WorldWideScience

Sample records for site infection prevention

  1. Preventing surgical site infections: a surgeon's perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Nichols, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Wound site infections are a major source of postoperative illness, accounting for approximately a quarter of all nosocomial infections. National studies have defined the patients at highest risk for infection in general and in many specific operative procedures. Advances in risk assessment comparison may involve use of the standardized infection ratio, procedure-specific risk factor collection, and logistic regression models. Adherence to recommendations in the 1999 Centers for Disease Contro...

  2. Evolving issues in the prevention of surgical site infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, A

    2009-06-01

    Surgical site infection is one of the more common causes of post-operative morbidity. Such infections contribute to prolonged recovery, delayed discharge and increasing costs to both patients and the health service. In the current climate increased emphasis is being placed on minimising the risks of acquiring or transmitting these nosocomial infections. This article reviews the current literature obtained from a Pubmed database search in relation to three specific aspects of surgical site infection: compliance with prophylactic antibiotics, post-discharge surveillance and novel methods for preventing surgical site infections. These topics represent areas where many institutions will find room for improvement in the prevention of surgical site infections. Tight adherence to prophylactic antibiotic guidelines, close followup of surgical wounds during and after hospital discharge, and attention to oxygenation status and the body temperature of patients may all prove to be useful adjuncts in significantly decreasing surgical site infections.

  3. Preventing surgical site infection. Where now?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2009-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is increasingly recognised as a measure of the quality of patient care by surgeons, infection control practitioners, health planners and the public. There is increasing pressure to compare SSI rates between surgeons, institutions and countries. For this to be meaningful, data must be standardised and must include post-discharge surveillance (PDS) as many superficial SSIs do not present to the original institution. Further work is required to determine the best method of conducting PDS. In 2008 two important documents on SSI were published from the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America\\/The Infectious Disease Society of America and the National Institute for Health and Clincal Excellence, UK. Both emphasise key aspects during the preoperative, operative and postoperative phases of patient care. In addition to effective interventions known to be important for some time, e.g. not shaving the surgical site until the day of the procedure, there is increasing emphasis on physiological parameters, e.g. blood glucose concentrations, oxygen tensions and body temperature. Laparoscopic procedures are increasingly associated with reduced SSI rates, and the screening and decontamination of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers is effective for certain surgical procedures but has to be balanced by cost and the risk of mupirocin resistance. Finally, there is a need to convert theory into practice by the rigorous application of SSI healthcare bundles. Recent studies suggest that, with a multidisciplinary approach, simple measures can be effective in reducing SSI rates.

  4. Prevention and treatment of surgical site infection in HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Lei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infection (SSI are the third most frequently reported nosocomial infection, and the most common on surgical wards. HIV-infected patients may increase the possibility of developing SSI after surgery. There are few reported date on incidence and the preventive measures of SSI in HIV-infected patients. This study was to determine the incidence and the associated risk factors for SSI in HIV-infected patients. And we also explored the preventive measures. Methods A retrospective study of SSI was conducted in 242 HIV-infected patients including 17 patients who combined with hemophilia from October 2008 to September 2011 in Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. SSI were classified according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC criteria and identified by bedside surveillance and post-discharge follow-up. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 statistical software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL. Results The SSI incidence rate was 47.5% (115 of 242; 38.4% incisional SSIs, 5.4% deep incisional SSIs and 3.7% organ/space SSIs. The SSI incidence rate was 37.9% in HIV-infected patients undergoing abdominal operation. Patients undergoing abdominal surgery with lower preoperative CD4 counts were more likely to develop SSIs. The incidence increased from 2.6% in clean wounds to 100% in dirty wounds. In the HIV-infected patients combined with hemophilia, the mean preoperative albumin and postoperative hemoglobin were found significantly lower than those in no-SSIs group (P Conclusions SSI is frequent in HIV-infected patients. And suitable perioperative management may decrease the SSIs incidence rate of HIV-infected patients.

  5. Frequency and prevention of laparoscopic port site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taj, Muhammad Naeem; Iqbal, Yasmeen; Akbar, Zakia

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the usefulness and safety of the nonpowder surgical glove for extraction of the gallbladder in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The study was carried out in Capital Hospital Islamabad and in a private hospital. The duration of study was from March 2009 to March 2012. This was an observational study carried out in 492 patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy using the surgical glove for extraction of the gallbladder and compared with the conventional method of gall bladder removal in two hospitals were analyzed. The operative findings, port site infection and co morbid conditions were evaluated. Postoperative wound infection was found in 27 (5.48%) of 492 cases. Umbilical port infection was found in 26 (5.28%) of cases in which gall bladder was removed without endogloves and only one case (0.2%) had infection when gall bladder was removed with the endogloves. Wound infection was more in acute cholecystitis (25.9%) and empyema of Gall Bladder (44.4%). Among the co morbid conditions, diabetes mellitus has got higher frequency of wound infection (44%). The use of the surgical glove for extraction of the gallbladder is safe, cheap, simple and potentially reduces significant morbidity. Its routine use at laparoscopic cholecystectomy is mandatory in all cases.

  6. Teamwork and Collaboration for Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, E Patchen

    2016-04-01

    The surgeon has been regarded as the "captain of the ship" in the operating room (OR) for many years, but cannot accomplish successful operative intervention without the rest of the team. Review of the pertinent English-language literature. Many reports demonstrate very different impressions of teamwork and communication in the OR held by different members of the surgical team. Objective measures of teamwork and communication demonstrate a reduction in complications including surgical site infections with improved teamwork and communication, with fewer distractions such as noise, and with effective use of checklists. Efforts to improve teamwork and communication and promote the effective use of checklists promote patient safety and improved outcomes for patients with reduction in surgical site infections.

  7. The surgical care improvement project and prevention of post-operative infection, including surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Laura H; Politano, Amani D; Sawyer, Robert G

    2011-06-01

    In response to inconsistent compliance with infection prevention measures, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services collaborated with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the Surgical Infection Prevention (SIP) project, introduced in 2002. Quality improvement measures were developed to standardize processes to increase compliance. In 2006, the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) developed out of the SIP project and its process measures. These initiatives, published in the Specifications Manual for National Inpatient Quality Measures, outline process and outcome measures. This continually evolving manual is intended to provide standard quality measures to unify documentation and track standards of care. Seven of the SCIP initiatives apply to the peri-operative period: Prophylactic antibiotics should be received within 1 h prior to surgical incision (1), be selected for activity against the most probable antimicrobial contaminants (2), and be discontinued within 24 h after the surgery end-time (3); (4) euglycemia should be maintained, with well-controlled morning blood glucose concentrations on the first two post-operative days, especially in cardiac surgery patients; (6) hair at the surgical site should be removed with clippers or by depilatory methods, not with a blade; (9) urinary catheters are to be removed within the first two post-operative days; and (10) normothermia should be maintained peri-operatively. There is strong evidence that implementation of protocols that standardize practices reduce the risk of surgical infection. The SCIP initiative targets complications that account for a significant portion of preventable morbidity as well as cost. One of the goals of the SCIP guidelines was a 25% reduction in the incidence of surgical site infections from implementation through 2010. Process measures are becoming routine, and as we practice more evidence-based medicine, it falls to us, the surgeons and scientists, to be active

  8. Quality improvement initiative: Preventative Surgical Site Infection Protocol in Vascular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizh, David; Ascher, Enrico; Raza Rizvi, Syed Ali; Hingorani, Anil; Amaturo, Michael; Johnson, Eric

    2018-02-01

    Objective A quality improvement initiative was employed to decrease single institution surgical site infection rate in open lower extremity revascularization procedures. In an attempt to lower patient morbidity, we developed and implemented the Preventative Surgical Site Infection Protocol in Vascular Surgery. Surgical site infections lead to prolonged hospital stays, adjunctive procedure, and additive costs. We employed targeted interventions to address the common risk factors that predispose patients to post-operative complications. Methods Retrospective review was performed between 2012 and 2016 for all surgical site infections after revascularization procedures of the lower extremity. A quality improvement protocol was initiated in January 2015. Primary outcome was the assessment of surgical site infection rate reduction in the pre-protocol vs. post-protocol era. Secondary outcomes evaluated patient demographics, closure method, perioperative antibiotic coverage, and management outcomes. Results Implementation of the protocol decreased the surgical site infection rate from 6.4% to 1.6% p = 0.0137). Patient demographics and comorbidities were assessed and failed to demonstrate a statistically significant difference among the infection and no-infection groups. Wound closure with monocryl suture vs. staple proved to be associated with decreased surgical site infection rate ( p site infections in the vascular surgery population are effective and necessary. Our data suggest that there may be benefit in the incorporation of MRSA and Gram-negative coverage as part of the Surgical Care Improvement Project perioperative guidelines.

  9. Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Podgorny, Kelly; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Greene, Linda; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Saiman, Lisa; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previously published guidelines are available that provide comprehensive recommendations for detecting and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The intent of this document is to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing their surgical site infection (SSI) prevention efforts. This document updates “Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals,”1 published in 2008. This expert guidance document is sponsored by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and is the product of a collaborative effort led by SHEA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise. The list of endorsing and supporting organizations is presented in the introduction to the 2014 updates.2 PMID:24799638

  10. Improving Surveillance and Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Melissa; Hersey, Diane; Harrison, Sheilah; Joy, Brian; Naguib, Aymen; Galantowicz, Mark; Simsic, Janet

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative cardiovascular surgical site infections are preventable events that may lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. To improve surgical wound surveillance and reduce the incidence of surgical site infections. An institutional review of surgical site infections led to implementation of 8 surveillance and process measures: appropriate preparation the night before surgery and the day of surgery, use of appropriate preparation solution in the operating room, appropriate timing of preoperative antibiotic administration, placement of a photograph of the surgical site in the patient's chart at discharge, sending a photograph of the surgical site to the patient's primary care physician, 30-day follow-up of the surgical site by an advanced nurse practitioner, and placing a photograph of the surgical site obtained on postoperative day 30 in the patient's chart. Mean overall compliance with the 8 measures from March 2013 through February 2014 was 88%. Infections occurred in 10 of 417 total operative cases (2%) in 2012, in 8 of 437 total operative cases (2%) in 2013, and in 7 of 452 total operative cases (1.5%) in 2014. Institution of the surveillance process has resulted in improved identification of suspected surgical site infections via direct rather than indirect measures, accurate identification of all surgical site infections based on definitions of the National Healthcare Safety Network, collaboration with all persons involved, and enhanced communication with patients' family members and referring physicians. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  11. Randomized clinical trial comparing two options for postoperative incisional care to prevent poststernotomy surgical site infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, Patrique; de Jong, Antonius P.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Ubbink, Dirk T.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains an important complication of cardiac surgery. Prevention is important, as SSI is associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. Incisional care is an important daily issue for surgeons. However, there is still scant scientific evidence on which guidelines

  12. Implementation of surgical quality improvement: auditing tool for surgical site infection prevention practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Hobson, Deborah B; Bennett, Jennifer L; Wick, Elizabeth C

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infections are a potentially preventable patient harm. Emerging evidence suggests that the implementation of evidence-based process measures for infection reduction is highly variable. The purpose of this work was to develop an auditing tool to assess compliance with infection-related process measures and establish a system for identifying and addressing defects in measure implementation. This was a retrospective cohort study using electronic medical records. We used the auditing tool to assess compliance with 10 process measures in a sample of colorectal surgery patients with and without postoperative infections at an academic medical center (January 2012 to March 2013). We investigated 59 patients with surgical site infections and 49 patients without surgical site infections. First, overall compliance rates for the 10 process measures were compared between patients with infection vs patients without infection to assess if compliance was lower among patients with surgical site infections. Then, because of the burden of data collection, the tool was used exclusively to evaluate quarterly compliance rates among patients with infection. The results were reviewed, and the key factors contributing to noncompliance were identified and addressed. Ninety percent of process measures had lower compliance rates among patients with infection. Detailed review of infection cases identified many defects that improved following the implementation of system-level changes: correct cefotetan redosing (education of anesthesia personnel), temperature at surgical incision >36.0°C (flags used to identify patients for preoperative warming), and the use of preoperative mechanical bowel preparation with oral antibiotics (laxative solutions and antibiotics distributed in clinic before surgery). Quarterly compliance improved for 80% of process measures by the end of the study period. This study was conducted on a small surgical cohort within a select subspecialty. The

  13. Improving surgical site infection prevention practices through a multifaceted educational intervention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owens, P

    2015-03-01

    As part of the National Clinical Programme on healthcare-associated infection prevention, a Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) and Royal College of Physicians of Ireland (RCPI) working group developed a quality improvement tool for prevention of surgical site infection (SS). We aimed to validate the effectiveness of an educational campaign, which utilises this quality improvement tool to prevent SSI in a tertiary hospital. Prior to the SSI educational campaign, surgical patients were prospectively audited and details of antibiotic administration recorded. Prophylactic antibiotic administration recommendations were delivered via poster and educational presentations. Post-intervention, the audit was repeated. 50 patients were audited pre-intervention, 45 post-intervention. Post-intervention, prophylaxis within 60 minutes prior to incision increased from 54% to 68% (p = 0.266). Appropriate postoperative prescribing improved from 71% to 92% (p = 0.075). A multifaceted educational program may be effective in changing SSI prevention practices.

  14. The efficacy of normal saline irrigation to prevent surgical site infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, V.; Awan, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of normal saline irrigation to prevent surgical site Infection The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of normal saline irrigations to prevent surgical site infection (SSI). Study Design: A comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at surgery and gynecology Dept CMH Chunian from 1st Jan 2012 to 1st Nov 2012. Patients and Methods: Two hundred clean surgical and gynecological cases were included in the study. Hundred cases which were randomly selected had their wound washed with warm normal saline for 60 sec and then mopped dry with clean swabs. Subcuticular Stitches were applied to all the 200 cases. The surgical wounds were examined on 3rd post operative day and then finally on 15th post operative day. Patients with wound infection developed pain at the operation site and fever on third post operative day. Wounds were examined for swelling, redness, discharge and stitch abscess. Routine investigations were done as per protocol. Wound swabs were taken for culture and sensitivity. Results: The study was carried out on 200 clean cases (general and gynecological). They were 130 females and 70 males. The 100 cases whose wounds were washed with normal saline only 1 patient developed wound infection while in the other group who did not had saline irrigations 8 patients out of 100 developed wound infection. The commonest infective organisms were staphylococcus aureus and the other organisms were streptococcus pyogenes, proteus, Klaebsiella, E coli and pseudomonas. No MRSA was detected. Conclusion: In our study washing the wound with warm normal saline for 60 seconds resulted in the wound being infection free. Wound infection is associated with delayed wound healing, prolonged hospital stay and increased economic pressure on the patient and on the state. (author)

  15. Introduction to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee Guideline for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection: Prosthetic Joint Arthroplasty Section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segreti, John; Parvizi, Javad; Berbari, Elie; Ricks, Philip; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I

    Peri-prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a severe complication of total joint arthroplasty that appears to be increasing as more of these procedures are performed. Numerous risk factors for incisional (superficial and deep) and organ/space (e.g., PJI) surgical site infections (SSIs) have been identified. A better understanding and reversal of modifiable risk factors may lead to a reduction in the incidence of incisional SSI and PJI. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) recently updated the national Guideline for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection. The updated guideline applies evidence-based methodology, presents recommendations for potential strategies to reduce the risk of SSI, and includes an arthroplasty-specific section. This article serves to introduce the guideline development process and to complement the Prosthetic Joint Arthroplasty section with background information on PJI-specific economic burden, epidemiology, pathogenesis and microbiology, and risk factor information.

  16. Consensus Bundle on Prevention of Surgical Site Infections After Major Gynecologic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Joseph E; Toledo, Paloma; Soper, David E; Bradford, William C; Cruz, Deborah A; Levy, Barbara S; Lemieux, Lauren A

    Surgical site infections are the most common complications of surgery in the United States. Of surgeries in women of reproductive age, hysterectomy is one of the most frequently performed, second only to cesarean birth. Therefore, prevention of surgical site infections in women undergoing gynecologic surgery is an ideal topic for a patient safety bundle. The primary purpose of this safety bundle is to provide recommendations that can be implemented into any surgical environment in an effort to reduce the incidence of surgical site infection. This bundle was developed by a multidisciplinary team convened by the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care. The bundle is organized into four domains: Readiness, Recognition and Prevention, Response, and Reporting and Systems Learning. In addition to recommendations for practice, each of the domains stresses communication and teamwork between all members of the surgical team. Although the bundle components are designed to be adaptable to work in a variety of clinical settings, standardization within institutions is encouraged. Copyright © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Intraoperative technique as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2012-02-01

    Approximately five percent of patients who undergo surgery develop surgical site infections (SSIs) which are associated with an extra seven days as an inpatient and with increased postoperative mortality. The competence and technique of the surgeon is considered important in preventing SSI. We have reviewed the evidence on different aspects of surgical technique and its role in preventing SSI. The most recent guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK recommend avoiding diathermy for skin incision even though this reduces incision time and blood loss, both associated with lower infection rates. Studies comparing different closure techniques, i.e. continuous versus interrupted sutures, have not found a statistically significant difference in the SSI rate, but using continuous sutures is quicker. For contaminated wounds, the surgical site should be left open for four days to allow for treatment of local infection before subsequent healing by primary intention. Surgical drains should be placed through separate incisions, closed suction drains are preferable to open drains, and all drains should be removed as soon as possible. There are relatively few large studies on the impact of surgical techniques on SSI rates. Larger multicentre prospective studies are required to define what aspects of surgical technique impact on SSI, to better inform surgical practice and support education programmes for surgical trainees.

  18. Intraoperative technique as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-02-28

    Approximately five percent of patients who undergo surgery develop surgical site infections (SSIs) which are associated with an extra seven days as an inpatient and with increased postoperative mortality. The competence and technique of the surgeon is considered important in preventing SSI. We have reviewed the evidence on different aspects of surgical technique and its role in preventing SSI. The most recent guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK recommend avoiding diathermy for skin incision even though this reduces incision time and blood loss, both associated with lower infection rates. Studies comparing different closure techniques, i.e. continuous versus interrupted sutures, have not found a statistically significant difference in the SSI rate, but using continuous sutures is quicker. For contaminated wounds, the surgical site should be left open for four days to allow for treatment of local infection before subsequent healing by primary intention. Surgical drains should be placed through separate incisions, closed suction drains are preferable to open drains, and all drains should be removed as soon as possible. There are relatively few large studies on the impact of surgical techniques on SSI rates. Larger multicentre prospective studies are required to define what aspects of surgical technique impact on SSI, to better inform surgical practice and support education programmes for surgical trainees.

  19. Prevent Infections During Chemotherapy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast discusses the importance of preventing infections in cancer patients who are undergoing chemotherapy. Dr. Lisa Richardson, CDC oncologist, talks about a new Web site for cancer patients and their caregivers.

  20. Patient engagement with surgical site infection prevention: an expert panel perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tartari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite remarkable developments in the use of surgical techniques, ergonomic advancements in the operating room, and implementation of bundles, surgical site infections (SSIs remain a substantial burden, associated with increased morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. National and international recommendations to prevent SSIs have been published, including recent guidelines by the World Health Organization, but implementation into clinical practice remains an unresolved issue. SSI improvement programs require an integrative approach with measures taken during the pre-, intra- and postoperative care from the numerous stakeholders involved. The current SSI prevention strategies have focused mainly on the role of healthcare workers (HCWs and procedure related risk factors. The importance and influence of patient participation is becoming an increasingly important concept and advocated as a means to improve patient safety. Novel interventions supporting an active participative role within SSI prevention programs have not been assessed. Empowering patients with information they require to engage in the process of SSI prevention could play a major role for the implementation of recommendations. Based on available scientific evidence, a panel of experts evaluated options for patient involvement in order to provide pragmatic recommendations for pre-, intra- and postoperative activities for the prevention of SSIs. Recommendations were based on existing guidelines and expert opinion. As a result, 9 recommendations for the surgical patient are presented here, including a practice brief in the form of a patient information leaflet. HCWs can use this information to educate patients and allow patient engagement.

  1. Patient engagement with surgical site infection prevention: an expert panel perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartari, E; Weterings, V; Gastmeier, P; Rodríguez Baño, J; Widmer, A; Kluytmans, J; Voss, A

    2017-01-01

    Despite remarkable developments in the use of surgical techniques, ergonomic advancements in the operating room, and implementation of bundles, surgical site infections (SSIs) remain a substantial burden, associated with increased morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. National and international recommendations to prevent SSIs have been published, including recent guidelines by the World Health Organization, but implementation into clinical practice remains an unresolved issue. SSI improvement programs require an integrative approach with measures taken during the pre-, intra- and postoperative care from the numerous stakeholders involved. The current SSI prevention strategies have focused mainly on the role of healthcare workers (HCWs) and procedure related risk factors. The importance and influence of patient participation is becoming an increasingly important concept and advocated as a means to improve patient safety. Novel interventions supporting an active participative role within SSI prevention programs have not been assessed. Empowering patients with information they require to engage in the process of SSI prevention could play a major role for the implementation of recommendations. Based on available scientific evidence, a panel of experts evaluated options for patient involvement in order to provide pragmatic recommendations for pre-, intra- and postoperative activities for the prevention of SSIs. Recommendations were based on existing guidelines and expert opinion. As a result, 9 recommendations for the surgical patient are presented here, including a practice brief in the form of a patient information leaflet. HCWs can use this information to educate patients and allow patient engagement.

  2. Introduction to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomkin, Joseph S; Mazuski, John; Blanchard, Joan C; Itani, Kamal M F; Ricks, Philip; Dellinger, E Patchen; Allen, George; Kelz, Rachel; Reinke, Caroline E; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common type of health-care-associated infection (HAI) and adds considerably to the individual, social, and economic costs of surgical treatment. This document serves to introduce the updated Guideline for the Prevention of SSI from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC). The Core section of the guideline addresses issues relevant to multiple surgical specialties and procedures. The second procedure-specific section focuses on a high-volume, high-burden procedure: Prosthetic joint arthroplasty. While many elements of the 1999 guideline remain current, others warrant updating to incorporate new knowledge and changes in the patient population, operative techniques, emerging pathogens, and guideline development methodology.

  3. The role of oral antibiotics prophylaxis in prevention of surgical site infection in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koullouros, Michalis; Khan, Nadir; Aly, Emad H

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) continues to be a challenge in colorectal surgery. Over the years, various modalities have been used in an attempt to reduce SSI risk in elective colorectal surgery, which include mechanical bowel preparation before surgery, oral antibiotics and intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis at induction of surgery. Even though IV antibiotics have become standard practice, there has been a debate on the exact role of oral antibiotics. The primary aim was to identify the role of oral antibiotics in reduction of SSI in elective colorectal surgery. The secondary aim was to explore any potential benefit in the use of mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) in relation to SSI in elective colorectal surgery. Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched. Any randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or cohort studies after 1980, which investigated the effectiveness of oral antibiotic prophylaxis and/or MBP in preventing SSIs in elective colorectal surgery were included. Twenty-three RCTs and eight cohorts were included. The results indicate a statistically significant advantage in preventing SSIs with the combined usage of oral and systemic antibiotic prophylaxis. Furthermore, our analysis of the cohort studies shows no benefits in the use of MBP in prevention of SSIs. The addition of oral antibiotics to systemic antibiotics could potentially reduce the risk of SSIs in elective colorectal surgery. Additionally, MBP does not seem to provide a clear benefit with regard to SSI prevention.

  4. Evaluation of adherence to measures for the prevention of surgical site infections by the surgical team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cristina de Oliveira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVEEvaluate pre- and intraoperative practices adopted by medical and nursing teams for the prevention of surgical infections.METHODA prospective study carried out in the period of April to May 2013, in a surgical center of a university hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais.RESULTS18 surgeries were followed and 214 surgical gloves were analyzed, of which 23 (10.7% had postoperative glove perforation detected, with 52.2% being perceived by users. Hair removal was performed on 27.7% of patients in the operating room, with the use of blades in 80% of the cases. Antibiotic prophylaxis was administered to 81.8% of patients up to 60 minutes prior to surgical incision. An average of nine professionals were present during surgery and the surgery room door remained open in 94.4% of the procedures.CONCLUSIONPartial adhesion to the recommended measures was identified, reaffirming a need for greater attention to these critical steps/actions in order to prevent surgical site infection.

  5. Preoperative skin antiseptic preparations for preventing surgical site infections: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Chris; McGahan, Lynda; Polisena, Julie; Mierzwinski-Urban, Monika; Embil, John M

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of preoperative skin antiseptic preparations and application techniques for the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs). Systematic review of the literature using Medline, EMBASE, and other databases, for the period January 2001 to June 2011. Comparative studies (including randomized and nonrandomized trials) of preoperative skin antisepsis preparations and application techniques were included. Two researchers reviewed each study and extracted data using standardized tables developed before the study. Studies were reviewed for their methodological quality and clinical findings. Twenty studies (n = 9,520 patients) were included in the review. The results indicated that presurgical antiseptic showering is effective for reducing skin flora and may reduce SSI rates. Given the heterogeneity of the studies and the results, conclusions about which antiseptic is more effective at reducing SSIs cannot be drawn. The evidence suggests that preoperative antiseptic showers reduce bacterial colonization and may be effective at preventing SSIs. The antiseptic application method is inconsequential, and data are lacking to suggest which antiseptic solution is the most effective. Disinfectant products are often mixed with alcohol or water, which makes it difficult to form overall conclusions regarding an active ingredient. Large, well-conducted randomized controlled trials with consistent protocols comparing agents in the same bases are needed to provide unequivocal evidence on the effectiveness of one antiseptic preparation over another for the prevention of SSIs.

  6. Prevent Infections During Chemotherapy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-10-24

    This podcast discusses the importance of preventing infections in cancer patients who are undergoing chemotherapy. Dr. Lisa Richardson, CDC oncologist, talks about a new Web site for cancer patients and their caregivers.  Created: 10/24/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 10/24/2011.

  7. Optimum Operating Room Environment for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Sara; Luo, James N; Gilbert, Jack; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C

    Surgical site infections (SSI), whether they be incisional or deep, can entail major morbidity and death to patients and additional cost to the healthcare system. A significant amount of effort has gone into optimizing the surgical patient and the operating room environment to reduce SSI. Relevant guidelines and literature were reviewed. The modern practice of surgical antisepsis involves the employment of strict sterile techniques inside the operating room. Extensive guidelines are available regarding the proper operating room antisepsis as well as pre-operative preparation. The use of pre-operative antimicrobial prophylaxis has become increasingly prevalent, which also presents the challenge of opportunistic and nosocomial infections. Ongoing investigative efforts have brought about a greater appreciation of the surgical patient's endogenous microflora, use of non-bactericidal small molecules, and pre-operative microbial screening. Systematic protocols exist for optimizing the surgical sterility of the operating room to prevent SSIs. Ongoing research efforts aim to improve the precision of peri-operative antisepsis measures and personalize these measures to tailor the patient's unique microbial environment.

  8. Peri-operative glycaemic control regimens for preventing surgical site infections in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Lillian S; Meeks, Derek; Moyer, Virginia A; Lally, Kevin P

    2009-07-08

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and resource utilization and are potentially preventable. Peri-operative hyperglycaemia has been associated with increased SSIs and previous recommendations have been to treat glucose levels above 200 mg/dL. However, recent studies have questioned the optimal glycaemic control regimen to prevent SSIs. Whether the benefits of strict or intensive glycaemic control with insulin infusion as compared to conventional management outweigh the risks remains controversial. To summarise the evidence for the impact of glycaemic control in the peri-operative period on the incidence of surgical site infections, hypoglycaemia, level of glycaemic control, all-cause and infection-related mortality, and hospital length of stay and to investigate for differences of effect between different levels of glycaemic control. A search strategy was developed to search the following databases: Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 25 March 2009), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1; Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to March Week 2 2009); Ovid EMBASE (1980 to 2009 Week 12) and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to March Week 3 2009). The search was not limited by language or publication status. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were eligible for inclusion if they evaluated two (or more) glycaemic control regimens in the peri-operative period (within one week pre-, intra-, and/or post-operative) and reported surgical site infections as an outcome. The standard method for conducting a systematic review in accordance with the Cochrane Wounds Group was used. Two review authors independently reviewed the results from the database searches and identified relevant studies. Two review authors extracted study data and outcomes from each study and reviewed each study for methodological quality. Any disagreement was resolved by discussion or by referral to a third review author. Five

  9. Efficacy of Negative Pressure Wound Treatment in Preventing Surgical Site Infections after Whipple Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ryan; Darby, Geoffrey C; Imagawa, David K

    2017-10-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) occur at an average rate of 21.1 per cent after Whipple procedures per NSQIP data. In the setting of adherence to standard National Surgery Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) Hepatopancreatobiliary recommendations including wound protector use and glove change before closing, this study seeks to evaluate the efficacy of using negative pressure wound treatment (NPWT) over closed incision sites after a Whipple procedure to prevent SSI formation. We retrospectively examined consecutive patients from January 2014 to July 2016 who met criteria of completing Whipple procedures with full primary incision closure performed by a single surgeon at a single institution. Sixty-one patients were included in the study between two cohorts: traditional dressing (TD) (n = 36) and NPWT dressing (n = 25). There was a statistically significant difference (P = 0.01) in SSI formation between the TD cohort (n = 15, SSI rate = 0.41) and the NPWT cohort (n = 3, SSI rate = 0.12). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of SSI formation was significant for NPWT use [OR = 0.15, P = 0.036] and for hospital length of stay [OR = 1.21, P = 0.024]. Operative length, operative blood loss, units of perioperative blood transfusion, intraoperative gastrojejunal tube placement, preoperative stent placement, and postoperative antibiotic duration did not significantly impact SSI formation (P > 0.05).

  10. Cyanoacrylate Skin Microsealant for Preventing Surgical Site Infection after Vascular Surgery : A Discontinued Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vierhout, Bastiaan P.; Ott, Alewijn; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.; Oskam, Jacques; Ott, Alewijn; van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) after vascular surgery are related to substantial morbidity. Restriction of bacterial access to the site of surgery with a cyanoacrylate sealant is a new concept. We performed a randomized clinical trial to assess the effect of the sealing of skin with a

  11. Intracavity lavage and wound irrigation for prevention of surgical site infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Gill; Atkinson, Ross A; Smith, Tanya A; Rowlands, Ceri; Rithalia, Amber D; Crosbie, Emma J; Dumville, Jo C

    2017-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSIs) are wound infections that occur after an operative procedure. A preventable complication, they are costly and associated with poorer patient outcomes, increased mortality, morbidity and reoperation rates. Surgical wound irrigation is an intraoperative technique, which may reduce the rate of SSIs through removal of dead or damaged tissue, metabolic waste, and wound exudate. Irrigation can be undertaken prior to wound closure or postoperatively. Intracavity lavage is a similar technique used in operations that expose a bodily cavity; such as procedures on the abdominal cavity and during joint replacement surgery. Objectives To assess the effects of wound irrigation and intracavity lavage on the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI). Search methods In February 2017 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid Embase and EBSCO CINAHL Plus. We also searched three clinical trials registries and references of included studies and relevant systematic reviews. There were no restrictions on language, date of publication or study setting. Selection criteria We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of participants undergoing surgical procedures in which the use of a particular type of intraoperative washout (irrigation or lavage) was the only systematic difference between groups, and in which wounds underwent primary closure. The primary outcomes were SSI and wound dehiscence. Secondary outcomes were mortality, use of systemic antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, adverse events, re-intervention, length of hospital stay, and readmissions. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion at each stage. Two review authors also undertook data extraction, assessment of risk of bias and GRADE assessment. We calculated risk ratios or differences in means with 95% confidence intervals where

  12. Update to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection (2017): A summary, review, and strategies for implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Lyndsay M; Thom, Kerri A; Preas, Michael Anne

    2018-03-07

    Surgical site infections remain a common cause of morbidity, mortality, and increased length of stay and cost amongst hospitalized patients in the United States. This article summarizes the evidence used to inform the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection (2017), and highlights key updates and new recommendations. We also present specific suggestions for how infection preventionists can play a central role in guideline implementation by translating these recommendations into evidence-based policies and practices in their facility. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. SURGICAL SITE INFECTION: REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. H. M. Bonai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infection or nosocomial infection (NI is one of the factors that increase the cost of maintaining patients in the health system, even in processes that should safely occur, such as hospital patients and performing simple and routine surgical procedures surgical centers and clinics leading to complications resulting from these infections that prolong hospital stay and promote pain and suffering to the patient, resulting in the defense of the quality of services and influencing negatively the hospitals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to review the factors that result in surgical site infection, with the purpose of better understanding of the subject and the possibility of preventive actions to better treatment outcome of the patient.

  14. Vancomycin Powder Regimen for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Complex Spine Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hal, Michael; Lee, Joon; Laudermilch, Dann; Nwasike, Chinedu; Kang, James

    2017-10-01

    In total, 496 patients of a single surgeon cohort examining the surgical-site infection (SSI) rates with the addition of vancomycin powder in both diabetic and revision spine surgery cases. A historical control group of 652 patients were compared from the same surgeon over an earlier time period before the inception of using vancomycin powder prophylaxis. The objective of this study was to describe and compare the rates of infection in high-risk patient populations while using vancomycin powder. Vancomycin powder may not decrease an already low rate of infection. Therefore, use of vancomycin powder in high-risk patients with a higher rate of infection would potentially show benefit of vancomycin powder. In total, 496 patient charts were collected from a database of cases. Patients were included in the cohort if they had revision spinal operation or if they were diabetic. Patients in the time period July 2010 to August 2013 were included in the vancomycin protocol where 1 g of vancomycin powder was added to the wound before wound closure. Cases were considered positive if there was a positive culture or if there was sufficient clinical suspicion to treat. As a control to this cohort, 692 charts were reviewed from a earlier time period of the same surgeon and institution. In total, 28 patients of 496 (5.6%) patients in the cohort returned to the operating room for seroma, hematoma, draining wound, or infection. Sixteen of these patients (16/496, 3.2%) had a culture positive infection or were treated as an infection. This rate was significantly lower than the historical rate before the protocol. Although vancomycin does seem to be useful in decreasing SSIs, it is not a panacea. SSIs in high-risk patients were not completely eliminated by the vancomycin protocol.

  15. Cancer treatment - preventing infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation - preventing infection; Bone marrow transplant - preventing infection; Cancer treatment - immunosuppression ... this is a short-lived side effect of cancer treatment. Your provider may give you medicines to help ...

  16. In vitro results of flexible light-emitting antimicrobial bandage designed for prevention of surgical site infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Mitchell; Sharan, Riti; Galbadage, Thushara; Sule, Preeti; Smith, Robert; Lovelady, April; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Glowczwski, Alan; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2018-02-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and a significant expense to the healthcare system and hospitals. The majority of these infections are preventable; however, increasing bacterial resistance, biofilm persistence, and human error contribute to the occurrence of these healthcare-associated infections. We present a flexible antimicrobial blue-light emitting bandage designed for use on postoperative incisions and wounds. The photonic device is designed to inactivate bacteria present on the skin and prevent bacterial colonization of the site, thus reducing the occurrence of SSIs. This antimicrobial light emitting bandage uses blue light's proven abilities to inactivate a wide range of clinical pathogens regardless of their resistance to antibiotics, inactivate bacteria without harming mammalian cells, improve wound healing, and inactivate bacteria in biofilms. The antimicrobial bandage consists of a thin 2"x2" silicone sheet with an array of 77 LEDs embedded in multiple layers of the material for thermal management. The 405 nm center wavelength LED array is designed to be a wearable device that integrates with standard hospital infection prevention protocols. The device was characterized for irradiance of 44.5 mW/cm2. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus seeded in a petri dish was used to evaluate bacterial inactivation in vitro. Starting with a concentration of 2.16 x 107 colony forming units (CFU)/mL, 45% of the bacteria was inactivated within 15 minutes, 65% had been inactivated by 30 minutes, 99% was inactivated by 60 minutes, and a 7 log reduction and complete sterilization was achieved within 120 minutes.

  17. Clinical relevance of surgical site infection as defined by the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, N A; Meyhoff, C S; Wetterslev, J

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after abdominal surgery and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria are commonly used for diagnosis and surveillance. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SSI diagnosed according to CDC is clinically relevant (C...... a suitable standard definition for monitoring and identifying SSI, even if some cases of less clinically significant superficial SSI are included.......Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after abdominal surgery and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria are commonly used for diagnosis and surveillance. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SSI diagnosed according to CDC is clinically relevant...... hospital stay or referral to an intensive care unit for SSI. The rate of CRSSI was 38 of 54 (70%) in patients with CDC-diagnosed SSI and none in patients without a CDC-diagnosed SSI. Sixty-one percent of the CDC-diagnosed SSIs were superficial, of which 48% were considered clinically relevant...

  18. Surgical site infection prevention: a survey to identify the gap between evidence and practice in University of Toronto teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskicioglu, Cagla; Gagliardi, Anna R; Fenech, Darlene S; Forbes, Shawn S; McKenzie, Marg; McLeod, Robin S; Nathens, Avery B

    2012-08-01

    A gap exists between the best evidence and practice with regards to surgical site infection (SSI) prevention. Awareness of evidence is the first step in knowledge translation. A web-based survey was distributed to 59 general surgeons and 68 residents at University of Toronto teaching hospitals. Five domains pertaining to SSI prevention with questions addressing knowledge of prevention strategies, efficacy of antibiotics, strategies for changing practice and barriers to implementation of SSI prevention strategies were investigated. Seventy-six individuals (60%) responded. More than 90% of respondents stated there was evidence for antibiotic prophylaxis and perioperative normothermia and reported use of these strategies. There was a discrepancy in the perceived evidence for and the self-reported use of perioperative hyperoxia, omission of hair removal and bowel preparation. Eighty-three percent of respondents felt that consulting published guidelines is important in making decisions regarding antibiotics. There was also a discrepancy between what respondents felt were important strategies to ensure timely administration of antibiotics and what strategies were in place. Checklists, standardized orders, protocols and formal surveillance programs were rated most highly by 75%-90% of respondents, but less than 50% stated that these strategies were in place at their institutions. Broad-reaching initiatives that increase surgeon and trainee awareness and implementation of multifaceted hospital strategies that engage residents and attending surgeons are needed to change practice.

  19. Clinical relevance of surgical site infection as defined by the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, N A; Meyhoff, C S; Wetterslev, J

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after abdominal surgery and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria are commonly used for diagnosis and surveillance. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SSI diagnosed according to CDC is clinically relevant...... diagnosed with SSI and a matched control group (N=46) without SSI according to the CDC criteria after laparotomy. Two blinded experienced surgeons evaluated the hospital records and determined whether patients had CRSSI, based on the following criteria: antibiotic treatment, surgical intervention, prolonged...... hospital stay or referral to an intensive care unit for SSI. The rate of CRSSI was 38 of 54 (70%) in patients with CDC-diagnosed SSI and none in patients without a CDC-diagnosed SSI. Sixty-one percent of the CDC-diagnosed SSIs were superficial, of which 48% were considered clinically relevant...

  20. Impact of the Antibiotic Stewardship Program on Prevention and Control of Surgical Site Infection during Peri-Operative Clean Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juyuan; Li, Na; Hao, Jinjuan; Li, Yanming; Liu, Anlei; Wu, Yinghong; Cai, Meng

    2018-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections and are associated with substantial healthcare costs, with increased morbidity and mortality. To investigate the effects of the antibiotic stewardship program on prevention and control of SSI during clean surgery, we investigated this situation in our institution. We performed a quasi-experimental study to compare the effect before and after the antibiotic stewardship program intervention. During the pre-intervention stage (January 1, 2010 through December 31, 2011), comprehensive surveillance was performed to determine the SSI baseline data. In the second stage (January 1, 2012 through December 31, 2016), an infectious diseases physician and an infection control practitioner identified the surgical patients daily and followed up on the duration of antimicrobial prophylaxis. From January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2016, 41,426 patients underwent clean surgeries in a grade III, class A hospital. The rate of prophylactic antibiotic use in the 41,426 clean surgeries was reduced from 82.9% to 28.0% after the interventions. The rate of antibiotic agents administered within 120 minutes of the first incision increased from 20.8% to 85.1%. The rate at which prophylactic antimicrobial agents were discontinued in the first 24 hours after surgery increased from 22.1% to 60.4%. Appropriate antibiotic selection increased from 37.0% to 93.6%. Prophylactic antibiotic re-dosing increased from 3.8% to 64.8%. The SSI rate decreased from 0.7% to 0.5% (p < 0.05). The pathogen detection rate increased from 16.7% up to 41.8% after intervention. The intensity of antibiotic consumption reduced from 74.9 defined daily doses (DDDs) per 100 bed-days to 34.2 DDDs per 100 bed-days after the interventions. Long-term and continuous antibiotic stewardship programs have important effects on the prevention and control of SSI during clean surgery.

  1. Surgical site infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a worldwide problem that has ... deep tissue is found on clinical examination, re-opening, histopathological or radiological investigation ..... Esposito S, Immune system and SSI, Journal of Chemotherapy, 2001.

  2. The New World Health Organization Recommendations on Perioperative Administration of Oxygen to Prevent Surgical Site Infections: A Dangerous Reductionist Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenk, Manuel; Van Aken, Hugo; Zarbock, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    In October 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) published recommendations for preventing surgical site infections (SSIs). Among those measures is a recommendation to administer oxygen at an inspired fraction of 80% intra- and postoperatively for up to 6 hours. SSIs have been identified as a global health problem, and the WHO should be commended for their efforts. However, this recommendation focuses only on the patient's "wound," ignores other organ systems potentially affected by hyperoxia, and may ultimately worsen patient outcomes.The WHO advances a "strong recommendation" for the use of a high inspired oxygen fraction even though the quality of evidence is only moderate. However, achieving this goal by disregarding other potentially lethal complications seems inappropriate, particularly in light of the weak evidence underpinning the use of high fractions of oxygen to prevent SSI. Use of such a strategy thus should be intensely discussed by anesthesiologists and perioperative physicians.Normovolemia, normotension, normoglycemia, normothermia, and normoventilation can clearly be safely applied to most patients in most clinical scenarios. But the liberal application of hyperoxemia intraoperatively and up to 6 hours postoperatively, as suggested by the WHO, is questionable from the viewpoint of anesthesia and perioperative medicine, and its effects will be discussed in this article.

  3. The role of topical antibiotics used as prophylaxis in surgical site infection prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-04-01

    Compared with systemic antibiotic therapy, the topical or local delivery of an antibiotic has many potential advantages. However, local antibiotics at the surgical site have received very limited approval in any of the surgical prophylaxis consensus guidelines that we are aware of. A review of the literature was carried out through searches of peer-reviewed publications in PubMed in the English language over a 30 year period between January 1980 and May 2010. Both retrospective and prospective studies were included, as well as meta-analyses. With regard to defining \\'topical\\' or \\'local\\' antibiotic application, the application of an antibiotic solution to the surgical site intraoperatively or immediately post-operatively was included. A number of surgical procedures have been shown to significantly benefit from perioperative topical prophylaxis, e.g. joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. The selective use of topical antibiotics as surgical prophylaxis is justified for specific procedures, such as joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In selective cases, such as obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. Apart from these specific indications, the evidence for use of topical antibiotics in surgery is lacking in conclusive randomized controlled trials.

  4. The role of topical antibiotics used as prophylaxis in surgical site infection prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2012-02-01

    Compared with systemic antibiotic therapy, the topical or local delivery of an antibiotic has many potential advantages. However, local antibiotics at the surgical site have received very limited approval in any of the surgical prophylaxis consensus guidelines that we are aware of. A review of the literature was carried out through searches of peer-reviewed publications in PubMed in the English language over a 30 year period between January 1980 and May 2010. Both retrospective and prospective studies were included, as well as meta-analyses. With regard to defining \\'topical\\' or \\'local\\' antibiotic application, the application of an antibiotic solution to the surgical site intraoperatively or immediately post-operatively was included. A number of surgical procedures have been shown to significantly benefit from perioperative topical prophylaxis, e.g. joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. The selective use of topical antibiotics as surgical prophylaxis is justified for specific procedures, such as joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In selective cases, such as obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. Apart from these specific indications, the evidence for use of topical antibiotics in surgery is lacking in conclusive randomized controlled trials.

  5. Preventing infections when visiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need.) When you visit a patient in the hospital, keep your hands away from your face. Cough or sneeze into a tissue or into the crease of your elbow, not into the air. References Calfee DP. Prevention and control of health care-associated infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  6. A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED STUDY OF RISK FACTORS AND ROLE OF PROPHYLACTIC ANTIBIOTICS IN PREVENTION OF SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avijeet Mukherjee, Naveen N

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Surgical site infection (SSI is the most common nosocomial infection encountered in post operative surgical wards. The use of prophylactic antibiotic in clean elective surgical cases is still a subject of controversy to surgeons. The objective of the study is to identify the need for using prophylactic antibiotics in clean surgeries, prevalence of organisms in patients who are not given prophylactic antibiotics and to study whether the presence of risk factors increase the incidence of surgical site infection. Methodology: The comparative study consists of 100 cases admitted under two groups of 50 each: Group A was given prophylactic antibiotic and Group B didn’t receive any. All surgeries other than clean surgical cases were excluded from the study. Results: Out of 50 patients in group B who were not given prophylactic antibiotic, 2 patients had more than one risk factor for development of SSI and both of them developed SSI. Of the 50 patients who received prophylactic antibiotic, none developed SSI. The rate of infection in group A was nil and in Group B was 4%. Conclusion: Prophylactic antibiotics are not recommended for clean elective surgical cases as there is no statistically significant change in the infection rate seen in patients not receiving prophylactic antibiotic(P=0.4952. Meticulous surgical technique and correcting risk factors prior to surgery is a must for reducing incidence of SSI.

  7. Prevention of Periprosthetic Joint Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisina Shahi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic joint infection (PJI is a calamitous complication with high morbidity and substantial cost. The reported incidence is low but it is probably underestimated due to the difficulty in diagnosis. PJI has challenged the orthopaedic community for several years and despite all the advances in this field, it is still a real concern with immense impact on patients, and the healthcare system. Eradication of infection can be very difficult. Therefore, prevention remains the ultimate goal. The medical community has executed many practices with the intention to prevent infection and treat it effectively when it encounters. Numerous factors can predispose patients to PJI. Identifying the host risk factors, patients’ health modification, proper wound care, and optimizing operative room environment remain some of the core fundamental steps that can help minimizing the overall incidence of infection. In this review we have summarized the effective prevention strategies along with the recommendations of a recent International Consensus Meeting on Surgical Site and Periprosthetic Joint Infection.

  8. Using the Electronic Health Record Data in Real Time and Predictive Analytics to Prevent Hospital-Acquired Postoperative/Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falen, Thomas; Noblin, Alice M; Russell, O Lucia; Santiago, Nonica

    Of critical concern to hospitals today is the prevention of postoperative (surgical site) infections that often result in increased lengths of stays for patients, increased resource demands and costs, loss of public trust and lawsuits, and needless pain and suffering for patients and their families. While all surgical patients have the potential to develop a postoperative infection, the main challenge is to identify key risk factors (both patient centered and operational) through an electronic early-warning system to reduce the likelihood of a postoperative infection from occurring. Currently, most postoperative infection risk prevention practices encompass limited use of informatics technologies or do not maximize the potential benefits. In addition, from a research perspective, there has been more focus on extrapolating electronically housed data (eg, from progress notes, operative notes, laboratory, pharmacy, radiology) retrospectively to describe poor patient outcomes for benchmarking purposes (revealing poor results and opportunities for improvement) rather than using similar sources of real-time data to prevent poor patient outcomes from occurring. This article proposes that standardized indicators, both patient centered and operational, linked to the patient's electronic health record could allow for implementation of 24/7, "real-time" monitoring/surveillance to implement well-timed preventive interventions scaled to each patient and facility to assist caregivers in reducing the numbers of postoperative infections and improve the overall quality and costs of patient care.

  9. Fighting surgical site infections in small animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verwilghen, Denis; Singh, Ameet

    2015-01-01

    A diverse array of pathogen-related, patient-related, and caretaker-related issues influence risk and prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs). The entire surgical team involved in health care settings in which surgical procedures are performed play a pivotal role in the prevention of SSIs. ...

  10. Effectiveness of triclosan-coated PDS Plus versus uncoated PDS II sutures for prevention of surgical site infection after abdominal wall closure: the randomised controlled PROUD trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Markus K; Knebel, Phillip; Kieser, Meinhard; Schüler, Philipp; Schiergens, Tobias S; Atanassov, Vladimir; Neudecker, Jens; Stein, Erwin; Thielemann, Henryk; Kunz, Reiner; von Frankenberg, Moritz; Schernikau, Utz; Bunse, Jörg; Jansen-Winkeln, Boris; Partecke, Lars I; Prechtl, Gerald; Pochhammer, Julius; Bouchard, Ralf; Hodina, René; Beckurts, K Tobias E; Leißner, Lothar; Lemmens, Hans-Peter; Kallinowski, Friedrich; Thomusch, Oliver; Seehofer, Daniel; Simon, Thomas; Hyhlik-Dürr, Alexander; Seiler, Christoph M; Hackert, Thilo; Reissfelder, Christoph; Hennig, René; Doerr-Harim, Colette; Klose, Christina; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W

    2014-07-12

    Postoperative surgical site infections are one of the most frequent complications after open abdominal surgery, and triclosan-coated sutures were developed to reduce their occurrence. The aim of the PROUD trial was to obtain reliable data for the effectiveness of triclosan-coated PDS Plus sutures for abdominal wall closure, compared with non-coated PDS II sutures, in the prevention of surgical site infections. This multicentre, randomised controlled group-sequential superiority trial was done in 24 German hospitals. Adult patients (aged ≥18 years) who underwent elective midline abdominal laparotomy for any reason were eligible for inclusion. Exclusion criteria were impaired mental state, language problems, and participation in another intervention trial that interfered with the intervention or outcome of this trial. A central web-based randomisation tool was used to randomly assign eligible participants by permuted block randomisation with a 1:1 allocation ratio and block size 4 before mass closure to either triclosan-coated sutures (PDS Plus) or uncoated sutures (PDS II) for abdominal fascia closure. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of superficial or deep surgical site infection according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria within 30 days after the operation. Patients, surgeons, and the outcome assessors were masked to group assignment. Interim and final analyses were by modified intention to treat. This trial is registered with the German Clinical Trials Register, number DRKS00000390. Between April 7, 2010, and Oct 19, 2012, 1224 patients were randomly assigned to intervention groups (607 to PDS Plus, and 617 to PDS II), of whom 1185 (587 PDS Plus and 598 PDS II) were analysed by intention to treat. The study groups were well balanced in terms of patient and procedure characteristics. The occurrence of surgical site infections did not differ between the PDS Plus group (87 [14·8%] of 587) and the PDS II group (96 [16·1%] of 598

  11. Waterless Hand Rub Versus Traditional Hand Scrub Methods for Preventing the Surgical Site Infection in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakiri, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Akio; Seki, Masahiko; Ando, Yoshiyuki; Tsujio, Tadao; Hoshino, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2017-11-15

    MINI: Fourteen hundred consecutive patients were investigated for evaluating the utility of waterless hand rub before orthopaedic surgery. The risk in the surgical site infection incidence was the same, but costs of liquids used for hand hygiene were cheaper and the hand hygiene time was shorter for waterless protocol, compared with traditional hand scrub. A retrospective cohort study with prospectively collected data. The aim of this study was to compare SSI incidences, the cost of hand hygiene agents, and hand hygiene time between the traditional hand scrub and the waterless hand rub protocols before orthopedic surgery. Surgical site infections (SSI) prolong hospitalization and are a leading nosocomial cause of morbidity and a source of excess cost. Recently, a waterless hand rub protocol comprising alcohol based chlorhexidine gluconate for use before surgery was developed, but no studies have yet examined its utility in orthopedic surgery. Fourteen hundred consecutive patients who underwent orthopedic surgery (spine, joint replacement, hand, and trauma surgeries) in our hospital since April 1, 2012 were included. A total of 712 cases underwent following traditional hand scrub between April 1, 2012 and April 30, 2013 and 688 cases underwent following waterless hand rub between June 1, 2013 and April 30, 2014. We compared SSI incidences within all and each subcategory between two hand hygiene protocols. All patients were screened for SSI within 1 year after surgery. We compared the cost of hand hygiene agents and hand hygiene time between two groups. The SSI incidences were 1.3% (9 of 712) following the traditional protocol (2 deep and 7 superficial infections) and 1.1% (8 of 688) following the waterless protocol (all superficial infections). There were no significant differences between the two groups. The costs of liquids used for one hand hygiene were about $2 for traditional hand scrub and less than $1 for waterless hand rub. The mean hand hygiene time was 264

  12. Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Protect: Know the Signs and Symptoms of Infection Neutropenia and Risk for Infection Health Care Providers Educational Materials Cancer and Flu How to Prevent Flu from Spreading Flu Symptoms Information for Families and Caregivers Flu Treatment for Cancer Patients and ...

  13. Vacuum-assisted closure versus closure without vacuum assistance for preventing surgical site infections and infections of chronic wounds: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansarli, Giannoula S; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z; Stratoulias, Constantinos; Peppas, George; Kapaskelis, Anastasios; Falagas, Matthew E

    2014-08-01

    We sought to examine whether vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is associated with fewer surgical site infections (SSIs) or infections of chronic wounds than other management procedures for surgical wounds. The PubMed and Scopus databases were searched systematically. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the development of SSIs or infections of chronic wounds between patients treated with VAC for acute or chronic wounds and those whose wounds were treated without VAC were considered eligible for inclusion in the study. Eight RCTs met the inclusion criteria for the study. Four of the studies included chronic or diabetic lower extremity wounds and four included fractures. In three of four studies reporting on fractures, the wounds were not closed post-operatively, whereas in one study primary closure of the wound was performed. With regard to wounds left open after the stabilization of fractures, patients whose wounds were treated with VAC developed fewer SSIs than those whose wounds were treated without VAC ([367 patients (196 with VAC; 171 without VAC) relative risk [RR], 0.47; 95% CI 0.28-0.81]). On the contrary, no difference in the development of SSIs occurred among patients with chronic or diabetic lower-extremity wounds treated with VAC and those whose wounds were treated without VAC ([638 patients (320 with VAC; 318 without VAC) RR 1.67; 95% CI: 0.71-3.94]). The available evidence suggests that the development of infections in wounds treated with VAC depends on the type of wound being treated.

  14. Routine implementation of isoniazid preventive therapy in HIV-infected patients in seven pilot sites in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choto, R. C.; Harries, A. D.; Mutasa-Apollo, T.; Chakanyuka-Musanhu, C.

    2017-01-01

    Setting: Seven pilot sites in Zimbabwe implementing 6 months of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) for people living with the human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV). Objectives: To determine, among PLHIV started on IPT, the completion rates for a 6-month course of IPT and factors associated with non-adherence. Design: A retrospective cohort study. Results: Of 578 patients, 466 (81%) completed IPT. Of the 112 patients who failed to complete IPT, 69 (60%) were lost to follow-up, 30 (27%) stopped treatment with no documented reasons, 8 (7%) developed toxicity/adverse reactions, 5 (5%) were documented as having drug stock-outs and the remainder transferred out or refused to continue treatment. Currently being on antiretroviral therapy (ART) (aOR 0.09, 95%CI 0.03–0.28) and receiving a ⩾2 month supply of isoniazid at the start of treatment were associated with a lower risk of not completing IPT, while missing clinic visits prior to starting IPT (aOR 5.25, 95%CI 2.10–13.14) was associated with a higher risk of non-completion. Conclusion: IPT completion rates in seven pilot sites of Zimbabwe were comparatively high, showing that IPT roll-out in public health facilities is feasible. Enhanced adherence counselling or active tracing among pre-ART patients and those with a history of loss to follow-up may improve IPT completion rates, along with synchronising IPT and ART resupplies. PMID:28775944

  15. The Importance of Perioperative Prophylaxis with Cefuroxime or Ceftriaxone in the Surgical Site Infections Prevention after Cranial and Spinal Neurosurgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimovska-Gavrilovska, Aleksandra; Chaparoski, Aleksandar; Gavrilovski, Andreja; Milenkovikj, Zvonko

    2017-09-01

    Introduction Surgical site infections pose a significant problem in the treatment of neurosurgical procedures, regardless of the application of perioperative prophylaxis with systemic antibiotics. The infection rate in these procedures ranges from less than 1% to above 15%. Different antibiotics and administration regimes have been used in the perioperative prophylaxis so far, and there are numerous comparative studies regarding their efficiency, however, it is generally indicated that the choice thereof should be based on information and local specifics connected to the most probable bacterial causers, which would possibly contaminate the surgical site and cause infection, and moreover, the mandatory compliance with the principles of providing adequate concentration of the drug at the time of the anticipated contamination. Objective Comparing the protective effect of two perioperative prophylactic antibiotic regimes using cefuroxime (second generation cephalosporin) and ceftriaxone (third generation cephalosporin) in the prevention of postoperative surgical site infections after elective and urgent cranial and spinal neurosurgical procedures at the University Clinic for Neurosurgery in Skopje in the period of the first three months of 2016. Design of the study Prospective randomized comparative study. Outcome measures Establishing the clinical outcome represented as prevalence of superficial and deep incision and organ/space postoperative surgical site infections. Material and method We analyzed prospectively 40 patients who received parenteral antibiotic prophylaxis with two antibiotic regimes one hour before the routine neurosurgical cranial and spinal surgical procedures; the patients were randomized in two groups, according to the order of admission and participation in the study, alternately, non-selectively, those persons who fulfilled inclusion criteria were placed in one of the two programmed regimes with cefuroxime in the first, and cefotaxime in the

  16. Prevention of health care-associated infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Vincent

    2014-09-15

    Health care-associated infections cause approximately 75,000 deaths annually, in addition to increasing morbidity and costs. Over the past decade, a downward trend in health care-associated infections has occurred nationwide. Basic prevention measures include administrative support, educating health care personnel, and hand hygiene and isolation precautions. Prevention of central line- or catheter-associated infections begins with avoidance of unnecessary insertion, adherence to aseptic technique when inserting, and device removal when no longer necessary. Specific recommendations for preventing central line-associated bloodstream infections include use of chlorhexidine for skin preparation, as a component of dressings, and for daily bathing of patients in intensive care units. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections are the most common device-related health care-associated infection. Maintaining a closed drainage system below the patient reduces the risk of infection. To prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia, which is associated with high mortality, mechanically ventilated patients should be placed in the semirecumbent position and receive antiseptic oral care. Prevention of surgical site infections includes hair removal using clippers, glucose control, and preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis. Reducing transmission of Clostridium difficile and multidrug-resistant organisms in the hospital setting begins with hand hygiene and contact precautions. Institutional efforts to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescribing are also strongly recommended. Reducing rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection can be achieved through active surveillance cultures and decolonization therapy with mupirocin.

  17. Sodium Mercaptoethane Sulfonate Reduces Collagenolytic Degradation and Synergistically Enhances Antimicrobial Durability in an Antibiotic-Loaded Biopolymer Film for Prevention of Surgical-Site Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Rosenblatt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Implant-associated surgical-site infections can have significant clinical consequences. Previously we reported a method for prophylactically disinfecting implant surfaces in surgical pockets, where an antibiotic solution containing minocycline (M and rifampin (R was applied as a solid film in a crosslinked biopolymer matrix that partially liquefied in situ to provide extended prophylaxis. Here we studied the effect of adding sodium 2-mercaptoethane sulfonate (MeSNA on durability of prophylaxis in an in vitro model of implant-associated surgical-site infection. Adding MeSNA to the M/R biopolymer, antimicrobial film extended the duration for which biofilm formation by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA was prevented on silicone surfaces in the model. M/R films with and without MeSNA were effective in preventing colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Independent experiments revealed that MeSNA directly inhibited proteolytic digestion of the biopolymer film and synergistically enhanced antimicrobial potency of M/R against MDR-PA. Incubation of the MeSNA containing films with L929 fibroblasts revealed no impairment of cellular metabolic activity or viability.

  18. Surgical site infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Decrease the inflammatory response Vasodilatation leads to better perfusion and ... Must NOT be allowed to come in contact with brain, meninges, eyes or .... project (SCIP): Evolution of National Quality Measure. Surgical. Infection 2008 ...

  19. 3% Amuchina is as effective as the 50% concentration in the prevention of exit-site infection in children on chronic peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosman, Mònica D; Mosquera, Vanesa M; Hernandez, Maria G; Agostini, Silvana; Adragna, Marta; Sojo, Ernesto T

    2005-01-01

    In a previous communication, we demonstrated that, in the prevention of exit-site infection (ESI) in children, the cleansing agent 50% Amuchina (electrolytic chloroxidizer. Amuchina SpA, Genoa, Italy) is more effective than 10% povidone iodine and as effective as 4% chlorhexidine, but with fewer adverse secondary effects. In the present study, we assessed, in an Argentine pediatric population, whether Amuchina 3% is as effective as Amuchina 50% in preventing ESI in children on chronic peritoneal dialysis. In an open-label, single-center prospective study, 27 children (mean age: 7.2 years; range: 1.7-17 years) used 3% Amuchina as a cleansing agent for the daily care of a healthy exit site. Of the 27 children, 14 were switched from 50% Amuchina to 3% Amuchina, and 13 were using the 3% Amuchina for the first time. The control group consisted of 18 patients who had previously used 50% Amuchina as a cleansing agent. We followed the recommendations of the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis with regard to exit-site care, which include keeping the cleansing agent out of the sinus and rinsing the exit site with sterile water. Amuchina was used from the first post-implantation care of the exit site. No adverse secondary effects were seen with the use of Amuchina at either concentration. Patients using 3% Amuchina presented an ESI rate similar to that of patients using Amuchina 50%. The cost of 3% Amuchina was significantly lower than that of the 50% concentration, and it was even lower than the cost for 10% povidone iodine or 4% chlorhexidine. Although more research trials are needed to assess the efficacy of 3% Amuchina, we conclude that 3% Amuchina is the best and most cost-effective cleansing agent for the daily care of a healthy exit site in children on chronic peritoneal dialysis.

  20. Surgical Site Infection Rate and Risk Factors among Obstetric Cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-04-01

    Among surgical patients in obstetrics, Surgical Site Infections were the most ... for delivery from April 1, 2009 to March 31, 2010 in obstetric ward of the Hospital. ... applying improved surgical techniques and improving infection prevention ...

  1. Glycopeptides versus β-lactams for the prevention of surgical site infections in cardiovascular and orthopedic surgery: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Anas; Khanna, Ashish; Chagin, Kevin M; Klika, Alison K; Johnston, Douglas; Barsoum, Wael K

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of glycopeptides and β-lactams in preventing surgical site infections (SSIs) in cardiac, vascular, and orthopedic surgery. The cost-effectiveness of switching from β-lactams to glycopeptides for preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis has been controversial. β-Lactams are generally recommended in clean surgical procedures, but they are ineffective against resistant gram-positive bacteria. PubMed, International Pharmaceuticals Abstracts, Scopus, and Cochrane were searched for randomized clinical trials comparing glycopeptides and β-lactams for prophylaxis in adults undergoing cardiac, vascular, or orthopedic surgery. Abstracts and conference proceedings were included. Two independent reviewers performed study selection, data extraction, and assessment of risk of bias. Fourteen studies with a total of 8952 patients were analyzed. No difference was detected in overall SSIs between antibiotic types. However, compared with β-lactams, glycopeptides reduced the risk of resistant staphylococcal SSIs by 48% (relative risk, 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.29-0.93; P = 0.03) and enterococcal SSIs by 64% (relative risk, 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.80; P = 0.01), but increased respiratory tract infections by 54% (relative risk, 1.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-2.01; P ≤ 0.01). Subgroup analysis of cardiac procedures showed superiority of β-lactams in preventing superficial and deep chest SSIs, susceptible staphylococcal SSIs, and respiratory tract infections. Glycopeptides reduce the risk of resistant staphylococcal SSIs and enterococcal SSIs, but increase the risk of respiratory tract infections. Additional high-quality randomized clinical trials are needed as these results are limited by high risk of bias.

  2. Prevention of Infection in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Ledger

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We believe the prevention of infection-related adverse pregnancy outcome is the most important focus for obstetricians today. An emphasis upon immunization of susceptible women, prevention of transmissible disease by modification of patient behavior, and identification and treatment of silent infections should become standards of practice. This will require educational initiatives for physicians and their patients as well as continued clinical trials to determine costs and effectiveness.

  3. Wound Care: Preventing Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for specific medical advice or before making any purchasing decisions involving their care. National Limb Loss Resource ... Events Calendar Search Our Site Donate Memorial/Honor Gift Ways to Give Workplace Giving Program Donate Now ...

  4. Pre-Operative Skin Antisepsis with Chlorhexidine Gluconate and Povidone-Iodine to Prevent Port-Site Infection in Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaziani, Erasmo; Di Filippo, Annalisa; Orelli, Simone; Fiorini, Flavia; Spaziani, Martina; Tintisona, Orlando; Torcasio, Angelo; De Cesare, Alessandro; Picchio, Marcello

    2018-04-01

    Skin preparation with antiseptic agents is commonly recommended for incisional site cleansing before surgery. We present the result of a prospective case series submitted to a scheduled pre-operative antiseptic procedure combining chlorhexidine gluconate and povidone-iodine before elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Consecutive patients underwent pre-operative standardized cleansing of the operation site combining chlorhexidine gluconate and povidone-iodine. Patients were reviewed one week and four weeks post-operatively. Post-operative infection was observed in seven patients (4.3%). All observed infections were port-site infections, always located at the level of the umbilical incision. In all cases infections involved skin and subcutaneous tissue. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in five patients (71.4%) and miscellaneous aerobic gram-positive bacteria in two subjects (28.6%). Post-operative hospital stay was the only factor significantly associated with the development of port-site infections. Port-site infections are a common complication after elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The proposed pre-operative disinfection procedure is effective in reducing port-site infections. Reducing hospital stay may contribute to limiting the occurrence of this complication.

  5. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Prophylactic Intra-Operative Wound Irrigation for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Stijn W; Boldingh, Quirine J J; Solomkin, Joseph S; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Egger, Matthias; Dellinger, E Patchen; Boermeester, Marja A

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are one of the most common hospital-acquired infections. To reduce SSIs, prophylactic intra-operative wound irrigation (pIOWI) has been advocated, although the results to date are equivocal. To develop recommendations for the new World Health Organization (WHO) SSI prevention guidelines, a systematic literature review and a meta-analysis were conducted on the effectiveness of pIOWI using different agents as a means of reducing SSI. The PUBMED, Embase, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and WHO databases were searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing either pIOWI with no pIOWI or with pIOWI using different solutions and techniques were retrieved with SSI as the primary outcome. Meta-analyses were performed, and odds ratios (OR) and the mean difference with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were extracted and pooled with a random effects model. Twenty-one studies were suitable for analysis, and a distinction was made between intra-peritoneal, mediastinal, and incisional wound irrigation. A low quality of evidence demonstrated a statistically significant benefit for incisional wound irrigation with an aqueous povidone-iodine (PVP-I) solution in clean and clean contaminated wounds (OR 0.31; 95% CI 0.13-0.73; p = 0.007); 50 fewer SSIs per 1,000 procedures (from 19 fewer to 64 fewer)). Antibiotic irrigation had no significant effect in reducing SSIs (OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.64-2.12; p = 0.63). Low-quality evidence suggests considering the use of prophylactic incisional wound irrigation to prevent SSI with an aqueous povidone-iodine solution. Antibiotic irrigation does not show a benefit and therefore is discouraged.

  6. The Current State of Screening and Decolonization for the Prevention of Staphylococcus aureus Surgical Site Infection After Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Mitchell C; Moucha, Calin S

    2015-09-02

    The most common pathogens in surgical site infections after total hip and knee arthroplasty are methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and coagulase-negative staphylococci. Patients colonized with MSSA or MRSA have an increased risk for a staphylococcal infection at the site of a total hip or knee arthroplasty. Most colonized individuals who develop a staphylococcal infection at the site of a total hip or total knee arthroplasty have molecularly identical S. aureus isolates in their nares and wounds. Screening and nasal decolonization of S. aureus can potentially reduce the rates of staphylococcal surgical site infection after total hip and total knee arthroplasty. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  7. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Prophylactic Intra-Operative Wound Irrigation for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Stijn W.; Boldingh, Quirine J. J.; Solomkin, Joseph S.; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Egger, Matthias; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are one of the most common hospital-acquired infections. To reduce SSIs, prophylactic intra-operative wound irrigation (pIOWI) has been advocated, although the results to date are equivocal. To develop recommendations for the new World Health Organization (WHO) SSI

  8. The comparison of exit-site care with normal saline and povidone-iodine in preventing exit-site infection and peritonitis in children on chronic peritoneal dialysis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onder Yavascan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peritonitis and catheter exit- site infections (ESI are important causes of hospitalization and catheter loss in patients undergoing chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD. The frequency of infection can be reduced by scrupulous exit- site care with or without topical antiseptics. There are no studies showing any benefit in the use of povidone-iodine or normal saline for care of exit- sites in long- term CPD patients. In this study, we aimed to determine the potential effectiveness of the application of povidone-iodine or normal saline at the catheter exit- site in preventing ESI and peritonitis in children on CPD. A total of 98 patients treated with either povidone-iodine or normal saline were included in this study. Group I (34 patients used povidone-iodine and group II (64 patients simply cleansed the exit- site with normal saline (0.9% NaCl. Dressings were changed 2 to 3 times in a week. The total cumulative follow- up time was 3233 patient- months. ESIs occurred in 10 (29.4% of 34 patients using povidone-iodine and in 10 (15.6% of 64 patients using normal saline. The frequency of ESI was significantly high in group I (povidone-iodine patients. The mean rate of ESI was 1 episode/60.8 patient- months for group I versus 1 episode/144 patient- months for group II (P 0.05. In conclusion, exit- site care with normal saline is an effective strategy in reducing the incidence of ESI in children on CPD. It can thus significantly reduce morbidity, catheter loss, and the need to transfer patients on peritoneal dialysis to hemodialysis.

  9. Surveillance and epidemiology of surgical site infections after cardiothoracic surgery in The Netherlands, 2002-2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manniën, Judith; Wille, Jan C.; Kloek, Jaap J.; van Benthem, Birgit H. B.

    2011-01-01

    Surgical site infections after cardiothoracic surgery substantially increase the risk for illness, mortality, and costs. Surveillance of surgical site infections might assist in the prevention of these infections. This study describes the Dutch surveillance methods and results of data collected

  10. Prevention of Nosocomial Respiratory Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Karpun

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of an extended package of preventive measures on the incidence of nosocomial respiratory infections in surgical patients at an intensive care unit (ICU. Subjects and methods. The study included 809 patients aged 35 to 80 years. A study group comprised 494 patients in whom an extended package of preventive measures was implemented during 7 months (March-September. A control group consisted of 315 patients treated in 2004 in the same period of time (March-September. The groups were stratified by age, gender, underlying diseases, and APACHE-2 and SOFA scores. The extended package of anti-infectious measures involved a high air purification in ICUs («Flow-M» technology, routine use of ventilatory filters, closed aspiration systems with a built-in antibacterial filter under artificial ventilation for over 2 days. Results. The proposed technologies could reduce the frequency of tracheobronchitis and ventilator-associated pneumonias in the groups of patients at high risk for nosocomial infections substantially (by more than twice. Conclusion. The findings have led to the conclusion that the extended package of preventive measures is effective in preventing respiratory infections in ICU patients. Of special note is the proper prevention of upper airway contamination with pathogenic microorganisms, by employing the closed aspiration systems with a built-in antibacterial filter. The routine use of high-tech consumables in the intensive care of surgical patients causes a considerable decrease in the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and purulent tracheobronchitis and a reduction in the number of microbiological studies. Key words: ventilator-associated pneumonia, prevention of nosocomial infections, closed aspiration system.

  11. An animal study of a newly developed skin-penetrating pad and covering material for catheters to prevent exit-site infection in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Masato; Mizuno, Toshihide; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Nemoto, Yasushi; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Takemoto, Yoshiaki; Naganuma, Toshihide; Nakatani, Tatsuya

    2009-12-01

    goat skin throughout the 2-year experimental period without any special wound care such as cleansing or disinfection. The performance of the skin-penetrating pad was similarly favorable when attached to a commercial continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis catheter. The newly developed segmented polyurethane porous material had excellent tissue biocompatibility and tissue ingrowth. The skin-penetrating pad devised by using this porous material did not cause epidermal downgrowth, suggesting that it may be effective for the prevention of exit-site infection.

  12. Effect of bag extraction to prevent wound infection on umbilical port site wound on elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a prospective randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comajuncosas, Jordi; Hermoso, Judit; Jimeno, Jaime; Gris, Pere; Orbeal, Rolando; Cruz, Antonio; Parés, David

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the gold standard treatment for gallbladder stones. Complications due to laparoscopic procedure are rare, but rate of wound infection in some studies is about 8 %. From January 2007 to December 2008, 320 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were performed at our hospital, and in 4.7 % of them, wound infection of the umbilical trocar was identified. We believe that this infection rate could be lower and that it is necessary to implement a new technique to reduce the wound infection. The aim of the study was to evaluate the benefits of bag extraction of gallbladder to prevent the wound infection. Two-arm, parallel, 1:1, randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN38095251). All patients suffering from symptomatic gallbladder stones of low risk were enrolled for this study and were divided into two groups in basics gallbladder extraction: with (80 patients) or, as usually, without bag (76 patients). All patients with cholecystitis or accidental gallbladder perforation were excluded. We compared all the results to establish whether meaningful differences were found. The final sample analysed (156 patients) consisted of 121 women and 35 men; there were 80 in the control group and 76 in the study group. There were 15 (9.6 %) diagnosed wound infections, eight cases in the study group and seven in the control group. There were no statistically significant differences. The determinant of wound infection in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not the direct contact of the gallbladder with the wound; therefore, bag extraction is not necessary.

  13. [Infection prevention check-in and infection prevention check-out to prevent nosocomial infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, A; Schilling, M; Heidecke, C D

    2010-02-01

    A precondition for the success of the prevention of SSI is the complete realisation of the proven anti-infective measures in form of the multi-barrier strategy or the so-called bundles. In daily practice it is important to follow the fixed instructions, i. e., to ensure a high compliance. In much the same way as an airline pilot or co-pilot must examine whether all instruments are functioning before each take-off, a comparable procedure should be developed as a pre-operative control for the observance of all -defined measures by the responsible surgeon and for the post-operative supervision by the patient. For the control of the observance of the defined pre-operative prevention measures, a check list with 12 items was developed, named the "infection prevention check-in". The check list is authorised by the responsible surgeon be-fore each operation. For the surveillance of the general hygiene in the post-operative period the "infection prevention check-out" with 14 items was developed. Thereby the patient is able to evaluate the staff's compliance with the hygienic measures at the time of dismissal. With the introduction of the check-lists a simple means is given to involve both the team of the surgeons and the ward staff, together with the patient, into the infection prophylaxis even more effectively. In order to assess the success of those measures, the influence on the rate of SSI is to be determined prospectively. Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart, New York.

  14. Meta-analysis of randomized and quasi-randomized clinical trials of topical antibiotics after primary closure for the prevention of surgical-site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, C F; Banks, J L; Lepper, P; Kontopantelis, E; van Driel, M L

    2017-08-01

    Surgical-site infections (SSIs) increase patient morbidity and costs. The aim was to identify and synthesize all RCTs evaluating the effect of topical antibiotics on SSI in wounds healing by primary intention. The search included Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, the Cochrane Wounds Specialized Register, Central Register of Controlled Trials and EBSCO CINAHL from inception to May 2016. There was no restriction of language, date or setting. Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. When sufficient numbers of comparable trials were available, data were pooled in meta-analysis. Fourteen RCTs with 6466 participants met the inclusion criteria. Pooling of eight trials (5427 participants) showed that topical antibiotics probably reduced the risk of SSI compared with no topical antibiotic (risk ratio (RR) 0·61, 95 per cent c.i. 0·42 to 0·87; moderate-quality evidence), equating to 20 fewer SSIs per 1000 patients treated. Pooling of three trials (3012 participants) for risk of allergic contact dermatitis found no clear difference between antibiotics and no antibiotic (RR 3·94, 0·46 to 34·00; very low-quality evidence). Pooling of five trials (1299 participants) indicated that topical antibiotics probably reduce the risk of SSI compared with topical antiseptics (RR 0·49, 0·30 to 0·80; moderate-quality evidence); 43 fewer SSIs per 1000 patients treated. Pooling of two trials (541 participants) showed no clear difference in the risk of allergic contact dermatitis with antibiotics or antiseptic agents (RR 0·97, 0·52 to 1·82; very low-quality evidence). Topical antibiotics probably prevent SSI compared with no topical antibiotic or antiseptic. No conclusion can be drawn regarding whether they cause allergic contact dermatitis. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Infections du site Operatoire en Chirurgie Orthopedique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mots clés: Infection site opératoire chirurgie orthopédique. English Title: Infections of the operative site in orthopedic surgery: clinical presentations, etiologies and management. English Abstract. Introduction: In orthopedic surgery, wound site infections constitute a difficult situation to the surgeon; and for the patient. The aim ...

  16. Systematic Review and Cost Analysis Comparing Use of Chlorhexidine with Use of Iodine for Preoperative Skin Antisepsis to Prevent Surgical Site Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ingi; Agarwal, Rajender K.; Lee, Bruce Y.; Fishman, Neil O.; Umscheid, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare use of chlorhexidine with use of iodine for preoperative skin antisepsis with respect to effectiveness in preventing surgical site infections (SSIs) and cost. Methods We searched the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality website, the Cochrane Library, Medline, and EMBASE up to January 2010 for eligible studies. Included studies were systematic reviews, meta-analyses, or randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing preoperative skin antisepsis with chlorhexidine and with iodine and assessing for the outcomes of SSI or positive skin culture result after application. One reviewer extracted data and assessed individual study quality, quality of evidence for each outcome, and publication bias. Meta-analyses were performed using a fixed-effects model. Using results from the meta-analysis and cost data from the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, we developed a decision analytic cost-benefit model to compare the economic value, from the hospital perspective, of antisepsis with iodine versus antisepsis with 2 preparations of chlorhexidine (ie, 4% chlorhexidine bottle and single-use applicators of a 2% chlorhexidine gluconate [CHG] and 70% isopropyl alcohol [IPA] solution), and also performed sensitivity analyses. Results Nine RCTs with a total of 3,614 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis revealed that chlorhexidine antisepsis was associated with significantly fewer SSIs (adjusted risk ratio, 0.64 [95% confidence interval, [0.51–0.80]) and positive skin culture results (adjusted risk ratio, 0.44 [95% confidence interval, 0.35–0.56]) than was iodine antisepsis. In the cost-benefit model baseline scenario, switching from iodine to chlorhexidine resulted in a net cost savings of $16–$26 per surgical case and $349,904–$568,594 per year for the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Sensitivity analyses showed that net cost savings persisted under most circumstances. Conclusions Preoperative skin antisepsis

  17. Frequently Asked Questions about Surgical Site Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... follow CDC infection prevention guidelines including: Clean their hands and arms up to their elbows with an antiseptic agent ... Resistance Antibiotic Prescribing and Use Blood Safety Dialysis Safety Hand Hygiene HICPAC Injection Safety Infection Control Medication Safety ...

  18. Prevention of Surgical Site Infection After Ankle Surgery Using Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy in High-Risk Patients With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Ya-Ke; Chen, Hong-Lin; Liu, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Patients with diabetes have a high risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after ankle surgery. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) in the prevention of SSI after ankle surgery compared with the efficacy of standard moist wound care (SMWC). A retrospective study was performed of unstable ankle fractures for surgical fixation in patients with diabetes from January 2012 to December 2014. VAC and SMWC were used for surgical incision coverage. The primary outcome was the incidence of SSI, and the secondary outcomes were the length of hospital stay and crude hospital costs. The data from 76 patients were analyzed, with 22 (28.95%) in the VAC group and 54 (71.05%) in the SMWC group. The incidence of SSI was 4.6% in the VAC group compared with 27.8% in the SMWC group (chi-square 5.076; p = .024), and the crude odds ratio for SSI in the VAC group was 0.124 (95% confidence interval 0.002 to 0.938). The length of hospital stay was lower in the VAC group than in the SMWC group (12.6 ± 2.7 days and 15.2 ± 3.5 days, respectively; t = 3.122, p = .003). The crude hospital costs were also lower in the VAC group than in the SMWC group (Chinese yuan 8643.2 ± 1195.3 and 9456.2 ± 1106.3, respectively; t = 2.839, p = .006). After logistic regression analysis, the adjusted odds ratio for the total SSI rate comparing VAC and SMWC was 0.324 (95% confidence interval 0.092 to 0.804; p = .021). Compared with SMWC, VAC can decrease the SSI rate after ankle surgery in patients with diabetes. This finding should be confirmed by prospective, randomized controlled clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Executive summary, Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    A pollution prevention plan is an organized, comprehensive, and continual effort to systematically reduce waste generation. The Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan is designed to eliminate or minimize pollutant releases to all environmental media from all aspects of Site operations. These efforts offer increased protection of public health and the environment. This plan reflects the goals and policies for pollution prevention at the Hanford Site and represents an ongoing effort to make pollution prevention part of the Site operating philosophy. The plan encompasses hazardous waste only and excludes radioactive waste and radioactive mixed waste

  20. Future Research Opportunities in Peri-Prosthetic Joint Infection Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbari, Elie; Segreti, John; Parvizi, Javad; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I

    Peri-prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a serious complication of prosthetic joint arthroplasty. A better understanding and reversal of modifiable risk factors may lead to a reduction in the incidence of incisional (superficial and deep) and organ/space (e.g., PJI) surgical site infections (SSI). Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) published the Guideline for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection. This targeted update applies evidence-based methodology in drafting recommendations for potential strategies to reduce the risk of SSI both across surgical procedures and specifically in prosthetic joint arthroplasty. A panel of PJI content experts identified nine PJI prevention research opportunities based on both evidence gaps identified through the guideline development process (transfusion, immunosuppressive therapy, anticoagulation, orthopedic space suit, and biofilm) and expert opinion (anesthesia, operative room environment, glycemic control, and Staphylococcus aureus nasal screening and decolonization. This article offers a road map for PJI prevention research.

  1. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Prevention and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Biology Disease Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Get Email Updates ...

  2. Surgical site infection among patients undergone orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical site infection among patients undergone orthopaedic surgery at Muhimbili Orthopaedic Institute, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ... of surgical site infection at Muhimbili Orthopedic Institute was high. This was associated with more than 2 hours length of surgery, lack of prophylaxis use, and pre-operative hospital stay.

  3. Prevention of catheter-related blood stream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Matthew C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2007-08-01

    Catheter-related blood stream infections are a morbid complication of central venous catheters. This review will highlight a comprehensive approach demonstrated to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections. Elements of prevention important to inserting a central venous catheter include proper hand hygiene, use of full barrier precautions, appropriate skin preparation with 2% chlorhexidine, and using the subclavian vein as the preferred anatomic site. Rigorous attention needs to be given to dressing care, and there should be daily assessment of the need for central venous catheters, with prompt removal as soon as is practicable. Healthcare workers should be educated routinely on methods to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections. If rates remain higher than benchmark levels despite proper bedside practice, antiseptic or antibiotic-impregnated catheters can also prevent infections effectively. A recent program utilizing these practices in 103 ICUs in Michigan resulted in a 66% decrease in infection rates. There is increasing recognition that a comprehensive strategy to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections can prevent most infections, if not all. This suggests that thousands of infections can potentially be averted if the simple practices outlined herein are followed.

  4. Use and Effectiveness of Peri-Operative Cefotetan versus Cefazolin Plus Metronidazole for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Abdominal Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danan, Eleanor; Smith, Janessa; Kruer, Rachel M; Avdic, Edina; Lipsett, Pamela; Curless, Melanie S; Jarrell, Andrew S

    2018-04-24

    Current practice guidelines for antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery recommend a cephamycin or cefazolin plus metronidazole for various abdominal surgeries. In February 2016, cephamycin drug shortages resulted in a change in The Johns Hopkins Hospital's (JHH) recommendation for peri-operative antibiotic prophylaxis in abdominal surgeries from cefotetan to cefazolin plus metronidazole. The primary objective of this study was to quantify the percentage of abdominal surgeries adherent to JHH peri-operative antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines. A sub-group analysis investigated whether prophylaxis with cefazolin plus metronidazole was associated with a lower rate of surgical site infections (SSIs) versus cefotetan. This retrospective cohort study included adult inpatients who underwent an abdominal surgery at JHH in September 2015 (Study Period I: cefotetan) or February to March 2016 (Study Period II: cefazolin plus metronidazole). Two hundred abdominal surgery cases were included in the primary analysis. A subset of 156 surgical cases were included in the sub-group analysis. The overall adherence rate to JHH guidelines was 75% in Study Period I versus 17% in Study Period II (p operative administration time (87% vs. 23%, p site infections occurred in 14% (12/83) of surgeries with cefotetan versus 8.2% (6/73) with cefazolin plus metronidazole for prophylaxis (p = 0.19). Adherence to an institution-specific peri-operative antibiotic prophylaxis guideline for abdominal surgeries was limited primarily by the longer infusion time required for pre-operative metronidazole. A higher percentage of SSIs occurred among abdominal surgeries with cefotetan versus cefazolin plus metronidazole for prophylaxis.

  5. Executive Summary of the American College of Surgeons/Surgical Infection Society Surgical Site Infection Guidelines-2016 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Kristen A; Minei, Joseph P; Laronga, Christine; Harbrecht, Brian G; Jensen, Eric H; Fry, Donald E; Itani, Kamal M F; Dellinger, E Patchen; Ko, Clifford Y; Duane, Therese M

    Guidelines regarding the prevention, detection, and management of surgical site infections (SSIs) have been published previously by a variety of organizations. The American College of Surgeons (ACS)/Surgical Infection Society (SIS) Surgical Site Infection (SSI) Guidelines 2016 Update is intended to update these guidelines based on the current literature and to provide a concise summary of relevant topics.

  6. Port Site Infections After Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz KH Al-Naser

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Port site infection (PSI is an infrequent surgical site infection that complicates laparoscopic surgery but has a considerable influence in the overall outcome of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate factors that influence PSI after laparoscopic cholecystectomies and to analyze which of these factors can be modified to avoid PSI in a trail to achieve maximum laparoscopic advantages. Methods: A prospective descriptive qualitative study conducted on patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomies. Swabs were taken for culture & sensitivity in all patients who developed PSI. Exploration under general anaesthesia, for patients, had deep surgical site infections and wound debridement was done, excisional biopsies had been taken for histopathological studies, and tissue samples for polymerase chain reaction for detection of mycobacterium tuberculosis was done. All patients were followed up for six months postoperatively. Factors as gender, site of infected port, type of microorganism, acute versus chronic cholecystitis, type of infection (superficial or deep infection and intraoperative spillage of stones, bile or pus were analyzed in our sample. Results: Port site infection rate was recorded in 40/889 procedures (4.5%, higher rates were observed in male patients 8/89 (8.9%, in acute cholecystitis 13/125 (10.4%, when spillage of bile, stones or pus occurred 24/80 (30%, and at epigastric port 32/40 (80%. Most of the PSI were superficial infections 77.5% with non-specific microorganism 34/40 (85%. Conclusion: There is a significant association of port site infection with spillage of bile, stones, or pus, with the port of gallbladder extraction and with acute cholecystitis. Especial consideration should be taken in chronic deep surgical site infection as mycobacterium tuberculosis could be the cause. Most of the PSIs are superficial and more common in males.

  7. Mycobacterium fortuitum causing surgical site wound infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaleem, F.; Usman, J.; Omair, M.; Din, R.U.; Hassan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum, a rapidly growing mycobacterium, is ubiquitous in nature. The organism was considered to be a harmless saprophyte but now there have been several reports from different parts of the world wherein it has been incriminated in a variety of human infections. We report a culture positive case of surgical site infection caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum, who responded well to the treatment. (author)

  8. Sexually transmitted infections: prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denis; Dallabetta, Gina; Steen, Richard

    2004-02-01

    In the early 21st century, STI and HIV have been linked inextricably. Although the focus of this article is STI, some discussion on the diagnosis and management of individuals with HIV infection is necessary. The history of HIV diagnosis in the workplace is checkered. The authors have seen cases of prospective workers being subjected to HIV testing without their knowledge as part of a pre-employment medical examination. If the test came back positive, the men were told that they would not be employed without explanation. This approach is a breech of the human rights of the individual being tested and cannot be condoned. Any HIV testing must be done with the full and informed consent of the individual, with counseling given before and after testing to enable individuals with HIV infection to seek care and protect their families and to give individuals without HIV infection counseling on risk reduction. Men and women who present with an STI are at risk for HIV infection. With increasing options for management and secondary prevention, it is important to recognize people who are at risk. This identification should be done through HIV VCT. The location, funding, and supervision of VCT sites related to workplace populations should be a subject for serious debate. Although fears of mass layoffs after HIV testing largely have been unfounded, it is natural for workers to be fearful, unless there is a clearly articulated policy stating that the company observes and enforces nondiscriminatory practices. The workplace examples show that syndromic STI management, allied to comprehensive prevention programs, can have a genuine and measurable impact on STI prevalence. The potential interventions and partners are listed in Table 2. A community-based, randomized study in Tanzania showed that the institution of a well-managed STI syndromic management program can reduce HIV incidence by up to 40%, in the context of a rising HIV epidemic. Presumptive STI treatment for female sex

  9. Does Infection Site Matter? A Systematic Review of Infection Site Mortality in Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motzkus, Christine A; Luckmann, Roger

    2017-09-01

    Sepsis treatment protocols emphasize source control with empiric antibiotics and fluid resuscitation. Previous reviews have examined the impact of infection site and specific pathogens on mortality from sepsis; however, no recent review has addressed the infection site. This review focuses on the impact of infection site on hospital mortality among patients with sepsis. The PubMed database was searched for articles from 2001 to 2014. Studies were eligible if they included (1) one or more statistical models with hospital mortality as the outcome and considered infection site for inclusion in the model and (2) adult patients with sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock. Data abstracted included stage of sepsis, infection site, and raw and adjusted effect estimates. Nineteen studies were included. Infection sites most studied included respiratory (n = 19), abdominal (n = 19), genitourinary (n = 18), and skin and soft tissue infections (n = 11). Several studies found a statistically significant lower mortality risk for genitourinary infections on hospital mortality when compared to respiratory infections. Based on studies included in this review, the impact of infection site in patients with sepsis on hospital mortality could not be reliably estimated. Misclassification among infections and disease states remains a serious possibility in studies on this topic.

  10. Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infection Prevention bundle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zarkotou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI are among the most common healthcare-associated infections, and potentially lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Multifaceted infection control strategies implemented as bundles can prevent nosocomial infections associated with invasive devices such as CAUTIs. The components of the CAUTI bundle proposed herein, include appropriate indications for catheterization and recommendations for the procedures of catheter insertion and catheter maintenance and care. Avoiding unnecessary urinary catheter use is the most effective measure for their prevention. To minimize the risk of CAUTI, urinary catheters should be placed only when a clinical valid indication is documented and they should be removed as soon as possible; alternatives to catheterization should also be considered. Aseptic insertion technique, maintenance of closed drainage system and strict adherence to hand hygiene are essential for preventing CAUTI. The successful implementation of the bundle requires education and training for all healthcare professionals and evaluation of surveillance data.

  11. Tuberculosis Vaccines and Prevention of Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Tracey A.; Scriba, Thomas J.; Hatherill, Mark; Hanekom, Willem A.; Evans, Thomas G.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Kublin, James G.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Self, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading cause of death worldwide despite the availability of effective chemotherapy for over 60 years. Although Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination protects against active TB disease in some populations, its efficacy is suboptimal. Development of an effective TB vaccine is a top global priority that has been hampered by an incomplete understanding of protective immunity to TB. Thus far, preventing TB disease, rather than infection, has been the primary target for vaccine development. Several areas of research highlight the importance of including preinfection vaccines in the development pipeline. First, epidemiology and mathematical modeling studies indicate that a preinfection vaccine would have a high population-level impact for control of TB disease. Second, immunology studies support the rationale for targeting prevention of infection, with evidence that host responses may be more effective during acute infection than during chronic infection. Third, natural history studies indicate that resistance to TB infection occurs in a small percentage of the population. Fourth, case-control studies of BCG indicate that it may provide protection from infection. Fifth, prevention-of-infection trials would have smaller sample sizes and a shorter duration than disease prevention trials and would enable opportunities to search for correlates of immunity as well as serve as a criterion for selecting a vaccine product for testing in a larger TB disease prevention trial. Together, these points support expanding the focus of TB vaccine development efforts to include prevention of infection as a primary goal along with vaccines or other interventions that reduce the rate of transmission and reactivation. PMID:25428938

  12. Prevention and management of cochlear implant infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluth, Michael B; Singh, Rajesh; Atlas, Marcus D

    2011-11-01

    Understanding the issues of infection related to an implantable medical device is crucial to all cochlear implant teams. Furthermore, given the risk of central nervous system complications and the relatively high quantity of underlying resource investment associated with cochlear implantation, the stakes of infection are high. The optimal strategies to prevent and manage such infections are still evolving as good-quality prospective data to guide such management decisions are not yet abundant within the medical literature and many recommendations are based on retrospective reviews or anecdotal evidence. We will outline a general strategy to deal with cochlear implant-related infection based on both the authors' experience and the published literature.

  13. Prevention of Infection in Orthopedic Prosthetic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirca, Ioana; Marculescu, Camelia

    2017-06-01

    Total joint arthroplasty is a generally safe orthopedic procedure; however, infection is a potentially devastating complication. Multiple risk factors have been identified for development of prosthetic joint infections. Identification of patients at risk and preoperative correction of known risk factors, such as smoking, diabetes mellitus, anemia, malnutrition, and decolonization of Staphylococcus carriers, represent well-established actions to decrease the infection risk. Careful operative technique, proper draping and skin preparation, and appropriate selection and dosing of antimicrobials for perioperative prophylaxis are also very important in prevention of infection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Timing of surgical site infection and pulmonary complications after laparotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundel, Ossian; Gundersen, Sofie Kirchhoff; Dahl, Rikke Maria

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surgical site infection (SSI) and other postoperative complications are associated with high costs, morbidity, secondary surgery, and mortality. Many studies have identified factors that may prevent SSI and pulmonary complications, but it is important to know when they in fact occur....... The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic timing of surgical site infections and pulmonary complications after laparotomy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of the PROXI trial which was a randomized clinical trial conducted in 1400 patients undergoing elective or emergent...... laparotomy. Patients were randomly allocated to either 80% or 30% perioperative inspiratory oxygen fraction. RESULTS: SSI or pulmonary complications were diagnosed in 24.2% (95% CI: 22.0%-26.5%) of the patients at a median of 9 days [IQR: 5-15] after surgery. Most common was surgical site infection (19...

  15. Hanford Site pollution prevention progress report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BETSCH, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    The Richland Operations Office (RL) and Office of River Protection (ORP) are pleased to issue the attached Pollution Prevention Progress Report. We have just met the most aggressive waste reduction and A recycling goals to date and are publishing this report to recognize A the site's progress, and to ensure it will sustain success beyond 1 Fiscal Year 2000. This report was designed to inform the been made by RL and ORP in Waste Minimization (WMin) and Pollution Prevention (P2). RL, ORP and their contractors are committed to protecting the environment, and we reiterate pollution prevention should continue to be at the forefront of the environmental cleanup and research efforts. As you read the attached report, we believe you will see a clear demonstration of RL and ORP's outstanding performance as it has been responsible and accountable to the nation, its employees, and the community in which we live and work. commitment that all employees have for environmental stewardship. The report provides useful information about the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) environmental policy and programs, and contains countless examples of waste minimization projects. This year was the first year our site received the White House Closing the Circle in the category of Affirmative Procurement. This Award recognizes our site for designing a comprehensive strategy for achieving 100 percent purchases of the U.S.Environmenta1 Protection Agency designated recycled items. DOE-Headquarters also acknowledged the site in 1999 for its public outreach efforts in communicating pollution prevention to Hanford Site employees and the community. Our site is truly a recognized leader in outreach as it has kept this title for two consecutive years. In previous years, we received the White House Closing the Circle Honorable Mention in Affirmative Procurement and several other National DOE Awards. Through partnership with the local community and stakeholders, the site and its contractors have a clear

  16. Hanford Site pollution prevention progress report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BETSCH, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    The Richland Operations Office (RL) and Office of River Protection (ORP) are pleased to issue the attached Pollution Prevention Progress Report. We have just met the most aggressive waste reduction and A recycling goals to date and are publishing this report to recognize A the site's progress, and to ensure it will sustain success beyond 1 Fiscal Year 2000. This report was designed to inform the been made by RL and ORP in Waste Minimization (WMin) and Pollution Prevention (P2). RL, ORP and their contractors are committed to protecting the environment, and we reiterate pollution prevention should continue to be at the forefront of the environmental cleanup and research efforts. As you read the attached report, we believe you will see a clear demonstration of RL and ORP's outstanding performance as it has been responsible and accountable to the nation, its employees, and the community in which we live and work. commitment that all employees have for environmental stewardship. The report provides useful information about the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) environmental policy and programs, and contains countless examples of waste minimization projects. This year was the first year our site received the White House Closing the Circle in the category of Affirmative Procurement. This Award recognizes our site for designing a comprehensive strategy for achieving 100 percent purchases of the U.S.Environmenta1 Protection Agency designated recycled items. DOE-Headquarters also acknowledged the site in 1999 for its public outreach efforts in communicating pollution prevention to Hanford Site employees and the community. Our site is truly a recognized leader in outreach as it has kept this title for two consecutive years. In previous years, we received the White House Closing the Circle Honorable Mention in Affirmative Procurement and several other National DOE Awards. Through partnership with the local community and stakeholders, the site and its contractors have a clear

  17. Compliance With Infection Prevention Guidelines By Health Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    the health workers' curricular, provision of in-service training in infection ... cheaper infection prevention and control methods7. In Zambia ... Zambia Infection Prevention Guidelines in 2003. This ..... Control (IPC) Policies and Guidelines or.

  18. Prebiotics for Prevention of Gut Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Tine Rask; Ebersbach, Tine; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    It is our postulate that the field of prebiotic research has until now been characterized by a one-view-fits-all approach, implicating that if a putatively prebiotic compound is good for something, it is good for everything. One area where this implication has been proved insufficient regards...... the putative preventive effect of prebiotics against intestinal pathogenic bacteria. Although indeed most evidence on effects of prebiotics against infections is positive, some studies indicate that prebiotic carbohydrates cause increased susceptibility to specific gastrointestinal infections. Here, we review...... existing knowledge about the impact of prebiotics on infective agents in vitro and in vivo....

  19. Surgical Site Infection among Patients Undergone Orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    with surgical site infection at Muhimbili Orthopedic Institute. ... Determination of the relationship between outcome and exposure variables ... determined by more than 2 hours length of surgical procedure (AOR= 1.4; 95%CI 1.14-6.69; ... hospital, those with metastatic fractures, back, spine were not included as they fall under.

  20. [Risk factors related to surgical site infection in elective surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeles-Garay, Ulises; Morales-Márquez, Lucy Isabel; Sandoval-Balanzarios, Miguel Antonio; Velázquez-García, José Arturo; Maldonado-Torres, Lulia; Méndez-Cano, Andrea Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    The risk factors for surgical site infections in surgery should be measured and monitored from admission to 30 days after the surgical procedure, because 30% of Surgical Site Infection is detected when the patient was discharged. Calculate the Relative Risk of associated factors to surgical site infections in adult with elective surgery. Patients were classified according to the surgery contamination degree; patient with surgery clean was defined as no exposed and patient with clean-contaminated or contaminated surgery was defined exposed. Risk factors for infection were classified as: inherent to the patient, pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative. Statistical analysis; we realized Student t or Mann-Whitney U, chi square for Relative Risk (RR) and multivariate analysis by Cox proportional hazards. Were monitored up to 30 days after surgery 403 patients (59.8% women), 35 (8.7%) developed surgical site infections. The factors associated in multivariate analysis were: smoking, RR of 3.21, underweight 3.4 hand washing unsuitable techniques 4.61, transfusion during the procedure 3.22, contaminated surgery 60, and intensive care stay 8 to 14 days 11.64, permanence of 1 to 3 days 2.4 and use of catheter 1 to 3 days 2.27. To avoid all risk factors is almost impossible; therefore close monitoring of elective surgery patients can prevent infectious complications.

  1. Topical silver for preventing wound infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storm-Versloot, Marja N.; Vos, Cornelis G.; Ubbink, Dirk T.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Silver-containing treatments are popular and used in wound treatments to combat a broad spectrum of pathogens, but evidence of their effectiveness in preventing wound infection or promoting healing is lacking. OBJECTIVES: To establish the effects of silver-containing wound dressings and

  2. Idaho National Laboratory Site Pollution Prevention Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E. D. Sellers

    2007-01-01

    It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that pollution prevention and sustainable environmental stewardship will be integrated into DOE operations as a good business practice to reduce environmental hazards, protect environmental resources, avoid pollution control costs, and improve operational efficiency and mission sustainability. In furtherance of this policy, DOE established five strategic, performance-based Pollution Prevention (P2) and Sustainable Environmental Stewardship goals and included them as an attachment to DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program. These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of Pollution Prevention into each site's Environmental Management System (EMS). This document presents a P2 and Sustainability Program and corresponding plan pursuant to DOE Order 450.1 and DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. This plan is also required by the state of Idaho, pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) partial permit. The objective of this document is to describe the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site P2 and Sustainability Program. The purpose of the program is to decrease the environmental footprint of the INL Site while providing enhanced support of its mission. The success of the program is dependent on financial and management support. The signatures on the previous page indicate INL, ICP, and AMWTP Contractor management support and dedication to the program. P2 requirements have been integrated into working procedures to ensure an effective EMS as part of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS). This plan focuses on programmatic functions which include environmentally preferable procurement, sustainable design, P2 and Sustainability awareness, waste generation and reduction, source reduction and recycling, energy management, and pollution prevention opportunity assessments. The INL Site P2 and Sustainability Program is administratively

  3. Idaho National Laboratory Site Pollution Prevention Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. D. Sellers

    2007-03-01

    It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that pollution prevention and sustainable environmental stewardship will be integrated into DOE operations as a good business practice to reduce environmental hazards, protect environmental resources, avoid pollution control costs, and improve operational efficiency and mission sustainability. In furtherance of this policy, DOE established five strategic, performance-based Pollution Prevention (P2) and Sustainable Environmental Stewardship goals and included them as an attachment to DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program. These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of Pollution Prevention into each site's Environmental Management System (EMS). This document presents a P2 and Sustainability Program and corresponding plan pursuant to DOE Order 450.1 and DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. This plan is also required by the state of Idaho, pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) partial permit. The objective of this document is to describe the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site P2 and Sustainability Program. The purpose of the program is to decrease the environmental footprint of the INL Site while providing enhanced support of its mission. The success of the program is dependent on financial and management support. The signatures on the previous page indicate INL, ICP, and AMWTP Contractor management support and dedication to the program. P2 requirements have been integrated into working procedures to ensure an effective EMS as part of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS). This plan focuses on programmatic functions which include environmentally preferable procurement, sustainable design, P2 and Sustainability awareness, waste generation and reduction, source reduction and recycling, energy management, and pollution prevention opportunity assessments. The INL Site P2 and Sustainability Program is administratively

  4. Prevention of Recurrent Staphylococcal Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, C. Buddy; Al-Zubeidi, Duha N.; Fritz, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Staphylococcus aureus infections pose a significant health burden. The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus has resulted in an epidemic of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), and many patients experience recurrent SSTI. As S. aureus colonization is associated with subsequent infection, decolonization is recommended for patients with recurrent SSTI or in settings of ongoing transmission. S. aureus infections often cluster within households and asymptomatic carriers serve as reservoirs for transmission; therefore, a household approach to decolonization is more effective than measures performed by individuals alone. Other factors, such as environmental surface contamination, may also be considered. Novel strategies for the prevention of recurrent SSTI are needed. PMID:26311356

  5. Is neonatal group B streptococcal infection preventable?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Azam, M

    2011-05-01

    Early onset group B streptococcal (EOGBS) infection causes significant neonatal morbidity and mortality. We determined the incidence of EOGBS at Galway University Hospital (GUH) and examined any "missed opportunities" for preventing neonatal infection between 2004 and 2009. Our obstetric approach is risk-based. The incidence was 0.45\\/1,000 live-births; one death and one with neurological sequelae. A single mother received IAP; however we could not determine any potential for reducing cases of EOGBS by improving current IAP usage.

  6. Pelvic Surgical Site Infections in Gynecologic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P. Lachiewicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of surgical site infection (SSI remains the most common complication of gynecologic surgical procedures and results in significant patient morbidity. Gynecologic procedures pose a unique challenge in that potential pathogenic microorganisms from the skin or vagina and endocervix may migrate to operative sites and can result in vaginal cuff cellulitis, pelvic cellulitis, and pelvic abscesses. Multiple host and surgical risk factors have been identified as risks that increase infectious sequelae after pelvic surgery. This paper will review these risk factors as many are modifiable and care should be taken to address such factors in order to decrease the chance of infection. We will also review the definitions, microbiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of pelvic SSIs after gynecologic surgery.

  7. [Surgical site infections: antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are very common, and represent more than 20% of all hospital-acquired infections. SSIs are associated with a higher mortality, as well as to an extended hospital stay and costs, depending on the surgical procedure and type of SSI. Advances in control practices for these infections include improvement in operating room ventilation, sterilization methods, barriers, and surgical techniques, as well as in surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis. For the latter, the antimicrobial agent should: be active against the most common pathogens, be administered in an appropriate dosage and in a time frame to ensure serum and tissue concentrations over the period of potential contamination, be safe, and be administered over the shortest effective time period to minimize adverse events, development of resistances, and cost. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevention of nosocomial infection in the ICU setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, A; Raimondi, F

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this review is to focus the epidemiology and preventing measures of nosocomial infections that affect the critically ill patients. Most of them (over 80%) are related to the device utilization needed for patient life support but responsible for such complications as ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI), surgical site infections (SSI) and urinary tract infections (UTI). General recommendations include staff education and use of a surveillance program with a restrictive antibiotic policy. Adequate time must be allowed for hand washing and barrier precautions must always be used during device manipulation. The routine changing of central catheters is not necessary and increases costs; it is necessary to decrease the handling of administration sets, to use a more careful insertion technique and less frequent set replacement. Specific measures for VAP prevention are: 1). use of multi-use, closed-system suction catheters; 2). no routine change of the breathing circuit; 3). lubrication of the the endotracheal tube cuff with a water-soluble gel; 4). maintenance of patient in semi-recumbent position to improve chest physiotherapy. Specific measures for UTI prevention include: 1). use of a catheter-valve instead of a standard drainage system; 2). use of a silver-alloy, hydro gel-coated latex urinary catheter instead of uncoated catheters. By implementing effective preventive measures and maintaining strict surveillance of ICU infections, we hope to affect the associated morbidity, mortality, and cost that our patients and society bare. More clinical trials are needed to verify the efficacy of prevention measures of ICU infections.

  9. Probiotics and prevention of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, E J C; Johnson, S J; Maziade, P-J; Evans, C T; Sniffen, J C; Millette, M; McFarland, L V

    2017-06-01

    The role of probiotics as adjunctive measures in the prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been controversial. However, a growing body of evidence has suggested that they have a role in primary prevention of CDI. Elements of this controversy are reviewed and the proposed mechanisms of action, the value and cost effectiveness of probiotics are addressed with a focus on three agents, Saccharomyces boulardii, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and the combination of Lactobacillus acidophilus CL1285, Lactobacillus casei LBC80R, Lactobacillus rhamnosus CLR2 (Bio-K+). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An integrated stewardship model : Antimicrobial, infection prevention and diagnostic (AID)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dik, Jan-Willem H.; Poelman, Randy; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Panday, Prashant Nannan; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.; van Assen, Sander; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E. W. C.; Niesters, Hubert G. M.; Hendrix, Ron; Sinha, Bhanu

    2016-01-01

    Considering the threat of antimicrobial resistance and the difficulties it entails in treating infections, it is necessary to cross borders and approach infection management in an integrated, multidisciplinary manner. We propose the antimicrobial, infection prevention and diagnostic stewardship

  11. An integrated stewardship model: antimicrobial, infection prevention and diagnostic (AID)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dik, Jan-Willem H.; Poelman, Randy; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Panday, Prashant N.; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.; van Assen, Sander; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.; Niesters, Hubert G.M.; Hendrix, Ron; Sinha, Bhanu

    2015-01-01

    Considering the threat of antimicrobial resistance and the difficulties it entails in treating infections, it is necessary to cross borders and approach infection management in an integrated, multidisciplinary manner. We propose the antimicrobial, infection prevention and diagnostic stewardship

  12. Risk factors for surgical site infections following clean orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk factors for surgical site infections following clean orthopaedic operations. ... the host and environmental risk factors for surgical site infections following clean ... Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients who satisfied the inclusion ...

  13. Engineered porous scaffolds for periprosthetic infection prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iviglia, Giorgio, E-mail: giorgio.iviglia@polito.it [Nobil Bio Ricerche Srl, 14037 Portacomaro (Italy); Department of Applied Science and Technology, Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, 10121 Torino (Italy); Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele [Nobil Bio Ricerche Srl, 14037 Portacomaro (Italy); Baino, Francesco [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, 10121 Torino (Italy); Torre, Elisa; Morra, Marco [Nobil Bio Ricerche Srl, 14037 Portacomaro (Italy); Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, 10121 Torino (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Periprosthetic infection is a consequence of implant insertion procedures and strategies for its prevention involve either an increase in the rate of new bone formation or the release of antibiotics such as vancomycin. In this work we combined both strategies and developed a novel, multifunctional three-dimensional porous scaffold that was produced using hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), coupled with a pectin (PEC)-chitosan (CHIT) polyelectrolyte (PEI), and loaded with vancomycin (VCA). By this approach, a controlled vancomycin release was achieved and serial bacterial dilution test demonstrated that, after 1 week, the engineered construct still inhibits the bacterial growth. Degradation tests show an excellent behavior in a physiological and acidic environment (< 10% of mass loss). Furthermore, the PEI coating shows an anti-inflammatory response, and good cell proliferation and migration were demonstrated in vitro using osteoblast SAOS-2 cell line. This new engineered construct exhibits excellent properties both as an antibacterial material and as a stimulator of bone formation, which makes it a good candidate to contrast periprosthetic infection. - Highlights: • A novel three-dimensional ceramic scaffold was developed for infection prevention. • Pectin/chitosan coating stabilizes the degradation behavior in acidic environment. • Polyelectrolyte complex allows sustained release of vancomycin. • Inhibition of bacterial proliferation and biofilm formation was assessed. • PEI coating elicits anti-inflammatory response.

  14. Engineered porous scaffolds for periprosthetic infection prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iviglia, Giorgio; Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele; Baino, Francesco; Torre, Elisa; Morra, Marco; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic infection is a consequence of implant insertion procedures and strategies for its prevention involve either an increase in the rate of new bone formation or the release of antibiotics such as vancomycin. In this work we combined both strategies and developed a novel, multifunctional three-dimensional porous scaffold that was produced using hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), coupled with a pectin (PEC)-chitosan (CHIT) polyelectrolyte (PEI), and loaded with vancomycin (VCA). By this approach, a controlled vancomycin release was achieved and serial bacterial dilution test demonstrated that, after 1 week, the engineered construct still inhibits the bacterial growth. Degradation tests show an excellent behavior in a physiological and acidic environment (< 10% of mass loss). Furthermore, the PEI coating shows an anti-inflammatory response, and good cell proliferation and migration were demonstrated in vitro using osteoblast SAOS-2 cell line. This new engineered construct exhibits excellent properties both as an antibacterial material and as a stimulator of bone formation, which makes it a good candidate to contrast periprosthetic infection. - Highlights: • A novel three-dimensional ceramic scaffold was developed for infection prevention. • Pectin/chitosan coating stabilizes the degradation behavior in acidic environment. • Polyelectrolyte complex allows sustained release of vancomycin. • Inhibition of bacterial proliferation and biofilm formation was assessed. • PEI coating elicits anti-inflammatory response.

  15. Preventing urinary tract infections in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gabrielle J; Craig, Jonathan C; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is common in children, causes them considerable discomfort, as well as distress to parents and has a tendency to recur. Approximately 20% of those children who experience one infection will have a repeat episode. Since 1975, 11 trials of long-term antibiotics compared with placebo or no treatment in 1,550 children have been published. Results have been heterogeneous, but the largest trial demonstrated a small reduction (6% absolute risk reduction, risk ratio 0.65) in the risk of repeat symptomatic UTI over 12 months of treatment. This effect was consistent across sub groups of children based upon age, gender, vesicoureteric reflux status and number of prior infections. Trials involving re-implantation surgery (and antibiotics compared with antibiotics alone) for the sub-group of children with vesicoureteric reflux have not shown a reduction in repeat UTI, with the possible exception of a very small benefit for febrile UTI. Systematic reviews have shown that circumcision reduces the risk of repeat infection but 111 circumcisions would need to be performed to prevent one UTI in unpredisposed boys. Given the need for anaesthesia and the risk of surgical complication, net clinical benefit is probably restricted to those who are predisposed (such as those with recurrent infection). Many small trials in complementary therapies have been published and many suggest some benefit, however inclusion of children is limited. Only three trials involving 394 children for cranberry products, two trials with a total of 252 children for probiotics and one trial with 24 children for vitamin A are published. Estimates of efficacy vary widely and imprecision is evident. Multiple interventions to prevent UTI in children exist. Of those, long-term low dose antibiotics has the strongest evidence base, but the benefit is small. Circumcision in boys reduces the risk substantially, but should be restricted to those at risk. There is little evidence of benefit of

  16. Standard abdominal wound edge protection with surgical dressings vs coverage with a sterile circular polyethylene drape for prevention of surgical site infections (BaFO: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaljevic André L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postoperative surgical site infections cause substantial morbidity, prolonged hospitalization, costs and even mortality and remain one of the most frequent surgical complications. Approximately 14% to 30% of all patients undergoing elective open abdominal surgery are affected and methods to reduce surgical site infection rates warrant further investigation and evaluation in randomized controlled trials. Methods/design To investigate whether the application of a circular plastic wound protector reduces the rate of surgical site infections in general and visceral surgical patients that undergo midline or transverse laparotomy by 50%. BaFO is a randomized, controlled, patient-blinded and observer-blinded multicenter clinical trial with two parallel surgical groups. The primary outcome measure will be the rate of surgical site infections within 45 days postoperative assessed according to the definition of the Center for Disease Control. Statistical analysis of the primary endpoint will be based on the intention-to-treat population. The global level of significance is set at 5% (2 sided and sample size (n = 258 per group is determined to assure a power of 80% with a planned interim analysis for the primary endpoint after the inclusion of 340 patients. Discussion The BaFO trial will explore if the rate of surgical site infections can be reduced by a single, simple, inexpensive intervention in patients undergoing open elective abdominal surgery. Its pragmatic design guarantees high external validity and clinical relevance. Trial registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01181206. Date of registration: 11 August 2010; date of first patient randomized: 8 September 2010

  17. Pathology Laboratories and Infection Prevention and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Baral

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory health care workers are vulnerable to infection with the Hospital Acquired Infections (HAIs while receiving, handling and disposing biological samples. Ideally the infrastructure of the lab should be according to the best practices like good ventilation, room pressure differential, lighting, space adequacy, hand hygiene facilities, personal protective equipments, biological safety cabinets etc. Disinfection of the environment, and specific precautions with sharps and microbial cultures should follow the protocols and policies of the Infection Prevention and Control Practices (IPAC. If Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Legionella pneumophila are expected, diagnostic tests should be performed in a bio-safety level 3 facilities (for agents which may cause serious or potentially lethal disease in healthy adults after inhalation. Laboratory access should be limited only to people working in it.Along with the advent of new technologies and advanced treatment we are now facing problems with the dreadful HAIs with Antimicrobial Resistant Organisms (AROs which is taking a pandemic form. According to WHO, hundreds of millions of patients develop HAI every year worldwide and as many as 1.4 million occur each day in hospitals alone. The principal goals for hospital IPAC programs are to protect the patient, protect the health care worker (HCW, visitors, and other persons in the health environment, and to accomplish the previous goals in a cost-effective manner like hand hygiene, surveillance, training of the HCWs, initiating awareness programs and making Best Practices and Guidelines to be followed by everyone in the hospital.The initiation for the best practices in the Pathology Laboratories can be either Sporadic or Organizational. Sporadic initiation is when the laboratories make their own IPAC policies. It has been seen that in few centres these policies have been conceptualized but not materialized. Organizational initiation is much more

  18. Surgical Site Infections and Associated Operative Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, Paul K; Zuckerbraun, Brian S

    Surgical site infection (SSI) contributes significantly to surgical morbidity. Patient factors and operative factors contribute to the risk of development of SSI. This review focuses on understanding operative characteristics that are associated with an increased risk of SSI. Much attention has been given to protocol care to reduce SSI, such as hair removal, skin preparation, and pre-operative antibiotic agents. Even with this, the appropriate antibiotic and re-dosing regimens often remain a challenge. Other operative factors such as blood loss/transfusion, emergency/urgent cases, duration of the operation, type of anesthesia, and resident involvement are also potentially modifiable to reduce the risk of SSI. Data are reviewed to highlight the increased risk associated with such factors. Strategies to reduce risk, such as operative care bundles, have significant promise to reduce the incidence of SSI for any given procedure.

  19. Hanford Site waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Place, B.G.

    1998-01-01

    This plan, which is required by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400. 1, provides waste minimization and pollution prevention guidance for all Hanford Site contractors. The plan is primary in a hierarchical series that includes the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan, Prime contractor implementation plans, and the Hanford Site Guide for Preparing and Maintaining Generator Group Pollution Prevention Program Documentation (DOE-RL, 1997a) describing programs required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) 3002(b) and 3005(h) (RCRA and EPA, 1994). Items discussed include the pollution prevention policy and regulatory background, organizational structure, the major objectives and goals of Hanford Site's pollution prevention program, and an itemized description of the Hanford Site pollution prevention program. The document also includes US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office's (RL's) statement of policy on pollution prevention as well as a listing of regulatory drivers that require a pollution prevention program

  20. Perioperative management for the prevention of bacterial infection in cardiac implantable electronic device placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko Imai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs have become important in the treatment of cardiac disease and placement rates increased significantly in the last decade. However, despite the use of appropriate antimicrobial prophylaxis, CIED infection rates are increasing disproportionately to the implantation rate. CIED infection often requires explantation of all hardware, and at times results in death. Surgical site infection (SSI is the most common cause of CIED infection as a pocket infection. The best method of combating CIED infection is prevention. Prevention of CIED infections comprises three phases: before, during, and after device implantation. The most critical factors in the prevention of SSIs are detailed operative techniques including the practice of proper technique by the surgeon and surgical team.

  1. Hand hygiene for the prevention of nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Günter; Löffler, Harald; Gastmeier, Petra

    2009-10-01

    The WHO regards hand hygiene as an essential tool for the prevention of nosocomial infection, but compliance in clinical practice is often low. The relevant scientific literature and national and international evidence-based recommendations (Robert Koch Institute [Germany], WHO) were evaluated. Hygienic hand disinfection has better antimicrobial efficacy than hand-washing and is the procedure of choice to be performed before and after manual contact with patients. The hands should be washed, rather than disinfected, only when they are visibly soiled. Skin irritation is quite common among healthcare workers and is mainly caused by water, soap, and prolonged wearing of gloves. Compliance can be improved by training, by placing hand-rub dispensers at the sites where they are needed, and by physicians setting a good example for others. Improved compliance in hand hygiene, with proper use of alcohol-based hand rubs, can reduce the nosocomial infection rate by as much as 40%.

  2. Prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Vahlensieck, W; Bauer, H W; Weidner, W; Piechota, H J; Naber, K G

    2013-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most frequent bacterial infections in the community and health care setting. Mostly young and, to some extent, postmenopausal women are affected by recurrent UTI (rUTI) defined as ≥3 UTI/year or ≥2 UTI/half year. In contrast, rUTI is rare in healthy men. On the other hand, rUTI are frequently found in female and male patients with complicating urological factors, e.g. urinary catheters, infection stones. Remediable predisposing factors in uncomplicated rUTI in women are rare. In complicated rUTI the success depends mainly on the possibility to eliminate or at leastimprove the complicating risk factors. Continuous antibiotic prophylaxis or postcoital prophylaxis, if there is close correlation with sexual intercourse, are most effective to prevent rUTI. Nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim (or cotrimoxazole), and fosfomycin trometamol are available as first-line drugs. Oral cephalosporins and quinolones should be restricted to specific indications. Antibiotic prophylaxis reduces the number of uropathogens in the gut and/or vaginal flora and reduces bacterial "fitness". Given the correct indication, the recurrence rate of rUTI can be reduced by about 90%. Due to possible adverse events and the concern of selecting resistant pathogens, according to the guidelines of the European Association of Urology antimicrobial prophylaxis should be considered only after counselling, behavioural modification and non-antimicrobial measures have been attempted. In postmenopausal patients vaginal substitution of oestriol should be started first. Oral or parenteral immunoprophylaxis is another option in patients with rUTI. Other possibilities with varying scientific evidence are prophylaxis with cranberry products, specific plant combinations or probiotics. The prophylaxis of catheter-associated UTI should employ strategies which result in a reduction of frequency and duration of catheter drainage of the urinary tract. The currently available

  3. Infection Prevention Practices and Associated Factors among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-01

    Mar 1, 2018 ... Healthcare Workers in Governmental Healthcare Facilities in Addis. Ababa .... personal protective equipments and materials, ... disinfection practice, tuberculosis infection control ..... E. Knowledge and practice of infection.

  4. Surgical site infection rates following laparoscopic urological procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Arvin K; Srinivasan, Arun K; Cho, Jane; Sadek, Mostafa A; Kavoussi, Louis R

    2011-04-01

    Surgical site infections have been categorized by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as "never events". The incidence of surgical site infection following laparoscopic urological surgery and its risk factors are poorly defined. We evaluated surgical site infection following urological laparoscopic surgery and identified possible factors that may influence occurrence. Patients who underwent transperitoneal laparoscopic procedures during a 4-year period by a single laparoscopic surgeon were retrospectively reviewed. Surgical site infections were identified postoperatively and defined using the Centers for Disease Control criteria. Clinical parameters, comorbidities, smoking history, preoperative urinalysis and culture results as well as operative data were analyzed. Nonparametric testing using the Mann-Whitney U test, multivariable logistic regression and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. In 556 patients undergoing urological laparoscopic procedures 14 surgical site infections (2.5%) were identified at mean postoperative day 21.5. Of the 14 surgical site infections 10 (71.4%) were located at a specimen extraction site. Operative time, procedure type and increasing body mass index were significantly associated with the occurrence of surgical site infections (p = 0.007, p = 0.019, p = 0.038, respectively), whereas history of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.071) and intraoperative transfusion (p = 0.053) were found to trend toward significance. Age, gender, positive urine culture, steroid use, procedure type and smoking history were not significantly associated with surgical site infection. Body mass index and operative time remained significant predictors of surgical site infection on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Surgical site infection is an infrequent complication following laparoscopic surgery with the majority occurring at the specimen extraction site. Infection is associated with prolonged operative time and

  5. Infection prevention and control practices in children's hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Jeffrey M; Virgallito, Mary; Newland, Jason G; Sammons, Julia S; Thorell, Emily A; Coffin, Susan E; Pavia, Andrew T; Sandora, Thomas J; Hersh, Adam L

    2015-05-01

    We surveyed hospital epidemiologists at 28 Children's Hospital Association member hospitals regarding their infection prevention and control programs. We found substantial variability between children's hospitals in both the structure and the practice of these programs. Research and the development of evidence-based guidelines addressing infection prevention in pediatrics are needed.

  6. Surgical site infection and timing of prophylactic antibiotics for appendectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wan-Ting; Tai, Feng-Chuan; Wang, Pa-Chun; Tsai, Ming-Lin

    2014-12-01

    Pre-operative prophylactic antibiotics may decrease the frequency of surgical site infection after appendectomy. However, the optimal timing for administration of pre-operative prophylactic antibiotics is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of timing of prophylactic antibiotics on the frequency of surgical site infection after appendectomy. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively for 577 consecutive patients who had appendectomy for acute appendicitis from 2006 to 2009. Quality assurance guidelines for timing of prophylactic antibiotics before the skin incision were changed from 0 to 30 min before the skin incision (before June 2008) to 30 to 60 min before the skin incision (after June 2008). Surgical site infection occurred in 28 patients (4.9%). There was no difference in frequency of surgical site infection with different timing of pre-operative prophylactic antibiotic (pre-operative time 0 to 30 min: 9 infections [3.6%]; 31 to 60 min: 13 infections [5.4%]; 61 to 120 min: 5 infections [7.0%]; >120 min: 1 infection [6.6%]). Multivariable analysis showed that surgical site infection was associated significantly with medical comorbidity but not perforated appendicitis. The frequency of surgical site infection was independent of timing of preoperative prophylactic antibiotics but was associated with the presence of medical comorbidity.

  7. Manual of infection prevention and control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Damani, N. N

    2012-01-01

    .... Unlike other books on infection control, the main strength of this book is to provide clear, up-to-date and practical guidance in infection control in an easy to read format which can act as a quick...

  8. Prevention of Recurrent Staphylococcal Skin Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Creech, C. Buddy; Al-Zubeidi, Duha N.; Fritz, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections pose a significant health burden. The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus has resulted in an epidemic of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), and many patients experience recurrent SSTI. As S. aureus colonization is associated with subsequent infection, decolonization is recommended for patients with recurrent SSTI or in settings of ongoing transmission. S. aureus infections often cluster within households and asymptomatic carr...

  9. Early and late surgical site infections in ear surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastier, P L; Leroyer, C; Lashéras, A; Rogues, A-M; Darrouzet, V; Franco-Vidal, V

    2016-04-01

    A retroauricular approach is routinely used for treating chronic otitis media. The incidence of surgical site infections after ear surgery is around 10% in contaminated or dirty procedures. This observational prospective study describes surgical site infections after chronic otitis media surgery with the retroauricular approach and investigated their potential predictive factors. This observational prospective study included patients suffering from chronic otitis media and eligible for therapeutic surgery with a retroauricular approach. During follow-up, surgical site infections were defined as "early" if occurring within 30 days after surgery or as "late" if occurring thereafter. The data of 102 patients were analysed. Concerning early surgical site infections, four cases were diagnosed (3.9%) and a significant association was found with preoperative antibiotic therapy, wet ear at pre-operative examination, class III (contaminated) in the surgical wound classification, NNIS (National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance) index > 1, and oral post-operative antibiotic use. Seven late surgical site infections were diagnosed (7.1%) between 90 and 160 days after surgery and were significantly correlated to otorrhoea during the 6 months before surgery, surgery duration ≤60 minutes, canal wall down technique and use of fibrin glue. Surgical site infections after chronic otitis media surgery seem to be associated with factors related to the inflammatory state of the middle ear at the time of surgery in early infections and with chronic inflammation in late infections. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  10. Infection prevention and control in deployed military medical treatment facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospenthal, Duane R; Green, Andrew D; Crouch, Helen K; English, Judith F; Pool, Jane; Yun, Heather C; Murray, Clinton K

    2011-08-01

    Infections have complicated the care of combat casualties throughout history and were at one time considered part of the natural history of combat trauma. Personnel who survived to reach medical care were expected to develop and possibly succumb to infections during their care in military hospitals. Initial care of war wounds continues to focus on rapid surgical care with debridement and irrigation, aimed at preventing local infection and sepsis with bacteria from the environment (e.g., clostridial gangrene) or the casualty's own flora. Over the past 150 years, with the revelation that pathogens can be spread from patient to patient and from healthcare providers to patients (including via unwashed hands of healthcare workers, the hospital environment and fomites), a focus on infection prevention and control aimed at decreasing transmission of pathogens and prevention of these infections has developed. Infections associated with combat-related injuries in the recent operations in Iraq and Afghanistan have predominantly been secondary to multidrug-resistant pathogens, likely acquired within the military healthcare system. These healthcare-associated infections seem to originate throughout the system, from deployed medical treatment facilities through the chain of care outside of the combat zone. Emphasis on infection prevention and control, including hand hygiene, isolation, cohorting, and antibiotic control measures, in deployed medical treatment facilities is essential to reducing these healthcare-associated infections. This review was produced to support the Guidelines for the Prevention of Infections Associated With Combat-Related Injuries: 2011 Update contained in this supplement of Journal of Trauma.

  11. Decolonization in Prevention of Health Care-Associated Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Marin L.

    2016-01-01

    topical decolonization with hexachlorophane and povidone-iodine cannot be recommended at this time. There is also evidence to support use of selective digestive decontamination and selective oropharyngeal decontamination, but additional studies are needed to assess resistance to these agents, especially selection for resistance among Gram-negative organisms. The strongest evidence for decolonization is for use among surgical patients as a strategy to prevent surgical site infections. PMID:26817630

  12. Cranberries for preventing urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth G. Jepson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cranberries have been used widely for several decades for the prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs. This is the third update of our review first published in 1998 and updated in 2004 and 2008. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of cranberry products in preventing UTIs in susceptible populations. METHODS: Search methods: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library and the Internet. We contacted companies involved with the promotion and distribution of cranberry preparations and checked reference lists of review articles and relevant studies. Date of search: July 2012. Selection criteria: All randomised controlled trials (RCTs or quasi-RCTs of cranberry products for the prevention of UTIs. Data collection and analysis: Two authors independently assessed and extracted data. Information was collected on methods, participants, interventions and outcomes (incidence of symptomatic UTIs, positive culture results, side effects, adherence to therapy. Risk ratios (RR were calculated where appropriate, otherwise a narrative synthesis was undertaken. Quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. MAIN RESULTS: This updated review includes a total of 24 studies (six cross-over studies, 11 parallel group studies with two arms; five with three arms, and two studies with a factorial design with a total of 4473 participants. Ten studies were included in the 2008 update, and 14 studies have been added to this update. Thirteen studies (2380 participants evaluated only cranberry juice/concentrate; nine studies (1032 participants evaluated only cranberry tablets/capsules; one study compared cranberry juice and tablets; and one study compared cranberry capsules and tablets. The comparison/control arms were placebo, no treatment, water, methenamine hippurate, antibiotics, or lactobacillus. Eleven studies were not included in the meta

  13. A framework for preventing healthcare-associated infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To ensure safe healthcare delivery to children, a co-ordinated HAI prevention strategy should promote development of infection prevention norms and policies, education, patient safety advocacy, healthcare infrastructure, surveillance and research. We present a framework for SA to develop and expand HAI prevention in ...

  14. A Targeted E-Learning Program for Surgical Trainees to Enhance Patient Safety in Preventing Surgical Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Seamus Mark; Corrigan, Mark; Dimitrov, Borislav; Cowman, Seamus; Tierney, Sean; Humphreys, Hilary; Hill, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infection accounts for 20% of all health care-associated infections (HCAIs); however, a program incorporating the education of surgeons has yet to be established across the specialty. Methods: An audit of surgical practice in infection prevention was carried out in Beaumont Hospital from July to November 2009. An…

  15. Organizational culture and its implications on infection prevention and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Baral

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The hospital acquired infections are becoming common in our hospitals lately. These infections are difficult to treat and maybe life threatening. Hospital acquired infection  can be minimized or eradicated by good Infection Prevention and Control guidelines and good hand hygiene practices. The success of Infection Prevention and Control guidelines program in any hospital is largely impacted by the organizational culture.  In any health care setting the management is challenged by the organizational culture to change of any kind. Where implementation of Infection Prevention and Control guidelines program is easily implemented in some hospitals it is very difficult in others. Moreover, hand hygiene is not only biomedical practice but also has more behavioral factors. 

  16. Current microbiology of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube (PEG tube) insertion site infections in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolston, Kenneth V I; Mihu, Coralia; Tarrand, Jeffrey J

    2011-08-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is frequently used to provide enteral access in cancer patients who are unable to swallow. Infection is an important complication in this setting. Current microbiological data are needed to guide infection prevention and treatment strategies. The microbiological records of our institution (a 550-bed comprehensive cancer center) were retrospectively reviewed over an 8-month study period in order to identify patients who developed PEG tube insertion site infections, and review their microbiological details and susceptibility/resistance data. Fifty-eight episodes of PEG tube insertion site infections were identified. Of these, 31 (53%) were monomicrobial, and the rest were polymicrobial. The most common organisms isolated were Candida species, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All infections were local (cellulitis, complicated skin, and skin structure infections including abdominal wall abscess) with no cases of concomitant bacteremia being documented. Most of the organisms isolated were susceptible to commonly used antimicrobial agents, although some quinolone-resistant and some multidrug-resistant organisms were isolated. This retrospective study provides descriptive data regarding PEG tube insertion site infections. These data have helped us update institutional guidelines for infection prevention and treatment as part of our focus on antimicrobial stewardship.

  17. Translational models of infection prevention and control: lessons from studying high risk aging populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona

    2018-06-13

    The present review describes our research experiences and efforts in advancing the field of infection prevention and control in nursing facilities including postacute and long-term care settings. There are over two million infections in postacute and long-term care settings each year in the United States and $4 billion in associated costs. To define a target group most amenable to infection prevention and control interventions, we sought to quantify the relation between indwelling device use and microbial colonization in nursing facility patients. Using various methodologies including survey methods, observational epidemiology, randomized controlled studies, and collaboratives, we showed that indwelling device type is related to the site of multidrug-resistant organism (MDRO) colonization; multianatomic site colonization with MDROs is common; community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) appeared in the nursing facility setting almost immediately following its emergence in acute care; (4) MDRO prevalence and catheter-associated infection rates can be reduced through a multimodal targeted infection prevention intervention; and (5) using a collaborative approach, such an intervention can be successfully scaled up. Our work advances the infection prevention field through translational research utilizing various methodologies, including quantitative and qualitative surveys, patient-oriented randomized controlled trials, and clinical microbiologic and molecular methods. The resulting interventions employ patient-oriented methods to reduce infections and antimicrobial resistance, and with partnerships from major national entities, can be implemented nationally.

  18. Surgical Site Infection Following Fixation of Acetabular Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Faizan; Younus, Sajid; Asmatullah; Zia, Osama Bin; Khan, Naveed

    2017-09-01

    Acetabular fractures are mainly caused by high energy trauma. Surgical fixation of these fractures requires extensive surgical exposure which increases the length of operation and blood loss as well. This may increase the risk of surgical site infection. Our aim is to evaluate the prevalence of surgical site infections and the risk factors associated with it so as to minimize its chances. A total of 261 patients who underwent acetabular fracture surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into 2 groups, with or without surgical site infection. Factors examined include patients' gender, age, body mass index (BMI), time between injury and surgery, operative time, estimated blood loss, number of packed red blood cell transfused, length of total intensive care unit (ICU) stay, fracture type, surgical approach, smoking status, patients' comorbids and associated injuries. Fourteen patients (5.4%) developed surgical site infection. Out of 14 infections, 4 were superficial and 10 were deep. The factors that were found to be associated with surgical site infection following acetabular fracture fixation were prolonged operation time, increased BMI, prolonged ICU stay, larger amount of packed red blood cell transfused and associated genitourinary and abdominal trauma. In our study, we conclude that measures should be undertaken to attenuate the chances of surgical site infection in this major surgery by considering the risk factors significantly associated with it.

  19. Hanford Site waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    The Hanford Site WMin/P2 program is an organized, comprehensive, and continual effort to systematically reduce the quantity and toxicity of hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and sanitary wastes; conserve resources; and prevent or minimize pollutant releases to all environmental media from all Site activities. The Hanford Site WMin/P2 program plan reflects national and DOE waste minimization and pollution prevention goals and policies, and represents an ongoing effort to make WMin/P2 part of the Site operating philosophy. In accordance with these policies, a hierarchical approach to environmental management has been adopted and is applied to all types of polluting and waste generating activities. Pollution prevention and waste minimization through source reduction are first priority in the Hanford WMin/P2 program, followed by environmentally safe recycling. Treatment to reduce the quantity, toxicity, and/or mobility will be considered only when prevention or recycling are not possible or practical. Environmentally safe disposal is the last option

  20. Adult Catheter Care and Infection Prevention Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and go to an emergency room or clinic. Bring your repair kit because, unfortunately, many emergency rooms do not have them. • Ask your clinician about a sutureless securement device to reduce the risk of infection and accidental ...

  1. Adaptive Architecture and the Prevention of Infections in Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khai Tran van

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Researches has shown that climate change may spark global epidemics. The objectives of hospital design consistent with a high standard of sustainable architecture must not only be the tropicalization of buildings but also a system to confront the impact of infectious diseases which arise from climate change. Infection control is the discipline concerned with preventing nosocomial or healthcare-associated infection. Infection control addresses factors related to the spread of infections within the hospital building, including prevention, monitoring and management measures. As the application of new technologies such as the Heating, ventilation and air conditioning system (HVAC with high-efficiency particulate arrestance (HEPA has application range within stamina, the study suggests the need to adopt an integrated adaptive hospital design strategy to prevent infection.

  2. Surgical site infection in posterior spine surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-20

    Mar 20, 2016 ... Methodology: All consecutive patients who had posterior spine surgeries between January 2012 ... However, spinal instrumentation, surgery on cervical region and wound inspection on or ... While advances have been made in infection control ... costs, due to loss of productivity, patient dissatisfaction and.

  3. Knowledge and attitudes of infection prevention and control among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    infection prevention and control is imparted early before they are introduced to the wards. ... professional nurses in Namibia instead of depending .... Table 3: ANOVA results for overall IPC Knowledge Score for gender, student area, high ...

  4. Air pollution prevention at the Hanford Site: Status and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    With the introduction of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and other air and pollution prevention regulations, there has been increased focus on both pollution prevention and air emissions at US DOE sites. The Pollution Prevention (P2) Group of WHC reviewed the status of air pollution prevention with the goal of making recommendations on how to address air emissions at Hanford through pollution prevention. Using the air emissions inventory from Hanford's Title V permit, the P2 Group was able to identify major and significant air sources. By reviewing the literature and benchmarking two other DOE Sites, two major activities were recommended to reduce air pollution and reduce costs at the Hanford Site. First, a pollution prevention opportunity assessment (P2OA) should be conducted on the significant painting sources in the Maintenance group and credit should be taken for reducing the burning of tumbleweeds, another significant source of air pollution. Since they are significant sources, reducing these emissions will reduce air emission fees, as well as have the potential to reduce material and labor costs, and increase worker safety. Second, a P2OA should be conducted on alternatives to the three coal-fired powerhouses (steam plants) on-site, including a significant costs analysis of alternatives. This analysis could be of significant value to other DOE sites. Overall, these two activities would reduce pollution, ease regulatory requirements and fees, save money, and help Hanford take a leadership role in air pollution prevention

  5. Livermore Site Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures Plan, May 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mertesdorf, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plan describes the measures that are taken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL) Livermore Site in Livermore, California, to prevent, control, and handle potential spills from aboveground containers that can contain 55 gallons or more of oil.

  6. Antibiotic therapy for preventing infections in people with acute stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Westendorp, Willeke F.; Dippel, Diederik Wj; van de Beek, Diederik; Nederkoorn, Paul J.

    2018-01-01

    Stroke is the main cause of disability in high-income countries and ranks second as a cause of death worldwide. Infections occur frequently after stroke and may adversely affect outcome. Preventive antibiotic therapy in the acute phase of stroke may reduce the incidence of infections and improve

  7. Antibiotic therapy for preventing infections in patients with acute stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westendorp, Willeke F.; Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Vermeij, Frederique; den Hertog, Heleen M.; Dippel, Diederik W. J.; van de Beek, Diederik; Nederkoorn, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke is the main cause of disability in high income countries and ranks second as a cause of death worldwide. Infections occur frequently after stroke and may adversely affect outcome. Preventive antibiotic therapy in the acute phase of stroke may reduce infections and improve outcome.

  8. Cranberry in prevention of urinary tract Infections in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda-Machado Pablo Andrés

    2011-01-01

    The urinary infection tract is the most common infectious complication in pregnancy.The aim was to conduct a literature review of the evidence on effectiveness, safetyand cost effectiveness of cranberry products in preventing urinary tract infection inpregnancy. Studies suggest a potential protective effect of cranberry products againsturinary tract infection in pregnancy and there is no documented evidence of danger orcontraindication in pregnancy or lactation. The cost effectiveness of cran...

  9. Achievement of interventions on HIV infection prevention among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In China, migrants with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have become a serious problem in the field of AIDS prevention. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of interventions for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection prevention for migrants in China and to identify factors associated with intervention ...

  10. Monitoring of nosocomial infections as an element of prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Gąska

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hospital infections are one of the most serious threats to the hospitalised patient and their monitoring is recognised as one of the most important criteria of care quality for modern hospitals. The aim of the work was to present the problem of nosocomial infections and desired behaviours and activities in the field of infection prophylaxis. Material and method. The analysis of the current scientific literature was carried out with particular attention to the prevention of infections in treatment wards and the need to monitor the patient's condition and the environment in the case of an infection. Results. The lack of developed and implemented programmes for the control of nosocomial infections is a fundamental element that increases the risk of nosocomial infections. This disrupts the proper functioning of the hospital and causes additional health problems for the patient and the ward staff. In addition, the hospital suffers losses instead of savings, which is a priority aim in the current funding system. Conclusions. The basis for eliminating or minimising the incidence of nosocomial infections is a well-developed and implemented programme of hospital infection control based on the education of medical personnel in the field of infection prevention. Constant, comprehensive assessment of the procedures used and the standards of conduct, epidemiological data as well as microbiological data can ensure quick identification and elimination of the threat.

  11. A Modern Approach to Preventing Prosthetic Joint Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Paraskevi Vivian; Congiusta, Dominick; Scuderi, Giles R; Cushner, Fred D

    2018-02-28

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is recognized as one of the most successful surgical procedures performed today. One of the most common and dreaded complications of TKA is postoperative infection. To prevent infections, it is critical to identify patients at high risk through analyzing their risk factors, and help in addressing them prior to surgery. The effort to prevent infection must be carried through every step of the surgical process, from preoperative counseling to intraoperative measures and postoperative protocols. Hair removal, the application of antiseptics, the utilization of antibiotics, barbed sutures, smart dressings, and antibacterial washes are some of the avenues surgeons may explore to help prevent infection. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. [Infection prevention and control in neonatal intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Elisiane; Lorenzini, Elisiane; da Costa, Tatiane Costa; da Silva, Eveline Franco

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed to identify the knowledge of the nursing team of a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) on infection control, identijfying the factors that facilitate or hinder the prevention and control of Healthcare Associated Infections (HICAI). A descriptive study using a qualitative research method conducted with three nurses and 15 nurse technicians, who work in a NICU of a charitable organization, in southern Brazil. It became evident that the nursing staff had great knowledge about the factors that facilitate the prevention and control of HCAI in NICU, the most important factor being proper hand hygiene. Among the factors that hinder infection prevention and control are to overcrowding and excessive workload. The efficient performance of the nursing staff is an important part of the strategy for prevention and control of HCAI.

  13. HIV INFECTION AND AIDS: EPIDEMIOLOGY AND PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Alparslan BABAYIÐIT

    Full Text Available Human Immune-deficiency Virus (HIV was first discovered in 1981 in the United States of America and the day of December 1, was announced as ?World AIDS Day? by WHO (World Health Organization. In Turkey, the first announcement of the people living with HIV was made in 1985. HIV/AIDS has killed more than 20 millions people and more than 16,000 people become newly infected each day since the first cases were diagnosed in 1981. It is estimated that 39.4 million people would have been infected with HIV at the end of 2004, with 4.9 million new cases that year. Sub-Saharan Africa is the worst-hit region, with 70 percent of all people living with HIV. In Africa alone, 10,000 people become infected each day. This year?s main theme is ?Women, Girls, HIV and AIDS,? which reflects a focus on how the effects of HIV/AIDS have significantly increased among women. Women now make up half of all people living with HIV worldwide with the number of 17,6 million. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2004; 3(11.000: 280-290

  14. Review and analysis of existing mobile phone applications for health care-associated infection prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall, Rebecca; Iribarren, Sarah J

    2015-06-01

    The expanding number of mobile health applications (apps) holds potential to reduce and eliminate health care-associated infections (HAIs) in clinical practice. The purpose of this review was to identify and provide an overview of the apps available to support prevention of HAIs and to assess their functionality and potential uses in clinical care. We searched 3 online mobile app stores using the following terms: infection prevention, prevention, hand hygiene, hand washing, and specific HAI terms (catheter-associated urinary tract infection [CAUTI], central line-associated bloodstream infections, surgical site infection, and ventilator associated pneumonia [VAP]). Search queries yielded a total of 2,646 potentially relevant apps, of which 17 met our final inclusion criteria. The areas of focus were CAUTI (n = 1, 5.9%), VAP (n = 1, 5.9%), environmental monitoring (n = 2, 11.8%), and hand hygiene (n = 2, 11.8%); the remainder (n = 11, 64.7%) were focused on >1 area (eg, multiple infection prevention bundles, infection prevention guidelines). Almost all of the apps (70.6%) had a maximum of two functions. Mobile apps may help reduce HAI by providing easy access to guidelines, hand hygiene monitoring support, or step-by-step procedures aimed at reducing infections at the point of clinical care. Given the dearth of available apps and the lack of functionality with those that are available, there is a need for further development of mobile apps for HAI prevention at the point of care. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Group B Strep Infection: Prevention in Newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevención en los recién nacidos Preventing Early-Onset Group B Strep Disease The two most important ways ... occurs in babies younger than 1 week old) group B strep disease include: Testing all pregnant women ...

  16. Site 300 Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mertesdorf, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plan describes the measures that are taken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) near Tracy, California, to prevent, control, and handle potential spills from aboveground containers that can contain 55 gallons or more of oil. This SPCC Plan complies with the Oil Pollution Prevention regulation in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 112 (40 CFR 112) and with 40 CFR 761.65(b) and (c), which regulates the temporary storage of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). This Plan has also been prepared in accordance with Division 20, Chapter 6.67 of the California Health and Safety Code (HSC 6.67) requirements for oil pollution prevention (referred to as the Aboveground Petroleum Storage Act [APSA]), and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order No. 436.1. This SPCC Plan establishes procedures, methods, equipment, and other requirements to prevent the discharge of oil into or upon the navigable waters of the United States or adjoining shorelines for aboveground oil storage and use at Site 300. This SPCC Plan has been prepared for the entire Site 300 facility and replaces the three previous plans prepared for Site 300: LLNL SPCC for Electrical Substations Near Buildings 846 and 865 (LLNL 2015), LLNL SPCC for Building 883 (LLNL 2015), and LLNL SPCC for Building 801 (LLNL 2014).

  17. Patient Self-Assessment of Surgical Site Infection is Inaccurate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Vered; Cohen, Matan J; Benenson, Shmuel; Almogy, Gideon; Brezis, Mayer

    2017-08-01

    Availability of surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance rates challenges clinicians, healthcare administrators and leaders and the public. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate the consequences patient self-assessment strategies have on SSI reporting rates. We performed SSI surveillance among patients undergoing general surgery procedures, including telephone follow-up 30 days after surgery. Additionally we undertook a separate validation study in which we compared patient self-assessments of SSI with surgeon assessment. Finally, we performed a meta-analysis of similar validation studies of patient self-assessment strategies. There were 22/266 in-hospital SSIs diagnosed (8.3%), and additional 16 cases were detected through the 30-day follow-up. In total, the SSI rate was 16.8% (95% CI 10.1-18.5). In the validation survey, we found patient telephone surveillance to have a sensitivity of 66% (95% CI 40-93%) and a specificity of 90% (95% CI 86-94%). The meta-analysis included five additional studies. The overall sensitivity was 83.3% (95% CI 79-88%), and the overall specificity was 97.4% (95% CI 97-98%). Simulation of the meta-analysis results divulged that when the true infection rate is 1%, reported rates would be 4%; a true rate of 50%, the reported rates would be 43%. Patient self-assessment strategies in order to fulfill 30-day SSI surveillance misestimate SSI rates and lead to an erroneous overall appreciation of inter-institutional variation. Self-assessment strategies overestimate SSIs rate of institutions with high-quality performance and underestimate rates of poor performance. We propose such strategies be abandoned. Alternative strategies of patient follow-up strategies should be evaluated in order to provide valid and reliable information regarding institutional performance in preventing patient harm.

  18. Staffing and structure of infection prevention and control programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Patricia W; Dick, Andrew; Pogorzelska, Monika; Horan, Teresa C; Furuya, E Yoko; Larson, Elaine

    2009-06-01

    The nature of infection prevention and control is changing; however, little is known about current staffing and structure of infection prevention and control programs. Our objectives were to provide a snapshot of the staffing and structure of hospital-based infection prevention and control programs in the United States. A Web-based survey was sent to 441 hospitals that participate in the National Healthcare Safety Network. The response rate was 66% (n = 289); data were examined on 821 professionals. Infection preventionist (IP) staffing was significantly negatively related to bed size, with higher staffing in smaller hospitals (P hospital epidemiologists were reported to have authority to close beds for outbreaks always or most of the time (n = 225, 78%). Only 32% (n = 92) reported using an electronic surveillance system to track infections. This study is the first to provide a comprehensive description of current infection prevention and control staffing, organization, and support in a select group of hospitals across the nation. Further research is needed to identify effective staffing levels for various hospital types as well as examine how the IP role is changing over time.

  19. The relationship of hospital charges and volume to surgical site infection after total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, Rebecca; Ensor, Kelsey; Qian, Edward; Hutzler, Lorraine; Slover, James; Bosco, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of hospital volume and charges on the rate of surgical site infections for total hip replacements (THRs) in New York State (NYS). In NYS, higher volume hospitals have higher charges after THR. The study team analyzed 93,620 hip replacements performed in NYS between 2008 and 2011. Hospital charges increased significantly from $43,713 in 2008 to $50,652 in 2011 (P<.01). Compared with lower volume hospitals, patients who underwent THR at the highest volume hospitals had significantly lower surgical site infection rates (P=.003) and higher total hospital charges (P<.0001). The study team found that in the highest volume hospitals, preventing one surgical site infection was associated with $1.6 million dollars in increased charges. © 2014 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  20. Infection Prevention and Control in Pediatric Ambulatory Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Mobeen H; Jackson, Mary Anne

    2017-11-01

    Since the American Academy of Pediatrics published its statement titled "Infection Prevention and Control in Pediatric Ambulatory Settings" in 2007, there have been significant changes that prompted this updated statement. Infection prevention and control is an integral part of pediatric practice in ambulatory medical settings as well as in hospitals. Infection prevention and control practices should begin at the time the ambulatory visit is scheduled. All health care personnel should be educated regarding the routes of transmission and techniques used to prevent the transmission of infectious agents. Policies for infection prevention and control should be written, readily available, updated every 2 years, and enforced. Many of the recommendations for infection control and prevention from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for hospitalized patients are also applicable in the ambulatory setting. These recommendations include requirements for pediatricians to take precautions to identify and protect employees likely to be exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials while on the job. In addition to emphasizing the key principles of infection prevention and control in this policy, we update those that are relevant to the ambulatory care patient. These guidelines emphasize the role of hand hygiene and the implementation of diagnosis- and syndrome-specific isolation precautions, with the exemption of the use of gloves for routine diaper changes and wiping a well child's nose or tears for most patient encounters. Additional topics include respiratory hygiene and cough etiquette strategies for patients with a respiratory tract infection, including those relevant for special populations like patients with cystic fibrosis or those in short-term residential facilities; separation of infected, contagious children from uninfected children when feasible; safe handling and disposal of needles and other sharp medical devices; appropriate use of personal

  1. Surgical site infections following instrumented stabilization of the spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapunt U

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ulrike Dapunt,1 Caroline Bürkle,1 Frank Günther,2 Wojciech Pepke,1 Stefan Hemmer,1 Michael Akbar1 1Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Center for Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, 2Department for Infectious Diseases, Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany Background: Implant-associated infections are still a feared complication in the field of orthopedics. Bacteria attach to the implant surface and form so-called biofilm colonies that are often difficult to diagnose and treat. Since the majority of studies focus on prosthetic joint infections (PJIs of the hip and knee, current treatment options (eg, antibiotic prophylaxis of implant-associated infections have mostly been adapted according to these results. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate patients with surgical site infections following instrumented stabilization of the spine with regard to detected bacteria species and the course of the disease. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective single-center analysis of implant-associated infections of the spine from 2010 to 2014. A total of 138 patients were included in the study. The following parameters were evaluated: C-reactive protein serum concentration, microbiological evaluation of tissue samples, the time course of the disease, indication for instrumented stabilization of the spine, localization of the infection, and the number of revision surgeries required until cessation of symptoms. Results: Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. were most commonly detected (n=69, 50%, followed by fecal bacteria (n=46, 33.3%. In 23.2% of cases, no bacteria were detected despite clinical suspicion of an infection. Most patients suffered from degenerative spine disorders (44.9%, followed by spinal fractures (23.9%, non-degenerative scoliosis (20.3%, and spinal tumors (10.1%. Surgical site infections occurred predominantly within 3

  2. New horizon for infection prevention technology and implantable device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Kondo, MD, PhD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There has been a significant increase in the number of patients receiving cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED over the last two decades. CIED infection represents a serious complication after CIED implantation and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Recently, newly advanced technologies have offered attractive and suitable therapeutic alternatives. Notably, the leadless pacemaker and anti-bacterial envelope decrease the potential risk of CIED infection and the resulting mortality, when it does occur. A completely subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator is also an alternative to the transvenous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD, as it does not require implantation of any transvenous or epicardial leads. Among the patients who require ICD removal and subsequent antibiotics secondary to infection, the wearable cardioverter defibrillator represents an alternative approach to inpatient monitoring for the prevention of sudden cardiac death. In this review paper, we aimed to introduce the advanced technologies and devices for prevention of CIED infection.

  3. Surveillance, Auditing, and Feedback Can Reduce Surgical Site Infection Dramatically: Toward Zero Surgical Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, Bhavani; Gowda, Deepak; Bulagonda, Pradeep; Rao, Abhishek; Raman, Sai Suguna; Natarajan, Shanmuga Vadivoo

    2018-04-01

    We evaluated the Surveillance of Surgical Site Infection (SSI), Auditing, and Feedback (SAF) effect on the rate of compliance with an SSI care bundle and measured its effectiveness in reducing the SSI rate. A prospective cohort study from January 2014 to December 2016 was classified into three phases: pre-SAF, early-SAF, and late-SAF. Pre-operative baseline characteristics of 24,677 patients who underwent orthopedic, cardiovascular thoracic surgery (CTVS) or urologic operations were recorded. Univariable analyses of the SSI rates in the pre-SAF and post-SAF phases were performed. Percentage compliance and non-compliance with each care component were calculated. Correlation between reduction in the SSI rate and increase in compliance with the pre-operative, peri-operative, and post-operative care-bundle components was performed using the Spearman test. There was a significant decrease in the SSI rate in orthopedic procedures that involved surgical implantation and in mitral valve/aortic valve (MVR/AVR) cardiac operations, with a relative risk (RR) ratio of 0.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.12-0.31) and 0.08 (95% CI 0.03-0.22), respectively. The SSI rate was inversely correlated with the rate of compliance with pre-operative (r = -0.738; p = 0.037), peri-operative (r = - 0.802; p = 0.017), and post-operative (r = -0.762; p = 0.028) care bundles. Implementation of the Surveillance of SSI, Auditing, and Feedback bundle had a profound beneficial effect on the SSI rate, thereby reducing healthcare costs and improving patient quality of life.

  4. Development of quality metrics for ambulatory pediatric cardiology: Infection prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jonathan N; Barrett, Cindy S; Franklin, Wayne H; Graham, Eric M; Halnon, Nancy J; Hattendorf, Brandy A; Krawczeski, Catherine D; McGovern, James J; O'Connor, Matthew J; Schultz, Amy H; Vinocur, Jeffrey M; Chowdhury, Devyani; Anderson, Jeffrey B

    2017-12-01

    In 2012, the American College of Cardiology's (ACC) Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology Council established a program to develop quality metrics to guide ambulatory practices for pediatric cardiology. The council chose five areas on which to focus their efforts; chest pain, Kawasaki Disease, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries after arterial switch, and infection prevention. Here, we sought to describe the process, evaluation, and results of the Infection Prevention Committee's metric design process. The infection prevention metrics team consisted of 12 members from 11 institutions in North America. The group agreed to work on specific infection prevention topics including antibiotic prophylaxis for endocarditis, rheumatic fever, and asplenia/hyposplenism; influenza vaccination and respiratory syncytial virus prophylaxis (palivizumab); preoperative methods to reduce intraoperative infections; vaccinations after cardiopulmonary bypass; hand hygiene; and testing to identify splenic function in patients with heterotaxy. An extensive literature review was performed. When available, previously published guidelines were used fully in determining metrics. The committee chose eight metrics to submit to the ACC Quality Metric Expert Panel for review. Ultimately, metrics regarding hand hygiene and influenza vaccination recommendation for patients did not pass the RAND analysis. Both endocarditis prophylaxis metrics and the RSV/palivizumab metric passed the RAND analysis but fell out during the open comment period. Three metrics passed all analyses, including those for antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with heterotaxy/asplenia, for influenza vaccination compliance in healthcare personnel, and for adherence to recommended regimens of secondary prevention of rheumatic fever. The lack of convincing data to guide quality improvement initiatives in pediatric cardiology is widespread, particularly in infection prevention. Despite this, three metrics were

  5. Role of disinfection in the Infection Prevention Multibarrier System

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Axel

    2007-01-01

    The role of disinfection in infection prevention has been analyzed over the past 50 years both in the form of benefit-risk evaluations as well as in an epidemiological sense. This has served as the basis for not only national and international guidelines and recommendations, but has also created the legal and normative framework for regulation of infection control (and hence of disinfection) in numerous and acts and ordinances. Likewise, today the efficacy of disinfection measures, user safet...

  6. Evaluation of two surveillance methods for surgical site infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haji Abdolbaghi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical wound infection surveillance is an important facet of hospital infection control processes. There are several surveillance methods for surgical site infections. The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of two different surgical site infection surveillance methods. Methods: In this prospective cross sectional study 3020 undergoing surgey in general surgical wards of Imam Khomeini hospital were included. Surveillance methods consisted of review of medical records for postoperative fever and review of nursing daily note for prescription of antibiotics postoperatively and during patient’s discharge. Review of patient’s history and daily records and interview with patient’s surgeon and the head-nurse of the ward considered as a gold standard for surveillance. Results: The postoperative antibiotic consumption especially when considering its duration is a proper method for surgical wound infection surveillance. Accomplishments of a prospective study with postdischarge follow up until 30 days after surgery is recommended. Conclusion: The result of this study showed that postoperative antibiotic surveillance method specially with consideration of the antibiotic usage duration is a proper method for surgical site infection surveillance in general surgery wards. Accomplishments of a prospective study with post discharge follow up until 30 days after surgery is recommended.

  7. First step to reducing infection risk as a system: evaluation of infection prevention processes for 71 hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakih, Mohamad G; Heavens, Michelle; Ratcliffe, Carol J; Hendrich, Ann

    2013-11-01

    Hospitals can better focus their efforts to prevent health care-associated infections (HAIs) if they identify specific areas for improvement. We administered a 96-question survey to infection preventionists at 71 Ascension Health hospitals to evaluate opportunities for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infection, central line-associated bloodstream infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and surgical site infection. Seventy-one (100%) infection preventionists completed the survey. The majority of hospitals had established policies for urinary catheter placement and maintenance (55/70, 78.6%), central venous catheter maintenance (68/71, 95.8%), and care for the mechanically ventilated patient (62/66, 93.9%). However, there was variation in health care worker practice and evaluation of competencies and outcomes. When addressing device need, 55 of 71 (77.5%) hospitals used a nurse-driven evaluation of urinary catheter need, 26 of 71 (36.6%) had a team evaluation for central venous catheters on transfer out of intensive care, and 53 of 57 (93%) assessed daily ventilator support for continued need. Only 19 of 71 (26.8%) hospitals had annual nursing competencies for urinary catheter placement and maintenance, 29 of 71 (40.8%) for nursing venous catheter maintenance, and 38 of 66 (57.6%) for appropriate health care worker surgical scrubbing. We suggest evaluating infection prevention policies and practices as a first step to improvement efforts. The next steps include implementing spread of evidence-based practices, with focus on competencies and feedback on performance. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. PRE-EXPOSURE PROPHYLAXIS FOR PREVENTION OF HIV INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Diniz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To review existing data on Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP for prevention of HIV infection, including the role of medical male circumcision, oral administration of antiretroviral drugs and topical microbicides. Data Sources: PubMed and www.clinicaltrials.gov. Review Methods: Comprehensive review. Results: Medical male circumcision has been shown to prevent 48-60% of new HIV-1 infections. The efficacy rate of antiretroviral drugs given per os to prevent HIV infection varies in direct association with the adherence rate (62.2% in TDF2 study with 84% adherence; 44% in iPrEx study with <50% adherence; 48% in Bangkok study with 67% adherence; 67-75% in Partners PrEP study with 82% adherence; and 6% in FEM-PrEP study with 40% adherence. As for the use of topic microbicides, the CAPRISA 004 study showed 39% reduction in HIV infection using a 1% tenofovir gel. On the other hand, PRO2000 gel showed a modest reduction of 30% which was not statistically significant. Conclusions: The studies suggest that medical male circumcision is highly cost-effective at preventing HIV infection but requires careful communication strategies to be successful. PrEP using antiretroviral drugs is also very effective but it is highly dependent on the adherence rate. As for topical microbicides, 1% tenofovir gel is currently the only promising option.

  9. Infection Control and Prevention: A Review of Hospital-Acquired Infections and the Economic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Deoine; Kemmerly, Sandra A.

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 2 million patients suffer from hospital-acquired infections every year and nearly 100,000 of them die. Most of these medical errors are preventable. Hospital-acquired infections result in up to $4.5 billion in additional healthcare expenses annually. The U.S. government has responded to this financial loss by focusing on healthcare quality report cards and by taking strong action to curb healthcare spending. The Medicare Program ha...

  10. Local antimicrobial administration for prophylaxis of surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huiras, Paul; Logan, Jill K; Papadopoulos, Stella; Whitney, Dana

    2012-11-01

    Despite a lack of consensus guidelines, local antibiotic administration for prophylaxis of surgical site infections is used during many surgical procedures. The rationale behind this practice is to provide high antibiotic concentrations at the site of surgery while minimizing systemic exposure and adverse effects. Local antibiotic administration for surgical site prophylaxis has inherent limitations in that antibiotics are applied after the incision is made, rather than the current standard for surgical site prophylaxis that recommends providing adequate antibiotic concentrations at the site before the incision. The efficacy and safety of local application of antibiotics for surgical site prophylaxis have been assessed in different types of surgery with a variety of antibiotic agents and methods of application. We identified 22 prospective, randomized, controlled trials that evaluated local application of antibiotics for surgical site prophylaxis. These trials were subsequently divided and analyzed based on the type of surgical procedure: dermatologic, orthopedic, abdominal, colorectal, and cardiothoracic. Methods of local application analyzed included irrigations, powders, ointments, pastes, beads, sponges, and fleeces. Overall, there is a significant lack of level I evidence supporting this practice for any of the surgical genres evaluated. In addition, the literature spans several decades, and changes in surgical procedures, systemic antibiotic prophylaxis, and microbial flora make conclusions difficult to determine. Based on available data, the efficacy of local antibiotic administration for the prophylaxis of surgical site infections remains uncertain, and recommendations supporting this practice for surgical site prophylaxis cannot be made. © 2012 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  11. The impact of economic recession on infection prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Riordan, M; Fitzpatrick, F

    2015-04-01

    The economic recession that began in 2007 led to austerity measures and public sector cutbacks in many European countries. Reduced resource allocation to infection prevention and control (IPC) programmes is impeding prevention and control of tuberculosis, HIV and vaccine-preventable infections. In addition, higher rates of infectious disease in the community have a significant impact on hospital services, although the extent of this has not been studied. With a focus on quick deficit reduction, preventive services such IPC may be regarded as non-essential. Where a prevention programme succeeds in reducing disease burden to a low level, its very success can undermine the perceived need for the programme. To mitigate the negative effects of recession, we need to: educate our political leaders about the economic benefits of IPC; better quantify the costs of healthcare-associated infection; and evaluate the effects of budget cuts on healthcare outcomes and IPC activities. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Post-operative Salmonella surgical site infection in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Marc; Boozer, Lindsay; Glass, Eric N; Sanchez, Susan; Platt, Simon R; Freeman, Lisa M

    2017-09-01

    Following decompressive surgery for degenerative lumbosacral stenosis, a 6-year-old German shepherd dog developed a subcutaneous infection at the surgical site and discospondylitis at the lumbosacral intervertebral disc. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, serotype Dublin was recovered from the surgical site. Salmonella of a different serovar was isolated from a sample of the raw meat-based diet that the owner fed the dog.

  13. Prevention of Clostridium difficile infection in rural hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Nicholas; Hofer, Adam; Greene, M Todd; Borlaug, Gwen; Pritchett, Jenny; Scallon, Tina; Safdar, Nasia

    2014-03-01

    Prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains challenging across the spectrum of health care. There are limited data on prevention practices for CDI in the rural health care setting. An electronic survey was administered to 21 rural facilities in Wisconsin, part of the Rural Wisconsin Health Cooperative. Data were collected on hospital characteristics and practices to prevent endemic CDI. Fifteen facilities responded (71%). Nearly all respondent facilities reported regular use of dedicated patient care items, use of gown and gloves, private patient rooms, hand hygiene, and room cleaning. Facilities in which the infection preventionist thought the support of his/her leadership to be "Very good" or "Excellent" employed significantly more CDI practices (13.3 ± 2.4 [standard deviation]) compared with infection preventionists who thought there was less support from leadership (9.8 ± 3.0, P = .033). Surveillance for CDI was highly variable. The most frequent barriers to implementation of CDI prevention practices included lack of adequate resources, lack of a physician champion, and difficulty keeping up with new recommendations. Although most rural facilities in our survey reported using evidence-based practices for prevention of CDI, surveillance practices were highly variable, and data regarding the impact of these practices on CDI rates were limited. Future efforts that correlate CDI prevention initiatives and CDI incidence will help develop evidence-based practices in these resource-limited settings. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  14. Prevention of Device-Related Healthcare-Associated Infections [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Septimus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Up to 15% of patients develop an infection while hospitalized in the United States, which accounts for approximately 1.7 million HAIs, 99,000 deaths annually and over 10 billion dollars in costs per year. A significant percentage of HAIs are preventable using evidenced-based strategies. In terms of device-related HAIs it is estimated that 65-70% of catheter-line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs and catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs are preventable. To prevent CLABSIs a bundle which includes hand hygiene prior to insertion and catheter manipulation, use of chlorhexidene alcohol for site preparation and maintenance, use of maximum barrier for catheter insertion, site selection, removing nonessential lines, disinfect catheter hubs before assessing line, and dressing changes are essential elements of basic practices. To prevent CAUTIs a bundle that includes hand hygiene for insertion and catheter or bag manipulation, inserting catheters for appropriate indications, insert using aseptic technique, remove catheters when no longer needed, maintain a close system keeping bag and tubing below the bladder are the key components of basic practices.

  15. Prevention of nosocomial infections in developing countries, a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murni, Indah; Duke, Trevor; Triasih, Rina; Kinney, Sharon; Daley, Andrew J; Soenarto, Yati

    2013-05-01

    Prevention of nosocomial infection is key to providing good quality, safe healthcare. Infection control programmes (hand-hygiene campaigns and antibiotic stewardship) are effective in reducing nosocomial infections in developed countries. However, the effectiveness of these programmes in developing countries is uncertain. To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for preventing nosocomial infections in developing countries. A systematic search for studies which evaluated interventions to prevent nosocomial infection in both adults and children in developing countries was undertaken using PubMed. Only intervention trials with a randomized controlled, quasi-experimental or sequential design were included. Where there was adequate homogeneity, a meta-analysis of specific interventions was performed using the Mantel-Haenzel fixed effects method to estimate the pooled risk difference. Thirty-four studies were found. Most studies were from South America and Asia. Most were before-and-after intervention studies from tertiary urban hospitals. Hand-hygiene campaigns that were a major component of multifaceted interventions (18 studies) showed the strongest effectiveness for reducing nosocomial infection rates (median effect 49%, effect range 12.7-100%). Hand-hygiene campaigns alone and studies of antibiotic stewardship to improve rational antibiotic use reduced nosocomial infection rates in three studies [risk difference (RD) of -0.09 (95%CI -0.12 to -0.07) and RD of -0.02 (95% CI -0.02 to -0.01), respectively]. Multifaceted interventions including hand-hygiene campaigns, antibiotic stewardship and other elementary infection control practices are effective in developing countries. The modest effect size of hand-hygiene campaigns alone and negligible effect size of antibiotic stewardship reflect the limited number of studies with sufficient homogeneity to conduct meta-analyses.

  16. Risk control of surgical site infection after cardiothoracic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, P.; de Jong, A. P.; Kloek, J. J.; Spanjaard, L.; de Mol, B. A. J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate whether a risk control programme based on risk assessment, new treatment modalities and the presence of a surveillance programme reduces the incidence of surgical site infections (SSI). Between January 2001 and December 2003, 167 patients were

  17. Surgical-site Infection Following Cesarean Section in Kano, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence, risk factors and common bacterial pathogens for surgical site infection (SSI), following cesarean section (CS). Materials and Methods: A retrospective case-control study of patients delivered by CS in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria. The cases were the patients whose ...

  18. Epidemiology, surveillance, and prevention of bloodstream infections in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Priti R; Kallen, Alexander J; Arduino, Matthew J

    2010-09-01

    Infections cause significant morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are particularly problematic, accounting for a substantial number of hospitalizations in these patients. Hospitalizations for BSI and other vascular access infections appear to have increased dramatically in hemodialysis patients since 1993. These infections frequently are related to central venous catheter (CVC) use for dialysis access. Regional initiatives that have shown successful decreases in catheter-related BSIs in hospitalized patients have generated interest in replicating this success in outpatient hemodialysis populations. Several interventions have been effective in preventing BSIs in the hemodialysis setting. Avoiding the use of CVCs in favor of access types with lower associated BSI risk is among the most important. When CVCs are used, adherence to evidence-based catheter insertion and maintenance practices can positively influence BSI rates. In addition, facility-level surveillance to detect BSIs and stimulate examination of vascular access use and care practices is essential to a comprehensive approach to prevention. This article describes the current epidemiology of BSIs in hemodialysis patients and effective prevention strategies to decrease the incidence of these devastating infections.

  19. Nurses infection prevention practices in handling injections: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adherence to basic infection prevention procedures/aseptic techniques in handling of injections by health workers is still a concern. The adherence to aseptic techniques in handling injections is significantly associated with the nurses to patients ratios. Therefore, it is imperative to improve nurse to patient ratio in public ...

  20. Compliance With Infection Prevention Guidelines By Health Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    revealed varied levels of compliance on different components of infection prevention. The highest level of compliance (100%) was with single use of needles and syringes while the lowest (35.1) was with decontamination of needles and syringes with 0.5% chlorine solution prior to disposal. Compliance with hand hygiene ...

  1. Interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Middleton, Philippa; Crowther, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are common in women who are pregnant and may cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be pharmacological

  2. Interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Middleton, Philippa; Crowther, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are common in women who are pregnant and may cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be

  3. Interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Middleton, Philippa; Crowther, Caroline A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are common in women who are pregnant and may cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be

  4. Prevention of common healthcare-associated infections in humanitarian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Richard A; Chua, Arlene C

    2016-08-01

    Humanitarian medical organizations focus on vulnerable patients with increased risk for healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and are obligated to minimize them in inpatient departments (IPDs). However, in doing so humanitarian groups face considerable obstacles. This report will focus on approaches to reducing common HAIs that the authors have found to be helpful in humanitarian settings. HAIs are common in humanitarian contexts but there are few interventions or guidelines adapted for use in poor and conflict-affected settings to improve prevention and guide surveillance. Based on existing recommendations and studies, it appears prudent that all humanitarian IPDs introduce a basic infection prevention infrastructure, assure high adherence to hand hygiene with wide accessibility to alcohol-based hand rub, and develop pragmatic surveillance based on clinically evident nosocomial infection. Although microbiology remains out of reach for most humanitarian hospitals, rapid tests offer the possibility of improving the diagnosis of HAIs in humanitarian hospitals in the decade ahead. There is a dearth of new studies that can direct efforts to prevent HAIs in IPDs in poor and conflict-affected areas and there is a need for practical, field-adapted guidelines from professional societies, and international bodies to guide infection prevention efforts in humanitarian environments.

  5. State of Infection Prevention in US Hospitals Enrolled in NHSN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Herzig, Carolyn T. A.; Weiner, Lindsey M.; Furuya, E. Yoko; Dick, Andrew; Larson, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Background This report provides a national cross-sectional snapshot of infection prevention and control programs and clinician compliance with the implementation of processes to prevent healthcare associated infections (HAI) in intensive care units (ICUs). Methods All hospitals, except for Veterans Affairs hospitals, enrolled in the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) were eligible to participate. Participation included: 1) completion of a survey that assessed presence of evidence-based prevention policies and clinician adherence, and 2) joining our NHSN research group. Descriptive statistics were computed. Facility characteristics and HAI rates by ICU type were compared between respondents and non-respondents. Results Of the 3,374 eligible hospitals, 975 hospitals provided data (29% response rate) on 1,653 ICUs; and, there were complete data on the presence of policies in 1,534 ICUs. The average number of infection preventionists (IPs) per 100 beds was 1.2. Certification of IP staff varied across institutions and the average hours per week of data management and secretarial support were generally low. There was variation in the presence of policies and clinician adherence to these policies. There were no differences in HAI rates between respondents and non-respondents. Conclusions Guidelines around IP staffing in acute care hospitals should be updated. In future publications we will analyze the associations between HAI rates and infection prevention and control program characteristics, presence of and clinician adherence to evidence-based policies. PMID:24485365

  6. Urinary Tract Infections in Pregnancy - Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, A; Gomes, G; Campos, A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Literature review of classification, epidemiology, pathophysiology, microbiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, complications, treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections (UTI) in pregnancy. Data Sources and Review Methods: Bibliographic research in Medline, through PubMed and Medscape, of systematic reviews, observational studies, clinical guidelines, meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials published between January 1992 and December 2010. Results: Asymp...

  7. Prevention of perioperative wound infections | Buteera | East and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aiming at short preoperative stay in hospital, and pre-washing of the area concerned before cleaning with antiseptic are also imperative in reducing SSI. Preoperative skin preparation is an important element in prevention of infection, but removes only up to 80% of skin flora. Standard surgical antisepsis is an accepted ...

  8. Prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections and other coinfections in HIV-infected patients: May 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren, José Antonio; Rubio, Rafael; Aguirrebengoa, Koldo; Arribas, Jose Ramón; Baraia-Etxaburu, Josu; Gutiérrez, Félix; Lopez Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Losa, Juan Emilio; Miró, José Ma; Moreno, Santiago; Pérez Molina, José; Podzamczer, Daniel; Pulido, Federico; Riera, Melchor; Rivero, Antonio; Sanz Moreno, José; Amador, Concha; Antela, Antonio; Arazo, Piedad; Arrizabalaga, Julio; Bachiller, Pablo; Barros, Carlos; Berenguer, Juan; Caylá, Joan; Domingo, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; Knobel, Hernando; Locutura, Jaime; López Aldeguer, José; Llibre, Josep Ma; Lozano, Fernando; Mallolas, Josep; Malmierca, Eduardo; Miralles, Celia; Miralles, Pilar; Muñoz, Agustín; Ocampo, Agustín; Olalla, Julián; Pérez, Inés; Pérez Elías, Ma Jesús; Pérez Arellano, José Luis; Portilla, Joaquín; Ribera, Esteban; Rodríguez, Francisco; Santín, Miguel; Sanz Sanz, Jesús; Téllez, Ma Jesús; Torralba, Miguel; Valencia, Eulalia; Von Wichmann, Miguel Angel

    2016-10-01

    Despite the huge advance that antiretroviral therapy represents for the prognosis of infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), opportunistic infections (OIs) continue to be a cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. OIs often arise because of severe immunosuppression resulting from poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy, failure of antiretroviral therapy, or unawareness of HIV infection by patients whose first clinical manifestation of AIDS is an OI. The present article updates our previous guidelines on the prevention and treatment of various OIs in HIV-infected patients, namely, infections by parasites, fungi, viruses, mycobacteria, and bacteria, as well as imported infections. The article also addresses immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  9. Livermore Site Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellah, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Griffin, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mertesdorf, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-21

    This Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plan describes the measures that are taken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL) Livermore Site in Livermore, California, to prevent, control, and handle potential spills from aboveground containers that can contain 55 gallons or more of oil. This SPCC Plan complies with the Oil Pollution Prevention regulation in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR), Part 112 (40 CFR 112) and with 40 CFR 761.65(b) and (c), which regulates the temporary storage of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). This Plan has also been prepared in accordance with Division 20, Chapter 6.67 of the California Health and Safety Code (HSC 6.67) requirements for oil pollution prevention (referred to as the Aboveground Petroleum Storage Act [APSA]), and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order No. 436.1. This SPCC Plan establishes procedures, methods, equipment, and other requirements to prevent the discharge of oil into or upon the navigable waters of the United States or adjoining shorelines for aboveground oil storage and use at the Livermore Site.

  10. Ant colonies prefer infected over uninfected nest sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontieri, Luigi; Vojvodic, Svjetlana; Graham, Riley

    2014-01-01

    with sporulating mycelium of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium brunneum (infected nests), nests containing nestmates killed by freezing (uninfected nests), and empty nests. In contrast to the expectation pharaoh ant colonies preferentially (84%) moved into the infected nest when presented with the choice...... the high risk of epidemics in group-living animals. Choosing nest sites free of pathogens is hypothesized to be highly efficient in invasive ants as each of their introduced populations is often an open network of nests exchanging individuals (unicolonial) with frequent relocation into new nest sites...... and low genetic diversity, likely making these species particularly vulnerable to parasites and diseases. We investigated the nest site preference of the invasive pharaoh ant, Monomorium pharaonis, through binary choice tests between three nest types: nests containing dead nestmates overgrown...

  11. Unique factors rural Veterans' Affairs hospitals face when implementing health care-associated infection prevention initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrod, Molly; Manojlovich, Milisa; Kowalski, Christine P; Saint, Sanjay; Krein, Sarah L

    2014-01-01

    Health care-associated infection (HAI) is costly to hospitals and potentially life-threatening to patients. Numerous infection prevention programs have been implemented in hospitals across the United States. Yet, little is known about infection prevention practices and implementation in rural hospitals. The purpose of this study was to understand the infection prevention practices used by rural Veterans' Affairs (VA) hospitals and the unique factors they face in implementing these practices. This study used a sequential, mixed methods approach. Survey data to identify the HAI prevention practices used by rural VA hospitals were collected, analyzed, and used to inform the development of a semistructured interview guide. Phone interviews were conducted followed by site visits to rural VA hospitals. We found that most rural VA hospitals were using key recommended infection prevention practices. Nonetheless, a number of challenges with practice implementation were identified. The 3 most prominent themes were: (1) lack of human capital including staff with HAI expertise; (2) having to cultivate needed resources; and (3) operating as a system within a system. Rural VA hospitals are providing key infection prevention services to ensure a safe environment for the veterans they serve. However, certain factors, such as staff expertise, limited resources, and local context impacted how and when these practices were used. The creative use of more accessible alternative resources as well as greater flexibility in implementing HAI-related initiatives may be important strategies to further improve delivery of these important services by rural VA hospitals. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Using a change model to reduce the risk of surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Mel

    2016-09-22

    A surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance module completed in 2014 highlighted that infection rates for breast surgery inpatients and readmissions at an acute trust had increased to 2.2%, from 0.5% in 2012. The national benchmark for 2014 established by Public Health England (PHE) was 1.0%. This demonstrated a greater than fourfold absolute increase in SSI for breast surgery during these periods. The infection rate could have been due to chance, but warranted investigation. The results were presented to the breast team and used to drive practice transformation through audit and observation, identifying areas of change to improve patient safety. The project used a recognised 8-step model for leading change developed by John Kotter, a professor at Harvard Business School and world-renowned change expert. The project presented opportunities to promote infection prevention while implementing care improvement strategies and behaviour change in partnership with the breast team.

  13. TREATMENT AND VACCINE PREVENTION OF ROTAVIRAL INFECTION AMONG CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Kulichenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Irrespective of the level of healthcare system development rotaviral infection is a serious medical, social and economic problem at all times. Any infant has to undergo rotaviral gastroenteritis. The run of the disease among infants is mostly often aggravated by dehydration and needs intense treatment of exicosis. The standard of treatment is an oral rehydration, which is in most cases contributes to a quicker improvement of the children’s status. In the meantime, according to the metaphor put forward by the who experts «the best solution» to prevent acute rotaviral diarrhea today may become a rotaviral vaccine. Nowadays, in different countries of the world, two vaccines, which showed high efficiency and safety in clinical research, have been registered. Application of these vaccines may contribute to the significant reduction of the acute forms of rotaviral infection among infants, hospitalizations and mortality caused by rotaviral gastroenteritis. This article highlights the principles of treatment and possibility for vaccine prevention of rotaviral infection among children.Key words: rotaviral infection, gastroenteritis, diarrhea, children, rehydration, vaccine prevention, rotaviral vaccine.

  14. Surgical-site infection following lymph node excision indicates susceptibility for lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads Gustaf; Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Thomsen, Jørn Bo

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cancer-related lymphedema is a common complication following lymph node excision. Prevention of lymphedema is essential, as treatment options are limited. Known risk factors are firmly anchored to the cancer treatment itself; however potentially preventable factors...... such as seroma and surgical-site infection (SSI) have yet to be asserted. METHODS: All malignant melanoma patients treated with sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNB) and/or complete lymph node dissection (CLND) in the axilla or groin between January 2008 and December 2014 were retrospectively identified. Identified...

  15. Pollution prevention opportunity assessments. Guidance for the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, J.A.

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide help to you, Hanford waste generators, in finding ways to reduce waste through Pollution Prevention (P2) and Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (P2OAs). It is based on guidance from other sites, and serves to compliment the Hanford-specific training on P2OAs offered by the Pollution Prevention group at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The chapters of this document include help on how to choose major waste generating activities, how to conduct a P2OA, how to get results, and how to show progress. There is also a chapter on special situations and problems your facility may encounter. This first chapter tells you why you should consider conducting P2OAs and why they may be required

  16. Optimal diagnosis, prevention, and management of periprosthetic joint infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tafer N

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nathalie Tafer,1 Wilson Belaieff,1 Céline Cuérel,1 Matthieu Zingg,1 Pierre Hoffmeyer,1 Ilker Uçkay1,2 1Orthopedic Surgery Department, 2Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Geneva Hospitals and Medical School, Geneva, Switzerland Abstract: The pace of the aging population is steadily rising worldwide with a parallel increase in the demand for joint replacement procedures. With the increasing number of patients undergoing arthroplasty, there is also an increased risk for arthroplasty infection that may lead to severe complications, poorer outcome, and substantial extra costs for health care systems. Current rates of prosthetic joint infection are not dramatically different from the 1960s or 1970s, but some general principles are now better defined, and their management has been studied extensively during the past decades, thus resulting in a change in clinical practice. The purpose of this review is to summarize important principles of prosthetic joint infection to guide the clinician and to contribute to the optimal diagnosis, prevention, and management of periprosthetic joint infections. Keywords: arthroplasty infection, antibiotic therapy, biofilm, surgery, prevention

  17. PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION: MODERN VIEW ON THE ISSUE AND PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.К. Tatochenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumococci are spread everywhere and they are very often a component of the microflora of the upper respiratory tracts. The level of the pneumococcus carriage is correlated with age. Among children the highest frequency is observed at the age of 4,5 years (up to 90% of cases, among adults it is 5–10%. According to international and Russian data, pneumococcal infection causes up to 76% of all the aetiologically deciphered cases of community cacquired pneumonia among adults and up to 94% (aggravated cases among children. The most frequent clinical forms of pneumococcal infection among children are acute otitis media (over 30%, pneumonia and meningitis (about 5–20% of all purulent bacterial meningitis, among adults — meningitis and sepsis. In 1998, in Russia was registered the first and still the only vaccine for the prevention of pneumococcal infection — Pneumo 23 (Sanofi Pasteur. The vaccine consists of 23 antic gens of the most dangerous pneumococcus serotypes and is used for the prevention of all the forms of pneumococcal infection. The composition of Pneumo 23 corresponds to 85% of pneumococcus serotypes circulating across Europe and to 90% serotypes resistant to penicillin. According to Russian data Pneumo 23 consists of about 80% of pneumococcus serotypes isolated in healthy carriers and ill with acute respiratory diseases and of 92% of serotypes in those suffering from acute bronchitis and pneumonia. The results of the clinical studies allow us to recommend the use of the given vaccine in a complex therapy of children, suffering from latent TB infection, often recurrent episodes of bronchopulmonary pathologies, ENT diseases, bronchial asthma and other chronic diseases.Key words: therapy, pediatrics, pneumonia, bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive lungs disease, prevention, treatment, pneumococcal infection.

  18. Preventing childhood obesity: the sentinel site for obesity prevention in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A Colin; Simmons, Anne; Sanigorski, Andrea M; Kremer, Peter J; Swinburn, Boyd A

    2008-12-01

    In spite of greater awareness of the need for action to reduce obesity, the evidence on sustainable community approaches to prevent childhood and adolescent obesity is surprisingly sparse. This paper describes the design and methodological components of the Sentinel Site for Obesity Prevention, a demonstration site in the Barwon-South West region of Victoria, Australia, that aims to build the programs, skills and evidence necessary to attenuate and eventually reverse the obesity epidemic in children and adolescents. The Sentinel Site for Obesity Prevention is based on a partnership between the region's university (Deakin University) and its health, education and local government agencies. The three basic foundations of the Sentinel Site are: multi-strategy, multi-setting interventions; building community capacity; and undertaking program evaluations and population monitoring. Three intervention projects have been supported that cover different age groups (preschool: 2-5 years, primary school: 5-12 years, secondary school: 13-17 years), but that have many characteristics in common including: community participation and ownership of the project; an intervention duration of at least 3 years; and full evaluations with impact (behaviours) and outcome measures (anthropometry) compared with regionally representative comparison populations. We recommend the Sentinel Site approach to others for successfully building evidence for childhood obesity prevention and stimulating action on reducing the epidemic.

  19. [The Importance of Vector Management for Prevention of Hospital Infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Hüseyin

    2015-09-01

    Many researches show that cockroaches, ants, some other arthropods and also rodents in hospitals, can act as potential vectors of medically important bacteria, fungi and parasites. The results of microbiological studies show that these animals play a significant role in the epidemiology of hospital infections. These vectors may be found inside of the kitchens, patient rooms, toilets, medicine stores, canteen and wards in health care environments. The importance of vector control in order to prevent the spread of nosocomial infections in healthcare facilities was discussed in this paper. This study also gives information on integrated control methods for vectors in hospitals.

  20. [The features in preventing recurrent lower urinary tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzhieva, Z K; Kazilov, Yu B

    2016-08-01

    This review outlines characteristics of medications most commonly used for preventing recurrent lower urinary tract infection (UTI). It shows that the treatment and prophylaxis of UTI should be comprehensive and include the restoration of the normal urogenital tract anatomy and use in addition to antibacterial and anti-inflammatory drugs, agents, normalizing the function of the lower urinary tract, as well as drugs for local and systemic immunoprophylaxis, protection of the urothelium from recurrent infection, local hormone replacement therapy in menopause, and dietary supplements to acidify the urine.

  1. Active prospective surveillance study with post-discharge surveillance of surgical site infections in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Guerra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Barriers to the implementation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC guidelines for surgical site infection (SSI surveillance have been described in resource-limited settings. This study aimed to estimate the SSI incidence rate in a Cambodian hospital and to compare different modalities of SSI surveillance. We performed an active prospective study with post-discharge surveillance. During the hospital stay, trained surveyors collected the CDC criteria to identify SSI by direct examination of the surgical site. After discharge, a card was given to each included patient to be presented to all practitioners examining the surgical site. Among 167 patients, direct examination of the surgical site identified a cumulative incidence rate of 14 infections per 100 patients. An independent review of medical charts presented a sensitivity of 16%. The sensitivity of the purulent drainage criterion to detect SSIs was 83%. After hospital discharge, 87% of the patients provided follow-up data, and nine purulent drainages were reported by a practitioner (cumulative incidence rate: 20%. Overall, the incidence rate was dependent on the surveillance modalities. The review of medical charts to identify SSIs during hospitalization was not effective; the use of a follow-up card with phone calls for post-discharge surveillance was effective. Keywords: Surgical wound infection, Cambodia, Infection control, Developing countries, Follow-up studies, Feasibility studies

  2. Condoms for sexually transmissible infection prevention: politics versus science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindel, Adrian; Sawleshwarkar, Shailendra

    2008-03-01

    The present review assesses the protection that condoms offer against sexually transmissible infections (STI) and the impact that social, political and religious opinion in the USA has had in the past 8 years on promoting condoms for safer sex. Condoms offer protection against most STI. However, the degree of protection depends on correct and consistent use, the type of sexual activity and the biological characteristics of different infections. Cross-sectional and case-control studies and other observational data provide the majority of evidence for STI prevention. Condoms provide a high level of protection against those infections that are transmitted mainly via infected secretions, including HIV, gonorrhoea, chlamydia and trichomoniasis. Protection against those infections transmitted via skin and mucous membrane contact, including Herpes simplex virus infection and human papilloma virus, appears to be less. The Bush administration, driven by conservative political, social and religious elements in the USA, has mounted a concerted campaign to undermine the role of the condom in health-promotion activities in the USA and overseas by undervaluing and misrepresenting scientific data, and through a sustained and well-funded promotion of abstinence-only education. However, this has lead to considerable controversy and disillusionment with abstinence-only education, both at home and abroad, and there is now incontrovertible evidence that abstinence-only programs are ineffectual.

  3. Prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Around 40-50% of women experience at least one urinary tract infection (UTI) during their lifetime and 20-30% of these have a recurrence within 3-4 months of the initial infection.¹ Recurrent UTI (usually defined as three episodes in the last 12 months or two episodes in the last 6 months) can have a considerable impact on a woman's quality of life. Each episode of acute UTI in young women is typically associated with about 6 days of symptoms, 2.4 days of restricted activities and 0.4 days of bed rest.¹ Antibacterial prophylaxis is effective in preventing recurrent episodes, but at the expense of unwanted effects and a risk of promoting bacterial resistance. Here we assess the efficacy of different antibacterial regimens and non-antibacterial alternatives (cranberry, probiotics, oestrogens, immunostimulation, hyaluronic acid and chondroitin, acupuncture and herbs) in the prevention of recurrent uncomplicated UTIs in women.

  4. Therapeutic and prevention strategies against human enterovirus 71 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Chee Choy

    2015-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (HEV71) is the cause of hand, foot and mouth disease and associated neurological complications in children under five years of age. There has been an increase in HEV71 epidemic activity throughout the Asia-Pacific region in the past decade, and it is predicted to replace poliovirus as the extant neurotropic enterovirus of highest global public health significance. To date there is no effective antiviral treatment and no vaccine is available to prevent HEV71 infection. The increase in prevalence, virulence and geographic spread of HEV71 infection over the past decade provides increasing incentive for the development of new therapeutic and prevention strategies against this emerging viral infection. The current review focuses on the potential, advantages and disadvantages of these strategies. Since the explosion of outbreaks leading to large epidemics in China, research in natural therapeutic products has identified several groups of compounds with anti-HEV71 activities. Concurrently, the search for effective synthetic antivirals has produced promising results. Other therapeutic strategies including immunotherapy and the use of oligonucleotides have also been explored. A sound prevention strategy is crucial in order to control the spread of HEV71. To this end the ultimate goal is the rapid development, regulatory approval and widespread implementation of a safe and effective vaccine. The various forms of HEV71 vaccine designs are highlighted in this review. Given the rapid progress of research in this area, eradication of the virus is likely to be achieved. PMID:25964873

  5. Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: New Prospects for Prevention and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Elizabeth C.; Schleiss, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common congenital viral infection in the developed world, with an overall birth prevalence of approximately 0.6%. Approximately 10% of congenitally infected infants have signs and symptoms of disease at birth, and these symptomatic infants have a high risk for demonstration of subsequent neurologic sequelae, including sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), mental retardation, microcephaly, development delay, seizure disorders, and cerebral palsy. Antiviral therapy of children with symptomatic central nervous system (CNS) congenital CMV infection is effective at reducing the risk of long-term disabilities and should be offered to families with affected newborns. An effective pre-conceptual vaccine against CMV could, by preventing congenital infection, protect against long-term neurological sequelae and other disabilities. A variety of active and passive immunization strategies are in clinical trials and are likely to be licensed in the next few years. Until a vaccine is licensed, preventive strategies aimed at reducing transmission should be emphasized and public awareness increased, particularly among women of child-bearing age. PMID:23481104

  6. INFECTION PREVENTION IN PEDIATRIC HOSPITAL ADMISSION: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia de Menezes Castilhos Azevedo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize and evaluate the measures of prevention and control of HI in pediatric hospitalization units. It was adopted as the method literature review. The following databases were consulted: Scielo, LILACS, PubMed and Google Scholar, as well as text books and legislation on the subject. The research was carried out from May to December 2015. Inclusion criteria were publications in the period between 1996 and 2015 that were available in the Portuguese or Spanish language. Nineteen publications were eligible, among them: 14 articles, 3 book chapters, 1 final graduation paper and 1 doctoral thesis. Data was consulted in existing legislation with regard to infection control. The results showed as key measures for proper prevention and Hospital Infection control in pediatric inpatient units: the proper use of insulation and precautions, the guidance and education of relatives and companions of hospitalized children and continuing education of staff nursing, highlighting the importance of hand washing in hospital infection control. It is important that the nursing professional has adequate knowledge of the country's legislation on the infection control in the hospital environment, so you can require that guidelines and regulations described in this are met by health care facilities, thereby helping to quality care to hospitalized children.

  7. Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan progress report, 1994. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This report tracks progress made during 1994 against the goals stated in DOE/RL-92-62, Executive Summary, Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan. The Executive Summary of the plan was submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in September 1992. The plan, Executive Summary, and the progress reports are elements of a pollution prevention planning program that is required by WAC 173-307, ''Plans,'' for all hazardous substance users and/or all hazardous waste generators regulated by Ecology. These regulations implement RCW 70.95C, ''Waste Reduction,'' an act relating to hazardous waste reduction. The act encourages voluntary efforts to redesign industrial processes to help reduce or eliminate hazardous substances and hazardous waste byproducts, and to maximize the in-process reuse or reclamation of valuable spent material. The Hanford Site is voluntarily complying with this state regulatory-mandated program. All treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities are exempt from participating; the Hanford Site is classified as a TSD

  8. Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan progress report, 1994. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This report tracks progress made during 1994 against the goals stated in DOE/RL-92-62, Executive Summary, Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan. The Executive Summary of the plan was submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in September 1992. The plan, Executive Summary, and the progress reports are elements of a pollution prevention planning program that is required by WAC 173-307, ``Plans,`` for all hazardous substance users and/or all hazardous waste generators regulated by Ecology. These regulations implement RCW 70.95C, ``Waste Reduction,`` an act relating to hazardous waste reduction. The act encourages voluntary efforts to redesign industrial processes to help reduce or eliminate hazardous substances and hazardous waste byproducts, and to maximize the in-process reuse or reclamation of valuable spent material. The Hanford Site is voluntarily complying with this state regulatory-mandated program. All treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities are exempt from participating; the Hanford Site is classified as a TSD.

  9. Measures to prevent nosocomial infections during mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Paula; Bassi, Gianluigi L; Torres, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    Endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation are lifesaving measures in critically ill patients. However, these interventions increase the risk of respiratory infections, particularly ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). VAP constitutes a serious burden for the healthcare system and worsens the patient's outcomes; thus, several preventive strategies have been implemented. This communication reviews the current knowledge on VAP pathogenesis and the latest preventive measures. Pathogen-laden oropharyngeal secretions leak across the endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff; thus, a continuous control of the internal cuff pressure and cuffs made of polyurethane improve sealing effectiveness and associated risks of infections. Subglottic secretions aspiration prevents VAP, and the latest evidence demonstrated a reduction in the incidence of late-onset VAP. The role of ETT biofilm in the pathogenesis of VAP is not fully elucidated. Nevertheless, antimicrobial-coated ETTs have showed beneficial effects in VAP incidence. Recent experimental evidence has challenged the benefits associated with the use of the semirecumbent position; yet, these findings need to be corroborated in clinical trials. The latest results from trials testing the effects of selective digestive decontamination (SDD) showed beneficial effects on patients' outcomes, but concerns remain regarding the emergence of bacterial resistance, specifically upon digestive tract re-colonization. The use of oropharyngeal decontamination with antiseptics and the use of probiotics are potential alternatives to SDD. There is consistent evidence that strategies affecting the primary mechanisms of VAP pathogenesis efficiently reduce the occurrence of the disease. Preventive measures should be implemented grouped into bundles to improve overall efficacy.

  10. Hanford site pollution prevention plan progress report, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkendall, J.R.

    1996-08-26

    This report tracks progress made during 1995 against the goals stated in DOE/RL-92-62, Executive Summary, Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan. The Executive Summary of the plan was submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in September 1992. The plan, Executive Summary, and the progress reports are elements of a pollution prevention planning program that is required by WAC 173-307,`Plans,` for all hazardous substance users and/or all hazardous waste generators regulated by Ecology. These regulations implement RCW 70.95C, `Waste Reduction,` an act relating to hazardous waste reduction. The act encourages voluntary efforts to redesign industrial processes to help reduce or eliminate hazardous substances and hazardous waste byproducts, and to maximize the in- process reuse or reclamation of valuable spent material.

  11. Surgical site infections in paediatric otolaryngology operative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifeacho, S N; Bajaj, Y; Jephson, C G; Albert, D M

    2012-07-01

    An assessment of the rate of surgical site infections associated with elective paediatric otolaryngology surgical procedures. Prospective data was collected for a 3-week period for all children undergoing surgery where either mucosa or skin was breached. The parents of the children were requested to complete a questionnaire at 30 days after the operation. Data was collected on 80 consecutive cases. The majority of cases were admitted on the day of the procedure. The procedures included adenotonsillectomy (24), grommets (12), cochlear implantation (6), bone-anchored hearing aid (2), submandibular gland excision (1), branchial sinus excision (1), cystic hygroma excision (3), nasal glioma excision (1), microlaryngobronchoscopy (13), tracheostomy (3) and other procedures (14). Nearly half the cases had more than one operation done at the same time. 26/80 (32.5%) patients had a temporary or permanent implant inserted at the time of operation (grommet, bone-anchored hearing aid, cochlear implant). 25/80 (31%) operative fields were classed as clean and 55/80 (68.7%) as clean contaminated operations. The duration of the operation varied from 6 min to 142 min. Hospital antibiotic protocol was adhered to in 69/80 (86.3%) cases but not in 11/80 cases. In our series, 3/80 (3.7%) patients had an infection in the postoperative period. Surgical site infections do occur at an appreciable rate in paediatric otolaryngology. With the potential for serious consequences, reduction in the risk of surgical site infections is important. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan Progress report, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This report tracks progress against the goals stated in the Hanford Site 5-year Pollution Prevention Plan. The executive summary of the plan was submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in September 1992. The plan, executive summary, and the progress reports are elements of a pollution prevention planning program that is required by Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-307 for all hazardous substance users and/or all hazardous waste generators regulated by Ecology. These regulations implement Chapter 70.95C, Revised Code of Washington, an act relating to hazardous waste reduction. The act encourages voluntary efforts to redesign industrial processes to help reduce or eliminate hazardous substances and hazardous waste byproducts, and to maximize the inprocess reuse or reclamation of valuable spent material. Although the Hanford Site is exempt, it is voluntarily complying with this state regulatory-mandated program. This is the first year the Hanford Site is submitting a progress report. It covers calendar year 1993 plus the last quarter of 1992. What is reported, in accordance with WAC 173-307, are reductions in hazardous substance use and hazardous waste generated. A system of Process Waste Assessments (PWA) was chosen to meet the requirements of the program. The PWAs were organized by a physical facility or company organization. Each waste-generating facility/organization performed PWAs to identify, screen, and analyze their own reduction options. Each completed PWA identified any number of reduction opportunities, that are listed individually in the plan and summarized by category in the executive summary. These opportunities were to be implemented or evaluated further over the duration of the 5-year plan. The basis of this progress report is to track action taken on these PWA reduction opportunities in relationship to achieving the goals stated in the Pollution Prevention Plan.

  13. Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan Progress report, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This report tracks progress against the goals stated in the Hanford Site 5-year Pollution Prevention Plan. The executive summary of the plan was submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in September 1992. The plan, executive summary, and the progress reports are elements of a pollution prevention planning program that is required by Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-307 for all hazardous substance users and/or all hazardous waste generators regulated by Ecology. These regulations implement Chapter 70.95C, Revised Code of Washington, an act relating to hazardous waste reduction. The act encourages voluntary efforts to redesign industrial processes to help reduce or eliminate hazardous substances and hazardous waste byproducts, and to maximize the inprocess reuse or reclamation of valuable spent material. Although the Hanford Site is exempt, it is voluntarily complying with this state regulatory-mandated program. This is the first year the Hanford Site is submitting a progress report. It covers calendar year 1993 plus the last quarter of 1992. What is reported, in accordance with WAC 173-307, are reductions in hazardous substance use and hazardous waste generated. A system of Process Waste Assessments (PWA) was chosen to meet the requirements of the program. The PWAs were organized by a physical facility or company organization. Each waste-generating facility/organization performed PWAs to identify, screen, and analyze their own reduction options. Each completed PWA identified any number of reduction opportunities, that are listed individually in the plan and summarized by category in the executive summary. These opportunities were to be implemented or evaluated further over the duration of the 5-year plan. The basis of this progress report is to track action taken on these PWA reduction opportunities in relationship to achieving the goals stated in the Pollution Prevention Plan

  14. [Effect of compliance with an antibiotic prophylaxis protocol in surgical site infections in appendectomies. Prospective cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Santana, Tomás; Del-Moral-Luque, Juan Antonio; Gil-Yonte, Pablo; Bañuelos-Andrío, Luis; Durán-Poveda, Manuel; Rodríguez-Caravaca, Gil

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is the most suitable tool for preventing surgical site infection. This study assessed compliance with antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery for acute appendicitis, and the effect of this compliance on surgical site infection. Prospective cohort study to evaluate compliance with antibiotic prophylaxis protocol in appendectomies. An assessment was made of the level of compliance with prophylaxis, as well as the causes of non-compliance. The incidence of surgical site infection was studied after a maximum incubation period of 30 days. The relative risk adjusted with a logistic regression model was used to assess the effect of non-compliance of prophylaxis on surgical site infection. The study included a total of 930 patients. Antibiotic prophylaxis was indicated in all patients, and administered in 71.3% of cases, with an overall protocol compliance of 86.1%. The principal cause of non-compliance was time of initiation. Cumulative incidence of surgical site infection was 4.6%. No relationship was found between inadequate prophylaxis compliance and infection (relative risk=0.5; 95% CI: 0.1-1.9) (P>.05). Compliance of antibiotic prophylaxis was high, but could be improved. No relationship was found between prophylaxis compliance and surgical site infection rate. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. Infection prevention workforce: Potential benefits to educational diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Sara M; Gilmartin, Heather M

    2017-06-01

    Nurses have historically occupied the infection preventionist (IP) role. As the knowledge and skills needed to advance the field expand, professionals from public health and the laboratory sciences have become IPs. Our study describes the characteristics of current IPs and assesses for relationships between background, certification, experience, and type of work performed. The data were drawn from an existing dataset collected in the conduct of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) MegaSurvey. Descriptive statistics were computed. Associations were calculated using χ 2 or Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests. Characteristics of IPs were stratified by work-related activities to allow for comparisons between groups. Of the 13,050 active APIC members, 4,079 participated in the survey (31% response rate). The primary job activity for nurses (97.9%; n = 2,434) was preventing and controlling the transmission of infectious agents or health care-associated infections, for laboratory scientists (97.5%; n = 307) it was the interpretation of surveillance data, and for public health professionals (96.1%; n = 136) it was management and communication: feedback. Infection control departments would benefit from hiring IPs with diverse education and training to address the expanding roles and responsibilities of IPs. This may facilitate the implementation of novel and innovative processes that will impact patient care. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Implications of Helicobacter pylori infection for stomach cancer prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman Karen J.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has implicated Helicobacter pylori, an established cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer, in the etiology of gastric cancer. Control of this infection would reduce the occurrence of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer and might substantially lower the risk of stomach cancer as well. The public health impact of this infectious agent warrants efforts to identify preventive measures. This paper reviews the evidence linking H. pylori infection to gastric cancer and evaluates the potential for control in high-risk populations. Current obstacles to H. pylori control are discussed, including the link to poor socioeconomic conditions, difficulty in identifying incident cases, lack of natural immunity to reinfection, limited effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in high-prevalence populations, and incomplete knowledge regarding the reservoir of infection, mode of transmission, host susceptibility factors, and the potential for developing an effective vaccine. Worthwhile avenues of research include studies designed to identify modifiable risk factors for acquisition of the infection, modifiable host factors that may increase resistance to chronic infection, more effective antibiotic therapies, and effective vaccines.

  17. ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERN OF ORGANISMS CAUSING SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS (SSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Murlidhar Gajbhiye

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND CDC defines surgical site infection as ‘Infections related to operative procedure that occurs at or near surgical incision within 30 days of operative procedure or within one year if the implant is left in situ’. Surgical site infection (SSI is 3 rd most frequently reported nosocomial infection (12%-16% as per National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of organisms causing SSI. MATERIALS AND METHODS During a two year study period in a tertiary care hospital, 19,127 patients underwent surgeries in various surgical departments. Of these 517 (2.7% developed surgical site infection. The surgical wounds were classified by CDC & NNIS criteria into 4 classes. Two wound swabs were taken and processed by standard microbiological techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility along with testing of ESBLs, MBLs, AmpCβ lactamases was done for all isolates causing SSI. RESULTS Among 19,127 patients, 517 (2.7% developed SSI. It was highest in patients of perforation peritonitis (11.99%.Among 517 specimens, 340 (65.76% showed growth and 177 (34.23% were culture negative. E.coli (23.33% was the commonest organism isolated followed by Acinetobacter spp. (16%, Klebsiella spp. (15.66%, Pseudomonas spp. (15.33%, S. aureus (10.33%, S. epidermidis(7.3%, Proteus spp. (6.00% and Citrobacter spp. (2.66%.Staphylococcus spp. were 100 % sensitive to Vancomycin & Linezolid. (27.5% S. aureus were MRSA and (17.5% were Inducible Clindamycin resistant (ICR. Enterobacteriaceae isolates showed maximum sensitivity towards Imipenem, Piperacillin-Tazobactam and Amikacin. Klebsiella spp. (40.62%, E.coli (35.89%, Citrobacter spp. (33.33%, Proteus spp. (26.08% were ESBL producers. Klebsiella spp. (17.18%, E.coli (10.25%, Proteus spp. (11.11% and Citrobacter spp. (8.69% were AmpC producers. Acinetobacter spp. (28.57% was commonest MBL producer followed by Klebsiella spp. (20

  18. Immediate placement of implants into infected sites: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Martins, Maximiliano Delany; Wennerberg, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, before placing dental implants, the compromised teeth are removed and the extraction sockets are left to heal for several months. To preserve the alveolar bone level from the collapse caused by healing and to reduce treatment time in situations in which tooth extraction precedes implant placement, some clinicians began to install the implant immediately into the postextraction socket without waiting for the site to heal. The purpose of this study was to review the literature regarding treatment outcomes of immediate implant placement into sites exhibiting pathology after clinical procedures to perform the decontamination of the implant's site. The following questions were raised: Does the presence of periodontal or endodontic infection affect immediate implant placement success? What is suggested to address the infection in the socket prior to immediate placement? An electronic search in PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD, USA) was undertaken in March 2013. The titles and abstracts from these results were read to identify studies within the selection criteria. Eligibility criteria included both animal and human studies, and excluded any review and case reports articles. The publication's intervention had to have been implant placement into a site classified as having an infection (periapical, endodontic, perioendodontic, and periodontal). The search strategy initially yielded 706 references. Thirty-two studies were identified within the selection criteria, from which nine were case reports and review articles and were excluded. Additional hand-searching of the reference lists of selected studies yielded five additional papers. The high survival rate obtained in several studies supports the hypothesis that implants may be successfully osseointegrated when placed immediately after extraction of teeth presenting endodontic and periodontal lesions, provided that appropriate clinical procedures are performed before the implant

  19. The role of surface disinfection in infection prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebel, Jürgen; Exner, Martin; French, Gary; Chartier, Yves; Christiansen, Bärbel; Gemein, Stefanie; Goroncy-Bermes, Peter; Hartemann, Philippe; Heudorf, Ursel; Kramer, Axel; Maillard, Jean-Yves; Oltmanns, Peter; Rotter, Manfred; Sonntag, Hans-Günther

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Rudolf Schuelke Foundation addresses topics related to hygiene, infection prevention and public health. In this context a panel of scientists from various European countries discussed “The Role of Surface Disinfection in Infection Prevention”. The most important findings and conclusions of this meeting are summarised in the present consensus paper. Aim: Although the relevance of surface disinfection is increasingly being accepted, there are still a number of issues which remain controversial. In particular, the following topics were addressed: Transferral of microbes from surface to patients as a cause of infection, requirements for surface disinfectants, biocidal resistance and toxicity, future challenges. Methods and findings: After discussion and review of current scientific literature the authors agreed that contaminated surfaces contribute to the transmission of pathogens and may thus pose an infection hazard. Targeted surface disinfection based on a risk profile is seen as an indispensable constituent in a multibarrier approach of universal infection control precautions. Resistance and cross-resistance depend on the disinfectant agent as well as on the microbial species. Prudent implementation of surface disinfection regimens tested to be effective can prevent or minimize adverse effects. Conclusions: Disinfection must be viewed as a holistic process. There is a need for defining standard principles for cleaning and disinfection, for ensuring compliance with these principles by measures such as written standard operating procedures, adequate training and suitable audit systems. Also, test procedures must be set up in order to demonstrate the efficacy of disinfectants including new application methods such as pre-soaked wipes for surface disinfection. PMID:23967396

  20. The role of surface disinfection in infection prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebel, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: The Rudolf Schuelke Foundation addresses topics related to hygiene, infection prevention and public health. In this context a panel of scientists from various European countries discussed “The Role of Surface Disinfection in Infection Prevention”. The most important findings and conclusions of this meeting are summarised in the present consensus paper.Aim: Although the relevance of surface disinfection is increasingly being accepted, there are still a number of issues which remain controversial. In particular, the following topics were addressed: Transferral of microbes from surface to patients as a cause of infection, requirements for surface disinfectants, biocidal resistance and toxicity, future challenges.Methods and findings: After discussion and review of current scientific literature the authors agreed that contaminated surfaces contribute to the transmission of pathogens and may thus pose an infection hazard. Targeted surface disinfection based on a risk profile is seen as an indispensable constituent in a multibarrier approach of universal infection control precautions. Resistance and cross-resistance depend on the disinfectant agent as well as on the microbial species. Prudent implementation of surface disinfection regimens tested to be effective can prevent or minimize adverse effects.Conclusions: Disinfection must be viewed as a holistic process. There is a need for defining standard principles for cleaning and disinfection, for ensuring compliance with these principles by measures such as written standard operating procedures, adequate training and suitable audit systems. Also, test procedures must be set up in order to demonstrate the efficacy of disinfectants including new application methods such as pre-soaked wipes for surface disinfection.

  1. National survey of practices to prevent health care-associated infections in Thailand: The role of prevention bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Ratz, David; Greene, M Todd; Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Weber, David J; Saint, Sanjay

    2017-07-01

    We evaluated the practices used in Thai hospitals to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). From January 1, 2014-November 30, 2014, we surveyed all Thai hospitals with an intensive care unit and at least 250 beds. The use of prevention practices for CAUTI, CLABSI, and VAP was assessed. High compliance (≥75%) with all components of the CLABSI and VAP prevention bundles were determined. CAUTI, CLABSI, and VAP infection rates before and after implementing infection control practices are reported. Multivariable regression was used to examine associations between infection prevention bundle compliance and infection rate changes. Out of 245 eligible hospitals, 212 (86.5%) responded. A total of 120 (56.6%) and 115 hospitals (54.2%) reported ≥75% compliance for all components of the CLABSI and VAP prevention bundles, respectively, and 91 hospitals (42.9%) reported using ≥ 4 recommended CAUTI-prevention practices. High compliance with all of the CLABSI and VAP bundle components was associated with significant infection rate reductions (CLABSI, 38.3%; P Hospitals regularly using ≥ 4 CAUTI-prevention practices did not have greater reductions in CAUTI (0.02%; P = .99). Compliance with practices to prevent hospital infections was suboptimal. Policies and interventions promoting bundled approaches may help reduce hospital infections for Thai hospitals. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of Infection Prevention and Control Initiatives on Acute Respiratory Infections in a Pediatric Long-Term Care Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Meghan T; Jackson, Olivia; Cohen, Bevin; Hutcheon, Gordon; Saiman, Lisa; Larson, Elaine; Neu, Natalie

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the collective impact of several infection prevention and control initiatives aimed at reducing acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in a pediatric long-term care facility. ARIs did not decrease overall, though the proportion of infections associated with outbreaks and average number of cases per outbreak decreased. Influenza rates decreased significantly. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:859-862.

  3. Prevention of pin tract infection in external stainless steel fixator frames using electric current in a goat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Borden, Arnout J; Maathuis, Patrick G M; Engels, Eefje; Rakhorst, Gerhard; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; Sharma, Prashant Kumar

    2007-04-01

    Pin tract infections of external fixators used in orthopaedic reconstructive bone surgery are serious complications that can eventually lead to periostitis and osteomyelitis. In vitro experiments have demonstrated that bacteria adhering to stainless steel in a biofilm mode of growth detach under the influence of small electric currents, while remaining bacteria become less viable upon current application. Therefore, we have investigated whether a 100microA electric current can prevent signs of clinical infection around percutaneous pins, implanted in the tibia of goats. Three pins were inserted into the lateral right tibia of nine goats, of which one served for additional frame support. Two pins were infected with a Staphylococcus epidermidis strain of which one pin was subjected to electric current, while the other pin was used as control. Pin sites were examined daily. The wound electrical resistance decreased with worsening of the infection from a dry condition to a purulent stage. After 21 days, animals were sacrificed and the pins taken out. Infection developed in 89% of the control pin sites, whereas only 11% of the pin sites in the current group showed infection. These results show that infection of percutaneous pin sites of external fixators in reconstructive bone surgery can be prevented by the application of a small DC electric current.

  4. National infection prevention and control programmes: Endorsing quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempliuk, Valeska; Ramon-Pardo, Pilar; Holder, Reynaldo

    2014-01-01

    Core components Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In addition to pain and suffering, HAIs increase the cost of health care and generates indirect costs from loss of productivity for patients and society as a whole. Since 2005, the Pan American Health Organization has provided support to countries for the assessment of their capacities in infection prevention and control (IPC). More than 130 hospitals in 18 countries were found to have poor IPC programmes. However, in the midst of many competing health priorities, IPC programmes are not high on the agenda of ministries of health, and the sustainability of national programmes is not viewed as a key point in making health care systems more consistent and trustworthy. Comprehensive IPC programmes will enable countries to reduce the mobility, mortality and cost of HAIs and improve quality of care. This paper addresses the relevance of national infection prevention and control (NIPC) programmes in promoting, supporting and reinforcing IPC interventions at the level of hospitals. A strong commitment from national health authorities in support of national IPC programmes is crucial to obtaining a steady decrease of HAIs, lowering health costs due to HAIs and ensuring safer care.

  5. Consensus document for the prevention of respiratory infections in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Froes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases are one of the principle causes of morbidity, mortality and drain on health resources worldwide. In recent years there has been an increase in the impact of respiratory infections, particularly in the Portuguese population. It is for this reason that the Portuguese Respiratory Society has presented a series of recommendations for the prevention of respiratory infections in adults. These recommendations include both general measures and vaccinations for flu and pneumococcal pneumonia. Resumo: As infeções respiratórias são uma das principais causas de morbilidade, mortalidade e consumo de recursos de saúde a nível global. Nos últimos anos tem-se assistido a um crescente impacto das infeções respiratórias, nomeadamente na população portuguesa. Assim, a Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia apresenta um conjunto de recomendações para a prevenção das infeções respiratórias no adulto. Estas recomendações englobam medidas gerais e de vacinação antigripal e antipneumocócica. Keywords: Prevention, Respiratory infections, Pneumonia, Flu vaccination, Pneumococcal vaccination, Palavras-chave: Prevenção, Infeções respiratórias, Pneumonia, Vacina da gripe, Vacina pneumocócica

  6. Vital Signs: Preventing Antibiotic-Resistant Infections in Hospitals - United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Lindsey M; Fridkin, Scott K; Aponte-Torres, Zuleika; Avery, Lacey; Coffin, Nicole; Dudeck, Margaret A; Edwards, Jonathan R; Jernigan, John A; Konnor, Rebecca; Soe, Minn M; Peterson, Kelly; McDonald, L Clifford

    2016-03-11

    Health care-associated antibiotic-resistant (AR) infections increase patient morbidity and mortality and might be impossible to successfully treat with any antibiotic. CDC assessed health care-associated infections (HAI), including Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), and the role of six AR bacteria of highest concern nationwide in several types of health care facilities. During 2014, approximately 4,000 short-term acute care hospitals, 501 long-term acute care hospitals, and 1,135 inpatient rehabilitation facilities in all 50 states reported data on specific infections to the National Healthcare Safety Network. National standardized infection ratios and their percentage reduction from a baseline year for each HAI type, by facility type, were calculated. The proportions of AR pathogens and HAIs caused by any of six resistant bacteria highlighted by CDC in 2013 as urgent or serious threats were determined. In 2014, the reductions in incidence in short-term acute care hospitals and long-term acute care hospitals were 50% and 9%, respectively, for central line-associated bloodstream infection; 0% (short-term acute care hospitals), 11% (long-term acute care hospitals), and 14% (inpatient rehabilitation facilities) for catheter-associated urinary tract infection; 17% (short-term acute care hospitals) for surgical site infection, and 8% (short-term acute care hospitals) for CDI. Combining HAIs other than CDI across all settings, 47.9% of Staphylococcus aureus isolates were methicillin resistant, 29.5% of enterococci were vancomycin-resistant, 17.8% of Enterobacteriaceae were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase phenotype, 3.6% of Enterobacteriaceae were carbapenem resistant, 15.9% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were multidrug resistant, and 52.6% of Acinetobacter species were multidrug resistant. The likelihood of HAIs caused by any of the six resistant bacteria ranged from 12% in inpatient rehabilitation facilities to 29% in long-term acute care hospitals. Although

  7. Antibiotic therapy for preventing infections in people with acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Westendorp, Willeke F; Dippel, Diederik Wj; van de Beek, Diederik; Nederkoorn, Paul J

    2018-01-22

    Stroke is the main cause of disability in high-income countries and ranks second as a cause of death worldwide. Infections occur frequently after stroke and may adversely affect outcome. Preventive antibiotic therapy in the acute phase of stroke may reduce the incidence of infections and improve outcome. In the previous version of this Cochrane Review, published in 2012, we found that antibiotics did reduce the risk of infection but did not reduce the number of dependent or deceased patients. However, included studies were small and heterogeneous. In 2015, two large clinical trials were published, warranting an update of this Review. To assess the effectiveness and safety of preventive antibiotic therapy in people with ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke. We wished to determine whether preventive antibiotic therapy in people with acute stroke:• reduces the risk of a poor functional outcome (dependency and/or death) at follow-up;• reduces the occurrence of infections in the acute phase of stroke;• reduces the occurrence of elevated body temperature (temperature ≥ 38° C) in the acute phase of stroke;• reduces length of hospital stay; or• leads to an increased rate of serious adverse events, such as anaphylactic shock, skin rash, or colonisation with antibiotic-resistant micro-organisms. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (25 June 2017); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 5; 25 June 2017) in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE Ovid (1950 to 11 May 2017), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 11 May 2017). In an effort to identify further published, unpublished, and ongoing trials, we searched trials and research registers, scanned reference lists, and contacted trial authors, colleagues, and researchers in the field. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of preventive antibiotic therapy versus control (placebo or open control) in people with acute ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke. Two review authors independently selected

  8. Preventing infection in general surgery: improvements through education of surgeons by surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-08-01

    Surgical patients are at particular risk of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) due to the presence of a surgical site leading to surgical site infection (SSI), and because of the need for intravascular access resulting in catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). A two-year initiative commenced with an initial audit of surgical practice; this was used to inform the development of a targeted educational initiative by surgeons specifically for surgical trainees. Parameters assessed during the initial audit and a further audit after the educational initiative were related to intra- and postoperative aspects of the prevention of SSIs, as well as care of peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) in surgical patients. The proportion of prophylactic antibiotics administered prior to incision across 360 operations increased from 30.0% to 59.1% (P<0.001). Surgical site dressings were observed in 234 patients, and a significant decrease was found in the percentage of dressings that were tampered with during the initial 48h after surgery (16.5% vs 6.2%, P=0.030). In total, 574 PVCs were assessed over the two-year period. Improvements were found in the proportion of unnecessary PVCs in situ (37.9% vs 24.4%, P<0.001), PVCs in situ for >72h (10.6% vs 3.1%, P<0.001) and PVCs covered with clean and intact dressings (87.3% vs 97.6%, P<0.001). Significant improvements in surgical practice were established for the prevention of SSI and CRBSI through a focused educational programme developed by and for surgeons. Potentially, other specific measures may also be warranted to achieve further improvements in infection prevention in surgical practice.

  9. Impact of using prophylactic antibiotic on prevention of wound infection in inguinal herniorrhaphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, K.; Khan, Z.; Bhatti, A.M.; Mahmood, K.

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis with placebo in prevention of wound infection amongst patients undergoing clean open inguinal herniorrhaphy (without mesh). Study Design: Randomized Controlled Trial. Place and Duration of Study: Pakistan Air Force Hospital, Faisal Base Karachi from October 2009 to November 2011. Material and Methods: One hundred and fifty patients undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy were included and randomly assigned to one of the two groups using random numbers table. Group A patients were given intravenous antibiotic while those in Group B were given equal volume of normal saline just before the induction of anaesthesia. Patients from both groups were observed for the presence of wound infection. Results: Total seven cases (4.7%) of surgical site infection were detected; two cases (2.7%) occurred in group A whereas five cases (6.7%) occurred in group B. The low frequency of post-operative wound infection was seen in group A as compared to group B but the difference was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Antibiotic prophylaxis has no significant effect on prevention of wound infection in inguinal herniorrhaphy. (author)

  10. Prone position for the prevention of lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuret, P

    2002-04-01

    Pulmonary infection is frequent in brain injured patients. It has been identified as an independent predictor of unfavorable neurological outcome, calling for attempts of prevention. We recently evaluated intermittent prone positioning for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in comatose brain injured patients, in a randomized study. 25 patients were included in the prone position (PP) group: they were positioned on prone four hours once daily until they could get up to sit in an armchair; 26 patients were included in the supine position (SP) group. The main characteristics of the patients from the two groups were similar at randomization. The primary end-point was the incidence of lung worsening, defined by an increase in the Lung Injury Score by at least one point since the time of randomization. The incidence of lung worsening was lower in the PP group (12%) than in the SP group (50%) (p=0.003). The incidence of VAP was 38.4% in the SP group and 20% in the PP group (p=0.14). There was no serious complication attributable to prone positioning. In conclusion, the beneficial effect of prone positioning for prevention of lung infection in brain injured patients is not well established. However, in those patients, prone positioning is able to avoid the worsening of pulmonary function, especially in oxygenation.

  11. Chasing zero: the drive to eliminate surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kristine M; Oldenburg, W Andrew; Deschamps, Claude; Rupp, William C; Smith, C Daniel

    2011-09-01

    It is estimated that healthcare associated infections (HAI) account for 1.7 million infections and 99,000 associated deaths each year, with annual direct medical costs of up to $45 billion. Surgical Site Infections (SSI) account for 17% of HAIs, an estimated annual cost of $3.5 to 10 billion for our country alone. This project was designed to pursue elimination of SSIs and document results. Starting in 2009 a program to eliminate SSIs was undertaken at a nationally recognized academic health center. Interventions already outlined by CMS and IHI were utilized, along with additional interventions based on literature showing relationships with SSI reduction and best practices. Rapid deployment of multiple interventions (SSI Bundle) was undertaken. Tactics included standardized order sets, a centralized preoperative evaluation (POE) clinic, high compliance with intraoperative interventions, and widespread monthly reporting of compliance and results. Data from 2008 to 2010 were collected and analyzed. Between May 1, 2008 and June 30, 2010, all patients with Class I and Class II wounds were tracked for SSIs. Baseline data (May-June 2008) was obtained showing a Class I surgical site infection rate of 1.78%, Class II of 2.82% (total surgical volume: 4160 cases). As of the second quarter 2010, those rates have dropped to 0.51% and 1.44%, respectively (P cost savings of nearly $1 million during the study period. Committed leadership, aggressive assurance of high compliance with multiple known interventions (SSI Bundle), transparency to achieve high levels of staff engagement, and centralization of critical surgical activities result in significant declines in SSIs with resulting substantial cost savings.

  12. Prevention of pin tract infection with titanium-copper alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Toshiharu; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Tohru; Ohtani, Kaori; Zen, Yo; Tomita, Katsuro

    2009-10-01

    The most frequent complication in external fixation is pin tract infection. To reduce the incidence of implant-associated infection, many published reports have looked at preventing bacterial adhesion by treating the pin surface. This study aimed to evaluate the antibacterial activity of a Titanium-Copper (Ti-Cu) alloy on implant infection, and to determine the potential use of the Ti-Cu alloy as a biomaterial. Two forms of Ti-Cu alloys were synthesized: one with 1% Cu and the other with 5% Cu. For analyzing infectious behavior, the implants were exposed to Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The reaction of pathogens to the Ti-Cu alloys was compared with their reaction to stainless steel and pure titanium as controls. Both Ti-Cu alloys evidently inhibited colonization by both bacteria. Conversely, cytocompatibility studies were performed using fibroblasts and colony formation on the metals was assessed by counting the number of colonies. Ti-1% Cu alloy showed no difference in the number of colonies compared with the control. External fixator pins made of Ti-Cu alloys were evaluated in a rabbit model. The tissue-implant interactions were analyzed for the presence of infection, inflammatory changes and osteoid-formation. Ti-1% Cu alloy significantly inhibited inflammation and infection, and had excellent osteoid-formation. Copper blood levels were measured before surgery and at 14 days postoperatively. Preoperative and postoperative blood copper values were not statistically different. Overall, it was concluded that Ti-Cu alloys have antimicrobial activity and substantially reduce the incidence of pin tract infection. Ti-1% Cu alloy shows particular promise as a biomaterial. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Enterobacteriaceae infection – diagnosis, antibiotic resistance and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jarząb

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal infections caused by rod-shaped bacteria of the [i]Enterobacteriaceae[/i] genus are one of the major health hazards in countries where sanitation standards are low. [i]Strains[/i] of [i]Shigella,[/i] [i]Salmonella, Escherichia[/i] and [i]Yersinia [/i]are responsible for diarrhea, severe bacillary dysentery, typhoid, other intestinal diseases, as well as genitourinary tract and blood infections. According to the WHO there are 4.5 billion cases every year, of which 1.9 million end in death. This makes intestinal infections third in terms of human disease mortality. In this work we discuss methods of pathogen identification, the mechanism of host-pathogen interaction, and the nature of the ¬host’s immunological response. Due to rising drug resistance we discuss the importance of better pathogen detection, vaccine design and the use of vaccines as a preventive measure against intestinal infections. Special attention is paid to OMP38, a protein isolated from [i]S. flexneri[/i] 3a outer membrane. Since it is known that this protein has good immunogenic properties, it can be used as an antigen or carrier for conjugate vaccines.

  14. Hospital infection prevention and control issues relevant to extensive floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Mundy, Linda M; Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Glen Mayhall, C

    2013-02-01

    The devastating clinical and economic implications of floods exemplify the need for effective global infection prevention and control (IPC) strategies for natural disasters. Reopening of hospitals after excessive flooding requires a balance between meeting the medical needs of the surrounding communities and restoration of a safe hospital environment. Postflood hospital preparedness plans are a key issue for infection control epidemiologists, healthcare providers, patients, and hospital administrators. We provide recent IPC experiences related to reopening of a hospital after extensive black-water floods necessitated hospital closures in Thailand and the United States. These experiences provide a foundation for the future design, execution, and analysis of black-water flood preparedness plans by IPC stakeholders.

  15. Preventing Bacterial Infections using Metal Oxides Nanocoatings on Bone Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duceac, L. D.; Straticiuc, S.; Hanganu, E.; Stafie, L.; Calin, G.; Gavrilescu, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays bone implant removal is caused by infection that occurs around it possibly acquired after surgery or during hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to reveal some metal oxides applied as coatings on bone implant thus limiting the usual antibiotics-resistant bacteria colonization. Therefore ZnO, TiO2 and CuO were synthesized and structurally and morphologically analized in order to use them as an alternative antimicrobial agents deposited on bone implant. XRD, SEM, and FTIR characterization techniques were used to identify structure and texture of these nanoscaled metal oxides. These metal oxides nanocoatings on implant surface play a big role in preventing bacterial infection and reducing surgical complications.

  16. Inhibition of sortase A by chalcone prevents Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongen; Chen, Yutao; Zhang, Bing; Niu, Xiaodi; Song, Meng; Luo, Zhaoqing; Lu, Gejin; Liu, Bowen; Zhao, Xiaoran; Wang, Jianfeng; Deng, Xuming

    2016-04-15

    The critical role of sortase A in gram-positive bacterial pathogenicity makes this protein a good potential target for antimicrobial therapy. In this study, we report for the first time the crystal structure of Listeria monocytogenes sortase A and identify the active sites that mediate its transpeptidase activity. We also used a sortase A (SrtA) enzyme activity inhibition assay, simulation, and isothermal titration calorimetry analysis to discover that chalcone, an agent with little anti-L. monocytogenes activity, could significantly inhibit sortase A activity with an IC50 of 28.41 ± 5.34 μM by occupying the active site of SrtA. The addition of chalcone to a co-culture of L. monocytogenes and Caco-2 cells significantly inhibited bacterial entry into the cells and L. monocytogenes-mediated cytotoxicity. Additionally, chalcone treatment decreased the mortality of infected mice, the bacterial burden in target organs, and the pathological damage to L. monocytogenes-infected mice. In conclusion, these findings suggest that chalcone is a promising candidate for the development of treatment against L. monocytogenes infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Reducing surgical site infections after hysterectomy: metronidazole plus cefazolin compared with cephalosporin alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Sara R; Morgan, Daniel M; Bazzi, Ali A; Pearlman, Mark D; Abdelsattar, Zaid; Campbell, Darrell A; Uppal, Shitanshu

    2017-08-01

    Organisms that are isolated from vaginal cuff infections and pelvic abscesses after hysterectomy frequently include anaerobic vaginal flora. Metronidazole has outstanding coverage against nearly all anaerobic species, which is superior to both cefazolin and second-generation cephalosporins. Cefazolin plus metronidazole has been demonstrated to reduce infectious morbidity compared with either cefazolin or second-generation cephalosporins in other clean-contaminated procedures, which include both as colorectal surgery and cesarean delivery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the combination of cefazolin plus metronidazole before hysterectomy was more effective in the prevention of surgical site infection than existing recommendations of cefazolin or second-generation cephalosporin. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative from July 2012 through February 2015. The primary outcome was surgical site infection. Patients who were >18 years old and who underwent abdominal, vaginal, laparoscopic, or robotic hysterectomy for benign or malignant indications were included if they received 1 of the following prophylactic antibiotic regimens: cefazolin, second-generation cephalosporin, or cefazolin plus metronidazole. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was performed to evaluate the independent effect of an antibiotic regimen, and propensity score matching was used to validate the findings. The study included 18,255 hysterectomies. The overall rate of surgical site infection was 1.8% (n=329). The unadjusted rate of surgical site infection was 1.8% (n=267) for cefazolin, 2.1% (n=49) for second-generation cephalosporin, and 1.4% (n=13) for cefazolin plus metronidazole. After adjustment for differences in patient and operative factors among the antibiotic cohorts, compared with cefazolin plus metronidazole, we found the risk of surgical site infection was significantly higher for patients who received

  18. Treating High-grade Lesions to Prevent Anal Cancer in HIV-infected People

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study, called the ANCHOR trial, will investigate whether screening and prevention methods similar to those used to prevent cervical cancer can help prevent anal cancer in HIV-infected men and women.

  19. Risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative treatment of ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovaska, Mikko T; Mäkinen, Tatu J; Madanat, Rami; Huotari, Kaisa; Vahlberg, Tero; Hirvensalo, Eero; Lindahl, Jan

    2013-02-20

    Surgical site infection is one of the most common complications following ankle fracture surgery. These infections are associated with substantial morbidity and lead to increased resource utilization. Identification of risk factors is crucial for developing strategies to prevent these complications. We performed an age and sex-matched case-control study to identify patient and surgery-related risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative ankle fracture treatment. We identified 1923 ankle fracture operations performed in 1915 patients from 2006 through 2009. A total of 131 patients with deep infection were identified and compared with an equal number of uninfected control patients. Risk factors for infection were determined with use of conditional logistic regression analysis. The incidence of deep infection was 6.8%. Univariate analysis showed diabetes (odds ratio [OR] = 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0, 4.9), alcohol abuse (OR = 3.8, 95% CI = 1.6, 9.4), fracture-dislocation (OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.2, 3.5), and soft-tissue injury (a Tscherne grade of ≥1) (OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.3, 5.3) to be significant patient-related risk factors for infection. Surgery-related risk factors were suboptimal timing of prophylactic antibiotics (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0, 3.4), difficulties encountered during surgery, (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.1, 4.0), wound complications (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.6, 14.0), and fracture malreduction (OR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.3, 9.2). Independent risk factors for infection identified by multivariable analyses were tobacco use (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.6, 8.5) and a duration of surgery of more than ninety minutes (OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.1, 5.7). Cast application in the operating room was independently associated with a decreased infection rate (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2, 0.8). We identified several modifiable risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative treatment of ankle fractures.

  20. Predictors of certification in infection prevention and control among infection preventionists: APIC MegaSurvey findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalp, Ericka L; Harris, Jeanette J; Zawistowski, Grace

    2018-06-06

    The 2015 APIC MegaSurvey was completed by 4,078 members to assess infection prevention practices. This study's purpose was to examine MegaSurvey results to relate infection preventionist (IP) certification status with demographic characteristics, organizational structure, compensation benefits, and practice and competency factors. Descriptive statistics were used to examine population characteristics and certification status. Bivariate logistic regression was performed to evaluate relationships between independent variables and certification status. Variables demonstrating statistical significance (P Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 76 FR 81959 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Homelessness Prevention Study Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... Information Collection: Comment Request; Homelessness Prevention Study Site Visits AGENCY: Office of the Chief.... This Notice also lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Homelessness Prevention Study Site... of the Paperwork Reduction Act requirements associated with HUD's Homelessness Prevention Study Site...

  2. Prevention and Control Strategies to Counter Dengue Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rather, Irfan A; Parray, Hilal A; Lone, Jameel B; Paek, Woon K; Lim, Jeongheui; Bajpai, Vivek K; Park, Yong-Ha

    2017-01-01

    Dengue is currently the highest and rapidly spreading vector-borne viral disease, which can lead to mortality in its severe form. The globally endemic dengue poses as a public health and economic challenge that has been attempted to suppress though application of various prevention and control techniques. Therefore, broad spectrum techniques, that are efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally sustainable, are proposed and practiced in dengue-endemic regions. The development of vaccines and immunotherapies have introduced a new dimension for effective dengue control and prevention. Thus, the present study focuses on the preventive and control strategies that are currently employed to counter dengue. While traditional control strategies bring temporary sustainability alone, implementation of novel biotechnological interventions, such as sterile insect technique, paratransgenesis, and production of genetically modified vectors, has improved the efficacy of the traditional strategies. Although a large-scale vector control strategy can be limited, innovative vaccine candidates have provided evidence for promising dengue prevention measures. The use of tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) has been the most effective so far in treating dengue infections. Nonetheless, challenges and limitation hinder the progress of developing integrated intervention methods and vaccines; while the improvement in the latest techniques and vaccine formulation continues, one can hope for a future without the threat of dengue virus.

  3. Prevention and Control Strategies to Counter Dengue Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan A. Rather

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is currently the highest and rapidly spreading vector-borne viral disease, which can lead to mortality in its severe form. The globally endemic dengue poses as a public health and economic challenge that has been attempted to suppress though application of various prevention and control techniques. Therefore, broad spectrum techniques, that are efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally sustainable, are proposed and practiced in dengue-endemic regions. The development of vaccines and immunotherapies have introduced a new dimension for effective dengue control and prevention. Thus, the present study focuses on the preventive and control strategies that are currently employed to counter dengue. While traditional control strategies bring temporary sustainability alone, implementation of novel biotechnological interventions, such as sterile insect technique, paratransgenesis, and production of genetically modified vectors, has improved the efficacy of the traditional strategies. Although a large-scale vector control strategy can be limited, innovative vaccine candidates have provided evidence for promising dengue prevention measures. The use of tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV has been the most effective so far in treating dengue infections. Nonetheless, challenges and limitation hinder the progress of developing integrated intervention methods and vaccines; while the improvement in the latest techniques and vaccine formulation continues, one can hope for a future without the threat of dengue virus.

  4. The HIV/AIDS pandemic: new ways of preventing infection in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, R V

    2004-01-01

    Nelson Mandela has recently said that HIV/AIDS is the greatest health crisis in human history. At the end of 2001, UNAIDS estimated that there were 40 million people living with the infection, with 5 million new cases, and 3 million deaths per year. About half the infected individuals are men, and heterosexual intercourse is the commonest route of infection. Although condoms remain the first line of defence, they are unpopular in parts of Africa, where the pandemic is worst, so an alternative is needed. Post-coital penile hygiene has received little attention. Wiping the glans penis and inner foreskin immediately after intercourse with an acidic solution like lemon or lime juice, or even vinegar, should immediately kill the virus and might prevent infection; clinical trials are urgently needed. Several studies in Africa and India have now conclusively demonstrated a 2-7-fold protective effect of male circumcision against HIV infection. Circumcision removes the inner foreskin and the frenulum, which are the prime sites of HIV entry into the penis. Since male circumcision also protects men from human papilloma virus infection, and their wives from cervical carcinoma, the procedure should be encouraged in developed and developing countries.

  5. Preventing healthcare-associated infections through human factors engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jesse T; Herwaldt, Loreen A; Durso, Francis T

    2018-05-24

    Human factors engineering (HFE) approaches are increasingly being used in healthcare, but have been applied in relatively limited ways to infection prevention and control (IPC). Previous studies have focused on using selected HFE tools, but newer literature supports a system-based HFE approach to IPC. Cross-contamination and the existence of workarounds suggest that healthcare workers need better support to reduce and simplify steps in delivering care. Simplifying workflow can lead to better understanding of why a process fails and allow for improvements to reduce errors and increase efficiency. Hand hygiene can be improved using visual cues and nudges based on room layout. Using personal protective equipment appropriately appears simple, but exists in a complex interaction with workload, behavior, emotion, and environmental variables including product placement. HFE can help prevent the pathogen transmission through improving environmental cleaning and appropriate use of medical devices. Emerging evidence suggests that HFE can be applied in IPC to reduce healthcare-associated infections. HFE and IPC collaboration can help improve many of the basic best practices including use of hand hygiene and personal protective equipment by healthcare workers during patient care.

  6. Preventing urinary tract infections after menopause without antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretto, Marta; Giannini, Andrea; Russo, Eleonora; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2017-05-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common bacterial infections in women, and increase in incidence after the menopause. It is important to uncover underlying abnormalities or modifiable risk factors. Several risk factors for recurrent UTIs have been identified, including the frequency of sexual intercourse, spermicide use and abnormal pelvic anatomy. In postmenopausal women UTIs often accompany the symptoms and signs of the genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM). Antimicrobial prophylaxis has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the risk of recurrent UTIs in women, but this may lead to drug resistance of both the causative microorganisms and the indigenous flora. The increasing prevalence of Escherichia coli (the most prevalent uropathogen) that is resistant to antimicrobial agents has stimulated interest in novel non-antibiotic methods for the prevention of UTIs. Evidence shows that topical estrogens normalize vaginal flora and greatly reduce the risk of UTIs. The use of intravaginal estrogens may be reasonable in postmenopausal women not taking oral estrogens. A number of other strategies have been used to prevent recurrent UTIs: probiotics, cranberry juice and d-mannose have been studied. Oral immunostimulants, vaginal vaccines and bladder instillations with hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate are newer strategies proposed to improve urinary symptoms and quality of life. This review provides an overview of UTIs' prophylaxis without antibiotics, focusing on a practical clinical approach to women with UTIs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevention of recurrent urinary tract infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gabrielle; Craig, Jonathan C

    2009-02-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) in children is common (5-10%) and recurs in 10-30%. UTI causes an unpleasant, usually febrile illness in children. This review focuses on studies evaluating interventions to prevent UTI in children and published between January 2007 and June 2008. Three relevant updated Cochrane reviews, six randomized trials and an evidence-based guideline were published in the study period. Five of the six trials and one of the three Cochrane updates included data on the effects of relevant interventions in children. Three of the six trials investigated the efficacy of long-term, low-dose antibiotics as prophylaxis, and the other trials and both Cochrane updates evaluated complementary therapies such as vitamin A, probiotics and herbal supplements. The benefit of prophylactic antibiotics for the prevention of recurrent UTI in children remains unclear because of underpowered and suboptimally designed trials, but these studies suggest that any benefit is likely to be small, and clinical significance may be limited. The trials of complementary interventions (vitamin A, probiotics, cranberry, nasturtium and horseradish) generally gave favourable results but were not conclusive. Children and families who use these products should be aware that further infections are possible despite their use.

  8. Research progress on influencing factors of hospital infection and prevention and control measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Wenlong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hospital infections are associated with the emergence of hospitals. As the understanding of hospital infections deepen and prevention and control measures improve, hospital infections have become manageable. In recent years, affected by the increase in invasive treatment technology, antimicrobial abuse, and other factors, the control of hospital infection has encountered new problems. This paper reviews the influencing factors of hospital infections and their prevention and control measures.

  9. The Violence Prevention Community Meeting: A Multi-Site Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Marilyn; Ridenour, Marilyn; Hendricks, Scott; Rierdan, Jill; Zeiss, Robert; Schmidt, Satu; Lovelace, Jeff; Amandus, Harlan

    2016-06-01

    The Violence Prevention Community Meeting (VPCM) is a specialized form of community meeting in which avoiding violence and promoting non-violent problem solving and interpersonal civility are focal points. A nationwide study to assess the VPCM as an effective intervention to reduce workplace violence was undertaken. Seven acute locked psychiatric units of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) throughout the United States participated in the study. All patients and all staff on the seven in-patient locked psychiatry units participated in the intervention (VPCM) or as a control (treatment as usual). The study was 21weeks at each site. The three time periods were pre-treatment weeks 1-3, treatment weeks 4-18, and post-treatment weeks 19-21. The VPCM was conducted during the treatment weeks. Overall rates of aggression declined by 0.6% (95% CI: -5.6%, 6.5%; nonsignificant) per week in the intervention hospitals and by 5.1% (95% CI: 0.4%, 9.6%; significant) per week for the control hospitals. Aggression decreased for both the intervention and control hospitals which could be due to enrollment in a research study and thus being more aware of their ability to address workplace violence at their site. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Geerlings, Suzanne E; Middleton, Philippa; Crowther, Caroline A

    2012-11-14

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are common in women who are pregnant and may cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be pharmacological (antibiotics) or non-pharmacological (cranberry products, acupuncture, probiotics and behavioural modifications). So far little is known about the best way to prevent RUTI in pregnant women. To assess the effects of interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infections in pregnant women.The primary maternal outcomes were RUTI before birth (variously defined) and preterm birth (before 37 weeks). The primary infant outcomes were small-for-gestational age and total mortality. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (8 June 2012) and reference lists of retrieved articles. Published, unpublished and ongoing randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs, clustered-randomised trials and abstracts of any intervention (pharmacological and non-pharmacological) for preventing RUTI during pregnancy (compared with another intervention, placebo or with usual care). Two review authors independently evaluated the one identified trial for inclusion and assessed trial quality. Two review authors extracted data. Data were checked for accuracy. The review included one trial involving 200 women. The trial compared a daily dose of nitrofurantoin and close surveillance (regular clinic visit, urine cultures and antibiotics when a positive culture was found) with close surveillance only. No significant differences were found for the primary outcomes: recurrent pyelonephritis (risk ratio (RR) 0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.31 to 2.53, one study, 167 women), recurrent urinary tract infection before birth (RR 0.30, 95% CI 0.06 to 1.38; one study 167 women) and preterm birth (before 37 weeks) (RR 1.18, 95% CI 0.42 to 3.35; one study 147 women). The

  11. Association between keeping home records of catheter exit-site and incidence of peritoneal dialysis-related infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Hidekazu; Kurita, Noriaki; Fujimoto, Shino; Kamijo, Yuka; Ishibashi, Yoshitaka; Fukuma, Shingo; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2018-04-01

    To prevent peritoneal dialysis (PD)-related infection, components of self-catheter care have been emphasized. However, studies on the effectiveness of home recording for the prevention of PD-related infections are limited. This study aimed to examine the association between keeping home records of catheter exit site and incidence of PD-related infections. Home record books were submitted by patients undergoing PD. The proportion of days on which exit-site home recording was carried out for 120 days (0-100%) was obtained. The patients were divided into the frequent home recording group (≥ 40.5%; median value) and the infrequent home recording group (home recording groups for PD-related infection were 1.58 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-3.46) in the univariate analysis and 1.49 (95% CI, 0.65-3.42) in the multivariate analysis. The IRRs of the frequent versus infrequent home recording groups for composite of surgery to create a new exit site and removal of PD catheter were 0.55 (95% CI, 0.78-3.88) and 0.35 (95% CI, 0.06-1.99), respectively. This study could not prove that keeping home records of patients' catheter exit site is associated with a lower incidence of PD-related infections.

  12. [Clinical guidelines for the prevention of infective endocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Lescure Picarzo, J; Crespo Marcos, D; Centeno Malfaz, F

    2014-03-01

    This article sets out the recommendations for the prevention of infective endocarditis (IE), contained in the guidelines developed by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), from which the recommendations of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Cardiology and Congenital Heart Disease have been agreed. In recent years, there has been a considerable change in the recommendations for the prevention of IE, mainly due to the lack of evidence on the effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis in prevention, and the risk of the development of antibiotic resistance. The main change is a reduction of the indications for antibiotic prophylaxis, both in terms of patients and procedures considered at risk. Clinical practice guidelines and recommendations should assist health professionals in making clinical decisions in their daily practice. However, the ultimate judgment regarding the care of a particular patient must be taken by the physician responsible. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of a bundle on prevention and control of healthcare associated infections in intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fang; Wu, Yan-yan; Zou, Jun-ning; Zhu, Ming; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Hai-yan; Xiong, Li-juan

    2015-04-01

    Inpatients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are at high risk for healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). In the current study, a bundle of interventions and measures for preventing and controlling HAIs were developed and implemented in the ICU by trained personnel, and the impact of the bundle was evaluated. The incidence of HAIs, the adjusted daily incidence of HAIs and the incidence of three types of catheter-related infections before and after the bundle implementation were compared. The execution rate of the bundle for preventing and controlling ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) was increased from 82.06% in 2012 to 96.88% in 2013. The execution rate was increased from 83.03% in 2012 to 91.33% in 2013 for central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), from 87.00% to 94.40% for catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), and from 82.05% to 98.55% for multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs), respectively. In total, 136 cases (10.37%) in 2012 and 113 cases (7.72%) in 2013 involved HAIs, respectively. Patients suffered from infection of the lower respiratory tract, the most common site of HAIs, in 134 cases (79.29%) in 2012 and 107 cases (74.30%) in 2013 respectively. The incidence of VAP was 32.72‰ and 24.60‰, the number of strains of pathogens isolated was 198 and 173, and the number of MDROs detected in the ICU was 91 and 74 in 2012 and 2013, respectively. The percentage of MDROs among the pathogens causing HAIs was decreased in each quarter of 2013 as compared with the corresponding percentage in 2012. In 2013, the execution rate of the bundle for preventing and controlling HAIs was increased, whereas the incidence of HAIs and VAP decreased as compared with that in 2012.

  14. Surgical site infections following craniotomy focusing on possible post-operative acquisition of infection: prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneh-Arbib, O; Shiferstein, A; Dagan, N; Fein, S; Telem, L; Muchtar, E; Eliakim-Raz, N; Rubinovitch, B; Rubin, G; Rappaport, Z H; Paul, M

    2013-12-01

    Neurosurgery is characterized by a prolonged risk period for surgical site infection (SSI), mainly related to the presence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains. We aimed to examine factors associated with post-neurosurgical SSIs, focusing on post-operative factors. A prospective cohort study was conducted in a single center over a period of 18 months in Israel. Included were adult patients undergoing clean or clean-contaminated craniotomy, including craniotomies with external CSF drainage or shunts. SSIs were defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria for healthcare-associated infections. All patients were followed up for 90 days and those with foreign body insertion for 1 year. We compared patients with and without SSI. A multivariable regression analysis for SSI was conducted including uncorrelated variables significantly associated with SSI. A total of 502 patients were included, with 138 (27.5%) undergoing emergent or urgent craniotomy. The overall SSI rate was 5.6% (28 patients), of which 3.2% (16 patients) were intracerebral. Non-elective surgery, external CSF drainage/monitoring devices, re-operation, and post-operative respiratory failure were independently associated with subsequent SSI. External CSF devices was the only significant risk factor for intracerebral SSIs (p operative infection acquisition through external CSF devices. Standard operating procedures for their maintenance are necessary.

  15. HPV type infection in different anogenital sites among HIV-positive Brazilian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donadi Eduardo Antonio

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV types, and risk factors for HPV positivity across cervix, vagina and anus, we conducted a study among 138 women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Goal Compare the prevalence of different HPV types and the risk factors for HPV positivity in three sites. Results The most frequently detected HPV types in all sites were, in decreasing order, HPV16, 53, 18, 61 and 81. Agreement between the cervix and vagina was good (kappa 0.60 – 0.80 for HPV16 and 53 and excellent (Kappa > 0.80 for HPV18 and 61. HPV positivity was inversely associated with age for all combinations including the anal site. Conclusion In HIV positive women, HPV18 is the most spread HPV type found in combinations of anal and genital sites. The relationship of anal to genital infection has implications for the development of anal malignancies. Thus, the efficacy of the current HPV vaccine may be considered not only for the cervix, but also for prevention of HPV18 anal infection among immunossuppressed individuals.

  16. Prevention and treatment strategy in pregnant women with group B streptococcal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevdorashvili, G; Tevdorashvili, D; Andghuladze, M; Tevdorashvili, M

    2015-04-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS; Streptococcus agalactiae) are encapsulated gram-positive cocci belonging to Lancefield group B, that frequently colonizes the human genital and gastrointestinal tracts. It is an important cause of illness in three categories of population: infants, pregnant women, and adults with underlying medical conditions. In pregnant women and postpartum women, GBS is a frequent cause of asymptomatic bacteriuria, urinary tract infection, upper genital tract infection (i.e. intraamniotic infection or chorioamnionitis), postpartum endometritis (8%), pneumonia (2%), puerperal sepsis (2%), and bacteremia without a focal site (31%). It also can cause focal infections such as pneumonia, meningitis, and endocarditis, albeit rarely. Invasive maternal infection with GBS is associated with pregnancy loss and preterm delivery. Prior to the widespread use of maternal intrapartum chemoprophylaxis, maternal colonization with GBS conferred an increased risk of chorioamnionitis, and early postpartum infection. The serotype distribution of invasive GBS infection in pregnant women is similar to that of early-onset neonatal disease. The most common GBS serotypes causing invasive disease in adults and neonates are Ia, Ib, III, and V. Vaccination of adolescent women is considered an ideal solution. However, recent reports (April 2015) have shown that serotype IV GBS is emerging in pregnant carriers and causing infections in neonates and adults. This emergence is of concern because GBS conjugate vaccines that are being developed to prevent invasive disease may protect only against serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III, and V, or combinations thereof. Though research for the development of such a vaccine is underway, a good candidate vaccine has yet to surface.

  17. The national response for preventing healthcare-associated infections: research and adoption of prevention practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Katherine L; Mendel, Peter; Leuschner, Kristin J; Hiatt, Liisa; Gall, Elizabeth M; Siegel, Sari; Weinberg, Daniel A

    2014-02-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) have long been the subject of research and prevention practice. When findings show potential to significantly impact outcomes, clinicians, policymakers, safety experts, and stakeholders seek to bridge the gap between research and practice by identifying mechanisms and assigning responsibility for translating research to practice. This paper describes progress and challenges in HAI research and prevention practices, as explained through an examination of Health and Human Services (HHS) Action Plan's goals, inputs, and implementation in each area. We used the Context-Input-Process-Product evaluation model, together with an HAI prevention system framework, to assess the transformative processes associated with HAI research and adoption of prevention practices. Since the introduction of the Action Plan, HHS has made substantial progress in prioritizing research projects, translating findings from those projects into practice, and designing and implementing research projects in multisite practice settings. Research has emphasized the basic science and epidemiology of HAIs, the identification of gaps in research, and implementation science. The basic, epidemiological, and implementation science communities have joined forces to better define mechanisms and responsibilities for translating HAI research into practice. Challenges include the ongoing need for better evidence about intervention effectiveness, the growing implementation burden on healthcare providers and organizations, and challenges implementing certain practices. Although these HAI research and prevention practice activities are complex spanning multiple system functions and properties, HHS is making progress so that the right methods for addressing complex HAI problems at the interface of patient safety and clinical practice can emerge.

  18. Prospective multicenter surveillance and risk factor analysis of deep surgical site infection after posterior thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Takashi; Maruyama, Toru; Oka, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Kota; Azuma, Seiichi; Yamada, Takashi; Murakami, Motoaki; Kawamura, Naohiro; Hara, Nobuhiro; Terayama, Sei; Morii, Jiro; Kato, So; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infection is a serious and significant complication after spinal surgery and is associated with high morbidity rates, high healthcare costs and poor patient outcomes. Accurate identification of risk factors is essential for developing strategies to prevent devastating infections. The purpose of this study was to identify independent risk factors for surgical site infection among posterior thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adult patients using a prospective multicenter surveillance research method. From July 2010 to June 2012, we performed a prospective surveillance study in adult patients who had developed surgical site infection after undergoing thoracic and/or lumbar posterior spinal surgery at 11 participating hospitals. Detailed preoperative and operative patient characteristics were prospectively recorded using a standardized data collection format. Surgical site infection was based on the definition established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A total of 2,736 consecutive adult patients were enrolled, of which 24 (0.9%) developed postoperative deep surgical site infection. Multivariate regression analysis indicated four independent risk factors. Preoperative steroid therapy (P = 0.001), spinal trauma (P = 0.048) and gender (male) (P = 0.02) were statistically significant independent patient-related risk factors, whereas an operating time ≥3 h (P operating time ≥3 h were independent risk factors for deep surgical site infection after thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adult patients. Identification of these risk factors can be used to develop protocols aimed at decreasing the risk of surgical site infection.

  19. Colorectal surgery and surgical site infection: is a change of attitude necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia-Guedea, Manuela; Cordoba-Diaz de Laspra, Elena; Echazarreta-Gallego, Estibaliz; Valero-Lazaro, María Isabel; Ramirez-Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Aguilella-Diago, Vicente

    2017-07-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) can be as high as 30% in patients undergoing colorectal surgery and is associated with an increase in morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a set of simple preventive measures that have resulted in a reduction in surgical site infection in colorectal surgery. Prospective study with two groups of patients treated in the colorectal unit of the "Clinico Universitario Lozano Blesa" hospital in Zaragoza. One group was subject to our measures from February to May 2015. The control group was given conventional treatment within a time period of 3 months before the set of measures were implemented. One hundred forty-nine patients underwent a major colorectal surgical procedure. Seventy (47%) belonged to the control group and were compared to the remaining 79 patients (53% of the total), who were subject to our treatment bundle in the period tested. Comparing the two groups revealed that our set of measures led to a general reduction in SSI (31.4 vs. 13.6%, p = 0.010) and in superficial site infection (17.1 vs. 2.5%, p = 0.002). As a consequence, the postoperative hospital stay was shortened (10.0 vs. 8.0 days, p = 0.048). However, it did not, the number of readmissions nor the re-operation rate. SSI was clearly related to open surgery. The preventive set of measures applied in colorectal surgery led to a significant reduction of the SSI and of the length of hospital stay.

  20. Cochrane Commentary: Probiotics For Prevention of Acute Upper Respiratory Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics may improve a person's health by regulating their immune function. Some trials have shown that probiotic strains can prevent respiratory infections. Even though the previous version of our review showed benefits of probiotics for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), several new studies have been published. To assess the effectiveness and safety of probiotics (any specified strain or dose), compared with placebo, in the prevention of acute URTIs in people of all ages, who are at risk of acute URTIs. We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1950 to July week 3, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to July 2014), Web of Science (1900 to July 2014), the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, which includes the China Biological Medicine Database (from 1978 to July 2014), the Chinese Medicine Popular Science Literature Database (from 2000 to July 2014) and the Masters Degree Dissertation of Beijing Union Medical College Database (from 1981 to July 2014). We also searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov for completed and ongoing trials on 31 July 2014. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing probiotics with placebo to prevent acute URTIs. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility and quality of trials, and extracted data using the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 13 RCTs, although we could only extract data to meta-analyze 12 trials, which involved 3720 participants including children, adults (aged around 40 years) and older people. We found that probiotics were better than placebo when measuring the number of participants experiencing episodes of acute URTI [at least one episode: odds ratio (OR): 0.53; 95% CI = 0.37-0.76, P school absence (OR: 0.10; 95% CI = 0.02-0.47, very low quality evidence). Probiotics and placebo were similar when measuring the rate ratio of episodes of acute URTI (rate ratio: 0

  1. Probiotics to prevent urinary tract infections: the rationale and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Gregor; Bruce, Andrew W

    2006-02-01

    For over 30 years, urologists have recognized in females, that urinary pathogens almost always infect the host through ascension from the rectum, vagina to the urethra and bladder. Likewise, the Lactobacillus organisms that predominate in the vagina of healthy women, spread from the rectum and perineum and form a barrier in the vagina to bladder entry by uropathogens. The concept of artificially boosting the lactobacilli numbers through probiotic instillation has long been conceived, but only in recent years shown to be possible. Not all lactobacilli are effective, and to date clinical efficacy only exists for Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri B-54 and RC-14. These strains are only commercially available in Austria, and therefore for most urologists, while some probiotic organisms may reduce the recurrences of bladder cancer or oxaluria, no probiotics can be recommended widely to prevent UTI at present.

  2. Nanosized Selenium: A Novel Platform Technology to Prevent Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi

    As an important category of bacterial infections, healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are considered an increasing threat to the safety and health of patients worldwide. HAIs lead to extended hospital stays, contribute to increased medical costs, and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In the United States, infections encountered in the hospital or a health care facility affect more than 1.7 million patients, cost 35.7 billion to 45 billion, and contribute to 88,000 deaths in hospitals annually. The most conventional and widely accepted method to fight against bacterial infections is using antibiotics. However, because of the widespread and sometimes inappropriate use of antibiotics, many strains of bacteria have rapidly developed antibiotic resistance. Those new, stronger bacteria pose serious, worldwide threats to public health and welfare. In 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported antibiotic resistance as a global serious threat that is no longer a prediction for the future but is now reality. It has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country. The most effective strategy to prevent antibiotic resistance is minimizing the use of antibiotics. In recent years, nanomaterials have been investigated as one of the potential substitutes of antibiotics. As a result of their vastly increased ratio of surface area to volume, nanomaterials will likely exert a stronger interaction with bacteria which may affect bacterial growth and propagation. A major concern of most existing antibacterial nanomaterials, like silver nanoparticles, is their potential toxicity. But selenium is a non-metallic material and a required nutrition for the human body, which is recommended by the FDA at a 53 to 60 μg daily intake. Nanosized selenium is considered to be healthier and less toxic compared with many metal-based nanomaterials due to the generation of reactive oxygen species from metals, especially heavy metals. Therefore, the objectives of

  3. Risk factors for surgical site infection and urinary tract infection after spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Hiroyuki; Setoguchi, Takao; Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Nagano, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Komiya, Setsuro

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to identify and compare risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) and non-surgical site infections (non-SSIs), particularly urinary tract infection (UTI), after spine surgery. We retrospectively reviewed 825 patients (median age 59.0 years (range 33-70 years); 442 males) who underwent spine surgery at Kagoshima University Hospital from January 2009 to December 2014. Patient parameters were compared using the Mann-Whitney U and Fisher's exact tests. Risk factors associated with SSI and UTI were analyzed via the multiple logistic regression analysis. P operation time (P = 0.0019 and 0.0162, respectively) and ASA classification 3 (P = 0.0132 and 0.0356, respectively). The 1 week post-operative C-reactive protein (CRP) level was a risk factor for UTI (P = 0.0299), but not for SSI (P = 0.4996). There was no relationship between SSI and symptomatic UTI after spine surgery. Risk factors for post-operative SSI and UTI were operative time and ASA classification 3; 1 week post-operative CRP was a risk factor for UTI only.

  4. [Primary and secondary prevention of urinary tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Vahlensieck, W; Bauer, H W; Weidner, W; Naber, K G; Piechota, H J

    2011-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most frequent bacterial infections in the community and health care setting. Mostly young and, to some extent, postmenopausal women are affected by recurrent UTI (rUTI) defined as ≥3 UTI/year. On the other hand rUTI are frequently found in patients with complicating urological factors, e.g. urinary catheters. Modifiable predisposing factors in uncomplicated rUTI in women are rare. Continuous antibiotic prophylaxis or postcoital prophylaxis, if there is close correlation with sexual intercourse, are most effective to prevent rUTI. Nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim (or cotrimoxazole), and fosfomycin trometamol are available as first-line drugs. Oral cephalosporins and quinolones should be restricted to specific indications. Antibiotic prophylaxis reduces the number of uropathogens in the gut and/or vaginal flora and reduces bacterial"fitness". Given the correct indication, the recurrence rate of rUTI can be reduced by about 90%. In postmenopausal patients vaginal substitution of oestriol should be started first. Oral or parenteral immunoprophylaxis is another option in patients with rUTI. Other possibilities with varying scientific evidence are prophylaxis with cranberries or probiotics. The prophylaxis of catheter-associated UTI or asymptomatic bacteriuria should employ strategies which result in a reduction of frequency and duration of catheter drainage of the urinary tract. The currently available catheter materials have only little influence on reducing catheter-associated rUTI.

  5. An intrepreneurial innovative role: integration of the clinical nurse specialist and infection prevention professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintar, Paula A

    2013-01-01

    Hospital quality and financial sustainability rely on reducing healthcare-associated events/infections, length of stay, and readmissions. This project focused on designing an integrated role for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and the infection prevention professional (IPP) to proactively manage the delivery of evidence-based practice to high-risk surgical patients. The healthcare industry is in the midst of a paradigm shift driven by changing health policy focusing on quality indicators, patient satisfaction, and lowering costs. Coupled with these indicators is the expectation and responsibility to provide evidence-based practice at all levels of the healthcare continuum. This paradigm shift places healthcare facilities in a very competitive atmosphere as they rally for the revenue of a fixed payer mix. A literature search using CINHAL, PubMed, and the CNS national listserve databases was completed to identify if there was any previously written information available on an integrated role of the CNS/IPP. An online business plan template was used to communicate the significance, implications, and return on organizational investment to practice with establishing this role. Chronic health conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure, and colonization with multidrug-resistant organisms can place patients at an increased risk for developing a surgical site infection or complications. The CNS/IPP will proactively manage these risk factors, including the patient and family in a preventive care model to manage the acute inpatient high-risk surgical patient. Care management will include coordinated, collaborative, and consultative follow-up by the CNS/IPP in the acute care, long-term care facilities, and home settings. The infection prevention skill set brings a level of clinical expertise that makes a unique CNS. The IPP is immersed in using epidemiological principles that examine the impact of comorbidities and the added risk that can

  6. Bezlotoxumab: A Review in Preventing Clostridium difficile Infection Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeks, Emma D

    2017-10-01

    Bezlotoxumab (Zinplava™) is a fully human monoclonal antibody against Clostridium difficile toxin B indicated for the prevention of C. difficile infection (CDI) recurrence in patients with a high recurrence risk. It is the first agent approved for recurrence prevention and is administered as a single intravenous infusion in conjunction with standard-of-care (SoC) antibacterial treatment for CDI. In well-designed, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trials (MODIFY 1 and 2), a single infusion of bezlotoxumab, given in combination with SoC antibacterial therapy for CDI in adults, was effective in reducing CDI recurrence in the 12 weeks post-treatment, with this benefit being seen mainly in the patients at high recurrence risk. Bezlotoxumab did not impact the efficacy of the antibacterials being used to treat the CDI and, consistent with its benefits on CDI recurrence, appeared to reduce the need for subsequent antibacterials, thus minimizing further gut microbiota disruption. Longer term, there were no further CDI recurrences over 12 months' follow-up among patients who had received bezlotoxumab in MODIFY 2 and entered an extension substudy. Bezlotoxumab has low immunogenicity and is generally well tolerated, although the potential for heart failure in some patients requires consideration; cost-effectiveness data for bezlotoxumab are awaited with interest. Thus, a single intravenous infusion of bezlotoxumab during SoC antibacterial treatment for CDI is an emerging option for reducing CDI recurrence in adults at high risk of recurrence.

  7. CAPABILITY OF PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTION PREVENTION IN GIRLS AND WOMEN OF VARIOUS AGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.Ch. Shakhtakhtinskaya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article looks at one of the critical issues in modern medicine — human papilloma virus infection. The prevalence of this infection in the world and the possibility of primary prevention in females of various age groups are highlighted in details. It provides the results of vaccine prevention against the human papilloma virus in Russian in girls and women aged 9 to 26 years.Key words: papilloma virus infection, cervical cancer, women, girls, vaccinal prevention.

  8. [Evaluation of practices for the prevention and control of bloodstream infections in a government hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim, Jaquelline Maria; Lacerda, Rúbia Aparecida; Soares, Naury de Jesus Danzi; Nunes, Bruna Kosar

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to observe clinical procedures in order to evaluate the practices used for the control and prevention of bloodstream infections associated with short-term central venous catheters (BSI-ACVC). The study data came from 5877 assessments distributed among selected practices. The results revealed the following adherence rates among the practices selected: 91.6% for recording the indication and permanence time of the CVC, 51.5% for adhering to the care and maintenance of the dressing at the CVC insertion site and its devices, 10.7% for hand hygiene practices while performing procedures related to the CVC, and 0.0% for the practices related to the insertion of the central venous catheter (CVC). The results demonstrate the need for further elaboration of strategies that ensure sustainable compliance practices for prevention and control BSI-ACVC in the institution being assessed.

  9. Cross-site scripting attacks procedure and Prevention Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xijun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cross-site scripting attacks and defense has been the site of attack and defense is an important issue, this paper, the definition of cross-site scripting attacks, according to the current understanding of the chaos on the cross-site scripting, analyzes the causes and harm cross-site scripting attacks formation of attacks XXS complete process XSS attacks made a comprehensive analysis, and then for the web program includes Mobility there are cross-site scripting filter laxity given from ordinary users browse the web and web application developers two the defense cross-site scripting attacks effective strategy.

  10. Multicenter Study of Pin Site Infections and Skin Complications Following Pinning of Pediatric Supracondylar Humerus Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Kristen; Frick, Steven; Kiebzak, Gary

    2016-12-03

    Pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures are the most common elbow fractures in pediatric patients. Surgical fixation using pins is the primary treatment for displaced fractures. Pin site infections may follow supracondylar humerus fracture fixation; the previously reported incidence rate in the literature is 2.34%, but there is significant variability in reported incidence rates of pin site infection. This study aims to define the incidence rate and determine pre-, peri-, and postoperative factors that may contribute to pin site infection following operative reduction, pinning, and casting. A retrospective chart analysis was performed over a one-year period on patients that developed pin site infection. A cast care form was added to Nemours' electronic medical records (EMR) system (Epic Systems Corp., Verona, WI) to identify pin site infections for retrospective review. The cast care form noted any inflamed or infected pins. Patients with inflamed or infected pin sites underwent a detailed chart review. Preoperative antibiotic use, number and size of pins used, method of postoperative immobilization, pin dressings, whether postoperative immobilization was changed prior to pin removal, and length of time pins were in place was recorded. A total of 369 patients underwent operative reduction, pinning, and casting. Three patients developed a pin site infection. The pin site infection incidence rate was 3/369=0.81%. Descriptive statistics were reported for the three patients that developed pin site infections and three patients that developed pin site complications. Pin site infection development is low. Factors that may contribute to the development of pin site infection include preoperative antibiotic use, length of time pins are left in, and changing the cast prior to pin removal.

  11. Executive summary: Prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections and other coinfections in HIV-infected patients: May 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren, José Antonio; Rubio, Rafael; Aguirrebengoa, Koldo; Arribas, Jose Ramón; Baraia-Etxaburu, Josu; Gutiérrez, Félix; Lopez Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Losa, Juan Emilio; Miró, José Ma; Moreno, Santiago; Pérez Molina, José; Podzamczer, Daniel; Pulido, Federico; Riera, Melchor; Rivero, Antonio; Sanz Moreno, José; Amador, Concha; Antela, Antonio; Arazo, Piedad; Arrizabalaga, Julio; Bachiller, Pablo; Barros, Carlos; Berenguer, Juan; Caylá, Joan; Domingo, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; Knobel, Hernando; Locutura, Jaime; López Aldeguer, José; Llibre, Josep Ma; Lozano, Fernando; Mallolas, Josep; Malmierca, Eduardo; Miralles, Celia; Miralles, Pilar; Muñoz, Agustín; Ocampo, Agustín; Olalla, Julián; Pérez, Inés; Pérez Elías, Ma Jesús; Pérez Arellano, José Luis; Portilla, Joaquín; Ribera, Esteban; Rodríguez, Francisco; Santín, Miguel; Sanz Sanz, Jesús; Téllez, Ma Jesús; Torralba, Miguel; Valencia, Eulalia; Von Wichmann, Miguel Angel

    2016-10-01

    Opportunistic infections continue to be a cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. They often arise because of severe immunosuppression resulting from poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy, failure of antiretroviral therapy, or unawareness of HIV infection by patients whose first clinical manifestation of AIDS is an opportunistic infection. The present article is an executive summary of the document that updates the previous recommendations on the prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections in HIV-infected patients, namely, infections by parasites, fungi, viruses, mycobacteria, and bacteria, as well as imported infections. The article also addresses immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This document is intended for all professionals who work in clinical practice in the field of HIV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. Risk factors for acute surgical site infections after lumbar surgery: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Qi; Song, Quanwei; Guo, Runsheng; Bi, Haidi; Liu, Xuqiang; Yu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Jianghao; Dai, Min; Zhang, Bin

    2017-07-19

    Currently, many scholars are concerned about the treatment of postoperative infection; however, few have completed multivariate analyses to determine factors that contribute to the risk of infection. Therefore, we conducted a multivariate analysis of a retrospectively collected database to analyze the risk factors for acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery, including fracture fixation, lumbar fusion, and minimally invasive lumbar surgery. We retrospectively reviewed data from patients who underwent lumbar surgery between 2014 and 2016, including lumbar fusion, internal fracture fixation, and minimally invasive surgery in our hospital's spinal surgery unit. Patient demographics, procedures, and wound infection rates were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and risk factors were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. Twenty-six patients (2.81%) experienced acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery in our study. The patients' mean body mass index, smoking history, operative time, blood loss, draining time, and drainage volume in the acute surgical site infection group were significantly different from those in the non-acute surgical site infection group (p operative type in the acute surgical site infection group were significantly different than those in the non-acute surgical site infection group (p operative type, operative time, blood loss, and drainage time were independent predictors of acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery. In order to reduce the risk of infection following lumbar surgery, patients should be evaluated for the risk factors noted above.

  13. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections: A Comprehensive Review and a Plastic Surgeon's Approach to the Occult Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Cedric; Rosenfield, Lorne; Silverstein, Elena; Petrou-Zeniou, Panayiota

    2016-08-01

    Up to 20 percent of the general population is persistently colonized with Staphylococcus aureus, and 1 to 3 percent of the population is colonized with community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Currently, the knowledge of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage sites other than the nose, and their effect on surgical site infections in cosmetic surgery, is lacking. A comprehensive literature review using the PubMed database to analyze prevalence, anatomical carrier sites, current screening and decontamination protocols and guidelines, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus in cosmetic surgery was performed. The senior author's (L.R.) methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection experience and prevention protocols were also reviewed. Nasal swabs detect only 50.5 percent of methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization, and broad screening has noted the presence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in the ear canal and umbilicus. Decolonization protocols within the orthopedic and cardiothoracic surgery literature have reduced rates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus surgical-site infections. There are no decolonization guidelines for plastic surgeons. Since instituting their decolonization protocol, the authors have had no cases of methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection in nearly 1000 cosmetic surgery procedures. There are very limited, if any, Level I or II data regarding methicillin-resistant S. aureus screening and decolonization. As the sequelae of a surgical-site infection can be disastrous, expert opinions recommend that plastic surgeons vigorously address methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization and infection. The authors have developed and recommend a simple decolonization protocol that includes treatment of the umbilicus, ear canal, and nares to limit surgical-site infection and improve surgical outcomes.

  14. Surgical site infection in patients submitted to heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jussara Aparecida Souza do Nascimento; Ferretti-Rebustini, Renata Eloah de Lucena; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2016-08-29

    to analyze the occurrence and predisposing factors for surgical site infection in patients submitted to heart transplantation, evaluating the relationship between cases of infections and the variables related to the patient and the surgical procedure. retrospective cohort study, with review of the medical records of patients older than 18 years submitted to heart transplantation. The correlation between variables was evaluated by using Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test. the sample consisted of 86 patients, predominantly men, with severe systemic disease, submitted to extensive preoperative hospitalizations. Signs of surgical site infection were observed in 9.3% of transplanted patients, with five (62.5%) superficial incisional, two (25%) deep and one (12.5%) case of organ/space infection. There was no statistically significant association between the variables related to the patient and the surgery. there was no association between the studied variables and the cases of surgical site infection, possibly due to the small number of cases of infection observed in the sample investigated. analisar a ocorrência e os fatores predisponentes para infecção de sítio cirúrgico em pacientes submetidos a transplante cardíaco e verificar a relação entre os casos de infecção e as variáveis referentes ao paciente e ao procedimento cirúrgico. estudo de coorte retrospectivo, com exame dos prontuários médicos de pacientes maiores de 18 anos, submetidos a transplante cardíaco. A correlação entre variáveis foi realizada por meio dos testes exato de Fischer e de Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon. a amostra foi constituída por 86 pacientes, predominantemente homens, com doença sistêmica grave, submetidos a internações pré-operatórias extensas. Apresentaram sinais de infecção do sítio cirúrgico 9,3% dos transplantados, sendo cinco (62,5%) incisionais superficiais, duas (25%) profundas e um (12,5%) caso de infecção de órgão/espaço. Não houve associa

  15. Preclinical evaluation of multi antigenic HCV DNA vaccine for the prevention of Hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyojin; Jeong, Moonsup; Oh, Jooyeon; Cho, Youngran; Shen, Xuefei; Stone, John; Yan, Jian; Rothkopf, Zachary; Khan, Amir S; Cho, Byung Mun; Park, Young K; Weiner, David B; Son, Woo-Chan; Maslow, Joel N

    2017-03-07

    Direct-acting antiviral treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is costly and does not protect from re-infection. For human and chimpanzees, recovery from acute HCV infection correlates with host CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. DNA plasmids targeting the HCV non-structural antigens NS3, NS4, and NS5, were previously reported to induce robust and sustained T cell responses in mice and primates. These plasmids were combined with a plasmid encoding cytokine IL-28B, together named as VGX-6150. The dose-dependent T cell response and safety of VGX-6150 administered intramuscularly and followed by electroporation was assessed in mice. Immune responses plateaued at 20 μg/dose with IL-28B demonstrating significant immunoadjuvant activity. Mice administered VGX-6150 at 40, 400, and 800 μg given either as a single injection or as 14 injections given bi-weekly over 26 weeks showed no vaccine related changes in any clinical parameter compared to placebo recipients. There was no evidence of VGX-6150 accumulation at the injection site or in any organ 1 month following the 14 th vaccination. Based on these studies, the approximate lethal dose (ALD) exceeds 800 μg/dose and the NOAEL was 800 μg/dose in mouse. In conclusion, VGX-6150 appears safe and a promising preventive vaccine candidate for HCV infection.

  16. Incidence of and risk factors for surgical site infections in women undergoing hysterectomy for endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomi, Taru; Pasanen, Annukka; Leminen, Arto; Bützow, Ralf; Loukovaara, Mikko

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of, and risk factors for, surgical site infections in a contemporary cohort of women with endometrial carcinoma. We retrospectively studied 1164 women treated for endometrial carcinoma by hysterectomy at a single institution in 2007-2013. In all, 912 women (78.4%) had minimally invasive hysterectomy. Data on surgical site infections were collected from medical records. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify risk factors for incisional and organ/space infections. Ninety-four women (8.1%) were diagnosed with a surgical site infection. Twenty women (1.7%) had an incisional infection and 74 (6.4%) had an organ/space infection. The associations of 17 clinico-pathologic and surgical variables were tested by univariate analyses. Those variables that were identified as potential risk factors in univariate analyses (p infections as dependent variables. Obesity (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), diabetes, and long operative time (>80th centile) were independently associated with a higher risk of incisional infection, whereas minimally invasive surgery was associated with a smaller risk. Smoking, conversion to laparotomy, and lymphadenectomy were associated with a higher risk of organ/space infection. Organ/space infections comprised the majority of surgical site infections. Risk factors for incisional and organ/space infections differed. Minimally invasive hysterectomy was associated with a smaller risk of incisional infections but not of organ/space infections. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  17. Toward the rational use of standardized infection ratios to benchmark surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Haruhisa; Morikane, Keita; Kuroki, Manabu; Taniguchi, Shinichiro; Shinzato, Takashi; Sakamoto, Fumie; Okada, Kunihiko; Matsukawa, Hiroshi; Ieiri, Yuko; Hayashi, Kouji; Kawai, Shin

    2013-09-01

    The National Healthcare Safety Network transitioned from surgical site infection (SSI) rates to the standardized infection ratio (SIR) calculated by statistical models that included perioperative factors (surgical approach and surgery duration). Rationally, however, only patient-related variables should be included in the SIR model. Logistic regression was performed to predict expected SSI rate in 2 models that included or excluded perioperative factors. Observed and expected SSI rates were used to calculate the SIR for each participating hospital. The difference of SIR in each model was then evaluated. Surveillance data were collected from a total of 1,530 colon surgery patients and 185 SSIs. C-index in the model with perioperative factors was statistically greater than that in the model including patient-related factors only (0.701 vs 0.621, respectively, P operative process or the competence of surgical teams, these factors should not be considered predictive variables. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Quality Improvement Approach to Reducing the Caesarean section Surgical Site Infection Rate in a Regional Hospital

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’ Hanlon, M

    2016-09-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) rates are used extensively by hospitals as a basis for quality improvement. A 30-day post-discharge SSI programme for Caesarean section operations has been implemented in Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital since 2011. It has been shown that skin antisepsis and antibiotic prophylaxis are key factors in the prevention of SSI. Using quality improvement methodology, an infection prevention bundle was introduced to address these two factors. Skin antisepsis was changed from povidone-iodine to chlorhexidine-alcohol. Compliance with choice of antibiotic prophylaxis increased from 89.6% in 2014 to 98.5% in 2015. Compliance with timing also improved. The SSI rate of 7.5% was the lowest recorded to date, with the majority of SSIs (64%) diagnosed after hospital discharge. The level of variation was also reduced. However, the continued presence of variation and possibility of lower infection rates from the literature imply that further improvements are required.

  19. Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections in Dermatological Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Current literature on risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI in dermatological surgery in the absence of antibiotic prophylaxis is limited. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate patients presenting for dermatological surgery. A total of 1,977 procedures were reviewed. SSI was clinically suspected in 79 (4.0% patients and confirmed by culture in 38 (1.9%. Using the strictest definition of SSI (clinical symptoms with positive culture significantly higher risk of SSI was found for location on the ear (odds ratio (OR 6.03, 95% confidence interval (95% CI 2.12–17.15, larger defects (OR 1.08 per cm2 increase, 95% CI 1.03–1.14, closure with flaps (OR 6.35, 95% CI 1.33–30.28 and secondary intention (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.11–8.13. These characteristics were also associated with higher risk of clinically suspected SSI regardless of culture results with slightly lower ORs. In conclusion, the risk of acquiring a SSI is increased in surgeries performed on the ear, in larger wounds and in defects closed with flaps or healed by secondary intention.

  20. Operative Duration and Risk of Surgical Site Infection in Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Coy, Shannon; Simmons, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    The association of surgical duration with the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has not been quantified in neurosurgery. We investigated the association of operative duration in neurosurgical procedures with the incidence of SSI. We performed a retrospective cohort study involving patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures from 2005 to 2012 and were registered in the American College of Surgeons National Quality Improvement Project registry. To control for confounding, we used multivariable regression models and propensity score conditioning. During the study period there were 94,744 patients who underwent a neurosurgical procedure and met the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 4.1% developed a postoperative SSI within 30 days. Multivariable logistic regression showed an association between longer operative duration with higher incidence of SSI (odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.20). Compared with procedures of moderate duration (third quintile, 40th-60th percentile), patients undergoing the longest procedures (>80th percentile) had higher odds (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.86-2.31) of developing SSI. The shortest procedures (operative duration was associated with increased incidence of SSI for neurosurgical procedures. These results can be used by neurosurgeons to inform operative management and to stratify patients with regard to SSI risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Patients at High-Risk for Surgical Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueck, Krislynn M; Kao, Lillian S

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a significant healthcare quality issue, resulting in increased morbidity, disability, length of stay, resource utilization, and costs. Identification of high-risk patients may improve pre-operative counseling, inform resource utilization, and allow modifications in peri-operative management to optimize outcomes. Review of the pertinent English-language literature. High-risk surgical patients may be identified on the basis of individual risk factors or combinations of factors. In particular, statistical models and risk calculators may be useful in predicting infectious risks, both in general and for SSIs. These models differ in the number of variables; inclusion of pre-operative, intra-operative, or post-operative variables; ease of calculation; and specificity for particular procedures. Furthermore, the models differ in their accuracy in stratifying risk. Biomarkers may be a promising way to identify patients at high risk of infectious complications. Although multiple strategies exist for identifying surgical patients at high risk for SSIs, no one strategy is superior for all patients. Further efforts are necessary to determine if risk stratification in combination with risk modification can reduce SSIs in these patient populations.

  2. Probiotics for preventing acute upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qiukui; Dong, Bi Rong; Wu, Taixiang

    2015-02-03

    Probiotics may improve a person's health by regulating their immune function. Some trials have shown that probiotic strains can prevent respiratory infections. Even though the previous version of our review showed benefits of probiotics for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), several new studies have been published. To assess the effectiveness and safety of probiotics (any specified strain or dose), compared with placebo, in the prevention of acute URTIs in people of all ages, at risk of acute URTIs. We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1950 to July week 3, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to July 2014), Web of Science (1900 to July 2014), the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, which includes the China Biological Medicine Database (from 1978 to July 2014), the Chinese Medicine Popular Science Literature Database (from 2000 to July 2014) and the Masters Degree Dissertation of Beijing Union Medical College Database (from 1981 to July 2014). We also searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov for completed and ongoing trials on 31 July 2014. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing probiotics with placebo to prevent acute URTIs. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility and quality of trials, and extracted data using the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 13 RCTs, although we could only extract data to meta-analyse 12 trials, which involved 3720 participants including children, adults (aged around 40 years) and older people. We found that probiotics were better than placebo when measuring the number of participants experiencing episodes of acute URTI (at least one episode: odds ratio (OR) 0.53; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37 to 0.76, P value school absence (OR 0.10; 95% CI 0.02 to 0.47, very low quality evidence). Probiotics and placebo were similar when measuring the rate ratio of episodes of acute

  3. The Surgical Site Infection Risk Score (SSIRS: A Model to Predict the Risk of Surgical Site Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl van Walraven

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections (SSI are an important cause of peri-surgical morbidity with risks that vary extensively between patients and surgeries. Quantifying SSI risk would help identify candidates most likely to benefit from interventions to decrease the risk of SSI.We randomly divided all surgeries recorded in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program from 2010 into a derivation and validation population. We used multivariate logistic regression to determine the independent association of patient and surgical covariates with the risk of any SSI (including superficial, deep, and organ space SSI within 30 days of surgery. To capture factors particular to specific surgeries, we developed a surgical risk score specific to all surgeries having a common first 3 numbers of their CPT code.Derivation (n = 181 894 and validation (n = 181 146 patients were similar for all demographics, past medical history, and surgical factors. Overall SSI risk was 3.9%. The SSI Risk Score (SSIRS found that risk increased with patient factors (smoking, increased body mass index, certain comorbidities (peripheral vascular disease, metastatic cancer, chronic steroid use, recent sepsis, and operative characteristics (surgical urgency; increased ASA class; longer operation duration; infected wounds; general anaesthesia; performance of more than one procedure; and CPT score. In the validation population, the SSIRS had good discrimination (c-statistic 0.800, 95% CI 0.795-0.805 and calibration.SSIRS can be calculated using patient and surgery information to estimate individual risk of SSI for a broad range of surgery types.

  4. Post-Caesarean Section Surgical Site Infection Surveillance Using an Online Database and Mobile Phone Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Eliana; McIsaac, Corrine; MacDougall, Bhreagh; Wilson, Douglas; Kohr, Rosemary

    2017-08-01

    Obstetric surgical site infections (SSIs) are common and expensive to the health care system but remain under reported given shorter postoperative hospital stays and suboptimal post-discharge surveillance systems. SSIs, for the purpose of this paper, are defined according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (1999) as infection incurring within 30 days of the operative procedure (in this case, Caesarean section [CS]). Demonstrate the feasibility of real-life use of a patient driven SSIs post-discharge surveillance system consisting of an online database and mobile phone technology (surgical mobile app - how2trak) among women undergoing CS in a Canadian urban centre. Estimate the rate of SSIs and associated predisposing factors. Prospective cohort of consecutive women delivering by CS at one urban Canadian hospital. Using surgical mobile app-how2trak-predetermined demographics, comorbidities, procedure characteristics, and self-reported symptoms and signs of infection were collected and linked to patients' incision self-portraits (photos) on postpartum days 3, 7, 10, and 30. A total of 105 patients were enrolled over a 5-month period. Mean age was 31 years, 13% were diabetic, and most were at low risk of surgical complications. Forty-six percent of surgeries were emergency CSs, and 104/105 received antibiotic prophylaxis. Forty-five percent of patients (47/105) submitted at least one photo, and among those, one surgical site infection was detected by photo appearance and self-reported symptoms by postpartum day 10. The majority of patients whom uploaded photos did so multiple times and 43% of them submitted photos up to day 30. Patients with either a diagnosis of diabetes or self-reported Asian ethnicity were less likely to submit photos. Post-discharge surveillance for CS-related SSIs using surgical mobile app how2trak is feasible and deserves further study in the post-discharge setting. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Port-site infections by nontuberculous mycobacterium: A retrospective clinico-microbiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roumi Ghosh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Port-site infection (PSI is a prevailing, chronic, nagging, treatment refractory complication of laparoscopic surgery (LS. It neutralizes the advantages of minimally invasive surgery and increases morbidity, treatment cost of patient, leading to loss of confidence on operating surgeon. PSIs are preventable with appropriate preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative measures. Atypical mycobacterium is most commonly associated with nonhealing postlaparoscopic wound infections, causing outbreaks or sporadic cases worldwide. Purpose: We retrospectively studied the occurrence of nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM from PSIs following LS that did not respond to antibiotics used for pyogenic infections and having sterile routine aerobic cultures and their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern to guide proper management. Methods: The study was done in a tertiary care hospital of Eastern India over a 1-year period which included PSI cases with delayed onset not responding to antibiotics, following different types of LS. Pus/discharge from 32 patients was collected and examined for isolation and identification of the causative agents. Gram stain and Ziehl–Neelsen staining methods were used for direct examination. Culture media included blood agar, Robertson's cooked meat broth, MacConkey agar, and Lowenstein–Jensen medium. Isolates from the cases were identified using biochemical tests or molecular methods and studied the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern by the standard microbiologic procedures. Results: Mycobacterium abscessus (13 and Mycobacterium fortuitum (2 were isolated from 15 serosanguinous drainage obtained from 32 cases by routine microbiological techniques. All isolates analyzed for antimicrobial susceptibility pattern were highly sensitive to clarithromycin (93.3%, amikacin (93.3%, and imipenem (80% but were variable to ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and linezolid. Conclusions: Our present study shows frequent association of

  6. [Risk of nosocomial infection in Intertropical Africa. Part 4: prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebaudet, S; De Pina, J J; Rapp, C; Kraemer, P; Savini, H; Demortiere, E; Simon, F

    2008-02-01

    Nosocomial infections have long been neglected in Sub-Saharan Africa, even though their prevalence is higher than in developed countries. Recently, however, this major public health problem has been the focus of a growing number of recommendations not only from the World Health Organization but also from some national health ministries. Because of the numerous limitations especially in financial resources in these regions, priority must be given to the implementation of simple and cost-effective measures. Accordingly the greatest efforts must be devoted to educating healthcare workers and patients about the importance of handwashing, eliminating unnecessary injections and transfusions, performing the latter acts in aseptic conditions, isolating patients with communicable diseases, handling waste products safely, and using antimicrobials properly. Amid the daunting health issues facing Sub-Saharan Africa, implementing these inexpensive measures that could save the lives of thousands of patients and healthcare workers appears easy. However it will require a cultural revolution. The keys to success will be changing the organizational culture, developing a commitment to prevention and evaluating performance regularly.

  7. Prevention of primary vascular graft infection with silver-coated polyester graft in a porcine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, H; Sandermann, J; Prag, J

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a silver-coated vascular polyester graft in the prevention of graft infection after inoculation with Staphylococcus aureus in a porcine model.......To evaluate the efficacy of a silver-coated vascular polyester graft in the prevention of graft infection after inoculation with Staphylococcus aureus in a porcine model....

  8. The role of education in the prevention and control of infection: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Deborah J

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a literature review which was undertaken prior to a research study about student nurses' and midwives' experiences of learning infection control in clinical practice. Its aim is to identify the role of education in the prevention and control of infection, with a specific focus on compliance with infection control precautions and reduction in infection rates. It also identifies the methods used for teaching infection control. The review concludes that there is no rigorous and convincing evidence that education improves compliance with infection control precautions or reduces rates of infection, particularly in the long-term. Areas for future research are identified. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. New approaches to infection prevention and control: implementing a risk-based model regionally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wale, Martin; Kibsey, Pamela; Young, Lisa; Dobbyn, Beverly; Archer, Jana

    2016-06-01

    Infectious disease outbreaks result in substantial inconvenience to patients and disruption of clinical activity. Between 1 April 2008 and 31 March 2009, the Vancouver Island Health Authority (Island Health) declared 16 outbreaks of Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci and Clostridium difficile in acute care facilities. As a result, infection prevention and control became one of Island Health's highest priorities. Quality improvement methodology, which promotes a culture of co-production between front-line staff, physicians and Infection Control Practitioners, was used to develop and test a bundle of changes in practices. A series of rapid Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles, specific to decreasing hospital-acquired infections, were undertaken by a community hospital, selected for its size, clinical specialty representation, and enthusiasm amongst staff and physicians for innovation and change. Positive results were incorporated into practice at the test site, and then introduced throughout the rest of the Health Authority. The changes implemented as a result of this study have enabled better control of antibiotic resistant organisms and have minimized disruption to routine activity, as well as saving an estimated $6.5 million per annum. When outbreaks do occur, they are now controlled much more promptly, even in existing older facilities. Through this process, we have changed our approach in Infection Prevention and Control (IPAC) from a rules-based approach to one that is risk-based, focusing attention on identifying and managing high-risk situations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  10. [Infection prevention in Dutch hospitals; results say more than process indicators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonten, Marc J M; Friedrich, Alexander; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Voss, Andreas; Vos, Margreet C

    2014-01-01

    The Dutch Health Care Inspectorate investigated the preparedness of Dutch hospitals for the emergence of antibiotic resistance, and concluded that hospitals are not well prepared and are insufficiently aware that infection prevention is a prerequisite for patient safety. These conclusions are based on observations of process indicators of current practice guidelines, without including the available outcome indicators that demonstrate the persistently low incidence of infections with antibiotic resistant bacteria in Dutch hospitals. The conclusions may have negative effects on the quality of infection prevention in Dutch hospitals. Therefore, it is advisable to use outcome indicators rather than process indicators to evaluate the quality of infection prevention.

  11. Truth in Reporting: How Data Capture Methods Obfuscate Actual Surgical Site Infection Rates within a Health Care Network System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeianou, Liliana; Cauley, Christy E; Antonelli, Donna; Bird, Sarah; Rattner, David; Hutter, Matthew; Mahmood, Sadiqa; Schnipper, Deborah; Rubin, Marc; Bleday, Ronald; Kenney, Pardon; Berger, David

    2017-01-01

    Two systems measure surgical site infection rates following colorectal surgeries: the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services pay-for-performance initiatives use National Healthcare Safety Network data for hospital comparisons. This study aimed to compare database concordance. This is a multi-institution cohort study of systemwide Colorectal Surgery Collaborative. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program requires rigorous, standardized data capture techniques; National Healthcare Safety Network allows 5 data capture techniques. Standardized surgical site infection rates were compared between databases. The Cohen κ-coefficient was calculated. This study was conducted at Boston-area hospitals. National Healthcare Safety Network or National Surgical Quality Improvement Program patients undergoing colorectal surgery were included. Standardized surgical site infection rates were the primary outcomes of interest. Thirty-day surgical site infection rates of 3547 (National Surgical Quality Improvement Program) vs 5179 (National Healthcare Safety Network) colorectal procedures (2012-2014). Discrepancies appeared: National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database of hospital 1 (N = 1480 patients) routinely found surgical site infection rates of approximately 10%, routinely deemed rate "exemplary" or "as expected" (100%). National Healthcare Safety Network data from the same hospital and time period (N = 1881) revealed a similar overall surgical site infection rate (10%), but standardized rates were deemed "worse than national average" 80% of the time. Overall, hospitals using less rigorous capture methods had improved surgical site infection rates for National Healthcare Safety Network compared with standardized National Surgical Quality Improvement Program reports. The correlation coefficient

  12. Prevention of urogenital infections by oral administration of probiotic lactobacilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedran Slačanac

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In general, lactobacilli are nonpathogenic part of the normal urogenital microflora and have been recognized as a barrier against colonization of unwanted (pathogen microflora. The results of many in vitro studies suggest following mechanisms of probiotic lactobacilli action in urogenital tract: adhesion to urogenital cells, competition with pathogens for adhesive sites, production of biosurfactants, co-aggregation with pathogens, production of antimicrobial substances (organic acids, hydrogen peroxide and bacteriocins and stimulation of immune system. From 80 different lactobacilli species isolated from human or animal intestinal and urogenital tract, only few lactobacilli strains possess optimal properties to be effective as probiotic therapeutics against infections in the urogenital tract. Combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus fermentum RC-14 was proposed as the best one for epithelial vaginal cells colonization and inhibition of uropathogens adhesion. The results of a number of clinical studies confirmed beneficial role of oral lactobacilli. However, the most of commercially available Lactobacillus strains, which are ordinary used in fermented dairy products,are seriously limited in protection of urogenital tract when they are ingested orally.

  13. Surgical site infections in women and their association with clinical conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Zélia de Araújo Madeira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Surgical site infections (SSIs can affect body tissues, cavities, or organs manipulated in surgery and constitute 14% to 16% of all infections. This study aimed to determine the incidence of SSIs in women following their discharge from a gynecology outpatient clinic, to survey different types of SSIs among women, and to verify the association of SSIs with comorbidities and clinical conditions. Methods Data were collected via analytical observation with a cross-sectional design, and the study was conducted in 1,026 women who underwent gynecological surgery in a teaching hospital in the municipality of Teresina, in the northeast Brazilian State of Piauí, from June 2011 to March 2013. Results The incidence of SSIs after discharge was 5.8% among the women in the outpatient clinic. The most prevalent surgery among the patients was hysterectomy, while the most prevalent type of SSI was superficial incisional. Comorbidities in women with SSIs included cancer, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Conclusions Surveillance of SSIs during the post-discharge period is critical for infection prevention and control. It is worth reflecting on the planning of surgical procedures for patients who have risk factors for the development of SSIs.

  14. Infection prevention in the surgical intensive care unit using selective decontamination : epidemiology, bacteriology and clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.W.M. Tetteroo (Geert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn Part A the extent of the problems in infection-prevention is described in Chapter 1 and nosocomial infections are defined in Chapter 2, in which also the difficulties of infection diagnosis in critically ill patients are reviewed. Chapter 3 describes the history of antibiotic

  15. PAPILLOMA VIRAL INFECTION AMONG BOYS AND YOUNG MEN PRIMARY PREVENTION

    OpenAIRE

    M.G. Galitskaya; M.I. Ivardava

    2009-01-01

    Young sexually active men may have anogenital HPV related infection, which can cause the genital penis verruca, penis cancer, perianal and anal cancer. Besides, men's HPV infection may cause an infection and subsequent diseases of cervix of the uterus and other organs among women. The available opportunity to inoculate boys and young men against HPV infection provides for 100% guaranteed protection from severe diseases not only for boys and young men but also for girls and women, who men may ...

  16. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed.......Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....

  17. Postoperative Surgical Site Infections: Understanding the Discordance Between Surveillance Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Mucheru, Mariam N; Seville, Maria T; Miller, Vickie; Sampathkumar, Priya; Etzioni, David A

    2018-04-18

    To characterize agreement in the ascertainment of surgical site infections (SSIs) between the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP), National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN), and administrative data. The NSQIP, NHSN, and administrative data are the primary systems used to monitor and report SSIs for the purpose of quality control and benchmarking of hospitals and surgeons. These systems have different methods for identifying SSIs. We queried the NHSN, NSQIP, and administrative data systems for patients who had an operation at 1 of 4 hospitals within a single health system between January 2013 and September 2015. The detection of an SSI during a postoperative hospitalization was the outcome of analysis. Any SSI detected by one (or more) of these systems was analyzed by 2 reviewers to determine the presence of discrete elements of documentation constituting evidence of SSI. Concordance between the 3 systems (NHSN, NSQIP, and administrative data) was analyzed using Cohen's kappa. After application of appropriate exclusion criteria, a cohort of 9447 inpatient operations was analyzed. In total, 130 SSIs were detected by 1 or more of the 3 systems, with reported SSI rates of 0.5% (NHSN), 0.7% (administrative data), and 1.0% (NSQIP). Of these 130 SSIs, only 17 SSIs were reported by all 3 systems. The concordance between these 3 systems was moderate (kappa values NSQIP-NHSN = 0.50 [0.40-0.60], administrative-NHSN = 0.36 [0.24-0.47], and administrative-NSQIP = 0.47 [0.38-0.57]). Chart review found that reasons for discordance were related to issues of different criteria as well as inaccuracies. There is significant discordance in the determination of SSIs reported by the NHSN, NSQIP, and administrative data. The differences and limitations of each of these systems have to be recognized, especially when using these data for quality reports and pay for performance.

  18. Korean clinical practice guidelines for preventing the transmission of infections in hemodialysis facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayne Cho Park

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving hemodialysis are vulnerable to infectious diseases due to their impaired immunity and high risk of exposure to pathogens. To protect patients, staff, and visitors from potential infections, each hemodialysis unit should establish and follow standard infection control and prevention measures. Therefore, clinical practice guidelines were developed by a working group of nephrologists and infection control specialists to provide evidence-based guidance for dialysis physicians and nurses, with the aim of preventing infection transmission and controlling infection sources in hemodialysis facilities. The areas of infection control covered by these guidelines include standard precautions, isolation strategies, vascular access, water treatment, cleaning/disinfecting/sterilizing, and vaccination. This special report summarizes the key recommendations from the Korean clinical practice guidelines for preventing the transmission of infections in hemodialysis facilities.

  19. Systems Thinking and Leadership: How Nephrologists Can Transform Dialysis Safety to Prevent Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Leslie P

    2018-04-06

    Infections are the second leading cause of death for patients with ESKD. Despite multiple efforts, nephrologists have been unable to prevent infections in dialysis facilities. The American Society of Nephrology and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have partnered to create Nephrologists Transforming Dialysis Safety to promote nephrologist leadership and engagement in efforts to "Target Zero" preventable dialysis infections. Because traditional approaches to infection control and prevention in dialysis facilities have had limited success, Nephrologists Transforming Dialysis Safety is reconceptualizing the problem in the context of the complexity of health care systems and organizational behavior. By identifying different parts of a problem and attempting to understand how these parts interact and produce a result, systems thinking has effectively tackled difficult problems in dynamic settings. The dialysis facility is composed of different physical and human elements that are interconnected and affect not only behavior but also, the existence of a culture of safety that promotes infection prevention. Because dialysis infections result from a complex system of interactions between caregivers, patients, dialysis organizations, and the environment, attempts to address infections by focusing on one element in isolation often fail. Creating a sense of urgency and commitment to eradicating dialysis infections requires leadership and motivational skills. These skills are not taught in the standard nephrology or medical director curriculum. Effective leadership by medical directors and engagement in infection prevention by nephrologists are required to create a culture of safety. It is imperative that nephrologists commit to leadership training and embrace their potential as change agents to prevent infections in dialysis facilities. This paper explores the systemic factors contributing to the ongoing dialysis infection crisis in the United States and the role

  20. Quality improvement collaborative: A novel approach to improve infection prevention and control. Perceptions of lead infection prevention nurses who participated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Debra; Hine, Victoria; Bucior, Helen; Foster, Wendy; Mukombe, Nyarayi; Ryan, Jane; Smirthwaite, Sandra; Winfield, Jodie

    2018-03-01

    In response to the ongoing infection prevention (IP) challenges in England, a 90-day quality improvement (QI) collaborative programme was developed. The paper discusses the approach, benefits, challenges and evaluation of the programme. The objective of the collaborative was to develop new approaches to enable sustainable and effective IP. Six trusts in the region participated in the collaborative. Each defined their bespoke IP focus. There was no expectation that statistically significant measurable improvements would be identified during the short time frame. The experiences of the participants were sought both during the programme to facilitate its constant review and at the end of the programme to evaluate its effectiveness. The feedback focused on achievements, barriers to change and benefits of participating in a QI collaborative. To measure the potential success of the projects, participants completed the Model for Understanding Success in Quality framework. (MUSIQ; Kaplan et al., 2012). Since each trusts IP focus was bespoke commonalities of success were not evaluated. Participants identified a positive outcome from their QI interventions. The MUSIQ score identified the projects had the potential for success. The feedback from the participants demonstrated that it is worthy of further development.

  1. State focus on health care-associated infection prevention in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Catherine C; Herzig, Carolyn T A; Carter, Eileen J; Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Larson, Elaine L; Stone, Patricia W

    2014-04-01

    Despite increased focus on health care-associated infections (HAI), between 1.6 and 3.8 million HAI occur annually among the vulnerable population residing in US nursing homes (NH). This study characterized state department of health (DOH) activities and policies intended to improve quality and reduce HAI in NH. We created a 17-item standardized data collection tool informed by 20 state DOH Web sites, reviewed by experts in the field and piloted by 2 independent reviewers (Cohen's κ .45-.73). The tool and corresponding protocol were used to systematically evaluate state DOH Web sites and related links. Three categories of data were abstracted: (1) consumer-directed information intended to increase accountability of and competition between NH, including mandatory HAI reporting and NH inspection reports; (2) surveyor training for federally-mandated NH inspections; and (3) guidance for NH providers to prevent HAI and monitor incidence. Only 5 states included HAI reporting in NH with differing HAI types and reporting requirements. State DOH information and activities focused on NH quality and reducing HAI were inconsistent. Systematically characterizing state DOH efforts to reduce HAI in NH is important to interpret the effects of these activities. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi: partial prevention of the natural infection of guinea pigs with a killed parasite vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basombrio, M A

    1990-07-01

    Guinea pigs are natural reservoirs of Chagas' disease. Domestic breeding and local trade of these animals are common practices among andean communities in South America. Infection by Trypanosoma cruzi occurs when the animals live in triatomine-infested houses or yards. The preventive effect of a vaccine consisting of cultured T. cruzi killed by freezing and thawing plus saponin was tested both in mice and in the guinea pig ecosystem. Resistance against T. cruzi challenge in mice was improved by increasing the trypomastigote/epimastigote ratio in live attenuated vaccines but not in killed parasite vaccines. Although the killing of attenuated parasites sharply reduced their immunogenicity for mice, a protective effect against natural T. cruzi infection was detected in guinea pigs. A total of 88 guinea pigs were vaccinated in four intradermal sites on three occasions. Eighty controls received similar inoculations of culture medium plus saponin. All animals were kept in a triatomine-infested yard. Parasitemia was studied with the capillary microhematocrit method. After an exposure time averaging 4 months, natural T. cruzi infection occurred in 55% (44/80) of the controls and in 33% (29/88) of the vaccinated group (P less than 0.01). The number of highly parasitemic guinea pigs was also significantly decreased (6/80 vs 0/88, P less than 0.01). Thus, immunizing protocols which are only partially protective against artificial callenge with T. cruzi may nevertheless constrain the exchange of parasites between natural hosts and vectors.

  3. Programs of the preventive interventions against sexually transmitted infections in the high-risk subpopulations

    OpenAIRE

    T. V. Krasnoselskikh; E. V. Sokolovskiy

    2017-01-01

    A review article highlights the practical issues of design, implementation and effectiveness estimation of STI prevention programs aimed to correct the behavior leading to infection. the importance of epidemiological modeling method for the organization of preventive interventions is discussed. the prospects of the multidisciplinary behavioral approach to STI prevention are demonstrated.

  4. Programs of the preventive interventions against sexually transmitted infections in the high-risk subpopulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Krasnoselskikh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A review article highlights the practical issues of design, implementation and effectiveness estimation of STI prevention programs aimed to correct the behavior leading to infection. the importance of epidemiological modeling method for the organization of preventive interventions is discussed. the prospects of the multidisciplinary behavioral approach to STI prevention are demonstrated.

  5. Stratification of surgical site infection by operative factors and comparison of infection rates after hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Margaret A; Nickel, Katelin B; Wallace, Anna E; Mines, Daniel; Fraser, Victoria J; Warren, David K

    2015-03-01

    To investigate whether operative factors are associated with risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after hernia repair. Retrospective cohort study. Patients Commercially insured enrollees aged 6 months-64 years with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure or Current Procedural Terminology, fourth edition, codes for inguinal/femoral, umbilical, and incisional/ventral hernia repair procedures from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2010. SSIs within 90 days after hernia repair were identified by diagnosis codes. The χ2 and Fisher exact tests were used to compare SSI incidence by operative factors. A total of 119,973 hernia repair procedures were analyzed. The incidence of SSI differed significantly by anatomic site, with rates of 0.45% (352/77,666) for inguinal/femoral, 1.16% (288/24,917) for umbilical, and 4.11% (715/17,390) for incisional/ventral hernia repair. Within anatomic sites, the incidence of SSI was significantly higher for open versus laparoscopic inguinal/femoral (0.48% [295/61,142] vs 0.34% [57/16,524], P=.020) and incisional/ventral (4.20% [701/16,699] vs 2.03% [14/691], P=.005) hernia repairs. The rate of SSI was higher following procedures with bowel obstruction/necrosis than procedures without obstruction/necrosis for open inguinal/femoral (0.89% [48/5,422] vs 0.44% [247/55,720], Poperative factors may facilitate accurate comparison of SSI rates between facilities.

  6. Association of Safety Culture with Surgical Site Infection Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Caleb J; Pawlik, Timothy M; Daniels, Tania; Vernon, Nora; Banks, Katie; Westby, Peggy; Wick, Elizabeth C; Sexton, J Bryan; Makary, Martin A

    2016-02-01

    Hospital workplace culture may have an impact on surgical outcomes; however, this association has not been established. We designed a study to evaluate the association between safety culture and surgical site infection (SSI). Using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture and National Healthcare Safety Network definitions, we measured 12 dimensions of safety culture and colon SSI rates, respectively, in the surgical units of Minnesota community hospitals. A Pearson's r correlation was calculated for each of 12 dimensions of surgical unit safety culture and SSI rate and then adjusted for surgical volume and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification. Seven hospitals participated in the study, with a mean survey response rate of 43%. The SSI rates ranged from 0% to 30%, and surgical unit safety culture scores ranged from 16 to 92 on a scale of 0 to 100. Ten dimensions of surgical unit safety culture were associated with colon SSI rates: teamwork across units (r = -0.96; 95% CI [-0.76, -0.99]), organizational learning (r = -0.95; 95% CI [-0.71, -0.99]), feedback and communication about error (r = -0.92; 95% CI [-0.56, -0.99]), overall perceptions of safety (r = -0.90; 95% CI [-0.45, -0.99]), management support for patient safety (r = -0.90; 95% CI [-0.44, -0.98]), teamwork within units (r = -0.88; 95% CI [-0.38, -0.98]), communication openness (r = -0.85; 95% CI [-0.26, -0.98]), supervisor/manager expectations and actions promoting safety (r = -0.85; 95% CI [-0.25, -0.98]), non-punitive response to error (r = -0.78; 95% CI [-0.07, -0.97]), and frequency of events reported (r = -0.76; 95% CI [-0.01, -0.96]). After adjusting for surgical volume and ASA classification, 9 of 12 dimensions of surgical unit safety culture were significantly associated with lower colon SSI rates. These data suggest an important role for positive safety and teamwork culture and engaged hospital management in producing high-quality surgical

  7. Surgical site infections in Italian Hospitals: a prospective multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ippolito Giuseppe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infections (SSI remain a major clinical problem in terms of morbidity, mortality, and hospital costs. Nearly 60% of SSI diagnosis occur in the postdischarge period. However, literature provides little information on risk factors associated to in-hospital and postdischarge SSI occurrence. A national prospective multicenter study was conducted with the aim of assessing the incidence of both in-hospital and postdisharge SSI, and the associated risk factors. Methods In 2002, a one-month, prospective national multicenter surveillance study was conducted in General and Gynecological units of 48 Italian hospitals. Case ascertainment of SSI was carried out using standardized surveillance methodology. To assess potential risk factors for SSI we used a conditional logistic regression model. We also reported the odds ratios of in-hospital and postdischarge SSI. Results SSI occurred in 241 (5.2% of 4,665 patients, of which 148 (61.4% during in-hospital, and 93 (38.6% during postdischarge period. Of 93 postdischarge SSI, sixty-two (66.7% and 31 (33.3% were detected through telephone interview and questionnaire survey, respectively. Higher SSI incidence rates were observed in colon surgery (18.9%, gastric surgery (13.6%, and appendectomy (8.6%. If considering risk factors for SSI, at multivariate analysis we found that emergency interventions, NNIS risk score, pre-operative hospital stay, and use of drains were significantly associated with SSI occurrence. Moreover, risk factors for total SSI were also associated to in-hospital SSI. Additionally, only NNIS, pre-operative hospital stay, use of drains, and antibiotic prophylaxis were associated with postdischarge SSI. Conclusion Our study provided information on risk factors for SSI in a large population in general surgery setting in Italy. Standardized postdischarge surveillance detected 38.6% of all SSI. We also compared risk factors for in-hospital and postdischarge SSI

  8. Positive deviance as a strategy to prevent and control bloodstream infections in intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francimar Tinoco de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To describe the application of positive deviance as a strategy to prevent and control bloodstream infections. METHOD An intervention study with nursing and medical team members working in an intensive care unit in a university hospital, between June and December 2014. The four steps of the positive defiance methodology were applied: to define, to determine, to discover and to design. RESULTS In 90 days, 188 actions were observed, of these, 36.70% (n=69 were related to catheter dressing. In 81.15% (n=56 of these dressings, the professionals most adhered to the use of flexible sterile cotton-tipped swabs to perform antisepsis at catheter entry sites and fixation dressing. CONCLUSION Positive deviance contributed to the implementation of proposals to improve work processes and team development related to problems identified in central venous catheter care.

  9. Causes, prevention and treatment of Escherichia coli infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Dinah

    Escherichia coli is a normal inhabitant of the human gastrointestinal tract and can cause healthcare-associated infections. The organism is most frequently responsible for urinary tract infections and it is the bacterium most often implicated in the cause of diarrhoea in people travelling overseas. In recent years, a strain called Ecoli O157 has gained notoriety for causing foodborne infection, which can have severe health consequences, especially in young children. This article describes the range of different infections caused by Ecoli in healthcare settings and the community and discusses the characteristics of the different strains of the bacteria that explain variations in their pathogenicity.

  10. Recurrences after oral and genital herpes simplex virus infection. Influence of site of infection and viral type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, W E; Coombs, R W; Benedetti, J; Critchlow, C; Corey, L

    1987-06-04

    We prospectively followed 39 adults with concurrent primary herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection (12 with HSV type 1 and 27 with HSV type 2) of the oropharynx and genitalia, caused by the same virus in each person, to evaluate the influence of viral type (HSV-1 vs. HSV-2) and site of infection (oropharyngeal vs. genital) on the frequency of recurrence. The subsequent recurrence patterns of HSV infection differed markedly according to viral type and anatomical site. Oral-labial recurrences developed in 5 of 12 patients with HSV-1 and 1 of 27 patients with HSV-2 (P less than 0.001). Conversely, genital recurrences developed in 24 of 27 patients with HSV-2 and 3 of 12 patients with HSV-1 (P less than 0.01). The mean rate of subsequent genital recurrences (due to HSV-1 and HSV-2) was 0.23 per month, whereas the mean rate of oral-labial recurrences was only 0.04 per month (P less than 0.001). The mean monthly frequencies of recurrence were, in order, genital HSV-2 infections, 0.33 per month; oral-labial HSV-1 infections, 0.12 per month; genital HSV-1 infections, 0.020 per month; and oral HSV-2 infections, 0.001 per month (P less than 0.01 for each comparison). We conclude that the likelihood of reactivation of HSV infection differs between HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections and between the sacral and trigeminal anatomical sites. The sixfold more frequent clinical recurrence rate of genital HSV infections as compared with oral-labial HSV infections may account for the relatively rapid increase in the prevalence of clinically recognized genital herpes in recent years.

  11. Infection control strategies for preventing the transmission of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in nursing homes for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Carmel; Tunney, Michael; Bradley, Marie C

    2013-11-19

    prevalence between intervention and control sites, while mean infection control audit scores were significantly higher in the intervention homes compared with control homes. There is a lack of research evaluating the effects on MRSA transmission of infection prevention and control strategies in nursing homes. Rigorous studies should be conducted in nursing homes, involving residents and staff to test interventions that have been specifically designed for this unique environment.

  12. Infection control strategies for preventing the transmission of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in nursing homes for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Carmel; Smith, Michael; Tunney, Michael; Bradley, Marie C

    2011-12-07

    control audit scores which measured adherence to infection control standards. At the end of the 12 month study, there was no change in MRSA prevalence between intervention and control sites, while mean infection control audit scores were significantly higher in the intervention homes compared with control homes. There is a lack of research evaluating the effects on MRSA transmission of infection prevention and control strategies in nursing homes. Rigorous studies should be conducted in nursing homes, to test interventions that have been specifically designed for this unique environment.

  13. Health care-associated infection prevention in Japan: the role of safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Fumie; Sakihama, Tomoko; Saint, Sanjay; Greene, M Todd; Ratz, David; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2014-08-01

    Limited data exist on the use of infection prevention practices in Japan. We conducted a nationwide survey to examine the use of recommended infection prevention strategies and factors affecting their use in Japanese hospitals. Between April 1, 2012, and January 31, 2013, we surveyed 971 hospitals in Japan. The survey instrument assessed general hospital and infection prevention program characteristics and use of infection prevention practices, including practices specific to preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Logistic regression models were used to examine multivariable associations between hospital characteristics and the use of the various prevention practices. A total of 685 hospitals (71%) responded to the survey. Maintaining aseptic technique during catheter insertion and maintenance, avoiding routine central line changes, and using maximum sterile barrier precautions and semirecumbent positioning were the only practices regularly used by more than one-half of the hospitals to prevent CAUTI, CLABSI, and VAP, respectively. Higher safety-centeredness was associated with regular use of prevention practices across all infection types. Although certain practices were used commonly, the rate of regular use of many evidence-based prevention practices was low in Japanese hospitals. Our findings highlight the importance of fostering an organization-wide atmosphere that prioritizes patient safety. Such a commitment to patient safety should in turn promote the use of effective measures to reduce health care-associated infections in Japan. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Probiotics for preventing urinary tract infections in adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenger, Erin M; Tejani, Aaron M; Loewen, Peter S

    2015-12-23

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common bacterial infection that can lead to significant morbidity including stricture, abscess formation, fistula, bacteraemia, sepsis, pyelonephritis and kidney dysfunction. Mortality rates are reported to be as high as 1% in men and 3% in women due to development of pyelonephritis. Because probiotic therapy is readily available without a prescription, a review of their efficacy in the prevention of UTI may aid consumers in making informed decisions about potential prophylactic therapy. Institutions and caregivers also need evidence-based synopses of current evidence to make informed patient care decisions. Compared to placebo or no therapy, did probiotics (any formulation) provide a therapeutic advantage in terms of morbidity and mortality, when used to prevent UTI in susceptible patient populations?Compared to other prophylactic interventions, including drug and non-drug measures (e.g. continuous antibiotic prophylaxis, topical oestrogen, cranberry juice), did probiotics (any formulation) provide a therapeutic advantage in terms of morbidity and mortality when used to prevent UTIs in susceptible patient populations? We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Specialised Register to 21 September 2015 through contact with the Trials' Search Co-ordinator using search terms relevant to this review. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of susceptible patients (e.g. past history of UTI) or healthy people in which any strain, formulation, dose or frequency of probiotic was compared to placebo or active comparators were included. All RCTs and quasi-RCTs (RCTs in which allocation to treatment was obtained by alternation, use of alternate medical records, date of birth or other predictable methods) looking at comparing probiotics to no therapy, placebo, or other prophylactic interventions were included. Summary estimates of effect were obtained using a random-effects model, and results were expressed as risk ratios (RR) and their 95

  15. Advance pre-operative chlorhexidine reduces the incidence of surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zywiel, Michael G; Daley, Jacqueline A; Delanois, Ronald E; Naziri, Qais; Johnson, Aaron J; Mont, Michael A

    2011-07-01

    Surgical site infections following elective knee arthroplasties occur most commonly as a result of colonisation by the patient's native skin flora. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of deep surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty patients who used an advance cutaneous disinfection protocol and who were compared to patients who had peri-operative preparation only. All adult reconstruction surgeons at a single institution were approached to voluntarily provide patients with chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths and a printed sheet instructing their use the night before and morning of surgery. Records for all knee arthroplasties performed between January 2007 and December 2008 were reviewed to determine the incidence of deep incisional and periprosthetic surgical site infections. Overall, the advance pre-operative protocol was used in 136 of 912 total knee arthroplasties (15%). A lower incidence of surgical site infection was found in patients who used the advance cutaneous preparation protocol as compared to patients who used the in-hospital protocol alone. These findings were maintained when patients were stratified by surgical infection risk category. No surgical site infections occurred in the 136 patients who completed the protocol as compared to 21 infections in 711 procedures (3.0%) performed in patients who did not. Patient-directed skin disinfection using chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths the evening before, and the morning of, elective knee arthroplasty appeared to effectively reduce the incidence of surgical site infection when compared to patients who underwent in-hospital skin preparation only.

  16. ICMR programme on Antibiotic Stewardship, Prevention of Infection & Control (ASPIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandy, Sujith J; Michael, Joy Sarojini; Veeraraghavan, Balaji; Abraham, O C; Bachhav, Sagar S; Kshirsagar, Nilima A

    2014-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance and hospital infections have increased alarmingly in India. Antibiotic stewardship and hospital infection control are two broad strategies which have been employed globally to contain the problems of resistance and infections. For this to succeed, it is important to bring on board the various stakeholders in hospitals, especially the clinical pharmacologists. The discipline of clinical pharmacology needs to be involved in themes such as antimicrobial resistance and hospital infection which truly impact patient care. Clinical pharmacologists need to collaborate with faculty in other disciplines such as microbiology to achieve good outcomes for optimal patient care in the hospital setting. The ASPIC programme was initiated by the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) in response to the above need and was designed to bring together faculty from clinical pharmacology, microbiology and other disciplines to collaborate on initiating and improving antibiotic stewardship and concurrently curbing hospital infections through feasible infection control practices. This programme involves the participation of 20 centres per year throughout the country which come together for a training workshop. Topics pertaining to the above areas are discussed in addition to planning a project which helps to improve antibiotic stewardship and infection control practices in the various centres. It is hoped that this programme would empower hospitals and institutions throughout the country to improve antibiotic stewardship and infection control and ultimately contain antimicrobial resistance.

  17. Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care: Prevalence, Prevention and Antibiotic use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoogen, A.

    2009-01-01

    Neonatal infections are an important cause of morbidity in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Prematurity or very low birth weight is an important predisposing factor for neonatal infection. In addition, preterm infants have a compromized immune system and they often require invasive procedures

  18. Natural approaches to prevention and treatment of infections of the lower urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Kathleen A

    2008-09-01

    Infections of the lower urinary tract are common occurrences in young women, during pregnancy, and in peri- and postmenopausal women. Because of the chronic nature of urinary tract infections (UTIs) and the potential for antibiotic resistance, a natural approach to prevention and treatment is desirable. Clinical research suggests the best natural options for long-term prevention include cranberry, mannose, and probiotics. Botanicals that can be effective at the first sign of an infection and for short-term prophylaxis include berberine and uva ursi. Estriol cream and vitamins A and C have also been shown to prevent UTIs, while potassium salts can alkalinize the urine and reduce dysuria.

  19. Strategies for the prevention of hospital-acquired infections in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghesi, A; Stronati, M

    2008-04-01

    Nosocomial infections are among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in neonatal intensive care units. Prevention of healthcare-associated infections is based on strategies that aim to limit susceptibility to infections by enhancing host defences, interrupting transmission of organisms by healthcare workers and by promoting the judicious use of antimicrobials. Several strategies are available and include: hand hygiene practices; prevention of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections; judicious use of antimicrobials for therapy and prophylaxis; enhancement of host defences; skin care; and early enteral feeding with human milk.

  20. Preoperative oral antibiotics reduce surgical site infection following elective colorectal resections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jamie A; Altom, Laura K; Deierhoi, Rhiannon J; Morris, Melanie; Richman, Joshua S; Vick, Catherine C; Itani, Kamal M F; Hawn, Mary T

    2012-11-01

    Surgical site infection is a major cause of morbidity after colorectal resections. Despite evidence that preoperative oral antibiotics with mechanical bowel preparation reduce surgical site infection rates, the use of oral antibiotics is decreasing. Currently, the administration of oral antibiotics is controversial and considered ineffective without mechanical bowel preparation. The aim of this study is to examine the use of mechanical bowel preparation and oral antibiotics and their relationship to surgical site infection rates in a colorectal Surgical Care Improvement Project cohort. This retrospective study used Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program preoperative risk and surgical site infection outcome data linked to Veterans Affairs Surgical Care Improvement Project and Pharmacy Benefits Management data. Univariate and multivariable models were performed to identify factors associated with surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery. This study was conducted in 112 Veterans Affairs hospitals. Included were 9940 patients who underwent elective colorectal resections from 2005 to 2009. The primary outcome measured was the incidence of surgical site infection. Patients receiving oral antibiotics had significantly lower surgical site infection rates. Those receiving no bowel preparation had similar surgical site infection rates to those who had mechanical bowel preparation only (18.1% vs 20%). Those receiving oral antibiotics alone had an surgical site infection rate of 8.3%, and those receiving oral antibiotics plus mechanical bowel preparation had a rate of 9.2%. In adjusted analysis, the use of oral antibiotics alone was associated with a 67% decrease in surgical site infection occurrence (OR=0.33, 95% CI 0.21-0.50). Oral antibiotics plus mechanical bowel preparation was associated with a 57% decrease in surgical site infection occurrence (OR=0.43, 95% CI 0.34-0.55). Timely administration of parenteral antibiotics (Surgical Care Improvement

  1. Nursing Care Model Based on Knowledge Management in Preventing Nosocomial Infection After Caesarean Section in Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Ahsan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nosocomial infection is one indicator of the quality of health services in the community, which also determines the image of health care institutions becauseit was a major cause of morbidityand death rate (mortality in hospital. Nursing care based on knowledge management is established from identification knowledge which is required, prevention performance of nosocomial infections post section caesarea. Nosocomial infections component consists of wound culture result. Method: This study was an observational study with a quasi experimental design. The population was all of nursing staff who working in obstetrics installation in hospitals A and B as much as 46 people. Sample was the total population. Data was collected through questionnaire, observation sheets and examination of the wound culture. Data was analyzed using t test B 1.274 dan p=0.028 Result: The result showed that 1 there was difference in knowledge management implementation before and after training; 2 there was difference in nurse’s performance in preventing nosocomial infection before and after training; 3 there is significant relationship between nurse’s performance in preventing nosocomial infection and infection incidence; 4 there is no significant difference of nursing care impementation on nosocomial incidence. Discussion: In conclusion, the development of nursing care based on knowledge management as a synthesis or induction of findings directed at 1 nurses’ knowledge does not affect the performance of the prevention of nosocomial infections; 2 knowledge management has a positive effect on the performance of the prevention of nosocomial infections; 3 implementation of infection prevention is integrated capabilities between knowledge, skills and attitudes of nurses in implementing performance in care. Keywords: model prevention, nosocomial infections, nursing care, knowledge management, sectio Caesarea

  2. Prevention of nosocomial infections in intensive care unit and nursing practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevilay Yüceer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections which are considered as the primary indicator of the quality of care in hospitals, cause to prolong hospitalization at intensive care unit and hospital, increase morbidity, mortality, and the cost of treatment. Although only 5-10% of the patients are treated in the intensive care units, 20-25% of all nosocomial infections are seen in these units. Preventing nosocomial infections in intensive care units is a process started at the patient acceptance to unit that requires an interdisciplinary team approach of intensive care staffs’ and Infection Control Committee members.Intensive care nurses who are in constant contact with patients have important responsibilities in preventing nosocomial infections. Intensive care nurses should be aware that the nosocomial infections can be prevented. They should have current knowledge about universal precautions related to prevention and control of infections, which are accepted by the entire world and they reinforce this knowledge by practice and should provide the most effective care to patients.In this article, nursing practices for prevention of nosocomial infections in intensive care units are discussed based on universal precautions.

  3. Harvest surgical site infection following coronary artery bypass grafting: risk factors, microbiology, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mamta; Fakih, Mohamad G; Berriel-Cass, Dorine; Meisner, Susan; Saravolatz, Louis; Khatib, Riad

    2009-10-01

    Our goals were to evaluate the risk factors predisposing to saphenous vein harvest surgical site infection (HSSI), the microbiology implicated, associated outcomes including 30-day mortality, and identify opportunities for prevention of infection. All patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) procedures from January 2000 through September 2004 were included. Data were collected on preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors, in addition to microbiology and outcomes. Eighty-six of 3578 (2.4%) patients developed HSSI; 28 (32.6%) of them were classified as deep. The median time to detection was 17 (range, 4-51) days. An organism was identified in 64 (74.4%) cases; of them, a single pathogen was implicated in 50 (78%) cases. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated pathogen: 19 (38% [methicillin-susceptible S aureus (MSSA) = 12, methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) = 7]). Gram-negative organisms were recovered in 50% of cases, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa predominating in 11 (22%) because of a single pathogen. Multiple pathogens were identified in 14 (22%) cases. The 30-day mortality was not significantly different in patients with or without HSSI. Multivariate analysis showed age, diabetes mellitus, obesity, congestive heart failure, renal insufficiency, and duration of surgery to be associated with increased risk. Diabetes mellitus, obesity, congestive heart failure, renal insufficiency, and duration of surgery were associated with increased risk for HSSI. S aureus was the most frequently isolated pathogen.

  4. Full-text automated detection of surgical site infections secondary to neurosurgery in Rennes, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo-Gimenez, Boris; Garcelon, Nicolas; Jarno, Pascal; Chapplain, Jean Marc; Cuggia, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The surveillance of Surgical Site Infections (SSI) contributes to the management of risk in French hospitals. Manual identification of infections is costly, time-consuming and limits the promotion of preventive procedures by the dedicated teams. The introduction of alternative methods using automated detection strategies is promising to improve this surveillance. The present study describes an automated detection strategy for SSI in neurosurgery, based on textual analysis of medical reports stored in a clinical data warehouse. The method consists firstly, of enrichment and concept extraction from full-text reports using NOMINDEX, and secondly, text similarity measurement using a vector space model. The text detection was compared to the conventional strategy based on self-declaration and to the automated detection using the diagnosis-related group database. The text-mining approach showed the best detection accuracy, with recall and precision equal to 92% and 40% respectively, and confirmed the interest of reusing full-text medical reports to perform automated detection of SSI.

  5. Hospital costs associated with surgical site infections in general and vascular surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Melissa M; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Julian, Kathleen G; Ortenzi, Gail; Dillon, Peter W

    2011-11-01

    Although much has been written about excess cost and duration of stay (DOS) associated with surgical site infections (SSIs) after cardiothoracic surgery, less has been reported after vascular and general surgery. We used data from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) to estimate the total cost and DOS associated with SSIs in patients undergoing general and vascular surgery. Using standard NSQIP practices, data were collected on patients undergoing general and vascular surgery at a single academic center between 2007 and 2009 and were merged with fully loaded operating costs obtained from the hospital accounting database. Logistic regression was used to determine which patient and preoperative variables influenced the occurrence of SSIs. After adjusting for patient characteristics, costs and DOS were fit to linear regression models to determine the effect of SSIs. Of the 2,250 general and vascular surgery patients sampled, SSIs were observed in 186 inpatients. Predisposing factors of SSIs were male sex, insulin-dependent diabetes, steroid use, wound classification, and operative time (P surgery. Although the excess costs and DOS associated with SSIs after general and vascular surgery are somewhat less, they still represent substantial financial and opportunity costs to hospitals and suggest, along with the implications for patient care, a continuing need for cost-effective quality improvement and programs of infection prevention. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Targeted Assessment for Prevention of Healthcare-Associated Infections: A New Prioritization Metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soe, Minn M; Gould, Carolyn V; Pollock, Daniel; Edwards, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    To develop a method for calculating the number of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) that must be prevented to reach a HAI reduction goal and identifying and prioritizing healthcare facilities where the largest reductions can be achieved. Acute care hospitals that report HAI data to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Healthcare Safety Network. METHODS :The cumulative attributable difference (CAD) is calculated by subtracting a numerical prevention target from an observed number of HAIs. The prevention target is the product of the predicted number of HAIs and a standardized infection ratio goal, which represents a HAI reduction goal. The CAD is a numeric value that if positive is the number of infections to prevent to reach the HAI reduction goal. We calculated the CAD for catheter-associated urinary tract infections for each of the 3,639 hospitals that reported such data to National Healthcare Safety Network in 2013 and ranked the hospitals by their CAD values in descending order. Of 1,578 hospitals with positive CAD values, preventing 10,040 catheter-associated urinary tract infections at 293 hospitals (19%) with the highest CAD would enable achievement of the national 25% catheter-associated urinary tract infection reduction goal. The CAD is a new metric that facilitates ranking of facilities, and locations within facilities, to prioritize HAI prevention efforts where the greatest impact can be achieved toward a HAI reduction goal.

  7. Prospective Randomized Evaluation of Intraoperative Application of Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma on Surgical Site Infection or Delayed Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanGiovanni, Thomas P; Kiebzak, Gary M

    2016-05-01

    Prevention of surgical site infections and the reduction of wound-related complication rates have become increasingly emphasized by hospital task groups and government agencies given the degree of economic burden it places on the health care system. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains growth factors and other biomolecules that promote endogenous microbicidal activity. We hypothesized that PRP would help prevent postoperative infection and delayed wound healing (DWH). We randomized patients having foot or ankle surgery to the treatment group receiving intraoperative PRP (applied to operative field) and platelet-poor plasma at closing (PPP, on the sutured skin) or the control group (no PRP/PPP). The incidence of deep surgical site infection and DWH (collectively called endpoints) was compared between groups (n = 250/group). PRP had a mean 5.3-fold platelet concentration compared to whole blood, with concentrated white blood cells. Mean age (±SD) of patients was 52 years (±15), 65% were women. Minor and major operative procedures were included. Patients were followed for 60 days. Seventy controls had PRP prepared for assay of growth factors. Procedure mix, ASA scores, mean operative times, and comorbidity mix were similar between groups. The primary result was no difference in number of endpoints between groups: 19 patients in the PRP group (7.6%) versus 18 controls (7.2%). Endpoints were deep surgical site infections in 2 PRP/PPP patients and 1 control, and DWH in 17 PRP/PPP patients and 17 controls. Analysis of PRP samples revealed a large variation in growth factor concentrations between patients. Intraoperative application of PRP/PPP did not reduce the incidence of postoperative infection or DWH. Growth factor profiles varied greatly between patients, suggesting that the potentially therapeutic treatment delivered was not consistent from patient-to-patient. Level I, prospective randomized trial. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Postoperative infections after major heart surgery and prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia: a one-day European prevalence study (ESGNI-008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouza, E; Hortal, J; Muñoz, P; Pascau, J; Pérez, M J; Hiesmayr, M

    2006-11-01

    Few data have been published on the prevalence of postoperative infection in patients undergoing major heart surgery (MHS). The degree of compliance with standard measures used to prevent them is unknown. This study assessed the prevalence of infections, particularly ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), in patients undergoing MHS in 42 institutions from 13 European countries. On the study day, there were 321 postoperative MHS patients, of whom 164 (51%) were mechanically ventilated. The overall prevalence of infection was 26.8%. Lower respiratory tract infections represented 57% of all the infections present on the study day. Other infections included intravenous-catheter-related bloodstream infections (2.8%), surgical site infections (2.2%), urinary tract infections (0.9%) and postoperative mediastinitis (0.9%). Of the mechanically ventilated patients, 55 (33.5%) were not being nursed in a semi-recumbent position, 36 (22%) had heat-moisture exchangers with no antibacterial filters, and intracuff pressure was not monitored in 78 patients (47.6%). Only 13 patients (8%) were given continuous subglottic suctioning, 64 patients (39%) did not receive postural oscillation, and gastric overdistension was not actively prevented in 23 patients (14%). In conclusion, these data from intensive care units across Europe provide information on postoperative infections in an important subset of the patient population, and stress the need for active interventions to prevent VAP in patients undergoing MHS.

  9. Surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shishui; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for surgical site infections and to quantify the contribution of independent risk factors to the probability of developing infection after definitive fixation of tibial plateau fractures in adult patients. A retrospective analysis was performed at a level I trauma center between January 2004 and December 2010. Data were collected from a review of the patient's electronic medical records. A total of 251 consecutive patients (256 cases) were divided into two groups, those with surgical site infections and those without surgical site infections. Preoperative and perioperative variables were compared between these groups, and risk factors were determined by univariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression. Variables analyzed included age, gender, smoking history, diabetes, presence of an open fracture, presence of compartment syndrome, Schatzker classification, polytrauma status, ICU stay, time from injury to surgery, use of temporary external fixation, surgical approach, surgical fixation, operative time, and use of a drain. The overall rate of surgical site infection after ORIF of tibial plateau fractures during the 7 years of this study was 7.8% (20 of 256). The most common causative pathogens was Staphylococcus aureus (n=15, 75%). Independent predictors of surgical site infection identified by multivariate analyses were open tibial plateau fracture (odds ratio=3.9; 95% CI=1.3-11.6; p=0.015) and operative time (odds ratio=2.7; 95% CI=1.6-4.4; psite infection. Both open fracture and operative time are independent risks factors for postoperative infection.

  10. Economic and clinical contributions of an antimicrobial barrier dressing: a strategy for the reduction of surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaper, David; Nazir, Jameel; Roberts, Chris; Searle, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In patients at risk of surgical site infection (SSI), there is evidence that an antimicrobial barrier dressing (Acticoat* ) applied immediately post-procedure is effective in reducing the incidence of infection. The objective of this study was to assess when it is appropriate to use an antimicrobial barrier dressing rather than a post-operative film dressing, by evaluating the net cost and budget impact of the two strategies. An economic model was developed, which estimates expected expenditure on dressings and the expected costs of surgical site infection during the initial inpatient episode, based on published literature on the pre-discharge costs of surgical infection and the efficacy of an antimicrobial barrier dressing in preventing SSI. At an SSI risk of 10%, an antimicrobial barrier dressing strategy is cost neutral if the incidence of infection is reduced by at least 9% compared with a post-operative film dressing. At 35% efficacy, expenditure on dressings would be higher by £30,760 per 1000 patients, and the cost of treating infection would be lower by £111,650, resulting in a net cost saving of £80,890. The break-even infection risk for cost neutrality is 2.6%. Although this cost analysis is based on published data, there are limitations in methodology: the model is dependent on and subject to the limitations of the data used to populate it. Further studies would be useful to increase the robustness of the conclusions, particularly in a broader range of surgical specialties. A strategy involving the use of an antimicrobial barrier dressing in patients at moderate (5-10%) or high (>10%) risk of infection appears reasonable and cost saving in light of the available clinical evidence.

  11. Maternal and fetal cytomegalovirus infection: diagnosis, management, and prevention [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert F. Pass

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cytomegalovirus infection is a major cause of central nervous system and sensory impairments that affect cognition, motor function, hearing, language development, vestibular function, and vision. Although the importance of congenital cytomegalovirus infection is readily evident, the vast majority of maternal and fetal infections are not identified, even in developed countries. Multiple studies of prenatal cytomegalovirus infections have produced a body of knowledge that can inform the clinical approach to suspected or proven maternal and fetal infection. Reliable diagnosis of cytomegalovirus infection during pregnancy and accurate diagnosis of fetal infection are a reality. Approaches to preventing the transmission of cytomegalovirus from mother to fetus and to the treatment of fetal infection are being studied. There is evidence that public health approaches based on hygiene can dramatically reduce the rate of primary maternal cytomegalovirus infections during pregnancy. This review will consider the epidemiology of congenital cytomegalovirus infection, the diagnosis and management of primary infection during pregnancy, and approaches to preventing maternal infection.

  12. A framework for preventing healthcare-associated infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mented an HAI prevalence of 24%, with hospital-acquired pneumonia and ... Healthcare-associated infection (HAI) is a frequent and serious complication affecting 4 - 8% of ... The risk of pathogen transmission and hospital outbreaks after.

  13. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection (RSV): Transmission and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Search Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection (RSV) Note: Javascript is disabled ... 2018 Content source: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD) , Division of Viral Diseases Email Recommend ...

  14. Novel Approaches to Preventing Urinary Tract Infection in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    vaccines . In: Mobley HLT. 54. Johnson JR. Steil A. Delavari P. Canine feces as a reservoir ofextraintestinal Warren 1W, eds. Urinary tract infections...the material was subjected to analysis by Triple quadrupole ESI-MS/CID-MS experiments were electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in the positive ion...prophylaxis. Characteristic of prophylactic regimens development of vaccines against these infections, containing nitrofurantoin is the frequency of side

  15. Identifying the Infection Control Areas Requiring Modifications in Thoracic Surgery Units: Results of a Two-Year Surveillance of Surgical Site Infections in Hospitals in Southern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubiel, Grzegorz; Rogoziński, Paweł; Żaloudik, Elżbieta; Bruliński, Krzysztof; Różańska, Anna; Wójkowska-Mach, Jadwiga

    2017-10-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is considered to be a priority in infection control. The objective of this study is the analysis of results of active targeted surveillance conducted over a two-year period in the Department of Thoracic Surgery at the Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery Center in Bystra, in southern Poland. The retrospective analysis was carried out on the basis of results of active monitoring of SSI in the 45-bed Department of Thoracic Surgery at the Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery Center in Bystra between April 1, 2014 and April 30, 2016. Surgical site infections were identified based on the definitions of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) taking into account the time of symptom onset, specifically, whether the symptoms occurred within 30 d after the surgical procedure. Detection of SSI relied on daily inspection of incisions by a trained nurse, analysis of medical and nursing entries in the computer system, and analysis of all results of microbiologic tests taken in the unit and in the operating room. In the study period, data were collected regarding 1,387 treatment procedures meeting the registration criteria. Forty cases of SSI were detected yielding an incidence rate of 3%. Most cases (55%) were found in the course of hospitalization and 45% were detected after the patient's discharge. The SSIs were classified as follows: superficial, 37.5%; deep infections, 7.5%; and organ/space infection, 55%. Among patients who were diagnosed with SSI, most were male (77.5%). For patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score I-II the incidence rate was 2%; ASA score III or more, 3.7%. The incidence rate varied from 0.3% in clean surgical site to 6.5% in clean-contaminated site. The study validated the usefulness of targeted surveillance in monitoring SSIs in patients hospitalized in thoracic surgery departments. Surgical site infection surveillance identified areas of care requiring modifications, namely

  16. Application of copper to prevent and control infection. Where are we now?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Gorman, J

    2012-08-01

    The antimicrobial effect of copper has long been recognized and has a potential application in the healthcare setting as a mechanism to reduce environmental contamination and thus prevent healthcare-associated infection (HCAI).

  17. Probiotics in Preventing Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections in Women: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Annie H

    2015-01-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance and increasing resistance to commonly used antibiotics makes treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections difficult. Although more research is needed, probiotics should be considered a useful and safe alternative to antibiotics.

  18. Potential of RNA aptamers in the prevention of HIV-1 subtype C infections

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    London, GM

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Compounds that have been used to prevent human immunodeficiency virus type-I (HIV-1) infections include synthetic chemicals, plant extras and monoclonal antibodies. Although most of these compounds have potent antiviral activity, they often fail...

  19. Risk factors for secondary transmission of Shigella infection within households: implications for current prevention policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boveé, Lian; Whelan, Jane; Sonder, Gerard J. B.; van Dam, Alje P.; van den Hoek, Anneke

    2012-01-01

    Background: Internationally, guidelines to prevent secondary transmission of Shigella infection vary widely. Cases, their contacts with diarrhoea, and those in certain occupational groups are frequently excluded from work, school, or daycare. In the Netherlands, all contacts attending pre-school

  20. THE INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS (PREVENTION, DIAGNOSIS CRITERIA AND TREATMENT: KEY POINTS 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Demin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Key positions of Guidelines on the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of infective endocarditis issued by the Task Force of ESC in 2009 are explained in the comments. Recent opinions on these items are presented.

  1. Multiplicity of Plasmodium falciparum infection following intermittent preventive treatment in infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchholz, Ulrike; Kobbe, Robin; Danquah, Ina; Zanger, Philipp; Reither, Klaus; Abruquah, Harry H.; Grobusch, Martin P.; Ziniel, Peter; May, Jürgen; Mockenhaupt, Frank P.

    2010-01-01

    Intermittent preventive treatment in infants with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTi-SP) reduces malaria morbidity by 20% to 33%. Potentially, however, this intervention may compromise the acquisition of immunity, including the tolerance towards multiple infections with Plasmodium falciparum.

  2. Multiplicity of Plasmodium falciparum infection following intermittent preventive treatment in infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchholz, U.; Kobbe, R.; Danquah, I.; Zanger, P.; Reither, K.; Abruquah, H.H.; Grobusch, M.P.; Ziniel, P.; May, J.; Mockenhaupt, F.P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Intermittent preventive treatment in infants with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTi-SP) reduces malaria morbidity by 20% to 33%. Potentially, however, this intervention may compromise the acquisition of immunity, including the tolerance towards multiple infections with Plasmodium

  3. Device-related infections in critically ill patients. Part II: Prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia and urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Filippo, A; De Gaudio, A R

    2003-12-01

    Device utilization in critically ill patients is responsible for a high risk of complications such as catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and urinary tract infections (UTI). In this article we will review the current status of data regarding the prevention of VAP and UTI. The results of the more recent (5 years) randomized controlled trials are reviewed and discussed. General recommendations include staff education and use of a surveillance program with a restrictive antibiotic policy. Adequate time must be allowed for hand washing and barrier precautions must always be used during device manipulation. Specific measures for VAP prevention are: 1) use of multi-use, closed-system suction catheters; 2) no routine change of the breathing circuit; 3) lubrication of the cuff of the endotracheal tube (ET) with a water-soluble gel; 4) maintenance of patient in semi-recumbent position to improve chest physiotherapy in intubated patients. Specific measures for UTI prevention include: 1) use of a catheter-valve instead of a standard drainage system; 2) use of a silver-alloy, hydro gel-coated latex urinary catheter instead of uncoated catheters. Biofilm represents a new variable: the capacity of bacteria to organize a biofilm on a device surface can explain the difficulty in preventing and eradicating an infection in a critically ill patient. More clinical trials are needed to verify the efficacy of prevention measures of ICU infections.

  4. Comparison between oral antibiotics and probiotics as bowel preparation for elective colon cancer surgery to prevent infection: prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadahiro, Sotaro; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Akira; Okada, Kazutake; Kamata, Hiroko; Ozaki, Toru; Koga, Yasuhiro

    2014-03-01

    We have already reported that, for patients undergoing elective colon cancer operations, perioperative infection can be prevented by a single intravenous dose of an antibiotic given immediately beforehand if mechanical bowel preparation and the administration of oral antibiotics are implemented. Synbiotics has been reported to reduce the rate of infection in patients after pancreatic cancer operations. The effectiveness of oral antibiotics and probiotics in preventing postoperative infection in elective colon cancer procedures was examined in a randomized controlled trial. Three hundred ten patients with colon cancer randomly were assigned to one of three groups. All patients underwent mechanical bowel preparation and received a single intravenous dose of flomoxef immediately before operation. Probiotics were administered in Group A; oral antibiotics were administered in Group B; and neither probiotics nor oral antibiotics were administered in Group C. Stool samples were collected 9 and 2 days before and 7 and 14 days after the procedure. Clostridium difficile toxin and the number of bacteria in the intestine were determined. The rates of incisional surgical-site infection were 18.0%, 6.1%, and 17.9% in Groups A, B, and C, and the rates of leakage were 12.0%, 1.0%, and 7.4% in Groups A, B, and C, respectively, indicating that both rates were lesser in Group B than in Groups A and C (P = .014 and P = .004, respectively). The detection rates of C. difficile toxin were not changed among the three groups. We recommend oral antibiotics, rather than probiotics, as bowel preparation for elective colon cancer procedures to prevent surgical-site infections. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Incidence of Surgical Site Infections and Microbial Pattern at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ANNALS of AFRICAN SURGERY. January ... morbidity and death. ... Four patients had culture negative results. ... contaminated and dirty wounds had infection rates of ... In the United States of America (USA) ... wounds from day three post operative. ... (Breast cancer, teratoma, lipoma, mandibular tumors excisions).

  6. Opiate Injection Site Infections--19 years in the UK

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-09-06

    Dan Lewer, a public health registrar in England, discusses an increase in infections related to opiate injections in the U.K.  Created: 9/6/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 9/6/2017.

  7. IFNγ and perforin cooperate to control infection and prevent fatal pathology during persistent gammaherpesvirus infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Christina; Høgh-Petersen, Mette; Storm, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    herpes virus infection, we infected IFNγ/perforin double deficient C57BL/6 mice and followed the outcome of infection. While absence of perforin prevented the splenic atrophy in IFNγ deficient mice, fibrosis did not disappear. Moreover, double deficient mice developed extreme splenomegaly, were unable...... in double deficient mice, other aspects are exaggerated, and the normal architecture of the spleen is completely destroyed. Thus, IFNγ and perforin work in concert to minimize pathology and control the viral load. In the absence of both effector molecules, the balancing race between the virus and the host...

  8. Effect of high perioperative oxygen fraction on surgical site infection and pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery: the PROXI randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyhoff, Christian S; Wetterslev, Jørn; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2009-01-01

    Control and Prevention. Secondary outcomes included atelectasis, pneumonia, respiratory failure, and mortality. RESULTS: Surgical site infection occurred in 131 of 685 patients (19.1%) assigned to receive 80% oxygen vs 141 of 701 (20.1%) assigned to receive 30% oxygen (odds ratio [OR], 0.94; 95...

  9. A prospective randomised trial of isolated pathogens of surgical site infections (SSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Alexiou

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: In conclusion, surgical site infections are important complications affecting the healthcare services, the cost of hospitalization and the patient himself. Future thorough studies are expected to reveal much more data, regarding predisposing and precautionary patient and hospital characteristics.

  10. The presentation, incidence, etiology, and treatment of surgical site infections after spinal surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Mohamed, A.S.; Skolasky, R.L.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive, retrospective cohort analysis. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the presentation, etiology, and treatment of surgical site infections (SSI) after spinal surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: SSI after spine surgery is frequently seen. Small case control studies have been published

  11. Effects of a catheter-associated urinary tract infection prevention campaign on infection rate, catheter utilization, and health care workers' perspective at a community safety net hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Dorinne; Nussle, Richard; Cruz, Abner; Kane, Gail; Toomey, Michael; Bay, Curtis; Ostovar, Gholamabbas Amin

    2016-01-01

    Preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infections is in the forefront of health care quality. However, nurse and physician engagement is a common barrier in infection prevention efforts. After implementation of a multidisciplinary catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) prevention campaign, we studied the impact of our campaign and showed its association with reducing the CAUTI rate and catheter utilization and the positive effect on health care workers' engagement and perspectives. CAUTI prevention campaigns can lead to lower infection rates and change health care workers' perspective. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A randomized controlled trial comparing mupirocin versus Polysporin Triple for the prevention of catheter-related infections in peritoneal dialysis patients (the MP3 study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassal, Sarbjit V; Lok, Charmaine E

    2008-01-01

    Peritonitis remains the most serious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Gram-positive organisms are among the most common causes of PD peritonitis; however, recent trends show increasing rates of gram-negative and fungal infections. Strategies to prevent peritonitis include the use of prophylactic topical mupirocin at the site where the PD catheter exits from the abdominal wall; however, mupirocin does not afford protection against gram-negative or fungal infections. The aim of this study is to determine if the incidence of catheter-related infections (exit-site infection, tunnel infection, or peritonitis) is significantly reduced by the routine application of Polysporin Triple antibiotic ointment (Pfizer Canada, Markham, Ontario, Canada) in comparison to mupirocin ointment. The Mupirocin Versus Polysporin Triple Study (MP3) is a multicenter, randomized, double-blinded controlled study comparing Polysporin Triple (P3) against the current standard of care. The aim of the study is to recruit 200 patients being treated with or starting on PD and randomize them to receive either mupirocin or P3 at the catheter exit site. Patients will be followed for 18 months or until death or transfer from PD to an alternate treatment modality. The primary outcome will be the time to first catheter-related infection. Catheter-related infections will be strictly defined using current guidelines and categorized into exit-site infections, infective peritonitis, or tunnel infections. The primary analysis will be an intention-to-treat analysis. The results of this study will help determine if the use of P3 is superior to mupirocin ointment in the prevention of catheter-related infections and will help guide evidence-based best practices.

  13. Prophylactic Antibiotic Choice and Risk of Surgical Site Infection After Hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Shitanshu; Harris, John; Al-Niaimi, Ahmed; Swenson, Carolyn W; Pearlman, Mark D; Reynolds, R Kevin; Kamdar, Neil; Bazzi, Ali; Campbell, Darrell A; Morgan, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate associations between prophylactic preoperative antibiotic choice and surgical site infection rates after hysterectomy. A retrospective cohort study was performed of patients in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative undergoing hysterectomy from July 2012 to February 2015. The primary outcome was a composite outcome of any surgical site infection (superficial surgical site infections or combined deep organ space surgical site infections). Preoperative antibiotics were categorized based on the recommendations set forth by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Surgical Care Improvement Project. Patients receiving a recommended antibiotic regimen were categorized into those receiving β-lactam antibiotics and those receiving alternatives to β-lactam antibiotics. Patients receiving nonrecommended antibiotics were categorized into those receiving overtreatment (excluded from further analysis) and those receiving nonstandard antibiotics. Multivariable logistic regression models were developed to estimate the independent effect of antibiotic choice. Propensity score matching analysis was performed to validate the results. The study included 21,358 hysterectomies. The overall rate of any surgical site infection was 2.06% (n=441). Unadjusted rates of "any surgical site infection" were 1.8%, 3.1%, and 3.7% for β-lactam, β-lactam alternatives, and nonstandard groups, respectively. After adjusting for patient and operative factors within clusters of hospitals, compared with the β-lactam antibiotics (reference group), the risk of "any surgical site infection" was higher for the group receiving β-lactam alternatives (odds ratio [OR] 1.7, confidence interval [CI] 1.27-2.07) or the nonstandard antibiotics (OR 2.0, CI 1.31-3.1). Compared with women receiving β-lactam antibiotic regimens, there is a higher risk of surgical site infection after hysterectomy among those receiving a recommended β-lactam alternative or nonstandard regimen.

  14. Current Microbiology of Surgical Site Infections in Patients with Cancer: A Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolston, Kenneth V I; Nesher, Lior; Tarrand, Jeffrey T

    2014-12-01

    Patients with solid tumors frequently undergo surgical procedures and develop procedure-related infections. We sought to describe the current microbiologic spectrum of infections at various sites following common surgical procedures. This was a retrospective review of microbiologic data between January 2011 and February 2012. The sites studied were those associated with breast cancer surgery, thoracotomy, craniotomy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube insertion, and abdominal/pelvic surgery. Only patients with solid tumors were included. A total of 368 surgical site infections (SSIs) were identified (68 breast cancer related; 91 thoracotomy related; 45 craniotomy related; 75 PEG-tube insertion related; and 89 abdominal/pelvic surgery related). Of these, 58% were monomicrobial and 42% were polymicrobial. Overall, 85% of the 215 monomicrobial infections were caused by Gram-positive organisms and 13% by Gram-negative bacilli (GNB). Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant pathogen in monomicrobial infections (150 of 215, 70%). Sixty (40%) of these staphylococcal isolates were methicillin resistant (MRSA), and 65% had a vancomycin minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥1.0 µg/ml. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the predominant GNB pathogen (19 of 27, 70%). Staphylococci were also the predominant pathogens in polymicrobial infections, while P. aeruginosa and Escherichia coli were the predominant GNB. Overall, 35% of isolates from polymicrobial infections were GNB. Cephalosporins (e.g., cefazolin) or amoxicillin/clavulanate was used most often for surgical prophylaxis, and 47% of organisms from monomicrobial infections (MRSA, P. aeruginosa) were resistant to them. A similar resistance pattern was observed in polymicrobial infections. Staphylococcus species were isolated most often from the sites studied. Polymicrobial infections (42%) and GNB monomicrobial infections (13%) were relatively frequent causes of SSIs. Many of these infections were caused by

  15. Guidelines for the Prevention of Infections Associated With Combat-Related Injuries: 2011 Update (Executive Summary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    employed at all deployed medical treatment facilities (MTF). These should include hand hygiene . with compli- ance monitoring. Infection control and...established infections where nosocomial pathogens, including multidrug~resistant. may be the in~ fecting agents (Table 3). 7. Selected agents should be dosed...REVIEW ARTICLE Executive Summary: Guidelines for the Prevention of Infections Associated With Combat-Related Injuries: 2011 Update Endorsed by the

  16. Discussion on the Relevant Factors of General Surgery Incision Infection and Prevention Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Baotao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many reasons that can lead to incision infection of general surgical patients. The main reasons include weight, age, body albumin level, surgical time, observation ward, etc. This paper analyzes the clinic data of patients with incision infection after general surgery based on clinic practice and study on the reasons that have impact on general surgical incision infection and gives relevant prevention countermeasures.

  17. Preclinical Efficacy of Clumping Factor A in Prevention of Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xue; Wang, Xiaogang; Thompson, Christopher D.; Park, Saeyoung; Park, Wan Beom; Lee, Jean C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections has become increasingly difficult because of the emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates. Development of a vaccine to prevent staphylococcal infections remains a priority. To determine whether clumping factor A (ClfA) is a good target protein for inclusion in a multivalent vaccine, we evaluated its efficacy in a variety of relevant staphylococcal infection models, challenging with different S. aureus strains. ClfA adsorbed to Alhydrogel...

  18. Role of Antibiotics on Surgical Site Infection in Cases of Open and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical site infection (SSI) comes as third most common healthcare related infection which produces morbidity and deaths at large.[1] There are evidence of postoperative morbidity due to SSI. So it is needed to improve the outcome of surgical procedures and hence advised to give antibiotic prophylaxis. The incidence.

  19. Reduced risk of surgical site infections through surveillance in a network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geubbels, Eveline L. P. E.; Nagelkerke, Nico J. D.; Mintjes-de Groot, A. Joke; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; de Boer, Annette S.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the effect of multicentre surveillance for nosocomial infections on patients' risk of surgical site infection (SSI). DESIGN: Prospective multi-centre cohort study, from January 1996 to December 2000. SETTING: Acute care hospitals in The Netherlands. STUDY PARTICIPANTS: All 50

  20. Are probiotics effective in preventing urinary tract infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Juan; Rada, Gabriel

    2018-04-04

    Urinary tract infection is the most common bacterial infection and recurrences are common. Probiotics have been proposed as an alternative to decrease this risk. However, it is not clear if they are really effective. To answer this question we used Epistemonikos, the largest database of systematic reviews in health, which is maintained by screening multiple information sources, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, among others. We extracted data from the systematic reviews, reanalyzed data of primary studies, conducted a meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table using the GRADE approach. We identified six systematic reviews including nine studies overall, of which seven were randomized trials. We concluded it is not clear whether probiotics decrease the risk of symptomatic urinary tract infection, because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  1. Advances in the Prevention of infection-Related Preterm Birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamont, R. F.

    2015-01-01

    Infection-related preterm birth (PTB) is more common at early gestational ages and is associated with major neonatal mortality and morbidity. Abnormal genital tract microflora in early pregnancy predicts late miscarriage and early PTB. Accordingly, it is logical to consider antibiotics as an inte......Infection-related preterm birth (PTB) is more common at early gestational ages and is associated with major neonatal mortality and morbidity. Abnormal genital tract microflora in early pregnancy predicts late miscarriage and early PTB. Accordingly, it is logical to consider antibiotics...

  2. Estimated hospital costs associated with preventable health care-associated infections if health care antiseptic products were unavailable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmier JK

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Jordana K Schmier,1 Carolyn K Hulme-Lowe,1 Svetlana Semenova,2 Juergen A Klenk,3 Paul C DeLeo,4 Richard Sedlak,5 Pete A Carlson6 1Health Sciences, Exponent, Inc., Alexandria, VA, 2EcoSciences, Exponent, Inc., Maynard, MA, 3Health Sciences, Exponent, Inc., Alexandria, VA, 4Environmental Safety, 5Technical and International Affairs, American Cleaning Institute, Washington, DC, 6Regulatory Affairs, Ecolab, Saint Paul, MN, USA Objectives: Health care-associated infections (HAIs pose a significant health care and cost burden. This study estimates annual HAI hospital costs in the US avoided through use of health care antiseptics (health care personnel hand washes and rubs; surgical hand scrubs and rubs; patient preoperative and preinjection skin preparations. Methods: A spreadsheet model was developed with base case inputs derived from the published literature, supplemented with assumptions when data were insufficient. Five HAIs of interest were identified: catheter-associated urinary tract infections, central line-associated bloodstream infections, gastrointestinal infections caused by Clostridium difficile, hospital- or ventilator-associated pneumonia, and surgical site infections. A national estimate of the annual potential lost benefits from elimination of these products is calculated based on the number of HAIs, the proportion of HAIs that are preventable, the proportion of preventable HAIs associated with health care antiseptics, and HAI hospital costs. The model is designed to be user friendly and to allow assumptions about prevention across all infections to vary or stay the same. Sensitivity analyses provide low- and high-end estimates of costs avoided. Results: Low- and high-end estimates of national, annual HAIs in hospitals avoided through use of health care antiseptics are 12,100 and 223,000, respectively, with associated hospital costs avoided of US$142 million and US$4.25 billion, respectively. Conclusion: The model presents a novel

  3. Preventing device-associated infections in US hospitals: national surveys from 2005 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krein, Sarah L; Fowler, Karen E; Ratz, David; Meddings, Jennifer; Saint, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    Numerous initiatives have focused on reducing device-associated infections, contributing to an overall decrease in infections nationwide. To better understand factors associated with this decline, we assessed the use of key practices to prevent device-associated infections by US acute care hospitals from 2005 to 2013. We mailed surveys to infection preventionists at a national random sample of ∼600 US acute care hospitals in 2005, 2009 and 2013. Our survey asked about the use of practices to prevent the 3 most common device-associated infections: central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI). Using sample weights, we estimated the per cent of hospitals reporting regular use (a score of 4 or 5 on a scale from 1 (never use) to 5 (always use)) of prevention practices from 2005 to 2013. The response rate was about 70% in all 3 periods. Use of most recommended prevention practices increased significantly over time. Among those showing the greatest increase were use of an antimicrobial dressing for preventing CLABSI (25-78%, ppreventing VAP (41-79%, ppreventing CAUTI (9-53%, pinfections. Practices for which little change was observed included use of antimicrobial catheters to prevent either CLABSI or CAUTI. US hospitals have responded to the call to reduce infection by increasing use of key recommended practices. Vigilance is needed to ensure sustained improvement and additional strategies may still be required, given an apparent continuing lag in CAUTI prevention efforts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. What Factors are Associated With a Surgical Site Infection After Operative Treatment of an Elbow Fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessen, Femke M A P; Braun, Yvonne; van Leeuwen, Wouter F; Dyer, George S; van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Ring, David

    2016-02-01

    Surgical site infections are one of the more common major complications of elbow fracture surgery and can contribute to other adverse outcomes, prolonged hospital stays, and increased healthcare costs. We asked: (1) What are the factors associated with a surgical site infection after elbow fracture surgery? (2) When taking the subset of closed elbow fractures only, what are the factors associated with a surgical site infection? (3) What are the common organisms isolated from an elbow infection after open treatment? One thousand three hundred twenty adult patients underwent surgery for an elbow fracture between January 2002 and July 2014 and were included in our study. Forty-eight of 1320 patients (4%) had a surgical site infection develop. Thirty-four of 1113 patients with a closed fracture (3%) had a surgical site infection develop. For all elbow fractures, use of plate and screw fixation (adjusted odds ratio [OR]= 2.2; 95% CI, 1.0-4.5; p = 0.041) and use of external fixation before surgery (adjusted OR = 4.7; 95% CI, 1.1-21; p = 0.035) were associated with higher infection rates. When subset analysis was performed for closed fractures, only smoking (adjusted OR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1-4.5; p = 0.023) was associated with higher infection rates. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common bacteria cultured (59%). The only modifiable risk factor for a surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation was cigarette smoking. Plate fixation and temporary external fixation are likely surrogates for more complex injuries, therefore no recommendations should be inferred from this association. Surgeons should counsel patients who smoke. Level IV, prognostic study.

  5. Antibiotic-Releasing Silk Biomaterials for Infection Prevention and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Pritchard, Eleanor M.; Valentin, Thomas; Panilaitis, Bruce; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Effective treatment of infections in avascular and necrotic tissues can be challenging due to limited penetration into the target tissue and systemic toxicities. Controlled release polymer implants have the potential to achieve the high local concentrations needed while also minimizing systemic exposure. Silk biomaterials possess unique characteristics for antibiotic delivery including biocompatibility, tunable biodegradation, stabilizing effects, water-based processing and diverse material f...

  6. Infection Prevention and Control in Deployed Military Medical Treatment Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    to surgery in 1867.31 Supported by the discoveries of Louis Pasteur (in the 1850s–1860s) that germs (bacteria) were the cause of putrification (pus...Kirkup BC Jr, et al. Surveillance, characterisation, and preservation of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Lancet Infect Dis. 2011;11: 8–10. 50. Lesho E

  7. [Social marketing: applying commercial strategies to the prevention of nosocomial infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sax, Hugo; Longtin, Yves; Alvarez-Ceyssat, Raymonde; Bonfillon, Chantal; Cavallero, Sabrina; Dayer, Pierre; Ginet, Claude; Herrault, Pascale

    2009-04-01

    Although a large proportion of healthcare-associated infections are avoidable, healthcare workers do not always practice evidence-based preventive strategies. Marketing technologies might help to improve patient safety. This article presents the basic principles of marketing and its potential use to promote good infection control practices. The marketing mix (Product, Price, Place, and Promotion) should be taken into account to induce behaviour change. By placing the emphasis on the perceived "profits" for healthcare workers the approach might lose its moral aspect and gain in effectiveness. VigiGerme, a non-commercial registered trademark, applies social marketing techniques to infection control and prevention.

  8. Post-operative Wound Site Infection Caused by Nocardia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunayana M. Jangla

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A61 year old diabetic female who was a known case of breast carcinoma and had undergone mastectomy was admitted with discharge from the post-operative wound site. Nocardia species was isolated from the discharge. She responded to treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.

  9. Mouse papillomavirus infections spread to cutaneous sites with progression to malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cladel, Nancy M; Budgeon, Lynn R; Cooper, Timothy K; Balogh, Karla K; Christensen, Neil D; Myers, Roland; Majerciak, Vladimir; Gotte, Deanna; Zheng, Zhi-Ming; Hu, Jiafen

    2017-09-25

    We report secondary cutaneous infections in the mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV1)/mouse model. Our previous study demonstrated that cutaneous MmuPV1 infection could spread to mucosal sites. Recently, we observed that mucosal infections could also spread to various cutaneous sites including the back, tail, muzzle and mammary tissues. The secondary site lesions were positive for viral DNA, viral capsid protein and viral particles as determined by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy analyses, respectively. We also demonstrated differential viral production and tumour growth at different secondarily infected skin sites. For example, fewer viral particles were detected in the least susceptible back tissues when compared with those in the infected muzzle and tail, although similar amounts of viral DNA were detected. Follow-up studies demonstrated that significantly lower amounts of viral DNA were packaged in the back lesions. Lavages harvested from the oral cavity and lower genital tracts were equally infectious at both cutaneous and mucosal sites, supporting the broad tissue tropism of this papillomavirus. Importantly, two secondary skin lesions on the forearms of two mice displayed a malignant phenotype at about 9.5 months post-primary infection. Therefore, MmuPV1 induces not only dysplasia at mucosal sites such as the vagina, anus and oral cavity but also skin carcinoma at cutaneous sites. These findings demonstrate that MmuPV1 mucosal infection can be spread to cutaneous sites and suggest that the model could serve a useful role in the study of the viral life cycle and pathogenesis of papillomavirus.

  10. On-site and off-site forensic analysis capabilities for proliferation and terrorism prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whipple, R.E.; Nunes, P.J.; Reynolds, J.G.; Alcaraz, A.; Hart, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: We will present current on-site technologies that can be utilized for the screening of explosives, chemical agents, and environmental contaminants. These techniques must have the capability to detect various hazardous materials at very low levels, since they pose a major challenge for first responders. Specifically, the technology must detect concealed explosives or chemical agents on-site rapidly. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently developing several different high explosive screening and detection technologies for field use. Two technologies that have demonstrated an ability to screen for explosives at low levels are colorimetric spot tests and thin layer chromatography (TLC). Another technology that has demonstrated usefulness for the on-site analysis of unknowns is portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) sampling. Several examples utilizing these technologies and their usefulness will be presented. In addition to developing on-site screening methods, LLNL is an Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) designated laboratory and is certified to accept CW suspect samples. Currently, LLNL is expanding its ISO-17025 certification to include nuclear forensics and explosives. These off-site forensic analysis capabilities and certified procedures will support the needs for homeland security. We will highlight some of the ISO-17025 requirements to accredit procedures, handle samples, and reports. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-ENG-48

  11. On-site and off-site forensic analysis capabilities for proliferation and terrorism prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, B.R.; Whipple, R.E.; Nunes, P.J.; Reynolds, J.G.; Alcaraz, A.

    2004-01-01

    We present current on-site technologies that can be utilized for the screening of explosives, chemical agents, and environmental contaminants. These techniques must have the capability to detect various hazardous materials at very low levels, since they pose a major challenge for first responders. Specifically, the technology must detect concealed explosives or chemical agents on-site rapidly. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently developing several different high explosive screening and detection technologies for field use. Two technologies that have demonstrated an ability to screen for explosives at low levels are colorimetric spot tests and thin layer chromatography (TLC). Another technology that has demonstrated usefulness for the on-site analysis of unknowns is portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) sampling. Several examples utilizing these technologies and their usefulness will be presented. In addition to developing on-site screening methods, LLNL is an Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) designated laboratory and is certified to accept CW suspect samples. Currently, LLNL is expanding its ISO-17025 certification to include nuclear forensics and explosives. These off-site forensic analysis capabilities and certified procedures will support the needs for homeland security. We will highlight some of the ISO-17025 requirements to accredit procedures, handle samples, and reports. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-ENG-48. (author)

  12. Pre-operative antibiotic use reduces surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Asad Ali; Farooka, Muhammad Waris; Ayyaz, Mahmood; Sarwar, Hassan; Malik, Awais Amjad; Shabbir, Faisal

    2015-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of World Health Organisation Surgical Safety Checklist as a simple, reliable and effective tool to ensure appropriate administration of intravenous antibiotics. The prospective interventional study was conducted in three phases at Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from May 2011 to January 2012. The first phase comprised baseline data collection, followed by implementation of World Health Organisation Surgical Safety Checklist, and finally post-implementation data collection. The duration of each phase was 3 months. Primary end points were discharge from hospital, 30 days or death of the patient. Of the 613 patients in the study, 303(49.4%) were in the pre-implementation phase and 310(50.5%) in post-implementation phase. Adherence of optimal administration of antibiotic increased from 114(37.6%) to 282(91%) (poperative infection fell from 99(32.7%) to 47(15.2%) (psite infection by more than half. Hospital stay was shortened by 1.3 days on average which results in considerable reduction in morbidity, mortality and costs.

  13. Second-site prosthetic joint infection in patients with multiple prosthetic joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clesham, Kevin; Hughes, Andrew J; O' hEireamhoin, Sven; Fleming, Catherine; Murphy, Colin G

    2018-04-10

    Prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are among the most serious complications in arthroplasty. A second-site PJI in patients with multiple prosthetic joints increases morbidity, with many requiring further revision procedures. We aimed to establish why some patients with multiple joints develop second-site infections. Our institution's arthroplasty database was reviewed from 2004 to 2017. All PJIs were identified, and all patients with more than one prosthetic joint in situ were included. We recorded risk factors, causative organisms, number of procedures and length of stay. Forty-four patients meeting the criteria were identified. Four patients (9.1%) developed second-site infection. Eight patients (18.2%) developed re-infection of the primary PJI. Positive MRSA carrier status and PJI of a total knee replacement were associated with an increased risk of a second episode of infection. Patients who developed further infection had more frequent admission and longer lengths of stay than isolated PJIs. Higher morbidity and use of hospital resources are associated with this cohort of patients. PJIs in total knee replacements and positive MRSA status are associated with higher rates of second infection. Identifying this vulnerable cohort of patients at an early stage is critical to ensure measures are taken to reduce the risks of further infection.

  14. The level of nurses’ knowledge of the prevention of nosocomial infections – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Gąska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A basic element in preventing and combating nosocomial infections is the medical personnel knowledge. It is up to health care workers to determine whether the hospital environment will be safe for both patients and those employed in this sector. The aim of the study was to present the level of nursing staff knowledge of nosocomial infections. Materials and methods. The research was carried out in the Podkarpackie Center of Cardiovascular Interventions in Sanok. The study group consisted of all nurses working in the Hemodynamic Department - 20 people. The tests were carried out using the diagnostic survey method. The research tool was the author's questionnaire. Results. The nurses were aware that the scale of the problem of nosocomial infections was important. Almost all nurses rated their level of knowledge of hospital-acquired infections very well. However, the full definition of the term "nosocomial infections" was not given by about a quarter of respondents. In hospitals nurses did not always follow the rules of aseptic and antiseptic treatment. In addition, they did not see the need to educate patients and their families about the prevention of infections. Conclusions. Hospitals should carry out monitoring of nurses’ compliance with the procedures that are aimed at the elimination of ward infections and should consistently strive at their best to apply these procedures at their workplace. The ward staff should be involved in the education of patients and their families in the prevention of nosocomial infections.

  15. Destructive disinfection of infected brood prevents systemic disease spread in ant colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pull, Christopher D; Ugelvig, Line V; Wiesenhofer, Florian; Grasse, Anna V; Tragust, Simon; Schmitt, Thomas; Brown, Mark Jf; Cremer, Sylvia

    2018-01-09

    In social groups, infections have the potential to spread rapidly and cause disease outbreaks. Here, we show that in a social insect, the ant Lasius neglectus , the negative consequences of fungal infections ( Metarhizium brunneum ) can be mitigated by employing an efficient multicomponent behaviour, termed destructive disinfection, which prevents further spread of the disease through the colony. Ants specifically target infected pupae during the pathogen's non-contagious incubation period, utilising chemical 'sickness cues' emitted by pupae. They then remove the pupal cocoon, perforate its cuticle and administer antimicrobial poison, which enters the body and prevents pathogen replication from the inside out. Like the immune system of a metazoan body that specifically targets and eliminates infected cells, ants destroy infected brood to stop the pathogen completing its lifecycle, thus protecting the rest of the colony. Hence, in an analogous fashion, the same principles of disease defence apply at different levels of biological organisation.

  16. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H.K.; Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. OBJECTIVES......: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search May 2008) and PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic...... fibrosis (last search May 2008). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic fibrosis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The authors independently selected trials...

  17. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....... This is an update of a previously published review. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search 30...... March 2015). We previously searched PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic fibrosis (last search 30 May 2013). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic...

  18. Infective endocarditis in patients on haemodialysis - possible strategies for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oun, Hadi A; Price, Andrew J; Traynor, Jamie P

    2016-05-01

    Infective endocarditis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients receiving haemodialysis for established renal failure. We carried out a prospective audit of patients developing infective endocarditis in a single renal unit. From 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2013, we collected data on all cases of endocarditis occurring in patients receiving haemodialysis at Monklands Hospital, Airdrie. Twenty-nine patients developed endocarditis during our audit period. Twenty-three (79.3%) of the patients had pre-existing cardiac valve abnormalities such as regurgitation or calcification. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common microorganism cultured from the blood of 22 patients (75.9%). MRSA bacteraemia was identified in eight of these patients and all eight patients died during that first presentation. Different strategies were introduced within the unit during the audit period aiming to reduce the rate of bacteraemia. Since 2011, a successful strategy has been introduced under the auspices of the Scottish Patient Safety Programme. This led to our Staph aureus bacteraemia rate related to non-tunnelled venous catheters going from an average of 15 days between episodes to having had no episodes between 2 December 2011 and the end of the study period (760 days). This also appears to have had a positive impact on reducing the rate of endocarditis. Infective endocarditis remains a devastating consequence of bacteraemia in patients receiving haemodialysis. An effective strategy aimed at reducing the rate of bacteraemia appears to have a similar effect on the rate of endocarditis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Malaria, preventive practices and vector infectivity studies in Makurdi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred questionnaires were administered for information on the use of preventive practices. Four hundred and twenty-fourmosquitoes were collected from Kanshio (sub-urban) and Old GRA (urban) using Human Landing Catch, aspirator and hand net. Vectors were identified morphologically, sexed and dissected.

  20. Strategies for Prevention and Treatment of Trichomonas vaginalis Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchemal, Kawthar; Bories, Christian; Loiseau, Philippe M

    2017-07-01

    The last estimated annual incidence of Trichomonas vaginalis worldwide exceeds that of chlamydia and gonorrhea combined. This critical review updates the state of the art on advances in T. vaginalis diagnostics and strategies for treatment and prevention of trichomoniasis. In particular, new data on treatment outcomes for topical administration of formulations are reviewed and discussed. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Changes in gastric microbiota induced by Helicobacter pylori infection and preventive effects of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY 2013 against such infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Mingfang; Wan, Cuixiang; Xie, Qiong; Huang, Renhui; Tao, Xueying; Shah, Nagendra P; Wei, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative pathogen linked to gastric ulcers and stomach cancer. Gastric microbiota might play an essential role in the pathogenesis of these stomach diseases. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of a probiotic candidate Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY 2013 as a protective agent against the gastric mucosal inflammation and alteration of gastric microbiota induced by H. pylori infection in a mouse model. Prior to infection, mice were pretreated with or without 400 µL of L. plantarum ZDY 2013 at a concentration of 10(9) cfu/mL per mouse. At 6 wk postinfection, gastric mucosal immune response and alteration in gastric microbiota mice were examined by quantitative real-time PCR and high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, respectively. The results showed that L. plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreatment prevented increase in inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-1β and IFN-γ) and inflammatory cell infiltration in gastric lamina propria induced by H. pylori infection. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinate analysis showed that L. plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreatment prevented the alteration in gastric microbiota post-H. pylori infection. Linear discriminant analysis coupled with effect size identified 22 bacterial taxa (e.g., Pasteurellaceae, Erysipelotrichaceae, Halomonadaceae, Helicobacteraceae, and Spirochaetaceae) that overgrew in the gastric microbiota of H. pylori-infected mice, and most of them belonged to the Proteobacteria phylum. Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreatment prevented this alteration; only 6 taxa (e.g., Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Clostridiaceae), mainly from the taxa of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, were dominant in the gastric microbiota of the L. plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreated mice. Administration of L. plantarum ZDY 2013 for 3 wk led to increase in several bacterial taxa (e.g., Rikenella, Staphylococcus, Bifidobacterium), although a nonsignificant alteration was found in the gastric microbiota

  2. INFECTION AFTER RADICAL ABDOMINAL HYSTERECTOMY AND PELVIC LYMPHADENECTOMY - PREVENTION OF INFECTION WITH A 2-DOSE PERIOPERATIVE ANTIBIOTIC-PROPHYLAXIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOUMA, J

    1993-01-01

    Surgical site-related infections occurred in 21% of 87 consecutive patients undergoing radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy (RHPL) without planned peri-operative prophylaxis. A prospective, randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 68 consecutive RHPL patients.

  3. HIV treatment as prevention: debate and commentary--will early infection compromise treatment-as-prevention strategies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myron S Cohen

    Full Text Available Universal HIV testing and immediate antiretroviral therapy for infected individuals has been proposed as a way of reducing the transmission of HIV and thereby bringing the HIV epidemic under control. It is unclear whether transmission during early HIV infection--before individuals are likely to have been diagnosed with HIV and started on antiretroviral therapy--will compromise the effectiveness of treatment as prevention. This article presents two opposing viewpoints by Powers, Miller, and Cohen, and Williams and Dye, followed by a commentary by Fraser.

  4. Enhanced surveillance of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia to identify targets for infection prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A K; Russell, C D

    2016-06-01

    Surveillance of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) in Scotland is limited to the number of infections per 100,000 acute occupied bed-days and susceptibility to meticillin. To demonstrate the value of enhanced SAB surveillance to identify targets for infection prevention. Prospective cohort study of all patients identified with SAB over a five-year period in a single health board in Scotland. All patients were reviewed at the bedside by a clinical microbiologist. In all, 556 SAB episodes were identified: 261 (46.6%) were hospital-acquired; 209 (37.9%) were healthcare-associated; 80 (14.4%) were community-acquired; and in six (1.1%) the origin of infection was not hospital-acquired, but could not be separated into healthcare-associated or community-acquired. These were classified as non-hospital-acquired. Meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteraemia was associated with hospital-acquired and healthcare-associated infections. In addition, there was a significantly higher 30-day mortality associated with hospital-acquired (31.4%) and healthcare-associated (16.3%) infections compared to community-acquired SAB (8.7%). Vascular access devices were associated with hospital-acquired SAB and peripheral venous cannulas were the source for most of these (43.9%). Community-acquired infections were associated with intravenous drug misuse, respiratory tract infections and skeletal and joint infections. Skin and soft tissue infections were more widely seen in healthcare-associated infections. The data indicate that enhanced surveillance of SAB by origin of infection and source of bacteraemia has implications for infection prevention, empirical antibiotic therapy, and health improvement interventions. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Probiotics for the Primary and Secondary Prevention of C. difficile Infections: A Meta-analysis and Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne V. McFarland

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infections are a global clinical concern and are one of the leading causes of nosocomial outbreaks. Preventing these infections has benefited from multidisciplinary infection control strategies and new antibiotics, but the problem persists. Probiotics are effective in preventing antibiotic-associated diarrhea and may also be a beneficial strategy for C. difficile infections, but randomized controlled trials are scarce. This meta-analysis pools 21 randomized, controlled trials for primary prevention of C. difficile infections (CDI and four trials for secondary prevention of C. difficile recurrences and assesses the efficacy of specific probiotic strains. Four probiotics significantly improved primary CDI prevention: (Saccharomyces boulardii, Lactobacillus casei DN114001, a mixture of L. acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum, and a mixture of L. acidophilus, L. casei and L. rhamnosus. None of the tested probiotics significantly improved secondary prevention of CDI. More confirmatory randomized trials are needed to establish if probiotics are useful for preventing C. difficile infections. v

  6. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2015-08-23

    Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. This is an update of a previously published review. To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search 30 March 2015). We previously searched PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic fibrosis (last search 30 May 2013). Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic fibrosis. The authors independently selected trials, assessed them and extracted data. Six trials were identified. Two trials were excluded since they were not randomised and one old, small trial because it was not possible to assess whether is was randomised. The three included trials comprised 483, 476 and 37 patients, respectively. No data have been published from one of the large trials, but the company stated in a press release that the trial failed to confirm the results from an earlier study and that further clinical development was suspended. In the other large trial, relative risk for chronic infection was 0.91 (95% confidence interval 0.55 to 1.49), and in the small trial, the risk was also close to one. In the large trial, one patient was reported to have died in the observation period. In that trial, 227 adverse events (4 severe) were registered in the vaccine group and 91 (1 severe) in the control group. In this large trial of a vaccine developed against flagella antigens, antibody titres against the epitopes contained in the vaccine were higher in the vaccine group compared to the placebo group (P Vaccines against

  7. Hand hygiene in preventing nosocomial infections:a nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Muzio, M; Cammilletti, V; Petrelli, E; Di Simone, E

    2015-01-01

    To verify whether there is some correlation between the nursing workload and the occurrence of healthcare-associated infections. An anonymous questionnaire made up of 20 items has been drafted for this specific purpose and delivered to a sample of 70 participants, including 33 nurses and 37 nursing students of a well-known University Hospital in Rome. The study is supported by extensive documental research, and a specific literature review. Hand hygiene is a mandatory daily practice, simple but critical, but not always clear enough for both nurses and students. The investigation demonstrated inconsistencies between nurses' and students' behaviour and what is recommended by the new WHO international guidelines. The documented correlation between the workload and the occurrence of healthcare-associated infections may be explained by the negative effect of nursing workload on correct hand-washing procedures. Out of the total sample, 58.6% answered affirmatively to both the presence of healthcare-associated infections within their unit and an excessive daily workload. Indeed, the remaining 41.4% of the sample do not report an excessive workload and states that "there are no healthcare-associated infections within their operational reality, at least not in the time period covered by the present investigation". Although limited to a small sample, this study may reveal that the correct practice of hand washing, prompted and considered fundamental by WHO, is still much underrated. Hand hygiene should be better understood and practiced in all healthcare facilities, through a series of interventions such as: specific training courses, the presence of a gel sanitizer next to each patient's bed or in each patient's room, as well as the adoption of the new international guidelines in all units. The analysis of other correlations found the presence of a protective factor (RRinfections. In fact, we found no statistically significant values to support such considerations (p>0

  8. Infection prevention needs assessment in Colorado hospitals: rural and urban settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Sara M; Gilmartin, Heather; Rich, Karen L; Price, Connie S

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to conduct a needs assessment for infection prevention programs in both rural and urban hospitals in Colorado. Infection control professionals (ICPs) from Colorado hospitals participated in an online survey on training, personnel, and experience; ICP time allocation; and types of surveillance. Responses were evaluated and compared based on hospital status (rural or urban). Additionally, rural ICPs participated in an interview about resources and training. Surveys were received from 62 hospitals (77.5% response); 33 rural (75.0% response) and 29 urban (80.6% response). Fifty-two percent of rural ICPs reported multiple job responsibilities compared with 17.2% of urban ICPs. Median length of experience for rural ICPs was 4.0 years compared with 11.5 years for urban ICPs (P = .008). Fifty-one percent of rural ICPs reported no access to infectious disease physicians (0.0% urban) and 81.8% of rural hospitals reported no antimicrobial stewardship programs (31.0% urban). Through the interviews it was revealed that priorities for rural ICPs were training and communication. Our study revealed numerous differences between infection prevention programs in rural versus urban hospitals. An infection prevention outreach program established in Colorado could potentially address the challenges faced by rural hospital infection prevention departments. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Outcomes of an infection prevention project focusing on hand hygiene and isolation practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, Daleen; Sole, Mary Lou; Brown, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major health problem for hospitalized patients and their families. Since the 1800s, hand hygiene has been recognized as the single best method to prevent the spread of pathogens and nosocomial infections. Despite this fact, many healthcare workers do not adhere to hand hygiene policies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a guideline for hand hygiene practices in 2002. Multifaceted approaches to improve hand hygiene have been shown to increase compliance among healthcare workers and subsequently reduce infections. A performance improvement project was initiated to implement this guideline and other strategies to prevent nosocomial infection. This article summarizes the performance improvement processes and the preliminary outcomes on adherence to infection prevention policies related to hand hygiene and isolation practices. Clinically and statistically significant increases were noted for hand hygiene prior to patient care and in wearing masks when indicated. Nurses and patient care technicians had the greatest increases in compliance. Increases in hand hygiene after patient contact and wearing of gown and gloves were also noted, but results were not statistically significant. Nosocomial infection rates from antibiotic-resistant organisms decreased in the first surveillance, but rates increased during the 1-year surveillance. Consumption of alcohol-based foam disinfectant doubled from baseline. Findings are consistent with other published studies. The project will continue with further reinforcement and education over the second year.

  10. Facilitating central line-associated bloodstream infection prevention: a qualitative study comparing perspectives of infection control professionals and frontline staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Hefner, Jennifer L

    2014-10-01

    Infection control professionals (ICPs) play a critical role in implementing and managing healthcare-associated infection reduction interventions, whereas frontline staff are responsible for delivering direct and ongoing patient care. The objective of our study was to determine if ICPs and frontline staff have different perspectives about the facilitators and challenges of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) prevention program success. We conducted key informant interviews at 8 hospitals that participated in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality CLABSI prevention initiative called "On the CUSP: Stop BSI." We analyzed interview data from 50 frontline nurses and 26 ICPs to identify common themes related to program facilitators and challenges. We identified 4 facilitators of CLABSI program success: education, leadership, data, and consistency. We also identified 3 common challenges: lack of resources, competing priorities, and physician resistance. However, the perspective of ICPs and frontline nurses differed. Whereas ICPs tended to focus on general descriptions, frontline staff noted program specifics and often discussed concrete examples. Our results suggest that ICPs need to take into account the perspectives of staff nurses when implementing infection control and broader quality improvement initiatives. Further, the deliberate inclusion of frontline staff in the implementation of these programs may be critical to program success. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Electronic surveillance systems in infection prevention: organizational support, program characteristics, and user satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grota, Patti G; Stone, Patricia W; Jordan, Sarah; Pogorzelska, Monika; Larson, Elaine

    2010-09-01

    The use of electronic surveillance systems (ESSs) is gradually increasing in infection prevention and control programs. Little is known about the characteristics of hospitals that have a ESS, user satisfaction with ESSs, and organizational support for implementation of ESSs. A total of 350 acute care hospitals in California were invited to participate in a Web-based survey; 207 hospitals (59%) agreed to participate. The survey included a description of infection prevention and control department staff, where and how they spent their time, a measure of organizational support for infection prevention and control, and reported experience with ESSs. Only 23% (44/192) of responding infection prevention and control departments had an ESS. No statistically significant difference was seen in how and where infection preventionists (IPs) who used an ESS and those who did not spend their time. The 2 significant predictors of whether an ESS was present were score on the Organizational Support Scale (odds ratio [OR], 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.18) and hospital bed size (OR, 1.004; 95% CI, 1.00-1.007). Organizational support also was positively correlated with IP satisfaction with the ESS, as measured on the Computer Usability Scale (P = .02). Despite evidence that such systems may improve efficiency of data collection and potentially improve patient outcomes, ESSs remain relatively uncommon in infection prevention and control programs. Based on our findings, organizational support appears to be a major predictor of the presence, use, and satisfaction with ESSs in infection prevention and control programs.

  12. Electronic surveillance systems in infection prevention: Organizational support, program characteristics, and user satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grota, Patti G.; Stone, Patricia W.; Jordan, Sarah; Pogorzelska, Monika; Larson, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of electronic surveillance systems (ESSs) is gradually increasing in infection prevention and control programs. Little is known about the characteristics of hospitals that have a ESS, user satisfaction with ESSs, and organizational support for implementation of ESSs. Methods A total of 350 acute care hospitals in California were invited to participate in a Web-based survey; 207 hospitals (59%) agreed to participate. The survey included a description of infection prevention and control department staff, where and how they spent their time, a measure of organizational support for infection prevention and control, and reported experience with ESSs. Results Only 23% (44/192) of responding infection prevention and control departments had an ESS. No statistically significant difference was seen in how and where infection preventionists (IPs) who used an ESS and those who did not spend their time. The 2 significant predictors of whether an ESS was present were score on the Organizational Support Scale (odds ratio [OR], 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.18) and hospital bed size (OR, 1.004; 95% CI, 1.00-1.007). Organizational support also was positively correlated with IP satisfaction with the ESS, as measured on the Computer Usability Scale (P = .02). Conclusion Despite evidence that such systems may improve efficiency of data collection and potentially improve patient outcomes, ESSs remain relatively uncommon in infection prevention and control programs. Based on our findings, organizational support appears to be a major predictor of the presence, use, and satisfaction with ESSs in infection prevention and control programs. PMID:20176411

  13. Fluid Overload and Cumulative Thoracostomy Output Are Associated With Surgical Site Infection After Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochet, Anthony A; Nyhan, Aoibhinn; Spaeder, Michael C; Cartron, Alexander M; Song, Xiaoyan; Klugman, Darren; Brown, Anna T

    2017-08-01

    To determine the impact of cumulative, postoperative thoracostomy output, amount of bolus IV fluids and peak fluid overload on the incidence and odds of developing a deep surgical site infection following pediatric cardiothoracic surgery. A single-center, nested, retrospective, matched case-control study. A 26-bed cardiac ICU in a 303-bed tertiary care pediatric hospital. Cases with deep surgical site infection following cardiothoracic surgery were identified retrospectively from January 2010 through December 2013 and individually matched to controls at a ratio of 1:2 by age, gender, Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery score, Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgery category, primary cardiac diagnosis, and procedure. None. Twelve cases with deep surgical site infection were identified and matched to 24 controls without detectable differences in perioperative clinical characteristics. Deep surgical site infection cases had larger thoracostomy output and bolus IV fluid volumes at 6, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively compared with controls. For every 1 mL/kg of thoracostomy output, the odds of developing a deep surgical site infection increase by 13%. By receiver operative characteristic curve analysis, a cutoff of 49 mL/kg of thoracostomy output at 48 hours best discriminates the development of deep surgical site infection (sensitivity 83%, specificity 83%). Peak fluid overload was greater in cases than matched controls (12.5% vs 6%; p operative characteristic curve analysis, a threshold value of 10% peak fluid overload was observed to identify deep surgical site infection (sensitivity 67%, specificity 79%). Conditional logistic regression of peak fluid overload greater than 10% on the development of deep surgical site infection yielded an odds ratio of 9.4 (95% CI, 2-46.2). Increased postoperative peak fluid overload and cumulative thoracostomy output were associated with deep surgical site infection after pediatric

  14. Probiotics for Treatment and Prevention of Urogenital Infections in Women: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Lisa; VandeVusse, Leona; Jermé, Martha; Abad, Cybéle L; Safdar, Nasia

    2016-05-01

    Probiotics are a complementary and integrative therapy useful in the treatment and prevention of urogenital infections in women. This study extends the work of researchers who systematically investigated the scientific literature on probiotics to prevent or treat urogenital infections. A systematic review was conducted to determine the efficacy of probiotics for prevention and/or treatment of urogenital infections in adult women from January 1, 2008, through June 30, 2015. We searched in CINAHL, MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, Dissertations and Theses, and Alt-HealthWatch. After removing duplicates and studies that did not meet inclusion criteria, 20 studies were reviewed. All included at least one species of Lactobacillus probiotic as an intervention for treatment or prevention of urogenital infections. Data extracted included samples, settings, study designs, intervention types, reported outcomes, follow-up periods, and results. We evaluated all randomized controlled trials for risk of bias and made quality appraisals on all studies. Fourteen of the studies focused on bacterial vaginosis (BV), 3 on urinary tract infections (UTIs), 2 on vulvovaginal candidiasis, and one on human papillomavirus (HPV) as identified on Papanicolaou test. Studies were heterogeneous in terms of design, intervention, and outcomes. Four studies were of good quality, 9 of fair, and 7 poor. Probiotic interventions were effective for treatment and prevention of BV, prevention of recurrences of candidiasis and UTIs, and clearing HPV lesions. No study reported significant adverse events related to the probiotic intervention. The quality of the studies in this systematic review varied. Although clinical practice recommendations were limited by the strength of evidence, probiotic interventions were effective in treatment and prevention of urogenital infections as alternatives or co-treatments. More good quality research is needed to strengthen the body

  15. N-Methyl-d-Aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Blockade Prevents Neuronal Death Induced by Zika Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Vivian V; Del Sarto, Juliana L; Rocha, Rebeca F; Silva, Flavia R; Doria, Juliana G; Olmo, Isabella G; Marques, Rafael E; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Foureaux, Giselle; Araújo, Julia Maria S; Cramer, Allysson; Real, Ana Luíza C V; Ribeiro, Lucas S; Sardi, Silvia I; Ferreira, Anderson J; Machado, Fabiana S; de Oliveira, Antônio C; Teixeira, Antônio L; Nakaya, Helder I; Souza, Danielle G; Ribeiro, Fabiola M; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2017-04-25

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is a global health emergency that causes significant neurodegeneration. Neurodegenerative processes may be exacerbated by N -methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent neuronal excitoxicity. Here, we have exploited the hypothesis that ZIKV-induced neurodegeneration can be rescued by blocking NMDA overstimulation with memantine. Our results show that ZIKV actively replicates in primary neurons and that virus replication is directly associated with massive neuronal cell death. Interestingly, treatment with memantine or other NMDAR blockers, including dizocilpine (MK-801), agmatine sulfate, or ifenprodil, prevents neuronal death without interfering with the ability of ZIKV to replicate in these cells. Moreover, in vivo experiments demonstrate that therapeutic memantine treatment prevents the increase of intraocular pressure (IOP) induced by infection and massively reduces neurodegeneration and microgliosis in the brain of infected mice. Our results indicate that the blockade of NMDARs by memantine provides potent neuroprotective effects against ZIKV-induced neuronal damage, suggesting it could be a viable treatment for patients at risk for ZIKV infection-induced neurodegeneration. IMPORTANCE Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is a global health emergency associated with serious neurological complications, including microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Infection of experimental animals with ZIKV causes significant neuronal damage and microgliosis. Treatment with drugs that block NMDARs prevented neuronal damage both in vitro and in vivo These results suggest that overactivation of NMDARs contributes significantly to the neuronal damage induced by ZIKV infection, and this is amenable to inhibition by drug treatment. Copyright © 2017 Costa et al.

  16. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-07-01

    Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics.

  17. Effect of Unshaven Hair with Absorbable Sutures and Early Postoperative Shampoo on Cranial Surgery Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Won-Oak; Yeom, Insun; Kim, Dong-Seok; Park, Eun-Kyung; Shim, Kyu-Won

    2018-01-01

    Cranial surgical site infection is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitals. Preoperative hair shaving for cranial neurosurgical procedures is performed traditionally in an attempt to protect patients against complications from infections at cranial surgical sites. However, preoperative shaving of surgical incision sites using traditional surgical blades without properly washing the head after surgery can cause infections at surgical sites. Therefore, a rapid protocol in which the scalp remains unshaven and absorbable sutures are used for scalp closure with early postoperative shampooing is examined in this study. A retrospective comparative study was conducted from January 2008 to December 2012. A total of 2,641 patients who underwent unshaven cranial surgery with absorbable sutures for scalp closure were enrolled in this study. Data of 1,882 patients who underwent surgery with the traditional protocol from January 2005 to December 2007 were also analyzed for comparison. Of 2,641 patients who underwent cranial surgery with the rapid protocol, all but 2 (0.07%) patients experienced satisfactory wound healing. Of 1,882 patients who underwent cranial surgery with the traditional protocol, 3 patients (0.15%) had infections. Each infection occurred at the superficial incisional surgical site. Unshaven cranial surgery using absorbable sutures for scalp closure with early postoperative shampooing is safe and effective in the cranial neurosurgery setting. This protocol has a positive psychological effect. It can help patients accept neurosurgical procedures and improve their self-image after the operation. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. [Incidence of surgical site infections in sub-Saharan Africa: systematic review and meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngaroua; Ngah, Joseph Eloundou; Bénet, Thomas; Djibrilla, Yaouba

    2016-01-01

    Surgical Site Infections (SSI) cause morbi-mortality and additional healthcare expenditures. Developing countries are the most affected. The objective was to estimate the pooled incidence of SSI in Sub-Saharan Africa and describe its major risk factors. Systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted using the databases of the World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa, PubMed and standard search to select electronic articles published between 2006 and 2015. Only articles investigating SSI impact and risk factors in Sub-Saharan African countries were retained. Out of 95 articles found, 11 met the inclusion criteria. Only 9 countries out of 45 have contributed, with a huge amount of information coming from Nigeria (5 articles out of 11). The impact of SSI ranged from 6.8% to 26% with predominance in general surgery. The pooled incidence of SSI was 14.8% (95% CI: 15,5-16,2%) with significant heterogeneity according to the specialty and the method of monitoring. Most cited risk factors were long procedure length and categories 3 and 4 of Altemeier contamination class. Other factors included hospital environment, inadequate care practices and underlying pathologies. SSI incidence is high in Sub-Saharan Africa. Studies in this area could improve knowledge, prevention and control of these multiple risk factors.

  19. Umbilical Microflora, Antiseptic Skin Preparation, and Surgical Site Infection in Abdominal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeff, Jörg; Erkan, Mert; Jäger, Carsten; Menacher, Maximilian; Gebhardt, Friedemann; Hartel, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) following abdominal surgery are frequent and a major cause of postoperative morbidity and prolonged hospital stay. Besides antibiotic prophylaxis, antiseptic skin preparation is an important measure to prevent SSI. Here we prospectively analyzed the effectiveness of antiseptic skin preparation in a cohort of 93 patients undergoing laparotomy, with special emphasis on the umbilical region. The microflora of the umbilicus contained a large number of resident (mostly staphylococci species and corynebacteria) and transient germs (including enterococci species). Following antiseptic skin preparation, bacteria could still be cultured from 24.7% of the patients' umbilici. In case of postoperative SSI, only one of seven SSI was caused by the microorganism that was present in the umbilicus before and after skin preparation. Antiseptic skin preparation fails to completely eradicate the microflora of the umbilical region in one quarter of the patients. However, at least in abdominal surgery, the vast majority of SSI are caused by intra-abdominal contamination rather than the skin microflora.

  20. 73. Surgical site infection after CABG: Root cause analysis and quality measures recommendation SSI quality improvement project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arifi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infection (SSI, is a preventable and devastating complication with significant morbidity after cardiac surgery. The reported SSI rate at our center, ranging from 3.4% to 11.2% (2007–2013. This rate is considered to be above the standardized rate recommended by the NHSN. Quality improvement project team to address the issue of SSI, (SCIP, where formed by the medical administration late 2014. The aim of the study was to identify SSI risk factors at our cardiac surgical unit, using evidence based practices while taking a local approach to problem solving. We performed Root Cause Analysis (RCA, and we applied other quality improvement tools to identify the area for potential improvement. Data include a Process Map of the pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative factors that might contribute to SSI risk. We prospectively used the RCA form to investigate all the stages of the patient process map (pre, intra op, and post operatively. The data included the Patient related factors, the sterilization and the hygiene practice in the operating room, and the operating room traffic, and the compliance to the bundle of care. Figure represent the “Fishbone” diagram of the possible causes of SSI after cardiac surgery in our unit. Demographic features of patients with SSI were as follows: mean age-65 years; female 83%; time to infection (mean 101 days; range 1–36 days;. The root cause analysis identified a significant weakness in the compliance to the bundle of care to prevent SSI. Furthermore, the patient flow, the operating theatre cleaning and traffic was also identified as a contributing factor to SSI. Surgical site infection after cardiac surgery is a preventable complication. The application of the evidence based practice and structured way of thinking in problem solving, will help identify the potential risk factors. Focusing on solving the right patient process and visually represents the problem will help identifying the

  1. Surveillance of surgical site infection after cholecystectomy using the hospital in Europe link for infection control through surveillance protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanic, Branko; Bosnjak, Zrinka; Budimir, Ana; Augustin, Goran; Milosevic, Milan; Plecko, Vanda; Kalenic, Smilja; Fiolic, Zlatko; Vanek, Maja

    2013-06-01

    The third most common healthcare-associated infection is surgical site infection (SSI), accounting for 14%-16% of infections. These SSIs are associated with high morbidity, numerous deaths, and greater cost. A prospective study was conducted to assess the incidence of SSI in a single university hospital in Croatia. We used the Hospital in Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance (HELICS) protocol for surveillance. The SSIs were classified using the standard definition of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) system. The overall incidence of SSI was 1.44%. The incidence of infection in the open cholecystectomy group was 6.06%, whereas in the laparoscopic group, it was only 0.60%. The incidence density of in-hospital SSIs per 1,000 post-operative days was 5.76. Patients who underwent a laparoscopic cholecystectomy were significantly younger (53.65±14.65 vs. 64.42±14.17 years; pconcept for the monitoring of SSI, but in the case of cholecystectomy, additional factors such as antibiotic appropriateness, gallbladder entry, empyema of the gallbladder, and obstructive jaundice must be considered.

  2. Urinary tract infections in extended care facilities: preventive management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regal, Randolph E; Pham, Co Q D; Bostwick, Thomas R

    2006-05-01

    To provide health care professionals with an overview of interventions that may be done to reduce the incidence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in elderly patients, especially those residing in extended care facilities. A Medline search of the English literature was performed from 1980 to January 2006 to find literature relevant to urinary tract prophylaxis. Further references were hand-searched from relevant sources. When assessing the effectiveness of various clinical interventions for reducing the incidence of UTIs in the elderly, preference was given to more recent, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized studies, but studies of less robust design also were included in the discussions when the former were lacking. Where possible, recent publications were favored over older studies. References were all reviewed by the authors and chosen to present key citations. Data selection was prioritized to address specific subtopics. Though still frequent in occurrence and quite costly in terms of morbidity, mortality, and cost to the health care system, numerous measures may be taken to ameliorate the incidence of UTIs in elderly, institutionalized residents. First and foremost, establishing and adhering to good infection-control practices by health care givers and minimizing the use of indwelling catheters are essential. Adequate staffing and training are germane to this effort. Reasonably well-designed clinical studies also give credence to the use of topical estrogens and lactobacillus "probiotics" for female subgroups and cranberry juice for a wider array of patients. Vitamin C is of no proven benefit. With regard to antibiotics, with the relative paucity of data available for this patient population, concerns for resistance proliferation must be balanced against perceived gains in UTI reduction.

  3. [Tuberculosis and HIV infection: experience of the national tuberculosis prevention program in Djibouti: 1990-1996].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renoux, E; Matan, A Barreh; Sevre, J P; Mohamed Ali, I; Chami, D; Vincent, V

    2002-01-01

    Based on analysis of data collected from the national tuberculosis prevention program in Djibouti between 1990 and 1996, the authors analyzed the relationship between HIV infection and tuberculosis. The study cohort comprised a total of 22,000 patients including 14,000 with documented HIV infection. Although HIV infection probably worsened the situation, it was neither the only nor the main factor involved in the resurgence of tuberculosis. Demographic growth, higher population density, and increasing poverty as well as the quality of the national tuberculosis prevention program must be taken into account. The incidence of smear-negative tuberculosis was not significantly higher in HIV-infected patients (incidence of smear positive cases, > 92%). Extrapulmonary tuberculosis especially of pleural involvement was more common (15% versus 9.4%). Treatment was effective in HIV-infected patients. If directly observed (DOT) therapy was used, there was no risk of emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis strains. Drug side-effects associated with the protocols used in Djibouti were not greater in HIV-infected patients. Most additional mortality observed in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients (10.5% versus 2%) was due to progression of HIV infection.

  4. Serologic Screening for Genital Herpes Infection: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Grossman, David C; Curry, Susan J; Davidson, Karina W; Epling, John W; García, Francisco A R; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phillips, William R; Phipps, Maureen G; Pignone, Michael P; Silverstein, Michael; Tseng, Chien-Wen

    2016-12-20

    Genital herpes is a prevalent sexually transmitted infection in the United States, occurring in almost 1 in 6 persons aged 14 to 49 years. Infection is caused by 2 subtypes of the herpes simplex virus (HSV), HSV-1 and HSV-2. Antiviral medications may provide symptomatic relief from outbreaks but do not cure HSV infection. Neonatal herpes infection, while uncommon, can result in substantial morbidity and mortality. To update the 2005 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for genital herpes. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the accuracy, benefits, and harms of serologic screening for HSV-2 infection in asymptomatic persons, including those who are pregnant, as well as the effectiveness and harms of preventive medications and behavioral counseling interventions to reduce future symptomatic episodes and transmission to others. Based on the natural history of HSV infection, its epidemiology, and the available evidence on the accuracy of serologic screening tests, the USPSTF concluded that the harms outweigh the benefits of serologic screening for genital HSV infection in asymptomatic adolescents and adults, including those who are pregnant. The USPSTF recommends against routine serologic screening for genital HSV infection in asymptomatic adolescents and adults, including those who are pregnant. (D recommendation).

  5. Where do youth in foster care receive information about preventing unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Angela L

    2012-10-01

    Adolescents in foster care are at risk for unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, including HIV infection. A study using a qualitative method was conducted to describe how and where foster youth receive reproductive health and risk reduction information to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. Participants also were asked to describe their relationship with their primary health care provider while they were in foster care. Nineteen young adults, recently emancipated from foster care, participated in individual interviews. Using grounded theory as the method of analysis, three thematic categories were generated: discomfort visiting and disclosing, receiving and not receiving the bare essentials, and learning prevention from community others. Recommendations include primary health care providers providing a confidential space for foster youth to disclose sexual activity and more opportunities for foster youth to receive reproductive and risk prevention information in the school setting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Testing the Quality Health Outcomes Model Applied to Infection Prevention in Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmartin, Heather M; Sousa, Karen H

    2016-01-01

    To test the Quality Health Outcomes Model to investigate the relationship between health care-associated infection (HAI) prevention interventions, organizational context, and HAI outcomes using structural equation modeling. Variables for adherence to the central line bundle, organizational context, and central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) were selected for this secondary data analysis from 614 US hospitals that participated in the Prevention of Nosocomial Infection and Cost-effectiveness-Refined study. One half of the dataset was used for exploration of the concepts, the second half for confirmation of the measurement models and testing of the structural model. The final model resulted in a good fit to the data (χ (1215) = 1906.86, P preventing HAIs, ongoing research is needed to reveal the exact aspects of context that influence interventions and outcomes.

  7. Using human factors engineering to improve the effectiveness of infection prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Judith; Gosbee, Laura Lin; Bessesen, Mary; Williams, Linda

    2010-08-01

    Human factors engineering is a discipline that studies the capabilities and limitations of humans and the design of devices and systems for improved performance. The principles of human factors engineering can be applied to infection prevention and control to study the interaction between the healthcare worker and the system that he or she is working with, including the use of devices, the built environment, and the demands and complexities of patient care. Some key challenges in infection prevention, such as delayed feedback to healthcare workers, high cognitive workload, and poor ergonomic design, are explained, as is how human factors engineering can be used for improvement and increased compliance with practices to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  8. Health-care-associated infections in neonates, children, and adolescents: an analysis of paediatric data from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control point-prevalence survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingg, Walter; Hopkins, Susan; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Holmes, Alison; Sharland, Mike; Suetens, Carl

    2017-04-01

    In 2011-12, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) held the first Europe-wide point-prevalence survey of health-care-associated infections in acute care hospitals. We analysed paediatric data from this survey, aiming to calculate the prevalence and type of health-care-associated infections in children and adolescents in Europe and to determine risk factors for infection in this population. Point-prevalence surveys took place from May, 2011, to November, 2012, in 1149 hospitals in EU Member States, Iceland, Norway, and Croatia. Patients present on the ward at 0800 h on the day of the survey and who were not discharged at the time of the survey were included. Data were collected by locally trained health-care workers according to patient-based or unit-based protocols. We extracted data from the ECDC database for all paediatric patients (age 0-18 years). We report adjusted prevalence for health-care-associated infections by clustering at the hospital and country level. We also calculated risk factors for development of health-care-associated infections with use of a generalised linear mixed-effects model. We analysed data for 17 273 children and adolescents from 29 countries. 770 health-care-associated infections were reported in 726 children and adolescents, corresponding to a prevalence of 4·2% (95% CI 3·7-4·8). Bloodstream infections were the most common type of infection (343 [45%] infections), followed by lower respiratory tract infections (171 [22%]), gastrointestinal infections (64 [8%]), eye, ear, nose, and throat infections (55 [7%]), urinary tract infections (37 [5%]), and surgical-site infections (34 [4%]). The prevalence of infections was highest in paediatric intensive care units (15·5%, 95% CI 11·6-20·3) and neonatal intensive care units (10·7%, 9·0-12·7). Independent risk factors for infection were age younger than 12 months, fatal disease (via ultimately and rapidly fatal McCabe scores), prolonged length of stay, and

  9. Disinfection efficacy of an ultraviolet light on film cassettes for preventive of the nosocomial infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Jeon, Yong Woong; Cho, Am

    2001-01-01

    The bacterial infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department of the S. hospital. The objective of this study was to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient prevention from nosocomial infection and for improvement of the hospital environment. The laboratory result was identified non-pathologic bacterial in the five different cassette size of the contact surface. Film cassettes were exposed to ultraviolet light for 1, 2 and 3 minutes. Ultraviolet light disinfection is proven suitable for bacterial. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. In addition education of nosocomial infection for radiographers will be required. In conclusion, ultraviolet is considered effective to irradiate bacterial. Additionally, two minutes are required to sterilize film cassettes

  10. [Surface disinfection in the context of infection prevention in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossow, A; Schaber, S; Kipp, F

    2013-03-01

    The highest proportion of nosocomial infections occurs on intensive care units (ICU) and infections with multiresistant pathogens are an ever increasing problem. Preventative measures should consist of a bundle of different measures including measures that address a specific problem and standard hygiene measures that are relevant in all areas. Specific measures in ICUs primarily aim at the prevention of ventilator associated pneumonia, blood vessel catheter associated infections and nosocomial urinary tract infections. Surface disinfection belongs to the standard hygiene measures and plays an inferior role compared to hand hygiene; however, surfaces come into focus in outbreak situations. The Commission on Hospital Hygiene (KRINKO) at the Robert Koch Institute (the German health protection agency) published recommendations regarding the cleaning and disinfection of surfaces. The frequency with which cleaning and/or disinfection is required varies according to defined areas of risk. The frequency and the disinfection agents used are documented in the disinfection plan.

  11. Disinfection efficacy of an ultraviolet light on film cassettes for preventive of the nosocomial infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol [Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Yong Woong; Cho, Am [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    The bacterial infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department of the S. hospital. The objective of this study was to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient prevention from nosocomial infection and for improvement of the hospital environment. The laboratory result was identified non-pathologic bacterial in the five different cassette size of the contact surface. Film cassettes were exposed to ultraviolet light for 1, 2 and 3 minutes. Ultraviolet light disinfection is proven suitable for bacterial. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. In addition education of nosocomial infection for radiographers will be required. In conclusion, ultraviolet is considered effective to irradiate bacterial. Additionally, two minutes are required to sterilize film cassettes.

  12. Risk factors for surgical site infection following operative ankle fracture fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, E G; Cashman, J P; Groarke, P J; Morris, S F

    2013-09-01

    Ankle fracture is a common injury and there is an increasingly greater emphasis on operative fixation. The purpose of the study was to determine the complication rate in this cohort of patients and, in doing so, determine risk factors which predispose to surgical site infection. A prospective cohort study was performed at a tertiary referral trauma center examining risk factors for surgical site infection in operatively treated ankle fractures. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed. Female gender and advancing age were determined to be the risk factors in univariate analysis. Drain usage and peri-operative pyrexia were found to be significant for infection in multivariate analysis. This study allows surgeons to identify those at increased risk of infection and counsel them appropriately. It also allows for a high level of vigilance with regard to soft tissue handling intra-operatively in this higher risk group.

  13. Observations of infection prevention and control practices in primary health care, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Guadalupe; Dolinger, Amy; Rogo, Khama; Mwaura, Njeri; Wafula, Francis; Coarasa, Jorge; Goicoechea, Ana; Das, Jishnu

    2017-07-01

    To assess compliance with infection prevention and control practices in primary health care in Kenya. We used an observational, patient-tracking tool to assess compliance with infection prevention and control practices by 1680 health-care workers during outpatient interactions with 14 328 patients at 935 health-care facilities in 2015. Compliance was assessed in five domains: hand hygiene; protective glove use; injections and blood sampling; disinfection of reusable equipment; and waste segregation. We calculated compliance by dividing the number of correct actions performed by the number of indications and evaluated associations between compliance and the health-care worker's and facility's characteristics. Across 106 464 observed indications for an infection prevention and control practice, the mean compliance was 0.318 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.315 to 0.321). The compliance ranged from 0.023 (95% CI: 0.021 to 0.024) for hand hygiene to 0.871 (95% CI: 0.866 to 0.876) for injection and blood sampling safety. Compliance was weakly associated with the facility's characteristics (e.g. public or private, or level of specialization) and the health-care worker's knowledge of, and training in, infection prevention and control practices. The observational tool was effective for assessing compliance with infection prevention and control practices across multiple domains in primary health care in a low-income country. Compliance varied widely across infection prevention and control domains. The weak associations observed between compliance and the characteristics of health-care workers and facilities, such as knowledge and the availability of supplies, suggest that a broader focus on behavioural change is required.

  14. The cost effectiveness of vancomycin for preventing infections after shoulder arthroplasty: a break-even analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, M Daniel; Daniels, Stephen D; Glerum, Kimberly M; Higgins, Laurence D

    2017-03-01

    Increasing methicillin resistance and recognition of Propionibacterium acnes as a cause of infection in shoulder arthroplasty has led to the adoption of local vancomycin powder application as a more effective method to prevent expensive periprosthetic infections. However, no study has analyzed the cost effectiveness of vancomycin powder for preventing infection after shoulder replacement. Cost data for infection-related care of 16 patients treated for deep periprosthetic shoulder infection was collected from our institution for the break-even analysis. An equation was developed and applied to the data to determine how effective vancomycin powder would need to be at reducing a baseline infection rate to make prophylactic use cost effective. The efficacy of vancomycin (absolute risk reduction [ARR]) was evaluated at different unit costs, baseline infection rates, and average costs of treating infection. We determined vancomycin to be cost effective if the initial infection rate decreased by 0.04% (ARR). Using the current costs of vancomycin reported in the literature (range: $2.50/1000 mg to $44/1000 mg), we determined vancomycin to be cost effective with an ARR range of 0.01% at a cost of $2.50/1000 mg to 0.19% at $44/1000 mg. Baseline infection rate does not influence the ARR obtained at any specific cost of vancomycin or the cost of treating infection. We have derived and used a break-even equation to assess efficacy of prophylactic antibiotics during shoulder surgery. We further demonstrated the prophylactic administration of local vancomycin powder during shoulder arthroplasty to be a highly cost-effective practice. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Probiotics in the Prevention and Treatment of Postmenopausal Vaginal Infections: Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Mo; Park, Yoo Jin

    2017-12-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) and complicated vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) are frequently occurring vaginal infections in postmenopausal women, caused by an imbalance in vaginal microflora. Postmenopausal women suffer from decreased ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone. A normal, healthy vaginal microflora mainly comprises Lactobacillus species (spp.), which act beneficially as a bacterial barrier in the vagina, interfering with uropathogens. During premenopausal period, estrogen promotes vaginal colonization by lactobacilli that metabolizing glycogen and producing lactic acid, and maintains intravaginal health by lowering the intravaginal pH level. A lower vaginal pH inhibits uropathogen growth, preventing vaginal infections. Decreased estrogen secretion in postmenopausal women depletes lactobacilli and increases intravaginal pH, resulting in increased vaginal colonization by harmful microorganisms (e.g., Enterobacter , Escherichia coli , Candida , and Gardnerella ). Probiotics positively effects on vaginal microflora composition by promoting the proliferation of beneficial microorganisms, alters the intravaginal microbiota composition, prevents vaginal infections in postmenopausal. Probiotics also reduce the symptoms of vaginal infections (e.g., vaginal discharge, odor, etc.), and are thus helpful for the treatment and prevention of BV and VVC. In this review article, we provide information on the intravaginal mechanism of postmenopausal vaginal infections, and describes the effectiveness of probiotics in the treatment and prevention of BV and VVC.

  16. State of infection prevention in US hospitals enrolled in the National Health and Safety Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Patricia W; Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Herzig, Carolyn T A; Weiner, Lindsey M; Furuya, E Yoko; Dick, Andrew; Larson, Elaine

    2014-02-01

    This report provides a national cross-sectional snapshot of infection prevention and control programs and clinician compliance with the implementation of processes to prevent health care-associated infections (HAIs) in intensive care units (ICUs). All hospitals, except Veterans Affairs hospitals, enrolled in the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) were eligible to participate. Participation involved completing a survey assessing the presence of evidence-based prevention policies and clinician adherence and joining our NHSN research group. Descriptive statistics were computed. Facility characteristics and HAI rates by ICU type were compared between respondents and nonrespondents. Of the 3,374 eligible hospitals, 975 provided data (29% response rate) on 1,653 ICUs, and there were complete data on the presence of policies in 1,534 ICUs. The average number of infection preventionists (IPs) per 100 beds was 1.2. Certification of IP staff varied across institutions, and the average hours per week devoted to data management and secretarial support were generally low. There was variation in the presence of policies and clinician adherence to these policies. There were no differences in HAI rates between respondents and nonrespondents. Guidelines for IP staffing in acute care hospitals need to be updated. In future work, we will analyze the associations between HAI rates and infection prevention and control program characteristics, as well as the inplementation of and clinician adherence to evidence-based policies. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Probiotics in the Prevention and Treatment of Postmenopausal Vaginal Infections: Review Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoo Jin

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) and complicated vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) are frequently occurring vaginal infections in postmenopausal women, caused by an imbalance in vaginal microflora. Postmenopausal women suffer from decreased ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone. A normal, healthy vaginal microflora mainly comprises Lactobacillus species (spp.), which act beneficially as a bacterial barrier in the vagina, interfering with uropathogens. During premenopausal period, estrogen promotes vaginal colonization by lactobacilli that metabolizing glycogen and producing lactic acid, and maintains intravaginal health by lowering the intravaginal pH level. A lower vaginal pH inhibits uropathogen growth, preventing vaginal infections. Decreased estrogen secretion in postmenopausal women depletes lactobacilli and increases intravaginal pH, resulting in increased vaginal colonization by harmful microorganisms (e.g., Enterobacter, Escherichia coli, Candida, and Gardnerella). Probiotics positively effects on vaginal microflora composition by promoting the proliferation of beneficial microorganisms, alters the intravaginal microbiota composition, prevents vaginal infections in postmenopausal. Probiotics also reduce the symptoms of vaginal infections (e.g., vaginal discharge, odor, etc.), and are thus helpful for the treatment and prevention of BV and VVC. In this review article, we provide information on the intravaginal mechanism of postmenopausal vaginal infections, and describes the effectiveness of probiotics in the treatment and prevention of BV and VVC. PMID:29354612

  18. Infection control in intensive care units and prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonten, M J; Weinstein, R A

    2000-12-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is considered the most frequent infection in the intensive care unit (ICU), although incidence rates depend on the diagnostic methods. Because VAP has been associated with increased mortality and greater costs for medical care, prevention remains an important goal for intensive care medicine. Selective digestive decontamination (SDD), the most frequently studied method of infection prevention, is still controversial despite more than 30 prospective randomized trials and 6 metaanalyses. SDD reduces the incidence of VAP diagnoses, but beneficial effects on duration of ventilation or ICU stay, antibiotic use, and patient survival have not been shown unequivocally. Although recent metaanalyses suggest a 20% to 40% decrease in ICU mortality for SDD used with systemic prophylaxis, this benefit should be confirmed in a large, prospective, randomized study, preferably with a cost-benefit analysis. Selection of pathogens resistant to the antibiotics used in SDD remains the most important drawback of SDD, rendering SDD contraindicated in wards with endemic resistant problems. Other methods of infection prevention that do not create a selective growth advantage for resistant microorganisms may be more useful. Among these are the use of endotracheal tubes with the possibility of continuous aspiration of subglottic secretions, oropharyngeal decontamination with antiseptics, or the semirecumbent treatment position of patients. Although these methods were successful in single studies, more data are needed. Notwithstanding the potential benefits of these interventions, such classic infection control measures as handwashing remain the cornerstone of infection prevention.

  19. Association between Pre-Operative Cefazolin Dose and Surgical Site Infection in Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppard, William J; Eberle, David G; Kugler, Nathan W; Mabrey, Danielle M; Weigelt, John A

    A fixed dose of cefazolin results in serum concentrations that decrease as body mass increases. Current national guidelines suggest a pre-operative cefazolin dose of two grams may be insufficient for patients ≥120 kg; thus a three gram dose is recommended. These recommendations, however, are based on pharmacokinetic rather than outcome data. We evaluate the efficacy of pre-operative cefazolin two gram and three gram doses as measured by the rate of surgical site infection (SSI). We conducted a retrospective review of adult patients ≥100 kg who were prescribed cefazolin as surgical prophylaxis between September 1, 2012 and May 31, 2013 at an academic medical center. Patients were excluded if cefazolin was prescribed but not administered, had a known infection at the site of surgery, or inappropriately received cefazolin prophylaxis based on surgical indication. The SSIs were identified by documentation of SSI in the medical record or findings consistent with the standard Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition. Inpatient and outpatient records up to 90 days post-operative were reviewed for delayed SSI. Four hundred eighty-three surgical cases were identified in which pre-operative cefazolin was prescribed. Forty-seven patients were excluded leaving a total of 436 patients for final analysis: 152 in the cefazolin two gram group and 284 in the three gram group. Baseline demographics were similar between groups with a mean follow-up duration of 77 days for both groups. Unadjusted SSI rates were 7.2% and 7.4% (odds ratio [OR] 0.98, p = 0.95), for the two gram and three gram groups, respectively. When differences in follow-up between groups were considered and logistic regression was adjusted with propensity score, there remained no difference in SSI rates (OR 0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.36-2.06, p = 0.77). In otherwise similar obese surgical patients weighing ≥100 kg, the administration of a pre-operative cefazolin two gram dose is

  20. Prevention of infection in children and adolescents with primary immunodeficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou-Alataki, Efimia; Hassan, Amel; Davies, E Graham

    2012-12-01

    Primary Immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) are a heterogenous group of inherited disorders that may involve one or multiple components of the immune system. PIDs are uncommon, chronic and severe disorders, in which patients cannot mount a sufficiently protective immune response, leading to an increased susceptibility to infections. This review addresses the current practices for the prevention of infection in children and adolescents with PIDs, particular covering immunisations and antimicrobial prophylaxis. Over recent years, there have been major advances in molecular and cellular understanding in the field of PIDs. Many different disorders are recognised with variable spectra of infection susceptibility depending on the particular aspects of the immune response that are affected. Immunoglobulin prophylaxis is the mainstay of treatment for PIDs and provides passive protection. Prophylactic antimicrobials are efficacious in children and adolescents with predominant defects in primary T cell immunodeficiency diseases and phagocytic disorders, and also with predominant defects in antibody production. Prophylactic antibiotics are suggested for patients with antibody deficiency diseases if recurrent infections exceed three per year, if severe infections occur despite adequate immunoglobulin replacement and in hypogammaglobulinaemic patients who have bronchiectasis. Certain immunisations are effective in antibody deficiencies, T cell deficiencies, complement deficiencies and phagocytic disorders. There are remarkably few published data relating to clinical management aimed at preventing infectious complications in children and adolescents with PIDs. The cornerstones of the prevention of infection in most PID patients are: antimicrobial prophylaxis, appropriate vaccination, immunoglobulin replacement, for the more severe cases, and regular ongoing follow-up.

  1. Host-Targeting Agents to Prevent and Cure Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeisel, Mirjam B; Crouchet, Emilie; Baumert, Thomas F; Schuster, Catherine

    2015-11-02

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) which are leading indications of liver transplantation (LT). To date, there is no vaccine to prevent HCV infection and LT is invariably followed by infection of the liver graft. Within the past years, direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have had a major impact on the management of chronic hepatitis C, which has become a curable disease in the majority of DAA-treated patients. In contrast to DAAs that target viral proteins, host-targeting agents (HTAs) interfere with cellular factors involved in the viral life cycle. By acting through a complementary mechanism of action and by exhibiting a generally higher barrier to resistance, HTAs offer a prospective option to prevent and treat viral resistance. Indeed, given their complementary mechanism of action, HTAs and DAAs can act in a synergistic manner to reduce viral loads. This review summarizes the different classes of HTAs against HCV infection that are in preclinical or clinical development and highlights their potential to prevent HCV infection, e.g., following LT, and to tailor combination treatments to cure chronic HCV infection.

  2. Scalp flora in Indian patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumors - Implications for pre-surgical site preparation and surgical site infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasgar V Moiyadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Causation of surgical site infection (SSI following craniotomy is multifactorial. Most preventive strategies (including site preparation and antibiotic prophylaxis revolve around reducing preoperative contamination of the local site. There is little evidence, however, linking site contamination with postoperative infections. This is important given the preference for performing non-shaved cranial surgery. We undertook a prospective study to document the scalp flora in neurosurgical patients in an Indian setting and to assess possible association with SSI. Materials and Methods: A prospective study recruited 45 patients undergoing non-shaved clean craniotomies for various brain tumors. Standard perioperative procedures and antibiotic policy were employed. Prior to and immediately following the pre-surgical scrubbing, we collected swabs and evaluated their growth qualitatively. SSI was documented adhering to CDC guidelines. The association of swab-positivity with various parameters (including SSI was evaluated. Results: Pre-scrub positivity was seen in 18 of 44 patients, three of them developed subsequent SSI. Most were known skin contaminants. Five patients had swab positivity after scrubbing, though none of these developed any SSI. Four of these five had pre-scrub positivity. In three the same organisms persisted (two being Staphylococcus aureus, and one had different growth post-scrub, whereas one patient developed new growth (contaminant mycelial fungus in the post-scrub swab. We did not find any association between swab positivity and SSI. Swab positivity was also not related to hair-length or hygiene. Conclusion: Scalp flora in Indian patients is similar to that described. Pre-surgical preparation does not always eliminate this contamination (especially staphylococcus. However, this does not necessarily translate into increased SSI. Moreover, the results also provide objective evidence to support the performance of non

  3. Microbicides in the prevention of HIV infection: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Jeremy

    2010-07-09

    More than 28 years since the first cases of HIV/AIDS, there is still no cure or vaccine. The worst affected region is sub-Saharan Africa and, increasingly, it is young women who are bearing the brunt of the epidemic. Consequently, there is an urgent need for HIV prevention options for women in developing countries. Microbicides are topical products that can be used vaginally by women to impede sexual transmission of HIV and thus represent one of the most promising prevention strategies. Efficacy trials with early nonspecific microbicide gels have so far been unsuccessful, but the field has now switched its focus to products containing highly potent and highly specific antiretroviral drugs that are easier to use, and can be formulated in a variety of dosage forms to suit individual and regional preferences. However, these products have their own challenges, with a greater likelihood of absorption, and the potential for systemic toxicities or the development of resistance in infected individuals who are unaware of their HIV status. The conduct of clinical trials is complex for all microbicides, with limited availability of trial sites, difficulties in dose selection and safety monitoring, and a lack of a truly objective measure of adherence. Once a microbicide has been shown to be safe and effective, there will need to be a clear pathway to regulatory approval, and the successful launch of a product will depend on having in place appropriate methods for distribution to the women who need it, along with a strategy for ensuring that they use it correctly. This will require substantial effort in terms of education and community engagement, and these activities need to be initiated well in advance of microbicide rollout.

  4. Guide: Monitoring Programme for unannounced inspections undertaken against the National Standards for the Prevention and Control of Healthcare Associated Infections

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This is a guide to the Health Information and Quality Authority?s (the Authority) programme of monitoring service providers? compliance with the National Standards for the Prevention and Control of Healthcare Associated Infections (referred to in this guide as the Infection, Prevention and Control Standards). This guide explains the approach that the Authority takes when monitoring the compliance of service providers ? including hospitals ? with the Infection, Prevention and Control Standards...

  5. A compendium of strategies to prevent healthcare-associated infections in acute care hospitals: 2014 updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Anderson, Deverick J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Calfee, David P; Dubberke, Erik R; Ellingson, Katherine D; Gerding, Dale N; Haas, Janet P; Kaye, Keith S; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Salgado, Cassandra D; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M; Fishman, Neil O; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of "A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals" in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS).

  6. Identifying diabetes knowledge network nodes as sites for a diabetes prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesler, Wilbert M; Arcury, Thomas A; Skelly, Anne H; Nash, Sally; Soward, April; Dougherty, Molly

    2006-12-01

    This paper reports on the methods used and results of a study that identified specific places within a community that have the potential to be sites for a diabetes prevention program. These sites, termed diabetes knowledge network nodes (DKNNs), are based on the concept of socio-spatial knowledge networks (SSKNs), the web of social relationships within which people obtain knowledge about type 2 diabetes. The target population for the study was working poor African Americans, Latinos, and European Americans of both sexes in a small rural southern town who had not been diagnosed with diabetes. Information was collected from a sample of 121 respondents on the places they visited in carrying out their daily activities. Data on number of visits to specific sites, degree of familiarity with these sites, and ratings of sites as places to receive diabetes information were used to develop three categories of DKNNs for six subgroups based on ethnicity and sex. Primary potential sites of importance to one or more subgroups included churches, grocery stores, drugstores, the local library, a beauty salon, laundromats, a community service agency, and a branch of the County Health Department. Secondary potential sites included gas stations, restaurants, banks, and post offices. Latent potential sites included three medical facilities. Most of the DKNNs were located either in the downtown area or in one of two shopping areas along the most used highway that passed through the town. The procedures used in this study can be generalized to other communities and prevention programs for other chronic diseases.

  7. Alpha 4 integrin directs virus-activated CD8+ T cells to sites of infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Andersson, E C; Scheynius, A

    1995-01-01

    This article examines the role of VLA-4 in directing lymphocytes to sites of viral infection using the murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection (LCMV) as the model system. This virus by itself induces little or no inflammation, but in most mouse/virus strain combinations a potent T cell...... response is induced, which is associated with marked CD8+ cell-mediated inflammation. Two expressions of LCMV-induced inflammation were studied: meningitis induced by intracerebral infection and adoptive transfer of virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity. Our previous studies have shown that LCMV...

  8. From the risk analysis to the development of interventions and training for the prevention and control of healthcare associated infections. The experience of G. Pini Orthopedic Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navone, P; Conti, C; Domeniconi, G; Nobile, M

    2015-01-01

    Health-care associated infections (HAIs) represents a phenomenon of central importance all over Europe. Every year 4,5 millions cases are detected in European Union, with 37.000 related deaths. Surgical-site infections (SSIs) are one of the most common HAIs, that are associated with an increased length of stay, re-operation rate, intensive care admissions rate, and higher mortality rate. G. Pini Orthopedics Institute implemented in the last two years a multimodal strategy for controlling and preventing HAIs, in particular for SSIs. This paper describes the prevention's strategies adopted for prevention of HAIs, at G. Pini Orthopedic Institute. Our findings show that application of a multi modal promotion strategy was associated with an improvement in HAI prevention.

  9. Hanford Site guide for preparing and maintaining generator group pollution prevention program documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Place, B.G.

    1998-01-01

    This document provides guidance to generator groups for preparing and maintaining documentation of Pollution Prevention Waste Minimization (P2/WMin) Program activities. The guidance is one of a hierarchical series that includes the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan (DOE-RL, 1998a) and Prime contractor implementation plans describing programs required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) 3002(b) and 3005(h) (RCRA and EPA, 1994). Documentation guidance for the following five P2/WMin elements are discussed: Fiscal Year (FY) Goals; Budget and Staffing; Waste Minimization (WMin) Assessments (WMAs); Quarterly Pollution Prevention (P2) Reporting WMin Certification

  10. Hanford Site Guide for Preparing and Maintaining Fenerator Group Pollution Prevention Program Documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PLACE, B.G.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides guidance to generator groups for preparing and maintaining documentation of Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization (P2/WMin) Program activities. The guidance is one of a hierarchical series that includes the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan (DOE-RL, 1998a) and Prime Contractor implementation plans describing programs required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) 3002(b) and (300501) (RCRA and EPA, 1994). Documentation guidance for the following five P2/WMin elements are discussed: Fiscal Year (FY) Goals; Budget and Staffing; Waste Minimization (WMinn ) Assessments (WMAs); Pollution Prevention (P2) Reporting; WMin Certification

  11. Siting criteria based on the prevention of deterministic effects from plutonium inhalation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorensen, S.A.; Low, J.O.

    1998-01-01

    Siting criteria are established by regulatory authorities to evaluate potential accident scenarios associated with proposed nuclear facilities. The 0.25 Sv (25 rem) siting criteria adopted in the United States has been historically based on the prevention of deterministic effects from acute, whole-body exposures. The Department of Energy has extended the applicability of this criterion to radionuclides that deliver chronic, organ-specific irradiation through the specification of a 0.25 Sv (25 rem) committed effective dose equivalent siting criterion. A methodology is developed to determine siting criteria based on the prevention of deterministic effects from inhalation intakes of radionuclides which deliver chronic, organ-specific irradiation. Revised siting criteria, expressed in terms of committed effective dose equivalent, are proposed for nuclear facilities that handle primarily plutonium compounds. The analysis determined that a siting criterion of 1.2 Sv (120 rem) committed effective dose equivalent for inhalation exposures to weapons-grade plutonium meets the historical goal of preventing deterministic effects during a facility accident scenario. The criterion also meets the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Goals provided that the frequency of the accident is sufficiently low

  12. Antibiotic-Loaded Synthetic Calcium Sulfate Beads for Prevention of Bacterial Colonization and Biofilm Formation in Periprosthetic Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, R. P.; Brayford, M. J.; Webb, J. S.; Cooper, J. J.; Aiken, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    Periprosthetic infection (PI) causes significant morbidity and mortality after fixation and joint arthroplasty and has been extensively linked to the formation of bacterial biofilms. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), as a cement or as beads, is commonly used for antibiotic release to the site of infection but displays variable elution kinetics and also represents a potential nidus for infection, therefore requiring surgical removal once antibiotics have eluted. Absorbable cements have shown improved elution of a wider range of antibiotics and, crucially, complete biodegradation, but limited data exist as to their antimicrobial and antibiofilm efficacy. Synthetic calcium sulfate beads loaded with tobramycin, vancomycin, or vancomycin-tobramycin dual treatment (in a 1:0.24 [wt/wt] ratio) were assessed for their abilities to eradicate planktonic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis relative to that of PMMA beads. The ability of the calcium sulfate beads to prevent biofilm formation over multiple days and to eradicate preformed biofilms was studied using a combination of viable cell counts, confocal microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy of the bead surface. Biofilm bacteria displayed a greater tolerance to the antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts. Antibiotic-loaded beads were able to kill planktonic cultures of 106 CFU/ml, prevent bacterial colonization, and significantly reduce biofilm formation over multiple days. However, established biofilms were harder to eradicate. These data further demonstrate the difficulty in clearing established biofilms; therefore, early preventive measures are key to reducing the risk of PI. Synthetic calcium sulfate loaded with antibiotics has the potential to reduce or eliminate biofilm formation on adjacent periprosthetic tissue and prosthesis material and, thus, to reduce the rates of periprosthetic infection. PMID:25313221

  13. Knowledge and beliefs of international travellers about the transmission and prevention of HIV infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Allard, R; Lambert, G

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To measure the perceived risk of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) among international travellers, to measure their knowledge of the transmission and prevention of HIV infection abroad and to identify some of the determinants of this knowledge. DESIGN: Survey. SETTING: Travellers' immunization clinic providing mostly primary preventive care to international travellers. PARTICIPANTS: All clients aged 18 to 50 years seen at the clinic between Oct. 2 and Dec. 21, 1989, before...

  14. Latent M. tuberculosis infection--pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment and prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Fol, Marek; Włodarczyk, Marcin; Rudnicka, Wiesława

    2012-01-01

    One third of the earths population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), but only 5-10% of the infected individuals develop active tuberculosis (TB) over their lifetime. The remaining 90-95% stay healthy and are called latently infected individuals. They are the biggest reservoir of the tubercle bacilli and identifying the cases of latent TB is a part of the global plan of TB control. From the clinical point of view detection of latent TB infections (LTBI) in individuals with the highest active TB risk including cases of HIV infection, autoimmune inflammatory diseases or cancer, is a priority. This review summarizes the recent findings in the pathogenesis of latent TB, its diagnosis, treatment and prevention.

  15. An image-guided tool to prevent hospital acquired infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Melinda; Szilágyi, László; Lehotsky, Ákos; Haidegger, Tamás; Benyó, Balázs

    2011-03-01

    Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI) represent the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, and claims hundreds of thousands of lives annually in the rest of the world. This paper presents a novel low-cost mobile device|called Stery-Hand|that helps to avoid HAI by improving hand hygiene control through providing an objective evaluation of the quality of hand washing. The use of the system is intuitive: having performed hand washing with a soap mixed with UV re ective powder, the skin appears brighter in UV illumination on the disinfected surfaces. Washed hands are inserted into the Stery-Hand box, where a digital image is taken under UV lighting. Automated image processing algorithms are employed in three steps to evaluate the quality of hand washing. First, the contour of the hand is extracted in order to distinguish the hand from the background. Next, a semi-supervised clustering algorithm classies the pixels of the hand into three groups, corresponding to clean, partially clean and dirty areas. The clustering algorithm is derived from the histogram-based quick fuzzy c-means approach, using a priori information extracted from reference images, evaluated by experts. Finally, the identied areas are adjusted to suppress shading eects, and quantied in order to give a verdict on hand disinfection quality. The proposed methodology was validated through tests using hundreds of images recorded in our laboratory. The proposed system was found robust and accurate, producing correct estimation for over 98% of the test cases. Stery-Hand may be employed in general practice, and it may also serve educational purposes.

  16. Taking advantage of public reporting: An infection composite score to assist evaluating hospital performance for infection prevention efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakih, Mohamad G; Skierczynski, Boguslow; Bufalino, Angelo; Groves, Clariecia; Roberts, Phillip; Heavens, Michelle; Hendrich, Ann; Haydar, Ziad

    2016-12-01

    The standardized infection ratio (SIR) evaluates individual publicly reported health care-associated infections, but it may not assess overall performance. We piloted an infection composite score (ICS) in 82 hospitals of a single health system. The ICS is a combined score for central line-associated bloodstream infections, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, colon and abdominal hysterectomy surgical site infections, and hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and Clostridium difficile infections. Individual facility ICSs were calculated by normalizing each of the 6 SIR events to the system SIR for baseline and performance periods (ICS ib and ICS ip , respectively). A hospital ICS ib reflected its baseline performance compared with system baseline, whereas a ICS ip provided information of its outcome changes compared with system baseline. Both the ICS ib (baseline 2013) and ICS ip (performance 2014) were calculated for 63 hospitals (reporting at least 4 of the 6 event types). The ICS ip improved in 36 of 63 (57.1%) hospitals in 2014 when compared with the ICS ib in 2013. The ICS ib 2013 median was 0.96 (range, 0.13-2.94) versus the 2014 ICS ip median of 0.92 (range, 0-6.55). Variation was more evident in hospitals with ≤100 beds. The system performance score (ICS sp ) in 2014 was 0.95, a 5% improvement compared with 2013. The proposed ICS may help large health systems and state hospital associations better evaluate key infectious outcomes, comparing them with historic and concurrent performance of peers. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Infection prevention and control measures for acute respiratory infections in healthcare settings: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, W H; Conly, J M; Pessoa-Silva, C L; Malik, M; Eremin, S

    2013-01-01

    Viruses account for the majority of the acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) globally with a mortality exceeding 4 million deaths per year. The most commonly encountered viruses, in order of frequency, include influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza and adenovirus. Current evidence suggests that the major mode of transmission of ARls is through large droplets, but transmission through contact (including hand contamination with subsequent self-inoculation) and infectious respiratory aerosols of various sizes and at short range (coined as "opportunistic" airborne transmission) may also occur for some pathogens. Opportunistic airborne transmission may occur when conducting highrisk aerosol generating procedures and airborne precautions will be required in this setting. General infection control measures effective for all respiratory viral infections are reviewed and followed by discussion on some of the common viruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus and the recently discovered novel coronavirus.

  18. A multicenter qualitative study on preventing hospital-acquired urinary tract infection in US hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint, Sanjay; Kowalski, Christine P; Forman, Jane; Damschroder, Laura; Hofer, Timothy P; Kaufman, Samuel R; Creswell, John W; Krein, Sarah L

    2008-04-01

    Although urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common hospital-acquired infection, there is little information about why hospitals use or do not use a range of available preventive practices. We thus conducted a multicenter study to understand better how US hospitals approach the prevention of hospital-acquired UTI. This research is part of a larger study employing both quantitative and qualitative methods. The qualitative phase consisted of 38 semistructured phone interviews with key personnel at 14 purposefully sampled US hospitals and 39 in-person interviews at 5 of those 14 hospitals, to identify recurrent and unifying themes that characterize how hospitals have addressed hospital-acquired UTI. Four recurrent themes emerged from our study data. First, although preventing hospital-acquired UTI was a low priority for most hospitals, there was substantial recognition of the value of early removal of a urinary catheter for patients. Second, those hospitals that made UTI prevention a high priority also focused on noninfectious complications and had committed advocates, or "champions," who facilitated prevention activities. Third, hospital-specific pilot studies were important in deciding whether or not to use devices such as antimicrobial-impregnated catheters. Finally, external forces, such as public reporting, influenced UTI surveillance and infection prevention activities. Clinicians and policy makers can use our findings to develop initiatives that, for example, use a champion to promote the removal of unnecessary urinary catheters or exploit external forces, such public reporting, to enhance patient safety.

  19. Prevalence of endoparasitic infection in children and its relation with cholera prevention efforts in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Charles T; Garcia, Benito Borrego; Logan, Michael H; New, John C; Patton, Sharon

    2003-07-01

    To investigate whether increased knowledge and use of public health measures promoted for cholera prevention is reflected in lower prevalence of parasitic infection in households in a community in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico, that is close to the border with the United States of America. Between 1994 and 1997, fecal samples from 438 children were collected through convenience sampling and then examined for helminth eggs/larvae and protozoan cysts as biologic indicators of household compliance with recommended cholera prevention measures. The suggested measures were to wash hands before meals and after defecation, to drink purified water, to wash fruits and vegetables, and to eat well-cooked food. In addition, information on the knowledge of and the use of cholera preventive measures was collected by interviews with adult informants in 252 households (186 of those households also provided a fecal sample for analysis). Parasitic infections occurred in 131 of the 438 children (30%), who resided in 79 of the 186 households (42%) that provided fecal samples. Giardia lamblia accounted for 12.5% of all infections. Infections with Hymenolepis nana, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis, Ancylostoma/Necator, Strongyloides stercoralis, Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba hartmanni, Entamoeba histolytica, Endolimax nana, and Iodamoeba bütschlii were also noted. Infected children were older and more often had an infected sibling. Households with three or more children were also more likely to have an infected child. The primary caregivers in the households where at least one child had a parasitic infection were distinguished by their inability to list at least three cholera prevention measures from memory. The 42% household prevalence of parasitic infection was relatively high and indicates that some residents of this community may not have fully embraced the public health education efforts promoted for prevention of cholera. The occurrence of

  20. Prevalence of endoparasitic infection in children and its relation with cholera prevention efforts in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles T. Faulkner

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether increased knowledge and use of public health measures promoted for cholera prevention is reflected in lower prevalence of parasitic infection in households in a community in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico, that is close to the border with the United States of America. METHODS: Between 1994 and 1997, fecal samples from 438 children were collected through convenience sampling and then examined for helminth eggs/larvae and protozoan cysts as biologic indicators of household compliance with recommended cholera prevention measures. The suggested measures were to wash hands before meals and after defecation, to drink purified water, to wash fruits and vegetables, and to eat well-cooked food. In addition, information on the knowledge of and the use of cholera preventive measures was collected by interviews with adult informants in 252 households (186 of those households also provided a fecal sample for analysis. RESULTS: Parasitic infections occurred in 131 of the 438 children (30%, who resided in 79 of the 186 households (42% that provided fecal samples. Giardia lamblia accounted for 12.5% of all infections. Infections with Hymenolepis nana, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis, Ancylostoma/Necator, Strongyloides stercoralis, Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba hartmanni, Entamoeba histolytica, Endolimax nana, and Iodamoeba bütschlii were also noted. Infected children were older and more often had an infected sibling. Households with three or more children were also more likely to have an infected child. The primary caregivers in the households where at least one child had a parasitic infection were distinguished by their inability to list at least three cholera prevention measures from memory. CONCLUSIONS: The 42% household prevalence of parasitic infection was relatively high and indicates that some residents of this community may not have fully embraced the public health education efforts

  1. [Vacuum-assisted closure as a treatment modality for surgical site infection in cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simek, M; Nemec, P; Zálesák, B; Hájek, R; Kaláb, M; Fluger, I; Kolár, M; Jecmínková, L; Gráfová, P

    2007-08-01

    The vacuum-asssited closure has represented an encouraging treatment modality in treatment of surgical site infection in cardiac surgery, providing superior results compared with conventional treatment strategies, particularly in the treatment of deep sternal wound infection. From November 2004 to January 2007, 40 patients, undergoing VAC therapy (VAC system, KCI, Austria, Hartmann-Rico Inc., Czech Republic) for surgical site infection following cardiac surgery, were prospectively evaluated. Four patients (10%) were treated for extensive leg-wound infection, 10 (25%) were treated for superficial sternal wound infection and 26 (65%) for deep sternal wound infection. The median age was 69.9 +/- 9.7 years and the median BMI was 33.2 +/- 5.0 kg/m2. Twenty-three patients (57%) were women and diabetes was present in 22 patients (55%). The VAC was employed after the previous failure of the conventional treatment strategy in 7 patients (18%). Thirty-eight patients (95%) were successfully healed. Two patients (5%) died, both of deep sternal infetion consequences. The overall length of hospitalization was 36.4 +/- 22.6 days. The median number of dressing changes was 4.6 +/- 1.8. The median VAC treatment time until surgical closure was 9.7 +/- 3.9 days. The VAC therapy was solely used as a bridge to the definite wound closure. Four patients (10%) with a chronic fistula were re-admitted with the range of 1 to 12 months after the VAC therapy. The VAC therapy is a safe and reliable option in the treatment of surgical site infection in the field of cardiac surgery. The VAC therapy can be considered as an effective adjunct to convetional treatment modalities for the therapy of extensive and life-threatening wound infection following cardiac surgery, particurlarly in the group of high-risk patients.

  2. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection in pregnancy: a review of prevalence, clinical features, diagnosis and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Zin W; Scott, Gillian M; Shand, Antonia; Hamilton, Stuart T; van Zuylen, Wendy J; Basha, James; Hall, Beverly; Craig, Maria E; Rawlinson, William D

    2016-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is under-recognised, despite being the leading infectious cause of congenital malformation, affecting ~0.3% of Australian live births. Approximately 11% of infants born with congenital CMV infection are symptomatic, resulting in clinical manifestations, including jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, petechiae, microcephaly, intrauterine growth restriction and death. Congenital CMV infection may cause severe long-term sequelae, including progressive sensorineural hearing loss and developmental delay in 40-58% of symptomatic neonates, and ~14% of initially asymptomatic infected neonates. Up to 50% of maternal CMV infections have nonspecific clinical manifestations, and most remain undetected unless specific serological testing is undertaken. The combination of serology tests for CMV-specific IgM, IgG and IgG avidity provide improved distinction between primary and secondary maternal infections. In pregnancies with confirmed primary maternal CMV infection, amniocentesis with CMV-PCR performed on amniotic fluid, undertaken after 21-22 weeks gestation, may determine whether maternofetal virus transmission has occurred. Ultrasound and, to a lesser extent, magnetic resonance imaging are valuable tools to assess fetal structural and growth abnormalities, although the absence of fetal abnormalities does not exclude fetal damage. Diagnosis of congenital CMV infection at birth or in the first 3 weeks of an infant's life is crucial, as this should prompt interventions for prevention of delayed-onset hearing loss and neurodevelopmental delay in affected infants. Prevention strategies should also target mothers because increased awareness and hygiene measures may reduce maternal infection. Recognition of the importance of CMV in pregnancy and in neonates is increasingly needed, particularly as therapeutic and preventive interventions expand for this serious problem. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  3. Oak Ridge K-25 Site chlorinated solvent pollution prevention opportunity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    A pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was conducted at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site to identify opportunities to reduce and better manage the use of chlorinated solvents. At the K-25 Site, 67 control areas were examined for their potential use of chlorinated solvents. Of these areas, 27 were found to be using (1) chlorinated solvents for cleaning, degreasing, and lubricating; (2) laboratory standards and solvents; and (3) test medium. Current management practices encourage the identification and use of nonhazardous chemicals, including the use of chlorinated solvents. The main pollution prevention principles are source reduction and recycling, and a number of pollution prevention options based on these principles were identified and evaluated as part of this chlorinated solvent PPOA. Source reduction options evaluated for the K-25 Site include the substitution of chlorinated solvents with nonchlorinated solvents. Recycling was identified for those areas that would benefit most from the reuse of the chlorinated solvents in use. The pollution prevention options that offer the greatest opportunity for success at the K-25 Site are the implementation of substitutes at the 10 control areas using chlorinated solvents for cleaning, degreasing, and lubrication. A change in the process may be all that is needed to eliminate the use of a chlorinated solvent. Once a decision is made to implement a substitution, the information should be communicated to all shops and laboratories. Another option to consider is the installation of recycling units to recycle the large amounts of methylene chloride used in the analytical sampling procedure

  4. Oak Ridge K-25 Site chlorinated solvent pollution prevention opportunity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    A pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was conducted at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site to identify opportunities to reduce and better manage the use of chlorinated solvents. At the K-25 Site, 67 control areas were examined for their potential use of chlorinated solvents. Of these areas, 27 were found to be using (1) chlorinated solvents for cleaning, degreasing, and lubricating; (2) laboratory standards and solvents; and (3) test medium. Current management practices encourage the identification and use of nonhazardous chemicals, including the use of chlorinated solvents. The main pollution prevention principles are source reduction and recycling, and a number of pollution prevention options based on these principles were identified and evaluated as part of this chlorinated solvent PPOA. Source reduction options evaluated for the K-25 Site include the substitution of chlorinated solvents with nonchlorinated solvents. Recycling was identified for those areas that would benefit most from the reuse of the chlorinated solvents in use. The pollution prevention options that offer the greatest opportunity for success at the K-25 Site are the implementation of substitutes at the 10 control areas using chlorinated solvents for cleaning, degreasing, and lubrication. A change in the process may be all that is needed to eliminate the use of a chlorinated solvent. Once a decision is made to implement a substitution, the information should be communicated to all shops and laboratories. Another option to consider is the installation of recycling units to recycle the large amounts of methylene chloride used in the analytical sampling procedure.

  5. Outcome and treatment of postoperative spine surgical site infections: predictors of treatment success and failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Keishi; Berven, Sigurd H

    2014-05-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is an important complication after spine surgery. The management of SSI is characterized by significant variability, and there is little guidance regarding an evidence-based approach. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors associated with treatment failure of SSI after spine surgery. A total of 225 consecutive patients with SSI after spine surgery between July 2005 and July 2010 were studied retrospectively. Patients were treated with aggressive surgical debridement and prolonged antibiotic therapy. Outcome and risk factors were analyzed in 197 patients having 1 year of follow-up. Treatment success was defined as resolution within 90 days. A total of 126 (76 %) cases were treated with retention of implants. Forty-three (22 %) cases had treatment failure with five (2.5 %) cases resulting in death. Lower rates of treatment success were observed with late infection (38 %), fusion with fixation to the ilium (67 %), Propionibacterium acnes (43 %), poly microbial infection (68 %), >6 operated spinal levels (67 %), and instrumented cases (73 %). Higher rates of early resolution were observed with superficial infection (93 %), methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (95 %), and failure. Superficial infection and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus were predictors of early resolution. Postoperative spine infections were treated with aggressive surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy. High rates of treatment failure occurred in cases with late infection, long instrumented fusions, polymicrobial infections, and Propionibacterium acnes. Removal of implants and direct or staged re-implantation may be a useful strategy in cases with high risk of treatment failure.

  6. Measures Taken to Prevent Zika Virus Infection During Pregnancy - Puerto Rico, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Denise V; Salvesen von Essen, Beatriz; Lamias, Mark J; Shulman, Holly; Hernandez-Virella, Wanda I; Taraporewalla, Aspy J; Vargas, Manuel I; Harrison, Leslie; Ellington, Sascha R; Soto, Leslianne; Williams, Tanya; Rodriguez, Aurea; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K; Rivera, Brenda; Cox, Shanna; Pazol, Karen; Rice, Marion E; Dee, Deborah L; Romero, Lisa; Lathrop, Eva; Barfield, Wanda; Smith, Ruben A; Jamieson, Denise J; Honein, Margaret A; Deseda, Carmen; Warner, Lee

    2017-06-09

    Zika virus infection during pregnancy remains a serious health threat in Puerto Rico. Infection during pregnancy can cause microcephaly, brain abnormalities, and other severe birth defects (1). From January 1, 2016 through March 29, 2017, Puerto Rico reported approximately 3,300 pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection (2). There is currently no vaccine or intervention to prevent the adverse effects of Zika virus infection during pregnancy; therefore, prevention has been the focus of public health activities, especially for pregnant women (3). CDC and the Puerto Rico Department of Health analyzed data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System Zika Postpartum Emergency Response (PRAMS-ZPER) survey conducted from August through December 2016 among Puerto Rico residents with a live birth. Most women (98.1%) reported using at least one measure to avoid mosquitos in their home environment. However, only 45.8% of women reported wearing mosquito repellent daily, and 11.5% reported wearing pants and shirts with long sleeves daily. Approximately one third (38.5%) reported abstaining from sex or using condoms consistently throughout pregnancy. Overall, 76.9% of women reported having been tested for Zika virus by their health care provider during the first or second trimester of pregnancy. These results can be used to assess and refine Zika virus infection prevention messaging and interventions for pregnant women and to reinforce measures to promote prenatal testing for Zika.

  7. Ebselen alleviates testicular pathology in mice with Zika virus infection and prevents its sexual transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanjuntak, Yogy; Liang, Jian-Jong; Chen, Si-Yu; Li, Jin-Kun; Lee, Yi-Ling; Wu, Han-Chung; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2018-02-01

    Despite the low case fatality, Zika virus (ZIKV) infection has been associated with microcephaly in infants and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Antiviral and vaccine developments against ZIKV are still ongoing; therefore, in the meantime, preventing the disease transmission is critical. Primarily transmitted by Aedes species mosquitoes, ZIKV also can be sexually transmitted. We used AG129 mice lacking interferon-α/β and -γ receptors to study the testicular pathogenesis and sexual transmission of ZIKV. Infection of ZIKV progressively damaged mouse testes, increased testicular oxidative stress as indicated by the levels of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, glutathione peroxidase 4, spermatogenesis-associated-18 homolog in sperm and pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, IL-6, and G-CSF. We then evaluated the potential role of the antioxidant ebselen (EBS) in alleviating the testicular pathology with ZIKV infection. EBS treatment significantly reduced ZIKV-induced testicular oxidative stress, leucocyte infiltration and production of pro-inflammatory response. Furthermore, it improved testicular pathology and prevented the sexual transmission of ZIKV in a male-to-female mouse sperm transfer model. EBS is currently in clinical trials for various diseases. ZIKV infection could be on the list for potential use of EBS, for alleviating the testicular pathogenesis with ZIKV infection and preventing its sexual transmission.

  8. Knowledge and attitudes of infection prevention and control among health sciences students at University of Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojulong, J; Mitonga, K H; Iipinge, S N

    2013-12-01

    Health Sciences students are exposed early to hospitals and to activities which increase their risk of acquiring infections. Infection control practices are geared towards reduction of occurrence and transmission of infectious diseases. To evaluate knowledge and attitudes of infection prevention and control among Health Science students at University of Namibia. To assess students' knowledge and attitudes regarding infection prevention and control and their sources of information, a self-administered questionnaire was used to look at standard precautions especially hands hygiene. One hundred sixty two students participated in this study of which 31 were medical, 17 were radiography and 114 were nursing students. Medical students had better overall scores (73%) compared to nursing students (66%) and radiology students (61%). There was no significant difference in scores between sexes or location of the high school being either in rural or urban setting. Serious efforts are needed to improve or review curriculum so that health sciences students' knowledge on infection prevention and control is imparted early before they are introduced to the wards.

  9. Infection prevention and control in outpatient settings in China-structure, resources, and basic practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Fu; Huang, Wenzhi; Zong, Zhiyong; Yin, Weijia

    2018-01-25

    More than 7 billion visits are made by patients to ambulatory services every year in mainland China. Healthcare-associated infections are becoming a new source of illness for outpatients. Little is known about infection prevention, control structure, resources available, and basic practices in outpatient settings. In 2014, we conducted a multisite survey. Five provinces were invited to participate based on geographic dispersion. Self-assessment questionnaires regarding the structure, infrastructure, apparatus and materials, and basic activities of infection prevention and control were issued to 25 hospitals and 5 community health centers in each province. A weight was assigned to each question according to its importance. Overall, 146 of 150 facilities (97.3%) participated in this study. The average survey score was 77.6 (95% confidence interval 75.7-79.5) and varied significantly between the different gross domestic product areas (P infection prevention and control was practiced consistently, although there were lapses in some areas. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection in pregnancy and the neonate: consensus recommendations for prevention, diagnosis, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlinson, William D; Boppana, Suresh B; Fowler, Karen B; Kimberlin, David W; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Alain, Sophie; Daly, Kate; Doutré, Sara; Gibson, Laura; Giles, Michelle L; Greenlee, Janelle; Hamilton, Stuart T; Harrison, Gail J; Hui, Lisa; Jones, Cheryl A; Palasanthiran, Pamela; Schleiss, Mark R; Shand, Antonia W; van Zuylen, Wendy J

    2017-06-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus is the most frequent, yet under-recognised, infectious cause of newborn malformation in developed countries. Despite its clinical and public health importance, questions remain regarding the best diagnostic methods for identifying maternal and neonatal infection, and regarding optimal prevention and therapeutic strategies for infected mothers and neonates. The absence of guidelines impairs global efforts to decrease the effect of congenital cytomegalovirus. Data in the literature suggest that congenital cytomegalovirus infection remains a research priority, but data are yet to be translated into clinical practice. An informal International Congenital Cytomegalovirus Recommendations Group was convened in 2015 to address these questions and to provide recommendations for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. On the basis of consensus discussions and a review of the literature, we do not support universal screening of mothers and the routine use of cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin for prophylaxis or treatment of infected mothers. However, treatment guidelines for infected neonates were recommended. Consideration must be given to universal neonatal screening for cytomegalovirus to facilitate early detection and intervention for sensorineural hearing loss and developmental delay, where appropriate. The group agreed that education and prevention strategies for mothers were beneficial, and that recommendations will need continual updating as further data become available. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ebselen alleviates testicular pathology in mice with Zika virus infection and prevents its sexual transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogy Simanjuntak

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the low case fatality, Zika virus (ZIKV infection has been associated with microcephaly in infants and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Antiviral and vaccine developments against ZIKV are still ongoing; therefore, in the meantime, preventing the disease transmission is critical. Primarily transmitted by Aedes species mosquitoes, ZIKV also can be sexually transmitted. We used AG129 mice lacking interferon-α/β and -γ receptors to study the testicular pathogenesis and sexual transmission of ZIKV. Infection of ZIKV progressively damaged mouse testes, increased testicular oxidative stress as indicated by the levels of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, glutathione peroxidase 4, spermatogenesis-associated-18 homolog in sperm and pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, IL-6, and G-CSF. We then evaluated the potential role of the antioxidant ebselen (EBS in alleviating the testicular pathology with ZIKV infection. EBS treatment significantly reduced ZIKV-induced testicular oxidative stress, leucocyte infiltration and production of pro-inflammatory response. Furthermore, it improved testicular pathology and prevented the sexual transmission of ZIKV in a male-to-female mouse sperm transfer model. EBS is currently in clinical trials for various diseases. ZIKV infection could be on the list for potential use of EBS, for alleviating the testicular pathogenesis with ZIKV infection and preventing its sexual transmission.

  12. Tackling wicked problems in infection prevention and control : a guideline for co-creation with stakeholders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woezik, Anne F. G.; Braakman-Jansen, Louise M. A.; Kulyk, Olga; Siemons, Liseth; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E. W. C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infection prevention and control can be seen as a wicked public health problem as there is no consensus regarding problem definition and solution, multiple stakeholders with different needs and values are involved, and there is no clear end-point of the problem-solving process.

  13. Tackling wicked problems in infection prevention and control: a guideline for co-creation with stakeholders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woezik, Anne; Braakman-Jansen, Louise Marie Antoinette; Kulyk, Olga Anatoliyivna; Tjin-Kam-Jet-Siemons, Liseth; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Infection prevention and control can be seen as a wicked public health problem as there is no consensus regarding problem definition and solution, multiple stakeholders with different needs and values are involved, and there is no clear end-point of the problem-solving process.

  14. Respiratory tract infections and its preventive measures among hajj pilgrims, 2010: A nested case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Emamian

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: This study showed that measures such as seasonal influenza vaccination, use of face masks and personal prayer carpet have no effect on the incidence of respiratory tract infections. However, washing throat and mouth with salt water can be considered the most effective preventive measures.

  15. VIRUS OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA. EPIDEMIOLOGY, LABORATORY DIAGNOSTICS AND PREVENTION OF PAPILLOMA VIRAL INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Narvskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The information reflected modern knowledge about virus of human papilloma (VHP and pathogenesis of papilloma viral infection is presented in the lecture. The actual problems of epidemiology, laboratory diagnostics and prevention of VHP associated damage of cervical epithelium have been described.

  16. Healthcare workers' challenges in the implementation of tuberculosis infection prevention and control measures in Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Miranda; Coelho, Eliana; Mosse, Carla das Dores; Brondi, Luciana; Winterton, Laura; van Leth, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare Workers (HCWs) have a higher frequency of TB exposure than the general population and have therefore an occupational TB risk that infection prevention and control (IPC) measures aim to reduce. HCWs are crucial in the implementation of these measures. The objective of the study was to

  17. Prevention of Clostridium difficile Infection with Saccharomyces boulardii: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Tung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile is a major cause of antibioticassociated diarrhea within the hospital setting. The yeast Saccharomyces boulardii has been found to have some effect in reducing the risk of C difficile infection (CDI; however, its role in preventive therapy has yet to be firmly established.

  18. Strategies for the prevention and treatment of reproductive tract infections among women in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huong, Nguyen My; Gammeltoft, Tine; Rasch, Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents selected findings from a larger study on reproductive tract infections (RTIs) among women seeking abortion in Northern Vietnam. In particular it focuses on women's experience of RTIs within the context of their perceptions of female physiology and what women do to prevent and ...

  19. Summary of Guidelines for Infection Prevention and Control for Flexible Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Hookey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High-quality processes to ensure infection prevention and control in the delivery of safe endoscopy services are essential. In 2010, the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG developed a Canadian guideline for the reprocessing of flexible gastrointestinal endoscopy equipment.

  20. Respiratory viruses in transplant recipients: more than just a cold. Clinical syndromes and infection prevention principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Abbas

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: RVIs are associated with high morbidity and mortality among SOT and HSCT recipients. Management options are currently limited or lack strong clinical evidence. As community and nosocomial spread has been reported for all reviewed RVIs, strict adherence to infection control measures is key to preventing outbreaks.

  1. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Saag, Michael S.; Benson, Constance A.; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Sax, Paul E.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Smith, Davey M.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE New data and therapeutic options warrant updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat or to prevent HIV infection in adults. OBJECTIVE To provide updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (aged ≥18 years) with established HIV infection, including when to start treatment, initial regimens, and changing regimens, along with recommendations for using ARVs for preventing HIV among those at risk, including preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis. EVIDENCE REVIEW A panel of experts in HIV research and patient care convened by the International Antiviral Society-USA reviewed data published in peer-reviewed journals, presented by regulatory agencies, or presented as conference abstracts at peer-reviewed scientific conferences since the 2014 report, for new data or evidence that would change previous recommendations or their ratings. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in the PubMed and EMBASE databases through April 2016. Recommendations were by consensus, and each recommendation was rated by strength and quality of the evidence. FINDINGS Newer data support the widely accepted recommendation that antiretroviral therapy should be started in all individuals with HIV infection with detectable viremia regardless of CD4 cell count. Recommended optimal initial regimens for most patients are 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI). Other effective regimens include nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or boosted protease inhibitors with 2 NRTIs. Recommendations for special populations and in the settings of opportunistic infections and concomitant conditions are provided. Reasons for switching therapy include convenience, tolerability, simplification, anticipation of potential new drug interactions, pregnancy or plans for pregnancy, elimination of food restrictions, virologic failure, or drug toxicities. Laboratory

  2. Surgical Site Infection in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, U. I.; Khan, A.; Nawaz, A.; Mansoor, R.; Malik, A. A.; Sher, F.; Ayyaz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the frequency of surgical site infections in patients with type II diabetes undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy as compared with non-diabetic patients. Study Design: Cohort study. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical Unit 2, Services Hospital, Lahore, from May to October 2012. Methodology: Patients were divided into two groups of 60 each, undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Group A comprised non-diabetic patients and group B comprised type II diabetic patients. Patients were followed postoperatively upto one month for the development of SSIs. Proportion of patients with surgical site infections or otherwise was compared between the groups using chi-square test with significance of p < 0.05. Results: In group A, 35 patients were above the age of 40 years. In group B, 38 patients were above the age of 40 years. Four patients in group A developed a surgical site infection. Seven patients in group B developed SSIs (p = 0.07). Conclusion: Presence of diabetes mellitus did not significantly affect the onset of surgical site infection in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. (author)

  3. Perioperative hyperoxygenation and wound site infection following surgery for acute appendicitis: a randomized, prospective, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Amitai; Gurevits, Michael; Vamos, Ronny; Ivry, Simon; Eitan, Arieh

    2011-04-01

    To assess the influence of hyperoxygenation on surgical site infection by using the most homogeneous study population. A randomized, prospective, controlled trial. Department of surgery in a government hospital. A total of 210 patients who underwent open surgery for acute appendicitis. In the study group, patients received 80% oxygen during anesthesia, followed by high-flow oxygen for 2 hours in the recovery room. The control group received 30% oxygen, as usual. Open appendectomy via incision in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen. Surgical site infection, mainly assessed by the ASEPSIS (additional treatment, serous discharge, erythema, purulent discharge, separation of deep tissues, isolation of bacteria, and stay in hospital prolonged >14 days) system score. Surgical site infections were recorded in 6 of 107 patients (5.6%) in the study group vs 14 of 103 patients (13.6%) in the control group (P = .04). Significant differences in the ASEPSIS score were also found. The mean hospital stay was longer in the control group (2.92 days) compared with the study group (2.51 days) (P = .01). The use of supplemental oxygen is advantageous in operations for acute appendicitis by reducing surgical site infection rate and hospital stay. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01002365.

  4. Measuring bovine gamma delta T cell function at the site of Mycobacterium bovis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine gamma delta T cells are amongst the first cells to accumulate at the site of Mycobacterium bovis infection; however, their role in the developing lesion remains unclear. We utilized transcriptomics analysis, in situ hybridization, and a macrophage/gamma delta T cell co-culture system to eluc...

  5. Aetiological agents of surgical site infection in a specialist hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the advances made in asepsis, antimicrobial drugs, sterilization and operative techniques, surgical site infections (SSI) continue to be a major problem in all branches of surgery in the hospitals. The objective of this study was to establish the incidence of SSI, the type and frequency of various pathogens and their ...

  6. Preventive and therapeutic challenges in combating Zika virus infection: are we getting any closer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meera V; Weber, Emily A; Singh, Vir B; Stirpe, Nicole E; Maggirwar, Sanjay B

    2017-06-01

    The neuroteratogenic nature of Zika Virus (ZIKV) infection has converted what would have been a tropical disease into a global threat. Zika is transmitted vertically via infected placental cells especially in the first and second trimesters. In the developing central nervous system (CNS), ZIKV can infect and induce apoptosis of neural progenitor cells subsequently causing microcephaly as well as other neuronal complications in infants. Its ability to infect multiple cell types (placental, dermal, and neural) and increased environmental stability as compared to other flaviviruses (FVs) has broadened the transmission routes for ZIKV infection from vector-mediated to transmitted via body fluids. To further complicate the matters, it is genetically similar (about 40%) with the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV), so much so that it can almost be called a fifth DENV serotype. This homology poses the risk of causing cross-reactive immune responses and subsequent antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection in case of secondary infections or for immunized individuals. All of these factors complicate the development of a single preventive vaccine candidate or a pharmacological intervention that will completely eliminate or cure ZIKV infection. We discuss all of these factors in detail in this review and conclude that a combinatorial approach including immunization and treatment might prove to be the winning strategy.

  7. Prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infection: implementation strategies of international guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Vera Lúcia Fonseca; Fernandes, Filipa Alexandra Veludo

    2016-01-01

    to describe strategies used by health professionals on the implementation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for the prevention of urinary infection related to catheterism. systematic review on literature based on data from CINAHL(r), Nursing & Allied Health Collection, Cochrane Plus Collection, MedicLatina, MEDLINE(r), Academic Search Complete, ACS - American Chemical Society, Health Reference Center Academic, Nursing Reference Center, ScienceDirect Journals and Wiley Online Library. A sample of 13 articles was selected. studies have highlighted the decrease of urinary tract infection related to catheterism through reminder systems to decrease of people submitted to urinary catheterism, audits about nursing professionals practice and bundles expansion. the present review systemizes the knowledge of used strategies by health professionals on introduction to international recommendations, describing a rate decrease of such infection in clinical practice.

  8. Reducing the risk of surgical site infection: a case controlled study of contamination of theatre clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanandan, Indu; Bowker, Karen E; Bannister, Gordon C; Soar, Jasmeet

    2011-02-01

    Surgical site infections are one of the most important causes of healthcare associated infections (HCAI), accounting for 20% of all HCAIs. Surgical site infections affect 1% of joint replacement operations. This study was designed to assess whether theatre clothing is contaminated more inside or outside the theatre suite. Petri dishes filled with horse blood agar were pressed on theatre clothes at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours to sample bacterial contamination in 20 doctors whilst working in and outside the theatre suite. The results showed that there was greater bacterial contamination when outside the theatre suite at 2 hours. There were no differences in the amount of contamination at 4, 6 and 8 hours. This study suggests that the level of contamination of theatre clothes is similar both inside and outside the theatre setting.

  9. Novel Nanotechnology Strategies for the Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jian Jun; Sun, Xiao Hui; Ma, Xue Ting; Guan, Jian Qing; Wang, Cun Xin

    2013-09-01

    It is a hard work to develop an hightly effective cure and prevention of HIV/AIDS. The widespread used of some therapy approaches such as highly active anti retroviral therapy (HAART) has improved life quality and span of infected individuals. However, some limitations of these approaches prevent them achieving further advancement. Recent research on drug delivery approaches indicates that engineered nanosystems may bring positive effect on the improvement of current antiretroviral therapy. Furthermore, the basic researches of nanotechnology- based systems which prevent HIV transmission have been started. Therefore, nanotechnology may become a potential approach in the field of HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention. This chapter reviews the latest advancement in the field of nanotechnology-based systems which improve the fields of HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention.

  10. YELLOW FEVER PREVENTION STRATEGIES AWARENESS AMONG HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS IN SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Iida Avelino-Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vaccination is the main preventive strategy against Yellow Fever (YF, which is a public health concern in Brazil. However, HIV-infected patients might have insufficient knowledge regarding YF, YF prevention, and vaccines in general. Methods: In this questionnaire-based study, data from 158 HIV-infected individuals were addressed in three distinct outpatient clinics in São Paulo. Information was collected on demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as patients' knowledge of vaccines, YF and YF preventive strategies. In addition, individual YF vaccine recommendations and vaccine status were investigated. Results: Although most participants adequately ascertain the vaccine as the main prevention strategy against YF, few participants were aware of the severity and lack of specific treatment for YF. Discrepancy in YF vaccine (patients who should have taken the vaccine, but did not was observed in 18.8% of participants. Conclusion: YF is an important and preventable public health concern, and these results demonstrate that more information is necessary for the HIV-infected population.

  11. New technologies in the prevention and control of healthcare-associated infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2010-06-01

    The increased interest in healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) among the public, patients and politicians has led to the development of potential new approaches to its prevention by industrial concerns and others. Such developments include better methods of assessing hospital hygiene, enhanced decontamination of the healthcare environment, biosynthetic tissue alternatives, antibiotic-impregnated medical devices and information technology that can help improve professional practice. Although promising, many of these have not been adequately evaluated in the clinical setting, highlighting the need for greater collaboration between industry and infection prevention and control practitioners to maximise the benefit of new products and to complement conventional approaches to HCAI prevention such as education, professional practice and the provision of better facilities.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Patterns of Post-Operative Spinal Infection: Relationship between the Clinical Onset of Infection and the Infection Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seon-Jeong; Lee, Sang Hoon; Chung, Hye Won; Lee, Min Hee; Shin, Myung Jin; Park, Seoung Woo

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and the patterns of postoperative spinal infection according to the passage of time. Institutional review board approval was obtained, and informed consent was not obtained for the retrospective review of patients' medical records. A total of 43 patients (27 men and 16 women; mean age, 64) diagnosed with postoperative spinal infection were included in this study. We retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings and the medical records and categorized the infection sites based on MRI, i.e., anterior, posterior, and both parts. The duration of the clinical onset from surgery was divided, i.e., acute (≤2 weeks), subacute (2-4 weeks), and late (>4 weeks). Postoperative spinal infection was involved in the posterior part in 31 (72%), anterior part in two (4.7%), and both parts in 10 patients (23.3%). Abscess or phlegmon in the back muscles and laminectomy site were the most common MRI findings. The number of patients with acute, subacute, and late clinical onset were 35, two, and six, respectively (mean, 33.4 days; range, 1-730 days). The mean duration of the clinical onset was 12 days in the posterior part, 15.2 days in both parts, and 456.5 days in the anterior part. Postoperative spinal infection usually occurred within four weeks in the posterior part and over time the infection was considered to spread into the anterior part. For the evaluation of postoperative spinal infection, the posterior surgical field was more important than the vertebral body or the disc space on MRI.

  13. Site-Specific Antioxidative Therapy for Prevention of Atherosclerosis and Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Otani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress has been implicated in pathophysiology of aging and age-associated disease. Antioxidative medicine has become a practice for prevention of atherosclerosis. However, limited success in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD in individuals with atherosclerosis using general antioxidants has prompted us to develop a novel antioxidative strategy to prevent atherosclerosis. Reducing visceral adipose tissue by calorie restriction (CR and regular endurance exercise represents a causative therapy for ameliorating oxidative stress. Some of the recently emerging drugs used for the treatment of CVD may be assigned as site-specific antioxidants. CR and exercise mimetic agents are the choice for individuals who are difficult to continue CR and exercise. Better understanding of molecular and cellular biology of redox signaling will pave the way for more effective antioxidative medicine for prevention of CVD and prolongation of healthy life span.

  14. Prophylaxis of surgical site infection in adult spine surgery: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Reina; Tan, Terence; Tee, Jin Wee; Street, John

    2018-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains a significant source of morbidity in spine surgery, with reported rates varying from 0.7 to 16%. To systematically review and evaluate the evidence for strategies for prophylaxis of SSI in adult spine surgery in the last twenty years. Two independent systematic searches were conducted, at two international spine centers, encompassing PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov, Cochrane Database, EBSCO Medline, ScienceDirect, Ovid Medline, EMBASE (Ovid), and MEDLINE. References were combined and screened, then distilled to 69 independent studies for final review. 11 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), 51 case-controlled studies (CCS), and 7 case series were identified. Wide variation exists in surgical indications, approaches, procedures, and even definitions of SSI. Intra-wound vancomycin powder was the most widely studied intervention (19 studies, 1 RCT). Multiple studies examined perioperative antibiotic protocols, closed-suction drainage, povidone-iodine solution irrigation, and 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate skin closure. 18 interventions were examined by a single study only. There is limited evidence for the efficacy of intra-wound vancomycin. There is strong evidence that closed-suction drainage does not affect SSI rates, while there is moderate evidence for the efficacy of povidone-iodine irrigation and that single-dose preoperative antibiotics is as effective as multiple doses. Few conclusions can be drawn about other interventions given the paucity and poor quality of studies. While a small body of evidence underscores a select few interventions for SSI prophylaxis in adult spine surgery, most proposed measures have not been investigated beyond a single study. Further high level evidence is required to justify SSI preventative treatments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk factors for surgical site infection after transvaginal mesh placement in a nationwide Japanese cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Jun; Yazawa, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Shingo; Kaburaki, Naoto; Takahashi, Satoru; Takeyama, Masami; Koyama, Masayasu; Homma, Yukio; Arakawa, Soichi; Kiyota, Hiroshi

    2018-03-01

    We conducted a nationwide survey on perioperative management and antimicrobial prophylaxis of transvaginal mesh surgeries for pelvic organ prolapse in Japan to understand the practice and risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI). Health records of women undergoing tension-free vaginal mesh (TVM) surgeries from 2010 to 2012 were obtained from 135 medical centers belonging to the Japanese Society of Pelvic Organ Prolapse Surgery. The questionnaire addressed hospital volume, perioperative management, and SSI. Risk factors for SSI were investigated by comparing cases with and without SSI. The hospital volume among institutions varied from 0 to 248 per year (median 16.7). Preoperative hair removal, bowel preparation, and urine culture were routinely performed at 74 (55%), 66 (49%), and 24 (18%) hospitals, respectively. Prophylactic antimicrobials used were mostly first-generation (43%) or second-generation (42%) cephalosporin. SSI was reported in 86 of 9323 patients (0.92%). A multivariate analysis indicated lower hospital volume (odds ratio [OR], 0.995 [by 1-point increase]; P < 0.001), preoperative bowel preparation (OR, 2.08; P = 0.013), non-routine urine culture (OR, 3.00; P = 0.0006), and the use of antibiotics other than first-generation cephalosporin (OR, 5.29; P = 0.0011) as significant risk factors for SSI. In contrast, the cut-off points of hospital volume for preventing SSI was 116.7 cases (area under curve: 0.61). The prevalence of SSI in TVM surgeries was 0.92% in Japan. Lower hospital volume, bowel preparation, non-routine preoperative urine culture, and prophylactic antibiotics other than first-generation cephalosporin significantly elevated the incidence of SSI. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Failure to Redose Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Long Surgery Increases Risk of Surgical Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasatpibal, Nongyao; Whitney, Joanne D; Dellinger, E Patchen; Nair, Bala G; Pike, Kenneth C

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is a key component of the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI). Failure to manage antibiotic prophylaxis effectively may increase the risk of SSI. This study aimed to examine the effects of antibiotic prophylaxis on SSI risk. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among patients having general surgery between May 2012 and June 2015 at the University of Washington Medical Center. Peri-operative data extracted from hospital databases included patient and operation characteristics, intra-operative medication and fluid administration, and survival outcome. The effects of antibiotic prophylaxis and potential factors on SSI risk were estimated using multiple logistic regression and were expressed as risk ratios (RRs). A total of 4,078 patients were eligible for analysis. Of these, 180 had an SSI. Mortality rates within and after 30 days were 0.8% and 0.3%, respectively. Improper antibiotic redosing increased the risk of SSI (RR 4.61; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.33-15.91). Other risk factors were in-patient status (RR 4.05; 95% CI 1.69-9.66), smoking (RR 1.63; 95% CI 1.03-2.55), emergency surgery (RR 1.97; 95% CI 1.26-3.08), colectomy (RR 3.31; 95% CI 1.19-9.23), pancreatectomy (RR 4.52; 95% CI 1.53-13.39), proctectomy (RR 5.02; 95% CI 1.72-14.67), small bowel surgery (RR 6.16; 95% CI 2.13-17.79), intra-operative blood transfusion >500 mL (RR 2.76; 95% CI 1.45-5.26), and multiple procedures (RR 1.40; 95% CI 1.01-1.95). These data demonstrate that failure to redose prophylactic antibiotic during long operations increases the risk of SSI. Strengthening a collaborative surgical quality improvement program may help to eradicate this risk.

  17. Wrong-site nerve blocks: A systematic literature review to guide principles for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Ellen S; Yonash, Robert A; Martin, Donald E; Atkins, Joshua H; Arnold, Theresa V; Hunt, Christina M

    2018-05-01

    Wrong-site nerve blocks (WSBs) are a significant, though rare, source of perioperative morbidity. WSBs constitute the most common type of perioperative wrong-site procedure reported to the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority. This systematic literature review aggregates information about the incidence, patient consequences, and conditions that contribute to WSBs, as well as evidence-based methods to prevent them. A systematic search of English-language publications was performed, using the PRISMA process. Seventy English-language publications were identified. Analysis of four publications reporting on at least 10,000 blocks provides a rate of 0.52 to 5.07 WSB per 10,000 blocks, unilateral blocks, or "at risk" procedures. The most commonly mentioned potential consequence was local anesthetic toxicity. The most commonly mentioned contributory factors were time pressure, personnel factors, and lack of site-mark visibility (including no site mark placed). Components of the block process that were addressed include preoperative nerve-block verification, nerve-block site marking, time-outs, and the healthcare facility's structure and culture of safety. A lack of uniform reporting criteria and divergence in the data and theories presented may reflect the variety of circumstances affecting when and how nerve blocks are performed, as well as the infrequency of a WSB. However, multiple authors suggest three procedural steps that may help to prevent WSBs: (1) verify the nerve-block procedure using multiple sources of information, including the patient; (2) identify the nerve-block site with a visible mark; and (3) perform time-outs immediately prior to injection or instillation of the anesthetic. Hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, and anesthesiology practices should consider creating site-verification processes with clinician input and support to develop sustainable WSB-prevention practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Knowledge and Prevention of Nosocomial Infection among Ward Nurses at Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oti A. Aja

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted for estimating the knowledge and prevention of nosocomial infection among ward nurses at Federal Medical Centre (FMC, Umuahia Abia state. Four objectives were set, and four questions were formulated. A descriptive survey research method was used for the study. A sample size of one hundred and fifty (150 nurses was drawn from eight wards (medical and surgical, at FMC, Umuahia. A self-developed questionnaire with seventeen (17 structured questions was the instrument of data collection. Data were collected, analyzed, and presented in tables, pie chart, bar chart, histogram, and percentages. The results revealed that the nurses were well knowledgeable about nosocomial infection, although little deficiencies existed in the area of infection control practice and compliance, such as hand washing frequency. This study therefore recommends continuing education/seminar/workshop for all health care givers, to sensitize them with the knowledge and practice of nosocomial infection.

  19. Comparison of hydrocolloid with conventional gauze dressing in prevention of wound infection after clean surgical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalique, M.S.; Shukr, I.; Khalique, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    To compare hydrocolloid with conventional gauze dressing in prevention of infections after clean surgical procedures. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Surgery, CMH Rawalpindi from 22 Jan 2010 to 22 Aug 2010. Patients and Methods: A total of 400 patients undergoing clean surgical procedures were randomly allocated in two equal groups, A and B by lottery method. In group A. simple gauze dressing was applied after clean surgical procedures while in group B hydrocolloid dressing was used. On 7th post operative day, patients were observed for presence of infection. Results: Mean age of sample was 42.08 +-11.112 years. In group A out of 200 Patients, 14 (7.0%) while in group B 10 (5%) developed infection postoperatively (p=0.709). Conclusion: There is no difference in the rate of infection when using a gauze dressing or a hydrocolloid dressing after clean surgical procedure. (author)

  20. [Role of donor human milk feeding in preventing nosocomial infection in very low birth weight infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hong-Juan; Xu, Jing; Wei, Qiu-Fen

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the role of donor human milk in the prevention of nosocomial infection in very low birth weight infants. MeETHODS: A total of 105 hospitalized preterm infants with a very low birth weight were enrolled. They were classified into mother's own milk feeding group, donor human milk feeding group, and preterm formula feeding group, with 35 infants in each group. The three groups were compared in terms of incidence rates of nosocomial infection, necrotizing enterocolitis, and feeding intolerance, time to full enteral feeding, and early growth indices. Compared with the preterm formula feeding group, the donor human milk feeding group and the mother's own milk feeding group had significantly lower incidence rates of nosocomial infection and necrotizing enterocolitis and shorter time to full enteral feeding (Pmilk can be used in case of a lack of mother's own milk and may help to reduce nosocomial infection.

  1. Incidence and predictors of surgical site infection in Ethiopia: prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legesse Laloto, Tamrat; Hiko Gemeda, Desta; Abdella, Sadikalmahdi Hussen

    2017-02-03

    Surgical site infections are commonest nosocomial infections and responsible for considerable morbidity and mo