Waste Separations and Pretreatment Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruse, J.M.; Harrington, R.A.; Quadrel, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides the minutes from the Waste Separations and Pretreatment Workshop sponsored by the Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration in Salt Lake City, Utah, February 3--5, 1993. The Efficient Separations and Processing-Integrated Program and the Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System were joint participants. This document provides the detailed minutes, including responses to questions asked, an attendance list, reproductions of the workshop presentations, and a revised chart showing technology development activities

  12. Single-Site Palladium(II) Catalyst for Oxidative Heck Reaction: Catalytic Performance and Kinetic Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hui; Li, Mengyang; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Huang, Zhiliang; Sun, Yu; Luo, Zhong; Chen, Hongzhong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Zou, Ruqiang; Lei, Aiwen; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The development of organometallic single-site catalysts (SSCs) has inspired the designs of new heterogeneous catalysts with high efficiency. Nevertheless, the application of SSCs in certain modern organic reactions, such as C-C bond formation reactions, has still been less investigated. In this study, a single-site Pd(II) catalyst was developed, where 2,2'-bipyridine-grafted periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) was employed as the support of a Pd(II) complex. The overall performance of the single-site Pd(II) catalyst in the oxidative Heck reaction was then investigated. The investigation results show that the catalyst displays over 99% selectivity for the product formation with high reaction yield. Kinetic profiles further confirm its high catalytic efficiency, showing that the rate constant is nearly 40 times higher than that for the free Pd(II) salt. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that the catalyst has remarkable lifetime and recyclability.

  13. Proceedings of the workshop on siting of radioactive waste repositories in geological formations. Compte rendu d'une reunion de travail sur le choix des sites des depots de dechets radioactifs dans les formations geologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The objectives of this workshop were: to review the approaches used in NEA Member countries for the siting of repositories; to consider what information is required to determine whether a particular location is suitable as a disposal site; to review the technical means that can be used to obtain the necessary information; to discuss possible approaches for effectively communicating to the public the results of the site characterisation process. The papers and discussions at the meeting are recorded in these proceedings which provide a synthesis of the present thinking in this field.

  14. Proceedings of the third specialists' workshop on modeling tritium behaviour in ceramic fusion blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werle, H.

    1991-08-01

    The third specialists' workshop on modeling tritium behaviour in ceramic fusion blankets, hosted by Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, was held June 10-11, 1991. The workshop was coordinated through the IEA Annex II implementing agreement on 'Radiation damage in fusion materials'. (orig./WL)

  15. 4th Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebs, Carsten [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-08-22

    The research area of biological inorganic chemistry encompasses a wide variety of subfields, including molecular biology, biochemistry, biophysics, inorganic chemistry, analytical chemistry, physical chemistry, and theoretical chemistry, as well as many different methods, such as biochemical characterization of enzymes, reaction kinetics, a plethora of spectroscopic techniques, and computational methods. The above methods are combined to understand the formation, function, and regulation of the many metallo-cofactors found in Nature as well as to identify novel metallo-cofactors. Many metalloenzyme-catalyzed reactions are extremely complex, but are of fundamental importance to science and society. Examples include (i) the reduction of the chemically inert molecule, dinitrogen, to ammonia by the enzyme nitrogenase (this reaction is fundamental for the production of nitrogen fertilizers); (ii) the oxidation of water to dioxygen by the Mn4Ca cluster found in photosystem II; and (iii) myriad reactions in which aliphatic, inert C-H bonds are cleaved for subsequent functionalization of the carbon atoms (the latter reactions are important in the biosynthesis of many natural products). Because of the broad range of areas and techniques employed in this field, research in bioinorganic chemistry is typically carried out collaboratively between two or more research groups. It is of paramount importance that researchers working in this field have a good, basic, working knowledge of many methods and approaches employed in the field, in order to design and discuss experiments with collaborators. Therefore, the training of students working in bioinorganic chemistry is an important aspect of this field. Hugely successful “bioinorganic workshops” were offered in the 1990s at The University of Georgia. These workshops laid the foundation for many of the extant collaborative research efforts in this area today. The large and diverse group of bioinorganic chemists at The

  16. Proceedings from the Workshop on Phytoremediation of Inorganic Contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.T.; Matthern, G.; Glenn, A.; Kauffman, J.; Rock, S.; Kuperberg, M.; Ainsworth, C.; Waugh, J.

    2000-01-01

    The Metals and Radionuclides Product Line of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) is responsible for the development of technologies and systems that reduce the risk and cost of remediation of radionuclide and hazardous metal contamination in soils and groundwater. The rapid and efficient remediation of these sites and the areas surrounding them represents a technological challenge. Phytoremediation, the use of living plants to cleanup contaminated soils, sediments, surface water and groundwater, is an emerging technology that may be applicable to the problem. The use of phytoremediation to cleanup organic contamination is widely accepted and is being implemented at numerous sites. This workshop was held to initiate a discussion in the scientific community about whether phytoremediation is applicable to inorganic contaminants, such as metals and radionuclides, across the DOE complex. The Workshop on Phytoremediation of Inorganic Contaminants was held at Argonne National Laboratory from November 30 through December 2, 1999. The purpose of the workshop was to provide SCFA and the DOE Environmental Restoration Program with an understanding of the status of phytoremediation as a potential remediation technology for DOE sites. The workshop was expected to identify data gaps, technologies ready for demonstration and deployment, and to provide a set of recommendations for the further development of these technologies

  17. Proceedings from the Workshop on Phytoremediation of Inorganic Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. T. Brown; G. Matthern; A. Glenn (INEEL); J. Kauffman (EnviroIssues); S. Rock (USEPA); M. Kuperberg (Florida State U); C. Ainsworth (PNNL); J. Waugh (Roy F. Weston Assoc.)

    2000-02-01

    The Metals and Radionuclides Product Line of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) is responsible for the development of technologies and systems that reduce the risk and cost of remediation of radionuclide and hazardous metal contamination in soils and groundwater. The rapid and efficient remediation of these sites and the areas surrounding them represents a technological challenge. Phytoremediation, the use of living plants to cleanup contaminated soils, sediments, surface water and groundwater, is an emerging technology that may be applicable to the problem. The use of phytoremediation to cleanup organic contamination is widely accepted and is being implemented at numerous sites. This workshop was held to initiate a discussion in the scientific community about whether phytoremediation is applicable to inorganic contaminants, such as metals and radionuclides, across the DOE complex. The Workshop on Phytoremediation of Inorganic Contaminants was held at Argonne National Laboratory from November 30 through December 2, 1999. The purpose of the workshop was to provide SCFA and the DOE Environmental Restoration Program with an understanding of the status of phytoremediation as a potential remediation technology for DOE sites. The workshop was expected to identify data gaps, technologies ready for demonstration and deployment, and to provide a set of recommendations for the further development of these technologies.

  18. International workshop: islet transplantation without borders enabling islet transplantation in Greece with international collaboration and innovative technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Klearchos K; Karatzas, Theodore; Berney, Thierry; Minor, Thomas; Pappas, Paris; Pattou, François; Shaw, James; Toso, Christian; Schuurman, Henk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Recently, initiatives have been undertaken to establish an islet transplantation program in Athens, Greece. A major hurdle is the high cost associated with the establishment and maintenance of a clinical-grade islet manufacturing center. A collaboration was established with the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland, to enable remote islet cell manufacturing with an established and validated fully operational team. However, remote islet manufacturing requires shipment of the pancreas from the procurement to the islet manufacturing site (in this case from anywhere in Greece to Geneva) and then shipment of the islets from the manufacturing site to the transplant site (from Geneva to Athens). To address challenges related to cold ischemia time of the pancreas and shipment time of islets, a collaboration was initiated with the University of Arizona, Tucson, USA. An international workshop was held in Athens, December 2011, to mark the start of this collaborative project. Experts in the field presented in three main sessions: (i) islet transplantation: state-of-the-art and the "network approach"; (ii) technical aspects of clinical islet transplantation and outcomes; and (iii) islet manufacturing - from the donated pancreas to the islet product. This manuscript presents a summary of the workshop. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. What Do Community Science Workshops Do For Kids? The Benefits to Urban Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverness Research Associates, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This module presents the range of benefits youths receive from their participation in Community Science Workshops (CSWs)--from personal, to social, to academic and how these benefits reveal the core values of the CSWs in action. The multi-year evaluation of the CSW program included site visits to multiple Community Science Workshop sites around…

  20. Final Phase II report : QuickSite(R) investigation, Everest, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Research)

    2003-11-01

    this reason, the CCC/USDA is conducting an environmental site investigation to determine the source(s) and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at Everest and to assess whether the contamination requires remedial action. The investigation at Everest is being performed by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. At these facilities, Argonne is applying its QuickSite{reg_sign} environmental site characterization methodology. This methodology has been applied successfully at a number of former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and Nebraska and has been adopted by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM 1998) as standard practice for environmental site characterization. Phase I of the QuickSite{reg_sign} investigation examined the key geologic, hydrogeologic, and hydrogeochemical relationships that define potential contaminant migration pathways at Everest (Argonne 2001). Phase II of the QuickSite{reg_sign} investigation at Everest was undertaken with the primary goal of delineating and improving understanding of the distribution of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at this site and the potential source area(s) that might have contributed to this contamination. To address this goal, four specific technical objectives were developed to guide the Phase II field studies. Sampling of near-surface soils at the former Everest CCC/USDA facility that was originally planned for Phase I had to be postponed until October 2000 because of access restrictions. Viable vegetation was not available for sampling then. This period is termed the first session of Phase II

  1. 1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database.

  2. 1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database

  3. Minutes of the third annual workshop on chromate replacements in light metal finishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilinger, T.R.; Buchheit, R.G.; Kelly, M.J. [and others

    1994-05-01

    Goal of the workshop was to bring together coating researchers, developers, and users from a variety of industries (defense, automotive, aerospace, packaging) to discuss new coating ideas from the perspective not only of end user, but also the coating supplier, developer, and researcher. The following are included in this document: workshop agenda, list of attendees, summary of feedback, workshop notes compiled by organizers, summaries of Sessions II and IV by session moderators, and vugraphs and abstracts.

  4. Amalgam Electrode-Based Electrochemical Detector for On-Site Direct Determination of Cadmium(II and Lead(II from Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Nejdl

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Toxic metal contamination of the environment is a global issue. In this paper, we present a low-cost and rapid production of amalgam electrodes used for determination of Cd(II and Pb(II in environmental samples (soils and wastewaters by on-site analysis using difference pulse voltammetry. Changes in the electrochemical signals were recorded with a miniaturized potentiostat (width: 80 mm, depth: 54 mm, height: 23 mm and a portable computer. The limit of detection (LOD was calculated for the geometric surface of the working electrode 15 mm2 that can be varied as required for analysis. The LODs were 80 ng·mL−1 for Cd(II and 50 ng·mL−1 for Pb(II, relative standard deviation, RSD ≤ 8% (n = 3. The area of interest (Dolni Rozinka, Czech Republic was selected because there is a deposit of uranium ore and extreme anthropogenic activity. Environmental samples were taken directly on-site and immediately analysed. Duration of a single analysis was approximately two minutes. The average concentrations of Cd(II and Pb(II in this area were below the global average. The obtained values were verified (correlated by standard electrochemical methods based on hanging drop electrodes and were in good agreement. The advantages of this method are its cost and time effectivity (approximately two minutes per one sample with direct analysis of turbid samples (soil leach in a 2 M HNO3 environment. This type of sample cannot be analyzed using the classical analytical methods without pretreatment.

  5. 3ircular dichroism simulation shows a site-II-to-site-I displacement of human serum albumin-bound diclofenac by ibuprofen

    OpenAIRE

    Yamasaki, Keishi; Rahman, Mohammed Hablbur; Tsutsumi, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Toru; Ahmed, Shamim; Kragh-Hansen; Otagiri, Masaki

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to confirm the hypothesis that a site-II-to-site-I displacement takes place when some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are displaced by another drug from their high-affinity binding site to a site of lower affinity on human serum albumin (HSA).Methods: Diclofenac, sodium salt, was used as a representative example because of its prominent reversal of the Cotton effect. Effects of site-specific drugs on the free fraction of diclofenac were determined b...

  6. Report of the transition crossing mini-workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Chou, W.

    1996-07-01

    This was the first in a series of mini-workshops on high intensity, high brightness hadron beams. Twenty five people from CERN, KEK, BNL, Fermilab and University of Houston attended the workshop. The first day was a plenary session with nine presentations. On the second day, three working groups (WG) were formed: WG-I was on theory, simulation and measurements, led by J.P. Riunaud (CERN) and P.L. Colestock (Fermilab); WG-II was on γ t -jump systems, led by T. Roser (BNL) and W. Chou (Fermilab); WG-III was on new schemes, led by Y. Mori (KEK) and J. Griffin (Fermilab). Each group gave a presentation at the final plenary session. The summaries from the three working groups are included in this report. During the workshop, P. Martin gave a guided tour to the Main Injector tunnel, which is under construction at Fermilab

  7. ENTRIA workshop: Emotions in the implementation of a final nuclear disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kattau, Alke

    2016-01-01

    On 21 June 2016, prior to the publication of the report of the Commission Storage of High Radioactive Waste, ''Emotions in the realisation of a repository for nuclear waste'' were the topic of a workshop. The workshop was organised in the context of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) interdisciplinary research platform ENTRIA. In his opening remarks, Prof.Dr. Ulrich Smeddinck (Institute of Law of the University of Braunschweig) noticed, that emotions have been neglected in the scientific analysis so far, but fears and feelings to be considered with a special view.

  8. Carotenoid-binding sites of the major light-harvesting complex II of higher plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croce, Roberta; Weiss, Saskia; Bassi, Roberto

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) proteins with modified carotenoid composition have been obtained by in vitro reconstitution of the Lhcb1 protein overexpressed in bacteria. The monomeric protein possesses three xanthophyll-binding sites. The L1 and L2 sites, localized by electron

  9. ITER workshops demonstrate details of Canada's bid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, P.

    2001-01-01

    On 5 and 6 November a series of five Workshops were held in Canada that provided thirty international ITER participants with significant background on various aspects of the Canadian offer. The public-private sector partnership basis for the Canadian offer is unique, and the Workshops provided an opportunity for participants from the EU, Japan and the Russian Federation to broaden their understanding of the offer and to share and discuss issues that may be relevant in the preparation of other site offers

  10. The Dimanganese(II) Site of Bacillus subtilis Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boal, Amie K.; Cotruvo, Jr., Joseph A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (MIT); (NWU)

    2014-10-02

    Class Ib ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) use a dimanganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor, Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet}, in their homodimeric NrdF ({beta}2) subunit to initiate reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. The structure of the Mn{sub 2}{sup II} form of NrdF is an important component in understanding O{sub 2}-mediated formation of the active metallocofactor, a subject of much interest because a unique flavodoxin, NrdI, is required for cofactor assembly. Biochemical studies and sequence alignments suggest that NrdF and NrdI proteins diverge into three phylogenetically distinct groups. The only crystal structure to date of a NrdF with a fully ordered and occupied dimanganese site is that of Escherichia coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF, prototypical of the enzymes from actinobacteria and proteobacteria. Here we report the 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF, representative of the enzymes from a second group, from Bacillus and Staphylococcus. The structures of the metal clusters in the {beta}2 dimer are distinct from those observed in E. coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF. These differences illustrate the key role that solvent molecules and protein residues in the second coordination sphere of the Mn{sub 2}{sup II} cluster play in determining conformations of carboxylate residues at the metal sites and demonstrate that diverse coordination geometries are capable of serving as starting points for Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor assembly in class Ib RNRs.

  11. Student Hands-On Training (SHOT) Workshop Summer 2003 and 2004

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koehler, Chris

    2004-01-01

    .... The objective of SHOT I AND II workshops are to provide these new students exposure to some of the basics of spacecraft construction, the teamwork and coordination involved, as well as the challenges...

  12. Proceedings of the geosciences workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-01-01

    The manuscripts in these proceedings represent current understanding of geologic issues associated with the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The Weldon Spring site is in St. Charles County, Missouri. The proceedings are the record of the information presented during the WSSRAP Geosciences Workshop conducted on February 21, 1991. The objective of the workshop and proceedings is to provide the public and scientific community with technical information that will facilitate a common understanding of the geology of the Weldon Spring site, of the studies that have been and will be conducted, and of the issues associated with current and planned activities at the site. This coverage of geologic topics is part of the US Department of Energy overall program to keep the public fully informed of the status of the project and to address public concerns as we clean up the site and work toward the eventual release of the property for use by this and future generations. Papers in these proceedings detail the geology and hydrology of the site. The mission of the WSSRAP derives from the US Department of Energy's Surplus Facilities Management Program. The WSSRAP will eliminate potential hazards to the public and the environment and make surplus real property available for other uses to the extent possible. This will be accomplished by conducting remedial actions which will place the quarry, the raffinate pits, the chemical plant, and the vicinity properties in a radiologically and chemically safe condition. The individual papers have been catalogued separately.

  13. Report of the Fourth international workshop on human chromosome 18 mapping 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, G.A.; Overhauser, J.; Gerken, S.; Aburomia, R.; O'Connell, P.; Krauter, K.S.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Yoshikawa, T.; Collins, A.R.; Geurts van Kessel, A.

    1996-01-01

    The fourth international workshop on human chromosome 18 mapping was held in Boston, Massachusetts, USA on October 7-9, 1996. The workshop was attended by 34 participants from 7 countries. The goals of the workshop were to (1) generate integrated genetic and physical maps, (2) update the transcriptional map, (3) assess the syntenic relationships between human chromosome 18 and the mouse genome, and (4) establish a chromosome 18 web site

  14. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, E. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Chipman, V.; Emer, D. F.; White, R. L.; Emmitt, R.; Wright, A. A.; Drellack, S.; Huckins-Gang, H.; Mercadante, J.; Floyd, M.; McGowin, C.; Cothrun, C.; Bonal, N.

    2013-12-01

    An objective of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to identify low-yield nuclear explosions from a regional distance. Low-yield nuclear explosions can often be difficult to discriminate among the clutter of natural and man-made explosive events (e.g., earthquakes and mine blasts). The SPE is broken into three phases. Phase I has provided the first of the physics-based data to test the empirical models that have been used to discriminate nuclear events. The Phase I series of tests were placed within a highly fractured granite body. The evolution of the project has led to development of Phase II, to be placed within the opposite end member of geology, an alluvium environment, thereby increasing the database of waveforms to build upon in the discrimination models. Both the granite and alluvium sites have hosted nearby nuclear tests, which provide comparisons for the chemical test data. Phase III of the SPE is yet to be determined. For Phase II of the experiment, characterization of the location is required to develop the geologic/geophysical models for the execution of the experiment. Criteria for the location are alluvium thickness of approximately 170 m and a water table below 170 m; minimal fracturing would be ideal. A P-wave mini-vibroseis survey was conducted at a potential site in alluvium to map out the subsurface geology. The seismic reflection profile consisted of 168 geophone stations, spaced 5 m apart. The mini-vibe was a 7,000-lb peak-force source, starting 57.5 m off the north end of the profile and ending 57.5 m past the southern-most geophone. The length of the profile was 835 m. The source points were placed every 5 m, equally spaced between geophones to reduce clipping. The vibroseis sweep was from 20 Hz down to 180 Hz over 8 seconds, and four sweeps were stacked at each shot location. The shot gathers show high signal-to-noise ratios with clear first arrivals across the entire spread and the suggestion of some shallow reflectors. The data were

  15. Towards the Study of the Early Medieval Site Bashanta-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochir-Goryaeva Maria A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors offer preliminary results on study of a new early medieval site discovered in the Gorodovikovo District (Kalmykia during a field survey near Bashanta-I hillfort at Chapaevskoe Lake (or Tsagan nur in Kalmyk language. The new site is found 8 km to the south-west from Bashanta-I hillfort, on the bank of the Egorlyk River. The site is dated by two radiocarbon dates by the middle of the 7th – late 8th centuries, i.e. by the time of Khazar Khanate. Some preliminary studies on the site included topographical mapping, collection of stray finds and a few prospection pits. These activities yielded numerous ceramic sherds, roof tiles and debris of masonry. Judging by the existing cultural stratum, remains of stone structures made of shell stone blocks and numerous ceramic finds of good quality, the new site was a settlement of Saltovo-Mayaki Culture, presumably a satellite hillfort. The identity of ceramics and construction materials allowed the authors to name this new site as Bashanta-II.

  16. Competitive binding of Chlorin p6 and Dansyl-L-Proline to Sudlow's site II of human serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunita; Sharma, Kaushal Kishor; Datta, Anindya

    2015-03-01

    The binding of chlorin p6, a model photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy (PDT), to the Sudlow's site II of Human Serum Albumin (HSA) has been monitored by different spectroscopic methods. Displacement of Dansyl-L-Proline (DP) from its conjugate with HSA is manifested in the spectral shift and decrease in its fluorescence intensity as well as the emergence of component with lifetime of 2-3 ns, which is characteristic of free DP. As DP is known to bind specifically to the Sudlow's site II of human serum albumin, its displacement by chlorin p6 indicates the residence of the photosensitizer in the same site, in addition to Sudlow's site I. The binding constants for Sudlow's site II, determined by the stopped-flow technique, are found to be two orders of magnitude smaller than that for Sudlow's site I.

  17. SPERA Workshop on environmental radioactivity, and the Workshop on Radiological Aspects of the Rehabilitiation of Contaminated Sites, June 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, M.

    1996-01-01

    Since its inception in 1991, the membership of the South Pacific Environmental Radioactivity Association (SPERA) has grown steadily, with over 50 members now enrolled. Both the attendance and quality of the biennial SPERA Workshops have increased as the organisation has matured, with each meeting building on the previous one; Dunedin 1992, Canberra 1994, and now SPERA96 in Darwin. Forty three people attended SPERA96, the majority from within Australia from government departments (mines, energy, human services, and health), mining companies, universities, ANSTO, ARL, ERISS, EPA, AGSO, and AIMS; together with participants from Chile, French Polynesia, Ireland, Japan and New Zealand. The Workshop had the theme of: The measurement of natural, technologically enhanced, and artificial radioactivity in the environment: methods, surveys, and applications. Such a general theme attracted a wide range of papers. (author)

  18. Proceedings from the Workshop on Phytoremediation of Inorganic Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Jay Thatcher; Matthern, Gretchen Elise; Glenn, Anne Williams; Kauffman, J.; Rock, S.; Kuperberg, M.; Ainsworkth, C.; Waugh, J.

    2000-02-01

    The Metals and Radionuclides Product Line of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) is responsible for the development of technologies and systems that reduce the risk and cost of remediation of radionuclide and hazardous metal contamination in soils and groundwater. The rapid and efficient remediation of these sites and the areas surrounding them represents a technological challenge. Phytoremediation, the use of living plants to cleanup contaminated soils, sediments, surface water and groundwater, is an emerging technology that may be applicable to the problem. The use of phytoremediation to cleanup organic contamination is widely accepted and is being implemented at numerous sites. This workshop was held to initiate a discussion in the scientific community about whether phytoremediation is applicable to inorganic contaminants, such as metals and radionuclides, across the DOE complex. The Workshop on Phytoremediation of Inorganic Contaminants was held at Argonne National Laboratory from November 30 through December 2, 1999. The purpose of the workshop was to provide SCFA and the DOE Environmental Restoration Program with an understanding of the status of phytoremediation as a potential remediation technology for DOE sites. The workshop was expected to identify data gaps, technologies ready for demonstration and deployment, and to provide a set of recommendations for the further development of these technologies. More specifically, the objectives of the workshop were to: · Determine the status of the existing baseline, including technological maturation, · Identify areas for future potential research, · Identify the key issues and recommendations for issue resolution, · Recommend a strategy for maturing key aspects of phytoremediation, · Improve communication and collaboration among organizations currently involved in phytoremediation research, and · Identify technical barriers to making phytoremediation commercially

  19. Planning for environmental restoration of radioactively contaminated sites in central and eastern Europe. V.1: Identification and characterization of contaminated sites. Proceedings of a workshop held within the technical co-operation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The radioactive contaminant materials resulting from diverse activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, defense related operations, and various industries in addition to medical and research facilities represent perhaps the most severe and immense pollution left from a past era. The political changes in central and eastern Europe (CEE) not only brought some disclosure of the radioactively contaminated sites, but also resulted in a political condition in which this region became receptive to co-operation from a range of outside countries. The subject of the first workshop held in Budapest, 4-8 October 1993, was the identification and characterization of radioactively contaminated sites in the region. Refs, figs and tabs.

  20. Planning for environmental restoration of radioactively contaminated sites in central and eastern Europe. V.1: Identification and characterization of contaminated sites. Proceedings of a workshop held within the technical co-operation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    The radioactive contaminant materials resulting from diverse activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, defense related operations, and various industries in addition to medical and research facilities represent perhaps the most severe and immense pollution left from a past era. The political changes in central and eastern Europe (CEE) not only brought some disclosure of the radioactively contaminated sites, but also resulted in a political condition in which this region became receptive to co-operation from a range of outside countries. The subject of the first workshop held in Budapest, 4-8 October 1993, was the identification and characterization of radioactively contaminated sites in the region. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. UVI Cyber-security Workshop Workshop Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuykendall, Tommie G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Allsop, Jacob Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, Benjamin Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boumedine, Marc [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carter, Cedric [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Galvin, Seanmichael Yurko [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gonzalez, Oscar [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lee, Wellington K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lin, Han Wei [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morris, Tyler Jake [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nauer, Kevin S.; Potts, Beth A.; Ta, Kim Thanh; Trasti, Jennifer; White, David R.

    2015-07-08

    The cybersecurity consortium, which was established by DOE/NNSA’s Minority Serving Institutions Partnerships Program (MSIPP), allows students from any of the partner schools (13 HBCUs, two national laboratories, and a public school district) to have all consortia options available to them, to create career paths and to open doors to DOE sites and facilities to student members of the consortium. As a part of this year consortium activities, Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Virgin Islands conducted a week long cyber workshop that consisted of three courses; Digital Forensics and Malware Analysis, Python Programming, and ThunderBird Cup. These courses are designed to enhance cyber defense skills and promote learning within STEM related fields.

  2. STREAM II-V7: Revision for STREAM II-V6 to include outflow from all Savannah River Site tributaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maze, Grace M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-01

    STREAM II is the aqueous transport model of the Weather Information Display (WIND) emergency response system at Savannah River Site. It is used to calculate transport in the event of a chemical or radiological spill into the waterways on the Savannah River Site. Improvements were made to the code (STREAM II V7) to include flow from all site tributaries to the Savannah River total flow and utilize a 4 digit year input. The predicted downstream concentrations using V7 were generally on the same order of magnitude as V6 with slightly lower concentrations and quicker arrival times when all onsite stream flows are contributing to the Savannah River flow. The downstream arrival time at the Savannah River Water Plant ranges from no change to an increase of 8.77%, with minimum changes typically in March/April and maximum changes typically in October/November. The downstream concentrations are generally no more than 15% lower using V7 with the maximum percent change in January through April and minimum changes in June/July.

  3. Numerical and Evolutionary Optimization Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Trujillo, Leonardo; Legrand, Pierrick; Maldonado, Yazmin

    2017-01-01

    This volume comprises a selection of works presented at the Numerical and Evolutionary Optimization (NEO) workshop held in September 2015 in Tijuana, Mexico. The development of powerful search and optimization techniques is of great importance in today’s world that requires researchers and practitioners to tackle a growing number of challenging real-world problems. In particular, there are two well-established and widely known fields that are commonly applied in this area: (i) traditional numerical optimization techniques and (ii) comparatively recent bio-inspired heuristics. Both paradigms have their unique strengths and weaknesses, allowing them to solve some challenging problems while still failing in others. The goal of the NEO workshop series is to bring together people from these and related fields to discuss, compare and merge their complimentary perspectives in order to develop fast and reliable hybrid methods that maximize the strengths and minimize the weaknesses of the underlying paradigms. Throu...

  4. Extended abstracts of the 12th JAERI workshop on high-Tc superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojou, Kiichi; Okayasu, Satoru; Sasase, Masato [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ishida, Takekazu [Osaka Prefectual Univ., Sakai (JP)] (eds.)

    2001-03-01

    This workshop was held on December 7-8, 2000 at JAERI (Tokai). The research group at JAERI shares a responsibility for material modification of high-Tc superconductors by irradiation in 'the multi-core project II of the high temperature superconducting material research' organized by STA (Science and Technology Agency) of Japan. This report contains the extended abstracts of workshop presentations covering basic theories, various experimental results and material improvement studies of the superconductivity by high energy ion irradiation. The twelve presentations of the workshop were devoted to a mini symposium where the direct observations of vortices were discussed in view of the various sophisticated techniques. (author)

  5. Extended abstracts of the 12th JAERI workshop on high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojou, Kiichi; Okayasu, Satoru; Sasase, Masato

    2001-03-01

    This workshop was held on December 7-8, 2000 at JAERI (Tokai). The research group at JAERI shares a responsibility for material modification of high-Tc superconductors by irradiation in 'the multi-core project II of the high temperature superconducting material research' organized by STA (Science and Technology Agency) of Japan. This report contains the extended abstracts of workshop presentations covering basic theories, various experimental results and material improvement studies of the superconductivity by high energy ion irradiation. The twelve presentations of the workshop were devoted to a mini symposium where the direct observations of vortices were discussed in view of the various sophisticated techniques. (author)

  6. WE-AB-206-03: Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound and to provide updates in ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements. The first half of this workshop will include two presentations reviewing diagnostic ultrasound QA/QC and ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements. The second half of the workshop will include live demonstrations of basic QC tests. An array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be available for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations and on-site instructors. The targeted attendees are medical physicists in diagnostic imaging. Learning Objectives: Gain familiarity with common elements of a QA/QC program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging dentify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools Learn ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements Jennifer Walter is an employee of American College of Radiology on Ultrasound Accreditation.

  7. Application of Geospatial Information System for the Study of Illuminance in Carpet Weaving Workshops in Bokan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Madjidi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carpet weaving is an occupation that requires sufficient and appropriate lighting. The lighting in carpet weaving workshops affects the productivity and the physical and mental health of workers. Therefore, the evaluation of the illumination and the identification of work stations requiring lighting modifications will be helpful in promotion of the health and safety of workers in carpet weaving workshops. Methods: This study was carried out for the evaluation of illumination on the basis of Geospatial Information System (GIS technology in two carpet weaving workshops of Bokan city. As per the norms of Illumination Engineering Society, the sensors of the photometer Testo 545 were placed at lowest and highest of 35 and 163 cm in workshop I, and at 40 and 245 cm in workshop II, which correspond to the lowest and highest work surfaces in the respective workshops. Total, natural, and artificial illuminance was measured in the center of each measurement station using the photometer, and data was analyzed using the Arc GIS software. The maximum and minimum illuminances as well as isolux curves were obtained for each workshop. Results: The illuminance in workshops I and II were found to be lower and higher, respectively, than 200 lux, which is considered the standard for carpet weaving workshops. Thus, improving the artificial lighting system or redesigning it is essential for ensuring that the standard conditions of illuminance (200–300 lux are provided. Discussion: This study showed that the application of GIS technology renders the assessment of illumination in carpet weaving workshops possible. This assessment method could also prove useful for determining the exact stations in the carpet weaving workshops that need modifications, thereby leading to cost reduction.

  8. 1993 DOE technical standards managers workshop: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This workshop is focused on the benefits of the DOE technical standards program, which is focused toward the preferred use of non-Government standards for DOE activities and the development of DOE technical standards when non-Government standards are not available or are inappropriate. One goal of the program is to replace redundant site-specific standards with more universally accepted documents that have been scrutinized by experts. This replacement is discussed at the workshop along with the problems encountered and solutions found. The workshop provided an opportunity for geographically dispersed people to meet and advance their standards knowledge and efforts to support the program. Safety issues have been the driving force behind the program to date. Several companies offer products and services that support the development, processing, and retrieval of standards. This document mostly comprise vugraphs.

  9. An Assessment of CFD/CSD Prediction State-of-the-Art by Using the HART II International Workshop Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marilyn J.; Lim, Joon W.; vanderWall, Berend G.; Baeder, James D.; Biedron, Robert T.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Jayaraman, Buvana; Jung, Sung N.; Min, Byung-Young

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been significant advancements in the accuracy of rotor aeroelastic simulations with the application of computational fluid dynamics methods coupled with computational structural dynamics codes (CFD/CSD). The HART II International Workshop database, which includes descent operating conditions with strong blade-vortex interactions (BVI), provides a unique opportunity to assess the ability of CFD/CSD to capture these physics. In addition to a baseline case with BVI, two additional cases with 3/rev higher harmonic blade root pitch control (HHC) are available for comparison. The collaboration during the workshop permits assessment of structured, unstructured, and hybrid overset CFD/CSD methods from across the globe on the dynamics, aerodynamics, and wake structure. Evaluation of the plethora of CFD/CSD methods indicate that the most important numerical variables associated with most accurately capturing BVI are a two-equation or detached eddy simulation (DES)-based turbulence model and a sufficiently small time step. An appropriate trade-off between grid fidelity and spatial accuracy schemes also appears to be pertinent for capturing BVI on the advancing rotor disk. Overall, the CFD/CSD methods generally fall within the same accuracy; cost-effective hybrid Navier-Stokes/Lagrangian wake methods provide accuracies within 50% the full CFD/CSD methods for most parameters of interest, except for those highly influenced by torsion. The importance of modeling the fuselage is observed, and other computational requirements are discussed.

  10. Workshop I – Black holes and compact objects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is a summary of the papers presented in session W1 on the papers submitted to the workshop I on the classical aspects of black holes and compact objects were classified into three categories: (i) theoretical aspects; (ii) astrophysical aspects; (iii) gravitational radiation. The three sessions were devoted each to one of ...

  11. Advances in bone augmentation to enable dental implant placement: Consensus Report of the Sixth European Workshop on Periodontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonetti, Maurizio S; Hämmerle, Christoph H F

    2008-09-01

    Bone augmentation procedures to enable dental implant placement are frequently performed in practice. In this session the European Workshop on Periodontology discussed the evidence in support of the procedures and examined both adverse events and implant performance in the augmented bone. While the available evidence improved both in quantity and quality since previous workshops the conclusions that could be drawn were limited by elements of design and/or reporting that are amenable to improvement. With regards to lateral bone augmentation, a sizable body of evidence supports its use to enable dental implant placement. The group recognized the potential for vertical ridge augmentation procedures to allow implant placement in clinical practice but questioned the applicability of these data to a wider array of operators and clinical settings. With regards to sinus floor augmentation, perforation of the sinus membrane, graft infection and graft loss resulting in inability of implant placement were the major reported adverse events. In cases with dental implants placed in pristine sites. The consensus emphasized the research need to answer questions on: (i) long-term performance of dental implants placed in augmented bone; (ii) the clinical performance of dental implants placed in augmented or pristine sites; and (iii) the clinical benefits of bone augmentation with respect to alternative treatments.

  12. Summary of CARE-HHH Mini-Workshop on LHC Crab Cavity Validation, 21 August 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Garoby, R; Linnecar, T; Tomás, R; Zimmermann, F; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2008-01-01

    A global LHC crab-cavity collaboration is rapidly advancing the R&D of a complete crab cavity cryomodule and performing the associated beam dynamics simulations compatible with a prototype test in the phase 0/I upgrade with the aim of establishing a full crab crossing scheme for the phase II upgrade of the LHC. A one day CARE-HHH mini-workshop was held on August 21, 2008 at CERN to discuss crab crossing in the LHC phase 0/I & II upgrades and this reports summarizes the activities of the four sessions that took place during the workshop. The goals of this crab-cavity workshop were fourfold: (1) to discuss prospects of crab cavities in LHC upgrades (2) to review the status of the cryomodule development and beam dynamics, (3) to establish validity requirements for LHC crab cavities which need to be demonstrated prior to their installation into the LHC, and (4) to provide guidance & coordination for the global collaborators.

  13. 77 FR 31371 - Public Workshop: Privacy Compliance Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... presentations, including the privacy compliance fundamentals, privacy and data security, and the privacy... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Office of the Secretary Public Workshop: Privacy Compliance... Homeland Security Privacy Office will host a public workshop, ``Privacy Compliance Workshop.'' DATES: The...

  14. Investigation of non-corrin cobalt(II)-containing sites in protein structures of the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriata, Luciano Andres

    2013-04-01

    Protein X-ray structures with non-corrin cobalt(II)-containing sites, either natural or substituting another native ion, were downloaded from the Protein Data Bank and explored to (i) describe which amino acids are involved in their first ligand shells and (ii) analyze cobalt(II)-donor bond lengths in comparison with previously reported target distances, CSD data and EXAFS data. The set of amino acids involved in Co(II) binding is similar to that observed for catalytic Zn(II) sites, i.e. with a large fraction of carboxylate O atoms from aspartate and glutamate and aromatic N atoms from histidine. The computed Co(II)-donor bond lengths were found to depend strongly on structure resolution, an artifact previously detected for other metal-donor distances. Small corrections are suggested for the target bond lengths to the aromatic N atoms of histidines and the O atoms of water and hydroxide. The available target distance for cysteine (Scys) is confirmed; those for backbone O and other donors remain uncertain and should be handled with caution in refinement and modeling protocols. Finally, a relationship between both Co(II)-O bond lengths in bidentate carboxylates is quantified.

  15. Design, implementation, and outcome of a hands-on arthrocentesis workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilla-Labarca, Maria-Louise; Tsang, James C; Goldsmith, Melissa; Furie, Richard

    2009-09-01

    During a 4-week rheumatology elective at our institution, opportunities for internal medicine residents to perform arthrocentesis were limited, particularly for sites other than the knee. Consequently, residents were inadequately prepared and had less self-confidence to perform such procedures. To overcome these educational deficiencies, an arthrocentesis workshop was developed. We report our quality improvement data that was collected during the first year of workshop implementation. We devised a structured half-day arthrocentesis workshop for rheumatology fellows as well as rotating internal medicine residents. This program consisted of a one hour lecture immediately followed by a hands-on workshop that used mannequin models for 5 anatomic sites. A self-assessment questionnaire and medical knowledge test were administered before and after each session. The accuracy of the self-assessment questionnaire was analyzed by comparing responses to an external objective measure of knowledge in the same content area. Finally, an optional postworkshop survey addressed resident satisfaction. Thirty-eight trainees participated in the workshop between July 2006 and June 2007. There were statistically significant improvements in self-confidence in 9 content areas (P knowledge test during the preworkshop analysis. In contrast, the postworkshop analysis displayed modestly higher concordance. All residents completing a postworkshop survey believed that it was a useful exercise, and 96% stated that they would change their practice habits. The arthrocentesis workshop provided a solid foundation from which trainees can learn key concepts of joint injection, increase their self-confidence and refine their motor skills. The accuracy of resident self-reported confidence is poor and should therefore be used only to complement other means of competency assessment and medical knowledge acquisition.

  16. Proceedings of the NOAMI workshop : a workshop to explore perspectives on risk assessment for orphaned and abandoned mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-03-01

    This workshop hosted by the National Orphaned/Abandoned Mines Initiative (NOAMI) discussed risk assessment strategies and perspectives for orphaned and abandoned mines in Canada. Different perspectives related to the risk assessment process were considered by participants from local, provincial, federal, and territorial agencies as well as non-governmental, academic, and mining industry organizations. Strategies for effectively communicating with local communities were discussed. New methods of assessing risk related to bioavailability and bioaccessibility were reviewed along with approaches to risk assessment and risk management in relation to the Environmental Management Act. Case studies of risk assessment and remediation projects were presented. The workshop presentations were divided into the following 6 sessions: (1) keynote, (2) opening panel, (3) human health panel, (4) ecological panel, (5) geotechnical-safety risk assessment panel, and (6) case studies and perspectives. The workshop featured 22 presentations, of which 2 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. A report on detailed ecological risk assessment (DERA) in British Columbia prepared by the Science Advisory Board for Contaminated Sites in British Columbia (BC) was included, as well as a final report that summarized presentations given at the workshop. refs., tabs., figs

  17. Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Tritium Effects in Plasma Facing Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causey, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    The 4th International Workshop on Tritium Effects in Plasma Facing Components was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 14-15, 1998. This workshop occurs every two years, and has previously been held in Livermore/California, Nagoya/Japan, and the JRC-Ispra Site in Italy. The purpose of the workshop is to gather researchers involved in the topic of tritium migration, retention, and recycling in materials used to line magnetic fusion reactor walls and provide a forum for presentation and discussions in this area. This document provides an overall summary of the workshop, the workshop agenda, a summary of the presentations, and a list of attendees

  18. Workshops som forskningsmetode

    OpenAIRE

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Levinsen, Karin Tweddell

    2017-01-01

    This paper contributes to knowledge on workshops as a research methodology, and specifically on how such workshops pertain to e-learning. A literature review illustrated that workshops are discussed according to three different perspectives: workshops as a means, workshops as practice, and workshops as a research methodology. Focusing primarily on the latter, this paper presents five studies on upper secondary and higher education teachers’ professional development and on teaching and learnin...

  19. Report on the value engineering workshop on APS beamline front ends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzay, T.

    1993-01-01

    A formal value engineering evaluation process was developed to address the front end components of the beamlines for the Advanced Photon Source (APS). This process (described in Section 2) involved an information phase, a creative phase, a judgment phase, a development phase, and a recommendation phase. Technical experts from other national laboratories and industry were invited to a two-day Value Engineering Workshop on November 5-6, 1992. The results of this Workshop are described in Section 4. Following the Workshop, various actions by the APS staff led to the redesign of the front end components, which are presented in Sections 5 and 6. The cost benefit analysis is presented in Section 7. It is important of realize that an added benefit of the Workshop was to obtain numerous design evaluations and enhancements of the front end components by experts in the field. As the design work proceeds to Title II completion, the APS staff is including many of these suggestions

  20. Interaction of Zn(II)bleomycin-A2 and Zn(II)peplomycin with a DNA hairpin containing the 5'-GT-3' binding site in comparison with the 5'-GC-3' binding site studied by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, Shelby E; Ingersoll, Azure D; Murray, Sally A; Reilly, Teresa M; Lehmann, Teresa E

    2017-10-01

    Bleomycins are a group of glycopeptide antibiotics synthesized by Streptomyces verticillus that are widely used for the treatment of various neoplastic diseases. These antibiotics have the ability to chelate a metal center, mainly Fe(II), and cause site-specific DNA cleavage. Bleomycins are differentiated by their C-terminal regions. Although this antibiotic family is a successful course of treatment for some types of cancers, it is known to cause pulmonary fibrosis. Previous studies have identified that bleomycin-related pulmonary toxicity is linked to the C-terminal region of these drugs. This region has been shown to closely interact with DNA. We examined the binding of Zn(II)peplomycin and Zn(II)bleomycin-A 2 to a DNA hairpin of sequence 5'-CCAGTATTTTTACTGG-3', containing the binding site 5'-GT-3', and compared the results with those obtained from our studies of the same MBLMs bound to a DNA hairpin containing the binding site 5'-GC-3'. We provide evidence that the DNA base sequence has a strong impact in the final structure of the drug-target complex.

  1. Assessment of trace metals using lichen transplant from automobile mechanic workshop in Ile-Ife metropolis, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odiwe, Anthony I; Adesanwo, Adeyemi T J; Olowoyo, Joshua O; Raimi, Idris O

    2014-04-01

    The level of air pollution around the automobile mechanic workshops has been generally overlooked. This study, examined the level of trace metals in automobile mechanic workshops and the suitability of using transplanted lichen thalli of Lepraria incana for measuring air pollution in such areas. Samples of the lichen thalli were transplanted into seven different sites and were attached to the bark of trees at each site. The samples were harvested from the sites after 3-month exposure. Concentrations of Pb, Cu, Cd, Fe, Zn, and S content were determined using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results showed that there was a significant difference in the trace metals concentrations across the sites (p trend in the concentration of these heavy metals suggests that activities in these workshops might become a major source of certain heavy metals in the environment and if the pollution activities persist, it might become worrisome over time.

  2. HTTR workshop (workshop on hydrogen production technology)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Yasuaki; Takizuka, Takakazu

    2004-12-01

    Various research and development efforts have been performed to solve the global energy and environmental problems caused by large consumption of fossil fuels. Research activities on advanced hydrogen production technology by the use of nuclear heat from high temperature gas cooled reactors, for example, have been flourished in universities, research institutes and companies in many countries. The Department of HTTR Project and the Department of Advanced Nuclear Heat Technology of JAERI held the HTTR Workshop (Workshop on Hydrogen Production Technology) on July 5 and 6, 2004 to grasp the present status of R and D about the technology of HTGR and the nuclear hydrogen production in the world and to discuss about necessity of the nuclear hydrogen production and technical problems for the future development of the technology. More than 110 participants attended the Workshop including foreign participants from USA, France, Korea, Germany, Canada and United Kingdom. In the Workshop, the presentations were made on such topics as R and D programs for nuclear energy and hydrogen production technologies by thermo-chemical or other processes. Also, the possibility of the nuclear hydrogen production in the future society was discussed. The workshop showed that the R and D for the hydrogen production by the thermo-chemical process has been performed in many countries. The workshop affirmed that nuclear hydrogen production could be one of the competitive supplier of hydrogen in the future. The second HTTR Workshop will be held in the autumn next year. (author)

  3. 9th FCC-ee (TLEP) Physics Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This is the 9th in the series of FCCee/TLEP-related workshops. It follows on from the sucessful 8th TLEP workshop that took place in Paris on 27-29 October 2014, and the FCC kick-off meeting held on 12-15 February 2014 at University of Geneva. The workshop is open to all FCC-ee /TLEP design study members, and more generally to all interested in a precision Z, W, H, top factory. The focus will be on physics and experiments at the FCC-ee, but a more general session is organized the first day (Tuesday 3 February afternoon) with presentations about the FCC design study as a whole, and on machine and physics for the FCC-ee and the FCC-hh, with synergies and complementarities. This session is aimed at a larger audience, towards improving the project visibility in Italy. It will be followed by a social dinner in the evening. The workshop starts on Tuesday at 13:30 and ends on Thursday 16:00. Registration is now open, please proceed at your earliest convenience! Please visit the FCC-ee / TLEP web site, and subscrib...

  4. Mixed waste focus area alternative technologies workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borduin, L.C.; Palmer, B.A.; Pendergrass, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA)-sponsored Alternative Technology Workshop held in Salt Lake City, Utah, from January 24--27, 1995. The primary workshop goal was identifying potential applications for emerging technologies within the Options Analysis Team (OAT) ''wise'' configuration. Consistent with the scope of the OAT analysis, the review was limited to the Mixed Low-Level Waste (MLLW) fraction of DOE's mixed waste inventory. The Los Alamos team prepared workshop materials (databases and compilations) to be used as bases for participant review and recommendations. These materials derived from the Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) data base (May 1994), the Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) data base, and the OAT treatment facility configuration of December 7, 1994. In reviewing workshop results, the reader should note several caveats regarding data limitations. Link-up of the MWIR and DSTP data bases, while representing the most comprehensive array of mixed waste information available at the time of the workshop, requires additional data to completely characterize all waste streams. A number of changes in waste identification (new and redefined streams) occurred during the interval from compilation of the data base to compilation of the DSTP data base with the end result that precise identification of radiological and contaminant characteristics was not possible for these streams. To a degree, these shortcomings compromise the workshop results; however, the preponderance of waste data was linked adequately, and therefore, these analyses should provide useful insight into potential applications of alternative technologies to DOE MLLW treatment facilities

  5. EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmer, R.; Heintzelman, J.; Squires, L.; Meservey, R.

    2009-01-01

    The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in about 100,000 gallons of wash water. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to evaluate alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The workshop was conducted by a trained facilitator using Value Engineering techniques to elicit the most technically sound solutions from the workshop participants. A brainstorming session was held to identify possible alternative treatment methods that would meet the primary functions and criteria of neutralizing the hazards, maximizing byproduct removal and minimizing waste generation. An initial list of some 20 probable alternatives was evaluated and refined down

  6. A new approach to the LILW repository site selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mele, I.; Zeleznik, N.

    1998-01-01

    After the failure of site selection, which was performed between 1990-1993, the Agency for Radwaste Management was urged to start a new site selection process for low and intermediate level waste (LILW). Since this is the most sensitive and delicate phase of the whole disposal project extensive analyses of foreign and domestic experiences in siting were performed. Three different models were studied and discussed at a workshop on preparation of the siting procedure for LILW repository. The participants invited to the workshop supported the combined approach, to the site selection, which is presented in this paper.(author)

  7. Workshop for development of formal MC and A plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkkila, B.H.; Hatcher, C.R.; Scott, S.C.; Thomas, K.E.

    1998-01-01

    Upgrades to both physical protection and material controls and accountability (MC and A) are progressing at many nuclear facilities in the Russian Federation. In general, Russian facilities are well prepared to address issues related to physical protection. The infrastructure to plan and implement physical protection upgrades is already in place in Russia. The infrastructure to integrate new and existing MC and A capabilities is not as well developed. The authors experience has shown that working with Russian facility management and technical personnel to draft an MC and A plan provides a way of moving MC and A upgrades forward. Los Alamos has developed a workshop for Russian nuclear facilities to facilitate the preparation of their facility MC and A plans. The workshops have been successful in bringing together facility management, safeguards specialists, and operations personnel to initiate the process of drafting these MC and A plans. The MC and A plans provide the technical basis for scheduling future MC and A upgrades at the facilities. Although facility MC and A plans are site specific, the workshop can be tailored to guide the development of an MC and A plan for any Russian nuclear site

  8. Proceedings of the sixth international workshop on ceramic breeder blanket interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Kenji

    1998-03-01

    This report is the Proceedings of ''the Sixth International Workshop on Ceramic Breeder Blanket Interactions'' which was held as a workshop on ceramic breeders under Annex II of IEA Implementing Agreement on a Programme of Research and Development on Fusion Materials, and Japan-US Workshop 97FT4-01. This workshop was held in Mito city, Japan on October 22-24, 1997. About forty experts from EU, Japan, USA, and Chile attended the workshop. The scope of the workshop included the following: 1) fabrication and characterization of ceramic breeders, 2) properties data for ceramic breeders, 3) tritium release characteristics, 4) modeling of tritium behavior, 5) irradiation effects on performance behavior, 6) blanket design and R and D requirements, 7) hydrogen behavior in materials, and 8) blanket system technology and structural materials. In the workshop, information exchange was performed for fabrication technology of ceramic breeder pebbles in EU and Japan, data of various properties of Li 2 TiO 3 , tritium release behavior of Li 2 TiO 3 and Li 2 ZrO 3 including tritium diffusion, modeling of tritium release from Li 2 ZrO 3 in ITER condition, helium release behavior from Li 2 O, results of tritium release irradiation tests of Li 4 SiO 4 pebbles in EXOTIC-7, R and D issues for ceramic breeders for ITER and DEMO blankets, etc. The 23 of the papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  9. A Fire Safety Certification System for Board and Care Operators and Staff. SBIR Phase II: Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bonnie L.

    This report describes Phase II of a project which developed a system for delivering fire safety training to board and care providers who serve adults with developmental disabilities. Phase II focused on developing and pilot testing a "train the trainers" workshop for instructors and field testing the provider's workshop. Evaluation of…

  10. Active site of tripeptidyl peptidase II from human erythrocytes is of the subtilisin type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomkinson, B.; Wernstedt, C.; Hellman, U.; Zetterqvist, Oe.

    1987-11-01

    The present report presents evidence that the amino acid sequence around the serine of the active site of human tripeptidyl peptidase II is of the subtilisin type. The enzyme from human erythrocytes was covalently labeled at its active site with (/sup 3/H)diisopropyl fluorophosphate, and the protein was subsequently reduced, alkylated, and digested with trypsin. The labeled tryptic peptides were purified by gel filtration and repeated reversed-phase HPLC, and their amino-terminal sequences were determined. Residue 9 contained the radioactive label and was, therefore, considered to be the active serine residue. The primary structure of the part of the active site (residues 1-10) containing this residue was concluded to be Xaa-Thr-Gln-Leu-Met-Asx-Gly-Thr-Ser-Met. This amino acid sequence is homologous to the sequence surrounding the active serine of the microbial peptidases subtilisin and thermitase. These data demonstrate that human tripeptidyl peptidase II represents a potentially distinct class of human peptidases and raise the question of an evolutionary relationship between the active site of a mammalian peptidase and that of the subtilisin family of serine peptidases.

  11. Workshop on programming beta cell development, impairment and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Scott; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2012-01-01

    Helsingør, the city of Hamlet in Denmark, provided the site for the workshop "Programming Beta Cell Development, Impairment and Regeneration" on October 23-26th, 2011. The same location has held two EASD Islet study group meetings, while the previous three workshops were held in Helsinki, Finland...... (2003), El Perello, Spain (2006) and Peebles, Scotland (2009). The meeting drew 190 attendees from 12 different countries. There were 37 main oral presentations, and 68 posters covered virtually all aspects of the pancreas and provided a dynamic snapshot of the most interesting areas of current...

  12. Scientific Summary of the First BINA Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Ram

    2018-04-01

    Scientific summary of the first Belgo-Indian Network for Astronomy & Astrophysics (BINA) work-shop is presented here. In the workshop, invited talks were supplemented with the contributory talks and poster paper presentations. The talks presented during the workshop provide latest information on the 3.6-m Devasthal Optical Telescope (DOT) and 4-m International Liquid Mirror Telescope (ILMT) projects. These observing fa-cilities are built jointly by the astronomical communities of India and Belgium. In the ILMT, reseachers from Canada, Poland and Uzbekistan are also actively participating. Preliminary results obtained from the on sky test indicate that 3.6-m DOT is capable of resolving binary stars separated by 0.4 arc second. CCD observations obtained with the telescope indicate that atmospheric conditions at Devasthal are very good for optical observations and the site can be considered internationally competitive. Buildings and telescope houses constructed at Devasthal have not deteriorated natural seeing conditions observed at the site 2 decades ago during 1997¬1999. Pointing and tracking accuracies of the 3.6-m DOT are as per specifications. All these indicate that on sky performance of the newly installed 3.6-m DOT is better than the specifications prescribed at the time of placing order. It is therefore capable of providing internationally competitive science with the modern backend instruments and also have global importance due to their geographical location particularly for the time domain and multi-wavelength astrophysical studies. A large number of talks and poster papers presented during the workshop discussed astrophysical potential of the Indian largest size (4 meter class) new technology optical telescopes located at Devasthal. All these indicate beyond doubt that there are enormous opportunities for the growth of astronomy in India.

  13. Outcomes of the 'Data Curation for Geobiology at Yellowstone National Park' Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomer, A.; Palmer, C. L.; Fouke, B. W.; Rodman, A.; Choudhury, G. S.; Baker, K. S.; Asangba, A. E.; Wickett, K.; DiLauro, T.; Varvel, V.

    2013-12-01

    The continuing proliferation of geological and biological data generated at scientifically significant sites (such as hot springs, coral reefs, volcanic fields and other unique, data-rich locales) has created a clear need for the curation and active management of these data. However, there has been little exploration of what these curation processes and policies would entail. To that end, the Site-Based Data Curation (SBDC) project is developing a framework of guidelines and processes for the curation of research data generated at scientifically significant sites. A workshop was held in April 2013 at Yellowstone National Park (YNP) to gather input from scientists and stakeholders. Workshop participants included nine researchers actively conducting geobiology research at YNP, and seven YNP representatives, including permitting staff and information professionals from the YNP research library and archive. Researchers came from a range of research areas -- geology, molecular and microbial biology, ecology, environmental engineering, and science education. Through group discussions, breakout sessions and hands-on activities, we sought to generate policy recommendations and curation guidelines for the collection, representation, sharing and quality control of geobiological datasets. We report on key themes that emerged from workshop discussions, including: - participants' broad conceptions of the long-term usefulness, reusability and value of data. - the benefits of aggregating site-specific data in general, and geobiological data in particular. - the importance of capturing a dataset's originating context, and the potential usefulness of photographs as a reliable and easy way of documenting context. - researchers' and resource managers' overlapping priorities with regards to 'big picture' data collection and management in the long-term. Overall, we found that workshop participants were enthusiastic and optimistic about future collaboration and development of community

  14. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Gunnison Site, Gunnison, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Gunnison, Colorado. The Phase II - Title I services include the preparation of topographic measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 0.5 million tons of tailings at the Gunnison site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The nine alternative actions presented range from millsite decontamination (Option I), to adding various depths of stabilization cover material (Options II and III), to removal of the tailings to long-term storage sites and decontamination of the present site (Options IV through IX). Cost estimates for the nine options range from $480,000 to $5,890,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium does not appear to be economically attractive at present

  15. Workshop summary: Water as hazard and water as heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostenaru-Dan, Maria

    2017-04-01

    Rationale: In a changing climate, hydrological and meteorological hazards related to water provoke more and more losses. Water courses are also causing other types of hazards, as alluvionar soil deposits are raising vulnerability to earthquakes through the Mexico City effect. On the other hand, water itself is a vulnerable habitat. To deal with the later, living museums including acquaria are planned, to raise awareness to protect the ecological diversity of water and water sites. Protecting water sites can be, at times, also protection against water related hazards, as landscape architecture begun to recognise recently. Floodplains are an alternative to dams and dikes. This would be already enough to underline water as dual element, but the duality goes futher. Having to think about duality, we think of Chinese philosophy. Water (or the lack of it, as in drought) destroys life as a hazard, but gives life as well. To this symbology of giving life is connected to role of water as heritage, to building culture next to the water. Architecture of river and coastalscapes underline this. Leisure architecture is connected to this, and includes also architectural objects such as bathes. Workshop I was a two day workshop, first day presentations and second day study tours. The morning session included introduction of the topic and then in chronological order approaches from archaeology of water sites, Ottoman time, and late 19th century. The Ottoman time approach was connected to an initiative shown in the introduction, from riverbed to seashore. The 19th century presentation was on the villa Gamberaia, a villa of a Romanian princess in Italy, featured on the poster of the workshop. In the 1966 floods in Florence which have an anniversary this year it was used as a symbol to maintain the positive significance of water. Places in the villa garden also make reference to hazards, as the earthquake shaped water fountain behind. The second part of presentations featured the

  16. Proceedings of the 1981 subseabed disposal program. Annual workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The 1981 Annual Workshop was the twelfth meeting of the principal investigators and program management personnel participating in the Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP). The first workshop was held in June 1973, to address the development of a program (initially known as Ocean Basin Floors Program) to assess the deep sea disposal of nuclear wastes. Workshops were held semi-annually until late 1977. Since November 1977, the workshops have been conducted following the end of each fiscal year so that the program participants could review and critique the total scope of work. This volume contains a synopsis, as given by each Technical Program Coordinator, abstracts of each of the talks, and copies of the visual materials, as presented by each of the principal investigators, for each of the technical elements of the SDP for the fiscal year 1981. The talks were grouped under the following categories; general topics; site studies; thermal response studies; emplacement studies; systems analysis; chemical response studies; biological oceanography studies; physical oceanographic studies; instrumentation development; transportation studies; social environment; and international seabed disposal

  17. Proceedings of the 1981 subseabed disposal program. Annual workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    The 1981 Annual Workshop was the twelfth meeting of the principal investigators and program management personnel participating in the Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP). The first workshop was held in June 1973, to address the development of a program (initially known as Ocean Basin Floors Program) to assess the deep sea disposal of nuclear wastes. Workshops were held semi-annually until late 1977. Since November 1977, the workshops have been conducted following the end of each fiscal year so that the program participants could review and critique the total scope of work. This volume contains a synopsis, as given by each Technical Program Coordinator, abstracts of each of the talks, and copies of the visual materials, as presented by each of the principal investigators, for each of the technical elements of the SDP for the fiscal year 1981. The talks were grouped under the following categories; general topics; site studies; thermal response studies; emplacement studies; systems analysis; chemical response studies; biological oceanography studies; physical oceanographic studies; instrumentation development; transportation studies; social environment; and international seabed disposal.

  18. Proceedings of the sixth international workshop on ceramic breeder blanket interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kenji [ed.

    1998-03-01

    This report is the Proceedings of `the Sixth International Workshop on Ceramic Breeder Blanket Interactions` which was held as a workshop on ceramic breeders under Annex II of IEA Implementing Agreement on a Programme of Research and Development on Fusion Materials, and Japan-US Workshop 97FT4-01. This workshop was held in Mito city, Japan on October 22-24, 1997. About forty experts from EU, Japan, USA, and Chile attended the workshop. The scope of the workshop included the following: (1) fabrication and characterization of ceramic breeders, (2) properties data for ceramic breeders, (3) tritium release characteristics, (4) modeling of tritium behavior, (5) irradiation effects on performance behavior, (6) blanket design and R and D requirements, (7) hydrogen behavior in materials, and (8) blanket system technology and structural materials. In the workshop, information exchange was performed for fabrication technology of ceramic breeder pebbles in EU and Japan, data of various properties of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}, tritium release behavior of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} including tritium diffusion, modeling of tritium release from Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} in ITER condition, helium release behavior from Li{sub 2}O, results of tritium release irradiation tests of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles in EXOTIC-7, R and D issues for ceramic breeders for ITER and DEMO blankets, etc. The 23 of the papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  19. International CJMT-1 Workshop on Asteroidal Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Wing-Huen

    2014-03-01

    An international workshop on asteroidal science was held between October 16 and 17, 2012, at the Macau University of Science and Technology gathering together experts on asteroidal study in China, Japan, Macao and Taiwan. For this reason, we have called it CJMT-1 Workshop. Though small in sizes, the asteroids orbiting mainly between the orbit of Mars and of Jupiter have important influence on the evolution of the planetary bodies. Topics ranging from killer asteroids to space resources are frequently mentioned in news reports with prominence similar to the search for water on Mars. This also means that the study of asteroids is very useful in exciting the imagination and interest in science of the general public. Several Asian countries have therefore developed long-term programs integrating ground-based observations and space exploration with Japan being the most advanced and ambitious as demonstrated by the very successful Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa. In this volume we will find descriptions of the mission planning of Hayabusa II to the C-type near-Earth asteroid, 1999 JU3. Not to be outdone, China's Chang-E 2 spacecraft was re-routed to a flyby encounter with asteroid 4179 Toutatis in December 2012. It is planned that in the next CJMT workshop, we will have the opportunity to learn more about the in-depth data analysis of the Toutatis observations and the progress reports on the Hayabusa II mission which launch date is set to be July 2014. Last but not least, the presentations on the ground-based facilities as described in this volume will pave the way for coordinated observations of asteroidal families and Trojan asteroids - across Asia from Taiwan to Uzbekistan. Such international projects will serve as an important symbol of good will and peaceful cooperation among the key members of this group. Finally, I want to thank the Space Science Institute, Macao University of Science and Technology, for generous support, and its staff members

  20. Proceedings of the workshop on transite decontamination dismantlement and recycle/disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    On February 3--4, 1993, a workshop was conducted to examine issues associated with the decontamination, dismantlement, and recycle/disposal of transite located at the US Department of Energy Fernald site near Cincinnati, OH. The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is a Superfund Site currently undergoing remediation. A major objective of the workshop was to assess the state-of-the-art of transite remediation, and generate concepts that could be useful to the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Co. (FERMCO) for remediation of transite. Transite is a building material consisting of asbestos fiber and cement and may be radioactively contaminated as a result of past uranium processing operations at the FEMP. Many of the 100 buildings within the former uranium production area were constructed of transite siding and roofing and consequently, over 180,000 m 2 of transite must be disposed or recycled. Thirty-six participants representing industry, academia, and government institutions such as the EPA and DOE assembled at the workshop to present their experience with transite, describe work in progress, and address the issues involved in remediating transite

  1. Proceeding of the workshop on quantum gravity and topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    1991-10-01

    The workshop on Quantum Gravity and Topology was held at INS on February 21-23, 1991. Several introductory lectures and more than 15 talks were delivered for about 100 participants. The main subjects discussed were i) Topological quantum field theories and topological gravity ii) Low dimensional and four dimensional gravity iii) Topology change iv) Superstring theories etc. (J.P.N.)

  2. Requirements of on-site facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchardt, H.

    1977-01-01

    1) Requirements of on-site facilities: a) brief description of supplying the site with electricity and water; communication facilities, b) necessary facilities for containment and pipeline installation, c) necessary facilities for storage, safety, accommodation of personnel, housing; workshops; 2) Site management: a) Organisation schedules for 'turn-key-jobs' and 'single commission', b) Duties of the supervisory staff. (orig.) [de

  3. Developing workshop module of realistic mathematics education: Follow-up workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palupi, E. L. W.; Khabibah, S.

    2018-01-01

    Realistic Mathematics Education (RME) is a learning approach which fits the aim of the curriculum. The success of RME in teaching mathematics concepts, triggering students’ interest in mathematics and teaching high order thinking skills to the students will make teachers start to learn RME. Hence, RME workshop is often offered and done. This study applied development model proposed by Plomp. Based on the study by RME team, there are three kinds of RME workshop: start-up workshop, follow-up workshop, and quality boost. However, there is no standardized or validated module which is used in that workshops. This study aims to develop a module of RME follow-up workshop which is valid and can be used. Plopm’s developmental model includes materials analysis, design, realization, implementation, and evaluation. Based on the validation, the developed module is valid. While field test shows that the module can be used effectively.

  4. Creating Fantastic PI Workshops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermann, Laura B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Clark, Blythe G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Colbert, Rachel S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dagel, Amber Lynn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gupta, Vipin P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hibbs, Michael R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Perkins, David Nikolaus [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); West, Roger Derek [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this SAND report is to provide guidance for other groups hosting workshops and peerto-peer learning events at Sandia. Thus this SAND report provides detail about our team structure, how we brainstormed workshop topics and developed the workshop structure. A Workshop “Nuts and Bolts” section provides our timeline and check-list for workshop activities. The survey section provides examples of the questions we asked and how we adapted the workshop in response to the feedback.

  5. Deliberating Together on Geological Repository Siting: Expectations and Challenges in the Czech Republic. Synthesis and International Perspective of the 9. Community Visit and National Workshop of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) - Czech Republic, 24-26 October 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The 9. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency 'Forum on Stakeholder Confidence' Community Visit and National Workshop was held in Karlovy Vary, Chyse and Blatno in the Czech Republic in October 2012. Entitled 'Deliberating Together on Geological Repository Siting', the workshop focussed on the process for siting an installation for the final management of spent nuclear fuel, and the expectations and challenges raised by this process. Three themes were examined: developing confidence in a participatory process; local and regional partnership and added value; and expectations for safety assurance by national, local and regional authorities. The workshop was held under the patronage of the Minister of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic. It was hosted by SURAO, the state-controlled Radioactive Waste Repository Authority, in cooperation with the pluralistic Working Group for Dialogue on the Site Selection Process for a Deep Geological Repository (including representatives from directly concerned municipalities and civil society, as well as from the national authorities, technical organisations; the group is chaired by a professor of sociology from the Czech Academy of Sciences). A large number of mayors and community representatives attended the full workshop. The international FSC contingent was made up of 49 delegates from 14 countries as well as the European Commission. Several citizens attended from municipalities across Europe, of which all had hosted FSC workshops in the past. For the first time in an FSC event, the Community Visit took the form of a public meeting. This was created as a neutral platform to enable debate about Czech and international siting experience. About one hundred residents of communities concerned by the Czech siting process attended this 2-hour meeting hosted by a mayor and chaired by the FSC Secretariat. A small panel of Czech stakeholders from both the national technical level and local civil society presented their positions and concerns

  6. 1996 DOE technical standards program workshop: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The workshop theme is `The Strategic Standardization Initiative - A Technology Exchange and Global Competitiveness Challenge for DOE.` The workshop goal is to inform the DOE technical standards community of strategic standardization activities taking place in the Department, other Government agencies, standards developing organizations, and industry. Individuals working on technical standards will be challenged to improve cooperation and communications with the involved organizations in response to the initiative. Workshop sessions include presentations by representatives from various Government agencies that focus on coordination among and participation of Government personnel in the voluntary standards process; reports by standards organizations, industry, and DOE representatives on current technology exchange programs; and how the road ahead appears for `information superhighway` standardization. Another session highlights successful standardization case studies selected from several sites across the DOE complex. The workshop concludes with a panel discussion on the goals and objectives of the DOE Technical Standards Program as envisioned by senior DOE management. The annual workshop on technical standards has proven to be an effective medium for communicating information related to standards throughout the DOE community. Technical standards are used to transfer technology and standardize work processes to produce consistent, acceptable results. They provide a practical solution to the Department`s challenge to protect the environment and the health and safety of the public and workers during all facility operations. Through standards, the technologies of industries and governments worldwide are available to DOE. The DOE Technical Standards Program, a Department-wide effort that crosscuts all organizations and disciplines, links the Department to those technologies.

  7. Regulatory policy issues and the Clean Air Act: Issues and papers from the state implementation workshops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K. [ed.; Burns, R.E.

    1993-07-01

    The National Regulatory Research Institute (NRRI), with funding from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Department of Energy (DOE), conducted four regional workshops` on state public utility commission implementation of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). The workshops had four objectives: (1) to discuss key issues and concerns on CAAA implementation, (2) to encourage a discussion among states on issues of common interests, (3) to attempt to reach consensus, where possible, on key issues, and (4) to provide the workshop participants with information and materials to assist in developing state rules, orders, and procedures. From the federal perspective, a primary goal was to ensure that workshop participants return to their states with a comprehensive background and understanding of how state commission actions may affect implementation of the CAAA and to be able to provide guidance to their jurisdictional utilities. It was hoped that this would reduce some of the uncertainty utilities face and assist in the development of an efficient allowance market. This report is divided into two main sections. In Section II, eleven principal issues are identified and discussed. These issues were chosen because they were either the most frequently discussed or they were related to the questions asked in response to the speakers` presentations. This section does not cover all the issues relevant to state implementation nor all the issues discussed at the workshops; rather, Section II is intended to provide an overview of the,planning, ratemaking, and multistate issues. Part III is a series of workshop papers presented by some of the speakers. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  8. Providing a computing environment for a high energy physics workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, J.

    1991-03-01

    Although computing facilities have been provided at conferences and workshops remote from the hose institution for some years, the equipment provided has rarely been capable of providing for much more than simple editing and electronic mail over leased lines. This presentation describes the pioneering effort involved by the Computing Department/Division at Fermilab in providing a local computing facility with world-wide networking capability for the Physics at Fermilab in the 1990's workshop held in Breckenridge, Colorado, in August 1989, as well as the enhanced facilities provided for the 1990 Summer Study on High Energy Physics at Snowmass, Colorado, in June/July 1990. Issues discussed include type and sizing of the facilities, advance preparations, shipping, on-site support, as well as an evaluation of the value of the facility to the workshop participants

  9. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Naturita site, Naturita, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Naturita, Colorado. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings, the performance of radiometric measurements to determine the extent of radium contamination, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology, and the costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 704,000 tons of tailings at the Naturita site constitutes the most significant environmental impact although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. Ranchers Exploration and Development Company has been licensed by the State of Colorado to reprocess the tailings at a location 3 mi from the present site where they will be stabilized for long-term storage. The remedial action options include remedial action for structures in Naturita and Nucla (Option I) at an estimated cost of $270,000 and remedial action for structures and open land adjacent to the tailings site (Option II) at an estimated cost of $950,000

  10. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Shiprock site, Shiprock, New Mexico. Phase II, Title I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-03-31

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Shiprock, New Mexico. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 1.7 million tons of tailings at the Shiprock site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The 11 alternative actions presented range from completion of the present ongoing EPA site decontamination plan (Option I), to stabilizing in-place with varying depths of cover material (Options II-IV), to removal to an isolated long-term disposal site (Options V-XI). All options include remedial action costs for off-site locations where tailings have been placed. Costs estimates for the 11 options range from $540,000 to $12,500,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium is not economically feasible.

  11. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Shiprock site, Shiprock, New Mexico. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Shiprock, New Mexico. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 1.7 million tons of tailings at the Shiprock site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The 11 alternative actions presented range from completion of the present ongoing EPA site decontamination plan (Option I), to stabilizing in-place with varying depths of cover material (Options II-IV), to removal to an isolated long-term disposal site (Options V-XI). All options include remedial action costs for off-site locations where tailings have been placed. Costs estimates for the 11 options range from $540,000 to $12,500,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium is not economically feasible

  12. Workshop Session II report: R and D needs of IGORR members

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boening, K [Fakultaet fuer Physik E21, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    1990-05-01

    On the first day of this meeting a variety of reports has been given on projects covering the range from major upgrades of existing research reactors or experimental installations up to totally new research reactor facilities. From these project descriptions it was clear that a strong need of all these groups for R and D research and development) work had to be anticipated. So the purpose of the present workshop was - on the one hand - to identify those fields in which the results of R and D work would be required by IGORR member groups. On the other hand - there is an appreciable amount of R and D work either being planned for the near future or being performed right now (or having just been completed) by IGORR member groups. So the purpose of this workshop was to identity those fields in which R and D work actually is or will be (or has been) performed by IGORR members. Topics of interest were: Thermal-hydraulic tests and correlations, Corrosion tests and analytical models , Multidimensional kinetic analysis for small cores, Fuel plates fabrication, Fuel plates stability, Fuel irradiation, Burnable poison irradiation, Structural materials irradiation, Neutron guides irradiation, Cold Source materials irradiation, Cold Source LN{sub 2} test, Source LH2-H{sub 2}O reaction (H or D), Instrumentation upgrading and digital control system, Man-machine interface.

  13. Workshop Session II report: R and D needs of IGORR members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boening, K.

    1990-01-01

    On the first day of this meeting a variety of reports has been given on projects covering the range from major upgrades of existing research reactors or experimental installations up to totally new research reactor facilities. From these project descriptions it was clear that a strong need of all these groups for R and D research and development) work had to be anticipated. So the purpose of the present workshop was - on the one hand - to identify those fields in which the results of R and D work would be required by IGORR member groups. On the other hand - there is an appreciable amount of R and D work either being planned for the near future or being performed right now (or having just been completed) by IGORR member groups. So the purpose of this workshop was to identity those fields in which R and D work actually is or will be (or has been) performed by IGORR members. Topics of interest were: Thermal-hydraulic tests and correlations, Corrosion tests and analytical models , Multidimensional kinetic analysis for small cores, Fuel plates fabrication, Fuel plates stability, Fuel irradiation, Burnable poison irradiation, Structural materials irradiation, Neutron guides irradiation, Cold Source materials irradiation, Cold Source LN 2 test, Source LH2-H 2 O reaction (H or D), Instrumentation upgrading and digital control system, Man-machine interface

  14. Summary from the epistemic uncertainty workshop: consensus amid diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferson, Scott; Joslyn, Cliff A.; Helton, Jon C.; Oberkampf, William L.; Sentz, Kari

    2004-01-01

    The 'Epistemic Uncertainty Workshop' sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on 6-7 August 2002. The workshop was organized around a set of Challenge Problems involving both epistemic and aleatory uncertainty that the workshop participants were invited to solve and discuss. This concluding article in a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety based on the workshop discusses the intent of the Challenge Problems, summarizes some discussions from the workshop, and provides a technical comparison among the papers in this special issue. The Challenge Problems were computationally simple models that were intended as vehicles for the illustration and comparison of conceptual and numerical techniques for use in analyses that involve: (i) epistemic uncertainty, (ii) aggregation of multiple characterizations of epistemic uncertainty, (iii) combination of epistemic and aleatory uncertainty, and (iv) models with repeated parameters. There was considerable diversity of opinion at the workshop about both methods and fundamental issues, and yet substantial consensus about what the answers to the problems were, and even about how each of the four issues should be addressed. Among the technical approaches advanced were probability theory, Dempster-Shafer evidence theory, random sets, sets of probability measures, imprecise coherent probabilities, coherent lower previsions, probability boxes, possibility theory, fuzzy sets, joint distribution tableaux, polynomial chaos expansions, and info-gap models. Although some participants maintained that a purely probabilistic approach is fully capable of accounting for all forms of uncertainty, most agreed that the treatment of epistemic uncertainty introduces important considerations and that the issues underlying the Challenge Problems are legitimate and significant. Topics identified as meriting additional research include elicitation of uncertainty representations, aggregation of

  15. Recommended criteria for the evaluation of on-site nuclear power plant emergency plans, volume II: criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    A critical review of existing Canadian and international nuclear power plant (NPP) emergency plans, evaluation criteria, and approaches has been conducted to provide AECB staff with information which can be used to assess the adequacy of NPP on-site emergency response plans. The results of this work are published in two volumes. Volume I, Basis Document, provides the reasons why certain requirements are in place. It also gives comprehensive references to various standards.Volume II, Criteria, contains the criteria which relate to on-site actions and their integration with control room activities and the roles of off-site responsible organizations. The recommended criteria provide information on what is required, and not on how to accomplish the requirements. The licensees are given the latitude to decide on the methods and processes needed to meet the requirements. The documents do not address NPP off-site plans and response capability, or the control room emergency operating procedures and response capability. This report contains only Volume II: Criteria. 55 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  16. STREAM2016: Streaming Requirements, Experience, Applications and Middleware Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Geoffrey [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Jha, Shantenu [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Ramakrishnan, Lavanya [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC) facilities including accelerators, light sources and neutron sources and sensors that study, the environment, and the atmosphere, are producing streaming data that needs to be analyzed for next-generation scientific discoveries. There has been an explosion of new research and technologies for stream analytics arising from the academic and private sectors. However, there has been no corresponding effort in either documenting the critical research opportunities or building a community that can create and foster productive collaborations. The two-part workshop series, STREAM: Streaming Requirements, Experience, Applications and Middleware Workshop (STREAM2015 and STREAM2016), were conducted to bring the community together and identify gaps and future efforts needed by both NSF and DOE. This report describes the discussions, outcomes and conclusions from STREAM2016: Streaming Requirements, Experience, Applications and Middleware Workshop, the second of these workshops held on March 22-23, 2016 in Tysons, VA. STREAM2016 focused on the Department of Energy (DOE) applications, computational and experimental facilities, as well software systems. Thus, the role of “streaming and steering” as a critical mode of connecting the experimental and computing facilities was pervasive through the workshop. Given the overlap in interests and challenges with industry, the workshop had significant presence from several innovative companies and major contributors. The requirements that drive the proposed research directions, identified in this report, show an important opportunity for building competitive research and development program around streaming data. These findings and recommendations are consistent with vision outlined in NRC Frontiers of Data and National Strategic Computing Initiative (NCSI) [1, 2]. The discussions from the workshop are captured as topic areas covered in this report's sections. The report

  17. Workshops as a Research Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Levinsen, Karin

    2017-01-01

    This paper contributes to knowledge on workshops as a research methodology, and specifically on how such workshops pertain to e-learning. A literature review illustrated that workshops are discussed according to three different perspectives: workshops as a means, workshops as practice, and workshops as a research methodology. Focusing primarily on…

  18. Estimating the cold war mortgage: The 1995 baseline environmental management report. Volume II: Site summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This volume, Volume II presents the site data that was used to generate the Department of Energy's (DOE) initial Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). The raw data was obtained by DOE field personnel from existing information sources and anticipated environmental management strategies for their sites and was tempered by general assumptions and guidance developed by DOE Headquarters personnel. This data was then integrated by DOE Headquarters personnel and modified to ensure that overall constraints such as funding and waste management capacity were addressed. The site summaries are presented by State and broken out by discrete activities and projects. The Volume I Glossary has been repeated to facilitate the reader's review of Volume II. The information presented in the site summaries represents the best data and assumptions available as of February 1, 1995. Assumptions that have not been mandated by formal agreement with appropriate regulators and other stakeholders do not constitute decisions by the Department nor do they supersede existing agreements. In addition, actions requiring decisions from external sources regarding unknowns such as future land use and funding/scheduling alternatives, as well as internal actions such as the Department's Strategic Realignment initiative, will alter the basis and general assumptions used to generate the results for this report. Consequently, the numbers presented in the site summaries do not represent outyear budget requests by the field installations

  19. Impact of Evidence-Based Dentistry Workshops on Educators' Use of Evidence in Teaching and Practice: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Narjara C F; Leonardi-Dutra, Kamile; Feres, Murilo F N; Colangelo, Erica A M; Balevi, Ben; Matthews, Debora; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2018-06-01

    The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the short-term impact of evidence-based dentistry (EBD) workshops on educators' use of clinical evidence in their clinical practice and educational activities and to identify barriers they encountered in implementing evidence in their teaching and clinical practice. Between April 2012 and January 2014, a series of EBD workshops was delivered to 31 dental faculty members and postdoctoral students at three Canadian dental schools. Survey I, assessing participants' perceptions of various aspects of the workshops, was administered immediately following the workshops. Survey II, evaluating the impact of the workshops on participants' EBD implementation, was conducted 10 to 31 months after their completion. Survey I was completed by all 31 participants (100% response rate); their mean scores ranged from 3.94 to 4.65 on a five-point scale. Survey II was completed by 20 participants (64.5% response rate; five postdoctoral students and 15 faculty members), using an online 20-item questionnaire. Of the respondents, 19 (95%) reported implementing EBD in their professional activities at that time, and 14 (70%) stated that the workshops had positively helped with EBD implementation. Eight respondents (40%) reported having experienced barriers to EBD implementation, while 15 (75%) reported that their patients/students welcomed use of EBD. The respondents reported believing that strategies such as increasing EBD education and dissemination and improving quality and accessibility of evidence would facilitate the transition to EBD practice. Reported barriers to EBD implementation included resistance and criticism from colleagues, difficulty in changing current practice model, and lack of time.

  20. FALSIRE Phase II. CSNI project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (Phase II). Comparison report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievers, J.; Schulz, H.; Bass, R.; Pugh, C.; Keeney, J.

    1996-11-01

    A summary of Phase II of the Project for Fracture Analysis of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE) is presented. A FALSIRE II Workshop focused on analyses of reference fracture experiments. More than 30 participants representing 22 organizations from 12 countries took part in the workshop. Final results for 45 analyses of the reference experiments were received from the participating analysts. For each experiment, analysis results provided estimates of variables that include temperature, crack-mouth-opening displacement, stress, strain, and applied K and J values. The data were sent electronically to the Organizing Committee, who assembled the results into a comparative data base using a special-purpose computer program. A comparative assessment and discussion of the analysis results are presented in the report. Generally, structural responses of the test specimens were predicted with tolerable scatter bands. (orig./DG)

  1. A Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship. Volume II, Site Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2001-01-01

    During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as for other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over a 100 sites in 30 States and one U.S. Territory. Hundreds of thousand of acres of residually contaminated soils, contaminated groundwater, surface water and sediment contamination, and contaminated buildings are present at many sites across the country. These sites range in size from less than one acre, containing only a single facility, to large sites spanning over 100,000 acres with huge uranium enrichment plants and plutonium processing canyons. Since 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) program has made significant progress in addressing this environmental legacy. Millions of cubic meters of waste have been removed, stabilized, or disposed of, resulting in significant risk and cost reduction. In addition, DOE began disposing of transuranic (i.e., plutonium-contaminated) waste in the nation’s first deep geologic repository – the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. DOE is now carrying out its long-term stewardship obligations at dozens of sites, including smaller sites where DOE has completed cleanup work for the entire site and many larger sites where DOE has remediated portions of the site.

  2. Zajęcia warsztatowe z filozofii a relatywizm (sytuacjonizm. Część II [Philosophical workshops and relativism (situationism]. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldona Pobojewska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this text, referring to the allegation that the Philosophical Workshops preach “empty freedom of relativism”, I deal with the theory which forms the foundation of the Matthew Lipman’s program. I do so in the context that attributes situa- tionism to it. First, I consider what is situationism (analyzing three of its versions, and whether the creators of the philosophical workshops represent situationism. Then, I wonder if they promote the “useful life at the moment” and explain what tools they propose to achieve the convergence of moral behavior of different entities, as well as what is, according to them, the basis of objective/intersubjective justification of individual entity actions that deviate from social expectations. At the end, I point at the Socratic roots of this concept.

  3. MOOC Design Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Rikke Toft; Mor, Yishay; Warburton, Steven

    2016-01-01

    For the last two years we have been running a series of successful MOOC design workshops. These workshops build on previous work in learning design and MOOC design patterns. The aim of these workshops is to aid practitioners in defining and conceptualising educational innovations (predominantly......, but not exclusively MOOCs) which are based on an empathic user-centered view of the target learners and teachers. In this paper, we share the main principles, patterns and resources of our workshops and present some initial results for their effectiveness...

  4. Summary and Findings from the NREL/DOE Hydrogen Sensor Workshop (June 8, 2011)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, W.; Burgess, R.; Post, M.; Rivkin, C.

    2012-07-01

    On June 8, 2011, DOE/NREL hosted a hydrogen sensor workshop attended by nearly forty participants from private organizations, government facilities, and academic institutions . The workshop participants represented a cross section of stakeholders in the hydrogen community, including sensor developers, end users, site safety officials, and code and standards developers. The goals of the workshop were to identify critical applications for the emerging hydrogen infrastructure that require or would benefit from hydrogen sensors, to assign performance specifications for sensor deployed in each application, and to identify shortcomings or deficiencies (i.e., technical gaps) in the ability of current sensor technology to meet the assigned performance requirements.

  5. BanII dimorphic site located in the third intron of the human apolipoprotein AI (APOA1) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, R T; Kresnak, M T; Frossard, P M

    1988-02-11

    A 0.7kb fragment generated by AvaII digestion of pBL13AI, a 0.965kb full-length human apolipoprotein AI cDNA was cloned into the EcoRI site of pBR322. The apoAI cDNA was isolated from a lambdagt10 human fetal liver cDNA library. BanII (GPuGCPyC) (International Biotechnologies, Inc.) identifies two invariant bands at 1122bp and 417bp, and a single two-allele polymorphism with bands at either 274bp or 452bp. The human apolipoprotein AI-CIII-AIV gene complex has been localized on the long arm of chromosome 11 by Southern blot analysis of human-chinese hamster cell hybrids. Co-dominant segregation has been observed in two families (13 individuals). The BanII restriction map was constructed from DNA sequence data of the human apoAI gene. The 452bp fragment is generated by the loss of a BanII dimorphic site in the third intron of the apoAI gene, between the 178bp and the 274bp fragments.

  6. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Slick Rock sites, Slick Rock, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at the two millsites in Slick Rock, Colorado. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals residing nearby, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. The Union Carbide site has 350,000 tons of tailings and the North Continent site now owned by Union Carbide has 37,000 tons of tailings. Both tailings piles have been stabilized in accordance with regulations of the State of Colorado. Radon gas release from the tailings on the sites constitute the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The sparse population and relatively low radiation levels yield minimal immediate environmental impact. Hence the three alternative actions presented are directed towards restricting access to the sites (Option I), and returning the windblown tailings to the piles and stabilizing the piles with cover material (Option II), and consolidating the two piles on the UC site and stabilizing with 2 ft of cover (Option III). Fencing around the tailings piles is included in all options. Options II and III provide 2 ft of cover material on the tailings. Costs of the options range from $370,000 to $1,100,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium is not economically feasible

  7. Ecosystem modelling in the Forsmark area. Proceedings from two workshops modelling Eckarfjaerden and Bolundsfjaerden catchment areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindborg, Tobias; Kautsky, Ulrik [eds.

    2004-11-01

    The siting program for a repository of spent fuel currently collects large set of data from the surface ecosystem, as well as from the geosphere. The data collected at the sites will be used for various purposes, mainly for the safety assessment for the repository and for environmental impact assessment. The safety assessment of the encapsulation plant also includes an assessment of the postclosure of the repository (SRCAN) at the two sites of current interest for a repository. To show important methods on how data from the sites should be used in a safety assessment, a report for methods concerning SRCAN will be produced. This report is a first step in showing how the site data will be used to understand the function and dynamics of the ecosystems and how it may be translated in various dose models. A more extensive report from The SurfaceNet taskforce is presented in SKB-R--05-01. This report is based on two workshops held in Grisslehamn, Uppland October 20-23, 2003 and in Marholmen, Uppland April 16-19, 2004. Participants from the site investigation program, the analysis group, safety assessment and research attended the workshops. The groups worked intensively for 3 full days respectively, and achieved the major findings in this report. The two workshops had approximately the same approach, although Marholmen was more focused on the terrestrial ecosystems and Grisslehamn on aquatic systems. Besides the major aim of the workshops, to examine function and dynamics of ecosystems translated into dose modelling, another purpose was to communicate the reasons for the sampling programmes, to train new resources and to get plenty of undisturbed time to generate a large amount of creative work. It also got the important role of increased understanding between different scientific disciplines. High quality data is important for validating the dose- and ecosystem models.

  8. Ecosystem modelling in the Forsmark area. Proceedings from two workshops modelling Eckarfjaerden and Bolundsfjaerden catchment areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindborg, Tobias; Kautsky, Ulrik

    2004-11-01

    The siting program for a repository of spent fuel currently collects large set of data from the surface ecosystem, as well as from the geosphere. The data collected at the sites will be used for various purposes, mainly for the safety assessment for the repository and for environmental impact assessment. The safety assessment of the encapsulation plant also includes an assessment of the postclosure of the repository (SRCAN) at the two sites of current interest for a repository. To show important methods on how data from the sites should be used in a safety assessment, a report for methods concerning SRCAN will be produced. This report is a first step in showing how the site data will be used to understand the function and dynamics of the ecosystems and how it may be translated in various dose models. A more extensive report from The SurfaceNet taskforce is presented in SKB-R--05-01. This report is based on two workshops held in Grisslehamn, Uppland October 20-23, 2003 and in Marholmen, Uppland April 16-19, 2004. Participants from the site investigation program, the analysis group, safety assessment and research attended the workshops. The groups worked intensively for 3 full days respectively, and achieved the major findings in this report. The two workshops had approximately the same approach, although Marholmen was more focused on the terrestrial ecosystems and Grisslehamn on aquatic systems. Besides the major aim of the workshops, to examine function and dynamics of ecosystems translated into dose modelling, another purpose was to communicate the reasons for the sampling programmes, to train new resources and to get plenty of undisturbed time to generate a large amount of creative work. It also got the important role of increased understanding between different scientific disciplines. High quality data is important for validating the dose- and ecosystem models

  9. 77 FR 12313 - Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... District Office (DALDO), in collaboration with Oklahoma State University (OSU), Robert M. Kerr Food...

  10. 75 FR 29775 - Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0001] Food and Drug Administration Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of...: Institute of Food Science & Engineering, University of Arkansas, 2650 North Young Ave., Fayetteville, AR...

  11. PREFACE: Workshop Photograph and Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    : Bonnie Fleming (Yale U.))18:30 Supernovae neutrino detection (20') Ines Gil-Botella (CIEMAT)18:50 Neutrino cross-section in Liquid Argon in the GeV range (15') Flavio Cavanna (U. of L'Aquila)19:05 Analysis of the ArgoNeuT neutrino data (15') Carl Bromberg (Michigan State U.)19:20 Neutrino event reconstruction (15') Gary Barker (U. of Warwick) Tuesday 30 March 2010Ways to improve the Liquid Argon Charge Imaging technology I (Chair: Christos Touramanis (U. of Liverpool))09:00 Liquid Argon LEM TPC (30') Filippo Resnati (ETH Zurich)09:30 Micromegas for charge readout of double phase liquid Argon large TPCs (20') Alain Delbart (Saclay)09:50 Development of Thick-GEMs for GEM-TPC Tracker (20') Fuminori Sakuma (RIKEN)10:10 Optical readout of the ionization (20') Neil Spooner (U. of Sheffield)10:30 Scintillation light readout (20') Kostas Mavrokoridis (U. of Liverpool)10:50-11:10 Coffee break Ways to improve the Liquid Argon Charge Imaging technology II (Chair: Alberto Marchionni (ETH Zurich))11:10 Development of cold electronics (30') Veljko Radeka (BNL)11:40 Development of a frontend ASIC and DAQ system Dario Autiero (IPN Lyon)12:00 CAEN digitizers (20') Carlo Tintori (CAEN)12:20 Recent results from Liquid Argon R&D activity (20') Masashi Tanaka (KEK)12:40 Results from the materials test stand and status of LAPD (20') Brian Rebel (FNAL)13:00 Purging and purification: 6 m3 @CERN (20') Alessandro Curioni (ETH Zurich)13:20-14:30 Lunch break14:30-20:00 Trip to J-PARC to visit T2K Beam Facility and Near Detector20:00-22:00 Workshop dinner at Okura Frontier Hotel Tsukuba Wednesday 31 March 2010Ways to improve the Liquid Argon Charge Imaging technology III (Chair: Takasumi Maruyama (KEK))09:00 ArgonTube and UV laser ionization (25') Biagio Rossi (U. of Bern)09:25 Detector magnetization (15') Andreas Badertscher (ETH Zurich)09:40 HV system (25') Sosuke Horikawa (ETH Zurich) Localization studies (Chair: Takuya Hasegawa (KEK))10:05 Okinoshima site study (20') Masakazu Yoshioka (KEK)10

  12. Systems Engineering Workshops | Wind | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workshops Systems Engineering Workshops The Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop is a biennial topics relevant to systems engineering and the wind industry. The presentations and agendas are available for all of the Systems Engineering Workshops: The 1st NREL Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop

  13. MO-AB-210-03: Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  14. Delivery Mechanisms for Rural Electrification. A report from a workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullberg, Monica; Ilskog, Elisabeth; Arvidson, Anders; Katyega, Maneno (eds.)

    2004-04-01

    The workshop was attended by 28 participants from Kenya, Mozambique South Africa, Sweden, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe, representing energy service providers (private, public and cooperative), consumer groups, public energy authorities, researchers, consultants, NGOs and the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency. The topic of the workshop was how different types of electricity delivery mechanisms - i.e. the combination of an energy supply technology and the organisation managing it - can support rural development. Which energy services have high priority for rural development? What are the appropriate delivery mechanisms? How can the expansion of different delivery mechanisms be supported and made to work efficiently? These are some of the key questions that were discussed in the workshop. The objectives of the workshop were to share experiences and develop a better understanding of existing and potential energy delivery mechanisms that contribute to development in rural areas in Eastern and Southern Africa. The workshop was targeted at, amongst others, the authorities which are in the process of being formed, or have recently been formed, to take charge of rural electrification such as the Rural Electrification Agencies and Rural Electrification Funds. Four case studies were presented and discussed to provide an introduction to the topic, and concrete examples of different delivery mechanisms were given to inspire the workshop discussions. Focus group discussions were used to explore the participants perceptions and experience of: (i) what rural development is, (ii) what role energy plays in rural development, (iii) which energy services are important for rural development, (iv) which delivery mechanisms are used and appropriate for different situations of energy service delivery in rural areas, and (v) what the institutional framework requirements are for delivering different types of energy services and supporting different types of

  15. Proceedings of the First Hanford Separation Science Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The First Hanford Separation Science Workshop, sponsored by PNL had two main objectives: (1) assess the applicability of available separation methods for environmental restoration and for minimization, recovery, and recycle of mixed and radioactive mutes; and (2) identify research needs that must be addressed to create new or improved technologies. The information gathered at this workshop not only applies to Hanford but could be adapted to DOE facilities throughout the nation as well. These proceedings have been divided into three components: Background and Introduction to the Problem gives an overview of the history of the Site and the cleanup mission, including waste management operations, past disposal practices, current operations, and plans for the future. Also included in this section is a discussion of specific problems concerning the chemistry of the Hanford wastes. Separation Methodologies contains the papers given at the workshop by national experts in the field of separation science regarding the state-of-the-art of various methods and their applicability/adaptability to Hanford. Research Needs identifies further research areas developed in working group sessions. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  16. Proceedings of the First Hanford Separation Science Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The First Hanford Separation Science Workshop, sponsored by PNL had two main objectives: (1) assess the applicability of available separation methods for environmental restoration and for minimization, recovery, and recycle of mixed and radioactive mutes; and (2) identify research needs that must be addressed to create new or improved technologies. The information gathered at this workshop not only applies to Hanford but could be adapted to DOE facilities throughout the nation as well. These proceedings have been divided into three components: Background and Introduction to the Problem gives an overview of the history of the Site and the cleanup mission, including waste management operations, past disposal practices, current operations, and plans for the future. Also included in this section is a discussion of specific problems concerning the chemistry of the Hanford wastes. Separation Methodologies contains the papers given at the workshop by national experts in the field of separation science regarding the state-of-the-art of various methods and their applicability/adaptability to Hanford. Research Needs identifies further research areas developed in working group sessions. Individual papers are indexed separately

  17. Applied antineutrino physics workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, James C.

    2008-01-01

    This workshop is the fourth one of a series that includes the Neutrino Geophysics Conference at Honolulu, Hawaii, which I attended in 2005. This workshop was organized by the Astro-Particle and Cosmology laboratory in the recently opened Condoret building of the University of Paris. More information, including copies of the presentations, on the workshop is available on the website: www.apc.univ-paris7.fr/AAP2007/. The workshop aims at opening neutrino physics to various fields such that it can be applied in geosciences, nuclear industry (reactor and spent fuel monitoring) and non-proliferation. The workshop was attended by over 60 people from Europe, USA, Asia and Brazil. The meeting was also attended by representatives of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The workshop also included a workshop dinner on board of a river boat sailing the Seine river

  18. Low-Level Radioactive Waste siting simulation information package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    The Department of Energy's National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program has developed a simulation exercise designed to facilitate the process of siting and licensing disposal facilities for low-level radioactive waste. The siting simulation can be conducted at a workshop or conference, can involve 14-70 participants (or more), and requires approximately eight hours to complete. The exercise is available for use by states, regional compacts, or other organizations for use as part of the planning process for low-level waste disposal facilities. This information package describes the development, content, and use of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Siting Simulation. Information is provided on how to organize a workshop for conducting the simulation. 1 ref., 1 fig

  19. Pedagogical sensemaking or "doing school": In well-designed workshop sessions, facilitation makes the difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Alice; Turpen, Chandra

    2017-12-01

    Although physics education researchers often use workshops to promote instructional change in higher education, little research has been done to investigate workshop design. Initial evidence suggests that many workshop sessions focus primarily on raising faculty's awareness of research-based instructional strategies, a fairly straightforward goal that has been largely met. However, increasing faculty's awareness of existing strategies alone has somewhat limited benefits. We argue that workshop leaders should also aim to cultivate faculty's ability and motivation to engage in pedagogical sensemaking, i.e., the pursuit of robust pedagogical logic based on observations and interpretations of classroom events. This goal is likely more challenging to achieve, and thus presents a greater need for research. In this paper, we pursue in situ, qualitative analysis of two parallel workshop sessions that seem to have the potential to support ambitious outcomes. We demonstrate how faculty may engage in aspects of pedagogical sensemaking, such as using observations of student behavior to support their arguments. We also show how faculty may instead seem to engage in interactions reminiscent of students "doing school," such as evaluating instruction based on "correctness" alone. We also show how differences in workshop facilitation seemed to contribute to faculty engaging in pedagogical sensemaking in one session only. These differences include (i) strictly enforcing session rules versus gently navigating faculty's incoming expectations, (ii) highlighting the workshop leaders' expertise versus working to minimize power differentials, and (iii) emphasizing the benefits of adoption of a prescribed strategy versus encouraging faculty to reason about possible adaptations. We consider the implications of this analysis for future research and workshop design.

  20. Archaeometric studies of ceramics from the Sao Paulo II archaeological site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogerio Baria; Munita, C.S.; Cano, N.F.; Tatumi, S.H.; Silva-Carrera, B.N.; Shigueo Watanabe; Neves, E.G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at studying the elementary chemical composition of 70 ceramic fragments from the Sao Paulo II archaeological site by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The concentration data was studied next using multivariate statistical methods, such as cluster analysis, principal component analysis and discriminant analysis. The results showed three different chemical groups of samples regarding the similarity/dissimilarity between the samples. Ceramics from each group have been selected and dated using thermoluminescence. The firing temperature of the ceramics was determined by electron paramagnetic resonance. (author)

  1. Raw material variability as archaeological tools: Preliminary results from a geochemical study of the basalt vessel workshop at Iron Age Tel Hazor, Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Gluhak

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of a basalt vessel workshop at Tel Hazor, one of the most important Iron Age sites in the Near East, marks a turning point in our understanding of stone artifact production and distribution during the1st millennium BCE. It offers a rare opportunity to characterize ancient raw material sources, production sites, and study production, trade and distribution systems. The basalt vessel workshop, the only one of its kind in the Levant, produced large quantities of bowl preforms and production waste. To better understand the production and distribution systems behind this specialized production center, in 2011 we initiated a focused geochemical project that concentrated on the products of this unique workshop.  We measured the major and trace element composition of 44 unfinished basalt vessels from the workshop and other contexts at Hazor, and can demonstrate that the majority of these objects were derived from one specific, geochemically well-constrained, basaltic rock source. Only a few bowls clearly deviate from this geochemical composition and were produced using raw material from other sources. Thus, we believe that one major quarry existed that supplied the Hazor workshop with the majority of the basaltic raw material. The products from this specific extraction site provide us with a “Hazor reference group” that can be used to test whether or not finished vessels from Hazor and contemporary sites were produced in the Hazor workshop.

  2. The in vitro transcription of a rainbow trout (Salmo gairdnerii) protamine gene. II. Controlled mutation of the cap site region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, J M; Dixon, G H

    1985-02-01

    A series of plasmids containing new fusion genes in which the trout protamine gene is placed under the control of the complete herpes virus (HSV-1) tk promoter Pvu II-Bgl II fragment (pM8), or a shortened thymidine kinase (tk) promoter in which the region between the TATA box and the cap site is altered by using the Pvu II-Mlu I fragment (pM7), have been constructed. An additional recombinant plasmid was constructed in which the Bgl II-Ava II fragment of the protamine gene containing the entire protamine promoter but missing the protamine coding region was cloned into pBR322 between the Xho II 1666 and Hind III sites (pP5). For in vitro transcription, a HeLa cell lysate system was prepared and the RNA transcription products, after glyoxalation, were electrophoretically analyzed on 5% polyacrylamide gels. In constructing pM8 the DNA sequence between the tk promoter and the cap site was present while in pM7 it was deleted. Similar multiple transcripts were seen in both cases, indicating that the region between the promoter and the cap site has no effect upon transcription in vitro. The multiple transcripts appear to be due to the presence of a cryptic promoter in the complementary strand of the protamine gene. The activity of this cryptic promoter has been confirmed by comparison of the transcription of plasmid pP5, in which the protamine mRNA coding region has been deleted, with a previously described plasmid, pJBRP (Jankowski JM and Dixon GH (1984) Can. J. Biochem. Cell. Biol. 62, 291-300), containing the intact protamine gene.

  3. Peer-Review Writing Workshops in College Courses: Students’ Perspectives about Online and Classroom Based Workshops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin B. Jensen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Peer-review workshops are commonly used in writing courses as a way for students to give their peers feedback as well as help their own writing. Most of the research on peer-review workshops focuses on workshops held in traditional in-person courses, with less research on peer-review workshops held online. Students in a freshman writing course experienced both a classroom based writing workshop and an online workshop and then took a survey about their experiences. The majority of the students preferred the online writing workshop because of the convenience of the workshop and being able to post anonymous reviews. Students whom preferred the traditional in-person writing workshop liked being able to talk with their peers about their papers. This research article focuses on the students’ responses and experiences with traditional and online peer-reviews.

  4. Chemical dechlorination of pesticides at a superfund site in Region II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendergrass, S.; Prince, J.

    1991-01-01

    Selecting technologies for cleaning up hazardous waste sites is a complex task, due in part to the rapidly changing nature of the state-of-the-art in technology. There is strong support for use of innovative technologies as specified in Section 121(b) of CERCLA. However, use of an innovative technology requires overcoming a variety of challenges. These challenges include: Screening potentially appropriate technologies, including innovative technologies, and selecting one or more potential innovative technologies for which preliminary results are promising; however, site-specific data are needed prior to technology evaluation. Evaluating the effectiveness of the proposed technology for the site through the use of treatability studies. Gaining acceptance for the innovative technology, which may employ new or unfamiliar concepts. Determining optimal design and operating parameters for full-scale remediation. This paper discusses the technology evaluation process and how that process supported the selection of an innovative technology for the Myers Property site, a Superfund site in Region II. A case study is presented showing how technology screening and laboratory treatability studies were used to evaluate an innovative technology (chemical dechlorination), which was selected as the technology for remediation of soils and sediments contaminated with pesticides at this environmentally sensitive site in New Jersey. The remedy selected by the U.S. EPA for this site designates chemical dechlorination as the selected technology, but does not specify any particular vendor or process. Rather, the remedy sets forth technology performance standards and recommends certain design tasks which may be used to select a particular chemical process. This paper discusses he of these design tasks as they might apply to innovative technologies, using chemical dechlorination as a model

  5. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Tuba City site, Tuba City, Arizona. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at the Tuba City millsite in Arizona. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals residing nearby, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the tailings on the site constitutes the most significant environmental impact to the inhabited area near the site. In the downwind direction, to the northeast of the site, airborne radioactivity is greater than Federal guidelines but there are no dwellings in that direction in the area of concern. Gamma radiation is significant over the tailings but is near background levels in the housing area. The sparse population and relatively low radiation levels yield minimal immediate environmental impact; hence, the four alternative actions presented are directed towards restricting access to the site (Option I), and returning the windblown tailings to the pile and stabilizing the pile with cover material (Options II, III, and IV). Fencing around the site or the tailings pile and the removal or decontamination of mill buildings is included in all options. Option II provides 2 ft of cover material on the tailings, Option III provides 4 ft of cover, and Option IV provides 13 ft of cover. Costs of the options range from $671,000 to $2,904,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium is only marginally feasible and would require a more detailed economic evaluation before any action was taken

  6. ICP-MS Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carman, April J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Eiden, Gregory C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This is a short document that explains the materials that will be transmitted to LLNL and DNN HQ regarding the ICP-MS Workshop held at PNNL June 17-19th. The goal of the information is to pass on to LLNL information regarding the planning and preparations for the Workshop at PNNL in preparation of the SIMS workshop at LLNL.

  7. 78 FR 33849 - Battery-Powered Medical Devices Workshop: Challenges and Opportunities; Public Workshop; Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... after the public workshop on the Internet at http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/NewsEvents/Workshops..., compact, and mobile, the number of battery-powered medical devices will continue to increase. While many...] Battery-Powered Medical Devices Workshop: Challenges and Opportunities; Public Workshop; Request for...

  8. The diversity and disparity in biomedical informatics (DDBI) workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southerland, William M; Swamidass, S Joshua; Payne, Philip R O; Wiley, Laura; Williams-DeVane, ClarLynda

    2018-01-01

    The Diversity and Disparity in Biomedical Informatics (DDBI) workshop will be focused on complementary and critical issues concerned with enhancing diversity in the informatics workforce as well as diversity in patient cohorts. According to the National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) at the NIH, diversity refers to the inclusion of the following traditionally underrepresented groups: African Americans/Blacks, Asians (>30 countries), American Indian or Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, Latino or Hispanic (20 countries). Gender, culture, and socioeconomic status are also important dimensions of diversity, which may define some underrepresented groups. The under-representation of specific groups in both the biomedical informatics workforce as well as in the patient-derived data that is being used for research purposes has contributed to an ongoing disparity; these groups have not experienced equity in contributing to or benefiting from advancements in informatics research. This workshop will highlight innovative efforts to increase the pool of minority informaticians and discuss examples of informatics research that addresses the health concerns that impact minority populations. This workshop topics will provide insight into overcoming pipeline issues in the development of minority informaticians while emphasizing the importance of minority participation in health related research. The DDBI workshop will occur in two parts. Part I will discuss specific minority health & health disparities research topics and Part II will cover discussions related to overcoming pipeline issues in the training of minority informaticians.

  9. Thirteenth International Workshop on Principles of Diagnosis (DX-2002)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    91 Suárez, Antonio J., 165 Szemethy, Tivadar, 7 Tatar, Mugur, 65 Torasso, Pietro , 43 Torta, Gianluca, 43 Travé-Massuyés, Louise, 106 Weiss, Ulrich...Washio Osaka University, Japan Marina Zanella Universitá di Brescia, Italy Feng Zhao Xerox PARC, USA II Foreword The Thirteenth International Workshop...dynamic and temporal systems, distribution and abstraction, and non-symbolic methods of di - agnosis. They bear witness to the continuing existence of

  10. Documentation of the workshop on R and D and application of seismic emergency information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    This report describes the summary of the workshop on R and D and application of Seismic Emergency Information System (SEIS) organized by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) held on December 20, 1999. Documents presented in the workshop are attached. The workshop consists of the following five technical sessions. - Session I: Objectives of Workshop, - Session II: Progress of R and D of SEIS, - Session III: Current status of application of Seismic Information Systems, - Session IV: Free-discussion for issues and future prospects of Information Systems, - Session V: Briefing, Subsequently to the introduction of objectives of the workshop, the four topics on the progress of R and D of the seismic information system were presented by JAERI and NIED. The discussions are summarized in three viewpoints, i.e.; utilization of the potential of JAERI activities to the R and D, clarification on the objectives and philosophy of the system, effective utilization of the result of R and D. In addition, the current status on the application of seismic information systems was presented by staffs of local government and etc. Issues and future prospects of the information systems were discussed. The workshop was summarized in the final session. (author)

  11. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Grand Junction site, Grand Junction, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented range from millsite decontamination (Option I), to adding various depths of stabilization cover material (Options II and III), to removal of the tailings to long-term storage sites and decontamination of the present site (Options IV through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from $470,000 to $18,130,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery does not appear to be economically attractive at present.

  12. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Grand Junction site, Grand Junction, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented range from millsite decontamination (Option I), to adding various depths of stabilization cover material (Options II and III), to removal of the tailings to long-term storage sites and decontamination of the present site (Options IV through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from $470,000 to $18,130,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery does not appear to be economically attractive at present

  13. 2nd Latin American Workshop on Magnetism, Magnetic Materials, and Their Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, J

    1994-01-01

    During August 24-27, 1993, approximately 60 scientists from the Americas, Europe and Japan, gathered in the city of Guanajuato, in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico, at the II Latin American Workshop on Magnetism, Magnetic Materials and their Applications. The group of scientists converging into the beautiful city of Guanajuato had come from Argentina, Chile, Brazil, Venezuela, Cuba, several places in Mexico, U. S. A. , Japan, Spain, France, Italy, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Denmark. The event attested to the success of the previous Workshop on Magnetism, Magnetic Materials and their Applications, held in Havana, Cuba, in 1991, as well as to the interest, level of activity and quality of the work being carried out in Latin America in the area of magnetism and magnetic materials. Equally important to everyone present was the fact that we had come to honor a friend, Professor L. M. Falicov, on his sixtieth birthday. The choice of a Latin American Workshop on magnetism as a Festschrift for Leo Falicov was,...

  14. Report of the 2004 Workshop on In Situ Iron Enrichment Experiments in the Eastern and Western Subarctic Pacific

    OpenAIRE

    Takeda, Shigenobu; Wong, C.S.

    2006-01-01

    Foreword 1. BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES (pdf, 0.1 Mb) 2. 2004 WORKSHOP SUMMARY (pdf, < 0.1 Mb) 2.1. What have we learned from the enrichment experiments? 2.2 What are the outstanding questions? 2.3 Recommendations for SEEDS-II 3. EXTENDED ABSTRACTS OF THE 2004 WORKSHOP 3.1 Synthesis of the Iron Enrichment Experiments: SEEDS and SERIES (pdf, 0.5 Mb) Iron fertilization experiment in the western subarctic Pacific (SEEDS) by At...

  15. Proceedings of the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management: Waste Reduction Workshop 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The sixth of a series of waste reduction workshops was held at the Airport Hilton Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia, on February 6--7, 1991. These workshops are held under the auspices of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The focus of this workshop was the review of guidance and the status of conducting process waste assessments (PWAs). Other highlights of the workshop were the status of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Pollution Prevention Program, and presentations on budgeting for waste reduction and the impact of the toxic release inventory (TRI) reporting requirements on pollution prevention activities. Concurrent sessions on the second day included case studies of the experiences at various sites on the subjects of recycling, incentives, source reduction, volume and toxicity reduction, and material procurement. The impact of new state laws on waste reduction efforts at Oak Ridge, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Hanford were also reviewed by representatives from those sites. These workshops assist DOE waste-generating sites in implementing waste minimization (WMIN) plans and programs, thus providing for optimal waste reduction within the DOE complex. All wastes are considered liquid, solid, and airborne, within the categories of high-level waste, transuranic waste (TRU), low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, mixed waste, office waste, and sanitary wastes. Topics of discussion within workshops encompass a wide range of subjects, including any method or technical activity from waste generation to disposal, such as process design or improvement, substitution of materials, waste segregation and recycling/reuse, waste treatment and processing, and administrative controls (procurement and waste awareness training). Consideration is also given to activities for remedial action and for decontamination and disposal

  16. Topic I: Induced changes in hydrology at low-level radioactive waste repository sites: A section in Safe disposal of radionuclides in low-level radioactive-waste repository sites; Low-level radioactive-waste disposal workshop, U.S. Geological Survey, July 11-16, 1987, Big Bear Lake, Calif., Proceedings (Circular 1036)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudic, David E.; Dennehy, Kevin F.; Bedinger, Marion S.; Stevens, Peter R.

    1990-01-01

    Engineering practices, including the excavation of trenches, placement of waste, nature of waste forms, backfilling procedures and materials, and trench-cover construction and materials at low-level radioactive-waste repository sites greatly affect the geohydrology of the sites. Engineering practices are dominant factors in eventual stability and isolation of the waste. The papers presented relating to Topic I were discussions of the hydrogeologic setting at existing low-level radioactive-waste repository sites and changes in the hydrology induced by site operations. Papers summarizing detailed studies presented at this workshop include those at sites near Sheffield, Ill.; Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tenn.; West Valley, N.Y.; Maxey Flats, Ky.; Barnwell, S.C.; and Beatty, Nev. 

  17. Workshop Proceedings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    , the main focus there is on spoken languages in their written and spoken forms. This series of workshops, however, offers a forum for researchers focussing on sign languages. For the third time, the workshop had sign language corpora as its main topic. This time, the focus was on the interaction between...... corpus and lexicon. More than half of the papers presented contribute to this topic. Once again, the papers at this workshop clearly identify the potentials of even closer cooperation between sign linguists and sign language engineers, and we think it is events like this that contribute a lot to a better...

  18. Workshop ''actual data processing supported applications in the area of soil protection and contaminated sites''; Workshop ''Aktuelle DV-gestuetzte Anwendungen im Bodenschutz- und Altlastenbereich''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, Jeannette; Frauenstein, Joerg; Mahrle, Sabine (comps.)

    2011-05-15

    Within the 5th workshop at the Federal Environment Agency (Dessau-Rosslau, Federal Republic of Germany) from 28th to 29th September, 2010, the following lectures were held: (1) Information systems for the contaminated site management in Baden-Wuerttemberg (I. Blankenhorn); (2) SALKA 7 - A web based solution for a central data handling of the Saxonian register of contaminated sites (S. Gruhne); (3) Information system (ABuDIS) for contaminated sites, soil conservation and disposal sites in the Free State of Bavaria - Experiences from the project 'Data quality' (O. Klammer); (4) Environmental specimen bank - Web interface (M. Ruether); (5) Biocides in the Web - A portal for the publicity (G. Minx); (6) INSPIRE - Thematic work group (TWG) Appendix III Soil (S. Marahrens); (6) INSPIRE - State of the art, requirements (R. Baritz); (7) Requirements for the interoperability of soil data from the view of the Federal Environment Agency (F. Hilliges); (8) Implementation of the PortalU-Software in the European context - The project GS Soil (K. Feiden); (9) What is offered by PRTR - Pollutant Release and Transfer Register? (E. Six); (10) GSBL - Application for web recherche (B. Liebscher); (11) New Web Map Service for ground water background values (B. Wagner); (12) Visualized information on contaminated sites - A status (J. Frauenstein); (13) Utilization of industrial wastelands - An idea makes soil good. A project of BAFU for revitalization of industrial wastelands (K. Schenk); (14) Information on the status of ground water for the governmental real estates (H.-O. Zintz); (15) Application of data processing procedures of the artificial intelligence on an area-based representation of pollutant contents in settlement areas (T. Hertwig).

  19. Biomonitoring of atmospheric pollution (with emphasis on trace elements) - BioMap II. Proceedings of an international workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Certain types of organisms integrate pollution over time, reducing the need for continuous chemical monitoring, thus avoiding the difficulty of interpreting 'snapshot' measurements and offering the potential of retrospective monitoring. Such organisms enrich the substance to be determined so that the analytical accessibility is improved and the measurement uncertainty reduced. By observing and measuring the changes in an appropriately selected organism, a conclusion as to the kind of pollution, its source, and its intensity can be drawn. The IAEA is making concerted efforts to promote the practical use of nuclear and related analytical techniques in studies of non-radioactive environmental pollutants that may impact on human health, and one of the main emphasis is on studying air contaminants. The IAEA has been systematically supporting biomonitoring atmospheric pollution for 10 years in the framework of its project on Environmental Pollution Monitoring and Research Using Nuclear and Related Analytical Techniques. The objective of this project is to identify the source and evaluate the fate of key non-radioactive environmental contaminants and provide the basis for improved health for human populations. The project has been implemented through a Coordinated Research Project on Validation and Application of Plants as Biomonitors of Trace Element Atmospheric Pollution Analysed by Nuclear and Related Techniques, several technical co-operation projects, and some dedicated analytical quality control activities. Within the scope of these efforts, the Second International Workshop on Biomonitoring of Atmospheric Pollution (with Emphasis on Trace Elements) - BioMAP, was organized as a follow-up to the 1997 BioMAP workshop held in Lisbon, Portugal. The proceedings of the first workshop were published in IAEA-TECDOC-1152. The second workshop was held in Praia da Vitoria, Azores Islands, Portugal, from 28 August to 3 September 2000. It was organized in co-operation with the

  20. Biomonitoring of atmospheric pollution (with emphasis on trace elements) - BioMap II. Proceedings of an international workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-01

    Certain types of organisms integrate pollution over time, reducing the need for continuous chemical monitoring, thus avoiding the difficulty of interpreting 'snapshot' measurements and offering the potential of retrospective monitoring. Such organisms enrich the substance to be determined so that the analytical accessibility is improved and the measurement uncertainty reduced. By observing and measuring the changes in an appropriately selected organism, a conclusion as to the kind of pollution, its source, and its intensity can be drawn. The IAEA is making concerted efforts to promote the practical use of nuclear and related analytical techniques in studies of non-radioactive environmental pollutants that may impact on human health, and one of the main emphasis is on studying air contaminants. The IAEA has been systematically supporting biomonitoring atmospheric pollution for 10 years in the framework of its project on Environmental Pollution Monitoring and Research Using Nuclear and Related Analytical Techniques. The objective of this project is to identify the source and evaluate the fate of key non-radioactive environmental contaminants and provide the basis for improved health for human populations. The project has been implemented through a Coordinated Research Project on Validation and Application of Plants as Biomonitors of Trace Element Atmospheric Pollution Analysed by Nuclear and Related Techniques, several technical co-operation projects, and some dedicated analytical quality control activities. Within the scope of these efforts, the Second International Workshop on Biomonitoring of Atmospheric Pollution (with Emphasis on Trace Elements) - BioMAP, was organized as a follow-up to the 1997 BioMAP workshop held in Lisbon, Portugal. The proceedings of the first workshop were published in IAEA-TECDOC-1152. The second workshop was held in Praia da Vitoria, Azores Islands, Portugal, from 28 August to 3 September 2000. It was organized in co-operation with the

  1. Historical sites at the Prince Edward islands

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cooper, J

    1986-07-01

    Full Text Available This report gives the results of a workshop held on historical sites at the sub-Antarctic Prince Edward islands, southern Indian Ocean. All known visits and sojourns on the Prince Edward islands up to 1948 are tabulated. All known historical sites...

  2. Workshop report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... health: report of first EQUIST training workshop in Nigeria .... The difference between the before and after measurements was ... After the administration of the pre-workshop questionnaire the ... represent Likert rating scale of 1-5 points, where 1point = grossly .... Procedures Manual for the "Evaluating.

  3. Technology Requirements For In Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannik, T.; Lee, P.; Gladden, J.; Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Urland, C.; Reynolds, E.

    2009-01-01

    In recognition of the increasing attention being focused on In Situ Decommissioning (ISD or entombment) as an acceptable and beneficial decommissioning end state, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is developing guidance for the implementation of ISD of excess facilities within the DOE complex. Consistent with the overarching DOE goals for increased personnel and environmental safety, reduced technical uncertainties and risks, and overall gains in efficiencies and effectiveness, EM's Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-23) initiated efforts to identify the technical barriers and technology development needs for the optimal implementation of ISD. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), as the EM Corporate Laboratory, conducted an ISD Technology Needs Workshop to identify the technology needs at DOE sites. The overall goal of the workshop was to gain a full understanding of the specific ISD technical challenges, the technologies available, and those needing development. The ISD Workshop was held December 9-10, 2008 in Aiken, SC. Experienced decommissioning operations personnel from Richland Operations Office (RL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and Savannah River Site (SRS) along with scientists and engineers specific expertise were assembled to identify incremental and 'game changing' solutions to ISD technology challenges. The workshop and follow-up activities yielded 14 technology needs statements and the recommendation that EM-23 prioritize and pursue the following specific technology development and deployment actions. For each action, the recommended technology acquisition mechanisms (competitive solicitation (CS) or direct funding (TCR)) are provided. Activities that are time critical for ISD projects, or require unique capabilities that reside in the DOE Laboratory system will be funded directly to those institutions. Activities that have longer lead times and where the private

  4. Asia-Pacific POPIN workshop on Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This brief article announces the accomplishments of the ESCAP Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis (DESIPA) in conjunction with the Asia-Pacific POPIN Internet (Information Superhighway) Training Workshop in popularizing useful new computer information technologies. A successful workshop was held in Bangkok in November 1996 for 18 people from 8 countries in the Asian and Pacific region, many of whom were from population information centers. Participants were taught some techniques for disseminating population data and information through use of the Internet computer facility. Participants learned 1) how to use Windows software in the ESCAP local area network (LAN), 2) about concepts such as HTML (hypertext mark-up language), and 3) detailed information about computer language. Computer practices involved "surfing the Net (Internet)" and linking with the global POPIN site on the Internet. Participants learned about computer programs for information handling and learned how to prepare documents using HTML, how to mount information on the World Wide Web (WWW) of the Internet, how to convert existing documents into "HTML-style" files, and how to scan graphics, such as logos, photographs, and maps, for visual display on the Internet. The Workshop and the three training modules was funded by the UN Population Fund (UNFPA). The POPIN Coordinator was pleased that competency was accomplished in such a short period of time.

  5. Workshops as a Research Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Levinsen, Karin Tweddell

    2017-01-01

    , and workshops as a research methodology. Focusing primarily on the latter, this paper presents five studies on upper secondary and higher education teachers’ professional development and on teaching and learning through video conferencing. Through analysis and discussion of these studies’ findings, we argue......This paper contributes to knowledge on workshops as a research methodology, and specifically on how such workshops pertain to e-learning. A literature review illustrated that workshops are discussed according to three different perspectives: workshops as a means, workshops as practice...... that workshops provide a platform that can aid researchers in identifying and exploring relevant factors in a given domain by providing means for understanding complex work and knowledge processes that are supported by technology (for example, e-learning). The approach supports identifying factors...

  6. Risk Management Techniques and Practice Workshop Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, T; Zosel, M

    2008-12-02

    At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) hosted a two-day Risk Management Techniques and Practice (RMTAP) workshop held September 18-19 at the Hotel Nikko in San Francisco. The purpose of the workshop, which was sponsored by the SC/Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)/Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, was to assess current and emerging techniques, practices, and lessons learned for effectively identifying, understanding, managing, and mitigating the risks associated with acquiring leading-edge computing systems at high-performance computing centers (HPCCs). Representatives from fifteen high-performance computing (HPC) organizations, four HPC vendor partners, and three government agencies attended the workshop. The overall workshop findings were: (1) Standard risk management techniques and tools are in the aggregate applicable to projects at HPCCs and are commonly employed by the HPC community; (2) HPC projects have characteristics that necessitate a tailoring of the standard risk management practices; (3) All HPCC acquisition projects can benefit by employing risk management, but the specific choice of risk management processes and tools is less important to the success of the project; (4) The special relationship between the HPCCs and HPC vendors must be reflected in the risk management strategy; (5) Best practices findings include developing a prioritized risk register with special attention to the top risks, establishing a practice of regular meetings and status updates with the platform partner, supporting regular and open reviews that engage the interests and expertise of a wide range of staff and stakeholders, and documenting and sharing the acquisition/build/deployment experience; and (6) Top risk categories include system scaling issues, request for proposal/contract and acceptance testing, and

  7. Proceedings of the second workshop of LHC Computing Grid, LCG-France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chollet, Frederique; Hernandez, Fabio; Malek, Fairouz; Gaelle, Shifrin

    2007-03-01

    The second LCG-France Workshop was held in Clermont-Ferrand on 14-15 March 2007. These sessions organized by IN2P3 and DAPNIA were attended by around 70 participants working with the Computing Grid of LHC in France. The workshop was a opportunity of exchanges of information between the French and foreign site representatives on one side and delegates of experiments on the other side. The event allowed enlightening the place of LHC Computing Task within the frame of W-LCG world project, the undergoing actions and the prospects in 2007 and beyond. The following communications were presented: 1. The current status of the LHC computation in France; 2.The LHC Grid infrastructure in France and associated resources; 3.Commissioning of Tier 1; 4.The sites of Tier-2s and Tier-3s; 5.Computing in ALICE experiment; 6.Computing in ATLAS experiment; 7.Computing in the CMS experiments; 8.Computing in the LHCb experiments; 9.Management and operation of computing grids; 10.'The VOs talk to sites'; 11.Peculiarities of ATLAS; 12.Peculiarities of CMS and ALICE; 13.Peculiarities of LHCb; 14.'The sites talk to VOs'; 15. Worldwide operation of Grid; 16.Following-up the Grid jobs; 17.Surveillance and managing the failures; 18. Job scheduling and tuning; 19.Managing the site infrastructure; 20.LCG-France communications; 21.Managing the Grid data; 22.Pointing the net infrastructure and site storage. 23.ALICE bulk transfers; 24.ATLAS bulk transfers; 25.CMS bulk transfers; 26. LHCb bulk transfers; 27.Access to LHCb data; 28.Access to CMS data; 29.Access to ATLAS data; 30.Access to ALICE data; 31.Data analysis centers; 32.D0 Analysis Farm; 33.Some CMS grid analyses; 34.PROOF; 35.Distributed analysis using GANGA; 36.T2 set-up for end-users. In their concluding remarks Fairouz Malek and Dominique Pallin stressed that the current workshop was more close to users while the tasks for tightening the links between the sites and the experiments were definitely achieved. The IN2P3 leadership expressed

  8. Workshop meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veland, Oeystein

    2004-04-01

    1-2 September 2003 the Halden Project arranged a workshop on 'Innovative Human-System Interfaces and their Evaluation'. This topic is new in the HRP 2003-2005 programme, and it is important to get feedback from member organizations to the work that is being performed in Halden. It is also essential that relevant activities and experiences in this area from the member organizations are shared with the Halden staff and other HRP members. Altogether 25 persons attended the workshop. The workshop had a mixture of presentations and discussions, and was chaired by Dominique Pirus of EDF, France. Day one focused on the HRP/IFE activities on Human-System Interface design, including Function-oriented displays, Ecological Interface Design, Task-oriented displays, as well as work on innovative display solutions for the oil and gas domain. There were also presentations of relevant work in France, Japan and the Czech Republic. The main focus of day two was the verification and validation of human-system interfaces, with presentations of work at HRP on Human-Centered Validation, Criteria-Based System Validation, and Control Room Verification and Validation. The chairman concluded that it was a successful workshop, although one could have had more time for discussions. The Halden Project got valuable feedback and viewpoints on this new topic during the workshop, and will consider all recommendations related to the future work in this area. (Author)

  9. Mock Site Licensing Demonstration Project. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roop, R.D.

    1986-06-01

    The Mock Site Licensing Demonstration Project developed the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Siting Simulation, a role-playing exercise designed to facilitate the process of siting and licensing disposal facilities for low-level waste (LLW). This report describes the development, contant, and usefulness of the siting simulation. The simulation was designed by Harvard University's Program on Negotiation; it can be conducted at a workshop or conference, involves 14 or more participants, and requires about eight hours to complete. The simulation consists of two sessions. In the first, participants negotiate the selection of siting criteria, and in the second, a preferred site for a facility is chosen from three candidate sites. The project sponsored two workshops (in Boston, Massachusetts and Richmond, Virginia) in which the simulation was conducted for persons involved in planning for LLW. It is concluded that the siting simulation can be useful in three ways: (1) as a tool for information dissemination, (2) as a vehicle that can foste communication among parties in conflict, and (3) as a step toward consensus building and conflict resolution. The DOE National Low-Level Waste Management Program is now making the siting simulation available for use by states, regional compacts, and other organizations involved in development of LLW disposal facilities

  10. 75 FR 56526 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Initiative Workshop of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The... recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management and...

  11. Modelling Zn(II) sorption onto clayey sediments using a multi-site ion-exchange model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tertre, E.; Beaucaire, C.; Coreau, N.; Juery, A.

    2009-01-01

    In environmental studies, it is necessary to be able to predict the behaviour of contaminants in more or less complex physico-chemical contexts. The improvement of this prediction partly depends on establishing thermodynamic models that can describe the behaviour of these contaminants and, in particular, the sorption reactions on mineral surfaces. In this way, based on the mass action law, it is possible to use surface complexation models and ion exchange models. Therefore, the aim of this study is (i) to develop an ion-exchange model able to describe the sorption of transition metal onto pure clay minerals and (ii) to test the ability of this approach to predict the sorption of these elements onto natural materials containing clay minerals (i.e. soils/sediments) under various chemical conditions. This study is focused on the behaviour of Zn(II) in the presence of clayey sediments. Considering that clay minerals are cation exchangers containing multiple sorption sites, it is possible to interpret the sorption of Zn(II), as well as competitor cations, by ion-exchange equilibria with the clay minerals. This approach is applied with success to interpret the experimental data obtained previously in the Zn(II)-H + -Na + -montmorillonite system. The authors' research team has already studied the behaviour of Na + , K + , Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ versus pH in terms of ion exchange onto pure montmorillonite, leading to the development of a thermodynamic database including the exchange site concentrations associated with montmorillonite and the selectivity coefficients of Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , and Zn 2+ versus H + . In the present study, experimental isotherms of Zn(II) on two different sediments in batch reactors at different pH and ionic strengths, using NaCl and CaSO 4 as electrolytes are reported. Assuming clay minerals are the main ion-exchanging phases, it is possible to predict Zn(II) sorption onto sediments under different experimental conditions, using the previously

  12. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 8 Air-Based Remediation Technology Selection Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  13. Workshop on the role of natural analogs in geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, W.M.; Kovach, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    A workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste (HLW) was held in San Antonio, Texas, on July 22-25, 1991. It was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). Invitations to the workshop were extended to a large number of individuals with a variety of technical and professional interests related to geologic disposal of nuclear waste and natural analog studies. The objective of the workshop was to examine the role of natural analog studies in performance assessment, site characterization, and prioritization of research related to geologic disposal of HLW

  14. Crystal Structure of Rat Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao,Y.; Jogl, G.; Esser, V.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) has a crucial role in the {beta}-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in mitochondria. We report here the crystal structure of rat CPT-II at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The overall structure shares strong similarity to those of short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, although detailed structural differences in the active site region have a significant impact on the substrate selectivity of CPT-II. Three aliphatic chains, possibly from a detergent that is used for the crystallization, were found in the structure. Two of them are located in the carnitine and CoA binding sites, respectively. The third aliphatic chain may mimic the long-chain acyl group in the substrate of CPT-II. The binding site for this aliphatic chain does not exist in the short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, due to conformational differences among the enzymes. A unique insert in CPT-II is positioned on the surface of the enzyme, with a highly hydrophobic surface. It is likely that this surface patch mediates the association of CPT-II with the inner membrane of the mitochondria.

  15. Evaluation of Fe(II) oxidation at an acid mine drainage site using laboratory-scale reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Juliana; Burgos, William

    2010-05-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a severe environmental threat to the Appalachian region of the Eastern United States. The Susquehanna and Potomac River basins of Pennsylvania drain to the Chesapeake Bay, which is heavily polluted by acidity and metals from AMD. This study attempted to unravel the complex relationships between AMD geochemistry, microbial communities, hydrodynamic conditions, and the mineral precipitates for low-pH Fe mounds formed downstream of deep mine discharges, such as Lower Red Eyes in Somerset County, PA, USA. This site is contaminated with high concentrations of Fe (550 mg/L), Mn (115 mg/L), and other trace metals. At the site 95% of dissolved Fe(II) and 56% of total dissolved Fe is removed without treatment, across the mound, but there is no change in the concentration of trace metals. Fe(III) oxides were collected across the Red Eyes Fe mound and precipitates were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and elemental analysis. Schwertmannite was the dominant mineral phase with traces of goethite. The precipitates also contained minor amounts of Al2O3, MgO,and P2O5. Laboratory flow-through reactors were constructed to quantify Fe(II) oxidation and Fe removal over time at terrace and pool depositional facies. Conditions such as residence time, number of reactors in sequence and water column height were varied to determine optimal conditions for Fe removal. Reactors with sediments collected from an upstream terrace oxidized more than 50% of dissolved Fe(II) at a ten hour residence time, while upstream pool sediments only oxidized 40% of dissolved Fe(II). Downstream terrace and pool sediments were only capable of oxidizing 25% and 20% of Fe(II), respectively. Fe(II) oxidation rates measured in the reactors were determined to be between 3.99 x 10-8and 1.94 x 10-7mol L-1s-1. The sediments were not as efficient for total dissolved Fe removal and only 25% was removed under optimal conditions. The removal efficiency for all sediments

  16. ENTRY 2003: The international workshop on reliable performance assessment through laboratory experiments and ground surface investigations. 10th anniversary of ENTRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hirohisa; Yui, Mikazu; Uchida, Masahiro; Kamei, Gento

    2004-03-01

    To commemorate the 10th anniversary of the ENTRY, a laboratory in JNC Tokai for R and D in the field of geological disposal of radioactive waste, an international workshop was held in JNC Tokai, during the term of Sept 22 to 24, 2003. A technical tour for the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory site was also done before the workshop, on October 20 to 21, to deepen understanding the background of discussion in the workshop. The workshop contained two sessions. The topic of each session was 1. long-term transition of the near-field and 2. cooperation among the performance assessment, in-situ experiment, and laboratory experiment, respectively. In the session 1, we mainly discussed the thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) coupled processes for the near-field performance assessment, especially focusing on chemical degradation effects by cement materials and the status of mechanistic understanding radionuclide migration. Silicate dissolution kinetic model, including smectite dissolution in a hyper alkaline solution, was also discussed. Then, we discussed a relevant linkage among laboratory experiments, model (simulation experiment) and database development, in-situ experiment and natural analogue. In the session 2, we discussed 1) methodology for understanding the site based on the surface and boreholes investigations, 2) identification of remained uncertainty after the surface and boreholes investigations, 3) the critical measurement at the surface and boreholes investigations, 4) feedback items from performance assessment to site characterization and 5) required data besides the site investigation. This report contains the minutes of discussion in the workshop. Presented materials were also appended with permission from the speakers. (author)

  17. The math excellence workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasser, Susan J.S.; Snelsire, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the first two years of the Clemson University College of Engineering's Math Excellence Workshop, a program administered by Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Savannah River Site, and funded by the Department of Energy. The objective of the program is to prepare minority students for technical/scientific study, with the goal of increasing minority retention in the College of Engineering, Twenty-three African American students, all of whom had been accepted into the College of Engineering Fall 1990 freshman class, took part in the first year of the program. The contract paid for room, board, tuition, fees, books, and supplies for the students to live on campus and take a precalculus math course. In addition, the students attended a special honors workshop designed to prepare them to study technical material effectively. Twenty of the 23 students earned As or Bs in the precalculus class. All participants indicated that they felt confident of their ability to succeed academically at Clemson. At the end of the session, twenty of the students were still planning to major in engineering. The program was repeated the following summer with 24 students from the 1991 freshman class. Twelve of the students earned A's or B's in the precalculus class. (author)

  18. The math excellence workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasser, Susan J.S.; Snelsire, Robert W [College of Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States)

    1992-07-01

    This paper describes the first two years of the Clemson University College of Engineering's Math Excellence Workshop, a program administered by Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Savannah River Site, and funded by the Department of Energy. The objective of the program is to prepare minority students for technical/scientific study, with the goal of increasing minority retention in the College of Engineering, Twenty-three African American students, all of whom had been accepted into the College of Engineering Fall 1990 freshman class, took part in the first year of the program. The contract paid for room, board, tuition, fees, books, and supplies for the students to live on campus and take a precalculus math course. In addition, the students attended a special honors workshop designed to prepare them to study technical material effectively. Twenty of the 23 students earned As or Bs in the precalculus class. All participants indicated that they felt confident of their ability to succeed academically at Clemson. At the end of the session, twenty of the students were still planning to major in engineering. The program was repeated the following summer with 24 students from the 1991 freshman class. Twelve of the students earned A's or B's in the precalculus class. (author)

  19. Summary of the Phase II, Title I, engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Gunnison Site, Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Gunnison, Colorado. The Phase II--Title I services include the preparation of topographic measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 0.5 million tons of tailings at the Gunnison site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The nine alternative actions presented range from millsite decontamination (Option I), to adding various depths of stabilization cover material (Options II and III), to removal of the tailings to long-term storage sites and decontamination of the present site (Options IV through IX). Cost estimates for the nine options range from $480,000 to $5,890,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium does not appear to be economically attractive at present

  20. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Durango site, Durango, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Durango, Colorado. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 1.555 million tons of tailings at the Durango site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented range from vegetative stabilization (Option I), to contouring and stabilizing in-place with varying depths of cover material (Options II and III), to removal to an isolated long-term disposal site (Options V to VIII). All options include remedial action costs for offsite locations where tailings have been placed. Costs estimated for the eight options range from $4,340,000 to $13,590,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium is sufficiently economically attractive to justify reprocessing in conjunction with each of the options

  1. Nuclear fission and fission-product spectroscopy: 3. International workshop on nuclear fission and fission-product spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutte, Heloise; Fioni, Gabriele; Faust, Herbert; Goutte, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    The present book contains the proceedings of the third workshop in a series of workshops previously held in Seyssins in 1994 and 1998. The meeting was jointly organized by different divisions of CEA and two major international laboratories. In the opening address, Prof. B. Bigot, the French High Commissioner for Atomic Energy, outlined France's energy policy for the next few decades. He emphasized the continuing progress of nuclear fission in both technical and economic terms, allowing it to contribute to the energy needs of the planet even more in the future than it does today. Such progress implies a very strong link between fundamental and applied research based on experimental and theoretical approaches. The workshop gathered the different nuclear communities studying the fission process, including topics as the following: - nuclear fission experiments, - spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei, - fission data evaluation, - theoretical aspects of nuclear fission, - and innovative nuclear systems and new facilities. The scientific program was suggested by an International Advisory Committee. About 100 scientists from 13 different countries attended the conference in the friendly working atmosphere of the Castle of Cadarache in the heart of the Provence. The proceedings of the workshop were divided into 11 sections addressing the following subject matters: 1. Cross sections and resonances (5 papers); 2. Fission at higher energies - I (5 papers); 3. Fission: mass and charge yields (4 papers); 4. Light particles and cluster emission (4 papers); 5. Spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei (5 papers); 6. Resonances, barriers, and fission times (5 papers); 7. Fragment excitation and neutron emission (4 papers); 8. Mass and energy distributions (4 papers); 9. Needs for nuclear data and new facilities - I (4 papers); 10. Angular momenta and fission at higher Energies - II (3 papers); 11. New facilities - II (2 papers). A poster session of 8 presentations completed the workshop

  2. Siting simulation for low-level waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roop, R.D.; Rope, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Mock Site Licensing Demonstration Project has developed the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Siting Simulation, a role-playing exercise designed to facilitate the process of siting and licensing disposal facilities for low-level waste (LLW). This paper describes the development, content, and usefulness of the siting simulation. The simulation can be conducted at a workshop or conference, involves 14 or more participants, and requires about eight hours to complete. The simulation consists of two sessions; in the first, participants negotiate the selection of siting criteria, and in the second, a preferred disposal site is chosen from three candidate sites. The project has sponsored two workshops (in Boston, Massachusetts and Richmond, Virginia) in which the simulation has been conducted for persons concerned with LLW management issues. It is concluded that the simulation can be valuable as a tool for disseminating information about LLW management; a vehicle that can foster communication; and a step toward consensus building and conflict resolution. The DOE National Low-Level Waste Management Program is now making the siting simulation available for use by states, regional compacts, and other organizations involved in development of LLW disposal facilities

  3. Report on the second uranium-series intercomparison project workshop, Harwell, 23 to 24, June 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovich, M.; Warchal, R.M.

    1981-03-01

    The second Uranium-series Intercomparison Project Workshop was held on June 23 and 24, 1980 at Harwell. The aim of the Workshop was to analyse the results of Phase III of the Project and to define the future aims of the Project, if any. This report is an account of the matters raised and discussed during the two day workshop. A detailed report of a statistical analysis of USIP results - Phases I, II, and III is included. A final report submitted to USIP by CBNM, Euratom Laboratory, Geel, on the determination of the alpha activity ratio 228 Th/ 232 U in the Harwell spike solution used in USIP Phase III is reproduced in full. An account of an investigation into suitability of a limestone specimen for a geologic standard carried out at Koeln University is also given. (author)

  4. U.S. Department of Energy national technology information exchange workshops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daub, G.J.; Earle, S.D.; Smibert, A.M.; Wight, E.H.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy National Technology Information Exchange (TIE) Workshops bring together environmental restoration and technology development personnel to exchange and share problems, needs, technological solutions, ideas, and successes and failures from lessons learned at DOE sites. The success of this forum is measured by the knowledge gained, contacts made, and program dollars saved by the people who actually do the work in the field. TIE is a unique opportunity to unite the DOE community and allow individuals to listen and to learn about each others' problems and solutions. By using today's technologies better, the National TIE Workshops help identify and implement cost-effective and appropriate technologies to meet the needs of the DOE environmental restoration program

  5. PREFACE: Galactic Center Workshop 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schödel, Rainer; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Muno, Michael P.; Nayakshin, Sergei; Ott, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    )-millimeter instrumentation, for example, provides high spatial resolution as well as important spectroscopic data on the complex chemistry of the central tens of parsecs. The new X-ray satellite Suzaku delivers unprecedented spectral resolution in the X-ray domain. Instruments such as H.E.S.S. open, for the first time, the window toward observations in the TeV regime with sub-arcminute resolution. A spectacular near-to-mid-infrared survey of the central hundred parsecs of the Milky Way has been conducted with the Spitzer infrared satellite. VLBI is moving to ever shorter wavelengths, opening the tantalizing prospect of imaging processes near the event horizon of Sagittarius A* within the next decade. Finally, the brightest near- and mid-infrared sources in the central parsec have been and are continued to be examined with infrared interferometry at the ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer. These first observations clear the way for future ambitious measurements of relativistic effects in the immediate environment of the black hole. The articles in this volume can also be accessed on-line in electronic form, including full color figures and multimedia files. The proceedings can be accessed via the internet site of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series of Institute of Physics Publishing. A link to this site can be also found on the web site of the GC 2006 Workshop, http://www.ph1.uni-koeln.de/GC06. The complete program of the conference, pictures, and other material can be accessed via this site as well. We are grateful to everyone who helped with their efforts to make this conference a fruitful and enjoyable one. Special thanks to the LOC and to the employees of the Physikzentrum in Bad Honnef. The location proved to be a perfect choice, providing all the necessary infrastructure on a high level, a fantastic lecture hall, and the very comfortable basement hall for discussing and socializing in the evenings. We also would like to thank all people working as editors for GCNEWS

  6. 2014 Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golbeck, John [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The 3rd Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop took place in early June 2014 and was combined with the 3rd Penn State Frontiers in Metallobiochemistry Symposium. The workshop was even larger than the 2nd Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop we offered in 2012. It had even more participants (162 rather than 123 in 2012). Like the 2012 workshop, the 2014 workshop had three parts. The first part consisted of 16 90-minute lectures presented by faculty experts on the topic of their expertise (see below). Based on the suggestions from the 2012 workshop, we have recorded all 16 lectures professionally and make them available to the entire bioinorganic community via online streaming. In addition, hard copies of the recordings are available as backup.

  7. A CK2 site is reversibly phosphorylated in the photosystem II subunit CP29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testi, M G; Croce, R; Polverino-De Laureto, P; Bassi, R

    1996-12-16

    Protein phosphorylation is a major mechanism in the regulation of protein function. In chloroplast thylakoids several photosystem II subunits, including the major antenna light-harvesting complex II and several core complex components, are reversibly phosphorylated depending on the redox state of the electron carriers. A previously unknown reversible phosphorylation event has recently been described on the CP29 subunit which leads to conformational changes and protection from cold stress (Bergantino, E., Dainese, P., Cerovic, Z. Sechi, S. and Bassi, R. (1995) J. Biol Chem. 270, 8474-8481). In this study, we have identified the phosphorylation site on the N-terminal, stroma-exposed domain, showing that it is located in a sequence not homologous to the other members of the Lhc family. The phosphorylated sequence is unique in chloroplast membranes since it meets the requirements for CK2 (casein kinase II) kinases. The possibility that this phosphorylation is involved in a signal transduction pathway is discussed.

  8. INDICO Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Fabbrichesi, Marco

    2004-01-01

    The INtegrated DIgital COnferencing EU project has finished building a complete software solution to facilitate the MANAGEMENT OF CONFERENCES, workshops, schools or simple meetings from their announcement to their archival. Everybody involved in the organization of events is welcome to join this workshop, in order to understand the scope of the project and to see demonstrations of the various features.

  9. Proceedings of a U.S. Geological Survey pressure-sensor Workshop, Denver, Colorado, July 28-31, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbourn, Sammy L.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a Pressure Sensor Workshop, oriented toward the measurement of stage in surface waters, in Denver, Colorado, July 28-31, 1992. Twenty attendees from the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration gave presentations concerning their experiences with the use of pressure sensors in hydrologic investigations. This report is a compilation of the abstracts of the presentations made at the workshop. Workshop participants concluded that each of the sensors evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey has strengths and weaknesses. Personnel contemplating the use of pressure sensors discussed at this workshop should contact workshop attendees and consult with them about their experiences with those sensors. The attendees preferred to use stilling wells with float-operated water-level sensors as the primary means for monitoring water levels. However, pressure sensor systems were favored as replacements for mercury manometers and as alternatives to stilling wells at sites where stilling wells are not practical or cost effective.

  10. Sixth national stakeholder workshop summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    On June 17--18, 1998, the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Worker and Community Transition convened its sixth National Stakeholder Workshop at the Ramada Plaza Hotel Old Town in Alexandria, Virginia. Approximately 325 stakeholders attended representing DOE headquarters and field offices, contractors, labor organizations, state and local government, education and community interest groups. The meeting addressed the progress made on the issues and challenges identified at the last stakeholder`s meeting in Oakland, California on April 9--11, 1997. Also discussed were the full range of the Department`s work force issues and creative solutions to the inherent challenges of simultaneously implementing the Department`s post Cold-War mission, work force restructuring guidance, contract reform objectives, asset disposition, performance-based management requirements, and business process improvement policies. The format of the Workshop included several plenary sessions and a number of small group discussion sessions. The small group sessions focused on topics related to labor issues, work force restructuring, work force planning, community transition, and employee concerns. The sessions provided a wide range of views on worker and community transition issues. The plenary sessions of the Workshop included presentations on the following topics: welcome and introductions; opening remarks; building a better labor-management relationship; keynote speech from Secretary of Energy Federico Pena; meeting tomorrow`s challenges (early site closures); harnessing the contracting process to encourage local growth; and, the British experience in economic conversion.

  11. Antibiotics in agroecosystems: state of the science “ARASOS” workshop summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    In August 2014, the Biosphere2 Conference Center in Oracle, Arizona was the site of a sunny three-day workshop on “Antibiotics in Agroecosystems: State of the Science.” Attended by 42 people, participants included scientists and others from academia, government agencies (including EPA and USDA), an...

  12. Proceedings of the 2016 Workshop on the Physics and Applications of High Brightness Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchi, Alessandro; Ferrario, Massimo; Musumeci, Pietro; Rosenzweig, James

    2017-09-01

    We are proud to present the proceedings of the latest in the series of International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA)-endorsed workshops on the Physics and Applications of High Brightness Beams, which has been held at the Hotel Nacional in Havana, Cuba between March 28 and April 1, 2016. In total, 135 participants coming from 14 different countries attended this historic conference. In recognition of its pioneering role in the significant blossoming of relations between Cuba and the larger scientific community, this workshop also received the endorsement of UNESCO. The workshop organization was headed by co-chairs Massimo Ferrario (INFN-LNF) and James Rosenzweig (UCLA), with the essential and energetic contributions of local organizing committee chair Fidel Antonio Castro Smirnov (InSTEC, Havana). The workshop scientific agenda was developed under the care of program committee co-chairs Pietro Musumeci (UCLA) and Luca Serafini (INFN-Milano). The publication of the proceedings we present here was led by Alessandro Cianchi (Tor Vergata). Tangible contributions to the workshop infrastructure were received from UCLA, INFN-LNF, InSTEC, EuroNNAC2, and the US National Science Foundation. The workshop web site, which contains detailed information on the scientific agenda of the meeting, is found at https://conferences.pa.ucla.edu/hbb/.

  13. The QED Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieper, G.W.

    1994-07-01

    On May 18--20, 1994, Argonne National Laboratory hosted the QED Workshop. The workshop was supported by special funding from the Office of Naval Research. The purpose of the workshop was to assemble of a group of researchers to consider whether it is desirable and feasible to build a proof-checked encyclopedia of mathematics, with an associated facility for theorem proving and proof checking. Among the projects represented were Coq, Eves, HOL, ILF, Imps, MathPert, Mizar, NQTHM, NuPrl, OTTER, Proof Pad, Qu-Prolog, and RRL. Although the content of the QED project is highly technical rigorously proof-checked mathematics of all sorts the discussions at the workshop were rarely technical. No prepared talks or papers were given. Instead, the discussions focused primarily on such political, sociological, practical, and aesthetic questions, such as Why do it? Who are the customers? How can one get mathematicians interested? What sort of interfaces are desirable? The most important conclusion of the workshop was that QED is an idea worthy pursuing, a statement with which virtually all the participants agreed. In this document, the authors capture some of the discussions and outline suggestions for the start of a QED scientific community.

  14. Phase II, Title I engineering assessment of radioactive sands and residues, Lowman Site, Lowman Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    An engineering assessment was performed of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium sand residues at the Lowman, Idaho, site. Services normally include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 90,000 tons of sand residues at the Lowman site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although external gamma radiation is also a factor. The two alternative actions presented are dike construction, fencing, and maintenance (Option I); and consolidation of the piles, addition of a 2-ft-thick stabilization cover, and on-site cleanup (Option II). Both options include remedial action at off-site structures. Cost estimates for the two options are $393,000 and $590,000.

  15. Phase II, Title I engineering assessment of radioactive sands and residues, Lowman Site, Lowman Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    An engineering assessment was performed of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium sand residues at the Lowman, Idaho, site. Services normally include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 90,000 tons of sand residues at the Lowman site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although external gamma radiation is also a factor. The two alternative actions presented are dike construction, fencing, and maintenance (Option I); and consolidation of the piles, addition of a 2-ft-thick stabilization cover, and on-site cleanup (Option II). Both options include remedial action at off-site structures. Cost estimates for the two options are $393,000 and $590,000

  16. An international perspective on the workshop results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore

    2002-01-01

    The majority of workshop participants considered the Finnish facility DiP both supportable (on the level of the host community), and legitimate (on the national level). Interestingly, several Finnish stakeholders emphasised that support for, and legitimacy of, the decisions can to a large extent be attributed so some unique features of Finnish political culture. Other participants however, primarily the four thematic rapporteurs, expressed the view that although the Finnish decision-making culture may have played an important role, a number of siting elements of broader cross-cultural significance emerged from the discussions. Overall, by combining the indications from the round-table discussions with those of the thematic rapporteurs and of the Finnish stakeholders, as well as the results of the first workshop of the FSC, in Paris in August 2000, three major sets of success criteria can be identified, criteria related to nuclear energy technologies, criteria related to waste management, criteria related to stakeholder involvement. (authors)

  17. Characterization of the minimum domain required for targeting budding yeast myosin II to the site of cell division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolliday Nicola J

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All eukaryotes with the exception of plants use an actomyosin ring to generate a constriction force at the site of cell division (cleavage furrow during mitosis and meiosis. The structure and filament forming abilities located in the C-terminal or tail region of one of the main components, myosin II, are important for localising the molecule to the contractile ring (CR during cytokinesis. However, it remains poorly understood how myosin II is recruited to the site of cell division and how this recruitment relates to myosin filament assembly. Significant conservation between species of the components involved in cytokinesis, including those of the CR, allows the use of easily genetically manipulated organisms, such as budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in the study of cytokinesis. Budding yeast has a single myosin II protein, named Myo1. Unlike most other class II myosins, the tail of Myo1 has an irregular coiled coil. In this report we use molecular genetics, biochemistry and live cell imaging to characterize the minimum localisation domain (MLD of budding yeast Myo1. Results We show that the MLD is a small region in the centre of the tail of Myo1 and that it is both necessary and sufficient for localisation of Myo1 to the yeast bud neck, the pre-determined site of cell division. Hydrodynamic measurements of the MLD, purified from bacteria or yeast, show that it is likely to exist as a trimer. We also examine the importance of a small region of low coiled coil forming probability within the MLD, which we call the hinge region. Removal of the hinge region prevents contraction of the CR. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, we show that GFP-tagged MLD is slightly more dynamic than the GFP-tagged full length molecule but less dynamic than the GFP-tagged Myo1 construct lacking the hinge region. Conclusion Our results define the intrinsic determinant for the localization of budding yeast myosin II and show

  18. BrainMap `95 workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The fourth annual BrainMap workshop was held at La Mansion del Rio Hotel in San Antonio December 3--4, 1995. The conference title was ``Human Brain Mapping and Modeling.`` The meeting was attended by 137 registered participants and 30 observers from 82 institutions representing 12 countries. The meeting focused on the technical issues associated with brain mapping and modeling. A total of 23 papers were presented covering the following topics: spatial normalization and registration; functional image analysis; metanalysis and modeling; and new horizons in biological databases. The full program with abstracts was available on the Research Imaging Center`s web site. A book will be published by John Wiley and Sons prior to the end of 1998.

  19. Coordination of two high-affinity hexamer peptides to copper(II) and palladium(II) models of the peptide-metal chelation site on IMAC resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Pasquinelli, R; Ataai, M; Koepsel, R R; Kortes, R A; Shepherd, R E

    2000-03-20

    The coordination of peptides Ser-Pro-His-His-Gly-Gly (SPHHGG) and (His)6 (HHHHHH) to [PdII(mida)(D2O)] (mida2- = N-methyliminodiacetate) was studied by 1H NMR as model reactions for CuII(iminodiacetate)-immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) sites. This is the first direct physical description of peptide coordination for IMAC. A three-site coordination is observed which involves the first, third, and fourth residues along the peptide chain. The presence of proline in position 2 of SPHHGG achieves the best molecular mechanics and bonding angles in the coordinated peptide and enhances the interaction of the serine amino nitrogen. Histidine coordination of H1, H3, and H4 of (His)6 and H3 and H4 of SPHHGG was detected by 1H NMR contact shifts and H/D exchange of histidyl protons. The EPR spectra of SPHHGG and HHHHHH attached to the [CuII(mida)] unit were obtained for additional modeling of IMAC sites. EPR parameters of the parent [Cu(mida)(H2O)2] complex are representative: gzz = 2.31; gyy = 2.086; gxx = 2.053; A parallel = 161G; AN = 19G (three line, one N coupling). Increased rhombic distortion is detected relative to the starting aqua complex in the order of [Cu(mida)L] for distortion of HHHHHH > SPHHGG > (H2O)2. The lowering of symmetry is also seen in the decrease in the N-shf coupling, presumably to the imino nitrogen of mida2- in the order 19 G (H2O), 16 G (SPHHGG) and 11 G (HHHHHH). Visible spectra of the [Cu(mida)(SPHHGG)] and [Cu(mida)(HHHHHH)] as a function of pH indicate coordination of one histidyl donor at ca. 4.5, two in the range of pH 5-7, and two chelate ring attachments involving the terminal amino donor for SPHHGG or another histidyl donor of HHHHHH in the pH domain of 7-8 in agreement with the [PdII(mida)L] derivatives which form the two-chelate-ring attachment even at lower pH as shown by the 1H NMR methods.

  20. Engineer exchanging project on coal mine technology field in fiscal 1999. International information exchanging project (the overseas workshop in Vietnam); 1999 nendo gijutsusha koryu jigyo (tanko gijutsu bun'ya) kokusai koryu jigyo. Kaigai workshop (Vietnam)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Technical information exchange was performed with Vietnamese engineers related to coal mine technologies through the overseas workshop and the technical tour. At the same time, investigations were executed on the production technology levels and needs in Vietnam, and on possibilities of transfer of Japanese technologies. The 'Overseas workshop (Vietnam)' was held on September 28, 1999 with the 'trends and problems in coal production technologies' as the main theme. Lectures were given in the session related to coal production technologies by Vietnamese coal technology experts, each from VINACOAL and IMSAT, and by two Japanese coal technology experts. A comprehensive discussion was also executed, and items of technical information were exchanged on the coal production technologies. The number of persons actually participated in the workshop counted 58, with the proceedings presented by them distributed. The Mao Khe and Duong Huy coal mines in Quang Ninh Province were visited as the technical tour, whereas the coal mine sites were inspected and opinions were exchanged with the site engineers. Gas analysis was performed in the Mao Khe mine from the viewpoint of a gas control technology, and site investigation was carried out on lock bolts in the Duong Huy mine from the viewpoint of a roof control technology. (NEDO)

  1. Urban landscape and architectural workshop Škocjan Caves 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Mahovič

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental aim and purpose of the Škocjan Caves 2007 student workshop was for students participating in the seminar of the Faculty of Architecture in Ljubljana to recognise and address some specific spatial and design issues for the further sustainable development of the Škocjan Caves. The working hypothesis of the workshop was that, in spite of significant results in the protection and development of the Caves which have been achieved in the past ten years, it is still necessary to address some spatial issues through an academic process, and to offer different architectural and spatial solutions. The aforesaid is even more important as the Caves are recognised as the only natural and cultural heritage of the Republic of Slovenia to be listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site since 1986.

  2. Proceedings of Workshop on Uranium Production Environmental Restoration: An exchange between the United States and Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Scientists, engineers, elected officials, and industry regulators from the United, States and Germany met in Albuquerque, New Mexico, August 16--20, 1993, in the first joint international workshop to discuss uranium tailings remediation. Entitled ``Workshop on Uranium Production Environmental Restoration: An Exchange between the US and Germany,`` the meeting was hosted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The goal of the workshop was to further understanding and communication on the uranium tailings cleanup projects in the US and Germany. Many communities around the world are faced with an environmental legacy -- enormous quantities of hazardous and low-level radioactive materials from the production of uranium used for energy and nuclear weapons. In 1978, the US Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act. Title I of the law established a program to assess the tailings at inactive uranium processing sites and provide a means for joint federal and state funding of the cleanup efforts at sites where all or substantially all of the uranium was produced for sale to a federal agency. The UMTRA Project is responsible for the cleanup of 24 sites in 10 states. Germany is facing nearly identical uranium cleanup problems and has established a cleanup project. At the workshop, participants had an opportunity to interact with a broad cross section of the environmental restoration and waste disposal community, discuss common concerns and problems, and develop a broader understanding of the issues. Abstracts are catalogued individually for the data base.

  3. Proceedings of Workshop on Uranium Production Environmental Restoration: An exchange between the United States and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Scientists, engineers, elected officials, and industry regulators from the United, States and Germany met in Albuquerque, New Mexico, August 16--20, 1993, in the first joint international workshop to discuss uranium tailings remediation. Entitled ''Workshop on Uranium Production Environmental Restoration: An Exchange between the US and Germany,'' the meeting was hosted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The goal of the workshop was to further understanding and communication on the uranium tailings cleanup projects in the US and Germany. Many communities around the world are faced with an environmental legacy -- enormous quantities of hazardous and low-level radioactive materials from the production of uranium used for energy and nuclear weapons. In 1978, the US Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act. Title I of the law established a program to assess the tailings at inactive uranium processing sites and provide a means for joint federal and state funding of the cleanup efforts at sites where all or substantially all of the uranium was produced for sale to a federal agency. The UMTRA Project is responsible for the cleanup of 24 sites in 10 states. Germany is facing nearly identical uranium cleanup problems and has established a cleanup project. At the workshop, participants had an opportunity to interact with a broad cross section of the environmental restoration and waste disposal community, discuss common concerns and problems, and develop a broader understanding of the issues. Abstracts are catalogued individually for the data base

  4. Summary of the Second Workshop on Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Research and Development in the United States

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, R; Artrip, D; Baller, B; Bromberg, C; Cavanna, F; Carls, B; Chen, H; Deptuch, G; Epprecht, L; Dharmapalan, R; Foreman, W; Hahn, A; Johnson, M; Jones, B J P; Junk, T; Lang, K; Lockwitz, S; Marchionni, A; Mauger, C; Montanari, C; Mufson, S; Nessi, M; Back, H Olling; Petrillo, G; Pordes, S; Raaf, J; Rebel, B; Sinins, G; Soderberg, M; Spooner, N J C; Stancari, M; Strauss, T; Terao, K; Thorn, C; Tope, T; Toups, M; Urheim, J; Van de Water, R; Wang, H; Wasserman, R; Weber, M; Whittington, D; Yang, T

    2015-01-01

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: $i)$ Argon Purity and Cryogenics, $ii)$ TPC and High Voltage, $iii)$ Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, $iv)$ Scintillation Light Detection, $v)$ Calibration and Test Beams, and $vi)$ Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world.

  5. Summary of the Second Workshop on Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Research and Development in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acciarri, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); et al.

    2015-04-21

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: i) Argon Purity and Cryogenics, ii) TPC and High Voltage, iii) Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, iv) Scintillation Light Detection, v) Calibration and Test Beams, and vi) Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world.

  6. Contributions to the 4. reflectometry workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clairet, F

    1999-09-15

    This document contains ten papers presented during the 4. workshop on reflectometry. Those papers deal with the utility of reflectometry to plasma density fluctuations study or reflectometry based plasma diagnostics: X mode reflectometry on edge density profile measurements on Tore Supra; recent results of reflectometry on ASDEX-UPGRADE; automatic evaluation of density profiles with high temporal resolution; the TJ-II reflectometry system; doppler reflectometry for the investigation of poloidally propagating density perturbations; poloidal rotation measuremin Tore Supra by oblique reflectometry; pulsed radar reflectometry at TEXTOR-94; density profile reconstruction methods using dispersive effects in pulse radar reflectometry; fluctuation reflectometry: two dimensional full wave modelling; phase ramping and modulation of reflectometer signals. (A.L.B.)

  7. Contributions to the 4. reflectometry workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clairet, F.

    1999-09-01

    This document contains ten papers presented during the 4. workshop on reflectometry. Those papers deal with the utility of reflectometry to plasma density fluctuations study or reflectometry based plasma diagnostics: X mode reflectometry on edge density profile measurements on Tore Supra; recent results of reflectometry on ASDEX-UPGRADE; automatic evaluation of density profiles with high temporal resolution; the TJ-II reflectometry system; doppler reflectometry for the investigation of poloidally propagating density perturbations; poloidal rotation measurement in Tore Supra by oblique reflectometry; pulsed radar reflectometry at TEXTOR-94; density profile reconstruction methods using dispersive effects in pulse radar reflectometry; fluctuation reflectometry: two dimensional full wave modelling; phase ramping and modulation of reflectometer signals. (A.L.B.)

  8. Alternate fusion fuels workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    The workshop was organized to focus on a specific confinement scheme: the tokamak. The workshop was divided into two parts: systems and physics. The topics discussed in the systems session were narrowly focused on systems and engineering considerations in the tokamak geometry. The workshop participants reviewed the status of system studies, trade-offs between d-t and d-d based reactors and engineering problems associated with the design of a high-temperature, high-field reactor utilizing advanced fuels. In the physics session issues were discussed dealing with high-beta stability, synchrotron losses and transport in alternate fuel systems. The agenda for the workshop is attached

  9. The Third ATLAS ROD Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Poggioli, L.

    A new-style Workshop After two successful ATLAS ROD Workshops dedicated to the ROD hardware and held at the Geneva University in 1998 and in 2000, a new style Workshop took place at LAPP in Annecy on November 14-15, 2002. This time the Workshop was fully dedicated to the ROD-TDAQ integration and software in view of the near future integration activities of the final RODs for the detector assembly and commissioning. More precisely, the aim of this workshop was to get from the sub-detectors the parameters needed for T-DAQ, as well as status and plans from ROD builders. On the other hand, what was decided and assumed had to be stated (like EB decisions and URDs), and also support plans. The Workshop gathered about 70 participants from all ATLAS sub-detectors and the T-DAQ community. The quite dense agenda allowed nevertheless for many lively discussions, and for a dinner in the old town of Annecy. The Sessions The Workshop was organized in five main sessions: Assumptions and recommendations Sub-de...

  10. Emergency response workers workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapeev, S.A.; Glukhikh, E.N.; Tyurin, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    A training workshop entitled Current issues and potential improvements in Rosatom Corporation emergency prevention and response system was held in May-June, 2012. The workshop combined theoretical training with full-scale practical exercise that demonstrated the existing innovative capabilities for radiation reconnaissance, diving equipment and robotics, aircraft, emergency response and rescue hardware and machinery. This paper describes the activities carried out during the workshop [ru

  11. IFPA Meeting 2010 Workshops Report II: Placental pathology; trophoblast invasion; fetal sex; parasites and the placenta; decidua and embryonic or fetal loss; trophoblast differentiation and syncytialisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khan, A; Aye, I L; Barsoum, I; Borbely, A; Cebral, E; Cerchi, G; Clifton, V L; Collins, S; Cotechini, T; Davey, A; Flores-Martin, J; Fournier, T; Franchi, A M; Fretes, R E; Graham, C H; Godbole, G; Hansson, S R; Headley, P L; Ibarra, C; Jawerbaum, A; Kemmerling, U; Kudo, Y; Lala, P K; Lassance, L; Lewis, R M; Menkhorst, E; Morris, C; Nobuzane, T; Ramos, G; Rote, N; Saffery, R; Salafia, C; Sarr, D; Schneider, H; Sibley, C; Singh, A T; Sivasubramaniyam, T S; Soares, M J; Vaughan, O; Zamudio, S; Lash, G E

    2011-03-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting. At IFPA Meeting 2010 diverse topics were discussed in twelve themed workshops, six of which are summarized in this report. 1. The placental pathology workshop focused on clinical correlates of placenta accreta/percreta. 2. Mechanisms of regulation of trophoblast invasion and spiral artery remodeling were discussed in the trophoblast invasion workshop. 3. The fetal sex and intrauterine stress workshop explored recent work on placental sex differences and discussed them in the context of whether boys live dangerously in the womb.4. The workshop on parasites addressed inflammatory responses as a sign of interaction between placental tissue and parasites. 5. The decidua and embryonic/fetal loss workshop focused on key regulatory mediators in the decidua, embryo and fetus and how alterations in expression may contribute to different diseases and adverse conditions of pregnancy. 6. The trophoblast differentiation and syncytialisation workshop addressed the regulation of villous cytotrophoblast differentiation and how variations may lead to placental dysfunction and pregnancy complications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Calcium-manganese oxides as structural and functional models for active site in oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II: lessons from simple models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    The oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II which induces the oxidation of water to dioxygen in plants, algae and certain bacteria contains a cluster of one calcium and four manganese ions. It serves as a model to split water by sunlight. Reports on the mechanism and structure of photosystem II provide a more detailed architecture of the oxygen evolving complex and the surrounding amino acids. One challenge in this field is the development of artificial model compounds to study oxygen evolution reaction outside the complicated environment of the enzyme. Calcium-manganese oxides as structural and functional models for the active site of photosystem II are explained and reviewed in this paper. Because of related structures of these calcium-manganese oxides and the catalytic centers of active site of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II, the study may help to understand more about mechanism of oxygen evolution by the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Lakeview Site, Lakeview, Oregon. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Results are reported from an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at the Lakeview, Oregon site. Results are included from the analyses of soil, water, and other samples; radiometric measurements to determine areas with radium-contaminated materials; evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations; investigation of site geology, hydrology, and meteorology; and evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 130,000 tons of tailings at the Lakeview site constitutes the main environmental impact, which is minimal. The two alternative actions presented are maintenance of the site now that the ARCO reclamation program has been completed (Option I); and addition of stabilization cover to a minimum depth of 2 ft, improved fencing, and removal of a few isolated spots of contamination (Option II). The cost estimates for these options are $40,000 and $290,000, respectively

  14. 2015 Inverter Workshop | Photovoltaic Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverter Workshop 2015 Inverter Workshop Wednesday, February 25, 2015 Chair: Jack Flicker In about inverters. This workshop represented a follow-on to the inverter workshops that Sandia National conversations between module and inverter experts. Agenda For a detailed schedule of the day's events, access

  15. Competition from Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) in Pb(II) binding to Suwannee River Fulvic Acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakraborty, P.; Chakrabarti, C.L.

    2008-01-01

    This is a study of trace metal competition in the complexation of Pb(II) by well-characterized humic substances, namely Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) in model solutions. It was found that Cu(II) seems to compete with Pb(II) for strong binding sites of SRFA when present at the same concentration

  16. The rock art of Mwana wa Chentcherere II rock shelter, Malawi : a site-specific study of girls' initiation rock art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zubieta, L.F.

    2006-01-01

    Mwana wa Chentcherere II, or Chentcherere Rock Shelter II, the name by which it was more generally known when it was excavated in 1972, is one of the largest rock painting sites in Malawi. It has been a national monument since 1972 and has been the subject of extensive archaeological research. This

  17. First International Workshop on Grid Simulator Testing of Wind Turbine Drivetrains: Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevorgian, V.; Link, H.; McDade, M.; Mander, A.; Fox, J. C.; Rigas, N.

    2013-11-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the First International Workshop on Grid Simulator Testing of Wind Turbine Drivetrains, held from June 13 to 14, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center, located south of Boulder, Colorado. The workshop was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and cohosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Clemson University under ongoing collaboration via a cooperative research and development agreement. The purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum to discuss the research, testing needs, and state-of-the-art apparatuses involved in grid compliance testing of utility-scale wind turbine generators. This includes both dynamometer testing of wind turbine drivetrains ('ground testing') and field testing grid-connected wind turbines. Four sessions followed by discussions in which all attendees of the workshop were encouraged to participate comprised the workshop.

  18. Proceedings of a workshop on wind turbine noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legerton, M.

    1993-08-01

    Noise generated by wind turbines is an environmental constraint on the exploitation of wind energy. It is a major consideration when seeking planning consent for the siting of machines due to the high population density in the UK and low levels of background noise in rural areas. There is, therefore, a need to identify the sources and characteristics of noise emitted by wind turbine generators, assess the influences on the propagation of noise through the atmosphere, and provide information to both wind farm developers and planning regulators on noise levels. A one day workshop was organised to provide an opportunity for experts in the field of wind turbine noise to present the current thoughts on the subject and so allow a wide ranging discussion of particular issues of interest. This volume contains the 10 papers presented at the workshop for each of which a separate abstract has been prepared. (author)

  19. IFPA meeting 2015 workshop report II: mechanistic role of the placenta in fetal programming; biomarkers of placental function and complications of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andraweera, P H; Bobek, G; Bowen, C; Burton, G J; Correa Frigerio, P; Chaparro, A; Dickinson, H; Duncombe, G; Hyett, J; Illanes, S E; Johnstone, E; Kumar, S; Morgan, T K; Myers, J; Orefice, R; Roberts, C T; Salafia, C M; Thornburg, K L; Whitehead, C L; Bainbridge, S A

    2016-12-01

    Workshops are an integral component of the annual International Federation of Placenta Association (IFPA) meeting, allowing for networking and focused discussion related to specialized topics on the placenta. At the 2015 IFPA meeting (Brisbane, Australia) twelve themed workshops were held, three of which are summarized in this report. These workshops focused on various aspects of placental function, particularly in cases of placenta-mediated disease. Collectively, these inter-connected workshops highlighted the role of the placenta in fetal programming, the use of various biomarkers to monitor placental function across pregnancy, and the clinical impact of novel diagnostic and surveillance modalities in instances of late onset fetal growth restriction (FGR). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Site locality identification study: Hanford Site. Volume II. Data cataloging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    Data compilation and cataloging for the candidate site locality identification study were conducted in order to provide a retrievable data cataloging system for the present siting study and future site evaluation and licensng processes. This task occurred concurrently with and also independently of other tasks of the candidate site locality identification study. Work in this task provided the data utilized primarily in the development and application of screening and ranking processes to identify candidate site localities on the Hanford Site. The overall approach included two steps: (1) data acquisition and screening; and (2) data compilation and cataloging. Data acquisition and screening formed the basis for preliminary review of data sources with respect to their probable utilization in the candidate site locality identification study and review with respect to the level of completeness and detail of the data. The important working assumption was that the data to be used in the study be based on existing and available published and unpublished literature. The data compilation and cataloging provided the basic product of the Task; a retrievable data cataloging system in the form of an annotated reference list and key word index and an index of compiled data. The annotated reference list and key word index are cross referenced and can be used to trace and retrieve the data sources utilized in the candidate site locality identification study

  1. Summary and Conclusions of the First DESY Test Beam User Workshop arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Arling, Jan-Hendrik; Bandiera, Laura; Behnke, Ties; Dannheim, Dominik; Diener, Ralf; Dreyling-Eschweiler, Jan; Ehrlichmann, Heiko; Gerbershagen, Andreas; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Hayrapetyan, Avetik; Kaminski, Jochen; Kroll, Jiri; Martinengo, Paolo; Meyners, Norbert; Müntz, Christian; Poley, Luise; Schwenker, Benjamin; Stanitzki, Marcel

    On October 5/6, 2017, DESY hosted the first DESY Test Beam User Workshop [1] which took place in Hamburg. Fifty participants from different user communities, ranging from LHC (ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, LHCb) to FAIR (CBM, PANDA), DUNE, Belle-II, future linear colliders (ILC, CLIC) and generic detector R&D presented their experiences with the DESY II Test Beam Facility, their concrete plans for the upcoming years and a first estimate of their needs for beam time in the long-term future beyond 2025. A special focus was also on additional improvements to the facility beyond its current capabilities.

  2. Tandem mirror theory workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    The workshop was divided into three sections which were constituted according to subject matter: RF Heating, MHD Equilibrium and Stability, and Transport and Microstability. An overview from Livermore's point of view was given at the beginning of each session. Each session was assigned a secretary to take notes. These notes have been used in preparing this report on the workshop. The report includes the activities, conclusions, and recommendations of the workshop

  3. International cooperation workshop. Regional workshop for CTBTO international cooperation: Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    Pursuant to the 1999 programme of work, and following the International Cooperation Workshop held in Vienna, Austria, in 1998, the Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) of the Preparatory Commission for the CTBTO (Prep Com) held a regional Workshop for CTBTO International Cooperation in Cairo. The purpose of the workshop was to identify how and by what means the Africa region can promote international cooperation in CTBT verification related technologies, and how the region can benefit from and contribute to Prep Com activity. PTS staff briefed the 40 participants from 22 African States who attended the Workshop on general aspects, including costs, of the establishment and operation of the CTBT verification system, including its four monitoring technologies. Participants were informed on opportunities for local institutions in the establishment of monitoring stations and on possible support for national and regional data centres. National experts presented their research and development activities and reviewed existing experiences on bi/multi-lateral cooperation. The main points of the discussion focused on the need to engage governments to advance signature/ratification, and further training opportunities for African states

  4. 75 FR 58411 - Center for Veterinary Medicine eSubmitter Workshop; Public Workshop; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ...] Center for Veterinary Medicine eSubmitter Workshop; Public Workshop; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food... Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Center for Veterinary Medicine... be emailed to all registrants. Contact Person: Charles Andres, Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV...

  5. Network workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Evans, Robert Harry

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the background for, realisation of and author reflections on a network workshop held at ESERA2013. As a new research area in science education, networks offer a unique opportunity to visualise and find patterns and relationships in complicated social or academic network data....... These include student relations and interactions and epistemic and linguistic networks of words, concepts and actions. Network methodology has already found use in science education research. However, while networks hold the potential for new insights, they have not yet found wide use in the science education...... research community. With this workshop, participants were offered a way into network science based on authentic educational research data. The workshop was constructed as an inquiry lesson with emphasis on user autonomy. Learning activities had participants choose to work with one of two cases of networks...

  6. Workshop report: US-China workshop on smart structures and smart systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizuka, Masayoshi

    2006-03-01

    A Joint U.S.-China workshop on the topic of Integrated Sensing Systems, Mechatronics and Smart Structures Technologies was held in Jinan, China in October 2005 to evaluate the current status of research and education in the topic areas in the United States and China, to identify critical and strategic research and educational issues of mutual interest, and to identify joint research projects and potential research teams for collaborative research activities. The workshop included a series of presentations by leading researchers and educators from the United States and China and group discussions on the workshop objectives.

  7. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Rifle Site, Rifle, Colorado. Summary of the Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Rifle, Colorado. The Phase II - Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 3.1 million tons of tailings at the two Rifle sites, constitutes the most significant environmental impact. Windblown tailings, external gamma radiation and localized contamination of surface waters are other environmental effects. The 15 alternative remedial action options presented range from millsite decomtamination and off-site remedial action (Options I and IV), to adding various depths of stabilization cover material (Options II, V, VI, and VII), to removal of the tailings to long-term storage sites and decontamination of the present sites (Options III and VIII through XV). Cost estimates for the first 14 options range from $224,000 to $20,300,000. Option XV, estimated at $32,200,000, includes the cost for moving both Rifle tailings piles and the Grand Junction tailings pile to DeBeque for long-term storage and site decontamination after removal of the piles. Reprocessing of the tailings for uranium appears to be economically attractive at present

  8. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings new and old Rifle site, Rifle, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Rifle, Colorado. The Phase II--Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 3.1 million tons of tailings at the two Rifle sites, constitutes the most significant environmental impact. Windblown tailings, external gamma radiation and localized contamination of surface waters are other environmental effects. The 15 alternative remedial action options presented range from millsite decontamination and off-site remedial action (Options I and IV), to adding various depths of stabilization cover material (Options II, V, VI and VII), to removal of the tailings to long-term storage sites and decontamination of the present sites (Options III and VIII through XV). Cost estimates for the first 14 options range from $224,000 to $20,300,000. Option XV, estimated at $32,200,000, includes the cost for moving both Rifle tailings piles and the Grand Junction tailings pile to DeBeque for long-term storage and site decontamination after removal of the piles. Reprocessing of the tailings for uranium appears to be economically attractive at present

  9. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings new and old Rifle site, Rifle, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Rifle, Colorado. The Phase II--Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 3.1 million tons of tailings at the two Rifle sites, constitutes the most significant environmental impact. Windblown tailings, external gamma radiation and localized contamination of surface waters are other environmental effects. The 15 alternative remedial action options presented range from millsite decontamination and off-site remedial action (Options I and IV), to adding various depths of stabilization cover material (Options II, V, VI and VII), to removal of the tailings to long-term storage sites and decontamination of the present sites (Options III and VIII through XV). Cost estimates for the first 14 options range from $224,000 to $20,300,000. Option XV, estimated at $32,200,000, includes the cost for moving both Rifle tailings piles and the Grand Junction tailings pile to DeBeque for long-term storage and site decontamination after removal of the piles. Reprocessing of the tailings for uranium appears to be economically attractive at present.

  10. Overview of BioCreative II gene mention recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, L.; Tanabe, L.K.; Johnson, R.; Kuo, C.-J.; Chung, I-F.; Hsu, C.-N.; Lin, Y.-S.; Klinger, R.; Friedrich, C.M.; Ganchev, K.; Torii, M.; Liu, H.; Haddow, B.; Struble, C.A.; Povinelli, R.J.; Vlachos, A.; Baumgartner (jr.), W.A.; Hunter, L.; Carpenter, B.; Tsai, R.T.-H.; Dai, H.-J.; Liu, F.; Chen, Y.; Sun, C.; Katrenko, S.; Adriaans, P.; Blaschke, C.; Torres, R.; Neves, M.; Nakov, P.; Divoli, A.; Maña-López, M.; Mata, J.; Wilbur, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen teams presented results for the Gene Mention Task at the BioCreative II Workshop. In this task participants designed systems to identify substrings in sentences corresponding to gene name mentions. A variety of different methods were used and the results varied with a highest achieved F1

  11. The DNA binding site specificity and antiproliferative property of ternary Pt(II) and Zn(II) complexes of phenanthroline and N,N'-ethylenediaminediacetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yusuke; Taruno, Yoko; Sugimoto, Masashi; Kitamura, Yusuke; Seng, Hoi Ling; Kong, Siew Ming; Ng, Chew Hee; Chikira, Makoto

    2013-03-14

    The binding site specificity of the ternary complexes, [M(II)(phen)(edda)] (M(II) = Pt(2+) and Zn(2+); phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; edda = N,N'-ethylenediaminediacetic acid), for the self-complementary oligonucleotides (ODNs), ds(C(1)G(2)C(3)G(4)A(5)A(6)T(7)T(8)C(9)G(10)C(11)G(12))(2) (ODN1) and ds(C(1)G(2)C(3)G(4)T(5)A(6)T(7)A(8)C(9)G(10)C(11)G(12))(2) (ODN2), was studied by NMR measurements. The results indicated that [Pt(ii)(phen)(edda)] was partially intercalated between C(3)/G(10) and G(4)/C(9) base pairs of ODN1 and ODN2 in the major grooves, whereas [Zn(II)(phen)(edda)] was bound specifically to the TATA region of ODN2 in the minor groove and to the terminal G(2)/C(11) base pair of ODN1 in the major groove. The preference for the TATA sequence over the AATT sequence in the binding of [Zn(phen)(edda)] was attributed to the wider minor groove width of the TATA sequence. The bindings of the complexes to ct-DNA were also studied by UV, CD, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Additionally, the antiproliferative property of [Pt(II)(phen)(edda)] towards MCF7 breast cancer cells and normal MCF10-A cells was compared with that of [Zn(II)(phen)(edda)].

  12. The Astronomy Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Asbury, M. L.; Proctor, A.

    2001-12-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is an interactive online astronomy resource developed, and maintained at the University of Maryland, for use by students, educators and the general public. The Astronomy Workshop has been extensively tested and used successfully at many different levels, including High School and Junior High School science classes, University introductory astronomy courses, and University intermediate and advanced astronomy courses. Some topics currently covered in the Astronomy Workshop are: Animated Orbits of Planets and Moons: The orbits of the nine planets and 91 known planetary satellites are shown in animated, to-scale drawings. The orbiting bodies move at their correct relative speeds about their parent, which is rendered as an attractive, to-scale gif image. Solar System Collisions: This most popular of our applications shows what happens when an asteroid or comet with user-defined size and speed impacts a given planet. The program calculates many effects, including the country impacted (if Earth is the target), energy of the explosion, crater size, magnitude of the planetquake generated. It also displays a relevant image (e.g. terrestrial crater, lunar crater, etc.). Planetary and Satellite Data Calculators: These tools allow the user to easily calculate physical data for all of the planets or satellites simultaneously, making comparison very easy. Orbital Simulations: These tools allow the student to investigate different aspects of the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. Astronomy Workshop Bulletin Board: Get innovative teaching ideas and read about in-class experiences with the Astronomy Workshop. Share your ideas with other educators by posting on the Bulletin Board. Funding for the Astronomy Workshop is provided by the National Science Foundation.

  13. Innovative confinement concepts workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Innovative Confinement Concepts Workshop occurred in California during the week preceding the Second Symposium on Current Trends in International Fusion Research. An informal report was made to the Second Symposium. A summary of the Workshop concluded that some very promising ideas were presented, that innovative concept development is a central element of the restructured US DOE. Fusion Energy Sciences program, and that the Workshop should promote real scientific progress in fusion

  14. Preface to COAST 2016 innovators' workshop on personalized and precision orthodontic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, J C; Covell, D A; Frazier-Bowers, S A; Kapila, S; Huja, S S; Iwasaki, L R

    2017-06-01

    A second focused workshop explored how to transfer novel findings into clinical orthodontic practice. Participants met in West Palm Beach (Florida, USA), on 9-11 September 2016 for the Consortium for Orthodontic Advances in Science and Technology 2016 Innovators' Workshop (COAST). Approximately 65 registered attendees considered and discussed information from 27 to 34 speakers, 8 to 15 poster presenters and four lunch-hour focus group leaders. The innovators' workshops were organized according to five themed sessions. The aims of the discussion sessions were to identify the following: i) the strength and impact of the evidenced-based discoveries, ii) required steps to enable further development and iii) required steps to translate these new discoveries into orthodontic practice. The role of gene-environment interactions that underlie complex craniofacial traits was the focus of several sessions. It was agreed that diverse approaches are called for, such as (i) large-scale collaborative efforts for future genetic studies of complex traits; (ii) deep genome sequencing to address the issues of isolated mutations; (iii) quantifying epigenetic-environmental variables in diverse areas myofascial pain, alveolar remodelling and mandibular growth. Common needs identified from the themed sessions were multiscale/multispecies modelling and experimentation using controlled and quantified mechanics and translation of the findings in bone biology between species. Panel discussions led to the consensus that a consortium approach to establish standards for intra-oral scanning and 3D imaging should be initiated. Current and emerging technologies still require supported research to translate new findings from the laboratory to orthodontic practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Proceedings of solar energy storage options. Volume I. An intensive workshop on thermal energy storage for solar heating and cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 28 papers presented. Panel chairmen's summaries are included; the complete panel reports will be published in Volume II of the Solar Energy Storage Options Workshop proceedings. (WHK)

  16. Workshop on Subcritical Neutron Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter Sadowski; Roald Sagdeev

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary of the Workshop on Subcritical Neutron Production A workshop on Subcritical Neutron Production was sponsored by the East-West Center of the University of Maryland on October 11-13, 2004. The subject of the workshop was the application of subcritical neutrons to transmutation of actinides. The workshop was attended by members of the fission, accelerator and fusion communities. Papers on the state of development of neutron production by accelerators, fusion devices, and fission reactors were presented. Discussions were held on the potential of these technologies to solve the problems of spent nuclear waste storage and nuclear non-proliferation presented by current and future nuclear power reactors. A list of participants including their affiliation and their E-Mail addresses is attached. The workshop concluded that the technologies, presently available or under development, hold out the exciting possibility of improving the environmental quality and long term energy resources of nuclear power while strengthening proliferation resistance. The workshop participants agreed on the following statements. The workshop considered a number of technologies to deal with spent nuclear fuels and current actinide inventories. The conclusion was reached that substantial increase in nuclear power production will require that the issue of spent nuclear fuel be resolved. The Workshop concluded that 14 MeV fusion neutrons can be used to destroy nuclear reactor by-products, some of which would otherwise have to be stored for geologic periods of time. The production of 14 MeV neutrons is based on existing fusion technologies at different research institutions in several countries around the world. At the present time this technology is used to produce 14 MeV neutrons in JET. More development work will be required, however, to bring fusion technology to the level where it can be used for actinide burning on an industrial scale. The workshop concluded that the potential

  17. The dynamics of magnetic vortices in type II superconductors with pinning sites studied by the time dependent Ginzburg–Landau model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter, E-mail: mpso@dtu.dk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Richard Petersens Plads, Bldg. 324, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby DK-2800 (Denmark); Pedersen, Niels Falsig [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Richard Petersens Plads, Bldg. 324, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby DK-2800 (Denmark); Ögren, Magnus [School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro SE-70182 (Sweden)

    2017-02-15

    We investigate the dynamics of magnetic vortices in type II superconductors with normal state pinning sites using the Ginzburg–Landau equations. Simulation results demonstrate hopping of vortices between pinning sites, influenced by external magnetic fields and external currents. The system is highly nonlinear and the vortices show complex nonlinear dynamical behaviour.

  18. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-02-01

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fueling station development.

  19. Run II jet physics: Proceedings of the Run II QCD and weak boson physics workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerald C. Blazey

    2000-01-01

    The Run II jet physics group includes the Jet Algorithms, Jet Shape/Energy Flow, and Jet Measurements/Correlations subgroups. The main goal of the jet algorithm subgroup was to explore and define standard Run II jet finding procedures for CDF and D0. The focus of the jet shape/energy flow group was the study of jets as objects and the energy flows around these objects. The jet measurements/correlations subgroup discussed measurements at different beam energies; α S measurements; and LO, NLO, NNLO, and threshold jet calculations. As a practical matter the algorithm and shape/energy flow groups merged to concentrate on the development of Run II jet algorithms that are both free of theoretical and experimental difficulties and able to reproduce Run I measurements. Starting from a review of the experience gained during Run I, the group considered a variety of cone algorithms, and K T algorithms. The current understanding of both types of algorithms, including calibration issues, are discussed in this report along with some preliminary experimental results. The jet algorithms group recommends that CDF and D0 employ the same version of both a cone algorithm and a K T algorithm during Run II. Proposed versions of each type of algorithm are discussed. The group also recommends the use of full 4-vector kinematic variables whenever possible. The recommended algorithms attempt to minimize the impact of seeds in the case of the cone algorithm and preclustering in the case of the K T algorithm. Issues regarding precluster definitions and merge/split criteria require further study

  20. Effective mitigation efforts to reduce road dust near industrial sites: assessment by mobile pollution surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, Patrick F; Corr, Denis; Wallace, Julie; Kanaroglou, Pavlos

    2012-05-15

    Assessment of spatial variation of fugitive dust sources, particularly road dust track-out from industrial sites and its subsequent re-suspension is difficult with fixed air quality monitoring stations given their sparse distribution and the highly localized nature of road dust. Mobile monitoring was employed to measure levels of road dust in the industrial area of the City of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Results of this monitoring were used in a Fugitive Dust Control workshop held for local stakeholders, where fugitive dust control solutions were presented. After the workshop, the City of Hamilton and cooperative industrial groups executed enhanced street cleaning and individual industries and facilities performed on-site control activities. Post-workshop mobile air monitoring was performed for comparison to the initial values to determine effectiveness of these approaches. A regression model testing the difference pre- and post-workshop yielded a statistically significant difference in PM(10) measurements demonstrating improvement. The average value of PM(10) prior to the workshop was 114 μg/m(3). Post-workshop the average value dropped to 73 μg/m(3). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

    2008-05-01

    The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The

  2. Applications of ion beam analysis workshop. Workshop handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    A workshop on applications of ion beam analysis was held at ANSTO, immediate prior to the IBMM-95 Conference in Canberra. It aims was to review developments and current status on use of ion beams for analysis, emphasizing the following aspects: fundamental ion beam research and secondary effects of ion beams; material sciences, geological, life sciences, environmental and industrial applications; computing codes for use in accelerator research; high energy heavy ion scattering and recoil; recent technological development using ion beams. The handbook contains the workshop's program, 29 abstracts and a list of participants

  3. Fennoscandian paleo-environment and ice sheet dynamics during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3. Report of a workshop held September 20-21, 2007 in Stockholm, Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naeslund, Jens-Ove (ed.) (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Wohlfarth, Barbara (ed.); Alexanderson, Helena (Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden)) (and others)

    2008-10-15

    This document compiles information on the paleoenvironment for a specific part of the last glacial cycle. The information is relevant for the analysis of climate and climate related processes in the safety assessment SR-Site. In particular, the information was used in setting up climate model simulations performed for SR-Site. The aim of the report is to summarize the state of knowledge on a selected period during the Weichselian glaciation, as presented and discussed during a workshop arranged by SKB in September 2007. The participants of the workshop comprised most of the researches working on this period in Fennoscandia. In the report, the workshop participants have written their own abstracts and also directly contributed to the discussion and conclusions. Considering this aim and content of the report, it was not useful for this document to undergo the SR-Site review process

  4. Fennoscandian paleo-environment and ice sheet dynamics during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3. Report of a workshop held September 20-21, 2007 in Stockholm, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naeslund, Jens-Ove; Wohlfarth, Barbara

    2008-10-01

    This document compiles information on the paleoenvironment for a specific part of the last glacial cycle. The information is relevant for the analysis of climate and climate related processes in the safety assessment SR-Site. In particular, the information was used in setting up climate model simulations performed for SR-Site. The aim of the report is to summarize the state of knowledge on a selected period during the Weichselian glaciation, as presented and discussed during a workshop arranged by SKB in September 2007. The participants of the workshop comprised most of the researches working on this period in Fennoscandia. In the report, the workshop participants have written their own abstracts and also directly contributed to the discussion and conclusions. Considering this aim and content of the report, it was not useful for this document to undergo the SR-Site review process

  5. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, Appendix B, Part 13: Sites with small plutonium holdings site assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This Appendix contains the initial responses to the Question Set received from each of the sites with small plutonium holdings. The WGAT report for sites with small plutonium holdings was then prepared, based on these initial site responses plus supplemental information obtained via telephone request with the site contractor and/or DOE Field Office personnel. These supplements serve to clarify information in the initial question set responses and/or obtain additional information. This WGAT report is published as Volume II, Part 13

  6. Workshop on Copper Corrosion and Buffer Erosion. Stockholm 15-17 September 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Peter; Bath, Adrian

    2011-02-01

    The workshop was convened to inform and advise SSM about the coupled processes of buffer erosion and enhanced canister corrosion that have been proposed as a potentially detrimental scenario in the long-term evolution of the engineered barrier system of a deep geological repository. It was an extension of the deliberations of SSM's BRITE advisory group on EBS issues and on SKB's approaches to the issues in the forthcoming SR-Site safety case. The workshop was planned to assist and advise SSM in its preparations for review of SKB.s license application and SR-Site submission. The potential for buffer erosion due to a future influx of dilute groundwater that induces bentonite to behave as a sol has been indicated by experiments carried out for SKB. It is generally considered that the most likely source and timing of such groundwater conditions will be the glacial stage of the normal evolution of the repository system, i.e. many tens of thousands of years into the future at least. The workshop considered, however, that potential causes of buffer erosion in the early post-closure period should also be considered. The main significance of buffer erosion for a safety case is that it would potentially lead to higher rates of corrosion of the copper canister. There are various physicochemical mechanisms that could be implicated in enhanced corrosion but basically they would involve (a) the failure of a diffusion controlled constraint on corrodant transport to and product transport away from the copper surface, and (b) the viability of microbially-mediated reactions producing higher concentrations of corrodants at or near to the copper surface. The general issues relating to corrosion had already been the theme for a previous workshop in 2005 (see Report SKI 2006:11), the outcomes of which formed the background for this workshop. Additional background was provided by SKB's interim safety case, SR-Can, and the regulatory authorities. responses to preliminary consideration of

  7. Workshop on Copper Corrosion and Buffer Erosion. Stockholm 15-17 September 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Peter (Quintessa (United Kingdom)); Bath, Adrian (Intellisci Ltd (United Kingdom))

    2011-02-15

    The workshop was convened to inform and advise SSM about the coupled processes of buffer erosion and enhanced canister corrosion that have been proposed as a potentially detrimental scenario in the long-term evolution of the engineered barrier system of a deep geological repository. It was an extension of the deliberations of SSM's BRITE advisory group on EBS issues and on SKB's approaches to the issues in the forthcoming SR-Site safety case. The workshop was planned to assist and advise SSM in its preparations for review of SKB.s license application and SR-Site submission. The potential for buffer erosion due to a future influx of dilute groundwater that induces bentonite to behave as a sol has been indicated by experiments carried out for SKB. It is generally considered that the most likely source and timing of such groundwater conditions will be the glacial stage of the normal evolution of the repository system, i.e. many tens of thousands of years into the future at least. The workshop considered, however, that potential causes of buffer erosion in the early post-closure period should also be considered. The main significance of buffer erosion for a safety case is that it would potentially lead to higher rates of corrosion of the copper canister. There are various physicochemical mechanisms that could be implicated in enhanced corrosion but basically they would involve (a) the failure of a diffusion controlled constraint on corrodant transport to and product transport away from the copper surface, and (b) the viability of microbially-mediated reactions producing higher concentrations of corrodants at or near to the copper surface. The general issues relating to corrosion had already been the theme for a previous workshop in 2005 (see Report SKI 2006:11), the outcomes of which formed the background for this workshop. Additional background was provided by SKB's interim safety case, SR-Can, and the regulatory authorities. responses to preliminary

  8. Summer 1994 Computational Science Workshop. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report documents the work performed by the University of New Mexico Principal Investigators and Research Assistants while hosting the highly successful Summer 1994 Computational Sciences Workshop in Albuquerque on August 6--11, 1994. Included in this report is a final budget for the workshop, along with a summary of the participants` evaluation of the workshop. The workshop proceeding have been delivered under separate cover. In order to assist in the organization of future workshops, we have also included in this report detailed documentation of the pre- and post-workshop activities associated with this contract. Specifically, we have included a section that documents the advertising performed, along with the manner in which applications were handled. A complete list of the workshop participants in this section. Sample letters that were generated while dealing with various commercial entities and departments at the University are also included in a section dealing with workshop logistics. Finally, we have included a section in this report that deals with suggestions for future workshops.

  9. Considerations on photochemical genotoxicity. II: Report of the 2009 International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing Working Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, A.M.; Guzzie, P.J.; Bauer, D.; Gocke, E.; Itoh, S.; Jacobs, A.; Krul, C.A.M.; Schepky, A.; Tanaka, N.; Kasper, P.

    2011-01-01

    A workshop to reappraise the previous IWGT recommendations for photogenotoxicity testing [E. Gocke, L. Muller, P.J. Guzzie, S. Brendler-Schwaab, S. Bulera, C.F. Chignell, L.M. Henderson, A. Jacobs, H. Murli, R.D. Snyder, N. Tanaka, Considerations on photochemical genotoxicity: report of the

  10. Report of the DOD-DOE Workshop on Converting Waste to Energy Using Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    cell research, development, and demonstration. Along with the general program overview, Dr. Satyapal highlighted the vast amount of biogas resources...Page ii DOD-DOE Workshop Summary on Converting Waste to Energy Using Fuel Cells List of Tables Table 1. Comparison by Generator Type: Based on 40...Table 2. Typical Composition of Biogas from Various Waste Streams ....................................................... 8 Table D-1

  11. Vulcano Workshop 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Mannocchi, G.; Morselli, A.; Trinchero, G.

    2016-01-01

    We announce the XVI Vulcano Workshop, which will be held from May 22nd to May 28th, 2016 in the Vulcano Island (Sicily, Italy). As in the past editions, the workshop will aim to gather people from High Energy Astrophysics and Particle Physics to discuss the most recent highlights in these fields. The workshop will cover the following topics: Astrophysics/Cosmology, Astrophysics/Gravity, Dark Matter, Particle Physics, Cosmic Rays, Gamma/Neutrino Astronomy, Neutrinos and Future Prospects. The scientific program will include several 30-minute review talks, to introduce the current problems, and 20-minute talks, giving new experimental and theoretical results. The participation is by invitation and limited to 80 people.

  12. CEBAF/SURA 1985 Summer Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crannel, H.

    1985-12-01

    The 1985 Summer Workshop began a new phase of planning for the experimental program at CEBAF. One goal of the Workshop was to define and describe options for equipping the CEBAF and stations with experimental equipment. Starting with an initial list of options which grew out of discussions during the Winter of 1984 and the Spring of 1985, the five working groups met during the Workshop and developed their final reports, included in these proceedings. The program of the Workshop consisted of invited talks on both theoretical and experimental topics, and working group meetings. The five working groups, include: Magnetic Spectrometers; Large Acceptance Detectors and Low Intensity Beams; Internal Targets; Positrons; Theory. These proceedings begin with an overview of CEBAF, and a report on progress made by the Magnetic Spectrometer and Internal Target Working Groups prior to the Workshop. The next part contains the invited talks, presented in the order which they were given during the week. The final reports of the five working groups follow this, and the proceedings conclude with papers contributed to the Workshop

  13. N Reactor Lessons Learned workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaberlin, S.W.

    1993-07-01

    This report describes a workshop designed to introduce participants to a process, or model, for adapting LWR Safety Standards and Analysis Methods for use on rector designs significantly different than LWR. The focus of the workshop is on the ''Lessons Learned'' from the multi-year experience in the operation of N Reactor and the efforts to adapt the safety standards developed for commercial light water reactors to a graphite moderated, water cooled, channel type reactor. It must be recognized that the objective of the workshop is to introduce the participants to the operation of a non-LWR in a LWR regulatory world. The total scope of this topic would take weeks to provide a through overview. The objective of this workshop is to provide an introduction and hopefully establish a means to develop a longer term dialogue for technical exchange. This report provides outline of the workshop, a proposed schedule of the workshop, and a description of the tasks will be required to achieve successful completion of the project

  14. Sustainability of the Benefits Derived from Fadama II Critical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sustainability of the Benefits Derived from Fadama II Critical Ecosystem Management Project in Eriti Watershed of Ogun State. ... Future projects should improve on the involvement of beneficiaries in procuring service providers in addition to been exposed to capacity building workshops on asset maintenance to enhance ...

  15. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Naturita site, Naturita, Colorado. A summary of the Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Naturita, Colorado. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings, the performance of radiometric measurements to determine the extent of radium contamination, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology, and the costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 704,000 tons of tailings at the Naturita site constitutes the most significant environmental impact although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. Ranchers Exploration and Development Company has been licensed by the State of Colorado to reprocess the tailings at a location 3 mi from the present site where they will be stabilized for long-term storage. The remedial action options include remedial action for structures in Naturita and Nucla (Option I) at an estimated cost of $270,000 and remedial action for structures and open land adjacent to the tailings site (Option II) at an estimated cost of $950,000

  16. Pollution distribution of heavy metals in surface soil at an informal electronic-waste recycling site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Takashi; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2014-02-01

    We studied distribution of heavy metals [lead (Pb), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn)] in surface soil at an electronic-waste (e-waste) recycling workshop near Metro Manila in the Philippines to evaluate the pollution size (spot size, small area or the entire workshop), as well as to assess heavy metal transport into the surrounding soil environment. On-site length-of-stride-scale (~70 cm) measurements were performed at each surface soil point using field-portable X-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF). The surface soil at the e-waste recycling workshop was polluted with Cu, Zn and Pb, which were distributed discretely in surface soil. The site was divided into five areas based on the distance from an entrance gate (y-axis) of the e-waste recycling workshop. The three heavy metals showed similar concentration gradients in the y-axis direction. Zn, Pb and Cu concentrations were estimated to decrease to half of their maximum concentrations at ~3, 7 and 7 m from the pollution spot, respectively, inside the informal e-waste recycling workshop. Distance from an entrance may play an important role in heavy metal transport at the soil surface. Using on-site FP-XRF, we evaluated the metal ratio to characterise pollution features of the solid surface. Variability analysis of heavy metals revealed vanishing surficial autocorrelation over metre ranges. Also, the possibility of concentration prediction at unmeasured points using geostatistical kriging was evaluated, and heavy metals had a relative "small" pollution scales and remained inside the original workshop compared with toxic organohalogen compounds. Thus, exposure to heavy metals may directly influence the health of e-waste workers at the original site rather than the surrounding habitat and environmental media.

  17. Report of the Orientation Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunez, Heilyn Camacho; Buus, Lillian; Ogange, Betty

    2014-01-01

    This Orientation Workshops is part of MAAGART project. The workshop is divided in three parts: 1) pre-Orientation Workshop stage, 2) Face-to-Face stage and 3) post-Orientation stage. Pre and post stages will be developed online. All the activities will take place in a virtual learning environment...... created for this purpose. Participants will receive all the information about how to access the virtual learning environment (Moodle) prior to the pre-orientation workshop. In this report we cover only the two first stages. Jørgen Bang, as a part of the Community of Practice activity, will be facilitating...

  18. Evaluation of proposed shallow-land burial sites using the PRESTO-II [Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations] methodology and code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, D.E.; Uslu, I.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    PRESTO-II (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) is a computer code designed to evaluate possible doses and risks (health effects) from shallow-land burial sites. The model is intended to serve as a non-site-specific screening model for assessing radionuclide transport, ensuing exposure, and health impacts to a static local population for a 1000-year period following the end of disposal operations. Human exposure scenarios include normal releases (including leaching and operational spillage), human intrusion, and limited site farming or reclamation. Pathways and processes of transport from the trench to an individual or population include ground-water transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, suspension, atmospheric transport and deposition, inhalation, external exposure, and ingestion of contaminated beef, milk, crops, and water. The proposed waste disposal area in Koteyli, Balikesir, Turkey, has been evaluated using the PRESTO-II methodology. The results have been compared to those obtained for the Barnwell, South Carolina, site. Dose estimates for both sites are below regulatory limits, for the release and exposure scenarios considered. The doses for the sites are comparable, with slightly higher estimates obtained for the Turkish site. 7 refs., 1 tab

  19. Transfer and Transition: Interagency Coordination for Managing Public Lands at UMTRCA Title II Sites in Wyoming – 16614

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafer, David S. [U.S. Dpartment of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Vanek, Tim [U.S.Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Ribeiro, Tracy [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Bahrke, Cheri [Navarro Research and Engineering

    2016-03-06

    By the end of fiscal year 2025, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is anticipating adding 17 sites remediated under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) to the current inventory of 90 sites that it manages. Among the new sites are ones where federal public lands occur within the proposed long-term care boundary, the boundary determined by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and LM as necessary to maintain site protectiveness for the entombed uranium mill tailings and residual groundwater contamination. For these sites, public land withdrawals for land and minerals will need to be established. LM’s primary mission at UMTRCA sites is to protect the public and the environment from exposure to contamination at the sites. For the sites with public lands or federally controlled minerals that will be transferring to LM, the Office will apply to the Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) for new, public land and mineral withdrawals. At most current LM UMTRCA sites that involved public lands and minerals, DOI granted DOE “full administrative jurisdiction” and permanent withdrawals. Hence, these withdrawals are, permanently, no longer subject to public land, mining, and mineral-leasing laws and regulations. LM is coordinating with DOI/BLM in Wyoming to permanently withdraw full and partial jurisdiction at future UMTRCA Title II sites in that state. This approach would allow LM to fully administer surface lands and minerals, where necessary, and DOI and LM to administer surface lands and leasable minerals where it would not jeopardize sites’ radiological safety and long-term public and environmental protection. This “shared-jurisdiction approach” will meet LM’s strategic goal of protecting human health and the environment but also allow BLM to fulfill their mission to “manage and conserve the lands under the mandate of multiple-use and sustained yield.” In addition, LM

  20. Reports on the AAAI 1999 Workshop Program

    OpenAIRE

    Drabble, Brian; Chaudron, Laurent; Tessier, Catherine; Abu-Hakima, Sue; Willmott, Steven; Austin, Jim; Faltings, Boi; Freuder, Eugene C.; Friedrich, Gerhard; Freitas, Alex A.; Cortes, U.; Sanchez-Marre, M.; Aha, David W.; Becerra-Fernandez, Irma; Munoz-Avila, Hector

    2000-01-01

    The AAAI-99 Workshop Program (a part of the sixteenth national conference on artificial intelligence) was held in Orlando, Florida. The program included 16 workshops covering a wide range of topics in AI. Each workshop was limited to approximately 25 to 50 participants. Participation was by invitation from the workshop organizers. The workshops were Agent-Based Systems in the Business Context, Agents' Conflicts, Artificial Intelligence for Distributed Information Networking, Artificial Intell...

  1. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Slick Rock sites, Slick Rock, Colorado. A summary of the Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at the two millsites in Slick Rock, Colorado. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals residing nearby, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. The Union Carbide site has 350,000 tons of tailings and the North Continent site now owned by Union Carbide has 37,000 tons of tailings. Both tailings piles have been stabilized in accordance with regulations of the State of Colorado. Radon gas release from the tailings on the sites constitute the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The sparse population and relatively low radiation levels yield minimal immediate environmental impact. Hence the three alternative actions presented are directed towards restricting access to the sites (Option I), and returning the windblown tailings to the piles and stabilizing the piles with cover material (Option II), and consolidating the two piles on the UC site and stabilizing with 2 ft of cover (Option III). Fencing around the tailings piles is included in all options. Options II and III provide 2 ft of cover material on the tailings. Costs of the options range from $370,000 to $1,100,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium is not economically feasible

  2. PV radiometrics workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    This report documents presentations and discussions held at the Photovoltaics Radiometeric Measurements Workshop conducted at Vail, Colorado, on July 24 and 25, 1995. The workshop was sponsored and financed by the Photovoltaic Module and Systems Performance and Engineering Project managed by Richard DeBlasio, Principal Investigator. That project is a component of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaic Research and Development Program, conducted by NREL for the US Department of Energy, through the NREL Photovoltaic Engineering and Applications Branch, managed by Roland Hulstrom. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this workshop.

  3. North Region ROW tool implementation workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    Welcome to the North Region ROW Tool Workshop. This workshop is funded under an implementation project sponsored by TxDOTs Research & Technology Implementation Office (RTI). This is the second of four regional workshops being planned for this summ...

  4. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Mexican Hat site, Mexican Hat, Utah. A summary of the Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at the Mexican Hat millsite in Utah. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals residing nearby, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 2,200,000 tons of tailings on the site constitutes the most significant environmental impact. The six alternative actions presented are directed towards restricting access to the site (Option I), returning the windblown tailings to the piles and stabilizing the piles with cover material (Options II, III, and IV), and consolidating the two piles into one pile and stabilizing it with cover material (Options V and VI). Fencing around the site or the tailings and the decontamination of mill buildings is included in all options. Options II and V provide 2 ft of cover material on the tailings, Options III, IV, and VI provide 4 ft, 13 ft, and 10 ft of cover, respectively. Costs of the options range from $370,000 to $4,390,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium is not feasible at present

  5. arXiv Proceedings of the Sixth International Workshop on Multiple Partonic Interactions at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Astalos, R.; Bartalini, P.; Belyaev, I.; Bierlich, Ch.; Blok, B.; Buckley, A.; Ceccopieri, F.A.; Cherednikov, I.; Christiansen, J.R.; Ciangottini, D.; Deak, M.; Ducloue, B.; Field, R.; Gaunt, J.R.; Golec-Biernat, K.; Goerlich, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Gueta, O.; Gunnellini, P.; Helenius, I.; Jung, H.; Kar, D.; Kepka, O.; Klusek-Gawenda, M.; Knutsson, A.; Kotko, P.; Krasny, M.W.; Kutak, K.; Lewandowska, E.; Lykasov, G.; Maciula, R.; Moraes, A.M.; Martin, T.; Mitsuka, G.; Motyka, L.; Myska, M.; Otwinowski, J.; Pierog, T.; Pleskot, V.; Rinaldi, M.; Schafer, W.; Siodmok, A.; Sjostrand, T.; Snigirev, A.; Stasto, A.; Staszewski, R.; Stebel, T.; Strikman, M.; Szczurek, A.; Treleani, D.; Trzebinski, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Hameren, A.; van Mechelen, P.; Waalewijn, W.; Wang, W.Y.; MPI@LHC 2014

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Partonic Interactions are often crucial for interpreting results obtained at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The quest for a sound understanding of the dynamics behind MPI - particularly at this time when the LHC is due to start its "Run II" operations - has focused the aim of this workshop. MPI@LHC2014 concentrated mainly on the phenomenology of LHC measurements whilst keeping in perspective those results obtained at previous hadron colliders. The workshop has also debated some of the state-of-the-art theoretical considerations and the modeling of MPI in Monte Carlo event generators. The topics debated in the workshop included: Phenomenology of MPI processes and multiparton distributions; Considerations for the description of MPI in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD); Measuring multiple partonic interactions; Experimental results on inelastic hadronic collisions: underlying event, minimum bias, forward energy flow; Monte Carlo generator development and tuning; Connections with low-x phenomena, diffractio...

  6. Workshop on ROVs and deep submergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The deep-submergence community has an opportunity on March 6 to participate in a unique teleconferencing demonstration of a state-of-the-art, remotely operated underwater research vehicle known as the Jason-Medea System. Jason-Medea has been developed over the past decade by scientists, engineers, and technicians at the Deep Submergence Laboratory at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The U.S. Navy, the Office of the Chief of Naval Research, and the National Science Foundation are sponsoring the workshop to explore the roles that modern computational, communications, and robotics technologies can play in deep-sea oceanographic research.Through the cooperation of Electronic Data Systems, Inc., the Jason Foundation, and Turner Broadcasting System, Inc., 2-1/2 hours of air time will be available from 3:00 to 5:30 PM EST on March 6. Twenty-seven satellite downlink sites will link one operating research vessel and the land-based operation with workshop participants in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and Bermuda. The research ship Laney Chouest will be in the midst of a 3-week educational/research program in the Sea of Cortez, between Baja California and mainland Mexico. This effort is focused on active hydrothermal vents driven by heat flow from the volcanically active East Pacific Rise, which underlies the sediment-covered Guaymas Basin. The project combines into a single-operation, newly-developed robotic systems, state-of-the-art mapping and sampling tools, fiber-optic data transmission from the seafloor, instantaneous satellite communication from ship to shore, and a sophisticated array of computational and telecommunications networks. During the workshop, land-based scientists will observe and participate directly with their seagoing colleagues as they conduct seafloor research.

  7. [Modular risk analysis for assessing multiple waste sites]: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, G.

    1994-01-01

    This document contains proceedings from the Integrated Planning Workshop from Strategic Planning to Baselining and Other Objectives. Topics discussed include: stakeholder involvement; regulations; future site use planning; site integration and baseline methods; risk analysis in decision making; land uses; and economics in decision making. Individual records have been processed separately for the database

  8. Optical Detectors for Astronomy II : State-of-the-art at the Turn of the Millennium : 4th ESO CCD Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Beletic, James

    2000-01-01

    th The 4 ESO CCO Workshop, Optical Detectors for Astronomy, was held during September 13-16, 1999 at its usual location, the headquarters of the European Southern Observatory in Garching, Germany. We prefer to remember this workshop as a "meeting of friends", who came to Garching to visit ESO and to present their work, rather than a formal meeting. Based on our experience with the 1996 ESO CCO workshop, we deliberately put emphasis on creating an environment that encouraged the participants to stay together and informally exchange ideas. These informal events began with a tour of the BWM auto factory and continued with a reception at "SchloB Beletic", the conference dinner at a real SchloB of the Bavarian International School (where the participants enjoyed basket, baseball, table soccer, rock climbing and eventually dancing) and concluded with a tour of the Paulaner Brewery and dinner at the Seehaus in the Englisher Garten. The lunch "Biergarten", adjacent to the poster session area, was a daily meeting poin...

  9. An Assessment of Comprehensive Code Prediction State-of-the-Art Using the HART II International Workshop Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWall, Berend G.; Lim, Joon W.; Smith, Marilyn J.; Jung, Sung N.; Bailly, Joelle; Baeder, James D.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advancements in computational fluid dynamics and their coupling with computational structural dynamics (= CSD, or comprehensive codes) for rotorcraft applications, CSD codes with their engineering level of modeling the rotor blade dynamics, the unsteady sectional aerodynamics and the vortical wake are still the workhorse for the majority of applications. This is especially true when a large number of parameter variations is to be performed and their impact on performance, structural loads, vibration and noise is to be judged in an approximate yet reliable and as accurate as possible manner. In this paper, the capabilities of such codes are evaluated using the HART II Inter- national Workshop data base, focusing on a typical descent operating condition which includes strong blade-vortex interactions. Three cases are of interest: the baseline case and two cases with 3/rev higher harmonic blade root pitch control (HHC) with different control phases employed. One setting is for minimum blade-vortex interaction noise radiation and the other one for minimum vibration generation. The challenge is to correctly predict the wake physics - especially for the cases with HHC - and all the dynamics, aerodynamics, modifications of the wake structure and the aero-acoustics coming with it. It is observed that the comprehensive codes used today have a surprisingly good predictive capability when they appropriately account for all of the physics involved. The minimum requirements to obtain these results are outlined.

  10. The HART II International Workshop: An Assessment of the State-of-the-Art in Comprehensive Code Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWall, Berend G.; Lim, Joon W.; Smith, Marilyn J.; Jung, Sung N.; Bailly, Joelle; Baeder, James D.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Significant advancements in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and their coupling with computational structural dynamics (CSD, or comprehensive codes) for rotorcraft applications have been achieved recently. Despite this, CSD codes with their engineering level of modeling the rotor blade dynamics, the unsteady sectional aerodynamics and the vortical wake are still the workhorse for the majority of applications. This is especially true when a large number of parameter variations is to be performed and their impact on performance, structural loads, vibration and noise is to be judged in an approximate yet reliable and as accurate as possible manner. In this article, the capabilities of such codes are evaluated using the HART II International Workshop database, focusing on a typical descent operating condition which includes strong blade-vortex interactions. A companion article addresses the CFD/CSD coupled approach. Three cases are of interest: the baseline case and two cases with 3/rev higher harmonic blade root pitch control (HHC) with different control phases employed. One setting is for minimum blade-vortex interaction noise radiation and the other one for minimum vibration generation. The challenge is to correctly predict the wake physics-especially for the cases with HHC-and all the dynamics, aerodynamics, modifications of the wake structure and the aero-acoustics coming with it. It is observed that the comprehensive codes used today have a surprisingly good predictive capability when they appropriately account for all of the physics involved. The minimum requirements to obtain these results are outlined.

  11. Dynamic defense workshop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason Juedes.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  12. Japanese contributions to IAEA INTOR Workshop, Phase Two A, Part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Shigeru; Tomabechi, Ken; Fujisawa, Noboru

    1988-02-01

    This report corresponds to Chapter I and II of Japanese contribution report to IAEA INTOR Workshop, Phase Two A, Part 3. The major objectives of the INTOR Workshop Part 3 are to evaluate innovative ideas which would significantly improve the tokamak concept, to study new-selected critical technical issues, that affect the feasibility or practicability of the INTOR concept, to assess scientific and technical data bases, and to conduct critical analyses of the existing INTOR-like designs with the aim of preparing a useful information base for future design work for ITER. To perform the innovations, critical issues, and data base, the following six groups are organized; (A) Impurity control, (B) Operational limits and confinement, (C) Current drive and heating, (D) Electromagnetics, (E) Configuration and maintenance, (F) Blanket and first wall. In addition to those groups, the two disciplinary groups are also organized to do the critical analyses of the existing INTOR-like designs; (G) Physics and (H) Engineering. (author)

  13. Workshop on the leaching mechanisms of nuclear-waste forms, October 27-28, 1981. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, J.E.

    1982-04-01

    The purpose of this informal workshop was to initiate the program and achieve the following goals: (1) acquaint laboratory investigators (data generators) with the needs of the mathematical modelers (data users). Session I was devoted to a tutorial by D.D. Jackson, mathematical modeler for the leaching mechanisms program, on PROTOCOL, a general case waste form leaching model; (2) define important testing parameters, based on the present state of knowledge. To achieve this, a number of important testing parameters were identified for special discussion in Session II; (3) develop an understanding of the interrelationships between the activities of leaching mechanisms program participants, and begin definition of the specific role of each participant in the overall program; and (4) establish good communication between the leaching mechanisms program and related programs, particularly the waste form leaching program at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) and the various Nuclear Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) waste package programs. The agenda for the workshop is attached as Appendix A; a list of attendees is in Appendix B. Because this workshop was devoted to preliminary planning for the leaching mechanisms program, the presentations and discussions were purposely kept informal. This report represents a synopsis of the proceedings that has been prepared by the leaching mechanisms coordinator and reviewed by the workshop participants

  14. Vaginal type-II mucosa is an inductive site for primary CD8+ T-cell mucosal immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yichuan; Sui, Yongjun; Kato, Shingo; Hogg, Alison E.; Steel, Jason C.; Morris, John C.; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    2014-01-01

    The structured lymphoid tissues are considered the only inductive sites where primary T cell immune responses occur. The naïve T cells in structured lymphoid tissues, once being primed by antigen -bearing dendritic cells, differentiate into memory T cells and traffic back to the mucosal sites through the bloodstream. Contrary to this belief, here we show that the vaginal type-II mucosa itself, despite lack of structured lymphoid tissues, can act as an inductive site during primary CD8+ T cell immune responses. We provide evidence that the vaginal mucosa supports both the local immune priming of naïve CD8+ T cells and the local expansion of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, thereby demonstrating a different paradigm for primary mucosal T cell immune induction. PMID:25600442

  15. PREFACE: XIV Mexican Workshop on Particles and Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delepine, D.; Napsuciale, M.; Ibarguen, H. S.

    2015-11-01

    The Mexican Workshop on Particles and Fields (MWPF) is a biennial meeting organized by the Division of Particles and Fields of the Mexican Physical Society designed to gather specialists in different areas of high energy physics to discuss the latest developments in the field. The fourteenth edition of this meeting was held from November 25 to 29, 2013, at the colonial city of Oaxaca de Juárez, Oaxaca, Mexico. The XIV Mexican Workshop on Particles and Fields consisted of invited lectures, discussion and poster sessions. Experimental and theoretical developments were presented by distinguished physicists, addressing the most recent results in the field. The invited review talks included topics on collider physics, neutrino physics, physics beyond the Standard Model, flavor and hadronic physics, astroparticle physics, dark matter physics and effective theories, among others. The highlight topic of the conference was the presentation of the most resent results from the most popular high energy experiments in the world. The discovery of a particle consistent with the long-sought Higgs boson, considered one of the most important discoveries of the 21st century, was fully addressed by José Benítez and Kirill Prokofiev from CERN. The overview of the results of ALICE on the first run of the LHC was extensivly covered by Antonio Ortiz, from Lund University, and Daniel Tapia, from Universití Paris-Sud. The prospects and status of the new Belle II experiment were presented by Yoshi Sakai from KEK. The plans and projects of Tevatron on the new era of accelerators were explained by Gene Fisk from FERMILAB. Eric Vázquez from SNOLAB presented a wonderful explanation about the Dark Matter detection and the most resent results about the searches for it. The largest high energy cosmic rays detector, the Pierre Auger, was presented by Luis Villasñnor from University of Michoacán. On Friday 29th of November, we had an excursion to the archeological site of Mitla and to Santa

  16. Blind comparisons of shear-wave velocities at closely-spaced sites in San Jose, California: Proceedings of a Workshop held at the US Geological Survey, Menlo Park, May 3, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asten, Michael W.; Boore, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Shear-wave velocities within several hundred meters of Earth's surface are important in specifying earthquake ground motions for engineering design. Not only are the shearwave velocities used in classifying sites for use of modern building codes, but they are also used in site-specific studies of particularly significant structures. Many are the methods for estimating sub-surface shear-wave velocities, but few are the blind comparisons of a number of the methods at a single site. The word "blind" is important here and means that the measurements and interpretations are done completely independent of one another. Stephen Hartzell of the USGS office on Golden, Colorado realized that such an experiment would be very useful for assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the various methods, and he and Jack Boatwright of the USGS office in Menlo Park, California, in cooperation with Carl Wentworth of the Menlo Park USGS office found a convenient site in the city of San Jose, California. The site had good access and space for conducting experiments, and a borehole drilled to several hundred meters by the Santa Clara Valley Water District was made available for downhole logging. Jack Boatwright asked David Boore to coordinate the experiment. In turn, David Boore persuaded several teams to make measurements, helped with the local logistics, collected the results, and organized and conducted an International Workshop in May, 2004. At this meeting the participants in the experiment gathered in Menlo Park to describe their measurements and interpretations, and to see the results of the comparisons of the various methods for the first time. This Open-File Report describes the results of that workshop. One of the participants, Michael Asten, offered to help the coordinator prepare this report. Because of his lead role in pulling the report together, Dr. Asten is the lead author of the paper to follow and is also the lead Compiler for the Open-File Report.It is important to

  17. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation, Volume 41 : GDIS Workshop Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Randal D. (Editor); Schubert, Siegfried; Pozzi, Will; Mo, Kingtse; Wood, Eric F.; Stahl, Kerstin; Hayes, Mike; Vogt, Juergen; Seneviratne, Sonia; Stewart, Ron; hide

    2015-01-01

    The workshop "An International Global Drought Information System Workshop: Next Steps" was held on 10-13 December 2014 in Pasadena, California. The more than 60 participants from 15 countries spanned the drought research community and included select representatives from applications communities as well as providers of regional and global drought information products. The workshop was sponsored and supported by the US National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) program, the World Climate Research Program (WCRP: GEWEX, CLIVAR), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the Group on Earth Observations (GEO), the European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC), the US Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR) program, and the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) programs on Modeling, Analysis, Predictions and Projections (MAPP) and Climate Variability & Predictability (CVP). NASA/JPL hosted the workshop with logistical support provided by the GEWEX program office. The goal of the workshop was to build on past Global Drought Information System (GDIS) progress toward developing an experimental global drought information system. Specific goals were threefold: (i) to review recent research results focused on understanding drought mechanisms and their predictability on a wide range of time scales and to identify gaps in understanding that could be addressed by coordinated research; (ii) to help ensure that WRCP research priorities mesh with efforts to build capacity to address drought at the regional level; and (iii) to produce an implementation plan for a short duration pilot project to demonstrate current GDIS capabilities. See http://www.wcrp-climate.org/gdis-wkshp-2014-objectives for more information.

  18. Summer workshops for high-school science teachers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, H.H.; Kohl, J.

    1975-01-01

    A total of 52 summer workshops attended by over 1700 high-school science teachers have been given by 27 universities in the period of 1971 to 1974. These workshops are funded by ERDA to provide factual material through educational channels so that the public could obtain an informed perspective of the role of nuclear energy as an electrical power source. The workshops have included lectures, panel discussions, laboratories, and field trips, and have emphasized providing teachers with materials for use in their classrooms. Actual use of workshop material has been monitored through workshop reports, meetings, and visits. Participants have used their workshop experience for classroom presentations, talks to the public, and for assembly programs. The material developed and the experience of presenting it has proved valuable for the nuclear engineering faculty members giving the workshops. They have used their experience in other courses, for public lectures, and for other workshops. And they have gained personal experience in methods of dealing with the nuclear power controversy. A review of these workshops indicates that they offer at a reasonable cost a productive method of presenting factual information on the various solutions to the complex electrical generation problem

  19. Opening Session - Introductory remarks for Workshop on Accident Tolerant Fuel. OECD/NEA Workshop on Accident Tolerant Fuels, Workshop Expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dujardin, Thierry; Gulliford, Jim; Massara, Simone; Pasamehmetoglu, K.

    2013-01-01

    The workshop opened with the welcome address from Th. Dujardin (OECD/NEA), NEA Deputy Director. Th. Dujardin recalled the integrated NEA response to the dramatic Fukushima-Daiichi events performed by three standing technical committees: the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA), the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) and the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH). J. Gulliford (OECD/NEA) placed the workshop in the context of the activities of the Nuclear Science Committee within the framework of the NEA response to Fukushima- Daiichi. K. Pasamehmetoglu (INL, US) explained the main goals of the workshop oriented towards defining requirements for selection among various options during the feasibility phase of the development process, and not towards identifying and proposing design solutions

  20. Reports on the 2015 AAAI Workshop Program

    OpenAIRE

    Albrecht, Stefano V.; Beck, J. Christopher; Buckeridge, David L.; Botea, Adi; Caragea, Cornelia; Chi, Chi-hung; Damoulas, Theodoros; Dilkina, Bistra; Eaton, Eric; Fazli, Pooyan; Ganzfried, Sam; Giles, C. Lee; Guillet, Sébastian; Holte, Robert; Hutter, Frank

    2015-01-01

    AAAI's 2015 Workshop Program was held Sunday and Monday, January 25–26, 2015 at the Hyatt Regency Austin Hotel in Austion, Texas, USA. The AAAI-15 workshop program included 15 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence. Most workshops were held on a single day. The titles of the workshops included AI and Ethics, AI for Cities, AI for Transportation: Advice, Interactivity and Actor Modeling, Algorithm Configuration, Artificial Intelligence Applied to Assistive Technol...

  1. NKS Workshop on Radioanalytical Chemistry - Final report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The NKS-B workshop on radioanalytical chemistry was held 2-6th Sept 2013 at Risø, Denmark. There were a total of 49 persons participating in the workshop, including 32 young participants and 15 lecturers. The work-shop started with 3 days of lab practice followed by 1.5 day’s lectures by the expe......The NKS-B workshop on radioanalytical chemistry was held 2-6th Sept 2013 at Risø, Denmark. There were a total of 49 persons participating in the workshop, including 32 young participants and 15 lecturers. The work-shop started with 3 days of lab practice followed by 1.5 day’s lectures...

  2. Chemistry Science Investigation: Dognapping Workshop, an Outreach Program Designed to Introduce Students to Science through a Hands-On Mystery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Sears, Jeremiah M.; Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A.; Casillas, Maddison R.; Nguyen, Thao H.

    2017-01-01

    The Chemistry Science Investigation: Dognapping Workshop was designed to (i) target and inspire fourth grade students to view themselves as "Junior Scientists" before their career decisions are solidified; (ii) enable hands-on experience in fundamental scientific concepts; (iii) increase public interaction with science, technology,…

  3. 2017 Marine Hydrokinetic Instrumentation Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, Frederick R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mauer, Erik [U.S. Department of Energy; Rieks, Jeff [Allegheny Science and Technologies

    2018-03-06

    The third Marine Hydrokinetic Instrumentation Workshop was held at Florida Atlantic University's Sea Tech Campus in Dania Beach, Florida, from February 28 to March 1, 2017. The workshop brought together 37 experts in marine energy measurement, testing, and technology development to present and discuss the instrumentation and data-processing needs of the marine energy industry. The workshop was comprised of a plenary session followed by two focused breakout sessions. The half-day plenary session reviewed findings from prior instrumentation workshops, presented research activities that aim to fill previously identified gaps, and had industry experts present the state of the marine energy measurement technologies. This report provides further detail on the workshop, objectives, and findings.

  4. Physics Analysis Tools Workshop Report

    CERN Multimedia

    Assamagan, K A

    A Physics Analysis Tools (PAT) workshop was held at the University of Tokyo in Tokyo Japan on May 15-19, 2006. Unlike the previous ones, this workshop brought together the core PAT developers and ATLAS users. The workshop was attended by 69 people from various institutions: Australia 5 Canada 1 China 6 CERN 4 Europe 7 Japan 32 Taiwan 3 USA 11 The agenda consisted of a 2-day tutorial for users, a 0.5-day user feedback discussion session between users and developers, and a 2-day core PAT workshop devoted to issues in Physics Analysis Tools activities. The tutorial, attended by users and developers, covered the following grounds: Event Selection with the TAG Event Selection Using the Athena-Aware NTuple Event Display Interactive Analysis within ATHENA Distributed Analysis Monte Carlo Truth Tools Trigger-Aware Analysis Event View By many accounts, the tutorial was useful. This workshop was the first time that the ATLAS Asia-Pacific community (Taiwan, Japan, China and Australia) go...

  5. Systems Engineering 2010 Workshop | Wind | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    0 Workshop Systems Engineering 2010 Workshop The 1st NREL Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop of the system engineering model. In the middle of the model is optimization, metric tracking &M model, capital cost model, and balance of station. Systems engineering represents a holistic

  6. SPLASH'13 workshops summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, S.; Schultz, U. P.

    2013-01-01

    Following its long-standing tradition, SPLASH 2013 will host 19 high-quality workshops, allowing their participants to meet and discuss research questions with peers, to mature new and exciting ideas, and to build up communities and start new collaborations. SPLASH workshops complement the main t...

  7. 6th International Microbeam Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr Kevin M. Prise

    2004-01-01

    The extended abstracts which are submitted here present a summary of the proceedings of the 6th International Workshop/12th LH Gray Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at St. Catherine's College, University of Oxford, UK on March, 29th-31st, 2003. In 1993 the 4th LH Gray Workshop entitled ''Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response'' was held at the Gray Cancer Institute in Northwood. This was organized by Prof BD Michael, Dr M. Folkard and Dr KM Prise and brought together 40 participants interested in developing and applying new microbeam technology to problems in radiation biology (1). The workshop was an undoubted success and has spawned a series of subsequent workshops every two years. In the past, these workshops have been highly successful in bringing together groups interested in developing and applying micro-irradiation techniques to the study of cell and tissue damage by ionizing radiations. Following the first microbeam workshop, there has been a rapid growth in the number of centres developing radiobiology microbeams, or planning to do so and there are currently 15-20 worldwide. Much of the recent research using microbeams has used them to study low-dose effects and ''non-targeted'' responses such bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. The goal of the 6th workshop was to build on our knowledge of the development of microbeam approaches and the application to radiation biology in the future with the meeting stretching over a 3 day period. Over 80 participants reviewed the current state of radiobiology microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments both in the fields of physics and biology.

  8. Nuclear Innovation Workshops Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, John Howard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Allen, Todd Randall [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hildebrandt, Philip Clay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baker, Suzanne Hobbs [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Innovation Workshops were held at six locations across the United States on March 3-5, 2015. The data collected during these workshops has been analyzed and sorted to bring out consistent themes toward enhancing innovation in nuclear energy. These themes include development of a test bed and demonstration platform, improved regulatory processes, improved communications, and increased public-private partnerships. This report contains a discussion of the workshops and resulting themes. Actionable steps are suggested at the end of the report. This revision has a small amount of the data in Appendix C removed in order to avoid potential confusion.

  9. Belgian Workshop (November 2003) - Executive Summary and International Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The fourth workshop of the OECD/NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was hosted by ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Belgian Agency for Radioactive Waste Management and enriched fissile materials. The central theme of the workshop was 'Dealing with interests, values and knowledge in managing risk' within the Belgian context of local partnerships for the long term management of low-level, short-lived radioactive waste. The four-day workshop started with a half-day session in Brussels giving a general introduction on the Belgian context and the local partnership methodology. This was followed by community visits to three local partnerships, PaLoFF in Fleurus-Farciennes, MONA in Mol, and STOLA in Dessel. After the visits, the workshop continued with two full-day sessions in Brussels. One hundred and nineteen registered participants, representing 13 countries, attended the workshop or participated in the community visits. About two thirds were Belgian stakeholders; the remainder came from FSC member organisations. The participants included representatives of municipal governments, civil society organisations, government agencies, industrial companies, the media, and international organisations as well as private citizens, consultants and academics. The four-day meeting was structured as follows: Day 1 morning was devoted to introductory presentations. Information was given on the general radioactive waste management context in Belgium. Regarding the management of LLW, and in particular the search for a disposal facility site, the workshop heard about the local partnership methodology developed by university researchers of the University of Antwerp and the Fondation Universitaire Luxembourgeoise (FUL). These partnerships between the potential host municipalities and the radwaste agency have the mission to develop an integrated facility proposal adapted to local conditions. Community visits took place on Day 1 afternoon and Day 2. Visits offered an opportunity for

  10. IFPA meeting 2012 workshop report I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, W E; Carter, Anthony Michael; De Mestre, A M

    2013-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2012 there were twelve themed workshops, three of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology but collectively...

  11. Evaluation of the Career Planning Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, L.W.

    1986-04-01

    People who apply to participate in this workshop appear to be genuinely interested in personal development. Participants reported that they were not very happy with several aspects of their jobs prior to the workshop. Predominant personality characteristics of the participants were shyness, communication anxiety, reserved style, cautiousness, moodiness, energetic, hard-working and analytical minded. Participants were favorably impressed with the workshop. One of the most potent ways that the workshop impacts participants is through improved self understanding and enhanced self-esteem. Many people did change jobs following the workshop. Of those who did not actually change jobs, almost half reported that they had modified their present job to achieve a better person-job fit. Participants did not report many changes in their routine behavior although they kept the supervisor more informed of their job activity. Current job satisfaction is good among the participants. Although the workshop is fairly expensive to provide, the long range benefits in terms of enhanced levels of performance far outweigh the costs.

  12. 1998 federal technical standards workshop: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The theme for the 1998 workshop was Standards Management -- A World of Change and Opportunities. The workshop`s goal was to further the implementation of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (Public Law 104-113) through the sharing of standards management success stories, lessons learned, and emerging initiatives within the Executive Branch of the Federal Government. The target audience for this workshop included agency/department and contractor personnel and representatives of standards developing organizations that either used technical standards in their work for the Federal Government of participated in standards writing/management activities in support of the missions and programs of Federal agencies/departments. As with previous standards workshops sponsored by the DOE, views on the technical subject areas under the workshop theme were solicited from and provided by agency Standards Executives and standards program managers, voluntary standards organizations, and the private sector. This report includes vugraphs of the presentations.

  13. Proceedings of the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management waste reduction workshop 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The fourth of a series of waste minimization/reduction workshops was held at the Sheridan Grand Hotel in Tampa, Florida, on February 6--7, 1990. The workshops are held under the auspices of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. This workshop provided a forum for waste minimization/reduction planning, including waste minimization assessments. The workshops assist DOE waste-generating sites in implementing waste minimization/reduction programs, plans, and activities, thus providing for optimal waste reduction within the DOE complex. All wastes are considered within this discipline: liquid, solid, and airborne, within the categories of high-level, transuranic (TRU), low-level (LLW), hazardous, and mixed. Topics of discussion within workshops encompassed a wide range of subjects. Subjects included any method or technical activity from waste generation to disposal, such as process design or improvement, substitution of materials, waste segregation and recycling/reuse, waste treatment and processing, and administrative controls (procurement and waste awareness training). Consideration was also given to activities for remedial action and for decontamination and disposal. 1 tab

  14. ISEE-magnetopause observations - workshop results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschmann, G.

    1982-01-01

    A brief history of ISEE magnetopause workshops held during 1977-1981 is presented, and an assessment of the activity of these workshops is made. Workshop results are surveyed, with attention given to magnetopause thickness and speed, large-scale reconnection, small-scale reconnection, magnetic field topology, plasma waves, boundary layer structure, surface waves, plasma origin, and the relationship between magnetopause and particle boundaries. Finally, a few topics that require particular attention in the future are mentioned

  15. IFPA meeting 2010 workshop report I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abad, C.; Antczak, D.F.; Carvalho, J.

    2011-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting. At IFPA Meeting 2010 there were twelve themed workshops, six of which are summarized in this report. 1. The immunology workshop focused on normal and pathological functions of the maternal immune system in pregnancy. 2. The transport wor...

  16. Recent Development of Prebiotic Research—Statement from an Expert Workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio La Fata

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A dietary prebiotic is defined as ‘a substrate that is selectively utilized by host microorganisms conferring a health benefit’. Although this definition evolved concomitantly with the knowledge and technological developments that accrued in the last twenty years, what qualifies as prebiotic continues to be a matter of debate. In this statement, we report the outcome of a workshop where academic experts working in the field of prebiotic research met with scientists from industry. The workshop covered three main topics: (i evolution of the prebiotic concept/definition; (ii the gut modeling in vitro technology PolyFermS to study prebiotic effects; and (iii the potential novel microbiome-modulating effects associated with vitamins. The future of prebiotic research is very promising. Indeed, the technological developments observed in recent years provide scientists with powerful tools to investigate the complex ecosystem of gut microbiota. Combining multiple in vitro approaches with in vivo studies is key to understanding the mechanisms of action of prebiotics consumption and their potential beneficial effects on the host.

  17. 2nd International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, Dietrich

    1985-01-01

    The second workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions (DIET II) took place October 15-17, 1984, in SchloB Elmau, Bavaria. DIET II, fol­ lowing the great success of DIET I (edited by N. H. Tolk, M. M. Traum, J. C. Tully, T. E. Madey and published in Springer Ser. Chem. Phys. , Vol. 24), again brought together over 60 workers in this exciting field. The "hard co­ re of experts" was essentially the same as in DIET I but the general overlap of participants between the two meetings was small. While DIET I had the function of an exposition of the status of the field DIET II focussed more on new developments. The main emphasis was again on the microscopic under­ standing of DIET but a number of side aspects and the application of DIET ideas to other fields such as sputtering, laser-induced desorption, fractu­ re, erosion, etc. were considered, too. New mechanisms and new refined expe­ rimental techniques were proposed and discussed at the meeting critically but with great enthusiasm. In addition t...

  18. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Grand Junction site, Grand Junction, Colorado. A summary of the Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented range from millsite decontamination (Option I), to adding various depths of stabilization cover material (Options II and III), to removal of the tailings to long-term storage sites and decontamination of the present site (Options IV through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from $470,000 to $18,130,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery does not appear to be economically attractive at present

  19. Natural decay series radionuclide studies at the Needle's Eye Natural Analogue Site, II, 1989-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKenzie, A.B.; Whitton, A.M.; Shimmield, T.M.; Jemielita, R.A.; Scott, R.D.; Hooker, P.J.

    1991-12-01

    HMIP has a research programme investigating some naturally radioactive sites as geochemical analogues of radionuclide migration. The objective is to test thermodynamic databases and computer codes used for modelling radionuclide migration under environmental conditions. This report describes the study of transport and retardation processes affecting natural radionuclides, mainly uranium (U), in the vicinity of pitchblende veins in the cliff at Needle's Eye on the Solway Coast, SW Scotland. The natural decay series results from this study have been used to develop a well constrained geochemical model within which the codes can be tested. A conceptual geochemical model for the behaviour of U at the site was developed in stage I of the study; work in stage II is concerned with improving the information available on the U source term, groundwater chemistry, U aqueous phase specification, U retardation by fracture-lining minerals during fissure flow of groundwater, U-organic associations and loss of U from the site by stream drainage. (author)

  20. Complementary safety assessment assessment of nuclear facilities - Tricastin facility - AREVA; Evaluation complementaire de la surete des installations nucleaires de base - Site du Tricastin - AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This complementary safety assessment analyses the robustness of the Areva part of the Tricastin nuclear site to extreme situations such as those that led to the Fukushima accident. This study includes the following facilities: Areva NC Pierrelatte, EURODIF production, Comurhex Pierrelatte, Georges Besse II plant and Socatri. Robustness is the ability for the plant to withstand events beyond which the plant was designed. Robustness is linked to safety margins but also to the situations leading to a sudden deterioration of the accidental sequence. Moreover, safety is not only a matter of design or engineered systems but also a matter of organizing: task organization (including subcontracting) as well as the setting of emergency plans or the inventory of nuclear materials are taken into consideration in this assessment. This report is divided into 10 main chapters: 1) the feedback experience of the Fukushima accident; 2) description of the site and its surroundings; 3) featuring of the site's activities and installations; 4) accidental sequences; 5) protection from earthquakes; 6) protection from floods; 7) protection from other extreme natural disasters; 8) the loss of electrical power and of the heat sink; 9) the management of severe accidents; and 10) subcontracting policy. This analysis has identified 5 main measures to be taken to limit the risks linked to natural disasters: -) continuing the program for replacing the current conversion plant and the enrichment plant; -) renewing the storage of hydrofluoric acid at the de-fluorination workshop; -) assessing the seismic behaviour of some parts of the de-fluorination workshop and of the fluorine fabrication workshop; -) improving the availability of warning and information means in case of emergency; and -) improving the means to mitigate accidental gaseous releases. (A.C.)

  1. Summary and report on four national environmental workshops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    House, Peter W.

    1980-07-01

    Individual abstracts were prepared for the summaries of four workshops held during the last two years: (1) Integrated Assessment for Energy Related Environmental Standards Workshop - Berkeley, California, November 1978; (2) National Ecological Assessment Workshop - Savannah, Georgia, January 1979; (3) National/Regional Modelling Workshop - Reston, Virginia, May 1979; (4) Groundwater Workshop - Albuquerque, New Mexico, January 1980. (JGB)

  2. Workshop of medical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This event was held in San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentine Republic from 14 th. through 18 th. November, 1988. A great part of the physicians in the area of medical physics participated in this workshop. This volume includes the papers presented at this Workshop of Medical Physics [es

  3. Workshops on Writing Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-30

    Sep 30, 2017 ... hands-on practice, feedback, mentoring and highly interactive sessions. The focus will be on work done as individuals and in teams. Maximum number of participants for the workshop is limited. The workshop is compulso- rily residential. Boarding and lodging free for selected candidates. Re-imbursement ...

  4. Randomized Multi-site Trial of the Job Seekers’ Workshop in Patients with Substance Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svikis, Dace S.; Keyser-Marcus, Lori; Stitzer, Maxine; Rieckmann, Traci; Safford, Lauretta; Loeb, Peter; Allen, Tim; Luna-Anderson, Carol; Back, Sudie E.; Cohen, Judith; DeBernardi, Michael A.; Dillard, Bruce; Forcehimes, Alyssa; Jaffee, William; Killeen, Therese; Kolodner, Ken; Levy, Michael; Pallas, Diane; Perl, Harold I.; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Provost, Scott; Reese, Karen; Sampson, Royce R.; Sepulveda, Allison; Snead, Ned; Wong, Conrad J.; Zweben, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Background Unemployment is associated with negative outcomes both during and after drug abuse treatment. Interventions designed to increase rates of employment may also improve drug abuse treatment outcomes. The purpose of this multi-site clinical trial was to evaluate the Job Seekers’ Workshop (JSW), a three session, manualized program designed to train patients in the skills needed to find and secure a job. Method Study participants were recruited through the NIDA Clinical Trials Network (CTN) from six psychosocial counseling (n=327) and five methadone maintenance (n=301) drug treatment programs. Participants were randomly assigned to either standard care (program-specific services plus brochure with local employment resources) (SC) or standard care plus JSW. Three 4-hr small group JSW sessions were offered weekly by trained JSW facilitators with ongoing fidelity monitoring. Results JSW and SC participants had similar 12- and 24-week results for the primary outcome measure (i.e., obtaining a new taxed job or enrollment in a training program), Specifically, one-fifth of participants at 12 weeks (20.1 – 24.3%) and nearly one-third at 24 weeks (31.4–31.9%) had positive outcomes, with “obtaining a new taxed job” accounting for the majority of cases. Conclusion JSW group participants did not have higher rates of employment/training than SC controls. Rates of job acquisition were modest for both groups, suggesting more intensive interventions may be needed. Alternate targets (e.g., enhancing patient motivation, training in job-specific skills) warrant further study as well. PMID:21802222

  5. Review of the SLAC and Les Houches workshops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1994-12-01

    Polarized Electron Source workshops have been held at varying intervals, beginning in 1983 when Charles Sinclair convened the first at SLAC. Since that time, three workshops were held in conjunction with the International Spin Symposia and two at other occasions. The increasing importance of polarized electron beams at accelerators has stimulated interest in these workshops. Two workshops have been held since the last International Spin Symposium in Nagoya. In 1993, a workshop was held at SLAC, and in 1994 at Les Houches, a polarized electron beam session was held as part of a polarized beam and targets workshop. This report summarizes highlights from the latter two workshops

  6. Perovskite phases in the systems Asup(II)O-Usup(VI)O/sub 3/. 2. On the system A/sub 2/sup(II)Bsup(II)Usup(VI)O/sub 6/, with Asup(II), Bsup(II) = Ba, Sr, Ca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, A J; Kemmler-Sack, S [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie 2

    1980-07-01

    Studies on the system A/sub 2/sup(II)Bsup(II)Usup(VI)O/sub 6/ with Asup(II), Bsup(II) = Ba, Sr, Ca or combinations of these have shown that the alkaline earth ions cannot substitute each other in all proportions. The perovskites were studied by X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopic methods. The lattice vibration region of the far infrared spectra proved to be of particular value in providing information on the occupancy of the A and B sites. Analysis of the spectra shows that, in the majority of cases, contary to the geometrical predictions some of the larger alkaline earth ions occupy the six-coordinated B sites and some smaller ions the A positions. The number of ions that take in this A reversible B site-exchange can amount to 20%, but is normally smaller.

  7. Geosciences Information for Teachers (GIFT) Workshops held in Conjunction with Alexander von Humboldt (AvH) EGU Conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laj, Carlo; Cifelli, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    The Alexander von Humboldt Conference Series of the European Geosciences Union are a series of meetings held outside of Europe, in particular in South America, Africa or Asia, on selected topics of geosciences with a socio-economic impact for regions on these continents, jointly organised with the scientists and their institutes and the institutions of these regions. Given the increasing success of the GIFT workshops held in conjunction with the General Assemblies, since 2010 EGU has also developed a series of GIFT workshops held in conjunction with AvH conferences. Associated GIFT workshops were held in Merida, Yucatan, on the theme of Climate Change, Natural Hazards and Societies (March 2010), then in Penang, Malaysia (June 2011) on the theme of Ocean Acidification, in November 2012 in Cusco (Peru) on the theme of Natural Disasters, Global Change and the Preservation of World Heritage Sites, finally in Istanbul (March 2014) on "High Impact Natural Hazards Related to the Euro-Mediterranean Region. The next GIFT workshop is already planned for October 2015 in Adis Ababa (Ethiopia) on the theme "Water". In each case, the GIFT workshop was held on the last two days of the AvH conference and reunited 40-45 teachers from the nation where the AvH was held. Keynote speakers from AvH were speakers to the GIFT workshops which also included hands-on activities animated by sciences educators. These GIFT workshops represented the first workshops specifically aimed at teachers held in the country, and therefore represents a significant Earth Sciences contribution to secondary education in non European countries.

  8. REPORT ON FIRST INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON ROBOTIC SURGERY IN THORACIC ONCOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Veronesi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A workshop of experts from France, Germany, Italy and the United States took place at Humanitas Research Hospital Milan, Italy, on 10-11 February 2016, to examine techniques for and applications of robotic surgery to thoracic oncology. The main topics of presentation and discussion were: robotic surgery for lung resection; robot-assisted thymectomy; minimally invasive surgery for esophageal cancer; new developments in computer-assisted surgery and medical applications of robots; the challenge of costs; and future clinical research in robotic thoracic surgery. The following article summarizes the main contributions to the workshop. The Workshop consensus was that, since video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS is becoming the mainstream approach to resectable lung cancer in North America and Europe, robotic surgery for thoracic oncology is likely to be embraced by an increasing numbers of thoracic surgeons, since it has technical advantages over VATS, including intuitive movements, tremor filtration, more degrees of manipulative freedom, motion scaling, and high definition stereoscopic vision. These advantages may make robotic surgery more accessible than VATS to trainees and experienced surgeons, and also lead to expanded indications. However the high costs of robotic surgery and absence of tactile feedback remain obstacles to widespread dissemination. A prospective multicentric randomized trial (NCT02804893 to compare robotic and VATS approaches to stage I and II lung cancer will start shortly.

  9. Report on First International Workshop on Robotic Surgery in Thoracic Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Giulia; Cerfolio, Robert; Cingolani, Roberto; Rueckert, Jens C; Soler, Luc; Toker, Alper; Cariboni, Umberto; Bottoni, Edoardo; Fumagalli, Uberto; Melfi, Franca; Milli, Carlo; Novellis, Pierluigi; Voulaz, Emanuele; Alloisio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A workshop of experts from France, Germany, Italy, and the United States took place at Humanitas Research Hospital Milan, Italy, on February 10 and 11, 2016, to examine techniques for and applications of robotic surgery to thoracic oncology. The main topics of presentation and discussion were robotic surgery for lung resection; robot-assisted thymectomy; minimally invasive surgery for esophageal cancer; new developments in computer-assisted surgery and medical applications of robots; the challenge of costs; and future clinical research in robotic thoracic surgery. The following article summarizes the main contributions to the workshop. The Workshop consensus was that since video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is becoming the mainstream approach to resectable lung cancer in North America and Europe, robotic surgery for thoracic oncology is likely to be embraced by an increasing numbers of thoracic surgeons, since it has technical advantages over VATS, including intuitive movements, tremor filtration, more degrees of manipulative freedom, motion scaling, and high-definition stereoscopic vision. These advantages may make robotic surgery more accessible than VATS to trainees and experienced surgeons and also lead to expanded indications. However, the high costs of robotic surgery and absence of tactile feedback remain obstacles to widespread dissemination. A prospective multicentric randomized trial (NCT02804893) to compare robotic and VATS approaches to stages I and II lung cancer will start shortly.

  10. WALLTURB International Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Javier; Marusic, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    This book brings together selected contributions from the WALLTURB workshop on ”Understanding and modelling of wall turbulence” held in Lille, France, on April 21st to 23rd 2009. This workshop was organized by the WALLTURB consortium, in order to present to the relevant scientific community the main results of the project and to stimulate scientific discussions around the subject of wall turbulence. The workshop reviewed the recent progress in theoretical, experimental and numerical approaches to wall turbulence. The problems of zero pressure gradient, adverse pressure gradient and separating turbulent boundary layers were addressed in detail with the three approaches, using the most advanced tools. This book is a milestone in the research field, thanks to the high level of the invited speakers and the involvement of the contributors and a testimony of the achievement of the WALLTURB project.

  11. Boiling water reactor simulator. Workshop material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and workshop material and sponsors workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development; and the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 21 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2002). Course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor (PWR) simulator developed by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated, Canada, is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No. 22 'Pressurized Water Reactor Simulator' (2003). This report consists of course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor (BWR) simulator. Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated, developed the simulator and prepared this report for the IAEA

  12. Warehouse Sanitation Workshop Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food and Drug Administration (DHHS/PHS), Washington, DC.

    This workshop handbook contains information and reference materials on proper food warehouse sanitation. The materials have been used at Food and Drug Administration (FDA) food warehouse sanitation workshops, and are selected by the FDA for use by food warehouse operators and for training warehouse sanitation employees. The handbook is divided…

  13. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Monument Valley site, Monument Valley, Arizona. A summary of the Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at the Monument Valley millsite in Arizona. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals residing nearby, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the tailings on the site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The sparse population and relatively low radiation levels yield minimal immediate environmental impact; hence, the two alternative actions presented are directed towards restricting access to the site (Options I and II), and returning the windblown tailings to the pile and stabilizing the pile with 2 ft of cover material (Option II). Both options include remedial action costs for offsite locations where tailings have been placed. Cost estimates for the two options are $585,000 and $1,165,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium is not economically feasible

  14. Phase II, Title I engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Green River Site, Green River, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    An engineering assessment was performed of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at the Green River site, Utah. Services included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations , the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 123 thousand tons of tailings at the Green River site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The three alternative actions presented are dike stabilization, fencing, on- and off-site decontamination and maintenance (Option I); improvements in the stabilization cover and diking plus cleanup of the site and Browns Wash, and realignment of Browns Wash (Option II); and addition of stabilization cover to a total of 2 ft, realignment of Browns Wash and placement of additional riprap, on-site cleanup and drainage improvements (Option III). All options include remedial action at off-site structures. Cost estimates for the three options range from $700,000 to $926,000

  15. Creating Virtual Fieldwork Experiences of Geoheritage Sites as Educator Professional Development (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan-Haas, D.

    2013-12-01

    Geoheritage sites are identified as such because they include excellent examples of geologic features or processes, or they have played an important role in the development of geologic understandings. These characteristics also make them excellent sites for teaching in the field, for teaching educators about the nature of fieldwork, and for making Virtual Fieldwork Experiences (VFEs, multimedia representations of field sites). Through the NSF-funded Regional and Local Earth (ReaL) Earth Inquiry Project, we have engaged educators in these practices. The nature of geoheritage sites is anomalous -- if this were not the case, the sites would not gain recognition. Anomalous features or processes can be powerful learning tools when placed into comparison with the more mundane, and the Earth system science of sites local to schools is likely to be mundane. By comparing the mundane and the extraordinary, it is hoped we can learn more about both. The professional development (PD) in ReaL Earth Inquiry begins with a face-to-face workshop within the teachers' region at a site that is interesting from an Earth system science perspective. Though we recognize and emphasize that all sites are interesting from an ESS perspective if you know how to look, the sites typically have features worthy of geoheritage designation. PD does not end with the end of the workshop but continues with online study groups where teachers work together to complete the workshop site VFE, and transition to work on VFEs of sites local to their schools. Throughout the program, participants engage in: - mentored fieldwork that pays attention to the skills and knowledge needed to lead fieldwork; - instruction in and use of a wide range of technologies for making VFEs; - study of a coherent conceptual framework connected to the project's driving question: Why does this place look the way it does? - and, use of resources for supporting all of the above The resources include templates for making VFEs and a

  16. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Lakeview Site, Lakeview, Oregon. Summary of Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Results are reported from an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at the Lakeview, Oregon site. Data ore included from the analyses of soil, water, and other samples; radiometric measurements to determine areas with radium-contaminated materials; evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations; investigation of site geology, hydrology, and meteorology; and evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 130,000 tons of tailings at the Lakeview site constitutes the main environmental impact, which is minimal. The two alternative actions presented are maintenance of the site now that the ARCO reclamation program has been completed (Option I); and addition of stabilization cover to a minimum depth of 2 ft, improved fencing, and removal of a few isolated spots of contamination (Option II). The cost estimates for these options are $40,000 and $290,000, respectively

  17. Proceedings of the Department of Energy Defense Programs hazardous and mixed waste minimization workshop: Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    The first workshop on hazardous and mixed waste minimization was held in Las Vegas, Nevada, on July 26--28, 1988. The objective of this workshop was to establish an interchange between DOE headquarters (DOE-HQ) DP, Operations Offices, and contractors of waste minimization strategies and successes. The first day of the workshop began with presentations stressing the importance of establishing a waste minimization program at each site as required by RCRA, the land ban restrictions, and the decrease in potential liabilities associated with waste disposal. Discussions were also centered on pending legislation which would create an Office of Waste Reduction in the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The Waste Minimization and Avoidance Study was initiated by DOE as an addition to the long-term productivity study to address the issues of evolving requirements facing RCRA waste management activities at the DP sites, to determine how major operations will be affected by these requirements, and to determine the available strategies and options for waste minimization and avoidance. Waste minimization was defined in this study as source reduction and recycling

  18. Academic excellence workshops in chemistry and physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Susan Rose

    In the mid-1970's, Uri Treisman, at the University of California, Berkeley, developed an academic excellence workshop program that had important successes in increasing minority student achievement and persistence in calculus. The present dissertation research is an in-depth study of chemistry and physics workshops at the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. Data for the first, longitudinal component of this study were obtained by tracking to Spring 1998 all workshop minority students, i.e., Latino, African American, and Native American workshop students, a random sample of non-workshop minority students, and a random sample of non-targeted students, i.e., Anglo and Asian students, enrolled in first-quarter General Chemistry or Physics during specific quarters of 1992 or 1993. Data for the second component were obtained by administering questionnaires, conducting interviews, and observing science students during Fall, 1996. Workshop participation was a significant predictor of first-quarter course grade for minority students in both chemistry and physics, while verbal and mathematics Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores were not significant predictors of beginning course grade for minority science students. The lack of predictive ability of the SAT and the importance of workshop participation in minority students' beginning science course performance are results with important implications for educators and students. In comparing pre-college achievement measures for workshop and non-targeted students, non-targeted students' mathematics SAT scores were significantly higher than chemistry and physics workshop students' scores. Nonetheless, workshop participation "leveled the field" as workshop and non-targeted students performed similarly in beginning science courses. Positive impacts of workshop participation on achievement, persistence, efficiency, social integration, and self-confidence support the continued and expanded funding of workshop programs

  19. Proceedings of the remedial investigation/feasibility study workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The objective of this workshop was to familiarize Department of Energy (DOE) personnel and contractors with all aspects of developing, managing, and conducting an RI/FS, based on HAZWRAP SCO experience in similar activities as part of the Installation Restoration program (IRP). The HAZWRAP SCO participation in Department of Defense (DOD) restoration activities provides an opportunity to develop capability and experience which are transferable to DOE activities. Paul Franco, Program Manager for the IRP, provided an overview of the IRP experience in conducting an RI/FS for a National Priorities List (NPL) site and a non-NPL site. A non-NPL site does not require an RI/FS by regulation; however, the RI/FS process can be used to determine whether to proceed with a feasibility study or terminate the action with a decision document. Al Porell, Program Manager for ICP, discussed the use of decision documents to remove non-NPL sites from regulatory consideration. DOE-Idaho has used similar documentation to remove numerous sites from their list of potential remedial action sites. Mr. Porell also discussed the use of the Technical Review Committee (TRC), which is established to coordinate activities during the RI/FS process. The TRC includes state, local, and federal authorities, and Air Force installation personnel

  20. Iterative Prototyping of Strategy Implementation Workshop Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kryger, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a strategy implementation workshop design can be developed and tested while minimizing the time spent on developing the design. Design/methodology/approach: This multiple case study at a diesel engine company shows how iterative prototyping...... can be used to structure the design process of a strategy implementation workshop. Findings: Strategy implementation workshop design can be developed in resource-constrained environments through iterative prototyping of the workshop design. Each workshop iteration can generate value in its own right...... draw on his/her experience as well as add to his/her knowledge base. Originality/value: Introducing iterative prototyping in an organizational context can facilitate fast yet structured development of a rigorous workshop design. Strategy consultants are provided with empirical examples of how...

  1. Li'l Red Schoolhouse workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Education specialists at Stennis conduct staff development workshops for elementary and secondary teachers of math, science and technology and other subjects as well as specialized workshops conducted in the NASA Li'l Red Schoolhouse.

  2. DESY: QCD workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingelman, Gunnar

    1994-01-01

    The traditional annual DESY Theory Workshop highlights a topical theory sector. The most recent was under the motto 'Quantum Chromo-Dynamics' - QCD, the field theory of quarks and gluons. The organizers had arranged a programme covering most aspects of current QCD research. This time the workshop was followed by a topical meeting on 'QCD at HERA' to look at the electron-proton scattering experiments now in operation at DESY's new HERA collider

  3. Physics and Astronomy New Faculty Workshops: 20 Years of Workshops and 2000 Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilborn, Robert

    Most college and university new faculty members start their teaching careers with almost no formal training in pedagogy. To address this issue, the American Association of Physics Teachers, the American Astronomical Society, and the American Physical Society have been offering since 1996 workshops for physics and astronomy new faculty members (and in recent years for experienced faculty members as well). The workshops introduce faculty members to a variety of interactive engagement teaching (IET) methods and the evidence for their effectiveness, embedded in a framework of general professional development. Currently the workshops engage about 50% of the new tenure-track hires in physics and astronomy. The workshops are quite successful in making the participants aware of IET methods and motivating them to implement them in their classes. However, about 1/3 of the participants stop using IET methods within a year or two. The faculty members cite (a) lack of time and energy to change, (b) content coverage concerns, and (c) difficulty getting students engaged as reasons for their discontinuance. To help overcome these barriers, we have introduced faculty online learning communities (FOLCs). The FOLCs provide peer support and advice through webinars and coaching from more experienced faculty members. Recommendations based on the workshops and the experiences of the participants can enhance the teaching effectiveness of future physics and astronomy faculty members. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant 1431638.

  4. A Model for Local Experiential Learning: Teacher Workshop on Mangroves, Oceans & Climate in Kosrae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, A. E.; Sachs, J. P.; Barros, C.; Low, M.

    2016-02-01

    A curriculum for an intensive one-day workshop about mangroves, oceans, and climate has been developed for school teachers in the Federated States of Micronesia. The goals of the workshop are for teachers/attendees to be able to (i) explain what salinity is and describe how it varies from the ocean to the river, (ii) explain what a mangrove is and describe adaptations mangroves have developed that allow them to live in saline or brackish water and adjust to changing sea level, and (iii) develop a grade-appropriate poster on mangroves or salinity and one interactive activity that uses the poster to engage students in learning. These objectives are accomplished by field trips to the ocean and mangrove swamp, where each participant learns how to measure salinity and identify mangrove species. The hands-on field component is followed by a poster development session where participants design, present, and share feedback on their posters that they will bring back to their classrooms. This experience allows schoolteachers to intimately explore their coastal ecosystems and gain new perspectives about their environment that they can take back to their students. The workshop was designed through a collaborative effort between Pacific Resources for Education and Learning (PREL) NSF Pacific Climate Education Partnership, University of Washington professors, graduate students and undergraduate students, Kosrae Department of Education, Kosrae Island Resource Management Authority (KIRMA), Kosrae Island Conservation and Safety Organization (KCSO), and local Kosraean schoolteachers and administrators. The workshop was offered to elementary school teachers from 4 of 5 school districts in 2013, 2014, and 2015, led by University of Washington scientists and PREL. Local education officials and PREL staff will lead future workshops.

  5. 75 FR 28051 - Public Workshop: Pieces of Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Office of the Secretary Public Workshop: Pieces of Privacy AGENCY: Privacy Office, DHS. ACTION: Notice announcing public workshop. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security Privacy Office will host a public workshop, ``Pieces of Privacy.'' DATES: The workshop will be...

  6. Organohalogen pollutants in surface particulates from workshop floors of four major e-waste recycling sites in China and implications for emission lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan-Hong; Tang, Bin; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Zheng, Xiao-Bo; Peng, Ping-An; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2016-11-01

    To examine the environmental pollution associated with e-waste recycling activities, the concentrations of organohologenated pollutants (OHPs), i.e., short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs and MCCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and several other halogenated flame retardants (OHFRs), were investigated in surface particulates from the workshop floors of four major e-waste recycling sites (Taizhou, Guiyu, Dali and Qingyuan) in China. The mean levels of SCCPs, MCCPs, PCBs, PBDEs and OHFRs in surface particulates ranged from 30,000-61,000, 170,000-890,000, 2700-27,000, 52,000-240,000, and 62,000-140,000ng/g dry weight (dw), respectively. OHFRs, including decabromodiphenyl ethane, dechlorane plus, 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane, tetrabromobisphenol A, hexabromocyclododecanes, polybrominated biphenyls, hexabromobenzene, pentabromotoluene, and pentabromoethylbenzene, were frequently (>50% detection frequency) detected in surface particulates with mean concentration ranges of 39,000-63,000, 310-2700, 98-16,000, 21,000-56,000, 55-5700, 1700-27,000, 42-1600, 3.2-220, and 5.8-12ng/g dw, respectively. The composition of OHPs varied depend on the e-waste items processing in different regions. Guiyu and Dali were typical sites contaminated by halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) and CPs, respectively, while Qingyuan, and Taizhou were representative PCB-polluted regions. The evidence produced by this preliminary study indicated that electronic devices and plastics may account for the high content of HFRs and the metal products are likely the major source of CPs in these e-waste sites. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. ATLAS TRT 2002 Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Capeans, M.

    Starting on 17th May, the ATLAS TRT 2002 Workshop was organised by Ken MacFarlane and his team at Hampton University, Virginia, USA. During a welcome break in the very dense workshop programme, the group enjoyed a half-day long boat trip along the waterways, offering a first-hand look at the history and heritage of this part of America. The attendance during the six-day workshop was about 50 people representing most of the collaborating institutes, although many Russian colleagues had stayed in their institutes to pursue the start-up of end-cap wheel production at PNPI and DUBNA. The meeting clearly showed that, during the year 2002, the TRT community is focusing on final design issues and module/wheel construction, while moving at the same time towards acceptance testing and integration, including the front-end electronics. The two main topics treated at the workshop were the preparation for beginning full production of the FE electronics, and the wire-joint problem that the US barrel colleagues have been fa...

  8. Glutamate Ligation in the Ni(II)- and Co(II)-Responsive Escherichia coli Transcriptional Regulator, RcnR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Carolyn E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, United States; Musiani, Francesco [Laboratory; Huang, Hsin-Ting [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, United States; Chivers, Peter T. [Departments of Biosciences and Chemistry, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE, United Kingdom; Ciurli, Stefano [Laboratory; Maroney, Michael J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, United States

    2017-05-18

    Escherichia coli RcnR (resistance to cobalt and nickel regulator, EcRcnR) is a metal-responsive repressor of the genes encoding the Ni(II) and Co(II) exporter proteins RcnAB by binding to PRcnAB. The DNA binding affinity is weakened when the cognate ions Ni(II) and Co(II) bind to EcRcnR in a six-coordinate site that features a (N/O)5S ligand donor-atom set in distinct sites: while both metal ions are bound by the N terminus, Cys35, and His64, Co(II) is additionally bound by His3. On the other hand, the noncognate Zn(II) and Cu(I) ions feature a lower coordination number, have a solvent-accessible binding site, and coordinate protein ligands that do not include the N-terminal amine. A molecular model of apo-EcRcnR suggested potential roles for Glu34 and Glu63 in binding Ni(II) and Co(II) to EcRcnR. The roles of Glu34 and Glu63 in metal binding, metal selectivity, and function were therefore investigated using a structure/function approach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to assess the structural changes in the Ni(II), Co(II), and Zn(II) binding sites of Glu → Ala and Glu → Cys variants at both positions. The effect of these structural alterations on the regulation of PrcnA by EcRcnR in response to metal binding was explored using LacZ reporter assays. These combined studies indicate that while Glu63 is a ligand for both metal ions, Glu34 is a ligand for Co(II) but possibly not for Ni(II). The Glu34 variants affect the structure of the cognate metal sites, but they have no effect on the transcriptional response. In contrast, the Glu63 variants affect both the structure and transcriptional response, although they do not completely abolish the function of EcRcnR. The structure of the Zn(II) site is not significantly perturbed by any of the glutamic acid variations. The spectroscopic and functional data obtained on the mutants were used to calculate models of the metal-site structures of EcRcnR bound to Ni(II), Co(II), and Zn(II). The results are interpreted

  9. Measurement Control Workshop Instructional Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, Philip; Crawford, Cary; McGinnis, Brent

    2014-01-01

    A workshop to teach the essential elements of an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) programs are outlined, along with the modes of Instruction, and the roles and responsibilities of participants in the workshop.

  10. Measurement control workshop instructional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Philip [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Crawford, Cary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McGinnis, Brent [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Insolves LLC, Piketon, OH (United States)

    2014-04-01

    A workshop to teach the essential elements of an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) programs are outlined, along with the modes of Instruction, and the roles and responsibilities of participants in the workshop.

  11. BrainMap '95 workshop. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The fourth annual BrainMap workshop was held at La Mansion del Rio Hotel in San Antonio December 3--4, 1995. The conference title was ''Human Brain Mapping and Modeling.'' The meeting was attended by 137 registered participants and 30 observers from 82 institutions representing 12 countries. The meeting focused on the technical issues associated with brain mapping and modeling. A total of 23 papers were presented covering the following topics: spatial normalization and registration; functional image analysis; metanalysis and modeling; and new horizons in biological databases. The full program with abstracts was available on the Research Imaging Center's web site. A book will be published by John Wiley and Sons prior to the end of 1998

  12. WORKSHOP REPORT - CONSIDERATIONS FOR DEVELOPING LEACHING TEST METHODS FOR SEMI- AND NON-VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report provides a summary of the information exchange at a workshop on the potential for release of semi- or non-volatile organic constituents at contaminated sites where sub-surface treatment has been used to control migration, and from waste that is disposed or re-used. The...

  13. 75 FR 11186 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of Workshop on Natural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... part of its strategic planning process, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... workshop is to inform the NCCAM's third strategic plan by identifying particularly promising areas with the... strategic plans, located on the NCCAM Web site at http://nccam.nih.gov/about/plans . Participating: The...

  14. Indonesian students' participation in an interprofessional learning workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernawati, Desak Ketut; Lee, Ya Ping; Hughes, Jeffery

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional learning activities, such as workshops allow students to learn from, with and about each other. This study assessed the impact on Indonesian health students' attitudes towards interprofessional education (IPE) from participating in a workshop on medication safety. The students attended a two-day IPE workshop on medication safety. Thirty-five (48.6%) students completed pre-/post-workshop surveys using a modified Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) survey. The post-workshop survey also had a series of open-ended questions. Students' responses to each RIPLS statement pre-/post-workshop were compared, whilst their responses to open-ended questions in post-workshop survey were thematically analysed. Students reported positive attitudinal changes on statements of shared learning and teamwork sub-scale (Wilcoxon p value importance of teamwork and communication skills. This study found that learning with other health students through an IPE workshop improved medical, nursing and pharmacy students' attitudes towards the importance of shared learning, teamwork and communication in healthcare service.

  15. Raven-II: an open platform for surgical robotics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaford, Blake; Rosen, Jacob; Friedman, Diana W; King, Hawkeye; Roan, Phillip; Cheng, Lei; Glozman, Daniel; Ma, Ji; Kosari, Sina Nia; White, Lee

    2013-04-01

    The Raven-II is a platform for collaborative research on advances in surgical robotics. Seven universities have begun research using this platform. The Raven-II system has two 3-DOF spherical positioning mechanisms capable of attaching interchangeable four DOF instruments. The Raven-II software is based on open standards such as Linux and ROS to maximally facilitate software development. The mechanism is robust enough for repeated experiments and animal surgery experiments, but is not engineered to sufficient safety standards for human use. Mechanisms in place for interaction among the user community and dissemination of results include an electronic forum, an online software SVN repository, and meetings and workshops at major robotics conferences.

  16. TPC workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) concept is now nearly ten years old and, as is evident in this workshop, is still evolving in many directions. From the liquid xenon TPC for double beta decay studies to the impressively large second generation TPC for the LEP experiment ALEPH, the surprising diversity of current applications is apparent. This workshop, the first to concentrate solely on the TPC has provided a most congenial and rewarding occasion for all TPC enthusiasts to share experience, results, and ideas

  17. t4 Workshop Report*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleensang, Andre; Maertens, Alexandra; Rosenberg, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne; Lamb, Justin; Auerbach, Scott; Brennan, Richard; Crofton, Kevin M.; Gordon, Ben; Fornace, Albert J.; Gaido, Kevin; Gerhold, David; Haw, Robin; Henney, Adriano; Ma’ayan, Avi; McBride, Mary; Monti, Stefano; Ochs, Michael F.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Sharan, Roded; Stierum, Rob; Tugendreich, Stuart; Willett, Catherine; Wittwehr, Clemens; Xia, Jianguo; Patton, Geoffrey W.; Arvidson, Kirk; Bouhifd, Mounir; Hogberg, Helena T.; Luechtefeld, Thomas; Smirnova, Lena; Zhao, Liang; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Kanehisa, Minoru; Carmichael, Paul; Andersen, Melvin E.; Hartung, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite wide-spread consensus on the need to transform toxicology and risk assessment in order to keep pace with technological and computational changes that have revolutionized the life sciences, there remains much work to be done to achieve the vision of toxicology based on a mechanistic foundation. A workshop was organized to explore one key aspect of this transformation – the development of Pathways of Toxicity (PoT) as a key tool for hazard identification based on systems biology. Several issues were discussed in depth in the workshop: The first was the challenge of formally defining the concept of a PoT as distinct from, but complementary to, other toxicological pathway concepts such as mode of action (MoA). The workshop came up with a preliminary definition of PoT as “A molecular definition of cellular processes shown to mediate adverse outcomes of toxicants”. It is further recognized that normal physiological pathways exist that maintain homeostasis and these, sufficiently perturbed, can become PoT. Second, the workshop sought to define the adequate public and commercial resources for PoT information, including data, visualization, analyses, tools, and use-cases, as well as the kinds of efforts that will be necessary to enable the creation of such a resource. Third, the workshop explored ways in which systems biology approaches could inform pathway annotation, and which resources are needed and available that can provide relevant PoT information to the diverse user communities. PMID:24127042

  18. The Rustler Formation at the WIPP [Waste Isolations Pilot Plant] site: Report of a workshop on the geology and hydrology of the Rustler Formation as it relates to the WIPP Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, L.

    1987-02-01

    This workshop contained eight papers characterizing the Rustler Formation at the WIPP site in New Mexico. Four of these reports were processed separately for the data bases. Information contained in the four remaining papers is available in journal articles or in the reports of other conferences and included discussions of ground water flow through the Rustler Formation, the potential migration of leached radionuclides in this rock, the effects of mineral dissolution on the removal of underlying salt deposits, and a possible pathway for radionuclide migration into the biosphere

  19. Report of the 13th IEA workshop on radiation effects in ceramic insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    The 13th IEA Workshop on Radiation Effects in Ceramic Insulators, based on Annex II: Experimentation on Radiation Damage in Fusion Materials, to the IEA Implementing Agreement for a Programme of Research and Development on Radiation Damage in Fusion Materials, was held on the 9th, December, 2003, at Kyoto International Conference Center, in Kyoto, Japan, in conjunction with the 11th International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-11). 44 participants from 10 countries (26 from Japan, 5 from Spain, 3 from Belgium, 3 from USA, 2 from RF, each 1 from Austria, Greece, Italy, Romania, and UK) gathered together and discussed following issues extensively, with the newest experimental results, after the welcome remarks by one of the organizer and chairpersons, Dr. E.R. Hodgson of CIEMAT. Effects of electric field on radiation induced microstructural evolution, parasitic electrical current and voltage induced in cables and wires by radiation effects, optical materials, IFMIF related issues and fundamental aspects were discussed. Significant results such as an observation of γ-alumina and aluminum colloid formation for the Radiation Induced Electrical Degradation mechanism are obtained. This report is workshop summary, abstracts and documents of the 13th IEA Workshop on Radiation Effects in Ceramic Insulators. (author)

  20. Workshop proceedings: "We are the Olifants" - Key stakeholder workshop for the Upper Olifants River study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Funke, Nicola S

    2013-03-31

    Full Text Available Project Leader, Natural Resources and the Environment Council for Scientific and Industrial Research March 2013 Workshop Proceedings Page v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Upper Olifants Key Stakeholder Workshop took place at the CSIR Knowledge...

  1. Proceedings of the Inheritance Workshop at ECOOP 2002

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    The Inheritance Workshop at ECOOP 2002, which took place on Tuesday, 11 June, was the first ECOOP workshop focusing on inheritance after the successful workshops in 1991 and 1992. The workshop was intended as a forum for designers and implementers of object-oriented languages, and for software de...

  2. Sheltered Workshops and Transition: Old Bottles, New Wine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombe, Edmund

    This paper provides a historical overview of sheltered workshops and presents information about service innovations and mission expansion. The first workshop in the United States was the Perkins Institute, opened in 1837 for individuals with visual handicaps. This workshop was typical of "categorical" workshops that were established during this…

  3. Phase II, Title I engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Falls City Site, Falls City, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    An engineering assessment was performed of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Falls City, Texas. Services included taking soil samples, the performance of radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 2.5 million tons of tailings at the Falls City site constitutes the most significant environmental impact. Windblown tailings, external gamma radiation and localized contamination of surface waters are other environmental effects. The two alternative remedial action options presented include on-site and off-site cleanup, fencing, and hydrological monitoring, and in addition, stabilization of pile 2 with 2 ft of cover material. The costs are $1.84 million for Option I and $2.45 million for Option II

  4. Organohalogen pollutants in surface particulates from workshop floors of four major e-waste recycling sites in China and implications for emission lists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yan-Hong [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Tang, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Luo, Xiao-Jun [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zheng, Xiao-Bo [College of Natural Resources and Environment, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Peng, Ping-An [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Mai, Bi-Xian, E-mail: nancymai@gig.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2016-11-01

    To examine the environmental pollution associated with e-waste recycling activities, the concentrations of organohologenated pollutants (OHPs), i.e., short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs and MCCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and several other halogenated flame retardants (OHFRs), were investigated in surface particulates from the workshop floors of four major e-waste recycling sites (Taizhou, Guiyu, Dali and Qingyuan) in China. The mean levels of SCCPs, MCCPs, PCBs, PBDEs and OHFRs in surface particulates ranged from 30,000–61,000, 170,000–890,000, 2700–27,000, 52,000–240,000, and 62,000–140,000 ng/g dry weight (dw), respectively. OHFRs, including decabromodiphenyl ethane, dechlorane plus, 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane, tetrabromobisphenol A, hexabromocyclododecanes, polybrominated biphenyls, hexabromobenzene, pentabromotoluene, and pentabromoethylbenzene, were frequently (> 50% detection frequency) detected in surface particulates with mean concentration ranges of 39,000–63,000, 310–2700, 98–16,000, 21,000–56,000, 55–5700, 1700–27,000, 42–1600, 3.2–220, and 5.8–12 ng/g dw, respectively. The composition of OHPs varied depend on the e-waste items processing in different regions. Guiyu and Dali were typical sites contaminated by halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) and CPs, respectively, while Qingyuan, and Taizhou were representative PCB-polluted regions. The evidence produced by this preliminary study indicated that electronic devices and plastics may account for the high content of HFRs and the metal products are likely the major source of CPs in these e-waste sites. - Highlights: • Report of characterizing the types and possible sources of OHPs in e-waste sites • Guiyu was a typical site contaminated by HFRs, while Dali was dominated by CPs. • Qingyuan and Taizhou were representative PCB-polluted regions. • Electronic devices and plastics may account for the

  5. Organohalogen pollutants in surface particulates from workshop floors of four major e-waste recycling sites in China and implications for emission lists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Yan-Hong; Tang, Bin; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Zheng, Xiao-Bo; Peng, Ping-An; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2016-01-01

    To examine the environmental pollution associated with e-waste recycling activities, the concentrations of organohologenated pollutants (OHPs), i.e., short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs and MCCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and several other halogenated flame retardants (OHFRs), were investigated in surface particulates from the workshop floors of four major e-waste recycling sites (Taizhou, Guiyu, Dali and Qingyuan) in China. The mean levels of SCCPs, MCCPs, PCBs, PBDEs and OHFRs in surface particulates ranged from 30,000–61,000, 170,000–890,000, 2700–27,000, 52,000–240,000, and 62,000–140,000 ng/g dry weight (dw), respectively. OHFRs, including decabromodiphenyl ethane, dechlorane plus, 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane, tetrabromobisphenol A, hexabromocyclododecanes, polybrominated biphenyls, hexabromobenzene, pentabromotoluene, and pentabromoethylbenzene, were frequently (> 50% detection frequency) detected in surface particulates with mean concentration ranges of 39,000–63,000, 310–2700, 98–16,000, 21,000–56,000, 55–5700, 1700–27,000, 42–1600, 3.2–220, and 5.8–12 ng/g dw, respectively. The composition of OHPs varied depend on the e-waste items processing in different regions. Guiyu and Dali were typical sites contaminated by halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) and CPs, respectively, while Qingyuan, and Taizhou were representative PCB-polluted regions. The evidence produced by this preliminary study indicated that electronic devices and plastics may account for the high content of HFRs and the metal products are likely the major source of CPs in these e-waste sites. - Highlights: • Report of characterizing the types and possible sources of OHPs in e-waste sites • Guiyu was a typical site contaminated by HFRs, while Dali was dominated by CPs. • Qingyuan and Taizhou were representative PCB-polluted regions. • Electronic devices and plastics may account for the

  6. Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1983-12-15

    The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil

  7. The ATLAS Electromagnetic Calorimeter Calibration Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Hong Ma; Isabelle Wingerter

    The ATLAS Electromagnetic Calorimeter Calibration Workshop took place at LAPP-Annecy from the 1st to the 3rd of October; 45 people attended the workshop. A detailed program was setup before the workshop. The agenda was organised around very focused presentations where questions were raised to allow arguments to be exchanged and answers to be proposed. The main topics were: Electronics calibration Handling of problematic channels Cluster level corrections for electrons and photons Absolute energy scale Streams for calibration samples Calibration constants processing Learning from commissioning Forty-five people attended the workshop. The workshop was on the whole lively and fruitful. Based on years of experience with test beam analysis and Monte Carlo simulation, and the recent operation of the detector in the commissioning, the methods to calibrate the electromagnetic calorimeter are well known. Some of the procedures are being exercised in the commisssioning, which have demonstrated the c...

  8. Summary of the PSI workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    The PSI workshop had been held at JAERI-Naka, from March 15th to 16th, 2002. This workshop is held twice a year as the skull practice session to report the recent progress on the plasma - surface interactions of the experimental reactors such as ITER, JT-60, LHD, etc. and the development of the plasma facing components. There were 34 participants from the university and 18 participants from JAERI and 26 papers were presented. This booklet was published for the purpose of saving a record of this workshop performed in oral lecture form. (author)

  9. 8th International Workshop on Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Rasch, Dieter; Melas, Viatcheslav; Moder, Karl; Statistics and simulation

    2018-01-01

    This volume features original contributions and invited review articles on mathematical statistics, statistical simulation and experimental design. The selected peer-reviewed contributions originate from the 8th International Workshop on Simulation held in Vienna in 2015. The book is intended for mathematical statisticians, Ph.D. students and statisticians working in medicine, engineering, pharmacy, psychology, agriculture and other related fields. The International Workshops on Simulation are devoted to statistical techniques in stochastic simulation, data collection, design of scientific experiments and studies representing broad areas of interest. The first 6 workshops took place in St. Petersburg, Russia, in 1994 – 2009 and the 7th workshop was held in Rimini, Italy, in 2013.

  10. Workshop Polli Talu Loomingulises Keskuses

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    MAP Intermedia Performance Collaboration'i (USA) workshop. Brendan McCall (liikumine), N. B. Aldrich (heli) ja Zach Poff (video) workshop tutvustab kolme kunstniku koostööd. Näidatakse ka multimeedia etendust, mis on külaliskunstnikel valminud Polli talus

  11. IFPA meeting 2009 workshops report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lash, G.E.; Burton, G.J.; Chamley, L.W.

    2010-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the annual meeting of the International Federation of Placenta Associations (IFPA). At IFPA Meeting 2009 diverse topics were discussed in twelve themed workshops. Topics covered included: immune response to pregnancy; signaling between fetus and placenta...

  12. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  13. Tyrosine411 and Arginine410 of Human Serum Albumin Play an Important Role in the Binding of Sodium 4-Phenylbutyrate to Site II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enokida, Taisuke; Yamasaki, Keishi; Okamoto, Yuko; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Ishiguro, Takako; Maruyama, Toru; Seo, Hakaru; Otagiri, Masaki

    2016-06-01

    Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PB) has many pharmacological activities; therefore extending its clinical use to the treatment of a wider variety of diseases would be desirable. However, our knowledge of the binding of PB to plasma proteins is not extensive. To address this issue in more detail, we characterized the protein binding of PB. Binding experiments showed that PB mainly binds to human serum albumin (HSA) in plasma. PB was also found to bind to a single site on HSA, which was identified as site II by fluorescent probe displacement experiment. Furthermore, an appropriate alkyl chain length and a carboxylic group in the PB structure were required for PB binding to HSA, suggesting that hydrophobic (and van der Waals) and electrostatic interactions are involved as binding modes. The contributions of hydrogen bonding and/or van der Waals interactions were also indicated by thermodynamic analyses. Tyrosine411 and arginine410 were identified as being involved in the binding of PB to site II, based on binding experiments using chemically modified- and mutant-HSA preparations. In conclusion, the available evidence indicates that PB binds to site II of HSA with assistance by multiple forces and that tyrosine411 and arginine410 both play important roles in this phenomenon. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Site of relapse after chemotherapy alone for stage I and II Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahidi, Mehdi; Kamangari, Nahid; Ashley, Sue; Cunningham, David; Horwich, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Background: Short course chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy is a standard treatment for early Hodgkin's disease. There is yet no consensus regarding the appropriate radiotherapy portal following chemotherapy. A good guide to the adjuvant radiotherapy field is the site of relapse in patients treated with chemotherapy alone. Patients and methods: From 1980 to 1996, 61 patients with stage I and II supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease were treated with chemotherapy alone at the Royal Marsden Hospital. We undertook a retrospective review and failure analysis to define the pattern of recurrence. Results: After a median follow-up of 6.5 years, 24 patients had relapsed giving a 5-year relapse rate of 40%. The 5 and 10-year actuarial survival rates were 94 and 89%, respectively with cause-sepecific survival being 94% at 5 and 10 years. Two-thirds of the relapses were nodal and supradiaphragmatic. Twenty patients (83%) relapsed in the initially involved sites of disease and this was the sole site of recurrence in 11 (45%) of patients. In retrospect, it appeared that at least 12 recurrences could have been prevented by involved field radiotherapy. Review of detailed imaging data (available in 9 out of 11 patients with recurrences in initial sites of disease) showed that the relapses were always in the initially involved nodes. Conclusion: After chemotherapy alone in early stage HD most initial recurrences are nodal. Loco-regional recurrences are in the originally involved nodes. Based on limited data it appears that involved nodal RT is equivalent to involved field radiotherapy and may halve the risk of recurrence

  15. Diagnostic Imaging Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sociedad Argentina de Fisica Medica

    2012-01-01

    The American Association of Physicist in Medicine (AAPM), the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP) and the Argentina Society of Medical Physics (SAFIM) was organized the Diagnostic Imaging Workshop 2012, in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina. This workshop was an oriented training and scientific exchange between professionals and technicians who work in medical physics, especially in the areas of diagnostic imaging, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy, with special emphasis on the use of multimodal imaging for radiation treatment, planning as well of quality assurance associates.

  16. Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggieri, Michael

    2006-07-07

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current

  17. Physicochemical characterization of ceramics from Sao Paulo II archaeological site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Rogerio Baria

    2013-01-01

    Archaeometry is a consolidated field with a wide application of nuclear analytical techniques for the characterization, protection, and restoration of archaeological pieces. This project aimed at studying the elementary chemical composition of 70 ceramic fragments samples from Sao Paulo II archaeological site, located along the Solimoes River channel, next to Coari city, in Brazilian Amazon. The characterization of samples was performed by neutron activation analysis (NAA). By the determination of 24 elements in the ceramic fragments ( Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Na, Nd, Sb, Sm. Rb, Se, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb and Zn), it was possible to define groups of samples regarding the similarity/dissimilarity in elementary chemical composition. For such a task, the multivariate statistical methods employed were cluster analysis (C A), principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant analysis (DA). Afterwards, seven ceramic fragments were selected based on the groups previously established, for the characterization of the site temporal horizon. Those ceramic fragments were analyzed by thermoluminescence (TL) and EPR for dating purposes. The firing temperatures were determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique, in order to infer about some aspects of the ceramic manufacture employed by the ancient peoples that lived in Sao Paulo 11. By the results obtained in this study, it was possible to identify the quantity of clay sources employed by the ceramists and the age of the ceramic pieces. Therefore, the results of this research may contribute to the study on the occupation dynamics in the pre-colonial Brazilian Amazon. (author)

  18. Collider workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of initial results after the start of operations at CERN's SPS proton-antiproton collider and the prospects for high energy hadron collisions at Fermilab (Tevatron) and Brookhaven (ISABELLE) provided a timely impetus for the recent Topical Workshop on Forward Collider Physics', held at Madison, Wisconsin, from 10-12 December. It became the second such workshop to be held, the first having been in 1979 at the College de France, Paris. The 100 or so participants had the chance to hear preliminary results from the UA1, UA4 and UA5 experiments at the CERN SPS collider, together with other new data, including that from proton-antiproton runs at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings

  19. Sources of long-lived atmospheric VOCs at the rural boreal forest site, SMEAR II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patokoski, J.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Kajos, M. K.; Taipale, R.; Rantala, P.; Aalto, J.; Ryyppö, T.; Nieminen, T.; Hakola, H.; Rinne, J.

    2015-12-01

    In this study a long-term volatile organic compound (VOCs) concentration data set, measured at the SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations) boreal forest site in Hyytiälä, Finland during the years 2006-2011, was analyzed in order to identify source areas and profiles of the observed VOCs. VOC mixing ratios were measured using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. Four-day HYSPLIT 4 (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) backward trajectories and the Unmix 6.0 receptor model were used for source area and source composition analysis. Two major forest fire events in Russia took place during the measurement period. The effect of these fires was clearly visible in the trajectory analysis, lending confidence to the method employed with this data set. Elevated volume mixing ratios (VMRs) of non-biogenic VOCs related to forest fires, e.g. acetonitrile and aromatic VOCs, were observed. Ten major source areas for long-lived VOCs (methanol, acetonitrile, acetaldehyde, acetone, benzene, and toluene) observed at the SMEAR II site were identified. The main source areas for all the targeted VOCs were western Russia, northern Poland, Kaliningrad, and the Baltic countries. Industrial areas in northern continental Europe were also found to be source areas for certain VOCs. Both trajectory and receptor analysis showed that air masses from northern Fennoscandia were less polluted with respect to both the VOCs studied and other trace gases (CO, SO2 and NOx), compared to areas of eastern and western continental Europe, western Russia, and southern Fennoscandia.

  20. Summary of comments received from workshops on radiological criteria for decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caplin, J.; Page, G.; Smith, D.; Wiblin, C.

    1994-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning of NRC-licensed facilities. Open public meetings were held during 1993 in Chicago, IL, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, Dallas, TX, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, and Washington, DC. Interested parties were invited to provide input on the rulemaking issues before the NRC staff develops a draft proposed rule. This report summarizes 3,635 comments categorized from transcripts of the seven workshops and 1,677 comments from 100 NRC docketed letters from individuals and organizations. No analysis or response to the comments is included. The comments reflect a broad spectrum of viewpoints on the issues related to radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning. The NRC also held public meetings on the scope of the Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) during July 1993. The GEIS meetings were held in Washington, DC., San Francisco, CA, Oklahoma City, OK, and Cleveland, OH. Related comments from these meetings were reviewed and comments which differed substantially from those from the workshops are also summarized in the body of the report. A summary of the comments from the GEIS scoping meetings is included as an Appendix

  1. Summary of comments received from workshops on radiological criteria for decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplin, J.; Page, G.; Smith, D.; Wiblin, C. [Advanced Systems Technology, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning of NRC-licensed facilities. Open public meetings were held during 1993 in Chicago, IL, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, Dallas, TX, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, and Washington, DC. Interested parties were invited to provide input on the rulemaking issues before the NRC staff develops a draft proposed rule. This report summarizes 3,635 comments categorized from transcripts of the seven workshops and 1,677 comments from 100 NRC docketed letters from individuals and organizations. No analysis or response to the comments is included. The comments reflect a broad spectrum of viewpoints on the issues related to radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning. The NRC also held public meetings on the scope of the Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) during July 1993. The GEIS meetings were held in Washington, DC., San Francisco, CA, Oklahoma City, OK, and Cleveland, OH. Related comments from these meetings were reviewed and comments which differed substantially from those from the workshops are also summarized in the body of the report. A summary of the comments from the GEIS scoping meetings is included as an Appendix.

  2. Scaling up kangaroo mother care in South Africa: 'on-site' versus 'off-site' educational facilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rooyen Elise

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scaling up the implementation of new health care interventions can be challenging and demand intensive training or retraining of health workers. This paper reports on the results of testing the effectiveness of two different kinds of face-to-face facilitation used in conjunction with a well-designed educational package in the scaling up of kangaroo mother care. Methods Thirty-six hospitals in the Provinces of Gauteng and Mpumalanga in South Africa were targeted to implement kangaroo mother care and participated in the trial. The hospitals were paired with respect to their geographical location and annual number of births. One hospital in each pair was randomly allocated to receive either 'on-site' facilitation (Group A or 'off-site' facilitation (Group B. Hospitals in Group A received two on-site visits, whereas delegates from hospitals in Group B attended one off-site, 'hands-on' workshop at a training hospital. All hospitals were evaluated during a site visit six to eight months after attending an introductory workshop and were scored by means of an existing progress-monitoring tool with a scoring scale of 0–30. Successful implementation was regarded as demonstrating evidence of practice (score >10 during the site visit. Results There was no significant difference between the scores of Groups A and B (p = 0.633. Fifteen hospitals in Group A and 16 in Group B demonstrated evidence of practice. The median score for Group A was 16.52 (range 00.00–23.79 and that for Group B 14.76 (range 07.50–23.29. Conclusion A previous trial illustrated that the implementation of a new health care intervention could be scaled up by using a carefully designed educational package, combined with face-to-face facilitation by respected resource persons. This study demonstrated that the site of facilitation, either on site or at a centre of excellence, did not influence the ability of a hospital to implement KMC. The choice of outreach

  3. A Workshop in Transcultural Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Thomas B.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an experimental, week-long interdisciplinary (i.e., nursing and anthropology) workshop on the relationship between health and culture conducted by Ohio University, Zanesville, in conjunction with the University of Toronto. Discusses program formulation, objectives, results, and suggestions for future workshops. (LAL)

  4. IFPA meeting 2008 workshops report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lash, G.E.; Ansari, T.; Bischof, P.

    2009-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting. At the IFPA meeting 2008 diverse topics were discussed in 12 themed workshops. Topics covered included: immunology of placentation; galectins and trophoblast invasion; signaling in implantation and invasion; markers to identify trophoblast...

  5. Presentation Skills Workshops for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinn, S.; Kenyon, M.

    2002-01-01

    Workshops were held to prepare nurses (n=87) to present results of professional activities. One year after the course, 20 had made oral and 30 written presentations. The workshops increased their confidence and were considered practical, informal, and nonthreatening. (Contains 31 references.) (SK)

  6. Summary of experimental insertions workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandweiss, J.; Month, M.

    1976-01-01

    An ISABELLE workshop of the summer 1976 series, which was held at Brookhaven August 16--20, focused on the design and utilization of the experimental insertions. The goals of the workshop are outlined, and a few general remarks about the results are presented

  7. BSM photon interaction for ALPS-II and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doebrich, Babette

    2012-12-15

    High-intensity photon beams can provide for a viable probe for many particles of Standard Model extensions. This workshop contribution briefly reviews the status of the second stage of the Any Light Particle Search (ALPS-II) at DESY, an experiment of the light-shining-through-a-wall type, as well as an idea to test asymptotically safe quantum gravity in a photon-scattering experiment.

  8. International Workshop on Diagnostics for ITER

    CERN Document Server

    Gorini, Giuseppe; Sindoni, Elio

    1996-01-01

    This book of proceedings collects the papers presented at the Workshop on Diagnostics for ITER, held at Villa Monastero, Varenna (Italy), from August 28 to September 1, 1995. The Workshop was organised by the International School of Plasma Physics "Piero Caldirola. " Established in 1971, the ISPP has organised over fifty advanced courses and workshops on topics mainly related to plasma physics. In particular, courses and workshops on plasma diagnostics (previously held in 1975, 1978, 1982, 1986, and 1991) can be considered milestones in the history of this institution. Looking back at the proceedings of the previous meetings in Varenna, one can appreciate the rapid progress in the field of plasma diagnostics over the past 20 years. The 1995 workshop was co-organised by the Istituto di Fisica del Plasma of the National Research Council (CNR). In contrast to previous Varenna meetings on diagnostics, which have covered diagnostics in present-day tokamaks and which have had a substantial tutorial component, the 1...

  9. Proceedings of a workshop on geophysical and related geoscientific research at Chalk River, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, M.D.; Dixon, D.F.

    1989-10-01

    A large part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is geoscience research and development aimed at obtaining information to quantify the transport of radionuclides through the geosphere and at determining the geotechnical properties required for disposal vault design. The geosphere at potential disposal sites is characterized in part by the use of remote sensing (geophysical) methods. In 1977 public concern about the disposal of radioactive waste resulted in field work being restricted to the site of Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, which was used to develop, evaluate and compare various techniques in order to optimize the methods for obtaining geoscience information. Methods tested at Chalk River are to be applied at other research sites. Most investigations have been carried out around Maskinonge Lake, using about thirty boreholes sink into bedrock. The boreholes provide subsurface geological information that can be used as a reference to compare the responses of various geophysical methods and equipment. Regional studies, including airborne geophysical surveys, have also been conducted. The 25 papers presented at this workshop provide comprehensive documentation of the most significant results of geophysical studies. The workshop also provided an evaluation of geophysical techniques and their utility to the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

  10. Workshop on Developing Safe Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, J.D.

    1994-11-01

    The Workshop on Developing Safe Software was held July 22--23, 1992, at the Hotel del Coronado, San Diego, California. The purpose of the workshop was to have four world experts discuss among themselves software safety issues which are of interest to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These issues concern the development of software systems for use in nuclear power plant protection systems. The workshop comprised four sessions. Wednesday morning, July 22, consisted of presentations from each of the four panel members. On Wednesday afternoon, the panel members went through a list of possible software development techniques and commented on them. The Thursday morning, July 23, session consisted of an extended discussion among the panel members and the observers from the NRC. A final session on Thursday afternoon consisted of a discussion among the NRC observers as to what was learned from the workshop

  11. Workshop on developing safe software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The Workshop on Developing Safe Software was held July 22--23 at the Hotel del Coronado, San Diego, California. The purpose of the workshop was to have four world experts discuss among themselves software safety issues which are of interest to the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These issues concern the development of software systems for use in nuclear power plant protection systems. The workshop comprised four sessions. Wednesday morning, July 22, consisted of presentations from each of the four panel members. On Wednesday afternoon, the panel members went through a list of possible software development techniques and commented on them. The Thursday morning, July 23, session consisted of an extended discussion among the panel members and the observers from the NRC. A final session on Thursday afternoon consisted of a discussion among the NRC observers as to what was teamed from the workshop

  12. Synchronization of workshops, using facilities planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zineb, Britel; Abdelghani, Cherkaoui

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we will present a methodology used for the synchronization of two workshops of a sheet metal department. These two workshops have a supplier-customer relationship. The aim of the study is to synchronise the two workshops as a step towards creating a better material flow, reduced inventory and achieving Just in time and lean production. To achieve this, we used a different set of techniques: SMED, Facilities planning…

  13. Nuclear Energy Innovation Workshops. Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Todd [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jackson, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hildebrandt, Phil [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baker, Suzy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The nuclear energy innovation workshops were organized and conducted by INL on March 2-4, 2015 at the five NUC universities and Boise State University. The output from these workshops is summarized with particular attention to final summaries that were provided by technical leads at each of the workshops. The current revision includes 3-4 punctuation corrections and a correction of the month of release from May to June.

  14. International workshop on multimodal analyses enabling artificial agents in human-machine interaction (workshop summary)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Böck, Ronald; Bonin, Francesca; Campbell, Nick; Poppe, R.W.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a brief overview of the third workshop on Multimodal Analyses enabling Artificial Agents in Human-Machine Interaction. The paper is focussing on the main aspects intended to be discussed in the workshop reflecting the main scope of the papers presented during the meeting. The MA3HMI

  15. Hanford and Savannah River Site Programmatic and Technical Integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, William Gene

    2013-01-01

    Abstract only. The Hanford Site and the Savannah River Site (SRS) were the primary plutonium production facilities within the U.S. nuclear weapons complex. Radioactive wastes were generated as part of these missions and are stored in similar fashion. The majority of radioactivity maintained by the two sites is located in underground carbon steel tanks in the physical form of supernatant, saltcake, or sludge. Disposition of SRS tank waste is ongoing by converting it into glass (pathway for sludge and radionuclides separated from supernatant or dissolved saltcake) or cement (pathway for the decontaminated supernatant and dissolved saltcake). Tank closure activity has also begun at SRS and will continue for the duration of mission. The Hanford tank waste inventory is roughly 2/3rds larger than SRS's by volume- but nominally half the radioactivity. The baseline disposition path includes high-level and low-activity waste vitrification with separate disposition of contact-handled transuranic tank waste. Retrieval of tank waste from aging single shell tanks (SSTs) into double-shell tanks (DSTs) is currently ongoing. As vitrification commences later this decade, Hanford will be in a similar operations mode as SRS. Site integration is increasing as the missions align. The ongoing integration is centered on key issues that impact both sites- regardless of mission timeframe. Three recent workshop exchanges have been held to improve communication with the primary intent of improving operations and technical work organization. The topics of these workshops are as follows: DST space utilization, optimization, and closure; Waste Feed Qualification; and, Cementitious Waste Forms. Key goals for these and future exchanges include aligning research and technology, preparing for joint initiatives (to maximize budgetary value for the customer), and reviewing lessons learned. Each site has played a leading role in the development of technology and operational practices that can be used

  16. Using Sound to Modify Fish Behavior at Power-Production and Water-Control Facilities: A Workshop December 12-13, 1995. Phase II: Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Thomas J. [ed.] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Popper, Arthur N. [ed.] [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1997-06-01

    A workshop on ``Use of Sound for Fish Protection at Power-Production and Water-Control Facilities`` was held in Portland, Oregon on December 12--13, 1995. This workshop convened a 22-member panel of international experts from universities, industry, and government to share knowledge, questions, and ideas about using sound for fish guidance. Discussions involved in a broad range of indigenous migratory and resident fish species and fish-protection issues in river systems, with particular focus on the Columbia River Basin. Because the use of sound behavioral barriers for fish is very much in its infancy, the workshop was designed to address the many questions being asked by fishery managers and researchers about the feasibility and potential benefits of using sound to augment physical barriers for fish protection in the Columbia River system.

  17. AAAI Workshop on Nonmonotonic Reasoning

    OpenAIRE

    Etherington, David

    1985-01-01

    On October 17-19 1984 a workshop on non-monotonic reasoning was held at Mohonk Mountain House, outside New Paltz, New York. The workshop was organized by Raymond Reiter and Bonnie Webber, and was sponsored by the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence.

  18. Pressurized water reactor simulator. Workshop material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established an activity in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the development and distribution of simulation programs and educational material and sponsors courses and workshops. The workshops are in two parts: techniques and tools for reactor simulator development; and the use of reactor simulators in education. Workshop material for the first part is covered in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 12, 'Reactor Simulator Development' (2001). Course material for workshops using a WWER- 1000 reactor department simulator from the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, the Russian Federation is presented in the IAEA Training Course Series No. 21 'WWER-1000 Reactor Simulator' (2002). Course material for workshops using a boiling water reactor simulator developed for the IAEA by Cassiopeia Technologies Incorporated of Canada (CTI) is presented in the IAEA publication: Training Course Series No.23 'Boiling Water Reactor Simulator' (2003). This report consists of course material for workshops using a pressurized water reactor simulator

  19. The low molecular weight protein PsaI stabilizes the light-harvesting complex II docking site of photosystem I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plöchinger, Magdalena; Torabi, Salar; Rantala, Marjaana

    2016-01-01

    PsaI represents one of three low molecular weight peptides of PSI. Targeted inactivation of the plastid PsaI gene in Nicotiana tabacum has no measurable effect on photosynthetic electron transport around PSI or on accumulation of proteins involved in photosynthesis. Instead, the lack of Psa......I destabilizes the association of PsaL and PsaH to PSI, both forming the light-harvesting complex (LHC)II docking site of PSI. These alterations at the LHCII binding site surprisingly did not prevent state transition but led to an increased incidence of PSI-LHCII complexes, coinciding with an elevated...

  20. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Thin Film Growth Techniques for Low-Dimensional Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, S; Dobson, P; Neave, J; Arrott, A

    1987-01-01

    This work represents the account of a NATO Advanced Research Workshop on "Thin Film Growth Techniques for Low Dimensional Structures", held at the University of Sussex, Brighton, England from 15-19 Sept. 1986. The objective of the workshop was to review the problems of the growth and characterisation of thin semiconductor and metal layers. Recent advances in deposition techniques have made it possible to design new material which is based on ultra-thin layers and this is now posing challenges for scientists, technologists and engineers in the assessment and utilisation of such new material. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has become well established as a method for growing thin single crystal layers of semiconductors. Until recently, MBE was confined to the growth of III-V compounds and alloys, but now it is being used for group IV semiconductors and II-VI compounds. Examples of such work are given in this volume. MBE has one major advantage over other crystal growth techniques in that the structure of the growi...

  1. Report on the final BRACElet workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Clear

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the thirteenth and final BRACElet workshop. In this paper we provide a brief retrospective review of the workshops and the findings that have resulted from this multi-institutional multinational investigation into the teaching and learning of novice programmers. Subsequently we report on the work undertaken during the final workshop and then discuss future avenues for research that have evolved as a result of the BRACElet project.

  2. Belle-II Experiment Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bell, Greg [ESnet; Carlson, Tim [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cowley, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dart, Eli [ESnet; Erwin, Brock [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Godang, Romulus [Univ. of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States); Hara, Takanori [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Johnson, Jerry [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Ron [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Johnston, Bill [ESnet; Dam, Kerstin Kleese-van [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kaneko, Toshiaki [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Kubota, Yoshihiro [NII; Kuhr, Thomas [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) (Germany); McCoy, John [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miyake, Hideki [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Monga, Inder [ESnet; Nakamura, Motonori [NII; Piilonen, Leo [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Pordes, Ruth [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ray, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Russell, Richard [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schram, Malachi [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schroeder, Jim [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sevior, Martin [Univ. of Melbourne (Australia); Singh, Surya [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suzuki, Soh [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Sasaki, Takashi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Williams, Jim [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2013-05-28

    The Belle experiment, part of a broad-based search for new physics, is a collaboration of ~400 physicists from 55 institutions across four continents. The Belle detector is located at the KEKB accelerator in Tsukuba, Japan. The Belle detector was operated at the asymmetric electron-positron collider KEKB from 1999-2010. The detector accumulated more than 1 ab-1 of integrated luminosity, corresponding to more than 2 PB of data near 10 GeV center-of-mass energy. Recently, KEK has initiated a $400 million accelerator upgrade to be called SuperKEKB, designed to produce instantaneous and integrated luminosity two orders of magnitude greater than KEKB. The new international collaboration at SuperKEKB is called Belle II. The first data from Belle II/SuperKEKB is expected in 2015. In October 2012, senior members of the Belle-II collaboration gathered at PNNL to discuss the computing and neworking requirements of the Belle-II experiment with ESnet staff and other computing and networking experts. The day-and-a-half-long workshop characterized the instruments and facilities used in the experiment, the process of science for Belle-II, and the computing and networking equipment and configuration requirements to realize the full scientific potential of the collaboration's work.

  3. Building Strong Geoscience Departments Through the Visiting Workshop Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormand, C. J.; Manduca, C. A.; Macdonald, H.; Bralower, T. J.; Clemens-Knott, D.; Doser, D. I.; Feiss, P. G.; Rhodes, D. D.; Richardson, R. M.; Savina, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Building Strong Geoscience Departments project focuses on helping geoscience departments adapt and prosper in a changing and challenging environment. From 2005-2009, the project offered workshop programs on topics such as student recruitment, program assessment, preparing students for the workforce, and strengthening geoscience programs. Participants shared their departments' challenges and successes. Building on best practices and most promising strategies from these workshops and on workshop leaders' experiences, from 2009-2011 the project ran a visiting workshop program, bringing workshops to 18 individual departments. Two major strengths of the visiting workshop format are that it engages the entire department in the program, fostering a sense of shared ownership and vision, and that it focuses on each department's unique situation. Departments applied to have a visiting workshop, and the process was highly competitive. Selected departments chose from a list of topics developed through the prior workshops: curriculum and program design, program elements beyond the curriculum, recruiting students, preparing students for the workforce, and program assessment. Two of our workshop leaders worked with each department to customize and deliver the 1-2 day programs on campus. Each workshop incorporated exercises to facilitate active departmental discussions, presentations incorporating concrete examples drawn from the leaders' experience and from the collective experiences of the geoscience community, and action planning to scaffold implementation. All workshops also incorporated information on building departmental consensus and assessing departmental efforts. The Building Strong Geoscience Departments website complements the workshops with extensive examples from the geoscience community. Of the 201 participants in the visiting workshop program, 140 completed an end of workshop evaluation survey with an overall satisfaction rating of 8.8 out of a possible 10

  4. Report on the second international workshop on residential radon: Workshop proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    As a follow-on to the first International Workshop on Residential Radon Epidemiology held in Alexandria VA, on July 24-26, 1989, a Second Workshop was convened, in Alexandria, VA, July 22-23 1991, also under the auspices of the US Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The Workshop, co-chaired by Jonathan Samet and Jan Stolwijk, was attended by 20 active participants from seven countries representing epidemiologic studies recently completed, currently in progress, or in the last stages of preparation. The studies reported on are being conducted in the United States, Canada, Sweden, the United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Germany and the Peoples' Republic of China. The invited presentations that initiated the Workshop focused on a number of methodological problems that have surfaced in the last few years. Among these were: (1) the difficulties in predicting indoor radon concentrations, based on geologic information, (discussed by Alan Tanner, formerly of the US Geologic Survey); (2) the relationships between indoor radon concentrations and building characteristics (discussed by Richard Sextro, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, USA); (3) the approaches to analysis of case-control studies in radon epidemiology (discussed by Sarah Darby, Imperial Cancer Research Fund, UK); (4) statistical approaches to error in measurements and missing data (discussed by Donna Spiegelman, Tufts University, USA); (5) preliminary results of a data pooling effort dealing with several different studies of residential radon epidemiology and the lessons to be drawn from this effort (discussed by Jay Lubin, US National Cancer Institute)

  5. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Durango site, Durango, Colorado. A summary of the Phase II, Title I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Durango, Colorado. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 1.555 million tons of tailings at the Durango site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented range from vegetative stabilization (Option I), to contouring and stabilizing in-place with varying depths of cover material (Options II and III), to removal to an isolated long-term disposal site (Options V to VIII). All options include remedial action costs for offsite locations where tailings have been placed. Costs estimated for the eight options range from $4,340,000 to $13,590,000. Reprocessing the tailings for uranium is sufficiently economically attractive to justify reprocessing in conjunction with each of the options

  6. Sawja: Static Analysis Workshop for Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Laurent; Barré, Nicolas; Besson, Frédéric; Demange, Delphine; Jensen, Thomas; Monfort, Vincent; Pichardie, David; Turpin, Tiphaine

    Static analysis is a powerful technique for automatic verification of programs but raises major engineering challenges when developing a full-fledged analyzer for a realistic language such as Java. Efficiency and precision of such a tool rely partly on low level components which only depend on the syntactic structure of the language and therefore should not be redesigned for each implementation of a new static analysis. This paper describes the Sawja library: a static analysis workshop fully compliant with Java 6 which provides OCaml modules for efficiently manipulating Java bytecode programs. We present the main features of the library, including i) efficient functional data-structures for representing a program with implicit sharing and lazy parsing, ii) an intermediate stack-less representation, and iii) fast computation and manipulation of complete programs. We provide experimental evaluations of the different features with respect to time, memory and precision.

  7. Physics Analysis Tools Workshop 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    Elizabeth Gallas,

    The ATLAS PAT (Physics Analysis Tools) group evaluates, develops and tests software tools for the analysis of physics data, consistent with the ATLAS analysis and event data models. Following on from earlier PAT workshops in London (2004), Tucson (2005) and Tokyo (2006), this year's workshop was hosted by the University of Bergen in Norway on April 23-28 with more than 60 participants. The workshop brought together PAT developers and users to discuss the available tools with an emphasis on preparing for data taking. At the start of the week, workshop participants, laptops and power converters in-hand, jumped headfirst into tutorials, learning how to become trigger-aware and how to use grid computing resources via the distributed analysis tools Panda and Ganga. The well organised tutorials were well attended and soon the network was humming, providing rapid results to the users and ample feedback to the developers. A mid-week break was provided by a relaxing and enjoyable cruise through the majestic Norwegia...

  8. 2nd Ralf Yorque Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    1985-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the Second R. Yorque Workshop on Resource Management which took place in Ashland, Oregon on July 23-25, 1984. The purpose of the workshop is to provide an informal atmosphere for the discussion of resource assessment and management problems. Each participant presented a one hour morning talk; afternoons were reserved for informal chatting. The workshop was successful in stimulating ideas and interaction. The papers by R. Deriso, R. Hilborn and C. Walters all address the same basic issue, so they are lumped together. Other than that, the order to the papers in this volume was determined in the same fashion as the order of speakers during the workshop -- by random draw. Marc Mangel Department of Mathematics University of California Davis, California June 1985 TABLE OF CONTENTS A General Theory for Fishery Modeling Jon Schnute Data Transformations in Regression Analysis with Applications to Stock-Recruitment Relationships David Ruppert and Raymond J. Carroll ••••••. •�...

  9. Determination of "safe" and "critical" nanoparticles exposure to welders in a workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J F; Miranda, R M

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined consequences of "safe" versus "critical" exposure to nanoparticles (NP) released during welding operations. With this aim in mind, a set of measurements regarding NP emissions was undertaken in a workshop during welding by metal active gas of carbon steel using different mixtures of argon (Ar) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) as well as different process parameters which might influence emission of (NP). If these measurements were conducted in several locations away from the welding sources, the graphical representation of the obtained observations with time enabled definition of "safe" and "critical" regions within a welding workshop in terms of welder's exposure. This information may be combined with the results of risk analysis derived by control banding and helps to categorize the sites where regulatory measures such as operation containment or dedicated exhaust ventilation need to be implemented.

  10. Nineteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1994-01-20

    PREFACE The Nineteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 18-20, 1994. This workshop opened on a sad note because of the death of Prof. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. on November 19, 1993. Hank had been fighting leukemia for a long time and finally lost the battle. Many of the workshop participants were present for the celebration of his life on January 21 at Stanford's Memorial Church. Hank was one of the founders of the Stanford Geothermal Program and the Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Workshop. His energy, kindness, quick wit, and knowledge will long be missed at future workshops. Following the Preface we have included a copy of the Memorial Resolution passed by the Stanford University Senate. There were one hundred and four registered participants. Participants were from ten foreign countries: Costa Rica, England, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines and Turkey. Workshop papers described the performance of fourteen geothermal fields outside the United States. Roland N. Home opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a presentation about the future of geothermal development. The banquet speaker was Jesus Rivera and he spoke about Energy Sources of Central American Countries. Forty two papers were presented at the Workshop. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: sciences, injection, production, modeling, and adsorption. Session chairmen are an important part of the workshop and our thanks go to: John Counsil, Mark Walters, Dave Duchane, David Faulder, Gudmundur Bodvarsson, Jim Lovekin, Joel Renner, and Iraj Ershaghi. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who

  11. Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion: Summary Report of the Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidl, P.A.; Barnard, J.J.

    2011-04-29

    The Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May 23-26, 2011. The workshop began with plenary sessions to review the state of the art in HIF (heavy ion fusion), followed by parallel working groups, and concluded with a plenary session to review the results. There were five working groups: IFE (inertial fusion energy) targets, RF approach to HIF, induction accelerator approach to HIF, chamber and driver interface, ion sources and injectors.

  12. Physical Properties of the MER and Beagle II Landing Sites on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, B. M.; Pelkey, S. M.; Mellon, M. T.; Putzig, N.; Martinez-Alonso, S.; Murphy, N.; Hynek, B.

    2003-12-01

    The ESA Beagle II and the NASA Mars Exploration Rover spacecraft are scheduled to land on the martian surface in December 2003 and January 2004, respectively. Mission operations and success depends on the physical properties of the surfaces on which they land. Surface structural characteristics such as the abundances of loose, unconsolidated fine material, of fine material that has been cemented into a duricrust, and of rocks affect the ability to safely land and to successfully sample and traverse the surface. Also, physical properties affect surface and atmospheric temperatures, which affect lander and rover functionality. We are in the process of analyzing surface temperature information for these sites, derived from MGS TES and Odyssey THEMIS daytime and nighttime measurements. Our approach is to: (i) remap thermal inertia using TES data at ~3-km resolution, to obtain the most complete coverage possible; (ii) interpret physical properties from TES coverage in conjunction with other remote-sensing data sets; (iii) map infrared brightness using daytime and nighttime THEMIS data at 100-m resolution, and do qualitative analysis of physical properties and processes; and (iv) derive thermal inertia from THEMIS nighttime data in conjunction with daytime albedo measurements derived from TES, THEMIS, and MOC observations. In addition, we will use measured temperatures and derived thermal inertia to predict surface temperatures for the periods of the missions.

  13. Industrial Fuel Flexibility Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-09-01

    On September 28, 2006, in Washington, DC, ITP and Booz Allen Hamilton conducted a fuel flexibility workshop with attendance from various stakeholder groups. Workshop participants included representatives from the petrochemical, refining, food and beverage, steel and metals, pulp and paper, cement and glass manufacturing industries; as well as representatives from industrial boiler manufacturers, technology providers, energy and waste service providers, the federal government and national laboratories, and developers and financiers.

  14. Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-12-01

    This document outlines activities for educating key target audiences, as suggested by workshop participants. Held December 4-5, 2002, the Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop kicked off a new education effort coordinated by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  15. Japanese contributions to IAEA INTOR Workshop, Phase Two A, Part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Masao; Ikeda, Bunko; Saito, Ryuta

    1988-02-01

    This report corresponds to Chapter VI of Japanese contributions to IAEA INTOR Workshop, Phase Two A, Part 3, and consists of two parts, i.e. Critical Issues and Innovations. The critical issues contains the analyses on poloidal field coils, operation scenario, closed loop plasma control and plasma disruptions. The innovations contains feasibility studies on high current density and high field for TF coil, use of Nb 3 Sn for PF coils, forced flow subcooled He II superconducting coils, allowable stresses in the structural material of the magnetic system and non-metallic structural materials, and design guidelines of toroidal field coil sizing. (author)

  16. The ROS Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Francis, D.

    The first week of February saw the taking place of the ReadOut Subsystem (ROS) workshop. The ROS is the subsystem of the Trigger, DAQ & DCS project which receives and buffers data from the detector ReadOut Drivers (RODs). On request it then provides a subset of this buffered data, the so-called Regions of Interest (RoI), to the Level 2 trigger. Using the subsequent Level 2 trigger decision, the ROS either removes the buffered event data from its buffers or sends the full event data to the Event Filter for further processing. The workshop took place over a four-day period at a location in the Jura. The average daily attendance was twenty people, which mainly represented the five main ATLAS institutes currently engaged in this Trigger, DAQ & DCS activity. The aim of the workshop was to bring to an end the current prototyping activities in this area and launch the next, final, phase of prototyping. This new phase of prototyping will build on the successful activities of the previous phase and will focus...

  17. Proceedings of the second workshop of LHC Computing Grid, LCG-France; ACTES, 2e colloque LCG-France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chollet, Frederique; Hernandez, Fabio; Malek, Fairouz; Gaelle, Shifrin (eds.) [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire Clermont-Ferrand, Campus des Cezeaux, 24, avenue des Landais, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2007-03-15

    The second LCG-France Workshop was held in Clermont-Ferrand on 14-15 March 2007. These sessions organized by IN2P3 and DAPNIA were attended by around 70 participants working with the Computing Grid of LHC in France. The workshop was a opportunity of exchanges of information between the French and foreign site representatives on one side and delegates of experiments on the other side. The event allowed enlightening the place of LHC Computing Task within the frame of W-LCG world project, the undergoing actions and the prospects in 2007 and beyond. The following communications were presented: 1. The current status of the LHC computation in France; 2.The LHC Grid infrastructure in France and associated resources; 3.Commissioning of Tier 1; 4.The sites of Tier-2s and Tier-3s; 5.Computing in ALICE experiment; 6.Computing in ATLAS experiment; 7.Computing in the CMS experiments; 8.Computing in the LHCb experiments; 9.Management and operation of computing grids; 10.'The VOs talk to sites'; 11.Peculiarities of ATLAS; 12.Peculiarities of CMS and ALICE; 13.Peculiarities of LHCb; 14.'The sites talk to VOs'; 15. Worldwide operation of Grid; 16.Following-up the Grid jobs; 17.Surveillance and managing the failures; 18. Job scheduling and tuning; 19.Managing the site infrastructure; 20.LCG-France communications; 21.Managing the Grid data; 22.Pointing the net infrastructure and site storage. 23.ALICE bulk transfers; 24.ATLAS bulk transfers; 25.CMS bulk transfers; 26. LHCb bulk transfers; 27.Access to LHCb data; 28.Access to CMS data; 29.Access to ATLAS data; 30.Access to ALICE data; 31.Data analysis centers; 32.D0 Analysis Farm; 33.Some CMS grid analyses; 34.PROOF; 35.Distributed analysis using GANGA; 36.T2 set-up for end-users. In their concluding remarks Fairouz Malek and Dominique Pallin stressed that the current workshop was more close to users while the tasks for tightening the links between the sites and the experiments were definitely achieved. The IN2P3

  18. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  19. Fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery as a potential problem for the WIPP: Proceedings of a June 1995 workshop and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.K.

    1996-08-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a facility of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), designed and constructed for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) defense waste. The repository is sited in the New Mexico portion of the Delaware Basin, at a depth of 655 meters, in the salt beds of the Salado Formation. The WIPP is surrounded by reserves and production of potash, crude oil and natural gas. In selecting a repository site, concerns about extensive oil field development eliminated the Mescalero Plains site in Chaves County and concerns about future waterflooding in nearby oil fields helped eliminate the Alternate II site in Lea County. Ultimately, the Los Medanos site in Eddy County was selected, relying in part on the conclusion that there were no oil reserves at the site. For oil field operations, the problem of water migrating from the injection zone, through other formations such as the Salado, and onto adjacent property has long been recognized. In 1980, the DOE intended to prohibit secondary recovery by waterflooding in one mile buffer surrounding the WIPP Site. However, the DOE relinquished the right to restrict waterflooding based on a natural resources report which maintained that there was a minimal amount of crude oil likely to exist at the WIPP site, hence waterflooding adjacent to the WIPP would be unlikely. This document presents the workshop presentations and analyses for the fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery utilizing fluid injection and their potential effects on the WIPP facility

  20. Replacing lecture with peer-led workshops improves student learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preszler, Ralph W

    2009-01-01

    Peer-facilitated workshops enhanced interactivity in our introductory biology course, which led to increased student engagement and learning. A majority of students preferred attending two lectures and a workshop each week over attending three weekly lectures. In the workshops, students worked in small cooperative groups as they solved challenging problems, evaluated case studies, and participated in activities designed to improve their general learning skills. Students in the workshop version of the course scored higher on exam questions recycled from preworkshop semesters. Grades were higher over three workshop semesters in comparison with the seven preworkshop semesters. Although males and females benefited from workshops, there was a larger improvement of grades and increased retention by female students; although underrepresented minority (URM) and non-URM students benefited from workshops, there was a larger improvement of grades by URM students. As well as improving student performance and retention, the addition of interactive workshops also improved the quality of student learning: Student scores on exam questions that required higher-level thinking increased from preworkshop to workshop semesters.

  1. 76 FR 58281 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ...] Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Public Workshop.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to discuss factors affecting the safe use of magnetic resonance imaging...

  2. Geometric Methods in Physics : XXXIII Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Bieliavsky, Pierre; Odzijewicz, Anatol; Schlichenmaier, Martin; Voronov, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a selection of papers based on the XXXIII Białowieża Workshop on Geometric Methods in Physics, 2014. The Białowieża Workshops are among the most important meetings in the field and attract researchers from both mathematics and physics. The articles gathered here are mathematically rigorous and have important physical implications, addressing the application of geometry in classical and quantum physics. Despite their long tradition, the workshops remain at the cutting edge of ongoing research. For the last several years, each Białowieża Workshop has been followed by a School on Geometry and Physics, where advanced lectures for graduate students and young researchers are presented; some of the lectures are reproduced here. The unique atmosphere of the workshop and school is enhanced by its venue, framed by the natural beauty of the Białowieża forest in eastern Poland. The volume will be of interest to researchers and graduate students in mathematical physics, theoretical physics and m...

  3. Geometric Methods in Physics : XXXII Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Bieliavsky, Pierre; Odesskii, Alexander; Odzijewicz, Anatol; Schlichenmaier, Martin; Voronov, Theodore; Geometric Methods in Physics

    2014-01-01

    The Białowieża Workshops on Geometric Methods in Physics, which are hosted in the unique setting of the Białowieża natural forest in Poland, are among the most important meetings in the field. Every year some 80 to 100 participants from both the mathematics and physics world join to discuss new developments and to exchange ideas. The current volume was produced on the occasion of the 32nd meeting in 2013. It is now becoming a tradition that the Workshop is followed by a School on Geometry and Physics, which consists of advanced lectures for graduate students and young researchers. Selected speakers at the 2013 Workshop were asked to contribute to this book, and their work was supplemented by additional review articles. The selection shows that, despite its now long tradition, the workshop remains at the cutting edge of research. The 2013 Workshop also celebrated the 75th birthday of Daniel Sternheimer, and on this occasion the discussion mainly focused on his contributions to mathematical physics such as ...

  4. A Death Awareness Workshop: Theory, Application, and Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, W. Michael; Warren, William M.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an experimental death awareness workshop based on Kubler-Ross' theory. The effects of the workshop reveal cognitive and emotional changes indicating participants in the workshop to be moving towards an acceptance of death. (Author)

  5. A Portable Computer Security Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Paul J.; Phillips, Andrew T.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a computer security workshop designed to instruct post-secondary instructors who want to start a course or laboratory exercise sequence in computer security. This workshop has also been used to provide computer security education to IT professionals and students. It is effective in communicating basic computer security principles…

  6. Secondary School Design: Workshop Crafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education and Science, London (England).

    Design features are described for school shop facilities. Some general requirements common to most workshops are discussed; and specific design information is provided for general woodwork, general metalwork, and combined wood and metalwork facilities. The grouping of the workshop crafts and their relation to other parts of the school are also…

  7. Flywheel energy storage workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Kain, D.; Carmack, J. [comps.

    1995-12-31

    Since the November 1993 Flywheel Workshop, there has been a major surge of interest in Flywheel Energy Storage. Numerous flywheel programs have been funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Hybrid Vehicle Program, and by private investment. Several new prototype systems have been built and are being tested. The operational performance characteristics of flywheel energy storage are being recognized as attractive for a number of potential applications. Programs are underway to develop flywheels for cars, buses, boats, trains, satellites, and for electric utility applications such as power quality, uninterruptible power supplies, and load leveling. With the tremendous amount of flywheel activity during the last two years, this workshop should again provide an excellent opportunity for presentation of new information. This workshop is jointly sponsored by ARPA and DOE to provide a review of the status of current flywheel programs and to provide a forum for presentation of new flywheel technology. Technology areas of interest include flywheel applications, flywheel systems, design, materials, fabrication, assembly, safety & containment, ball bearings, magnetic bearings, motor/generators, power electronics, mounting systems, test procedures, and systems integration. Information from the workshop will help guide ARPA & DOE planning for future flywheel programs. This document is comprised of detailed viewgraphs.

  8. ALARA in radioactive waste management- Summary and recommendations of the 11. European ALARA Network Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, P.; Crouail, P.; Drouet, F.

    2008-01-01

    The 11. European ALARA Network (E.A.N.) workshop on 'ALARA in radioactive waste management' took place in Athens (Greece) in April 2008. The aim of that workshop was to focus on the implementation of the ALARA principle with regard to occupational and public exposures arising from the management of radioactive waste in all sectors (nuclear, medical, industrial, etc.). This workshop consisted of invited oral presentations, which highlighted the main issues, and half of the programme was devoted to discussions within working groups on specific topics. Individual presentations (papers and slides) are available to download from the E.A.N. web site (http://www.eu-alara.net). Based on report backs from the groups and discussions with all the participants, five formal recommendations have been formulated. These recommendations, addressed to international organisations (International Atomic Energy Agency, European Commission, Nuclear Energy Agency), national authorities, national and local stake holders and to E.A.N. itself, deal with the following themes: international guidance on ALARA in radioactive waste management, harmonization issues at the international level, ALARA approach in non-nuclear waste management, 'broader approach' in the radioactive waste management process, stake holder involvement. The objective of this paper is to present the main conclusions and the five recommendations produced during the workshop. (authors)

  9. Final Technical Report: Electronic Structure Workshop (ES13)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shiwei [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2015-02-26

    The 25th Annual Workshop on Recent Developments in Electronic Structure Methods (ES2013) was successfully held at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg VA on June 11-14, 2013. The workshop website is at http://es13.wm.edu/ , which contains updated information on the workshop and a permanent archive of the scientific contents. DOE's continued support has been instrumental to the success of the workshop.

  10. Steps to the Future. Dental Hygiene Education and Practice Workshop II Proceedings (Louisville, Kentucky, April 25-27, 1985).

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Dental Hygienists' Association, Chicago, IL.

    The proceedings of the second in a series of workshops on dental hygiene education and practice are presented. The opening remarks are by Cheryl Westphal. Papers categorized as "Considerations for the Professionalization of Dental Hygiene" are as follows: "Socio-Economic Viewpoint" (Gary Gaumer); "Political Science Viewpoint" (Lelia Helms);…

  11. Diversity in Action: Interactive Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Diversity Office

    2012-01-01

    Come and take part in an interactive workshop organised by the CERN Diversity Office to allow you to discuss and share your experience of diversity at CERN. What does diversity mean to you? How important is it for you at work? David Weaver, an experienced external specialist on diversity issues, will facilitate a lively exchange of views on the benefits and challenges of working with colleagues of different nationalities, genders, ages and professions This session will be run in English; small group discussions may be held in both official languages. Everyone working on the CERN site is welcome! There are a limited number of places available so please sign up here  as soon as possible. The event will take place on Thursday 8 March from 2.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. in the Pump Room, Building 216-R-401.

  12. Evaluasi Risiko Keterlambatan Pekerjaan Pembangunan Apron Baru Bandara Sultan Syarif Kasim II, Pekanbaru

    OpenAIRE

    Yulita, Syifa; Sandhyavitri, Ari; Malik, Alfian

    2017-01-01

    Implementation of the project of New Apron Development Workshop of Sultan Syarif Kasim II Airport, Pekanbaru from initial observations of previous authors poses a risk during the construction period of unpredictable events by civil engineer is a force majure condition such as unpredictable volume during interim planning The time set does not include unexpected or over volume work. The delay that occurred in the project of Advanced Construction Work of New Apron Sultan Syarif Kasim II Airport,...

  13. A stress management workshop improves residents' coping skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, J D; Sachs, C L

    1991-11-01

    We describe the effectiveness of a stress management workshop designed for physicians. Of the 64 medicine, pediatrics, and medicine-pediatrics residents who agreed to participate in the workshop, the 43 who could be freed from clinical responsibilities constituted the intervention group; the 21 residents who could not be freed from clinical responsibilities were asked to be the nonintervention group. The ESSI Stress Systems Instrument and Maslach Burnout Inventory were administered to control subjects and workshop participants 2 weeks before and 6 weeks after the workshop. The half-day workshops taught management of the stresses of medical practice through: (1) learning and practicing interpersonal skills that increase the availability of social support; (2) prioritization of personal, work, and educational demands; (3) techniques to increase stamina and attend to self-care needs; (4) recognition and avoidance of maladaptive responses; and (5) positive outlook skills. Overall, the ESSI Stress Systems Instrument test scores for the workshop participants improved (+1.27), while the nonintervention group's mean scores declined (-0.65). All 21 individual ESSI Stress Systems Instrument scale items improved for the workshop, compared with eight of 21 items for the nonintervention group. The workshop group improved in the Maslach Burnout Inventory emotional exhaustion scale and deteriorated less than the nonintervention group in the depersonalization scale. We conclude that a modest, inexpensive stress management workshop was received positively, and can lead to significant short-term improvement in stress and burnout test scores for medicine and pediatrics residents.

  14. Proceedings: An international workshop on offshore lease abandonment and platform disposal: Technology, regulation, and environmental effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulsipher, A. [ed.] [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Center for Energy Studies

    1997-03-01

    This Proceedings volume includes papers prepared for an international workshop on lease abandonment and offshore platform disposal. The workshop was held April 15, 16, and 17, 1996, in New Orleans, Louisiana. Included in the volume are several plenary speeches and issue papers. prepared by six working groups, who discussed: Abandoning Wells; Abandoning Pipelines; Removing Facilities; Site Clearance; Habitat Management, Maintenance, and Planning; and Regulation and Policy. Also included are an introduction, an afterword (reprinted with the permission of its author, John Lohrenz), and, as Appendix C, the complete report of the National Research Council Marine Boards An Assessment of Techniques for Removing Fixed Offshore Structures, around which much of the discussion at the workshop was organized. Short biographies of many speakers, organizers, and chairpersons are included as Appendix A. Appendix B is a list of conference participants. Selected papers have been processes separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

  15. Buildings energy management program workshop design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-12-01

    This document describes activities undertaken by Honeywell's Energy Resources Center for design and development of the format, content, and materials that were used in conducting 129 one-day energy management workshops for specific commercial business audiences. The Building Energy Management Workshop Program was part of a National Workshop Program that was intended to increase awareness of energy-related issues and to encourage energy-conservation actions on the part of commercial and industrial sectors. The total effort included executive conferences for chief executive officers and other senior management personnel; industrial energy-conservation workshops directed at plant management and engineering personnel; vanpooling workshops designed to inform and encourage business in implementing a vanpooling program for employees; and the building energy-management workshops specifically developed for managers, owners, and operators of office and retail facilities, restaurants, and supermarkets. The total program spanned nearly two years and reached approximately 2,500 participants from all parts of the U.S. A detailed followup evaluation is still being conducted to determine the impact of this program in terms of conservation action undertaken by workshop participants.

  16. Sixth international wind-diesel workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    At a workshop on hybrid wind/diesel power generation systems, papers were presented on international research programs, demonstration projects, wind/diesel deployment strategies and requirements, wind/diesel market development and economics, wind turbine design requirements, and wind/diesel models and analytical tools. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 11 papers from this workshop

  17. Sixth international wind-diesel workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    At a workshop on hybrid wind/diesel power generation systems, papers were presented on international research programs, demonstration projects, wind/diesel deployment strategies and requirements, wind/diesel market development and economics, wind turbine design requirements, and wind/diesel models and analytical tools. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 11 papers from this workshop.

  18. Proceedings of the 3rd US-Japan Workshop on Plasma Polarization Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Flyimoto, T

    2002-01-01

    The third US-Japan Workshop on Plasma Polarization Spectroscopy was held at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, on June 18-21, 2001. The talks presented at this workshop are summarized in these proceedings. The papers cover both experimental investigation and applications of plasma polarization spectroscopy as well as the theoretical foundation and formalisms to understand and describe the polarization phenomena. The papers give an overview of the history of plasma polarization spectroscopy, derive the formal aspects of polarization spectroscopy, including the effects of electric and magnetic fields, discuss spectra perturbed by intense microwave fields, charge exchange, and dielectronic recombination, and present calculations of various collisional excitation and ionization cross sections and the modeling of plasma polarization spectroscopy phenomena. Experimental results are given from the WT-3 tokamak, the MST reverse field pinch, the Large Helical Device, the GAMMA 10 mirror machine, the Nevada Terrawatt Facility, the Livermore EBIT-II electron beam ion trap, and beam-foil spectroscopy. In addition, results were presented from studies of several laser-produced plasma experiments and new instrumental techniques were demonstrated

  19. Workshop presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanden, Per-Olof; Edland, Anne; Reiersen, Craig; Mullins, Peter; Ingemarsson, Karl-Fredrik; Bouchard, Andre; Watts, Germaine; Johnstone, John; Hollnagel, Erik; Ramberg, Patric; Reiman, Teemu

    2009-01-01

    An important part of the workshop was a series of invited presentations. The presentations were intended to both provide the participants with an understanding of various organisational approaches and activities as well as to stimulate the exchange of ideas during the small group discussion sessions. The presentation subjects ranged from current organisational regulations and licensee activities to new organisational research and the benefits of viewing organisations from a different perspective. There were more than a dozen invited presentations. The initial set of presentations gave the participants an overview of the background, structure, and aims of the workshop. This included a short presentation on the results from the regulatory responses to the pre-workshop survey. Representatives from four countries (Sweden, Canada, Finland, and the United Kingdom) expanded upon their survey responses with detailed presentations on both regulatory and licensee safety-related organisational activities in their countries. There were also presentations on new research concerning how to evaluate safety critical organisations and on a resilience engineering perspective to safety critical organisations. Below is the list of the presentations, the slides of which being available in Appendix 2: 1 - Workshop Welcome (Per-Olof Sanden); 2 - CSNI Working Group on Human and Organisational Factors (Craig Reiersen); 3 - Regulatory expectations on justification of suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Anne Edland); 4 - Justifying the suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Karl-Fredrik Ingemarsson); 5 - Nuclear Organisational Suitability in Canada (Andre Bouchard); 6 - Designing and Resourcing for Safety and Effectiveness (Germaine Watts); 7 - Organisational Suitability - What do you need and how do you know that you've got it? (Craig Reiersen); 8 - Suitability of Organisations - UK Regulator's View (Peter

  20. Proceedings of the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management: Waste reduction workshop 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    The focus of this workshop was on goal setting and the methods of establishing meaningful goals for a waste minimization program. These workshops assist DOE waste-generating sites in implementing waste minimization plans and programs, thus providing for optimal waste reduction within the DOE complex. All wastes are considered liquid, solid, and airborne within the categories of high-level waste, transuranic waste (TRU), low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, mixed waste, office waste, and sanitary waste. Topics of discussion within workshops encompass a wide range of subjects. Subjects include any method or technical activity from waste generation to disposal, such as process design or improvements, substitution of materials, waste segregation and recycling/reuse, waste treatment and processing, and administrative controls (procurement and waste awareness training). Consideration is also given to activities for remedial action and for decontamination and decommissioning

  1. Proceedings of workshop 5: Flow and transport through unsaturated fractured rock -- related to high-level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.D.; Nicholson, T.J.

    1993-06-01

    The ''Workshop on Flow and Transport Through Unsaturated Fractured Rock Related to High-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal'' was cosponsored by the NRC, the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, and the University of Arizona (UAZ) and was held in Tucson, Arizona, on January 7--10, 1991. The focus of this workshop, similar to the earlier four (the first being in 1982), related to hydrogeologic technical issues associated with possible disposal of commercial high-level nuclear waste (HLW) in a geologic repository within an unsaturated fractured rock system which coincides with the UAZ field studies on HLW disposal. The presentations and discussions centered on flow and transport processes and conditions, relevant parameters, as well as state-of-the-art measurement techniques, and modeling capabilities. The workshop consisted of: four half-day technical meetings, a one day field visit to the Apache Leap test site to review ongoing field studies that are examining site characterization techniques and developing data sets for model validation studies, and a final half-day session devoted to examining research needs related to modeling groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in unsaturated, fractured rock. These proceedings provide extended abstracts of the technical presentations and short summaries of the research group reports

  2. Designing and Using Videos in Undergraduate Geoscience Education - a workshop and resource website review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, K.; Mcconnell, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Do you use video in your teaching? Do you make your own video? Interested in joining our growing community of geoscience educators designing and using video inside and outside the classroom? Over four months in Spring 2014, 22 educators of varying video design and development expertise participated in an NSF-funded On the Cutting Edge virtual workshop to review the best educational research on video design and use; to share video-development/use strategies and experiences; and to develop a website of resources for a growing community of geoscience educators who use video: http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/video/workshop2014/index.html. The site includes links to workshop presentations, teaching activity collections, and a growing collection of online video resources, including "How-To" videos for various video editing or video-making software and hardware options. Additional web resources support several topical themes including: using videos to flip classes, handling ADA access and copyright issues, assessing the effectiveness of videos inside and outside the classroom, best design principles for video learning, and lists and links of the best videos publicly available for use. The workshop represents an initial step in the creation of an informal team of collaborators devoted to the development and support of an ongoing network of geoscience educators designing and using video. Instructors who are interested in joining this effort are encouraged to contact the lead author.

  3. PREFACE: Collapse Calderas Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottsmann, Jo; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo

    2008-10-01

    Caldera-formation is one of the most awe-inspiring and powerful displays of nature's force. Resultant deposits may cover vast areas and significantly alter the immediate topography. Post-collapse activity may include resurgence, unrest, intra-caldera volcanism and potentially the start of a new magmatic cycle, perhaps eventually leading to renewed collapse. Since volcanoes and their eruptions are the surface manifestation of magmatic processes, calderas provide key insights into the generation and evolution of large-volume silicic magma bodies in the Earth's crust. Despite their potentially ferocious nature, calderas play a crucial role in modern society's life. Collapse calderas host essential economic deposits and supply power for many via the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs, and thus receive considerable scientific, economic and industrial attention. Calderas also attract millions of visitors world-wide with their spectacular scenic displays. To build on the outcomes of the 2005 calderas workshop in Tenerife (Spain) and to assess the most recent advances on caldera research, a follow-up meeting was proposed to be held in Mexico in 2008. This abstract volume presents contributions to the 2nd Calderas Workshop held at Hotel Misión La Muralla, Querétaro, Mexico, 19-25 October 2008. The title of the workshop `Reconstructing the evolution of collapse calderas: Magma storage, mobilisation and eruption' set the theme for five days of presentations and discussions, both at the venue as well as during visits to the surrounding calderas of Amealco, Amazcala and Huichapan. The multi-disciplinary workshop was attended by more than 40 scientist from North, Central and South America, Europe, Australia and Asia. Contributions covered five thematic topics: geology, geochemistry/petrology, structural analysis/modelling, geophysics, and hazards. The workshop was generously supported by the International Association of Volcanology and the Chemistry of The Earth's Interior

  4. Thermophysical properties of the MER and Beagle II landing site regions on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Hynek, Brian M.; Pelkey, Shannon M.; Mellon, Michael T.; Martínez-Alonso, Sara; Putzig, Nathaniel E.; Murphy, Nate; Christensen, Philip R.

    2006-08-01

    We analyzed remote-sensing observations of the Isidis Basin, Gusev Crater, and Meridiani Planum landing sites for Beagle II, MER-A Spirit, and MER-B Opportunity spacecraft, respectively. We emphasized the thermophysical properties using daytime and nighttime radiance measurements from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer and Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) and thermal inertias derived from nighttime data sets. THEMIS visible images, MGS Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) narrow-angle images, and MGS Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data are incorporated as well. Additionally, the remote-sensing data were compared with ground-truth at the MER sites. The Isidis Basin surface layer has been shaped by aeolian processes and erosion by slope winds coming off of the southern highlands and funneling through notches between massifs. In the Gusev region, surface materials of contrasting thermophysical properties have been interpreted as rocks or bedrock, duricrust, and dust deposits; these are consistent with a complex geological history dominated by volcanic and aeolian processes. At Meridiani Planum the many layers having different thermophysical and erosional properties suggest periodic deposition of differing sedimentological facies possibly related to clast size, grain orientation and packing, or mineralogy.

  5. PREFACE: 3rd International Workshop on Statistical Physics and Mathematics for Complex Systems (SPMCS 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayurskii, Dmitrii; Abe, Sumiyoshi; Alexandre Wang, Q.

    2012-11-01

    The 3rd International Workshop on Statistical Physics and Mathematics for Complex Systems (SPMCS2012) was held between 25-30 August at Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University, Kazan, Russian Federation. This workshop was jointly organized by Kazan Federal University and Institut Supérieur des Matériaux et Mécaniques Avancées (ISMANS), France. The series of SPMCS workshops was created in 2008 with the aim to be an interdisciplinary incubator for the worldwide exchange of innovative ideas and information about the latest results. The first workshop was held at ISMANS, Le Mans (France) in 2008, and the third at Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan (China) in 2010. At SPMCS2012, we wished to bring together a broad community of researchers from the different branches of the rapidly developing complexity science to discuss the fundamental theoretical challenges (geometry/topology, number theory, statistical physics, dynamical systems, etc) as well as experimental and applied aspects of many practical problems (condensed matter, disordered systems, financial markets, chemistry, biology, geoscience, etc). The program of SPMCS2012 was prepared based on three categories: (i) physical and mathematical studies (quantum mechanics, generalized nonequilibrium thermodynamics, nonlinear dynamics, condensed matter physics, nanoscience); (ii) natural complex systems (physical, geophysical, chemical and biological); (iii) social, economical, political agent systems and man-made complex systems. The conference attracted 64 participants from 10 countries. There were 10 invited lectures, 12 invited talks and 28 regular oral talks in the morning and afternoon sessions. The book of Abstracts is available from the conference website (http://www.ksu.ru/conf/spmcs2012/?id=3). A round table was also held, the topic of which was 'Recent and Anticipated Future Progress in Science of Complexity', discussing a variety of questions and opinions important for the understanding of the concept of

  6. Proceedings of the National Silviculture Workshop: The Shelterwood Regeneration Method; Charleston, South Carolina September 17-21, 1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Cramsey; Carl Puuri; Dick Miller; Billy E. Page; David Smith; David Marquis; Jack Usher; Bob Naumann; William Beaufait; Robert Loomis; Edward Smith; David Loftis; Gordon Langdon; Thomas Croker; William Boyer; Jim Edgren; Douglas Roy; John Hughes; Charles Boldt; Glenn Jacobson; Dick Godman; Carl Tubbs; Ivan Sander; Bob Blomquist

    1979-01-01

    Historic Charleston, South Carolina was the site of the 1979 Silviculture Workshop. The objective of the meeting was to discuss state of the art application of the shelterwood regeneration method to forests of the United States. These proceedings include the presentations of the individuals on the program.

  7. Proceedings of the fifth workshop on containment integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, M.B.; Hughey, C.E. [eds.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-07-01

    The Fifth Workshop on Containment integrity was held in Washington, DC, on May 12--14, 1992. The purpose of these workshops is to provide an international forum for the exchange of information on performance of containments in nuclear power plants under severe accident loadings. Severe accident investigations of existing containment designs as well as future advanced containments were presented during the workshop. There were 145 participants at the workshop from 15 countries. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  8. Effects of ionizing radiation on terrestrial plants and animals: A workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnthouse, L.W.

    1995-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Air, Water, and Radiation Division (EH-412) is preparing to issue protective radiological standards for aquatic and terrestrial organisms. To support this effort, DOE sponsored a workshop to evaluate the adequacy of current approaches to radiological protection. Workshop participants reviewed and discussed a 1992 International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) report on radiological protection of biota for its adequacy and completeness in answering the following questions: can DOE use these data and conclusions for promulgating radiological standards for the protection of terrestrial organisms; are the conclusions given in this report still valid or have they been superseded by more recent data? The consensus of the workshop participants was that the dose limits for animals and plants recommended by the IAEA are adequately supported by the available scientific information. Participants agreed, however, that better guidance on application of those dose limits is needed. Participants further agreed with the IAEA that dose limits deigned to protect humans generally protect biota as well, except when (1) human access is restricted without restricting access by biota, (2) unique exposure pathways exist, (3) rare or endangered species are present, or (4) other stresses are significant. To deal with these exceptions, site-specific exposures should be considered in developing secondary standards.

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation on terrestrial plants and animals: A workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnthouse, L.W.

    1995-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Air, Water, and Radiation Division (EH-412) is preparing to issue protective radiological standards for aquatic and terrestrial organisms. To support this effort, DOE sponsored a workshop to evaluate the adequacy of current approaches to radiological protection. Workshop participants reviewed and discussed a 1992 International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) report on radiological protection of biota for its adequacy and completeness in answering the following questions: can DOE use these data and conclusions for promulgating radiological standards for the protection of terrestrial organisms; are the conclusions given in this report still valid or have they been superseded by more recent data? The consensus of the workshop participants was that the dose limits for animals and plants recommended by the IAEA are adequately supported by the available scientific information. Participants agreed, however, that better guidance on application of those dose limits is needed. Participants further agreed with the IAEA that dose limits deigned to protect humans generally protect biota as well, except when (1) human access is restricted without restricting access by biota, (2) unique exposure pathways exist, (3) rare or endangered species are present, or (4) other stresses are significant. To deal with these exceptions, site-specific exposures should be considered in developing secondary standards

  10. Quality assurance during site construction. Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potrz, R.; Dilling, H.

    1980-01-01

    Quality control during the assembly of an pressure water reactor containment: 1.) Fundamental principles of the quality control: short explanation to the specification and job instruction. 2.) Quality control during the assembly: welding control, non destructive material test. 3.) Quality deviations: explanation of an repair-plan. 4.) Documentation: join together the workshop- and site documentation. (orig.)

  11. PS2004 Light-harvesting Systems Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    This special issue of the international scientific research journal Photosynthesis Research consists of 25 original peer-reviewed contributions from participants in the PS 2004 Lisht-Harvesting Systems Workshop. This workshop was held from 26-29, 2004 at Hotel Le Chantecler, Sainte-Adele, Quebec, Canada. The workshop was a satellite meeting of the XIII International Congress on Photosynthesis held August 29-September 3, 2004 in Montreal, Canada. The workshope dealt with all types of photosynthetic antenna systems and types of organisms, including anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, algae and higher plants, as well as in vitro studies of isolated pigments. This collection of papers is a good representation of the highly interdisciplinary nature of modern research on photosynthetic antenna complexes, utilizing techniques of advanced spectroscopy, biochemistry, molecular biology, synthetic chemistry and structural determination to understand these diverse and elegant molecular complexes.

  12. Influence Of Extension Education Workshop On Cabbage Growers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence Of Extension Education Workshop On Cabbage Growers Awareness And Knowledge Of Ipm In Aghtapeh Town, Iran. ... A survey was conducted among 60 farmers in Karaj County that included 30 workshop participants, and 30 randomly selected farmers. The study found that workshop participants had ...

  13. PROBABILISTIC SENSITIVITY AND UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS WORKSHOP SUMMARY REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, R

    2008-06-25

    Stochastic or probabilistic modeling approaches are being applied more frequently in the United States and globally to quantify uncertainty and enhance understanding of model response in performance assessments for disposal of radioactive waste. This increased use has resulted in global interest in sharing results of research and applied studies that have been completed to date. This technical report reflects the results of a workshop that was held to share results of research and applied work related to performance assessments conducted at United States Department of Energy sites. Key findings of this research and applied work are discussed and recommendations for future activities are provided.

  14. Structural basis of carbohydrate recognition by lectin II from Ulex europaeus, a protein with a promiscuous carbohydrate-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loris, R; De Greve, H; Dao-Thi, M H; Messens, J; Imberty, A; Wyns, L

    2000-08-25

    Protein-carbohydrate interactions are the language of choice for inter- cellular communication. The legume lectins form a large family of homologous proteins that exhibit a wide variety of carbohydrate specificities. The legume lectin family is therefore highly suitable as a model system to study the structural principles of protein-carbohydrate recognition. Until now, structural data are only available for two specificity families: Man/Glc and Gal/GalNAc. No structural data are available for any of the fucose or chitobiose specific lectins. The crystal structure of Ulex europaeus (UEA-II) is the first of a legume lectin belonging to the chitobiose specificity group. The complexes with N-acetylglucosamine, galactose and fucosylgalactose show a promiscuous primary binding site capable of accommodating both N-acetylglucos amine or galactose in the primary binding site. The hydrogen bonding network in these complexes can be considered suboptimal, in agreement with the low affinities of these sugars. In the complexes with chitobiose, lactose and fucosyllactose this suboptimal hydrogen bonding network is compensated by extensive hydrophobic interactions in a Glc/GlcNAc binding subsite. UEA-II thus forms the first example of a legume lectin with a promiscuous binding site and illustrates the importance of hydrophobic interactions in protein-carbohydrate complexes. Together with other known legume lectin crystal structures, it shows how different specificities can be grafted upon a conserved structural framework. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  15. Proceedings of 6th International Microbeam Workshop/12th L.H. Gray Workshop Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prise, Kevin M.

    2004-01-01

    The extended abstracts which are submitted here present a summary of the proceedings of the 6th International Workshop/12th LH Gray Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at St. Catherine's College, University of Oxford, UK on March, 29th-31st, 2003. In 1993 the 4th LH Gray Workshop entitled ''Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response'' was held at the Gray Cancer Institute in Northwood. This was organized by Prof BD Michael, Dr M. Folkard and Dr KM Prise and brought together 40 participants interested in developing and applying new microbeam technology to problems in radiation biology (1). The workshop was an undoubted success and has spawned a series of subsequent workshops every two years. In the past, these workshops have been highly successful in bringing together groups interested in developing and applying micro-irradiation techniques to the study of cell and tissue damage by ionizing radiations. Following the first microbeam workshop, there has been a rapid growth in the number of centres developing radiobiology microbeams, or planning to do so and there are currently 15-20 worldwide. Much of the recent research using microbeams has used them to study low-dose effects and ''non-targeted'' responses such bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. The goal of the 6th workshop was to build on our knowledge of the development of microbeam approaches and the application to radiation biology in the future with the meeting stretching over a 3 day period. Over 80 participants reviewed the current state of radiobiology microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments both in the fields of physics and biology

  16. Rapporteur's Report of the Workshop on Radiological Characterisation for Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierfeldt, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    In April 2012, the Nuclear Energy Agency, in co-operation with Studsvik Nuclear AB, the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM), Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) and AB SVAFO, held a Workshop on Radiological Characterisation in Decommissioning in Studsvik near Nykoeping (Sweden). During three days, a wide range of presentations, posters, discussions and site visits brought together over 120 participants from 23 countries and 4 international organisations, the IAEA, the WNA, the European Commission and the OECD/NEA. Members of the Task Group on Radiological Characterisation for Decommissioning (RCD) of the WPDD were involved in the preparation of the workshop. Many decommissioning projects of all types of nuclear installations have progressed substantially and/or have been completed to brown field or green field conditions, so that it was the right time to bring together operators, regulators, scientists, consultants and contractors to exchange information and views and to evaluate the information on radiological characterisation gained from this multitude of projects. The outcome will be valuable for the large number of decommissioning projects about to start in the near future. The Workshop consisted of 5 topical sessions and a poster session. The topical sessions were complemented by discussions in the plenary and in smaller groups. This report provides a short summary of the various presentations and discussions. It concentrates on the outcome of the presentations, posters and discussions than giving an account of the spoken word

  17. Workshop introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeper, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has three subprograms that directly reduce the nuclear/radiological threat; Convert (Highly Enriched Uranium), Protect (Facilities), and Remove (Materials). The primary mission of the Off-Site Source Recovery Project (OSRP) falls under the 'Remove' subset. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a venue for joint-technical collaboration between the OSRP and the Nuclear Radiation Safety Service (NRSS). Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace initiative and the Soviet equivalent both promoted the spread of the paradoxical (peaceful and harmful) properties of the atom. The focus of nonproliferation efforts has been rightly dedicated to fissile materials and the threat they pose. Continued emphasis on radioactive materials must also be encouraged. An unquantifiable threat still exists in the prolific quantity of sealed radioactive sources (sources) spread worldwide. It does not appear that the momentum of the evolution in the numerous beneficial applications of radioactive sources will subside in the near future. Numerous expert studies have demonstrated the potentially devastating economic and psychological impacts of terrorist use of a radiological dispersal or emitting device. The development of such a weapon, from the acquisition of the material to the technical knowledge needed to develop and use it, is straightforward. There are many documented accounts worldwide of accidental and purposeful diversions of radioactive materials from regulatory control. The burden of securing sealed sources often falls upon the source owner, who may not have a disposal pathway once the source reaches the end of its useful life. This disposal problem is exacerbated by some source owners not having the resources to safely and compliantly store them. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) data suggests that, in the US alone, there are tens of thousands of high-activity (IAEA

  18. Solid waste processing and compaction in the AD2 workshop of the new La Hague reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, B.M.; Vigreux, B.

    1987-01-01

    The AD2 workshop of the new spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at La Hague in France will process and package dry solid wastes. The waste packages will be segregated according to their activity levels and stored at temporary on-site facilities. Full commissioning is scheduled for end-1988. However, operation of the TO dry spent field unloading and receiving unit at La Hague required early availability of some waste processing functions and part of the AD2 workshop was commissioned towards the end of 1986. The new La Hague plant is organized into four main zones: - zone 1 is an uncontrolled area with no permanent contamination and zero risk of accidental contamination, - zone 2 is a controlled are with no permanent contamination and low risk of accidental minor contamination, - zone 3 is a controlled area with no permanent contamination but a risk of minor contamination due to various incidents, - zone 4 is a controlled area with permanent contamination. The AD2 workshop will handle all dry solid wastes from zones 2, 3 and 4. It will also: characterize the resulting waste packages (contents, mass, alpha, beta and gamma activity, dose equivalent rate) and check for absence of surface contamination; transfer the packages to temporary on-site storage facilities; store and administer mobile handling tasks and transporters

  19. CHDS Sponsors Critical Infrastructure Protection Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2008-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security, PRESS RELEASES The NPS Center for Homeland Defense and Security in partnership with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security recently hosted its first Critical Infrastructure Protection Workshop. The workshop brought together practitioners and...

  20. Theory for site-site pair distribution functions of molecular fluids. II. Approximations for the Percus--Yevick site-site direct correlation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.

    1977-01-01

    A theory for site-site pair distribution functions of molecular fluids is derived from the Ornstein-Zernike equation. Atom-atom pair distribution functions of this theory which were obtained by using different approximations for the Percus-Yevick site-site direct correlation functions are compared

  1. High-Penetration Photovoltaics Standards and Codes Workshop, Denver, Colorado, May 20, 2010: Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coddington, M.; Kroposki, B.; Basso, T.; Lynn, K.; Herig, C.; Bower, W.

    2010-09-01

    Effectively interconnecting high-level penetration of photovoltaic (PV) systems requires careful technical attention to ensuring compatibility with electric power systems. Standards, codes, and implementation have been cited as major impediments to widespread use of PV within electric power systems. On May 20, 2010, in Denver, Colorado, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), held a workshop to examine the key technical issues and barriers associated with high PV penetration levels with an emphasis on codes and standards. This workshop included building upon results of the High Penetration of Photovoltaic (PV) Systems into the Distribution Grid workshop held in Ontario California on February 24-25, 2009, and upon the stimulating presentations of the diverse stakeholder presentations.

  2. Planning for environmental restoration of uranium mining and milling sites in Central and Eastern Europe. Proceedings of a workshop held under the technical co-operation project RER/9/022 on environmental restoration in Central and Eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    An IAEA Regional Technical Co-operation (TC) project RER/9/022 on ``Environmental Restoration`` for central and eastern Europe and the former USSR was launched in 1992 and concluded at the end of 1996. The first phase of this project had the primary purpose of identifying and characterizing radioactively contaminated sites in the region, including evaluation of doses to the general public and other environmental impacts. The main result of this phase of the project were published in IAEA-TECDOC-865. A new 1995-1996 phase of the project focused on the radioactive contamination of uranium mining and milling sites and the development of plans for environmental restoration of these sites. While the 1993-1994 phase aimed at attracting the attention of Member States in the region to a long neglected problem, the second phase served as a stimulus to initiate concrete planning activities that would lead to corrective actions in highly contaminated areas in those countries. As a consequence, the project emphasis shifted from scientific discussions to the identification of responsibilities, planning activities, and the assessment of existing and required resources for the eventual implementation of restoration plans. The 1995-1996 phase of the project consisted of a planning meeting and three workshops that addressed different topical themes. The papers compiled in this publication were presented at the last workshop, held in Felix, Romania, 4-8 November 1996. They summarize national situations in environmental contamination as of the end of 1996 and ongoing or planned actions for remediation. Refs, figs, tabs.

  3. Planning for environmental restoration of uranium mining and milling sites in Central and Eastern Europe. Proceedings of a workshop held under the technical co-operation project RER/9/022 on environmental restoration in Central and Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    An IAEA Regional Technical Co-operation (TC) project RER/9/022 on ''Environmental Restoration'' for central and eastern Europe and the former USSR was launched in 1992 and concluded at the end of 1996. The first phase of this project had the primary purpose of identifying and characterizing radioactively contaminated sites in the region, including evaluation of doses to the general public and other environmental impacts. The main result of this phase of the project were published in IAEA-TECDOC-865. A new 1995-1996 phase of the project focused on the radioactive contamination of uranium mining and milling sites and the development of plans for environmental restoration of these sites. While the 1993-1994 phase aimed at attracting the attention of Member States in the region to a long neglected problem, the second phase served as a stimulus to initiate concrete planning activities that would lead to corrective actions in highly contaminated areas in those countries. As a consequence, the project emphasis shifted from scientific discussions to the identification of responsibilities, planning activities, and the assessment of existing and required resources for the eventual implementation of restoration plans. The 1995-1996 phase of the project consisted of a planning meeting and three workshops that addressed different topical themes. The papers compiled in this publication were presented at the last workshop, held in Felix, Romania, 4-8 November 1996. They summarize national situations in environmental contamination as of the end of 1996 and ongoing or planned actions for remediation

  4. Workshop I: Gender Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessey, Eden; Kurup, Anitha; Meza-Montes, Lilia; Shastri, Prajval; Ghose, Shohini

    2015-12-01

    Participants in the Gender Studies workshop of the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics discussed the gender question in science practice from a policy perspective, informed by investigations from the social science disciplines. The workshop's three sessions—"Equity and Education: Examining Gender Stigma in Science," "A Comparative Study of Women Scientists and Engineers: Experiences in India and the US," and "Toward Gender Equity Through Policy: Characterizing the Social Impact of Interventions—are summarized, and the resulting recommendations presented.

  5. The second international workshop on enterprise security

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, V; Ramachandran, M; Yen, NN; Walters, RJ; Wills, G

    2016-01-01

    Welcome to our second international workshop on Enterprise Security as part of CloudCom 2015, Vancouver, Canada, November 30-December 3, 2015. The first international workshop held in Singapore has been a major success since then we have achieved greater team activities, research, and international collaborations as the major and significant outcome of our first workshop on this topic. Enterprise Security involves all business, products, governments, organization, and their contractors. This ...

  6. Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Report - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, W.I.

    1994-09-28

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Program, a joint effort to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site`s high-level waste tanks. In Phase II, the program has been expanded to include inorganic constituents in addition to radionuclides. Results from Phase II that exceeded 20% relative percent difference criteria are identified.

  7. Evolution of Metal(Loid) Binding Sites in Transcriptional Regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez, E.; Thiyagarajan, S.; Cook, J.D.; Stemmler, T.L.; Gil, J.A.; Mateos, L.M.; Rosen, B.P.

    2009-05-22

    Expression of the genes for resistance to heavy metals and metalloids is transcriptionally regulated by the toxic ions themselves. Members of the ArsR/SmtB family of small metalloregulatory proteins respond to transition metals, heavy metals, and metalloids, including As(III), Sb(III), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Co(II), and Ni(II). These homodimeric repressors bind to DNA in the absence of inducing metal(loid) ion and dissociate from the DNA when inducer is bound. The regulatory sites are often three- or four-coordinate metal binding sites composed of cysteine thiolates. Surprisingly, in two different As(III)-responsive regulators, the metalloid binding sites were in different locations in the repressor, and the Cd(II) binding sites were in two different locations in two Cd(II)-responsive regulators. We hypothesize that ArsR/SmtB repressors have a common backbone structure, that of a winged helix DNA-binding protein, but have considerable plasticity in the location of inducer binding sites. Here we show that an As(III)-responsive member of the family, CgArsR1 from Corynebacterium glutamicum, binds As(III) to a cysteine triad composed of Cys{sup 15}, Cys{sup 16}, and Cys{sup 55}. This binding site is clearly unrelated to the binding sites of other characterized ArsR/SmtB family members. This is consistent with our hypothesis that metal(loid) binding sites in DNA binding proteins evolve convergently in response to persistent environmental pressures.

  8. Special workshop on lung dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    A Special Workshop on Lung Dosimetry was convened in Salt Lake City, Utah, on April 21-22, 1982, to stimulate the use of improved radiation dosimetry and to formulate a stronger basis for dose-response relationships for inhaled radionuclides. The two-day workshop was held in conjunction with the 30th Annual Meeting of the Radiation Research Society. Publication is planned

  9. Entrepreneurship Education: Workshops and Entrepreneurial Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Using data collected from participants in an entrepreneurship education workshop series, the author examined the series' impact and tested a model of entrepreneurial intentions incorporating social and psychological factors. He found that entrepreneurial disposition and workshop participation significantly influenced intentions, exposure to role…

  10. Cleanroom Energy Efficiency Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschudi, Bill

    1999-03-15

    On March 15, 1999, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory hosted a workshop focused on energy efficiency in Cleanroom facilities. The workshop was held as part of a multiyear effort sponsored by the California Institute for Energy Efficiency, and the California Energy Commission. It is part of a project that concentrates on improving energy efficiency in Laboratory type facilities including cleanrooms. The project targets the broad market of laboratory and cleanroom facilities, and thus cross-cuts many different industries and institutions. This workshop was intended to raise awareness by sharing case study success stories, providing a forum for industry networking on energy issues, contributing LBNL expertise in research to date, determining barriers to implementation and possible solutions, and soliciting input for further research.

  11. Extreme Conditions Modeling Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coe, Ryan Geoffrey [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Neary, Vincent Sinclair [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lawon, Michael J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yu, Yi-Hsiang [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Weber, Jochem [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted the Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Extreme Conditions Modeling (ECM) Workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico on May 13–14, 2014. The objective of the workshop was to review the current state of knowledge on how to numerically and experimentally model WECs in extreme conditions (e.g. large ocean storms) and to suggest how national laboratory resources could be used to improve ECM methods for the benefit of the wave energy industry. More than 30 U.S. and European WEC experts from industry, academia, and national research institutes attended the workshop, which consisted of presentations from W EC developers, invited keynote presentations from subject matter experts, breakout sessions, and a final plenary session .

  12. Waterloo Workshop on Computer Algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Zima, Eugene; WWCA-2016; Advances in computer algebra : in honour of Sergei Abramov's' 70th birthday

    2018-01-01

    This book discusses the latest advances in algorithms for symbolic summation, factorization, symbolic-numeric linear algebra and linear functional equations. It presents a collection of papers on original research topics from the Waterloo Workshop on Computer Algebra (WWCA-2016), a satellite workshop of the International Symposium on Symbolic and Algebraic Computation (ISSAC’2016), which was held at Wilfrid Laurier University (Waterloo, Ontario, Canada) on July 23–24, 2016.   This workshop and the resulting book celebrate the 70th birthday of Sergei Abramov (Dorodnicyn Computing Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow), whose highly regarded and inspirational contributions to symbolic methods have become a crucial benchmark of computer algebra and have been broadly adopted by many Computer Algebra systems.

  13. Auroral Tomography Workshop, Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, Aa.

    1993-08-01

    In ionospheric and atmospheric physics the importance of multi-station imaging has grown as a consequence of the availability of scientific grade CCD cameras with digital output and affordable massive computing power. Tomographic inversion techniques are used in many different areas, e.g. medicine, plasma research and space physics. The tomography workshop was announced to gather a limited group of people interested in auroral tomography or tomographic inversion methods in general. ALIS (Auroral Large Imaging System) is a multi-station ground-based system developed primarily for three-dimensional auroral imaging, however other non-auroral objects can be studied with ALIS, e.g. stratospheric clouds. Several of the contributions in the workshop dealt with problems related to geometries similar to the ALIS-configuration. The Proceedings contain written contributions received either in abstract form or as full papers. The Proceedings also contain contributions intended for the Workshop but not presented due to the absence of the speaker. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 15 of the 17 papers

  14. Grid and Entrepreneurship Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The CERN openlab is organising a special workshop about Grid opportunities for entrepreneurship. This one-day event will provide an overview of what is involved in spin-off technology, with a special reference to the context of computing and data Grids. Lectures by experienced entrepreneurs will introduce the key concepts of entrepreneurship and review, in particular, the industrial potential of EGEE (the EU co-funded Enabling Grids for E-sciencE project, led by CERN). Case studies will be given by CEOs of European start-ups already active in the Grid and computing cluster area, and regional experts will provide an overview of efforts in several European regions to stimulate entrepreneurship. This workshop is designed to encourage students and researchers involved or interested in Grid technology to consider the entrepreneurial opportunities that this technology may create in the coming years. This workshop is organized as part of the CERN openlab student programme, which is co-sponsored by CERN, HP, ...

  15. Second workshop of I.A.G./A.I.G. SEDIBUD - Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments: Sediment fluxes and sediment budgets in changing high-latitude and high-altitude cold environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beylich, Achim A; Lamoureux, Scott F; Decaulne, Armelle

    2007-07-01

    This Second Workshop of the I.A.G./A.I.G. Working Group SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) builds on four previous ESF SEDIFLUX Science Meetings held in Saudarkrokur (Iceland) in June 2004, Clermont-Ferrand (France) in January 2005, Durham (UK) in December 2005 and Trondheim (Norway) in the end of October/beginning of November 2006. A first kick-off Meeting of the new I.A.G./A.I.G. SEDIBUD Workshop. The theme of this Second I.A.G./A.I.G. SEDIBUD Workshop is Sediment FLuxes and Sediment Budgets in Changing High-Latitude Cold Environments. The Workshop is split between scientific paper and poster presentations, presentation and discussion of SEDIBUD key test sites, discussions within defined work groups and guided field trip to Kaerkevagge. This workshop will address the key aim of SEDIBUD to discuss Source-to-Sink-Fluxes and Sediment Budgets in Changing Cold Environments. Major emphasis will be given to consequences of climate change, scaling issues and source-to-sink correlations. Central issues will be presentation and discussion of the SEDIFLUX Manual (First Edition), the selection of SEDIBUD key test sites, the discussion and development of further ideas to extend the scientific activities within SEDIBUD in a global framework.(auth)

  16. Thirteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1988-01-21

    PREFACE The Thirteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 19-21, 1988. Although 1987 continued to be difficult for the domestic geothermal industry, world-wide activities continued to expand. Two invited presentations on mature geothermal systems were a keynote of the meeting. Malcolm Grant presented a detailed review of Wairakei, New Zealand and highlighted plans for new development. G. Neri summarized experience on flow rate decline and well test analysis in Larderello, Italy. Attendance continued to be high with 128 registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, New Zealand, Japan, Mexico and The Philippines. A discussion of future workshops produced a strong recommendation that the Stanford Workshop program continue for the future. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Four technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published. In addition to these forty five technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Gustavo Calderon from the Inter-American Development Bank. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants a description of the Bank???s operations in Costa Rica developing alternative energy resources, specifically Geothermal, to improve the country???s economic basis. His talk appears as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: J. Combs, G. T. Cole, J. Counsil, A. Drenick, H. Dykstra, K. Goyal, P. Muffler, K. Pruess, and S. K. Sanyal. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Marilyn King, Pat Oto, Terri Ramey, Bronwyn Jones

  17. Exploring Programmatic Interoperability: Army Future Force Workshop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith , II., James D; Meyers, B. C

    2005-01-01

    .... It describes the background and motivation for the workshop, provides a brief overview of the workshop activities, and highlights the key observations and conclusions obtained through the course...

  18. IAEA monitoring field trials workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, H.H.; Cooley, J.N.; Belew, W.L.

    1995-01-01

    Recent safeguards inspections in Iraq and elsewhere by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have led to the supposition that environmental monitoring can aid in verifying declared and in detecting undeclared nuclear activities or operations. This assumption was most recently examined by the IAEA's Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation (SAGSI), in their reports to the IAEA Board of Governors. In their reports, SAGSI suggested that further assessment and development of environmental monitoring would be needed to fully evaluate its potential application to enhanced IAEA safeguards. Such an inquiry became part of the IAEA ''Programme 93+2'' assessment of measures to enhance IAEA safeguards. In March, 1994, the International Safeguards Group at Oak Ridge hosted an environmental monitoring field trial workshop for IAEA inspectors to train them in the techniques needed for effective environmental sampling. The workshop included both classroom lectures and actual field sampling exercises. The workshop was designed to emphasize the analytical infrastructure needed for an environmental program, practical sampling methods, and suggested procedures for properly planning a sampling campaign. Detailed techniques for swipe, vegetation, soil, biota, and water associated sampling were covered. The overall approach to the workshop, and observed results, are described

  19. Impressions from the 3rd Nordcode Seminar & Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Boelskifte, Per; Hansen, Claus Thorp

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarises the purpose and contents of the 3rd Nordcode Seminar and Workshop. First, the workshop assignments are described. Second, the paper briefly presents the topics of the keynote speeches and all presentations of the working papers that took place in the seminar.......This paper summarises the purpose and contents of the 3rd Nordcode Seminar and Workshop. First, the workshop assignments are described. Second, the paper briefly presents the topics of the keynote speeches and all presentations of the working papers that took place in the seminar....

  20. How to put on an ANS teachers' workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besmann, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    One of the most successful public outreach programs organized by the American Nuclear Society (ANS) has been the teachers' workshops. They are so highly thought of that a national meeting is considered incomplete without an attendant workshop. The workshops are also included in topical meetings, and a number are simply organized by local sections with no connection to a technical meeting. The accumulated experience with these workshops has now matured to where a set of reasonable guidelines can be established, although there are no guarantees of success or hard and fast rules