WorldWideScience

Sample records for sintering boron carbide

  1. Process for microwave sintering boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

    1993-10-12

    A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy.

  2. Kinetic analysis of boron carbide sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchert, W.; Kerler, A.R.

    1975-01-01

    The kinetics of the sintering of boron carbide were investigated by shrinkage measurements with a high-temperature dilatometer under argon atmosphere in dependence on temperature, grain size, and pressure. The activation energies and the reaction mechanisms of the different stages of sintering were determined. (orig.) [de

  3. NEUTRON IRRADIATION EFFECTS ON SPARK PLASMA SINTERED BORON CARBIDE

    OpenAIRE

    Buyuk, Bulent; Cengiz, Meral; Tugrul, A. Beril

    2015-01-01

    In this study, spark plasma sintered boron carbide (B4C) was examined against neutrons. The specimens were irradiated by reactor neutrons (include both thermal and fast neutrons) up to fluence of 1.37x1021n m-2. Thermal and fast neutrons cause swelling by different interactions with boron (10B) atoms in the related materials. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were investigated for initial and irradiated samples. In addition, lattice parameters and ...

  4. Enhanced Sintering of Boron Carbide-Silicon Composites by Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaojun; Liu, Weiliang

    2016-11-01

    Boron carbide (B4C)-silicon (Si) composites have been prepared by aqueous tape casting, laminating, and spark plasma sintering (SPS). The influences of silicon (Si) content on the phases, microstructure, sintering properties, and mechanical properties of the obtained B4C-Si composites are studied. The results indicate that the addition of Si powder can act as a sintering aid and contribute to the sintering densification. The addition of Si powder can also act as a second phase and contribute to the toughening for composites. The relative density of B4C-Si composites samples with adding 10 wt.% Si powder prepared by SPS at 1600 °C and 50 MPa for 8 min is up to 98.3%. The bending strength, fracture toughness, and Vickers hardness of the sintered samples are 518.5 MPa, 5.87 MPa m1/2, and 38.9 GPa, respectively. The testing temperature-dependent high-temperature bending strength and fracture toughness can reach a maximum value at 1350 °C. The B4C-Si composites prepared at 1600, 1650, and 1700 °C have good high-temperature mechanical properties. This paper provides a facile low-temperature sintering route for B4C ceramics with improved properties.

  5. Sintering of nano crystalline α silicon carbide by doping with boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sinterable nano silicon carbide powders of mean particle size (37 nm) were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type alpha silicon carbide having mean particle size of 0.39 m (390 nm). Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of boron carbide of 0.5 wt% together ...

  6. Neutron irradiation effects on spark plasma sintered boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buyuk, B.; Cengiz, M.; Tugrul, A.; Ozer, S.; Yucel, O.; Goller, G.; Sahin, F.C.; Lastovski, S.B.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, spark plasma sintered boron carbide (B 4 C) was examined against neutrons. The specimens were ir-radiated by reactor neutrons (include both thermal and fast neutrons) up to fluence of 1.37x10 21 n*m -2 . Thermal and fast neutrons cause swelling by different interactions with boron ( 10 B) atoms in the related materials. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were investigated for initial and irradiated samples. In addition, lattice parameters and unit cell volumes were calculated for the samples. The swelling percentages were calculated to be within a range of 0.49-3.80 % (average 1.70 %) for the outer surface of the materials for applied neutron irradiation doses. (authors)

  7. Chemical and mechanical analysis of boron-rich boron carbide processed via spark plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munhollon, Tyler Lee

    Boron carbide is a material of choice for many industrial and specialty applications due to the exceptional properties it exhibits such as high hardness, chemical inertness, low specific gravity, high neutron cross section and more. The combination of high hardness and low specific gravity makes it especially attractive for high pressure/high strain rate applications. However, boron carbide exhibits anomalous behavior when high pressures are applied. Impact pressures over the Hugoniot elastic limit result in catastrophic failure of the material. This failure has been linked to amorphization in cleavage planes and loss of shear strength. Atomistic modeling has suggested boron-rich boron carbide (B13C2) may be a better performing material than the commonly used B4C due to the elimination of amorphization and an increase in shear strength. Therefore, a clear experimental understanding of the factors that lead to the degradation of mechanical properties as well as the effects of chemistry changes in boron carbide is needed. For this reason, the goal of this thesis was to produce high purity boron carbide with varying stoichiometries for chemical and mechanical property characterization. Utilizing rapid carbothermal reduction and pressure assisted sintering, dense boron carbides with varying stoichiometries were produced. Microstructural characteristics such as impurity inclusions, porosity and grain size were controlled. The chemistry and common static mechanical properties that are of importance to superhard materials including elastic moduli, hardness and fracture toughness of the resulting boron-rich boron carbides were characterized. A series of six boron carbide samples were processed with varying amounts of amorphous boron (up to 45 wt. % amorphous boron). Samples with greater than 40 wt.% boron additions were shown to exhibit abnormal sintering behavior, making it difficult to characterize these samples. Near theoretical densities were achieved in samples with

  8. Investigations on the conditions for obtaining high density boron carbide by sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kislyj, P.S.; Grabtschuk, B.L.

    1975-01-01

    The results of investigations on kinetics of condensation and mechanisms of mass transfer in the process of sintering of technical, chemically pure and synthesized boron carbide are generalized. Laws on boron carbide densification depending upon temperature, time of isothermic endurance, thermal speed, size of powder particles and variable composition in homogeneity are determined. From the results obtained on condensation kinetics and special experiments on studying the changes in properties after heating under different conditions, the role of dislocation and diffusion processes in mass transfer during boron carbide sintering is exposed. The properties of sintered boron carbide are 15-20% lower than the properties of high-pressed one, that is conditioned by intercrystallite distortion of the first one and transcrystallite of the second one

  9. Sintering of nano crystalline α silicon carbide by doping with boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    the use of sintering aids. In the meantime, Prochazka. (1975) reported that with addition of boron and carbon to submicron size β-SiC, sintering of silicon carbide to near theoretical density was achieved. He proposed that during the firing of pure submicron powders of covalently bonded solids, densification is prevented by a ...

  10. Sintering of nano crystalline α silicon carbide by doping with boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2.2 Sintering additives. Boron carbide from M/s Starck A, West Germany having a purity of 99⋅5% was used as sintering aid along with carbon. Phenolic resin from M/s Allied Resin & Che- micals Ltd, India, was used as a source for carbon. Phe- nolic resin pyrolizes at high temperature with a carbon yield of 47% (Carbon ...

  11. Sintering boron carbide ceramics without grain growth by plastic deformation as the dominant densification mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei; Rehman, Sahibzada Shakir; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Jinyong; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Zhengyi

    2015-10-27

    A new ceramic sintering approach employing plastic deformation as the dominant mechanism is proposed, at low temperature close to the onset point of grain growth and under high pressure. Based on this route, fully dense boron carbide without grain growth can be prepared at 1,675-1,700 °C and under pressure of (≥) 80 MPa in 5 minutes. The dense boron carbide shows excellent mechanical properties, including Vickers hardness of 37.8 GPa, flexural strength of 445.3 MPa and fracture toughness of 4.7 MPa•m(0.5). Such a process should also facilitate the cost-effective preparation of other advanced ceramics for practical applications.

  12. Effect of sintering temperature and boron carbide content on the wear behavior of hot pressed diamond cutting segments

    OpenAIRE

    Islak S.; Çelik H.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sintering temperature and boron carbide content on wear behavior of diamond cutting segments. For this purpose, the segments contained 2, 5 and 10 wt.% B4C were prepared by hot pressing process carried out under a pressure of 35 MPa, at 600, 650 and 700 °C for 3 minutes. The transverse rupture strength (TRS) of the segments was assessed using a three-point bending test. Ankara andesite stone was cut to ...

  13. Effect of sintering temperature and boron carbide content on the wear behavior of hot pressed diamond cutting segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islak S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sintering temperature and boron carbide content on wear behavior of diamond cutting segments. For this purpose, the segments contained 2, 5 and 10 wt.% B4C were prepared by hot pressing process carried out under a pressure of 35 MPa, at 600, 650 and 700 °C for 3 minutes. The transverse rupture strength (TRS of the segments was assessed using a three-point bending test. Ankara andesite stone was cut to examine the wear behavior of segments with boron carbide. Microstructure, surfaces of wear and fracture of segments were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. As a result, the wear rate decreased significantly in the 0-5 wt.% B4C contents, while it increased in the 5-10 wt.% B4C contents. With increase in sintering temperature, the wear rate decreased due to the hard matrix.

  14. Reaction of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, A.V.; Melekhin, V.F.; Pegov, V.S.

    1989-01-01

    The investigation results of interaction in the B 4 C-MoSi 2 system during sintering in vacuum are presented. Sintering of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide is shown to lead to the formation of MoB 2 , SiC, Mo 5 Si 3 compounds, the presence of carbon-containing covering plays an important role in sintering

  15. Pulverization of boron element and proportions of boron carbide in boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, F.M.; Finck, C.

    1956-01-01

    It is possible to reduce boron element into fine powder by means of a mortar and pestle made of sintered boron carbide, the ratio of boron carbide introduced being less than one per cent. Boron element at our disposal is made of sharp edged, dark brown, little grains of average size greater than 5 μ. Grain sizes smaller than 1μ are required for applying thin layers of such boron. (author) [fr

  16. Spark plasma sintered bismuth telluride-based thermoelectric materials incorporating dispersed boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, H.R., E-mail: hugo.williams@leicester.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ambrosi, R.M. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Chen, K. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Friedman, U. [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ning, H.; Reece, M.J. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Robbins, M.C.; Simpson, K. [European Thermodynamics Ltd., 8 Priory Business Park, Wistow Road, Kibworth LE8 0R (United Kingdom); Stephenson, K. [European Space Agency, ESTEC TEC-EP, Keplerlaan 1, 2201AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2015-03-25

    Highlights: • Nano-B{sub 4}C reinforced Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} p-type thermoelectric produced by SPS. • Addition of B{sub 4}C up to 0.2 vol% to SPS’d material has little effect on zT. • Vickers hardness improved by 27% by adding 0.2 vol% B{sub 4}C. • Fracture toughness of SPS material: K{sub IC} = 0.80 MPa m{sup 1/2} by SEVNB. • Mechanical properties much better than commercial directionally solidified material. - Abstract: The mechanical properties of bismuth telluride based thermoelectric materials have received much less attention in the literature than their thermoelectric properties. Polycrystalline p-type Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} materials were produced from powder using spark plasma sintering (SPS). The effects of nano-B{sub 4}C addition on the thermoelectric performance, Vickers hardness and fracture toughness were measured. Addition of 0.2 vol% B{sub 4}C was found to have little effect on zT but increased hardness by approximately 27% when compared to polycrystalline material without B{sub 4}C. The K{sub IC} fracture toughness of these compositions was measured as 0.80 MPa m{sup 1/2} by Single-Edge V-Notched Beam (SEVNB). The machinability of polycrystalline materials produced by SPS was significantly better than commercially available directionally solidified materials because the latter is limited by cleavage along the crystallographic plane parallel to the direction of solidification.

  17. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  18. Fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yuan, Jun

    2009-09-09

    Chemical composition and crystal structure of fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires have been determined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The fivefold cyclic twinning relationship is confirmed by systematic axial rotation electron diffraction. Detailed chemical analysis reveals a carbon-rich boron carbide phase. Such boron carbide nanowires are potentially interesting because of their intrinsic hardness and high temperature thermoelectric property. Together with other boron-rich compounds, they may form a set of multiply twinned nanowire systems where the misfit strain could be continuously tuned to influence their mechanical properties.

  19. Compression and Associated Properties of Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Klandadze, G.I., and Eristavi, A.M., 1999: IR- Active Phonons and Structure Elements of Isotope - Enriched Boron Carbide, J. Sol. State Chem. 154, 79- 86...COMPRESSION AND ASSOCIATED PROPERTIES OF BORON CARBIDE D. P. Dandekar*and J. A. Ciezak Army Research Laboratory, APG, MD 21005 M. Somayazulu...of the observed loss of shear strength in boron carbide under plane shock wave compression to amorphization in boron carbide under triaxial stress

  20. Thermal conductivity of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbide is necessary to evaluate its potential for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. Measurements have been conducted of the thermal diffusivity of hot-pressed boron carbide BxC samples as a function of composition (x in the range from 4 to 9), temperature (300-1700 K), and temperature cycling. These data, in concert with density and specific-heat data, yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results are discussed in terms of a structural model that has been previously advanced to explain the electronic transport data. Some novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are briefly discussed.

  1. New Icosahedral Boron Carbide Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria Mora, Elena Maria

    Novel semiconductor boron carbide films and boron carbide films doped with aromatic compounds have been investigated and characterized. Most of these semiconductors were formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The aromatic compound additives used, in this thesis, were pyridine (Py), aniline, and diaminobenzene (DAB). As one of the key parameters for semiconducting device functionality is the metal contact and, therefore, the chemical interactions or band bending that may occur at the metal/semiconductor interface, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy has been used to investigate the interaction of gold (Au) with these novel boron carbide-based semiconductors. Both n- and p-type films have been tested and pure boron carbide devices are compared to those containing aromatic compounds. The results show that boron carbide seems to behave differently from other semiconductors, opening a way for new analysis and approaches in device's functionality. By studying the electrical and optical properties of these films, it has been found that samples containing the aromatic compound exhibit an improvement in the electron-hole separation and charge extraction, as well as a decrease in the band gap. The hole carrier lifetimes for each sample were extracted from the capacitance-voltage, C(V), and current-voltage, I(V), curves. Additionally, devices, with boron carbide with the addition of pyridine, exhibited better collection of neutron capture generated pulses at ZERO applied bias, compared to the pure boron carbide samples. This is consistent with the longer carrier lifetimes estimated for these films. The I-V curves, as a function of external magnetic field, of the pure boron carbide films and films containing DAB demonstrate that significant room temperature negative magneto-resistance (> 100% for pure samples, and > 50% for samples containing DAB) is possible in the resulting dielectric thin films. Inclusion of DAB is not essential for significant negative magneto

  2. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Dennis E.

    2015-04-01

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20-60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable mechanistic

  3. Advanced microstructure of boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, Helmut; Shalamberidze, Sulkhan

    2012-09-26

    The rhombohedral elementary cell of the complex boron carbide structure is composed of B(12) or B(11)C icosahedra and CBC, CBB or B□B (□, vacancy) linear arrangements, whose shares vary depending on the actual chemical compound. The evaluation of the IR phonon spectra of isotopically pure boron carbide yields the quantitative concentrations of these components within the homogeneity range. The structure formula of B(4.3)C at the carbon-rich limit of the homogeneity range is (B(11)C) (CBC)(0.91) (B□B)(0.09) (□, vacancy); and the actual structure formula of B(13)C(2) is (B(12))(0.5)(B(11)C)(0.5)(CBC)(0.65)(CBB)(0.16) (B□B)(0.19), and deviates fundamentally from (B(12))CBC, predicted by theory to be the energetically most favourable structure of boron carbide. In reality, it is the most distorted structure in the homogeneity range. The spectra of (nat)B(x)C make it evident that boron isotopes are not randomly distributed in the structure. However, doping with 2% silicon brings about a random distribution.

  4. Heterogeneous burnable poisons. Sinterability study in oxidizing atmosphere of alumina-gadolinia and alumina-boron carbide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueda, H.C.; Leiva, S.F.; Russo, D.O.

    1990-01-01

    Solid burnable poisons are used in reactors cooled by pressure light water (PLWR) with the purpose of controlling initial reactivity in the first reactor's core. The burnable poisons may be uniformly mixed with the fuel -known as 'homogeneous' poisons-; or constituting separate elements -known as heterogeneous poisons-. The purpose of this work is to present the results of two sinterability studies, performed on Al 2 O 3 -Gd 2 O 3 and Al 2 O 3 -B 4 C, where alumina acts as inert matrix, storing the absorbing elements as Gd 2 O 3 or B 4 C. The elements were sintered at an air atmosphere and additives permitting the obtention of a greater density alumina were tested at lower temperatures than the characteristic for this material, in order to determine its compatibility with the materials dealt with herein. (Author) [es

  5. Conduction mechanism in boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical conductivity, Seebeck-coefficient, and Hall-effect measurements have been made on single-phase boron carbides, B(1-x)C(x), in the compositional range from 0.1 to 0.2 X, and between room temperature and 1273 K. The results indicate that the predominant conduction mechanism is small-polaron hopping between carbon atoms at geometrically inequivalent sites.

  6. Mechanical characteristics of microwave sintered silicon carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    tions ranging from kiln furniture to membrane material. Keywords. Microwave sintering; biaxial flexure; silicon carbide. 1. Introduction. Silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics is a very well known candidate material for a structural application. However, due to (i) poor densification due to highly directional bonding, (ii) susceptibility of ...

  7. Mechanical characteristics of microwave sintered silicon carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In firing of products by conventionally sintered process, SiC grain gets oxidized producing SiO2 (∼ 32 wt%) and deteriorates the quality of the product substantially. Partially sintered silicon carbide by such a method is a useful material for a varieties of applications ranging from kiln furniture to membrane material.

  8. Boron carbide whiskers produced by vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Boron carbide whiskers have an excellent combination of properties for use as a reinforcement material. They are produced by vaporizing boron carbide powder and condensing the vapors on a substrate. Certain catalysts promote the growth rate and size of the whiskers.

  9. Compression and associated properties of boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciezak, Jennifer; Dandekar, Dattatraya

    2009-06-01

    The observed loss of shear strength of boron carbide around 22 GPa has been attributed to presence of amorphous material in the shock recovered, and statically indented and pressurized boron carbide. The present work presents a more direct association of the observed loss of shear strength in boron carbide under plane shock wave compression to amorphization in boron carbide under triaxial stress compression. This evidence is obtained from in-situ measurement of Raman, and infrared vibrational spectra of boron carbide confined in a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressures. X-ray-diffraction measurements do show a shift in the compression of boron carbide around 27 GPa. However, X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that the amorphization does not extend to micron scale, as there is no evidence of a loss of crystallinity in the recorded diffraction pattern of boron carbide to 47 GPa. Our work shows that shear plays a very dominant role in the stress-induced amorphization of boron carbide.

  10. Multipurpose boron carbide-aluminum composite and its manufacture via the control of the microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyzik, A.J.; Aksay, I.A.

    1987-01-01

    A method of making a boron carbidealuminum composite is described comprising: heating a particulate boron carbide in the presence of free carbon to 1800 0 -2250 0 C wherein the resulting boron carbide exhibits a substantially reduced reaction rate with aluminum; and reacting the boron carbide with aluminum, wherein a boron carbide-aluminum composite is formed having a microstructure including principally boron carbide and aluminum metal homogeneously distributed throughout the composite. A method is described of making a boron carbide-aluminum composite of selected ceramic and metal content and microstructure, having high fracture toughness, fracture strength and Young's modulus, and low density. It consists of: dispersing a particulate boron carbide of less than 10 micrometers particle size in water at a pH selected to maximize electrostatic repelling forces on boron carbide particle surfaces; consolidating the boron carbide into a porous compact; sintering the compact, whereby an open porous structure is retained; infilterating the compact with aluminum; and heat treating the compact, whereby a voidless composite is formed having microstructure phases

  11. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Edward L.

    1985-01-01

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  12. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, J E; Bhakhri, V; Hao, R; Prior, T J; Scheler, T; Gregoryanz, E; Chhowalla, M; Giulani, F

    2015-01-14

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping.

  13. Study on plasma sprayed boron carbide coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yi; Lee, Soo W.; Ding, Chuanxian

    2002-03-01

    The microstructure, phase composition, and mechanical properties of boron carbide coatings formed by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) are studied in the present work. The boron carbide coating with high microhardness and low porosity could be produced by APS. The decomposition of boron carbide powder during the plasma spray process would result in the formation of the BxC phase and an increase of the carbon phase, which is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction results.

  14. Breaking the icosahedra in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kelvin Y; An, Qi; Sato, Takanori; Breen, Andrew J; Ringer, Simon P; Goddard, William A; Cairney, Julie M; Hemker, Kevin J

    2016-10-25

    Findings of laser-assisted atom probe tomography experiments on boron carbide elucidate an approach for characterizing the atomic structure and interatomic bonding of molecules associated with extraordinary structural stability. The discovery of crystallographic planes in these boron carbide datasets substantiates that crystallinity is maintained to the point of field evaporation, and characterization of individual ionization events gives unexpected evidence of the destruction of individual icosahedra. Statistical analyses of the ions created during the field evaporation process have been used to deduce relative atomic bond strengths and show that the icosahedra in boron carbide are not as stable as anticipated. Combined with quantum mechanics simulations, this result provides insight into the structural instability and amorphization of boron carbide. The temporal, spatial, and compositional information provided by atom probe tomography makes it a unique platform for elucidating the relative stability and interactions of primary building blocks in hierarchically crystalline materials.

  15. Microstructure evolution of SiC sintered bodies activated by boron and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubernat, A.; Stobierski, L.

    2003-01-01

    Investigation on the role of sintering aids on densification of silicon carbide indicate that boron and carbon modify mass transport mechanisms. It leads to changes of microstructure of polycrystalline silicon carbide. In the present work the influence of varying proportions of sintering aids on the material microstructure was studied. The microstructural changes were related to the changes of the selected properties of the resulting materials. (author)

  16. Boron Carbides As Thermo-electric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles

    1988-01-01

    Report reviews recent theoretical and experimental research on thermoelectric materials. Recent work with narrow-band semiconductors demonstrated possibility of relatively high thermoelectric energy-conversion efficiencies in materials withstanding high temperatures needed to attain such efficiencies. Among promising semiconductors are boron-rich borides, especially boron carbides.

  17. Electrical transport and thermoelectric properties of boron carbide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirihara, Kazuhiro; Mukaida, Masakazu; Shimizu, Yoshiki

    2017-04-01

    The electrical transport and thermoelectric property of boron carbide nanowires synthesized by a carbothermal method are reported. It is demonstrated that the nanowires achieve a higher Seebeck coefficient and power factor than those of the bulk samples. The conduction mechanism of the nanowires at low temperatures below 300 K is different from that of the sintered-polycrystalline and single-crystal bulk samples. In a temperature range of 200-450 K, there is a crossover between electrical conduction by variable-range hopping and phonon-assisted hopping. The inhomogeneous carbon concentration and planar defects, such as twins and stacking faults, in the nanowires are thought to modify the bonding nature and electronic structure of the boron carbide crystal substantially, causing differences in the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient. The effect of boundary scattering of phonon at nanostructured surface on the thermal conductivity reduction is discussed.

  18. Microstructural optimization of solid-state sintered silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Gonzalez, Lionel R.

    Silicon carbide armor, manufactured through solid-state sintering, liquid-phase sintering, and hot-pressing, is being used by the United States Armed Forces for personal and vehicle protection. There is a lack of consensus, however, on which process results in the best-performing ballistic armor. Previous studies have shown that hot-pressed ceramics processed with secondary oxide and/or rare earth oxides, which exhibit high fracture toughness, perform well in handling and under ballistic impact. This high toughness is due to the intergranular nature of the fracture, creating a tortuous path for cracks and facilitating crack deflection and bridging. However, it has also been shown that higher-hardness sintered SiC materials might perform similarly or better to hot-pressed armor, in spite of the large fracture toughness deficit, if the microstructure (density, grain size, purity) of these materials are improved. In this work, the development of theoretically-dense, clean grain boundary, high hardness solid-state sintered silicon carbide (SiC) armor was pursued. Boron carbide and graphite (added as phenolic resin to ensure the carbon is finely dispersed throughout the microstructure) were used as the sintering aids. SiC batches between 0.25--4.00 wt.% carbon were mixed and spray dried. Cylindrical pellets were pressed at 13.7 MPa, cold-isostatically pressed (CIP) at 344 MPa, sintered under varying sintering soaking temperatures and heating rates, and varying post hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) parameters. Carbon additive amounts between 2.0--2.5 wt.% (based on the resin source), a 0.36 wt.% B4C addition, and a 2050°C sintering soak yielded parts with high sintering densities (˜95.5--96.5%) and a fine, equiaxed microstructure (d50 = 2.525 mum). A slow ramp rate (10°C/min) prevented any occurrence of abnormal grain growth. Post-HIPing at 1900°C removed the remaining closed porosity to yield a theoretically-dense part (3.175 g/cm3, according to rule of mixtures). These

  19. Determination of free carbon content in boron carbide ceramic powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.R.M. de; Lima, N.B. de; Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1990-01-01

    Boron carbide is a ceramic material of technological importance due to its hardness and high chemical and thermal stabilities. Free carbon is always found as a process dependent impurity in boron carbide. The development of procedures for its detection is required because its presence leads to a degradation of the boron carbide properties. In this work, several procedures for determining free carbon content in boron carbide specimens are reported and discussed for comparison purposes. (author) [pt

  20. Sintering of nano crystalline o silicon carbide doping with

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sinterable silicon carbide powders were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type -SiC. Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of aluminium nitride together with carbon. Nearly 99% sintered density was obtained. The mechanism of sintering was studied by ...

  1. Mesoscale Modeling of Dynamic Compression of Boron Carbide Polycrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    occurs in ballistic impact, and accompanies amorphization in diamond anvil cell (DAC) experiments (Yan et al., 2009). Fracture in boron carbide ...Mesoscale Modeling of Dynamic Compression of Boron Carbide Polycrystals by J. D. Clayton ARL-RP-440 May 2013...Ground, MD 21005-5069 ARL-RP-440 May 2013 Mesoscale Modeling of Dynamic Compression of Boron Carbide Polycrystals J. D. Clayton

  2. Thermal conductivity behavior of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Zoltan, A.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1983-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbides is necessary to evaluate its potential for high temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. The thermal diffusivity of hot pressed boron carbide B/sub 1-x/C/sub x/ samples as a function of composition, temperature and temperature cycling was measured. These data in concert with density and specific heat data yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results in terms of a structural model to explain the electrical transport data and novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are discussed.

  3. Lattice dynamics of α boron and of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vast, N.

    1999-01-01

    The atomic structure and the lattice dynamics of α boron and of B 4 C boron carbide have been studied by Density Functional Theory (D.F.T.) and Density Functional Perturbation Theory (D.F.P.T.). The bulk moduli of the unit-cell and of the icosahedron have been investigated, and the equation of state at zero temperature has been determined. In α boron, Raman diffusion and infrared absorption have been studied under pressure, and the theoretical and experimental Grueneisen coefficients have been compared. In boron carbide, inspection of the theoretical and experimental vibrational spectra has led to the determination of the atomic structure of B 4 C. Finally, the effects of isotopic disorder have been modeled by an exact method beyond the mean-field approximation, and the effects onto the Raman lines has been investigated. The method has been applied to isotopic alloys of diamond and germanium. (author)

  4. Testing boron carbide under triaxial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Charles; Chocron, Sidney; Dannemann, Kathryn A.; Nicholls, Arthur E.

    2012-03-01

    This article focuses on the pressure dependence and summarizes the characterization work conducted on intact and predamaged specimens of boron carbide under confinement in a pressure vessel and in a thick steel sleeve. The failure curves obtained are presented, and the data compared to experimental data from the literature.

  5. Anomalous Seebeck coefficient in boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aselage, T.L.; Emin, D.; Wood, C.; Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Howard, I.A.

    1987-01-01

    Boron carbides exhibit an anomalously large Seebeck coefficient with a temperature coefficient that is characteristic of polaronic hopping between inequivalent sites. The inequivalence in the sites is associated with disorder in the solid. The temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient for materials prepared by different techniques provides insight into the nature of the disorder

  6. Perfomance analysis of boron carbide in LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitner, A.L.; Birney, K.R.

    1975-01-01

    Reactivity control in the FFTF and LMFBR's will be maintained by control elements utilizing boron carbide pellets contained in stainless steel pins. Computer performance codes predict irradiation service conditions of absorber pellets and identify required experimental testing. Test results are incorporated in the codes to improve performance prediction capabilities

  7. Boron carbide nanowires: Synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhe

    Bulk boron carbide has been widely used in ballistic armored vest and the property characterization has been heavily focused on mechanical properties. Even though boron carbides have also been projected as a promising class of high temperature thermoelectric materials for energy harvesting, the research has been limited in this field. Since the thermal conductivity of bulk boron carbide is still relatively high, there is a great opportunity to take advantage of the nano effect to further reduce it for better thermoelectric performance. This dissertation work aims to explore whether improved thermoelectric performance can be found in boron carbide nanowires compared with their bulk counterparts. This dissertation work consists of four main parts. (1) Synthesis of boron carbide nanowires. Boron carbide nanowires were synthesized by co-pyrolysis of diborane and methane at low temperatures (with 879 °C as the lowest) in a home-built low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) system. The CVD-based method is energy efficient and cost effective. The as-synthesized nanowires were characterized by electron microscopy extensively. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show the nanowires are single crystalline with planar defects. Depending on the geometrical relationship between the preferred growth direction of the nanowire and the orientation of the defects, the as-synthesized nanowires could be further divided into two categories: transverse fault (TF) nanowires grow normal to the defect plane, while axial fault (AF) ones grow within the defect plane. (2) Understanding the growth mechanism of as-synthesized boron carbide nanowires. The growth mechanism can be generally considered as the famous vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. TF and AF nanowires were found to be guided by Ni-B catalysts of two phases. A TF nanowire is lead by a hexagonal phase catalyst, which was proved to be in a liquid state during reaction. While an AF nanowires is catalyzed by a

  8. Raman spectroscopy study of metal-containing boron carbide-based ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radev, Dimitar D.; Mihailova, Boriana; Konstantinov, Ludmil

    2002-01-01

    Dense boron carbide-based materials, B 4C-Me xB y (Me = V, W), are obtained by pressureless sintering in the presence of metal carbides. The sintered B 4CVB 2 and B 4CW 2B 5 ceramics, with various contents of the metal borides, are investigated by powder X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained show that the non-homogeneity of the ceramic samples increases with increasing the content of metal and, additionally, metal cations replace a part of boron atoms in icosahedra positions in the B 4C network, thus stiffening the B 4C lattice and improving the micro-hardness and the wear resistance of the boron carbide ceramics.

  9. Characterization of boron carbide with an electron microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteudi, G.; Ruste, J.

    1983-01-01

    Within the framework of a study of heterogeneous materials (Matteudi et al., 1971: Matteudi and Verchery, 1972) thin deposits of boron carbide were characterized. Experiments using an electronic probe microanalyzer to analyze solid boron carbide or boron carbide in the form of thick deposits are described. Quantitative results on boron and carbon are very close to those obtained when applying the Monte Carlo-type correction calculations.

  10. Impact scenarios in boron carbide: A computational study

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, R. G.; Sugden, I. J.; Plant, D. F.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of radiative impacts on the structure of boron carbide has been studied by both classical and ab initio simulations. As a part of this study, a new forcefield was developed for use in studying boron carbide materials. Impact scenarios in boron carbide were simulated in order to investigate the exceptional resistance of this material, and other icosahedral boron solids, to high-energy impact events. It was observed that interstitial defects created by radiative impacts are likely to...

  11. Structure of Boron Carbide: Where's the Carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, David; Seidler, Gerald; Fister, Timothy; Nagle, Kenneth; Segre, Carlo

    2008-03-01

    Although the structure of the boron carbide series, B12-xCx with 0.06 x x-ray scattering (LERIX) spectrometer on the PNC-CAT beamline at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Lab has enabled differentiation of the boron and carbon absorption edge data for the various crystallographic sites. The structure (R-3m) consists of twelve-atom icosahedra and three-atom chains. Boron carbide may have a maximum of three carbon atoms, which may be located on the two end of chain sites and in one of two inequivalent sites on the icosahedra. At least one carbon atom must be present in the structure for it to be stable. In this presentation, structural results from non-resonant x-ray scattering for seven samples, ranging from B4C to B10.1C will be presented.

  12. Comparative sinterability of combustion synthesized and commercial titanium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    The influence of various parameters on the sinterability of combustion synthesized titanium carbide was investigaged. Titanium carbide powders, prepared by the combustion synthesis process, were sintered in the temperature range 1150 to 1600 0 C. Incomplete combustion and high oxygen contents were found to be the cause of reduced shrinkage during sintering of the combustion syntheized powders when compared to the shrinkage of commercial TiC. Free carbon was shown to inhibit shrinkage. The activation energy for sintering was found to depend on stoichiometry (C/Ti). With decreasing C/Ti, the rate of sintering increased. 29 references, 16 figures, 13 tables

  13. Compatibility of heat resistant alloys with boron carbide, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Shin-ichi; Nagamatuya, Takaaki; Aoyama, Isao; Ito, Hisanori; Muraoka, Susumu.

    1982-12-01

    In the present design of the control rod for the experimental Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor, sintered pellets of boron carbide mixed with graphite are used as a neutron absorber, which are clad with the sheath material of Hastelloy XR. The sintered pellet contains 30 wt% of natural boron. Chemical reaction occurs between the neutron absorber and the sheath material when they contact mutually at elevated temperature. The term called compatibility is defined as the ability of those materials to be used together without undesirable reaction, in this report. The experimental results on the compatibility of both materials are presented and are discussed on three subjects as (1) the comparison between Hastelloy X and Hastelloy XR, (2) the long term exposure, (3) the effect of the reaction barrier. No difference was observed between Hastelloy X and Hastelloy XR within the conditions of the experiment at 850 0 C, 950 0 C and 1050 0 C for each 100 h concerning the first subject. On the second, the penetration depth of 74 um and 156 um were observed on Hastelloy X reacted with sintered pellets (boron carbide and graphite) at 750 0 C for 3000 h and 850 0 C for 2000 h, respectively. On the third subject, Hastelloy X surfaces were coated with zirconia or alumina powder by plasma spraying process and by calorizing process in order to prevent the above mentioned reaction. These specimens were tested under two conditions: the one was a simple heat test of 1000 0 C - 100 h and the other was five thermal cycles of 1000 0 C - 20 h. The test results showed that no reaction occurred in the both alloys themselves and some of the coated layers were stripped or cracked. (author)

  14. Behavior of disordered boron carbide under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchini, Giovanni; McCauley, James W; Chhowalla, Manish

    2006-07-21

    Gibbs free-energy calculations based on density functional theory have been used to determine the possible source of failure of boron carbide just above the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL). A range of B4C polytypes is found to be stable at room pressure. The energetic barrier for shock amorphization of boron carbide is by far the lowest for the B12(CCC) polytype, requiring only 6 GPa approximately = P(HEL) for collapse under hydrostatic conditions. The results clearly demonstrate that the collapse of the B12(CCC) phase leads to segregation of B12 and amorphous carbon in the form of 2-3 nm bands along the (113) lattice direction, in excellent agreement with recent transmission electron microscopy results.

  15. Electron-Spin Resonance in Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles; Venturini, Eugene L.; Azevedo, Larry J.; Emin, David

    1987-01-01

    Samples exhibit Curie-law behavior in temperature range of 2 to 100 K. Technical paper presents studies of electron-spin resonance of samples of hot pressed B9 C, B15 C2, B13 C2, and B4 C. Boron carbide ceramics are refractory solids with high melting temperatures, low thermal conductives, and extreme hardnesses. They show promise as semiconductors at high temperatures and have unusually large figures of merit for use in thermoelectric generators.

  16. High resolution imaging of boron carbide microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, I.D.R.; Aselage, T.; Van Deusen, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    Two samples of boron carbide have been examined using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A hot-pressed B 13 C 2 sample shows a high density of variable width twins normal to (10*1). Subtle shifts or offsets of lattice fringes along the twin plane and normal to approx.(10*5) were also observed. A B 4 C powder showed little evidence of stacking disorder in crystalline regions

  17. A fundamental study of industrial boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuppiroli, L.; Kormann, R.; Lesueur, D.

    1983-09-01

    Some of the physical properties of boron carbide, before and after irradiation are reviewed on the basis of several new experiments performed in our laboratory. The layered aspect of the grains of this ceramic, due to a microtwinning of the rhomboedral structure, is emphasized first. Then, the location of free carbon in samples of composition close to B 4 C is discussed in relation with new sputtering experiments. Coupled studies of the electric conductivities and the electron spin resonance lines have demonstrated the important role of free carbon in the electronic properties of boron carbide and revealed the existence of a homogeneous short range disorder, the origin of which is not very clear (amorphous concept). The elementary processes responsible of the swelling and microcracking of neutron irradiated boron carbide are rather well understood. The role of the point defects in these processes is reported. The displacement threshold energies and formation volumes are discussed in relation with electron irradiation experiments, and displacement rates are calculated in different irradiation situations including neutron irradiations [fr

  18. Boron-carbide-aluminum and boron-carbide-reactive metal cermets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Danny C.; Pyzik, Aleksander J.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    1986-01-01

    Hard, tough, lightweight boron-carbide-reactive metal composites, particularly boron-carbide-aluminum composites, are produced. These composites have compositions with a plurality of phases. A method is provided, including the steps of wetting and reacting the starting materials, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected. Starting compositions, reaction temperatures, reaction times, and reaction atmospheres are parameters for controlling the process and resulting compositions. The ceramic phases are homogeneously distributed in the metal phases and adhesive forces at ceramic-metal interfaces are maximized. An initial consolidation step is used to achieve fully dense composites. Microstructures of boron-carbide-aluminum cermets have been produced with modulus of rupture exceeding 110 ksi and fracture toughness exceeding 12 ksi.sqroot.in. These composites and methods can be used to form a variety of structural elements.

  19. Unveiling polytype transformation assisted growth mechanism in boron carbide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningning; Li, Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate direct evidence that the lattice distortion, induced by boron carbide (BxCy) stoichiometry, assists the growth of boron carbide nanowires. The transformation between different polytypic boron carbide phases lowers the energy barrier for boron diffusion, promoting boron migration in the nanowire growth. An atomistic mass transport model has been established to explain such volume-diffusion-induced nanowire growth which cannot be explained by the conventional surface diffusion model alone. These findings significantly advance our understanding of nanowire growth processes and mass transport mechanisms and provide new guidelines for the design of nanowire-structured devices.

  20. Effects of sintering process on wear and mechanical behavior properties of titanium carbide/hexagonal boron nitrid/steel 316L base nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadooghi, Ali; Payganeh, Gholamhassan

    2018-02-01

    Powder metallurgy process is one of the approaches to manufacture nanocomposite samples, in which the product quality depends upon the pressure, temperature, and sintering time. In this manuscript, steel is selected as the base material together with 2% carbon-based reinforcing TiC particles, and 2% hBN particles as the self-lubricant material. The powders were mixed for 5 h in high ball milling, and compacted with two pressures of 350 and 450 MPa, sintered in the furnace for 2 and 4 h, and sintering temperatures of 1350 and 1450 °C were utilized. SEM, XRD, and EDX tests are performed to identify the nanocomposite structure, and DTA tests are carried out to specify the temperature graph of the material. Finally, hardness, wear, and bending tests are done to find the corresponding mechanical properties of the samples. As a result, the optimum process parameters, including pressure, temperature and sintering duration is achieved. Results show that adding the reinforcing particles into a steel matrix increase the hardness, as well as flexural strength of the nanocomposite product. Also, coefficient of friction shows a decreases.

  1. Testing Boron Carbide and Silicon Carbide under Triaxial Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Charles; Chocron, Sidney; Nicholls, Arthur

    2011-06-01

    Boron Carbide (B4C) and silicon carbide (SiC-N) are extensively used as armor materials. The strength of these ceramics depends mainly on surface defects, hydrostatic pressure and strain rate. This article focuses on the pressure dependence and summarizes the characterization work conducted on intact and predamaged specimens by using compression under confinement in a pressure vessel and in a thick steel sleeve. The techniques used for the characterization will be described briefly. The failure curves obtained for the two materials will be presented, although the data are limited for SiC. The data will also be compared to experimental data from Wilkins (1969), and Meyer and Faber (1997). Additionally, the results will be compared with plate-impact data.

  2. Chemical vapor deposited boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Smith, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed analytical electron microscope (AEM) studies of yellow whiskers produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) show that two basic types of whiskers are produced at low temperatures (between 1200 0 C and 1400 0 C) and low boron to carbon gas ratios. Both whisker types show planar microstructures such as twin planes and stacking faults oriented parallel to, or at a rhombohedral angle to, the growth direction. For both whisker types, the presence of droplet-like terminations containing both Si and Ni indicate that the growth process during CVD is via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanisms

  3. Re-sintered boron-rich polycrystalline cubic boron nitride and method for making same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavens, T.R.; Corrigan, F.R.; Shott, R.L.; Bovenkerk, H.P.

    1987-06-16

    A method is described for making re-sintered polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (CBN) which comprises: (a) placing sintered substantially catalyst-free boron-rich polycrystalline cubic boron nitride particles in a high pressure/high temperature apparatus, the particles being substantially free of sintering inhibiting impurities; (b) subjecting the boron-rich cubic boron nitride particles to a pressure and a temperature adequate to re-sinter the particles, the temperature being below the CBN reconversion temperature; (c) maintaining the temperature and pressure for a time sufficient to re-sinter the boron-rich cubic boron nitride particles in the apparatus, and (d) recovering the re-sintered polycrystalline cubic boron nitride from the apparatus.

  4. Production of boron carbide powder by carbothermal synthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Production of boron carbide powder by carbothermal synthesis of gel material. A K KHANRA. Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302, India. MS received 21 August 2006; revised 29 January 2007. Abstract. Boron carbide (B4C) powder has been produced ...

  5. Processing of boron carbide-aluminum composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halverson, D.C.; Pyzik, A.J.; Aksay, I.A.

    1989-01-01

    The processing problems associated with boron carbide and the limitations of its mechanical properties can be significantly reduced when a metal phase (e.g., aluminum) is added. Lower densification temperatures and higher fracture toughness will result. Based on fundamental capillarity thermodynamics, reaction thermodynamics, and densification kinetics, we have established reliable criteria for fabricating B 4 C-Al particulate composites. Because chemical reactions cannot be eliminated, it is necessary to process B 4 C-Al by rapidly heating to near 1200 degrees C (to ensure wetting) and subsequently heat-treating below 1200 degrees C (for microstructural development)

  6. Boron carbide nanowires with uniform CNx coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. Z.; Wang, R. M.; You, L. P.; Yu, J.; Chen, H.; Yu, D. P.; Chen, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Boron carbide nanowires with uniform carbon nitride coating layers were synthesized on a silicon substrate using a simple thermal process. The structure and morphology of the as-synthesized nanowires were characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. A correlation between the surface smoothness of the nanowire sidewalls and their lateral sizes has been observed and it is a consequence of the anisotropic formation of the coating layers. A growth mechanism is also proposed for these growth phenomena.

  7. Boron carbide synthesis by carbothermic reduction of boron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.R.M. de; Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1988-01-01

    Boron carbide (B 4 C) is a ceramic material of technological applications due to its extreme hardness and high chemical as well as thermal stability. Some parameters of the process for obtaining B 4 C by carbothermic reduction of B 2 O 3 have been determined. The starting powders and the final products have been analysed by chemical, spectrographic and X-ray diffraction methods. The results show that the B 4 C obtained by the carbothermic reduction process is suitable for applications with a definite determination of the free carbon content. (author) [pt

  8. Computational Studies of Physical Properties of Boron Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizhi Ouyang

    2011-09-30

    The overall goal is to provide valuable insight in to the mechanisms and processes that could lead to better engineering the widely used boron carbide which could play an important role in current plight towards greener energy. Carbon distribution in boron carbide, which has been difficult to retrieve from experimental methods, is critical to our understanding of its structure-properties relation. For modeling disorders in boron carbide, we implemented a first principles method based on supercell approach within our G(P,T) package. The supercell approach was applied to boron carbide to determine its carbon distribution. Our results reveal that carbon prefers to occupy the end sites of the 3-atom chain in boron carbide and further carbon atoms will distribute mainly on the equatorial sites with a small percentage on the 3-atom chains and the apex sites. Supercell approach was also applied to study mechanical properties of boron carbide under uniaxial load. We found that uniaxial load can lead to amorphization. Other physical properties of boron carbide were calculated using the G(P,T) package.

  9. Microwave Sintering and Its Application on Cemented Carbides

    OpenAIRE

    Rumman Md Raihanuzzaman; Lee Chang Chuan; Zonghan Xie; Reza Ghomashchi

    2015-01-01

    Cemented carbides, owing to their excellent mechanical properties, have been of immense interest in the field of hard materials for the past few decades. A number of processing techniques have been developed to obtain high quality carbide tools, with a wide range of grain size depending on the application and requirements. Microwave sintering is one of the heating processes, which has been used to prepare a wide range of materials including ceramics. A deep understanding ...

  10. Mechanical characteristics of microwave sintered silicon carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700 032, India. Abstract. The present work deals with the sintering of ... recently become an attractive area of research and deve- lopment. The major advantages of ... without the usage of sintering aids (Lee and Case 1999;. Goldstein et al 1999). Several studies have ...

  11. Helium behaviour in implanted boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motte Vianney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When boron carbide is used as a neutron absorber in nuclear power plants, large quantities of helium are produced. To simulate the gas behaviour, helium implantations were carried out in boron carbide. The samples were then annealed up to 1500 °C in order to observe the influence of temperature and duration of annealing. The determination of the helium diffusion coefficient was carried out using the 3He(d,p4He nuclear reaction (NRA method. From the evolution of the width of implanted 3He helium profiles (fluence 1 × 1015/cm2, 3 MeV corresponding to a maximum helium concentration of about 1020/cm3 as a function of annealing temperatures, an Arrhenius diagram was plotted and an apparent diffusion coefficient was deduced (Ea = 0.52 ± 0.11 eV/atom. The dynamic of helium clusters was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM of samples implanted with 1.5 × 1016/cm2, 2.8 to 3 MeV 4He ions, leading to an implanted slab about 1 μm wide with a maximum helium concentration of about 1021/cm3. After annealing at 900 °C and 1100 °C, small (5–20 nm flat oriented bubbles appeared in the grain, then at the grain boundaries. At 1500 °C, due to long-range diffusion, intra-granular bubbles were no longer observed; helium segregates at the grain boundaries, either as bubbles or inducing grain boundaries opening.

  12. Non-pressurized sintered silicon carbide with titanium carbide reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.

    1992-01-01

    A non-pressurized compression of SiC-TiC composite materials can be achieved via liquid phase sintering by the application of oxidic additives. Materials with TiC proportions up to 40% by volume of TiC and densities of 97 to 98% TD were produced at sintering temperatures around 1875 C. With SiC sintered in the liquid phase an increase of toughness at fracture of 80% compared with conventionally non-pressurized sintered SiC was achieved with B/C additive. No further increase could be achieved by the addition of TiC particles. However, the oxidation resistance at 1200 C was worsened. (orig.) [de

  13. Radial furnace shows promise for growing straight boron carbide whiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, E.

    1967-01-01

    Radial furnace, with a long graphite vaporization tube, maintains a uniform thermal gradient, favoring the growth of straight boron carbide whiskers. This concept seems to offer potential for both the quality and yield of whiskers.

  14. On surface Raman scattering and luminescence radiation in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Filipov, V; Schwarz, U; Armbrüster, M; Leithe-Jasper, A; Tanaka, T; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-02-03

    The discrepancy between Raman spectra of boron carbide obtained by Fourier transform Raman and conventional Raman spectrometry is systematically investigated. While at photon energies below the exciton energy (1.560 eV), Raman scattering of bulk phonons of boron carbide occurs, photon energies exceeding the fundamental absorption edge (2.09 eV) evoke additional patterns, which may essentially be attributed to luminescence or to the excitation of Raman-active processes in the surface region. The reason for this is the very high fundamental absorption in boron carbide inducing a very small penetration depth of the exciting laser radiation. Raman excitations essentially restricted to the boron carbide surface region yield spectra which considerably differ from bulk phonon ones, thus indicating structural modifications.

  15. Analysis of boron carbides' electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Iris A.; Beckel, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic properties of boron-rich icosahedral clusters were studied as a means of understanding the electronic structure of the icosahedral borides such as boron carbide. A lower bound was estimated on bipolaron formation energies in B12 and B11C icosahedra, and the associated distortions. While the magnitude of the distortion associated with bipolaron formation is similar in both cases, the calculated formation energies differ greatly, formation being much more favorable on B11C icosahedra. The stable positions of a divalent atom relative to an icosahedral borane was also investigated, with the result that a stable energy minimum was found when the atom is at the center of the borane, internal to the B12 cage. If incorporation of dopant atoms into B12 cages in icosahedral boride solids is feasible, novel materials might result. In addition, the normal modes of a B12H12 cluster, of the C2B10 cage in para-carborane, and of a B12 icosahedron of reduced (D sub 3d) symmetry, such as is found in the icosahedral borides, were calculated. The nature of these vibrational modes will be important in determining, for instance, the character of the electron-lattice coupling in the borides, and in analyzing the lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity.

  16. Production of boron carbide powder by carbothermal synthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    weight armour plates etc (Alizadeh et al 2004). It can also be used as a reinforcing material for ceramic matrix composites. It is an excellent neutron absorption material in nuclear industry due to its high neutron absorption co- efficient (Sinha et al 2002). Boron carbide can be prepared by reaction of elemental boron and ...

  17. Embrittling Components in Sintered Steels: Comparison of Phosphorus and Boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danninger, Herbert; Vassileva, Vassilka; Gierl-Mayer, Christian

    2017-12-01

    In ferrous powder metallurgy, both boron and phosphorus have been known to be sintering activators for a long time. However, the use has been widely different: while P is a standard additive to sintered iron and steels, boron has been frequently studied, but its use in practice is very limited. Both additives are also known to be potentially embrittling, though in a different way. In the present study the differences between the effects of both elements are shown: while P activates sintering up to a certain threshold, in part by stabilizing ferrite, in part by forming a transient liquid phase, boron is the classical additive enhancing persistent liquid phase, being virtually insoluble in the iron matrix. The consequence is that sintered steels can tolerate quite a proportion of phosphorus, depending on composition and sintering process; boron however is strongly embrittling in particular in combination with carbon, which requires establishing a precisely defined content that enhances sintering but is not yet embrittling. The fracture mode of embrittled materials is also different: while with Fe-P the classical intergranular fracture is observed, with boron a much more rugged fracture surface appears, indicating some failure through the eutectic interparticle network but mostly transgranular cleavage. If carbon is added, in both cases transgranular cleavage dominates even in the severely embrittled specimens, indicating that no more the grain boundaries and sintering necks are the weakest links in the systems.

  18. Isotopic effects on the phonon modes in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Kuhlmann, U; Rotter, H W; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-10-06

    The effect of isotopes ((10)B-(11)B; (12)C-(13)C) on the infrared- and Raman-active phonons of boron carbide has been investigated. For B isotopes, the contributions of the virtual crystal approximation, polarization vector and isotopical disorder are separated. Boron and carbon isotope effects are largely opposite to one another and indicate the share of the particular atoms in the atomic assemblies vibrating in specific phonon modes. Some infrared-active phonons behave as expected for monatomic boron crystals.

  19. Synergistic methods for the production of high-strength and low-cost boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Charles Schenck

    2011-12-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a non-oxide ceramic in the same class of nonmetallic hard materials as silicon carbide and diamond. The high hardness, high elastic modulus and low density of B4C make it a nearly ideal material for personnel and vehicular armor. B4C plates formed via hot-pressing are currently issued to U.S. soldiers and have exhibited excellent performance; however, hot-pressed articles contain inherent processing defects and are limited to simple geometries such as low-curvature plates. Recent advances in the pressureless sintering of B4C have produced theoretically-dense and complex-shape articles that also exhibit superior ballistic performance. However, the cost of this material is currently high due to the powder shape, size, and size distribution that are required, which limits the economic feasibility of producing such a product. Additionally, the low fracture toughness of pure boron carbide may have resulted in historically lower transition velocities (the projectile velocity range at which armor begins to fail) than competing silicon carbide ceramics in high-velocity long-rod tungsten penetrator tests. Lower fracture toughness also limits multi-hit protection capability. Consequently, these requirements motivated research into methods for improving the densification and fracture toughness of inexpensive boron carbide composites that could result in the development of a superior armor material that would also be cost-competitive with other high-performance ceramics. The primary objective of this research was to study the effect of titanium and carbon additives on the sintering and mechanical properties of inexpensive B4C powders. The boron carbide powder examined in this study was a sub-micron (0.6 mum median particle size) boron carbide powder produced by H.C. Starck GmbH via a jet milling process. A carbon source in the form of phenolic resin, and titanium additives in the form of 32 nm and 0.9 mum TiO2 powders were selected. Parametric studies of

  20. Structural modifications induced by ion irradiation and temperature in boron carbide B{sub 4}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor, G., E-mail: g.victor@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Institut Universitaire de Technologie (IUT) Lyon-1, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); CEA-DEN, Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Djourelov, N. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko chaussee blvd, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); ELI-NP, IFIN-HH, 30 Reactorului Str, MG-6 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Miro, S. [CEA-DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Baillet, J. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Pradeilles, N.; Rapaud, O.; Maître, A. [SPCTS, UMR CNRS 7315, Centre Européen de la céramique, University of Limoges (France); Gosset, D. [CEA, Saclay, DMN-SRMA-LA2M, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-12-15

    Already used as neutron absorber in the current French nuclear reactors, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) is also considered in the future Sodium Fast Reactors of the next generation (Gen IV). Due to severe irradiation conditions occurring in these reactors, it is of primary importance that this material presents a high structural resistance under irradiation, both in the ballistic and electronic damage regimes. Previous works have shown an important structural resistance of boron carbide even at high neutron fluences. Nevertheless, the structural modification mechanisms due to irradiation are not well understood. Therefore the aim of this paper is to study structural modifications induced in B{sub 4}C samples in different damage regimes. The boron carbide pellets were shaped and sintered by using spark plasma sintering method. They were then irradiated in several conditions at room temperature or 800 °C, either by favoring the creation of ballistic damage (between 1 and 3 dpa), or by favoring the electronic excitations using 100 MeV swift iodine ions (S{sub e} ≈ 15 keV/nm). Ex situ micro-Raman spectroscopy and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation technique with variable energy slow positrons were coupled to follow the evolution of the B{sub 4}C structure under irradiation.

  1. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses.

  2. The determination of boron and carbon in reactor grade boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossley, D.; Wood, A.J.; McInnes, C.A.J.; Jones, I.G.

    1978-09-01

    The sealed tube method of dissolution at high temperature and pressure has been successfully applied in the analysis of reactor grade boron carbide for the determination of boron. A 50 mg sample of boron carbide is completely dissolved by heating with concentrated nitric acid in a sealed tube at 300 0 C. The boron content of the resultant sample solution is determined by the mannitol potentiometric titration method. The precision of the method for the determination of 2.5 mg of boron using the Harwell automatic potentiometric titrator is 0.2% (coefficient of variation). The carbon content of a boron carbide sample is determined by combustion of the sample at 1050 0 C in a stream of oxygen using vanadium pentoxide to ensure the complete oxidation of the sample. The carbon dioxide produced from the sample is measured manometrically and the precision of the method for the determination of 4 mg of carbon is 0.4% (coefficient of variation). (author)

  3. PROCESSING AND PROPERTIES OF BORON CARBIDE WITH HAFNIUM DIBORIDE ADDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sairam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of investigations on densification, mechanical and electrical properties of boron carbide (B₄C with the addition of HfB₂. High dense B₄C-HfB₂ (2.5-30 wt.% composites were prepared by hot pressing at a temperature of 2173 K with 40 MPa mechanical pressure. The B₄C-HfB₂ composite mixture exhibited a better sintering aptitude compared with monolithic B₄C. Hardness and elastic modulus of B₄C-HfB₂ composites were measured to be in the range 36-28GPa and 465-525GPa respectively. Indentation fracture toughness of B₄C increased with HfB₂ content and obtained a maximum of 7 MPa.m 1/2 at 30 wt.% HfB₂, which is ∼3 times higher than the monolithic B₄C. Crack deflection was identified to be the major toughening mechanism in the developed composite. B₄C-10wt.% HfB₂ composite exhibited a maximum electrical conductivity of 7144 Ω-1m-1 which is 26% higher than the conductivity of monolithic B₄C (5639 Ω-1m-1 at 1373 K.

  4. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten substrates from atomic fluxes of boron and carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovskiy, Y.; Begrambekov, L.; Ayrapetov, A.; Gretskaya, I.; Grunin, A.; Dyachenko, M.; Puntakov, N.

    2016-09-01

    A device used for both coating deposition and material testing is presented in the paper. By using lock chambers, sputtering targets are easily exchanged with sample holder thus allowing testing of deposited samples with high power density electron or ion beams. Boron carbide coatings were deposited on tungsten samples. Methods of increasing coating adhesion are described in the paper. 2 μm boron carbide coatings sustained 450 heating cycles from 100 to 900 C. Ion beam tests have shown satisfactory results.

  5. Ordering of carbon atoms in boron carbide structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponomarev, V. I., E-mail: i2212@yandex.ru; Kovalev, I. D.; Konovalikhin, S. V.; Vershinnikov, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    Boron carbide crystals have been obtained in the entire compositional range according to the phase diagram by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS). Based on the results of X-ray diffraction investigations, the samples were characterized by the unit-cell metric and reflection half-width in the entire range of carbon concentrations. A significant spread in the boron carbide unit-cell parameters for the same carbon content is found in the data in the literature; this spread contradicts the structural concepts for covalent compounds. The SHS samples have not revealed any significant spread in the unit-cell parameters. Structural analysis suggests that the spread of parameters in the literary data is related to the unique process of ordering of carbon atoms in the boron carbide structure.

  6. Shock-induced localized amorphization in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingwei; McCauley, James W; Hemker, Kevin J

    2003-03-07

    High-resolution electron microscope observations of shock-loaded boron carbide have revealed the formation of nanoscale intragranular amorphous bands that occur parallel to specific crystallographic planes and contiguously with apparent cleaved fracture surfaces. This damage mechanism explains the measured, but not previously understood, decrease in the ballistic performance of boron carbide at high impact rates and pressures. The formation of these amorphous bands is also an example of how shock loading can result in the synthesis of novel structures and materials with substantially altered properties.

  7. Boron-carbide-aluminum and boron-carbide-reactive metal cermets. [B/sub 4/C-Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, D.C.; Pyzik, A.J.; Aksay, I.A.

    1985-05-06

    Hard, tough, lighweight boron-carbide-reactive metal composites, particularly boron-carbide-aluminum composites, are produced. These composites have compositions with a plurality of phases. A method is provided, including the steps of wetting and reacting the starting materials, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected. Starting compositions, reaction temperatures, reaction times, and reaction atmospheres are parameters for controlling the process and resulting compositions. The ceramic phases are homogeneously distributed in the metal phases and adhesive forces at ceramic-metal interfaces are maximized. An initial consolidated step is used to achieve fully dense composites. Microstructures of boron-carbide-aluminum cermets have been produced with modules of rupture exceeding 110 ksi and fracture toughness exceeding 12 ksi..sqrt..in. These composites and methods can be used to form a variety of structural elements.

  8. Modeling solid-state boron carbide low energy neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundstedt, C.; Harken, A.; Day, E.; Robertson, B.W.; Adenwalla, S.

    2006-01-01

    Two independent techniques for modeling boron-based solid-state neutron detectors are presented-one using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit and the other one an analytical approach using a simplified physical model. Results of these techniques are compared for three different types of solid-state boron carbide detector. These results provide the basis for distinguishing between conversion layer and other solid-state detectors

  9. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichio...

  10. Sintering Behavior, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties: A Comparison among Pressureless Sintered Ultra-Refractory Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Silvestroni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nearly fully dense carbides of zirconium, hafnium, and tantalum were obtained by pressureless sintering at 1950°C with the addition of 5–20 vol% of MoSi2. Increasing the amount of sintering aid, the final density increased too, thanks to the formation of small amounts of liquid phase constituted by M-Mo-Si-O-C, where M is either Zr, Hf, or Ta. The matrices of the composites obtained with the standard procedure showed faceted squared grains; when an ultrasonication step was introduced in the powder treatment, the grains were more rounded and no exaggerated grains growth occurred. Other secondary phases observed in the microstructure were SiC and mixed silicides of the transition metals. Among the three carbides prepared by pressurless sintering, TaC-based composites had the highest mechanical properties at room temperature (strength 590 MPa, Young's modulus 480 GPa, toughness 3.8 MPa·m1/2. HfC-based materials showed the highest sinterability (in terms of final density versus amount of sintering aid and the highest high-temperature strength (300 MPa at 1500  °C.

  11. Infiltration processing of boron carbide-, boron-, and boride-reactive metal cermets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Danny C.; Landingham, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    A chemical pretreatment method is used to produce boron carbide-, boron-, and boride-reactive metal composites by an infiltration process. The boron carbide or other starting constituents, in powder form, are immersed in various alcohols, or other chemical agents, to change the surface chemistry of the starting constituents. The chemically treated starting constituents are consolidated into a porous ceramic precursor which is then infiltrated by molten aluminum or other metal by heating to wetting conditions. Chemical treatment of the starting constituents allows infiltration to full density. The infiltrated precursor is further heat treated to produce a tailorable microstructure. The process at low cost produces composites with improved characteristics, including increased toughness, strength.

  12. High-hardness ceramics based on boron carbide fullerite derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikov, D. A.; Popov, M. Yu.; Perfilov, S. A.; Prokhorov, V. M.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Blank, V. D.

    2017-02-01

    A new type of ceramics based on the phases of fullerite derivatives and boron carbide B4C is obtained. The material is synthesized at a temperature of 1500 K and a relatively low pressure of 4 GPa; it has a high hardness of 45 GPa and fracture toughness of 15 MPa m1/2.

  13. Standard specification for nuclear-Grade boron carbide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This specification applies to boron carbide pellets for use as a control material in nuclear reactors. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only.

  14. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Björkdahl, O.; Sørensen, P. G.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant...

  15. An Exploration of Neutron Detection in Semiconducting Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Nina

    The 3He supply problem in the U.S. has necessitated the search for alternatives for neutron detection. The neutron detection efficiency is a function of density, atomic composition, neutron absorption cross section, and thickness of the neutron capture material. The isotope 10B is one of only a handful of isotopes with a high neutron absorption cross section---3840 barns for thermal neutrons. So a boron carbide semiconductor represents a viable alternative to 3He. This dissertation provides an evaluation of the performance of semiconducting boron carbide neutron detectors grown by plasma enhance chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) in order to determine the advantages and drawbacks of these devices for neutron detection. Improved handling of the PECVD system has resulted in an extremely stable plasma, enabling deposition of thick films of semiconducting boron carbide. A variety of material and semiconducting characterization tools have been used to investigate the structure and electronic properties of boron carbide thin films, including X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, infrared/Raman spectroscopy, current-voltage measurements and capacitance-voltage measurements. Elemental concentrations in the boron carbide films have been obtained from Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection analysis. Solid state neutron detection devices have been fabricated in the form of heterostructured p-n diodes, p-type boron carbide/n-type Si. Operating conditions, including applied bias voltage, and time constants, have been optimized for maximum detection efficiency and correlated to the semiconducting properties investigated in separate electronic measurements. Accurate measurements of the neutron detection efficiency and the response of the detector to a wide range of neutron wavelengths have been performed at a well calibrated, tightly collimated, "white" cold neutron beam source using time-of-flight neutron detection technique

  16. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-18

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials.

  17. Atomic-Level Understanding of "Asymmetric Twins" in Boron Carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kelvin Y; An, Qi; Toksoy, M Fatih; McCauley, James W; Haber, Richard A; Goddard, William A; Hemker, Kevin J

    2015-10-23

    Recent observations of planar defects in boron carbide have been shown to deviate from perfect mirror symmetry and are referred to as "asymmetric twins." Here, we demonstrate that these asymmetric twins are really phase boundaries that form in stoichiometric B(4)C (i.e., B(12)C(3)) but not in B(13)C(2). TEM observations and ab initio simulations have been coupled to show that these planar defects result from an interplay of stoichiometry, atomic positioning, icosahedral twinning, and structural hierarchy. The composition of icosahedra in B(4)C is B(11)C and translation of the carbon atom from a polar to equatorial site leads to a shift in bonding and a slight distortion of the lattice. No such distortion is observed in boron-rich B(13)C(2) because the icosahedra do not contain carbon. Implications for tailoring boron carbide with stoichiometry and extrapolations to other hierarchical crystalline materials are discussed.

  18. Pairwise cobalt doping of boron carbides with cobaltocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatov, A. Yu.; Losovyj, Ya. B.; Carlson, L.; LaGraffe, D.; Brand, J. I.; Dowben, P. A.

    2007-10-01

    We have performed Co K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements of Co-doped plasma enhanced chemical vapor phase deposition (PECVD) grown "C2B10Hx" semiconducting boron carbides, using cobaltocene. Cobalt does not dope PECVD grown boron carbides as a random fragment of the cobaltocene source gas. The Co atoms are fivefold boron coordinated (R=2.10±0.02Å) and are chemically bonded to the icosahedral cages of B10CHx or B9C2Hy. Pairwise Co doping occurs, with the cobalt atoms favoring sites some 5.28±0.02Å apart.

  19. INFLUENCE OF FINE-DISPERSED BORON CARBIDE ON THE STRUCTURE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF IRON-BORON ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Nevar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of boron carbide as fine-dispersed material input into the melt on structure morphology, founding, technological and exploitation characterisstics of cast iron-boron material is shown.

  20. Rapid mass-spectrometric determination of boron isotopic distribution in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, J E; Abernathey, R M

    1972-07-01

    Boron isotopic ratios are measured in boron carbide by thermionic ionization mass spectrometry with no prior chemical separation. A powder blend of boron carbide and sodium hydroxide is prepared, a small portion is transferred to a tantalum filament, the filament is heated to produce sodium borate, and the filament is transferred to the mass spectrometer where the(11)B/(10)B ratio is measured, using the Na(2)BO(2)(+) ion. Variables investigated for their effect on preferential volatilization of (10)B include the sodium hydroxide-boron carbide ratio and the temperature and duration of filament heating. A series of boron carbide pellets containing natural boron, of the type proposed for the control rods of the Fast Flux Test Facility reactor, were analysed with an apparently unbiased result of 4.0560 for the (11)B/(10)B ratio (standard deviation 0.0087). The pellets contained over 3% metal impurities typically found in this material. Time of analysis is 45 min per sample, with one analyst.

  1. Field assisted sintering of refractory carbide ceramics and fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gephart, Sean

    The sintering behaviors of silicon carbide (SiC) and boron carbide (B4C) based materials were investigated using an emerging sintering technology known as field assisted sintering technology (FAST), also known as spark plasma sintering (SPS) and pulse electric current sintering (PECS). Sintering by FAST utilizes high density electric current, uniaxial pressure, and relatively high heating rate compared to conventional sintering techniques. This effort investigated issues of scaling from laboratory FAST system (25 ton capacity) to industrial FAST system (250 ton capacity), as well as exploring the difference in sintering behavior of single phase B4C and SiC using FAST and conventional sintering techniques including hot-pressing (HP) and pressure-less sintering (PL). Materials were analyzed for mechanical and bulk properties, including characterization of density, hardness, fracture toughness, fracture (bend) strength, elastic modulus and microstructure. A parallel investigation was conducted in the development of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) using SiC powder impregnation of fiber compacts followed by FAST sintering. The FAST technique was used to sinter several B4C and SiC materials to near theoretical density. Preliminary efforts established optimized sintering temperatures using the smaller 25 ton laboratory unit, targeting a sample size of 40 mm diameter and 8 mm thickness. Then the same B4C and SiC materials were sintered by the larger 250 ton industrial FAST system, a HP system, and PL sintering system with a targeted dense material geometry of 4 x 4 x 0.315 inches3 (101.6 x 101.6 x 8 mm3). The resulting samples were studied to determine if the sintering dynamics and/or the resulting material properties were influenced by the sintering technique employed. This study determined that FAST sintered ceramic materials resulted in consistently higher averaged values for mechanical properties as well as smaller grain size when compared to conventionally sintered

  2. Review on Sintering Process of WC-Co Cemented Carbide in Metal Injection Molding Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathabrao, M.; Amin, Sri Yulis M.; Ibrahim, M. H. I.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to give an overview on sintering process of WC-Co cemented carbides in metal injection molding technology. Metal injection molding is an advanced and promising technology in producing cemented nanostructured carbides. Cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) hard metal is known for its high hardness and wear resistance in various applications. Moreover, areas include fine grained materials, alternative binders, and alternative sintering techniques has been discussed in this paper.

  3. Predicted boron-carbide compounds: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De Yu; Yan, Qian; Wang, Bing; Wang, Yuan Xu; Yang, Jueming; Yang, Gui

    2014-06-14

    By using developed particle swarm optimization algorithm on crystal structural prediction, we have explored the possible crystal structures of B-C system. Their structures, stability, elastic properties, electronic structure, and chemical bonding have been investigated by first-principles calculations with density functional theory. The results show that all the predicted structures are mechanically and dynamically stable. An analysis of calculated enthalpy with pressure indicates that increasing of boron content will increase the stability of boron carbides under low pressure. Moreover, the boron carbides with rich carbon content become more stable under high pressure. The negative formation energy of predicted B5C indicates its high stability. The density of states of B5C show that it is p-type semiconducting. The calculated theoretical Vickers hardnesses of B-C exceed 40 GPa except B4C, BC, and BC4, indicating they are potential superhard materials. An analysis of Debye temperature and electronic localization function provides further understanding chemical and physical properties of boron carbide.

  4. Dilatometric study on sintering mechanism of the WC-10wt%Co cemented carbide doped with tantalum carbide and niobium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manuel, J.B. [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE), PE (Brazil); Gomes, U.U.; Karimi, M.M. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), RN (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Nanocrystalline WC-10wt.%Co powders were prepared by high energy milling and were liquid phase sintered. The powders were milled at 20 hours and characterized by X-ray diffraction, and Scanning electron microscopy. The particle size distribution and mean diameter analysis were characterized by Granulometro Cilas model 920 L and 1180. After sintering the WC-10wt.%Co cemented carbides doped with tantalum carbide and niobium carbide exhibited ultra fine grain sizes. dilatometer study on sintering mechanism detected phase transformations and degassing. (author)

  5. Superconductivity in heavily boron-doped silicon carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Markus Kriener, Takahiro Muranaka, Junya Kato, Zhi-An Ren, Jun Akimitsu and Yoshiteru Maeno

    2008-01-01

    The discoveries of superconductivity in heavily boron-doped diamond (C:B) in 2004 and silicon (Si:B) in 2006 renew the interest in the superconducting state of semiconductors. Charge-carrier doping of wide-gap semiconductors leads to a metallic phase from which upon further doping superconductivity can emerge. Recently, we discovered superconductivity in a closely related system: heavily-boron doped silicon carbide (SiC:B). The sample used for that study consists of cubic and hexagonal SiC ph...

  6. Boron carbide-based coatings on graphite for plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, P.G.; Trester, P.W.; Winter, J.; Linke, J.; Duwe, R.; Wallura, E.; Philipps, V.

    1994-01-01

    In the effort to evaluate boron-rich coatings as plasma facing surfaces in fusion devices, a new process for applying boron carbide (B 4 C) coatings to graphite was developed. The process entails eutectic melting of the carbon (C) substrate surface with a precursor layer of B 4 C particles. Adherent coatings were achieved which consisted of two layers: a surface layer and a graded penetration zone in the outer portion of the substrate. The surface-layer microstructure was multiphase and ranged from reaction-sintered structures of sintered B 4 C particles in an eutectic-formed matrix to that of hypereutectic carbon particles in a B 4 C-C eutectic matrix. Because of high surface energy, the coating generally developed a nonuniform thickness. Quantitative evaluations of the coating were performed with limiters in the TEXTOR fusion device and with coupons in electron beam tests. Test results revealed the following: good adherence of the coating even after remelting; and, during remelting, diagnostics detected a corresponding interaction of boron with the plasma

  7. Boron carbide (B4C) coating. Deposition and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizov, E.; Barsuk, V.; Begrambekov, L.; Buzhinsky, O.; Evsin, A.; Gordeev, A.; Grunin, A.; Klimov, N.; Kurnaev, V.; Mazul, I.; Otroshchenko, V.; Putric, A.; Sadovskiy, Ya.; Shigin, P.; Vergazov, S.; Zakharov, A.

    2015-08-01

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material of in-situ protecting coating for tungsten tiles of ITER divertor. To prove this concept the project including investigation of regimes of plasma deposition of B4C coating on tungsten and tests of boron carbide layer in ITER-like is started recently. The paper contends the first results of the project. The results of B4C coating irradiation by the plasma pulses of QSPU-T plasma accelerator are presented. The new device capable of B4C film deposition on tungsten and testing of the films and materials with ITER-like heat loads and ion- and electron irradiation is described. The results of B4C coating deposition and testing of both tungsten substrate and coating are shown and discussed.

  8. Determination of soluble carbon in nuclear grade boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega Bustillos, J.O.; Gomes, R.; Camaro, J.; Zorzetto, F.; Domingues, P.; Riella, H.

    1990-05-01

    The present work describes two different techniques (manometric and wet chemical) for the soluble carbon determination in nuclear grade boron carbide. The techniques are based on the reaction of the boron carbide with a sulfocromic mixture, generating CO 2 . The techniques differ on the mode they do the measurement of CO 2 produced. By wet chemical technique the CO 2 is absorved in a barium hydroxide solution and is determinated by titration. In the manometric technique the CO 2 gas is measured using a McLeod gauge. The gas produced by the latter technique is analysed by mass spectrometry. The details of the analytical technique and the data obtained are discussed. (author) [pt

  9. Microstructural evaluation of the NbC-20Ni cemented carbides during sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, D.; Cannizza, E.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Fine carbides in a metallic matrix (binder) form the microstructure of the cemented carbides. Grain size and binder content are the main variables to adjust hardness and toughness. These products are produced by Powder Metallurgy, and traditional route involves mixing carbides with binder by high energy milling, pressing and sintering. During sintering, a liquid phase promotes densification, and a final relative density higher than 99% is expected. Sintering is carried out at high temperatures, and dissolution of the carbides changes the chemical composition of the binder. To control grain growth of the main carbide, which reduces hardness, small quantities of secondary carbides are used. These additives limit dissolution and precipitation of the main carbides reducing the final grain size. This paper focused the structural and chemical evolution during sintering using NbC-20Ni cermets. Mixtures of very fine NbC carbides and carbonyl Ni powders were produce by intense milling. These mixtures were pressed using uniaxial pressures from 50 to 200MPa. Shrinkage was evaluated using dilatometric measurements under an atmosphere of dynamic argon. Samples were also sintered under vacuum in high temperature industrial furnace. The sintered samples were characterized in terms of density hardness, toughness and microstructure. DRX was the main tool used to evaluate the structural evolution of the binder. In situ chemical analysis helped to understand the dissolution mechanisms. (author)

  10. Microstructural evaluation of the NbC-20Ni cemented carbides during sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, D. [BRATS Sintered Filters and Metallic Powders, Cajamar, SP (Brazil); Cannizza, E. [EHT Cannizza Consultoria Em Engenharia Ltda, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Fine carbides in a metallic matrix (binder) form the microstructure of the cemented carbides. Grain size and binder content are the main variables to adjust hardness and toughness. These products are produced by Powder Metallurgy, and traditional route involves mixing carbides with binder by high energy milling, pressing and sintering. During sintering, a liquid phase promotes densification, and a final relative density higher than 99% is expected. Sintering is carried out at high temperatures, and dissolution of the carbides changes the chemical composition of the binder. To control grain growth of the main carbide, which reduces hardness, small quantities of secondary carbides are used. These additives limit dissolution and precipitation of the main carbides reducing the final grain size. This paper focused the structural and chemical evolution during sintering using NbC-20Ni cermets. Mixtures of very fine NbC carbides and carbonyl Ni powders were produce by intense milling. These mixtures were pressed using uniaxial pressures from 50 to 200MPa. Shrinkage was evaluated using dilatometric measurements under an atmosphere of dynamic argon. Samples were also sintered under vacuum in high temperature industrial furnace. The sintered samples were characterized in terms of density hardness, toughness and microstructure. DRX was the main tool used to evaluate the structural evolution of the binder. In situ chemical analysis helped to understand the dissolution mechanisms. (author)

  11. Sodium erosion of boron carbide from breached absorber pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmajian, J.A.; Baker, D.E.

    1981-03-01

    The purpose of the irradiation experiment was to provide an engineering demonstration of the irradiation behavior of breached boron carbide absorber pins. By building defects into the cladding of prototypic absorber pins, and performing the irradiation under typical FFTF operating conditions, a qualitative assessment of the consequences of a breach was achieved. Additionally, a direct comparison of pin behavior with that of the ex-reactor test could be made

  12. Production of boron carbide powder by carbothermal synthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boron carbide (B4C) powder has been produced by carbothermal reduction of boric acid–citric acid gel. Initially a gel of boric acid–citric acid is prepared in an oven at 100°C. This gel is pyrolyzed in a high temperature furnace over a temperature range of 1000–1800°C. The reaction initiation temperature range for B4C ...

  13. Electrical Characterization of Irradiated Semiconducting Amorphous Hydrogenated Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, George Glenn

    Semiconducting amorphous partially dehydrogenated boron carbide has been explored as a neutron voltaic for operation in radiation harsh environments, such as on deep space satellites/probes. A neutron voltaic device could also be used as a solid state neutron radiation detector to provide immediate alerts for radiation workers/students, as opposed to the passive dosimetry badges utilized today. Understanding how the irradiation environment effects the electrical properties of semiconducting amorphous partially dehydrogenated boron carbide is important to predicting the stability of these devices in operation. p-n heterojunction diodes were formed from the synthesis of semiconducting amorphous partially dehydrogenated boron carbide on silicon substrates through the use of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Many forms of structural and electrical measurements and analysis have been performed on the p-n heterojunction devices as a function of both He+ ion and neutron irradiation including: transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), current versus voltage I(V), capacitance versus voltage C(V), conductance versus frequency G(f), and charge carrier lifetime (tau). In stark contrast to nearly all other electronic devices, the electrical performance of these p-n heterojunction diodes improved with irradiation. This is most likely the result of bond defect passivation and resolution of degraded icosahedral based carborane structures (icosahedral molecules missing a B, C, or H atom(s)).

  14. Investigation of wear and tool life of coated carbide and cubic boron nitride cutting tools in high speed milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Twardowski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the investigation was analysis of the wear of milling cutters made of sintered carbide and of boron nitride. The article presents the life period of the cutting edges and describes industrial conditions of the applicability of tools made of the materials under investigation. Tests have been performed on modern toroidal and ball-end mill cutters. The study has been performed within a production facility in the technology of high speed machining of 55NiCrMoV6 and X153CrMoV12 hardened steel. The analysed cutting speed is a parameter which significantly influences the intensity of heat generated in the cutting zone. Due to the wear characteristics, two areas of applicability of the analysed tools have been distinguished. For vc  ≤ 300 m/min, sintered carbide edges are recommended; for vc  > 500 m/min, boron nitride edges. For 300 ≤ vc  ≤ 500 m/min, a transition area has been observed. It has been proved that the application of sintered carbide edges is not economically justified above certain cutting speed.

  15. Nanotwins soften boron-rich boron carbide (B13C2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A.

    2017-03-01

    Extensive studies of metals and alloys have observed that nanotwins lead to strengthening, but the role of nanotwins in ceramics is not well established. We compare here the shear strength and the deformation mechanism of nanotwinned boron-rich boron carbide (B13C2) with the perfect crystal under both pure shear and biaxial shear deformations. We find that the intrinsic shear strength of crystalline B13C2 is higher than that of crystalline boron carbide (B4C). But nanotwins in B13C2 lower the strength, making it softer than crystalline B4C. This reduction in strength of nanotwinned B13C2 arises from the interaction of the twin boundary with the C-B-C chains that connect the B12 icosahedra.

  16. Shear-Induced Brittle Failure along Grain Boundaries in Boron Carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaokun; Coleman, Shawn P; Lasalvia, Jerry C; Goddard, William A; An, Qi

    2018-02-07

    The role that grain boundaries (GBs) can play on mechanical properties has been studied extensively for metals and alloys. However, for covalent solids such as boron carbide (B 4 C), the role of GB on the inelastic response to applied stresses is not well established. We consider here the unusual ceramic, boron carbide (B 4 C), which is very hard and lightweight but exhibits brittle impact behavior. We used quantum mechanics (QM) simulations to examine the mechanical response in atomistic structures that model GBs in B 4 C under pure shear and also with biaxial shear deformation that mimics indentation stress conditions. We carried out these studies for two simple GB models including also the effect of adding Fe atoms (possible sintering aid and/or impurity) to the GB. We found that the critical shear stresses of these GB models are much lower than that for crystalline and twinned B 4 C. The two GB models lead to different interfacial energies. The higher interfacial energy at the GB only slightly decreases the critical shear stress but dramatically increases the critical failure strain. Doping the GB with Fe decreases the critical shear stress of at the boundary by 14% under pure shear deformation. In all GBs studied here, failure arises from deconstructing the icosahedra within the GB region under shear deformation. We find that Fe dopant interacts with icosahedra at the GB to facilitate this deconstruction of icosahedra. These results provide significant insight into designing polycrystalline B 4 C with improved strength and ductility.

  17. Electronic Structure Studies of Amorphous Hydrogenated Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sky Driver, M.; Sandstrom, Joseph; Boyko, Teak; Moewes, Alexander; Caruso, Anthony

    2010-03-01

    Boron carbide is a technologically relevant material with importance in voltaic transduction. However, the local physical, chemical and electronic structure of low temperature deposited thin films of amorphous boron carbide is far from understood, hindering its progress in application. X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies (XAS/XES) were applied to thin films of B4C and B5C:Hx to study the near Fermi edge structure; the films were prepared by RF magnetron sputtering and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and were thermally treated after deposition from 400 to 800 C. XES spectra indicate a physical structure transition from amorphous to nanocrystalline at 700 C, a much lower temperature than expected from traditional physical vapor deposition or flash annealing temperatures reported. These structural differences are of significant interest to transport measurements and will be discussed as a correlation. Further, x-ray and ultraviolet photoemission were also collected as a compliment to XES/XAS and will be discussed in the context of understanding the local intra vs. intermolecular electronic structure of these boron-rich molecular based solids.

  18. Auger electron spectroscopy studies of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, H.H.; Nelson, G.C.; Wallace, W.O.

    1986-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy has been used to probe the electronic structure of ion bombardment (IB) cleaned surfaces of B 9 C and B 4 C samples. The shapes of the B-KVV and C-KVV Auger lines were found to be relatively insensitive to the bulk stoichiometry of the samples. This indicates that the local chemical environments surrounding B and C atoms, respectively, on the surfaces of the IB cleaned samples do not change appreciably in going from B 9 C to B 4 C. Fracturing the sample in situ is a way of producing a clean representative internal surface to compare with the IB surfaces. Microbeam techniques have been used to study a fracture surface of the B 9 C material with greater spatial resolution than in our studies of IB surfaces. The B 9 C fracture surface was not homogeneous and contained both C-rich and B-rich regions. The C-KVV line for the C-rich regions was graphitic in shape. Much of the C-rich regions was found by IB to be less than 100 nm in thickness. The C-KVV line from the B-rich regions was carbidic and did not differ appreciably in shape from those recorded for the IB cleaned surfaces

  19. Evidence for multiple polytypes of semiconducting boron carbide (C2B10) from electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunca-Popa, Petru; Brand, J I; Balaz, Snjezana; Rosa, Luis G; Boag, N M; Bai Mengjun; Robertson, B W; Dowben, P A

    2005-01-01

    Boron carbides fabricated via plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition from different isomeric source compounds with the same C 2 B 10 H 12 closo-icosahedral structure result in materials with very different direct (optical) band gaps. This provides compelling evidence for the existence of multiple polytypes of C 2 B 10 boron carbide and is consistent with electron diffraction results

  20. High temperature synthesis of ceramic composition by directed reaction of molten titanium or zirconium with boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.B.

    1990-01-01

    Alternative methods of producing ceramics and ceramic composites include sintering, hot pressing and more recently hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS). Though each of these techniques has its advantages, each suffers from several restrictions as well. Sintering may require long times at high temperatures and for most materials requires sintering aids to get full density. These additives can, and generally do, change (often degrade) the properties of the ceramic. Hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing are convenient methods to quickly prepare samples of some materials to full density, but generally are expensive and may damage some types of reinforcements during densification. This paper focuses on the preparation and processing of composites prepared by the directed reaction of molten titanium or zirconium with boron carbide. Advantages and disadvantages of this approach when compared to traditional methods are discussed, with reference to specific examples. Examples of microstructure are properties of these materials are reported

  1. WC grain growth during sintering of cemented carbides : Experiments and simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Mannesson, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Cemented carbides are composite materials consisting of a hard carbide and a ductile binder. They are powdermetallurgically manufactured, where liquid-phase sintering is one of the main steps. The most common cemented carbide consists of WC and Co and it is widely used for cutting tools. Two of the most important factors controlling the mechanical properties are the WC grain size and the grain size distribution and thus it is of great interest to understand the grain growth behavior. In this ...

  2. Method of producing high density silicon carbide product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    A method of sintering silicon carbide powders containing boron or boron - containing compounds as densification aids to produce a high-density silicon carbide ceramic material is described. It has been found that higher densification can be obtained by sintering the powders in an atmosphere containing boron. Boron may be introduced in the form of a gas, e.g. boron trichloride, mixed with the inert gas used, i.e. nitrogen, argon or helium, or boron compounds, e.g. boron carbide, may be applied to the interior of the sintering chamber as solutions or slurries. Alternatively a boron compound, per se, in the sintering chamber, or furnace components containing a significant amount of boron may be used. (U.K.)

  3. Depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X Q; Tang, Z; Zhang, L; Guo, J J; Jin, C Q; Zhang, Y; Goto, T; McCauley, J W; Chen, M W

    2009-02-20

    We report depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide (B4C) investigated by in situ high-pressure Raman spectroscopy. It was found that localized amorphization of B4C takes place during unloading from high pressures, and nonhydrostatic stresses play a critical role in the high-pressure phase transition. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the depressurization amorphization results from pressure-induced irreversible bending of C-B-C atomic chains cross-linking 12 atom icosahedra at the rhombohedral vertices.

  4. Ndt Characterization of Boron Carbide for Ballistic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaptsis, D.; Cooper, I.; Ludford, N.; Gunner, A.; Williams, Mike; Willis, David

    2011-06-01

    Boron Carbide (B4C) is widely used to provide ballistic protection in challenging service environments. This work was carried out to develop non-destructive testing (NDT) for B4C characterization. Deliberate flaws were introduced within the B4C tiles during manufacturing. An experimental program was undertaken to determine the best method to detect defects in ceramic tiles and material characterization. Ultrasonic characterization of the material was found to be able to detect both density variation and defects within the material.

  5. Characterization of plastic and boron carbide additive manufactured neutron collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M. B.; Siddel, D. H.; Elliott, A. M.; Anderson, D.; Abernathy, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques allow for the production of materials with complicated geometries with reduced costs and production time over traditional methods. We have applied this technique to the production of neutron collimators for use in thermal and cold neutron scattering instrumentation directly out of boron carbide. We discuss the design and generation of these collimators. We also provide measurements at neutron scattering beamlines which serve to characterize the performance of these collimators. Additive manufacturing of parts using neutron absorbing material may also find applications in radiography and neutron moderation.

  6. Superconductivity in heavily boron-doped silicon carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Kriener, Takahiro Muranaka, Junya Kato, Zhi-An Ren, Jun Akimitsu and Yoshiteru Maeno

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The discoveries of superconductivity in heavily boron-doped diamond in 2004 and silicon in 2006 have renewed the interest in the superconducting state of semiconductors. Charge-carrier doping of wide-gap semiconductors leads to a metallic phase from which upon further doping superconductivity can emerge. Recently, we discovered superconductivity in a closely related system: heavily boron-doped silicon carbide. The sample used for that study consisted of cubic and hexagonal SiC phase fractions and hence this led to the question which of them participated in the superconductivity. Here we studied a hexagonal SiC sample, free from cubic SiC phase by means of x-ray diffraction, resistivity, and ac susceptibility.

  7. Superconductivity in heavily boron-doped silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriener, Markus; Muranaka, Takahiro; Kato, Junya; Ren, Zhi-An; Akimitsu, Jun; Maeno, Yoshiteru

    2008-12-01

    The discoveries of superconductivity in heavily boron-doped diamond in 2004 and silicon in 2006 have renewed the interest in the superconducting state of semiconductors. Charge-carrier doping of wide-gap semiconductors leads to a metallic phase from which upon further doping superconductivity can emerge. Recently, we discovered superconductivity in a closely related system: heavily boron-doped silicon carbide. The sample used for that study consisted of cubic and hexagonal SiC phase fractions and hence this led to the question which of them participated in the superconductivity. Here we studied a hexagonal SiC sample, free from cubic SiC phase by means of x-ray diffraction, resistivity, and ac susceptibility.

  8. Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Boron Carbide by Direct Microwave Carbothermal Reduction of Boric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo F. K. Gunnewiek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The excellent physical and chemical properties of boron carbide make it suitable for many applications. However, its synthesis requires a large amount of energy and is time-consuming. Microwave carbothermal reduction is a fast technique for producing well crystallized equiaxial boron carbide nanoparticles of about 50 nm and very few amounts of elongated nanoparticles were also synthesized. They presented an average length of 82 nm and a high aspect ratio (5.5. The total reaction time was only 20 minutes, which disfavor the growing process, leading to the synthesis of nanoparticles. Microwave-assisted synthesis leaded to producing boron-rich boron carbide. Increasing the forward power increases the boron content and enhances the efficiency of the reaction, resulting in better crystallized boron carbide.

  9. Implementation Challenges for Sintered Silicon Carbide Fiber Bonded Ceramic Materials for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decades, a number of fiber reinforced ceramic composites have been developed and tested for various aerospace and ground based applications. However, a number of challenges still remain slowing the wide scale implementation of these materials. In addition to continuous fiber reinforced composites, other innovative materials have been developed including the fibrous monoliths and sintered fiber bonded ceramics. The sintered silicon carbide fiber bonded ceramics have been fabricated by the hot pressing and sintering of silicon carbide fibers. However, in this system reliable property database as well as various issues related to thermomechanical performance, integration, and fabrication of large and complex shape components has yet to be addressed. In this presentation, thermomechanical properties of sintered silicon carbide fiber bonded ceramics (as fabricated and joined) will be presented. In addition, critical need for manufacturing and integration technologies in successful implementation of these materials will be discussed.

  10. Boron carbide as a target for the SPES project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradetti, S.; Carturan, S.; Biasetto, L.; Andrighetto, A.; Colombo, P.

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the research on targets for the SPES project (Selective Production of Exotic Species), porous boron carbide (B 4 C) based materials were produced from the carbothermal reduction of boric acid and two different carbon sources, i.e. citric acid and phenolic resin. Samples composition and microstructural morphology were studied by means of X-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM–EDS). The amount of total porosity was obtained from the comparison between the theoretical density and the measured bulk density. To better characterize the material microstructure, nitrogen physisorption measurements were performed in order to obtain data about the type of generated porosity and the specific surface area of the samples. Analysis performed on the samples show that after the final thermal treatment they are composed of boron carbide and residual free carbon, whose quantity is related to the processes involved in the two synthesis. Remarkable differences in the overall weight loss have been noticed for the two different reactions, resulting in different densities and pore size distributions, but in both cases similar values of specific surface area (SSA) were obtained.

  11. Frequency mixing in boron carbide laser ablation plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oujja, M.; Benítez-Cañete, A.; Sanz, M.; Lopez-Quintas, I.; Martín, M.; Nalda, R. de, E-mail: r.nalda@iqfr.csic.es; Castillejo, M.

    2015-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two-color frequency mixing has been studied in a laser ablation boron carbide plasma. • A space- and time-resolved study mapped the nonlinear optical species in the plasma. • The nonlinear process maximizes when charge recombination is expected to be completed. • Neutral atoms and small molecules are the main nonlinear species in this medium. • Evidence points to six-wave mixing as the most likely process. - Abstract: Nonlinear frequency mixing induced by a bichromatic field (1064 nm + 532 nm obtained from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser) in a boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) plasma generated through laser ablation under vacuum is explored. A UV beam at the frequency of the fourth harmonic of the fundamental frequency (266 nm) was generated. The dependence of the efficiency of the process as function of the intensities of the driving lasers differs from the expected behavior for four-wave mixing, and point toward a six-wave mixing process. The frequency mixing process was strongly favored for parallel polarizations of the two driving beams. Through spatiotemporal mapping, the conditions for maximum efficiency were found for a significant delay from the ablation event (200 ns), when the medium is expected to be a low-ionized plasma. No late components of the harmonic signal were detected, indicating a largely atomized medium.

  12. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ULTRAFINE WC/Co CEMENTED CARBIDES WITH CUBIC BORON NITRIDE AND Cr₃C₂ ADDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genrong Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the microstructure and mechanical properties of ultrafine tungsten carbide and cobalt (WC/Co cemented carbides with cubic boron nitride (CBN and chromium carbide (Cr₃C₂ fabricated by a hot pressing sintering process. This study uses samples with 8 wt% Co content and 7.5 vol% CBN content, and with different Cr₃C₂ content ranging from 0 to 0.30 wt%. Based on the experimental results, Cr₃C₂ content has a significant influence on inhibiting abnormal grain growth and decreasing grain size in cemented carbides. Near-full densification is possible when CBN-WC/Co with 0.25 wt% Cr₃C₂ is sintered at 1350°C and 20 MPa; the resulting material possesses optimal mechanical properties and density, with an acceptable Vickers hardness of 19.20 GPa, fracture toughness of 8.47 MPa.m1/2 and flexural strength of 564 MPa.u̇ Å k⃗

  13. Properties of Carbide Ceramics from Gelcasting and Pressure-less Sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Dongliang; Zhang Jingxian, E-mail: dljiang@mail.sic.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2011-10-29

    In this paper, the properties of carbide ceramics (SiC, and B{sub 4}C) from aqueous gelcasting and pressure-less sintering were studied systematically. The optimized sintering process was achieved via a series of experiments with effective control of grain size and microstructure for developing high performance ceramics. SiC samples can be pressure-less sintered to 98% TD with B{sub 4}C and C as the sintering additives. The samples showed excellent mechanical properties, homogeneous microstructure and improved reliability. B{sub 4}C samples can also be pressure-less sintered with the relative density around 96%. Results showed that gelcasting is a reliable process for the manufacturing of carbide ceramics with satisfied properties.

  14. Embedding Ba Monolayers and Bilayers in Boron Carbide Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiyang; Luo, Jian; Shi, Baiou; Zhao, Jiong; Harmer, Martin P; Zhu, Jing

    2015-11-26

    Aberration corrected high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) was employed to study the distribution of barium atoms on the surfaces and in the interiors of boron carbide based nanowires. Barium based dopants, which were used to control the crystal growth, adsorbed to the surfaces of the boron-rich crystals in the form of nanometer-thick surficial films (a type of surface complexion). During the crystal growth, these dopant-based surface complexions became embedded inside the single crystalline segments of fivefold boron-rich nanowires collectively, where they were converted to more ordered monolayer and bilayer modified complexions. Another form of bilayer complexion stabilized at stacking faults has also been identified. Numerous previous works suggested that dopants/impurities tended to segregate at the stacking faults or twinned boundaries. In contrast, our study revealed the previously-unrecognized possibility of incorporating dopants and impurities inside an otherwise perfect crystal without the association to any twin boundary or stacking fault. Moreover, we revealed the amount of barium dopants incorporated was non-equilibrium and far beyond the bulk solubility, which might lead to unique properties.

  15. Effect of boron carbide on primary crystallization of chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In the paper results of the influence of boron carbide (B4C as inoculant of abrasion-resisting chromium cast iron (about 2,8% carbon and 18% chromium on primary crystallization researches are presented. Boron carbide dispersion was introduced at the bottom of pouring ladle before tap of liquid cast iron. In this investigations were used three different quantities of inoculant in amounts 0,1%; 0,2% and 0,3% with relation to bath weight. It has been demonstrated that such small additions of boron carbide change primary crystallization parameters, particularly temperature characteristic of process, their time and kinetics.

  16. Priority compositions of boron carbide crystals obtained by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, V. I.; Konovalikhin, S. V.; Kovalev, I. D.; Vershinnikov, V. I.

    2015-09-01

    Splitting of reflections from boron carbide has been found for the first time by an X-ray diffraction study of polycrystalline mixture of boron carbide В15- х С х , (1.5 ≤ x ≤ 3) and its magnesium derivative C4B25Mg1.42. An analysis of reflection profiles shows that this splitting is due to the presence of boron carbide phases of different compositions in the sample, which are formed during crystal growth. The composition changes from В12.9С2.1 to В12.4С2.6.

  17. Preparation and characterization of Boron carbide nanoparticles for use as a novel agent in T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Sørensen, P. G.; Björkdahl, O.

    2006-01-01

    Boron carbide nanoparticles are proposed as a system for T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy. Nanoparticles were produced by ball milling in various atmospheres of commercially available boron carbide. The physical and chemical properties of the particles were investigated using...

  18. Compatibility of heat resistant alloys with boron carbide, 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Shinichi; Kurasawa, Toshimasa; Endow, Taichi; Someya, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Isao.

    1986-08-01

    This paper includes an experimental result of out-of-pile compatibility and capsule design for irradiation test in Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The compatibility between sheath material and neutron absorber materials for control rod devices (CRD) was examined for potential use in a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) which is under development at JAERI. The purpose of the compatibility tests are preliminary evaluation of safety prior to irradiation tests. Preliminary compatibility evaluation was concerned with three items as follows : 1) Lithium effects on the penetrating reaction of Incoloy 800H alloy in contact with a mixture of boronated graphite and lithium hydroxide powders, 2) Short term tensile properties of Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy XR alloy reacted with boronated graphite and fracture mode analysis, 3) Reaction behavior of both alloys under transient power conditions of a VHTR. It was clear that the reaction rate constant of the Incoloy 800H alloy was accelerated by doping lithium hydroxide into the boron carbide and graphite powder. The mechanical properties of Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy XR alloy reacted with boronated graphite were decreased. Ultimate tensile strength and tensile ductilities at temperatures over 850 deg C were reduced, but there was no change in the proof (yield) stress. Both alloys exhibited a brittle intergranular fracture mode during transient power conditions of a VHTR and also exhibited severe penetration. Irradiation capsules for compatibility test were designed to simulate three irradiation conditions of VHTR: 1) steady state for VHTR, 2) Transient power condition, 3) Service limited life of CRD. Capsule irradiation experiments have been carried out satisfactorily and thus confirm the validity of the capsule design procedure. (author)

  19. Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy characterization of boron- and nitrogen-doped 6H silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Liu, Chuan

    2011-01-01

    Boron - and nitrogen-doped 6H silicon carbide epilayers grown on low off-axis 6H silicon carbide substrates have been characterized by photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. Combined with secondary ion mass spectrometry results, preferable doping type and optimized concentration could be propo......Boron - and nitrogen-doped 6H silicon carbide epilayers grown on low off-axis 6H silicon carbide substrates have been characterized by photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. Combined with secondary ion mass spectrometry results, preferable doping type and optimized concentration could...

  20. Impact strength of sintered astaloy CrM powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazior, J.; Ploszczak, J.; Nykiel, M.; Pieczonka, T.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper results of a series of impact tests on sintered Astaloy CrM powders alloys modified by boron are presented and discussed. Boron in different forms, i.e. as elemental boron powder, boron carbide B 4 C powder or mixture of boron and carbon elemental powders, was used in different weight percentage to activate sintering of Astaloy CrM powder and to increase hardenability, with aim of increasing impact strength in view of structural applications. (author)

  1. Novel boron channel-based structure of boron carbide at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Miao; Liu, Hanyu; Yao, Yansun; Cheng, Taimin; Chen, Hui

    2017-11-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is one of the hardest materials known to date. The extreme hardness of B4C arises from architecturally efficient B12 or B11C icosahedrons and strong inter-icosahedral B-C bonding. As an excellent material for use in ballistic armor, the mechanic limit of B4C and possible phase transitions under extreme stress conditions are of great interest. Here we systematically explored the post-icosahedral solid structures of B4C under high pressure, using an unbiased structure search method. A new structure composed of extended framework of B and zigzag chains of C is predicted to be stable above 96 GPa. The new structure was predicted to have a high Vickers hardness of 55 GPa and simultaneously to retain a metallic ground state. The exceptional mechanical properties found in this structure are attributed to strong sp 3 covalent network formed under extreme pressure conditions. The predicted structure represents a new type of superhard boron carbides that form under high pressure without the presence of boron icosahedrons, which encourages experimental exploration in this direction.

  2. Dynamical conductivity of boron carbide: heavily damped plasma vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, Helmut; Gerlach, Guido

    2014-10-22

    The FIR reflectivity spectra of boron carbide, measured down to ω~10 cm(-1) between 100 and 800 K, are essentially determined by heavily damped plasma vibrations. The spectra are fitted applying the classical Drude-Lorentz theory of free carriers. The fitting Parameter Π=ωp/ωτ yields the carrier densities, which are immediately correlated with the concentration of structural defects in the homogeneity range. This correlation is proved for band-type and hopping conductivity. The effective mass of free holes in the valence band is estimated at m*/me~2.5. The mean free path of the free holes has the order of the cell parameters.

  3. Microalloying Boron Carbide with Silicon to Achieve Dramatically Improved Ductility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A

    2014-12-04

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a hard material whose value for extended engineering applications such as body armor; is limited by its brittleness under impact. To improve the ductility while retaining hardness, we used density functional theory to examine modifying B4C ductility through microalloying. We found that replacing the CBC chain in B4C with Si-Si, denoted as (B11Cp)-Si2, dramatically improves the ductility, allowing a continuous shear to a large strain of 0.802 (about twice of B4C failure strain) without brittle failure. Moreover, (B11C)-Si2 retains low density and high hardness. This ductility improvement arises because the Si-Si linkages enable the icosahedra accommodate additional shear by rotating instead of breaking bonds.

  4. Mode Grüneisen parameters of boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, Helmut; Manghnani, Murli H.; Kuhlmann, Udo; Hushur, Anwar; Shalamberidze, Sulkhan

    2017-10-01

    IR- and Raman-active phonons of boron carbide and the mode Grüneisen parameters γ related are studied concerning their dependence on chemical composition, temperatures between 30 and 800 K and pressures up to ∼70 GPa. Most bulk phonons yield γ between +1.5 and - 1.5: those related to icosahedra yield γ = 0.8(3). Surface phonons are distinguished by considerably higher γ. Negative γ of chain bending modes supports the assumption that the chain center buckles out under pressure. Some striking specific mode Grüneisen parameters are explained. Pressure-dependent bond lengths suggest the reversible high-pressure phase transition to be second order.

  5. Directional amorphization of boron carbide subjected to laser shock compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shiteng; Kad, Bimal; Remington, Bruce A; LaSalvia, Jerry C; Wehrenberg, Christopher E; Behler, Kristopher D; Meyers, Marc A

    2016-10-25

    Solid-state shock-wave propagation is strongly nonequilibrium in nature and hence rate dependent. Using high-power pulsed-laser-driven shock compression, unprecedented high strain rates can be achieved; here we report the directional amorphization in boron carbide polycrystals. At a shock pressure of 45∼50 GPa, multiple planar faults, slightly deviated from maximum shear direction, occur a few hundred nanometers below the shock surface. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that these planar faults are precursors of directional amorphization. It is proposed that the shear stresses cause the amorphization and that pressure assists the process by ensuring the integrity of the specimen. Thermal energy conversion calculations including heat transfer suggest that amorphization is a solid-state process. Such a phenomenon has significant effect on the ballistic performance of B 4 C.

  6. Size-scaling of tensile failure stress in boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Kirkland, Timothy Philip [ORNL; Strong, Kevin T [ORNL; Jadaan, Osama M. [University of Wisconsin, Platteville; Thompson, G. A. [U.S. Army Dental and Trauma Research Detachment, Greak Lakes

    2010-01-01

    Weibull strength-size-scaling in a rotary-ground, hot-pressed boron carbide is described when strength test coupons sampled effective areas from the very small (~ 0.001 square millimeters) to the very large (~ 40,000 square millimeters). Equibiaxial flexure and Hertzian testing were used for the strength testing. Characteristic strengths for several different specimen geometries are analyzed as a function of effective area. Characteristic strength was found to substantially increase with decreased effective area, and exhibited a bilinear relationship. Machining damage limited strength as measured with equibiaxial flexure testing for effective areas greater than ~ 1 mm2 and microstructural-scale flaws limited strength for effective areas less than 0.1 mm2 for the Hertzian testing. The selections of a ceramic strength to account for ballistically-induced tile deflection and to account for expanding cavity modeling are considered in context with the measured strength-size-scaling.

  7. Frequency mixing in boron carbide laser ablation plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oujja, M.; Benítez-Cañete, A.; Sanz, M.; Lopez-Quintas, I.; Martín, M.; de Nalda, R.; Castillejo, M.

    2015-05-01

    Nonlinear frequency mixing induced by a bichromatic field (1064 nm + 532 nm obtained from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser) in a boron carbide (B4C) plasma generated through laser ablation under vacuum is explored. A UV beam at the frequency of the fourth harmonic of the fundamental frequency (266 nm) was generated. The dependence of the efficiency of the process as function of the intensities of the driving lasers differs from the expected behavior for four-wave mixing, and point toward a six-wave mixing process. The frequency mixing process was strongly favored for parallel polarizations of the two driving beams. Through spatiotemporal mapping, the conditions for maximum efficiency were found for a significant delay from the ablation event (200 ns), when the medium is expected to be a low-ionized plasma. No late components of the harmonic signal were detected, indicating a largely atomized medium.

  8. Directional amorphization of boron carbide subjected to laser shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shiteng; Kad, Bimal; Remington, Bruce A.; LaSalvia, Jerry C.; Wehrenberg, Christopher E.; Behler, Kristopher D.; Meyers, Marc A.

    2016-10-01

    Solid-state shock-wave propagation is strongly nonequilibrium in nature and hence rate dependent. Using high-power pulsed-laser-driven shock compression, unprecedented high strain rates can be achieved; here we report the directional amorphization in boron carbide polycrystals. At a shock pressure of 45˜50 GPa, multiple planar faults, slightly deviated from maximum shear direction, occur a few hundred nanometers below the shock surface. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that these planar faults are precursors of directional amorphization. It is proposed that the shear stresses cause the amorphization and that pressure assists the process by ensuring the integrity of the specimen. Thermal energy conversion calculations including heat transfer suggest that amorphization is a solid-state process. Such a phenomenon has significant effect on the ballistic performance of B4C.

  9. Synthesis of boron carbide nano particles using polyvinyl alcohol and boric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Fathi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study boron carbide nano particles were synthesized using polyvinyl alcohol and boric acid. First, initial samples with molar ratio of PVA : H3BO3 = 2.7:2.2 were prepared. Next, samples were pyrolyzed at 600, 700 and 800°C followed by heat treatment at 1400, 1500 and 1600°C. FTIR analysis was implemented before and after pyrolysis in order to study the reaction pathway. XRD technique was used to study the composition of produced specimens of boron carbide. Moreover, SEM and PSA analysis were also carried out to study the particle size and morphology of synthesized boron carbide. Finally, according to implemented tests and analyses, carbon-free boron carbide nano particles with an average size of 81 nm and mainly spherical morphology were successfully produced via this method.

  10. The effects of stoichiometry on the mechanical properties of icosahedral boron carbide under loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, DeCarlos E; McCauley, James W; Wright, T W

    2012-12-19

    The effects of stoichiometry on the atomic structure and the related mechanical properties of boron carbide (B(4)C) have been studied using density functional theory and quantum molecular dynamics simulations. Computational cells of boron carbide containing up to 960 atoms and spanning compositions ranging from 6.7% to 26.7% carbon were used to determine the effects of stoichiometry on the atomic structure, elastic properties, and stress-strain response as a function of hydrostatic, uniaxial, and shear loading paths. It was found that different stoichiometries, as well as variable atomic arrangements within a fixed stoichiometry, can have a significant impact on the yield stress of boron carbide when compressed uniaxially (by as much as 70% in some cases); the significantly reduced strength of boron carbide under shear loading is also demonstrated.

  11. Phase diagram of boron carbide with variable carbon composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Sanxi; Gao, Qin; Widom, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Boron carbide exhibits intrinsic substitutional disorder over a broad composition range. The structure consists of 12-atom icosahedra placed at the vertices of a rhombohedral lattice, together with a 3-atom chain along the threefold axis. In the high-carbon limit, one or two carbon atoms can replace boron atoms on the icosahedra while the chains are primarily of type C-B-C. We fit an interatomic pair interaction model to density-functional-theory total energies to investigate the substitutional carbon disorder. Monte Carlo simulations with sampling improved by replica exchange and augmented by two-dimensional multiple histogram analysis predict three phases. The low-temperature, high-carbon-composition monoclinic C m structure disorders through a pair of phase transitions, first via an Ising-like transition to a monoclinic centrosymmetric state with space group C 2 /m , then via a first-order three-state Potts-like transition to the experimentally observed rhombohedral R 3 ¯m symmetry.

  12. Standard specification for nuclear-grade boron carbide powder

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This specification defines the chemical and physical requirements for boron carbide powder intended for a variety of nuclear applications. Because each application has a different need for impurity and boron requirements, three different chemical compositions of powder are specified. In using this specification, it is necessary to dictate which type of powder is intended to be used. In general, the intended applications for the various powder types are as follows: 1.1.1 Type 1—For use as particulate material in nuclear reactor core applications. 1.1.2 Type 2—Powder that will be further processed into a fabricated shape for use in a nuclear reactor core or used in non-core applications when the powder directly or indirectly may cause adverse effects on structural components, such as halide stress corrosion of stainless steel. 1.1.3 Type 3—Powder that will be used for non-core applications or special in-core applications. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other ...

  13. Boron carbide-carbon composites and composites for cryogenic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheinberg, H.

    1979-01-01

    Because of its neutronic properties, high hardness, and high melting temperature, boron carbide (B 4 C) is widely used at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. However because of its hardness and mode of manufacture, it is expensive to machine finish to tight dimensional specifictions. For some neutronic applications, a density considerably below the theoretical 2.52 Mg/m 3 was acceptable, and this relaxation in density specification permitted addition of carbon as a second phase to reduce machining costs. We conducted an experimental program to prepare 50.8-mm-diam by 34.8-mm-thick cylinders of B 4 C and B 4 C-C composites with concentrations of carbon varying from 5.5 to 30 volume percent. Additionally we used three forms of carbon, natural flake graphite, synthetic graphite flour, and a fine furnace black as the source of the second phase. We determined the sound velocity, compressive strength, coefficient of thermal expansion, electrical resistivity, and microstructure as functions of composition. Additionally, an enriched boron ( 10 B)-carbon composite was studied as an alternate material

  14. Study and optimization of the carbothermic reduction process for obtaining boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.R.M. de.

    1989-01-01

    Boron carbide - B sub(4)C - is a ceramic material of technological importance due to its hardness and high chemical and thermal stabilities. Moreover, its high neutron capture cross section makes it suitable for application as neutron absorber in nuclear technology. The process for obtaining carbothermally derived boron carbide has been studied in two steps: firstly, the parameters of the boric acid → boron oxide dehydration reaction have been defined; secondly, the optimization of the carbothermal reduction reaction using boron oxide has been undertaken looking for boron carbide having low level of free carbon. The starting materials as well as the main products have been studied by chemical and spectrographic analyses, X-ray diffractometry, granulometric classification and scanning electron microscopy. The optimization of the carbothermic reduction process allowed for the development and set up of a fabrication procedure yielding high quality B sub(4) C powders, starting from low cost and easily available (in the Brazilian market) raw materials. (author)

  15. Processing and Properties of Distaloy Sa Sintered Alloys with Boron and Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karwan-Baczewska J.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Prealloyed iron-based powders, manufactured in Höganäs Company, are used in the automotive parts industry. The properties and life time of such sintered parts depend, first of all, on their chemical composition, the production method of the prealloyed powder as well as on the technology of their consolidation and sintering. One of simpler and conventional methods aimed at increasing the density in sintered products is the process of activated sintering, performed, for example, by adding boron as elementary boron powder. Under this research project obtained were novel sintered materials, based on prealloyed and diffusion bonded powder, type: Distaloy SA, with the following chemical composition: Fe-1.75% Ni-1.5%Cu- 0.5%Mo with carbon (0.55%; 0.75% and boron (0.2%, 0.4% and 0.6%. Distaloy SA samples alloyed with carbon and boron were manufactured by mixing powders in a Turbula mixer, then compressed using a hydraulic press under a pressure of 600 MPa and sintered in a tube furnace at 1473 K, for a 60 minute time, in the hydrogen atmosphere. After the sintering process, there were performed density and porosity measurements as well as hardness tests and mechanical properties were carried out, too. Eventually, analyzed was the effect of boron upon density, hardness and mechanical properties of novel sintered construction parts made from Distaloy SA powder.

  16. Enhancement of oxidation resistance via a self-healing boron carbide coating on diamond particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Youhong; Meng, Qingnan; Qian, Ming; Liu, Baochang; Gao, Ke; Ma, Yinlong; Wen, Mao; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-02-02

    A boron carbide coating was applied to diamond particles by heating the particles in a powder mixture consisting of H3BO3, B and Mg. The composition, bond state and coverage fraction of the boron carbide coating on the diamond particles were investigated. The boron carbide coating prefers to grow on the diamond (100) surface than on the diamond (111) surface. A stoichiometric B4C coating completely covered the diamond particle after maintaining the raw mixture at 1200 °C for 2 h. The contribution of the boron carbide coating to the oxidation resistance enhancement of the diamond particles was investigated. During annealing of the coated diamond in air, the priory formed B2O3, which exhibits a self-healing property, as an oxygen barrier layer, which protected the diamond from oxidation. The formation temperature of B2O3 is dependent on the amorphous boron carbide content. The coating on the diamond provided effective protection of the diamond against oxidation by heating in air at 1000 °C for 1 h. Furthermore, the presence of the boron carbide coating also contributed to the maintenance of the static compressive strength during the annealing of diamond in air.

  17. Controlling the Morphology and Oxidation Resistance of Boron Carbide Synthesized Via Carbothermic Reduction Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Yasser M. Z.; El-Sheikh, Said M.; Ewais, Emad M. M.; Abd-Allah, Asmaa A.; Sayed, Said A.

    2017-03-01

    Boron carbide powder was synthesized from boric acid and lactose mixtures via easy procedure. Boric acid and lactose solution mixtures were roasted in stainless steel pot at 280 °C for 24 h. Boron carbide was obtained by heating the roasted samples under flowing of industrial argon gas at 1500 °C for 3 h. The amount of borate ester compound in the roasted samples was highly influenced by the boron/carbon ratio in the starting mixtures and plays a versatile role in the produced boron carbide. The high-purity boron carbide powder was produced with a sample composed of lowest boron/carbon ratio of 1:1 without calcination step. Particle morphology was changed from nano-needles like structure of 8-10 nm size with highest carbon ratio mixture to spherical shape of >150 nm size with lowest one. The oxidation resistance performance of boron carbide is highly dependent on the morphology and grain size of the synthesized powder.

  18. Effect of boron on the microstructure and mechanical properties of carbidic austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Yuncheng; Jin Huijin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300132 (China); Liu Jinhai, E-mail: pyc_wanhj@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300132 (China); Li Guolu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300132 (China)

    2011-11-25

    Highlights: {yields} Boron are applied to carbidic austempered ductile iron (CADI). {yields} Boron microalloying CADI is a new high hardenability of wear-resistant cast iron. {yields} Addition of boron to CADI significantly improves hardenability. {yields} Effect of boron on the CADI grinding ball were investigated. {yields} Optimum property is obtained when boron content at 0.03 wt%. - Abstract: Carbidic austempered ductile iron (CADI) castings provide a unique combination of high hardness and toughness coupled with superior wear resistance properties, but their hardenability restricts their range of applications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of boron on the microstructure and mechanical properties of CADI. The experimental results indicate that the CADI comprises graphite nodules, which are dispersive boron-carbides that are distributed in the form of strips, and the matrix is a typical ausferritic matrix. Microscopic amounts of boron can improve the hardenability of CADI, but higher boron content reduces the hardenability and toughness of CADI. The results are discussed in the context of the influence of boron content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of grinding balls.

  19. Semiconducting boron carbide thin films: Structure, processing, and diode applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ruqiang

    The high energy density and long lifetime of betavoltaic devices make them very useful to provide the power for applications ranging from implantable cardiac pacemakers to deep space satellites and remote sensors. However, when made with conventional semiconductors, betavoltaic devices tend to suffer rapid degradation as a result of radiation damage. It has been suggested that the degradation problem could potentially be alleviated by replacing conventional semiconductors with a radiation hard semiconducting material like icosahedral boron carbide. The goal of my dissertation was to better understand the fundamental properties and structure of boron carbide thin films and to explore the processes to fabricate boron carbide based devices for voltaic applications. A pulsed laser deposition system and a radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering deposition system were designed and built to achieve the goals. After comparing the experimental results obtained using these two techniques, it was concluded that RF magnetron sputtering deposition technique is a good method to make B4C boron carbide thin films to fabricate repeatable and reproducible voltaic devices. The B4C thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering require in situ dry pre-cleaning to make ohmic contacts for B4C thin films to fabricate the devices. By adding another RF sputtering to pre-clean the substrate and thin films, a process to fabricate B4C / n-Si heterojunctions has been established. In addition, a low energy electron accelerator (LEEA) was built to mimic beta particles emitted from Pm147 and used to characterize the betavoltaic performance of betavoltaic devices as a function of beta energy and beta flux as well as do accelerated lifetime testing for betavoltaic devices. The energy range of LEEA is 20 - 250 keV with the current from several nA to 50 muA. High efficiency Si solar cells were used to demonstrate the powerful capabilities of LEEA, i.e., the characterization of betavoltaic

  20. Micrometric rods grown by nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Quintas, Ignacio; Oujja, Mohamed; Sanz, Mikel; Benitez-Cañete, Antonio [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Chater, Richard J. [Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cañamares, Maria Vega [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Marco, José F. [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Castillejo, Marta, E-mail: marta.castllejo@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Micrometric rods obtained by ns pulsed laser deposition of boron carbide at 1064 and 266 nm. • At 1064 nm microrods display crystalline polyhedral shape with sharp edges and flat sides. • Microrods consist of a mixture of boron, boron oxide, boron carbide and aliphatic hydrocarbons. - Abstract: Micrometric size rods have been fabricated via pulsed laser deposition in vacuum from boron carbide targets using nanosecond pulses of 1064 and 266 nm and room temperature Si (1 0 0) substrates. Morphological, structural and chemical characterization of the microrods was made by applying scanning electron microscopy, focussed ion beam microscopy coupled to secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Ablation at 1064 nm favours the formation of microrods with high aspect ratio, sharp edges and pyramidal tips, typically 10 μm long with a cross section of around 2 μm × 2 μm. Differently, at 266 nm the microrods are of smaller size and present a more globular aspect. The analyses of the microrods provide information about their crystalline nature and composition, based on a mixture which includes boron, boron oxide and boron carbide, and allows discussion of the wavelength dependent growth mechanisms involved.

  1. Phase Field Theory and Analysis of Pressure-Shear Induced Amorphization and Failure in Boron Carbide Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Phase Field Theory and Analysis of Pressure-Shear Induced Amorphization and Failure in Boron Carbide Ceramic by John D Clayton ARL-RP...Pressure-Shear Induced Amorphization and Failure in Boron Carbide Ceramic John D Clayton Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL...and Analysis of Pressure-Shear Induced Amorphization and Failure in Boron Carbide Ceramic 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  2. Spark Plasma Sintering of Low Alloy Steel Modified with Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebda M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of adding different amounts of silicon carbide on the properties (density, transverse rupture strength, microhardness and corrosion resistance and microstructure of low alloy steel was investigated. Samples were prepared by mechanical alloying (MA process and sintered by spark plasma sintering (SPS technique. After the SPS process, half of each of obtained samples was heat-treated in a vacuum furnace. The results show that the high-density materials have been achieved. Homogeneous and fine microstructure was obtained. The heat treatment that followed the SPS process resulted in an increase in the mechanical and plastic properties of samples with the addition 1wt. % of silicon carbide. The investigated compositions containing 1 wt.% of SiC had better corrosion resistance than samples with 3 wt.% of silicon carbide addition. Moreover, corrosion resistance of the samples with 1 wt.% of SiC can further be improved by applying heat treatment.

  3. Influence of Carbon Content on the Crystallographic Structure of Boron Carbide Films

    OpenAIRE

    Conde, O.; Silvestre, A. J.; Oliveira, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    Boron carbide thin films were synthesised by laser-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LCVD), using a CO2 laser beam and boron trichloride and methane as precursors. Boron and carbon contents were measured by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Microstructural analysis was carried out by Raman microspectroscopy and glancing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) was used to study the crystallographic structure and to determine the lattice parameters of the polycrystalline films. The rhombohedr...

  4. Dynamic modulus and damping of boron, silicon carbide, and alumina fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicarlo, J. A.; Williams, W.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamic modulus and damping capacity for boron, silicon carbide, and silicon carbide-coated boron fibers were measured from -190 to 800 C. The single fiber vibration test also allowed measurement of transverse thermal conductivity for the silicon carbide fibers. Temperature-dependent damping capacity data for alumina fibers were calculated from axial damping results for alumina-aluminum composites. The dynamic fiber data indicate essentially elastic behavior for both the silicon carbide and alumina fibers. In contrast, the boron-based fibers are strongly anelastic, displaying frequency-dependent moduli and very high microstructural damping. The single fiber damping results were compared with composite damping data in order to investigate the practical and basic effects of employing the four fiber types as reinforcement for aluminum and titanium matrices.

  5. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles. The first step toward T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, M W; Björkdahl, O; Sørensen, P G; Hansen, T; Jensen, M R; Gundersen, H J G; Bjørnholm, T

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant melanoma cells in amounts as high as 0.3 wt. % and 1 wt. %, respectively. Neutron irradiation of a test system consisting of untreated B16 cells mixed with B16 cells loaded with boron carbide nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferative capacity of untreated cells, showing that cells loaded with boron-containing nanoparticles can hinder the growth of neighboring cells upon neutron irradiation. This could provide the first step toward a T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy.

  6. Lattice dynamics of {alpha} boron and of boron carbide; Proprietes vibrationnelles du bore {alpha} et du carbure de bore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vast, N

    1999-07-01

    The atomic structure and the lattice dynamics of {alpha} boron and of B{sub 4}C boron carbide have been studied by Density Functional Theory (D.F.T.) and Density Functional Perturbation Theory (D.F.P.T.). The bulk moduli of the unit-cell and of the icosahedron have been investigated, and the equation of state at zero temperature has been determined. In {alpha} boron, Raman diffusion and infrared absorption have been studied under pressure, and the theoretical and experimental Grueneisen coefficients have been compared. In boron carbide, inspection of the theoretical and experimental vibrational spectra has led to the determination of the atomic structure of B{sub 4}C. Finally, the effects of isotopic disorder have been modeled by an exact method beyond the mean-field approximation, and the effects onto the Raman lines has been investigated. The method has been applied to isotopic alloys of diamond and germanium. (author)

  7. Amorphisation of boron carbide under slow heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosset, D., E-mail: Dominique.gosset@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DMN, SRMA, LA2M, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191, Gif/Yvette (France); Miro, S. [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DMN, SRMP, Laboratoire JANNUS, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191, Gif/Yvette (France); Doriot, S. [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DMN, SRMA, LA2M, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191, Gif/Yvette (France); Moncoffre, N. [CNRS/IN2P3/IPNL, 69622, Villeurbanne (France)

    2016-08-01

    Boron carbide B{sub 4}C is widely used as a neutron absorber in nuclear plants. Most of the post-irradiation examinations have shown that the structure of the material remains crystalline, in spite of very high atomic displacement rates. Here, we have irradiated B{sub 4}C samples with 4 MeV Au ions with different fluences at room temperature. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy have been performed. The Raman analyses show a high structural disorder at low fluence, around 10{sup −2} displacements per atoms (dpa). However, the TEM observations show that the material remains crystalline up to a few dpa. At high fluence, small amorphous areas a few nanometers large appear in the damaged zone but the long range order is preserved. Moreover, the size and density of the amorphous zones do not significantly grow when the damage increases. On the other hand, full amorphisation is observed in the implanted zone at a Au concentration of about 0.0005. It can be inferred from those results that short range and long range damages arise at highly different fluences, that heavy ions implantation has drastic effects on the structure stability and that in this material self-healing mechanisms are active in the damaged zone.

  8. Study of nano-metric silicon carbide powder sintering. Application to fibers processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinge, A.

    2011-01-01

    Silicon carbide ceramic matrix composites (SiCf/SiCm) are of interest for high temperature applications in aerospace or nuclear components for their relatively high thermal conductivity and low activation under neutron irradiation. While most of silicon carbide fibers are obtained through the pyrolysis of a poly-carbo-silane precursor, sintering of silicon carbide nano-powders seems to be a promising route to explore. For this reason, pressureless sintering of SiC has been studied. Following the identification of appropriate sintering aids for the densification, optimization of the microstructure has been achieved through (i) the analysis of the influence of operating parameters and (ii) the control of the SiC β a SiC α phase transition. Green fibers have been obtained by two different processes involving the extrusion of SiC powder dispersion in polymer solution or the coagulation of a water-soluble polymer containing ceramic particles. Sintering of these green fibers led to fibers of around fifty microns in diameter. (author) [fr

  9. Effects of ball milling and sintering on alumina and alumina-boron compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Thomas

    Alumina has a wide variety of applications, but the processing of alumina based materials can be costly. Mechanically milling alumina has been shown to enhance the sintering properties while decreasing the sintering temperature. Additions of boron have also proven to increase sintering properties of alumina. These two processes, mechanical milling and boron additions, will be combined to test the sintering properties and determine if they are improved upon even further compared to the individual processes. Multiple samples of pure alumina, 0.2 weight percent boron, and 1.0 weight percent boron are batched and processed in a ball mill for different time intervals. These samples are then characterized to observe the structure and properties of the samples after milling but before sintering. Pellets are dry pressed from the milled powders, sintered at 1200°C for one to 10 hours, and characterized to determine the impact of processing. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) was used on each sample to determine crystallite size and lattice parameters at different stages throughout the experiment. XRD was also used to identify any samples with an aluminum borate phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the powder and pellet morphology and to measure bulk chemical composition. Samples were sputter coated with an Au-Pd coating observed in the SEM to characterize the topography as a function of variables such as milling time, boron composition, and sintering time. Additionally, porosity and change in diameter were measured to track the sintering process. Milling sample for longer periods of time would be unnecessary due to the crystallite size leveling off between 10 and 12 hours of milling time. Samples of alumina with 0.2 weight percent boron prove to have very little effect on the sintering properties. At 1.0 weight percent boron, there are changes in diffraction patterns and topography after being sintered for one hour. The porosities of all of the sintered

  10. Ultrafine WC-Ni cemented carbides fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong Huiyong [School of Engineering and Technology, China University of Geosciences at Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Peng Zhijian, E-mail: pengzhijian@cugb.edu.cn [School of Engineering and Technology, China University of Geosciences at Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Ren Xiaoyong; Peng Ying; Wang Chengbiao; Fu Zhiqiang [School of Engineering and Technology, China University of Geosciences at Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Qi Longhao; Miao Hezhuo [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrafine WC-Ni cemented carbides with average WC grain size of about 330 nm prepared by combination of sparking plasma sintering and grain growth inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Very short mean free path of about 22 nm for crack in metal binder of the obtained materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher hardness than those of WC-Co cemented carbide counterparts sintered by rapid sintering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Observation of fracture along metal binder and no carbon-carbon fracture face. - Abstract: With VC and TaC as WC grain growth inhibitors, ultrafine WC-Ni cemented carbides with different fractions (6-10 wt%) of binder metal nickel were fabricated by utilizing high energy milling together with spark plasma sintering. In the obtained samples, only WC and Ni phases were detected in X-ray diffraction limit. The microstructure of the specimens was examined on fractural, polished, and polished/etched surfaces by scanning electron microscopy, and the results revealed that the average WC grain size of the WC-Ni cemented carbides was about 330 nm, and there were lots of micro-pores in the samples. The relative density of the samples was all higher than 92%. But the measurement of hardness and flexural strength indicated that the existence of micro-pores had no significant influence on the performance of the obtained materials. On the basis of observation on the micro-fracture surface of the samples, it was found that fractures occurred along the binder metal, and the obtained ultrafine WC-Ni cemented carbides showed a very short binder mean free path (about 22 nm), thus resulting in excellent performance in mechanical strength.

  11. Measurements and simulations of boron carbide as degrader material for proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbershagen, Alexander; Baumgarten, Christian; Kiselev, Daniela; van der Meer, Robert; Risters, Yannic; Schippers, Marco

    2016-07-21

    We report on test measurements using boron carbide (B4C) as degrader material in comparison with the conventional graphite, which is currently used in many proton therapy degraders. Boron carbide is a material of lower average atomic weight and higher density than graphite. Calculations predict that, compared to graphite, the use of boron carbide results in a lower emittance behind the degrader due to the shorter degrader length. Downstream of the acceptance defining collimation system we expect a higher beam transmission, especially at low beam energies. This is of great interest in proton therapy applications as it allows either a reduction of the beam intensity extracted from the cyclotron leading to lower activation or a reduction of the treatment time. This paper summarizes the results of simulations and experiments carried out at the PROSCAN facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute(1). The simulations predict an increase in the transmitted beam current after the collimation system of approx. 30.5% for beam degradation from 250 to 84 MeV for a boron carbide degrader compared to graphite. The experiment carried out with a boron carbide block reducing the energy to 84 MeV yielded a transmission improvement of 37% compared with the graphite degrader set to that energy.

  12. Measurements and simulations of boron carbide as degrader material for proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbershagen, Alexander; Baumgarten, Christian; Kiselev, Daniela; van der Meer, Robert; Risters, Yannic; Schippers, Marco

    2016-07-01

    We report on test measurements using boron carbide (B4C) as degrader material in comparison with the conventional graphite, which is currently used in many proton therapy degraders. Boron carbide is a material of lower average atomic weight and higher density than graphite. Calculations predict that, compared to graphite, the use of boron carbide results in a lower emittance behind the degrader due to the shorter degrader length. Downstream of the acceptance defining collimation system we expect a higher beam transmission, especially at low beam energies. This is of great interest in proton therapy applications as it allows either a reduction of the beam intensity extracted from the cyclotron leading to lower activation or a reduction of the treatment time. This paper summarizes the results of simulations and experiments carried out at the PROSCAN facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute1. The simulations predict an increase in the transmitted beam current after the collimation system of approx. 30.5% for beam degradation from 250 to 84 MeV for a boron carbide degrader compared to graphite. The experiment carried out with a boron carbide block reducing the energy to 84 MeV yielded a transmission improvement of 37% compared with the graphite degrader set to that energy.

  13. Quantitative evaluation of normal and abnormal grain growth of cemented carbides during liquid phase sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabretou, V.; Lavergne, O.; Missiaen, J.-M.; Allibert, C. H.

    1999-04-01

    The liquid-phase sintering (LPS) of cemented carbides prepared from submicronic powders induces a micro-structural evolution generally ascribed to normal and abnormal grain growth. Such phenomena can be prevented by small additions of inhibitors (Cr, V). Presently, the mechanisms controlling either the grain growth or its inhibition are not strictly identified. In the present work, the effects of major parameters on grain growth (initial WC grain size, liquid composition, liquid fraction) are studied by image analysis of specimens sintered at 1450°C up to 8h.The evolution of the mean intercept and intercept distribution of WC grains is analysed in terms of the possible mechanisms involved.

  14. The All Boron Carbide Diode Neutron Detector: Experiment and Modeling Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabirianov, Ildar F.; Brand, Jennifer I.; Fairchild, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Boron carbide diode detectors, fabricated from two different polytypes of semiconducting boron carbide, will detect neutrons in reasonable agreement with theoretical expectations. The performance of the all boron carbide neutron detector differs, as expected, from devices where a boron rich neutron capture layer is distinct from the diode charge collection region (i.e. a conversion layer solid state detector). Diodes were fabricated from natural abundance boron (20% 10 B and 80% 11 B.) directly on the metal substrates and metal contacts applied to the films as grown. The total boron depth was on the order of 2 microns. This is clearly not a conversion-layer configuration. The diodes were exposed to thermal neutrons generated from a paraffin moderated plutonium-beryllium source in moderated and un-moderated, as well as shielded and unshielded experimental configurations, where the expected energy peaks at at 2.31 MeV and 2.8 MeV were clearly observed, albeit with some incomplete charge collection typical of thinner diode structures. The results are compared with other boron based thin film detectors and literature models. (authors)

  15. Boron carbide: hydrocode simulation of plate-impact experiments with an improved failure model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachkov, Sergey; Parshikov, Anatoly; Zhakhovsky, Vasily

    2017-06-01

    Unique strength properties of boron carbide make it useful for numerous applications. However, shock compression accompanied by high strains rates involves material into the process of failure what significantly reduces its strength. In this research we compare simulation results for two sets of plate-impact experiments where samples were manufactured using different technology. Simulations are performed using our 3D SPH hydrocode and the improved Johnson-Holmquist failure model. Complex wave profiles obtained via VISAR are properly reproduced in our modeling. However, it was found that the failed boron carbide strength have a strong effect on the wave profiles and should be different for the each set of experiments. Moreover, heterogeneous distribution of failed boron carbide is shown to affect wave propagation to the rear surface of sample what results in spatial velocity profile variations obtained via line-VISAR system.

  16. Superconductivity in boron carbide? Clarification by low-temperature MIR/FIR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Kuhlmann, U

    2011-11-02

    The electronic structure and phonon density of B(13)B(2) boron carbide calculated by Calandra et al (2004 Phys. Rev. B 69 224505) defines this compound as metallic, and the authors predict superconductivity with T(C)s up to 36.7 K. Their results are affected by the same deficiencies as former band structure calculations on boron carbides based on hypothetical crystal structures deviating significantly from the real ones. We present optical mid IR/far IR (MIR/FIR) spectra of boron carbide with compositions between B(4.3)C and B(10.37)C, evidencing semiconducting behaviour at least down to 30 K. There is no indication of superconductivity. The spectra yield new information on numerous localized gap states close to the valence band edge.

  17. Evaluation of mechanical properties of aluminium alloy–alumina–boron carbide metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijaya Ramnath, B.; Elanchezhian, C.; Jaivignesh, M.; Rajesh, S.; Parswajinan, C.; Siddique Ahmed Ghias, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fabrication of MMC with aluminium alloy–alumina–boron carbide is done. • Different proportions of reinforcements are added. • The effects of varying proportions are studied. • Investigation on mechanical properties above composites is performed. • Failure morphology analysis is done using SEM. - Abstract: This paper deals with the fabrication and mechanical investigation of aluminium alloy, alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) and boron carbide metal matrix composites. Aluminium is the matrix metal having properties like light weight, high strength and ease of machinability. Alumina which has better wear resistance, high strength, hardness and boron carbide which has excellent hardness and fracture toughness are added as reinforcements. Here, the fabrication is done by stir casting which involves mixing the required quantities of additives into stirred molten aluminium. After solidification, the samples are prepared and tested to find the various mechanical properties like tensile, flexural, impact and hardness. The internal structure of the composite is observed using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)

  18. Ultrafine-grained Aluminm and Boron Carbide Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Rustin

    Cryomilling is a processing technique used to generate homogenously distributed boron carbide (B4C) particulate reinforcement within an ultrafine-grained aluminum matrix. The motivation behind characterizing a composite consisting of cryomilled aluminum B4C metal matrix composite is to design and develop a high-strength, lightweight aluminum composite for structural and high strain rate applications. Cryomilled Al 5083 and B4C powders were synthesized into bulk composite by various thermomechanical processing methods to form plate and extruded geometries. The effects of processing method on microstructure and mechanical behavior for the final consolidated composite were investigated. Cryomilling for extended periods of time in liquid nitrogen has shown to increase strength and thermal stability. The effects associated with cryomilling with stearic acid additions (as a process-control agent) on the degassing behavior of Al powders is investigated and results show that the liberation of compounds associated with stearic acid were suppressed in cryomilled Al powders. The effect of thermal expansion mismatch strain on strengthening due to geometrically necessary dislocations resulting from quenching is investigated and found not to occur in bulk cryomilled Al 5083 and B 4C composites. Previous cryomilled Al 5083 and B4C composites have exhibited ultrahigh strength associated with considerable strain-to-failure (>14 pct.) at high strain rates (>103/s) during mechanical testing, but only limited strain-to-failure (˜0.75 pct.) at quasi-static strain rates (10-3/s). The increased strain to failure at high strain rates is attributed to micro-flaw developments, including kinking, extensive axial splitting, and grain growth were observed after high strain rate deformation, and the significance of these mechanisms is considered.

  19. Comparative Evaluations and Microstructure: Mechanical Property Relations of Sintered Silicon Carbide Consolidated by Various Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barick, Prasenjit; Chatterjee, Arya; Majumdar, Bhaskar; Saha, Bhaskar Prasad; Mitra, Rahul

    2018-04-01

    A comparative evaluation between pressureless or self-sintered silicon carbide (SSiC), hot-pressed silicon carbide (HP-SiC), and spark plasma-sintered silicon carbide (SPS-SiC) has been carried out with emphasis on examination of their microstructures and mechanical properties. The effect of sample dimensions on density and properties of SPS-SiC has been also examined. Elastic modulus, flexural strength, and fracture toughness measured by indentation or testing of single-edge notched beam specimens have been found to follow the following trend, HP-SiC > SSiC > SPS-SiC. The SPS-SiC samples have shown size-dependent densification and mechanical properties, with the smaller sample exhibiting superior properties. The mechanical properties of sintered SiC samples appear to be influenced by relative density, grain size, and morphology, as well as the existence of intergranular glassy phase. Studies of fracture surface morphologies have revealed the mechanism of failure to be transgranular in SSiC or HP-SiC, and intergranular in case of SPS-SiC, indicating the dominating influence of grain size and α-SiC formation with high aspect ratio.

  20. A thermo dynamical model for the shape and size effect on melting of boron carbide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniammal, Paneerselvam; Arivuoli, Dakshanamoorthy

    2012-02-01

    The size and shape dependence of the melting temperature of Boron Carbide (B4C) nanoparticles has been investigated with a numerical thermo dynamical approach. The problem considered in this paper is the inward melting of nanoparticles with spherical and cylindrical geometry. The cylindrical Boron Carbide (B4C) nanoparticles, whose melting point has been reported to decrease with decreasing particle radius, become larger than spherical shaped nanoparticle. Comparative investigation of the size dependence of the melting temperature with respect to the two shapes is also been done. The melting temperature obtained in the present study is approximately a dealing function of radius, in a good agreement with prediction of thermo dynamical model.

  1. Neutron Detection using Amorphous Boron-Carbide Hetero-Junction Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    states. Special nuclear material as defined by Title I of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 includes Pu, 233U, and uranium enriched in the isotopes 233U...NEUTRON DETECTION USING AMORPHOUS BORON -CARBIDE HETERO-JUNCTION DIODES THESIS Thomas P. McQuary, Major, USA AFIT/NUCL/ENP/12-M06 DEPARTMENT OF THE...is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT/NUCL/ENP/12-M06 NEUTRON DETECTION USING AMORPHOUS BORON -CARBIDE HETERO-JUNCTION

  2. Elastic properties of boron carbide films via surface acoustic waves measured by Brillouin light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, E.; Jimenez-Villacorta, F.; Jimenez Rioboo, R.J.; Prieto, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez-Marcos, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Munoz-Martin, A.; Prieto, J.E.; Joco, V. [Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-03-15

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity has been determined by high resolution Brillouin light scattering to study the mechano-elastic properties of boron carbide films prepared by radio frequency (RF) sputtering. The comparison of experimentally observed elastic behaviour with simulations made by considering film composition obtained from elastic recoil detection analysis-time of flight (ERDA-ToF) spectroscopy allows establishing that elastic properties are determined by that of crystalline boron carbide with a lessening of the SAW velocity values due to surface oxidation. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Method of accurate thickness measurement of boron carbide coating on copper foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Regmi, Murari

    2017-11-07

    A method is disclosed of measuring the thickness of a thin coating on a substrate comprising dissolving the coating and substrate in a reagent and using the post-dissolution concentration of the coating in the reagent to calculate an effective thickness of the coating. The preferred method includes measuring non-conducting films on flexible and rough substrates, but other kinds of thin films can be measure by matching a reliable film-substrate dissolution technique. One preferred method includes determining the thickness of Boron Carbide films deposited on copper foil. The preferred method uses a standard technique known as inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICPOES) to measure boron concentration in a liquid sample prepared by dissolving boron carbide films and the Copper substrates, preferably using a chemical etch known as ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN). Measured boron concentration values can then be calculated.

  4. Micrometric rods grown by nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Quintas, Ignacio; Oujja, Mohamed; Sanz, Mikel; Benitez-Cañete, Antonio; Chater, Richard J.; Cañamares, Maria Vega; Marco, José F.; Castillejo, Marta

    2015-02-01

    Micrometric size rods have been fabricated via pulsed laser deposition in vacuum from boron carbide targets using nanosecond pulses of 1064 and 266 nm and room temperature Si (1 0 0) substrates. Morphological, structural and chemical characterization of the microrods was made by applying scanning electron microscopy, focussed ion beam microscopy coupled to secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Ablation at 1064 nm favours the formation of microrods with high aspect ratio, sharp edges and pyramidal tips, typically 10 μm long with a cross section of around 2 μm × 2 μm. Differently, at 266 nm the microrods are of smaller size and present a more globular aspect. The analyses of the microrods provide information about their crystalline nature and composition, based on a mixture which includes boron, boron oxide and boron carbide, and allows discussion of the wavelength dependent growth mechanisms involved.

  5. Atomic structure and vibrational properties of icosahedral B$_4$C boron carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Lazzari, R.; Vast, N.; Besson, J. M.; Baroni, S.; Corso, A. Dal

    1999-01-01

    The atomic structure of icosahedral B$_4$C boron carbide is determined by comparing existing infra-red absorption and Raman diffusion measurements with the predictions of accurate {\\it ab initio} lattice-dynamical calculations performed for different structural models. This allows us to unambiguously determine the location of the carbon atom within the boron icosahedron, a task presently beyond X-ray and neutron diffraction ability. By examining the inter- and intra-icosahedral contributions ...

  6. Effects of space exposure on ion-beam-deposited silicon-carbide and boron-carbide coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keski-Kuha, R A; Blumenstock, G M; Fleetwood, C M; Schmitt, D R

    1998-12-01

    Two recently developed optical coatings, ion-beam-deposited silicon carbide and ion-beam-deposited boron carbide, are very attractive as coatings on optical components for instruments for space astronomy and earth sciences operating in the extreme-UV spectral region because of their high reflectivity, significantly higher than any conventional coating below 105 nm. To take full advantage of these coatings in space applications, it is important to establish their ability to withstand exposure to the residual atomic oxygen and other environmental effects at low-earth-orbit altitudes. The first two flights of the Surface Effects Sample Monitor experiments flown on the ORFEUS-SPAS and the CRISTA-SPAS Shuttle missions provided the opportunity to study the effects of space exposure on these materials. The results indicate a need to protect ion-beam-deposited silicon-carbide-coated optical components from environmental effects in a low-earth orbit. The boron-carbide thin-film coating is a more robust coating able to withstand short-term exposure to atomic oxygen in a low-earth-orbit environment.

  7. Friction and wear performance of diamond-like carbon, boron carbide, and titanium carbide coatings against glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, B.K.; Brown, D.W.; Kimock, F.M.

    1997-01-01

    Protection of glass substrates by direct ion beam deposited diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings was observed using a commercial pin-on-disk instrument at ambient conditions without lubrication. Ion beam sputter-deposited titanium carbide and boron carbide coatings reduced sliding friction, and provided tribological protection of silicon substrates, but the improvement factor was less than that found for DLC. Observations of unlubricated sliding of hemispherical glass pins at ambient conditions on uncoated glass and silicon substrates, and ion beam deposited coatings showed decreased wear in the order: uncoated glass>uncoated silicon>boron carbide>titanium carbide>DLC>uncoated sapphire. Failure mechanisms varied widely and are discussed. Generally, the amount of wear decreased as the sliding friction decreased, with the exception of uncoated sapphire substrates, for which the wear was low despite very high friction. There is clear evidence that DLC coatings continue to protect the underlying substrate long after the damage first penetrates through the coating. The test results correlate with field use data on commercial products which have shown that the DLC coatings provide substantial extension of the useful lifetime of glass and other substrates. copyright 1997 Materials Research Society

  8. Reactive sintering and microstructure development of tungsten carbide-AISI 304 stainless steel cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, C.M. [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CEMUC-Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Oliveira, F.J. [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Senos, A.M.R., E-mail: anamor@ua.pt [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2017-06-01

    Sintering of WC-stainless steel (SS) composites within a typical binder range from 6 up to 15 wt% SS was investigated through constant heating rate dilatometry, in vacuum conditions, complemented by differential thermal analysis and by the study of the high temperature wetting behavior of SS on WC. The densification starts ∼900 °C with a typical densification curve for all compositions, where three distinct regions are discernible: the first one with a slow densification rate, followed by a second region where a sharp increase in the densification rate up to a maximum value dependent on the binder amount is observed and, finally, a third one with a slowdown of the densification rate until the end of the thermal cycle. The attained final density at 1450 °C is dependent on the binder amount, increasing proportionally to its initial content. The final microstructure presents a normal grain size distribution and appreciable amounts of eta-phase, besides the major WC phase and residual iron rich phase. The reactive densification behavior and the role of the liquid phase are interpreted accordingly with structural and kinetic data. - Highlights: • Sintering of WC-AISI304 composites starts ∼900 °C and involves three stages. • Densification is largely dominated by a reactive liquid phase sintering process. • Eta-phase constitutes a transient liquid phase during sintering. • Sintering cycles are dependent on the initial binder content.

  9. The mean grain size determination of boron carbide (B4C)-aluminium (Al) and boron carbide (B4C)-nickel (Ni) composites by ultrasonic velocity technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, Ridvan; Sarpuen, Ismail H.; Yalim, H. Ali; Erol, Ayhan; Ozdemir, Tuba; Tuncel, Sabri

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the mean grain size of ceramic-metal composites, made from boron carbide (B 4 C)-aluminium (Al)-nickel (Ni) powders, has been determined with ultrasonic velocity technique by using a 2 MHz transducer. An ultrasonic velocity-grain size master graph was plotted using a 4 MHz ultrasonic transducer. The results were compared to the mean grain size obtained from SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) images

  10. Sintering of beryllium oxide with 3-4 per cent elemental boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pointud, R.; Rispal, Ch.; Le Garec, M.

    1958-01-01

    In order to manufacture a baffle absorbing neutrons of various energies, there was developed or mixture of a slower and an absorber. It is made by hot pressing impure beryllium containing boron carbide. The dense briquette has 100 x 100 x 50 mm and is machined on all her faces. She is of 2,85 density and about 3 to 4 per cent porosity, according to 5 per cent of boron. Difference of boron amount is lower than ten per cent between any two points of the briquette. (author) [fr

  11. Cobalt Doping of Semiconducting Boron Carbide Using Cobaltocene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carlson, Lonnie

    2007-01-01

    .... This temperature dependent surface photovoltage effect is not compelling evidence for the majority carrier type but does suggest an increase in the carrier concentration in semiconducting boron...

  12. An experimental investigation of wire electrical discharge machining of hot-pressed boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindranadh Bobbili

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work discusses the experimental study on wire-cut electric discharge machining of hot-pressed boron carbide. The effects of machining parameters, such as pulse on time (TON, peak current (IP, flushing pressure (FP and spark voltage on material removal rate (MRR and surface roughness (Ra of the material, have been evaluated. These parameters are found to have an effect on the surface integrity of boron carbide machined samples. Wear rate of brass wire increases with rise in input energy in machining of hot-pressed boron carbide. The surfaces of machined samples were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The influence of machining parameters on mechanism of MRR and Ra was described. It was demonstrated that higher TON and peak current deteriorate the surface finish of boron carbide samples and result in the formation of large craters, debris and micro cracks. The generation of spherical particles was noticed and it was attributed to surface tension of molten material. Macro-ridges were also observed on the surface due to protrusion of molten material at higher discharge energy levels.

  13. Aluminum-titanium hydride-boron carbide composite provides lightweight neutron shield material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, A. M.

    1967-01-01

    Inexpensive lightweight neutron shield material has high strength and ductility and withstands high internal heat generation rates without excessive thermal stress. This composite material combines structural and thermal properties of aluminum, neutron moderating properties of titanium hydride, and neutron absorbing characteristics of boron carbide.

  14. Standard specification for nuclear-grade aluminum oxide-boron carbide composite pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This specification applies to pellets composed of mixtures of aluminum oxide and boron carbide that may be ultimately used in a reactor core, for example, in neutron absorber rods. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only.

  15. Stability and kinetics of helium interstitials in boron carbide from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Anton; Roma, Guido; Crocombette, Jean-Paul; Motte, Vianney; Gosset, Dominique

    2017-12-01

    When boron carbide is used in nuclear reactors as a neutron absorber, helium concentrations on the order of a few atomic percent can be attained. It is thus of primary importance to know the distribution and kinetics of helium atoms in boron carbide. In spite of a variety is of experimental works devoted to the characterization of the microstructure and He bubbles in boron carbide irradiated in reactor, there is a serious lack of knowledge concerning the basic mechanisms governing helium kinetics. This study is devoted to the stability and mobility of helium interstitial atoms in carbon rich boron carbide. The lowest energy He insertion sites were screened through density functional theory and the most probable migration paths and energy barriers were investigated using the nudged elastic bands (NEB) approach. The results suggest that in a wide range of temperatures He interstitials undergo 2D diffusion confined between two 〈111 〉 planes. The onset of 3D diffusion is expected, according to our calculations, with an activation energy close to 2 eV. Our result is in qualitative agreement with the observation of flat bubbles with 〈111 〉 orientation, although a quantitative comparison with He diffusion data is hindered by discrepancies and microstructure issues in available experimental results.

  16. Evidence of amorphisation of B{sub 4}C boron carbide under slow, heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosset, D., E-mail: dominique.gosset@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DMN-SRMA-LA2M, F-91191 Gif/Yvette (France); Miro, S. [CEA, DEN, DMN-SRMP-JANNUS, F-91191 Gif/Yvette (France); Doriot, S. [CEA, DEN, DMN-SRMA-LA2M, F-91191 Gif/Yvette (France); Victor, G. [CNRS-IN2P3-IPNL, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Motte, V. [CEA, DEN, DMN-SRMA-LA2M, F-91191 Gif/Yvette (France)

    2015-12-15

    Boron carbide is widely used either as armor-plate or neutron absorber. In both cases, a good structural stability is required. However, a few studies have shown amorphisation may occur in severe conditions. Hard impacts lead to the formation of amorphous bands. Some irradiations in electronic regime with H or He ions have also shown amorphisation of the material. Most authors however consider the structure is not drastically affected by irradiations in the ballistic regime. Here, we have irradiated at room temperature dense boron carbide pellets with Au 4 MeV ions, for which most of the damage is in the ballistic regime. This study is part of a program devoted to the behavior of boron carbide under irradiation. Raman observations have been performed after the irradiations together with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman observations show a strong structural damage at moderate fluences (10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2}, about 0.1 dpa), in agreement with previous studies. On the other hand, TEM shows the structure remains crystalline up to 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2} then partially amorphises. The amorphisation is heterogeneous, with the formation of nanometric amorphous zones with increasing density. It then appears short range and long range disorder occurs at quite different damage levels. Further experiments are in progress aiming at studying the structural stability of boron carbide and isostructural materials (α-B, B{sub 6}Si,…).

  17. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lumin [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science; Wierschke, Jonathan Brett [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science

    2015-04-08

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H3BO3). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.

  18. Effects of lower cobalt binder concentrations in sintering of tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tao; Li Qingfa; Fuh, J.Y.H.; Yu, P.C.; Wu, C.C.

    2006-01-01

    Cemented tungsten carbides have received much attention because of their superior characteristics. Traditional cemented tungsten carbides usually contain 3-30 wt% binder phase. In this paper, WC with low Co concentration less than 3 wt% is studied using traditional powder metallurgy. The binder phase has tremendous effect on sinterability of WC. High sinterability and high hardness can be achieved for the WC (0.7 μm) with 0.5 wt% Co. Abnormal grain growth (AGG) is often observed in sintering WC with small amount of Co. It seems that AGG is affected by the concentration of Co and a range of Co concentrations may exist for the large amount of AGG. To control the grain size, VC is added to inhibit the grain growth of WC. It is observed that the hardness is affected by the amount of addition of VC. Controlling the ratio of C/W less than unity at low Co concentrations will result in the production of W 2 C phase. The hardness of WC-Co is affected by the amount of W 2 C phase in the sample and W 2 C is stable during the normal cooling process

  19. Comparative optical investigations of sintered and monocrystalline black and green silicon carbide (SiC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werheit, H.; Schwetz, K.A.

    2004-01-01

    Crystalline SiC appears in many different polytypes of cubic, hexagonal, and rhombohedral structures. These polytypes are colorless transparent or exhibit various colors evoked by doping with different elements. Dense sintered S-SiC (solid-state sintered) and LPS-SiC (liquid-phase sintered) were known in black color only, but recently a new liquid-phase sintering process was developed to achieve green LPS-SiC as well. Whereas in S-SiC the polycrystalline grains are homogeneously doped with 0.2 wt% boron, in the LPS-types the SiC grains contain up to 1.2 wt% Al, 0.3 wt% N and 0.1% O having a structure comprising a SiC(Al,N,O) mixed crystal shell and a pure SiC core. The difference in color of polycrystalline SiC bodies seems to result from small amounts of carbon in the sintered specimens (0.2-0.5 wt% C). Green sintered LPS-SiC is obtained, after free carbon has largely been removed by a suitable oxidation process prior to sintering. To get information on the various types of sintered SiC, the optical extinction and absorption spectra of black and green sintered SiC and green Acheson-SiC single crystals were quantitatively measured in the spectral range between about 1.4 and 4.1 eV. While the absorption coefficients of the single crystals vary between about 50 and 200 cm -1 , the extinction coefficients of the sintered materials are between 2000 and 7000 cm -1 . Nevertheless the absorption bands in the more or less transparent region of the green and black materials can easily be attributed to one another. Hence, the reason for these absorption processes must be assumed to be the same. In the same way, position and slope of the absorption edges are correlated amongst green or black SiC, irrespective of, whether the material is single crystal or sintered

  20. Equations of state and melting curve of boron carbide in the high-pressure range of shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molodets, A. M.; Golyshev, A. A.; Shakhrai, D. V.

    2017-03-01

    We have constructed the equations of state for crystalline boron carbide B11C (C-B-C) and its melt under high dynamic and static pressures. A kink on the shock adiabat for boron carbide has been revealed in the pressure range near 100 GPa, and the melting curve with negative curvature in the pressure range 0-120 GPa has been calculated. The results have been used for interpreting the kinks on the shock adiabat for boron carbide in the pressure range of 0-400 GPa.

  1. Effect of Sintering Process on Properties and Microstructure of WC-1.0TiC-3.1TaC-4.5Co Cemented Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Zhong-dian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of WC-1.0TiC-3.1TaC-4.5Co cemented carbides were prepared by vacuum sintering and Sintering-HIP through traditional powder metallurgy method. Optical microscopy(OM,scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS were used to characterize the microstructures. The results show that pores and cobalt-lake can be reduced in cemented carbides by increasing sintering temperature or using Sintering-HIP. The mean size of WC cemented carbide prepared by vacuum sintering process is larger than that prepared by Sintering-HIP. Furthermore, the phenomenon of WC abnormal growth was found in the cemented carbides prepared by Sintering-HIP.

  2. Mechanical characterization of cemented carbide WC-6Co (%wt) manufactured by SPS (Spark Plasma Sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boidi, G.; Tertuliano, A.J.; Machado, I.F.

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed to manufacture cemented carbide (WC-6%wtCo) obtained by SPS (Spark Plasma Sintering) process and to carry out the mechanical characterization by hardness and fracture toughness. The material was consolidated at 1100 deg C for different holding times (1 min, 5 min, 10 min), in order to evaluate the densification. A reference sample was also used to be compared to SPS. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were carried out to characterize the microstructural features of the samples and mechanical properties were obtained by hardness measurements (micro and macro) and instrumented indentation. The fracture toughness was calculated with the method of Palmqvist. Best results were found in the material sintered by SPS for 10 minutes of holding time, in which 97% of relative density and about 1600 HV 10 was reached. (author)

  3. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Buzhinskiy, O. I.; Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400-1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  4. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B., E-mail: lbb@plasma.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Buzhinskiy, O. I. [State Research Center Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI) (Russian Federation); Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400–1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  5. Influence of edge radius of sintered-carbide tip on roughness of machined surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Votava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing of cutting speed and thus increasing labour productivity is observed as a current trend in engineering production. This effort results to development of new cutting materials which are more capable to resist increased requirements on machined surface as well as operating life of the instrument. Nowadays, the most widely used materials used for cutting instruments are sintered carbides which are alloyed by other metals. The goal of this paper is to analyse change in quality of machined surface depending on the change of cutting conditions. For cutting operation, there were used a milling cutter high-speed steel 90 (HSS and removable sintered-carbide tips with different radius. Steel 12 050 hardened for 17 HRC was used as a machined material. Firstly, hardness of machined as well as machining materials was analysed. Further, metallographic analysis and measurement of microhardness of the individual structure phases was processed. Cutting conditions of both instruments were selected depending on the machined material. Surface roughness indicates the quality of machined surface.

  6. Annealing of deep boron centers in silicon carbide

    CERN Document Server

    Ballandovich, V S

    2002-01-01

    Effect of thermal annealing on the high temperature luminescence efficiency (HTL) in 6H-SiC samples grown in different conditions and doped with boron impurity was investigated. Some of the crystals were irradiated by reactor neutrons or fast electrons. The HTL efficiency was shown to depend on the abundance of deep boron centers discovered by capacitive spectroscopy as D-centers. High temperature treatment of samples results in decomposition of D-centers which is identified as B sub S sub i -V sub C complexes. The deep boron centers are shown to be stable at temperature as low as 1500 deg C. Conservation of these centers in SiC crystals at higher temperatures (up to 2600 deg C) is caused by presence of clusters which are the sources of nonequilibrium carbon vacancies

  7. The Promotion of Liquid Phase Sintering of Boron-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steels by Adding Nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Ming-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron is a feasible alloying element for liquid phase sintering (LPS of powder metallurgy (PM steels. This study investigated the effect of nickel (Ni, which is widely used in PM steels, on the liquid phase sintering of boron-containing PM steels. The results showed that the addition of 1.8wt% Ni does not apparently modify the LPS mechanism of boron-containing PM steels. However, adding 1.8wt% Ni slightly improves the LPS densification from 0.60 g/cm3 to 0.65 g/cm3, though the green density is reduced. Thermodynamic simulation demonstrated that the presence of Ni lowers the temperature region of liquid formation, resulting in enhanced LPS densification. Moreover, original graphite powders remains in the steels sintered at 1200 ºC. These graphite powders mostly dissolve into the base iron powder when the sintering temperature is increased from 1200 ºC to 1250 ºC.

  8. Preparation and characterization of Boron carbide nanoparticles for use as a novel agent in T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, M W; Sørensen, P G; Björkdahl, O; Jensen, M R; Gundersen, H J G; Bjørnholm, T

    2006-03-01

    Boron carbide nanoparticles are proposed as a system for T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy. Nanoparticles were produced by ball milling in various atmospheres of commercially available boron carbide. The physical and chemical properties of the particles were investigated using transmission electron microscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and chemical assays and reveal profound changes in surface chemistry and structural characteristics. In vitro thermal neutron irradiation of B16 melanoma cells incubated with sub-100 nm nanoparticles (381.5 microg/g (10)B) induces complete cell death. The nanoparticles alone induce no toxicity.

  9. Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Robert E.; Newkirk, Lawrence R.; Valencia, Flavio A.

    1981-09-01

    Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000.degree. C. with amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of B:C of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

  10. Thermal-shock Resistance of a Ceramic Comprising 60 Percent Boron Carbide and 40 Percent Titanium Diboride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeomans, C M; Hoffman, C A

    1953-01-01

    Thermal-shock resistance of a ceramic comprising 60 percent boron carbide and 40 percent titanium diboride was investigated. The material has thermal shock resistance comparable to that of NBS body 4811C and that of zirconia, but is inferior to beryllia, alumina, and titanium-carbide ceramals. It is not considered suitable for turbine blades.

  11. Experimental determination of boron and carbon thermodynamic activities in the carbide phase of the boron-carbon system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froment, A.K.

    1990-01-01

    - The boron-carbon phase diagram presents a single phase area ranging from 9 to 20 atomic percent of carbon. The measurement of carbon activity, in this range of composition, has been measured according to the following methods: - quantitative analysis of the methane-hydrogen mixture in equilibrium with the carbide, - high temperature mass spectrometry measurements. The first method turned out to be a failure; however, the apparatus used enabled the elaboration of a B 4 C composition pure phase from a two-phase (B 4 C + graphite) industrial product. The results obtained with the other two methods are consistent and lead to a law expressing the increase of the carbon activity in relation with the amount of this element; the high temperature mass spectrometry method has also made it possible to measure the boron activity which decreases when the carbon activity increases, but with a variation of amplitude much lower, according to the theoretical calculations. These results are a first step towards the knowledge of the boron carbide thermodynamical data for compositions different from B 4 C [fr

  12. Boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) coating. Deposition and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azizov, E.; Barsuk, V. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI), Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Begrambekov, L., E-mail: lbb@plasma.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Buzhinsky, O. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI), Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Evsin, A.; Gordeev, A.; Grunin, A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Klimov, N. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI), Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kurnaev, V. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Mazul, I. [Federal State Unitary Interprise Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA Efremov), St-Peterburg (Russian Federation); Otroshchenko, V.; Putric, A. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI), Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Sadovskiy, Ya.; Shigin, P.; Vergazov, S.; Zakharov, A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material of in-situ protecting coating for tungsten tiles of ITER divertor. To prove this concept the project including investigation of regimes of plasma deposition of B{sub 4}C coating on tungsten and tests of boron carbide layer in ITER-like is started recently. The paper contends the first results of the project. The results of B{sub 4}C coating irradiation by the plasma pulses of QSPU-T plasma accelerator are presented. The new device capable of B{sub 4}C film deposition on tungsten and testing of the films and materials with ITER-like heat loads and ion- and electron irradiation is described. The results of B{sub 4}C coating deposition and testing of both tungsten substrate and coating are shown and discussed.

  13. Influence of high power density plasma irradiation on the boron carbide coating on tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Grunin, A. V.; Puntakov, N. A.; Sadovskiy, Ya A.; Utkov, N. S.

    2017-05-01

    The paper considers an influence of T-10 tokamak plasma disruption on boron carbide (B4C) coating on tungsten. The power density of coating irradiation reached 100 MW/m2. The relief and composition of the boron carbide coating sample areas heated up to different temperature due to influence of disruption is determined. Conclusion is made that B4C does not change integrity, when heated to temperatures of up to 2000 K. Local melting was observed in areas heated up to 2500 K. In the range of 2500-3600 K most of the coating was melted and collected into droplets. Composition rate is reduced to B:C = 1:1. In all temperature ranges the coating remained continuous and provided protection of tungsten from direct plasma irradiation.

  14. Structure and characteristics of chromium steel coatings alloyed with boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, E. N.; Losev, A. S.; Borodikhin, S. A.; Matalasova, A. E.; Ponomarev, I. A.; Ivlev, K. E.

    2018-01-01

    This study explores the problems arising from the increase of wear resistance on the coatings of details of a wide range of applications, obtained by surfacing the Fe - Cr system with flux-cored wires. It has shown that insignificant wear resistance of such steel under conditions of metal friction against another metal is due to their relatively low hardness and the absence of strengthening phases. It also shows the effect of boron carbide on the structure and the characteristics of chromium steel obtained by the surfacing process. It was established that the use of high-chromium flux-cored wires alloyed with boron carbide aids the production of a deposited metal of a composite type, with a dispersed hardening based on chromium carboboride. The deposited metal with such structure has a high wear resistance and the hardness of 55 … 58 HRC and can be used for surfacing cladding the hardening, corrosion-resistant coatings.

  15. Plasma-sprayed boron carbide coatings for first-wall protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, J. G.; Schnedecker, G.; van Osch, E. V.; Duwe, R.; Linke, J.

    1994-08-01

    Plasma-sprayed boron carbide coatings have been manufactured by different suppliers onto substrates of type 316L stainless steel. The coating thickness ranges from 0.3 to 2.0 mm. The larger thicknesses could only be achieved by application of an adaptive or gradient bond-layer between substrate and the boron carbide top coating. Measurements of the thermal diffusivity of coating materials are reported. Several high heat flux facilities have been used to study the thermal shock and erosion behaviour of the coated samples. A supporting numerical analysis of the thermal behaviour of the coating under normal and off-normal heat loads is presented, focussing on the differences between electron beam and laser beam tests due to volumetric energy deposition. Some aspects of the applicability of plasma sprayed B 4C coatings for first-wall protection in a next step device are discussed.

  16. Characteristics of deposited boron doping diamond on tungsten carbide insert by MPECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Seok; Park, Yeong Min; Kim, Jeong Wan; Tulugan, Kelimu; Kim, Tae Gyu

    2015-03-01

    Diamond-coated cutting tools are used primarily for machining non-ferrous materials such as aluminum-silicon alloys, copper alloys, fiber-reinforced polymers, green ceramics and graphite. Because the tool life of cemented carbide cutting tool is greatly improved by diamond coating, and typically more than 10 times of the tool life is obtained. However, research of boron-doped diamond (BDD) coating tool has not been fully researched yet. In this study, we have succeeded to make boron-doped microcrystalline and nanocrystalline diamond-coated Co-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) inserts. Microcrystalline BDD thin film is deposited on WC-Co insert by using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) method. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the as-deposited diamond films.1,2

  17. Rare earth metal boron carbide MBC compounds containing monodimensional branched zigzag chains of non-metal atoms: Theoretical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiitkar, F.; Kahlal, S.; Halet, J.F.; Saillard, J.Y.

    1995-01-01

    The authors apply extended Hueckel calculations to solving the electronic structure of rare earth metal boron carbides. These compounds contain boron-carbon zigzag chains the structure of which is dictated by the ionic nature of the interaction between the chains and the rare earth metal. The authors report a relationship between formal charge of the BC units and structural orientation of the chains

  18. Structure of boron carbide after applying shear deformations under a pressure to 55 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenkov, M. R.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Ovsyannikov, D. A.; Popov, M. Yu.; Blank, V. D.

    2017-05-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to study the structural features of boron carbide treated in a high-pressure shear chamber with diamond anvils in the pressure range 25-55 GPa. Such a treatment has been shown to lead to the predominant crack formation along planes {10 11 } and {10 12} and also the formation of polytypes in the {10 11} planes and strain bands in the {10 12} planes.

  19. Thermal expansion measurements on boron carbide and europium sesquioxide by laser interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, S.D.

    1980-01-01

    A laser interferometer technique for measuring the absolute linear thermal expansion of small annular specimens is described. Results are presented for unirradiated boron carbide (B 4 C) and europia (Eu 2 O 3 ) up to 1000 0 C. Both compounds are neutron-absorbing materials of potential use in fast-reactor control rods and data on their thermophysical properties, in particular linear thermal expansion, are essential to the control rod designers. (author)

  20. Synthesis of low carbon boron carbide powder using a minimal time processing route: Thermal plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Avinna Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Boron carbide powder was synthesized by thermal plasma reduction of boric acid in presence of graphite with a very minimal processing time. Subsequently, the as-synthesized products were leached to minimize the impurities content. Based on the results of X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, the effect of leaching on phase purity and crystallinity was studied. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to identify the chemical composition which highlighted the absence of the BO bondi...

  1. Bare and boron-doped cubic silicon carbide nanowires for electrochemical detection of nitrite sensitively

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Yang; Liqin Zhang; Xinmei Hou; Junhong Chen; Kuo-Chih Chou

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of eletrochemical sensors based on wide bandgap compound semiconductors has attracted increasing interest in recent years. Here we report for the first time electrochemical nitrite sensors based on cubic silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires (NWs) with smooth surface and boron-doped cubic SiC NWs with fin-like structure. Multiple techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS...

  2. Determination of nitrogen in boron carbide by instrumental photon activation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchel, Silke; Berger, Achim

    2007-05-01

    Boron carbide is widely used as industrial material, because of its extreme hardness, and as a neutron absorber. As part of a round-robin exercise leading to certification of a new reference material (ERM-ED102) which was demanded by the industry we analysed nitrogen in boron carbide by inert gas fusion analysis (GFA) and instrumental photon activation analysis (IPAA) using the 14N(gamma,n)13N nuclear reaction. The latter approach is the only non-destructive method among all the methods applied. By using photons with energy below the threshold of the 12C(gamma,n)11C reaction, we hindered activation of matrix and other impurities. A recently installed beam with a very low lateral activating flux gradient enabled us to homogeneously activate sample masses of approximately 1 g. Taking extra precautions, i.e. self-absorption correction and deconvolution of the complex decay curves, we calculated a nitrogen concentration of 2260+/-100 microg g-1, which is in good agreement with our GFA value of 2303+/-64 microg g-1. The values are the second and third highest of a rather atypical (non-S-shape) distribution of data of 14 round-robin participants. It is of utmost importance for the certification process that our IPAA value is the only one not produced by inert gas fusion analysis and, therefore, the only one which is not affected by a possible incomplete release of nitrogen from high-melting boron carbide.

  3. Tribological behaviour of mechanically synthesized titanium-boron carbide nanostructured coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliofkhazraei, M; Rouhaghdam, A Sabour

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, titanium-boron carbide (Ti/B4C) nanocomposite coatings with different B4C nanoparticles contents were fabricated by surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) method by using B4C nanoparticles with average nanoparticle size of 40 nm. The characteristics of the nanopowder and coatings were evaluated by microhardness test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Friction and wear performances of nanocomposite coatings and pure titanium substrate were comparatively investigated, with the effect of the boron carbide content on the friction and wear behaviours to be emphasized. The results show the microhardness, friction and wear behaviours of nanocomposite coatings are closely related with boron carbide nanoparticle content. Nanocomposite coating with low B4C content shows somewhat (slight) increased microhardness and wear resistance than pure titanium substrate, while nanocomposite coating with high B4C content has much better (sharp increase) wear resistance than pure titanium substrate. The effect of B4C nanoparticles on microhardness and wear resistance was discussed.

  4. Boron carbide-coated carbon material, manufacturing method therefor and plasma facing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Hyakki, Yasuo.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention concerns a plasma facing material suitable to a thermonuclear device. The material comprises a carbon material formed by converting the surface of a carbon fiber-reinforced carbon material comprising a carbon matrix and carbon fibers to a boron carbide, the material has a surface comprising vertically or substantially vertically oriented carbon fibers, and the thickness of the surface converted to boron carbide is reduced in the carbon fiber portion than in the carbon matrix portion. Alternatively, a carbon fiber-reinforced carbon material containing carbon fibers having a higher graphitizing degree than the carbon matrix is converted to boron carbide on the surface where the carbon fibers are oriented vertically or substantially vertically. The carbon fiber-reinforced material is used as a base material, and a resin material impregnated into a shaped carbon fiber product is carbonized or thermally decomposed carbon is filled as a matrix. The material of the present invention has high heat conduction and excellent in heat resistance thereby being suitable to a plasma facing material for a thermonuclear device. Electric specific resistivity of the entire coating layer can be lowered, occurrence of arc discharge is prevented and melting can be prevented. (N.H.)

  5. Improved p–n heterojunction device performance induced by irradiation in amorphous boron carbide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, George [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0857 (United States); Su, Qing [Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0857 (United States); Wang, Yongqiang [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Dowben, Peter A. [Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0298 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0299 (United States); Nastasi, Michael, E-mail: mnastasi2@unl.edu [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0857 (United States); Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0857 (United States); Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0298 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Amorphous boron carbide films were grown on n-type silicon creating a heterojunction. • We irradiated the devices with 200 keV alpha particles to varying levels of damage. • We measured the current versus voltage at each level of damage for the device. • The electrical properties improved with moderate amounts of irradiation. • Device failure is due to the fragility of the Si, not the boron carbide film. - Abstract: Amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide films (a-B{sub 10}C{sub 2+x}:H{sub y}) on Si p–n heterojunctions were fabricated utilizing plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). These devices were found to be robust when irradiated with 200 keV He{sup +} ions. For low doses of irradiation, contrary to most other electrical devices, the electrical performance improved. On the heterojunction I(V) curve, reverse bias leakage current decreased by 3 orders of magnitude, series resistance across the device decreased by 64%, and saturation current due to generation of electron–hole pairs in the depletion region also decreased by an order of magnitude. It is believed that the improvements in the electrical properties of the devices are due to an initial passivation of defects in the a-B{sub 10}C{sub 2+x}:H{sub y} film resulting from electronic energy deposition, breaking bonds and allowing them to reform in a lower energy state, or resolving distorted icosahedron anion states.

  6. Methyldichloroborane evidenced as an intermediate in the chemical vapour deposition synthesis of boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, G; Patel, S; Chollon, G; Leyssale, J-M; Alotta, D; Bertrand, N; Vignoles, G L

    2011-09-01

    The most recent ceramic-matrix composites (CMC) considered for long-life applications as thermostructural parts in aerospace propulsion contain, among others, boron-rich phases like boron carbide. This compound is prepared by thermal Chemical Vapour Infiltration (CVI), starting from precursors like boron halides and hydrocarbons. We present a study aiming at a precise knowledge of the gas-phase composition in a hot-zone LPCVD reactor fed with BCl3, CH4 and H2, which combines experimental and theoretical approaches. This work has brought strong evidences of the presence of Methydichloroborane (MDB, BCl2CH3) in the process. It is demonstrated that this intermediate, the presence of which had never been formally proved before, appears for processing temperatures slightly lower than the deposition temperature of boron carbide. The study features quantum chemical computations, which provide several pieces of information like thermochemical and kinetic data, as well as vibration and rotation frequencies, reaction kinetics computations, and experimental gas-phase characterization of several species by FTIR, for several processing parameter sets. The main results are presented, and the place of MDB in the reaction scheme is discussed.

  7. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade boron carbide

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade boron carbide powder and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Total Carbon by Combustion and Gravimetry 7-17 Total Boron by Titrimetry 18-28 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrometry 29-38 Chloride and Fluoride Separation by Pyrohydrolysis 39-45 Chloride by Constant-Current Coulometry 46-54 Fluoride by Ion-Selective Electrode 55-63 Water by Constant-Voltage Coulometry 64-72 Impurities by Spectrochemical Analysis 73-81 Soluble Boron by Titrimetry 82-95 Soluble Carbon by a Manometric Measurement 96-105 Metallic Impurities by a Direct Reader Spectrometric Method 106-114

  8. Surface modification of the hard metal tungsten carbide-cobalt by boron ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrotchek, I.

    2007-01-01

    In the present thesis ion beam implantation of boron is studied as method for the increasement of the hardness and for the improvement of the operational characteristics of cutting tools on the tungsten carbide-cobalt base. For the boron implantation with 40 keV energy and ∼5.10 17 ions/cm 2 fluence following topics were shown: The incoerporation of boron leads to a deformation and remaining strain of the WC lattice, which possesses different stregth in the different directions of the elementary cell. The maximum of the deformation is reached at an implantation temperature of 450 C. The segregation of the new phases CoWB and Co 3 W was detected at 900 C implantation temperature. At lower temperatures now new phases were found. The tribological characteristics of WC-Co are improved. Hereby the maxiaml effect was measured for implantation temperatures from 450 C to 700 C: Improvement of the microhardness by the factor 2..2.5, improvement of the wear resistance by the factor 4. The tribological effects extend to larger depths than the penetration depth of the boron implantation profile. The detected property improvements of the hard metal H3 show the possibility of a practical application of boron ion implantation in industry. The effects essential for a wer decreasement are a hardening of the carbide phase by deformation of the lattice, a hardening of the cobalt binding material and the phase boundaries because of the formation of a solid solution of the implanted boron atoms in Co and by this a blocking of the dislocation movement and the rupture spreading under load

  9. High-temperature effect of hydrogen on sintered alpha-silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallum, G. W.; Herbell, T. P.

    1986-01-01

    Sintered alpha-silicon carbide was exposed to pure, dry hydrogen at high temperatures for times up to 500 hr. Weight loss and corrosion were seen after 50 hr at temperatures as low as 1000 C. Corrosion of SiC by hydrogen produced grain boundary deterioration at 1100 C and a mixture of grain and grain boundary deterioration at 1300 C. Statistically significant strength reductions were seen in samples exposed to hydrogen for times greater than 50 hr and temperatures above 1100 C. Critical fracture origins were identified by fractography as either general grain boundary corrision at 1100 C or as corrosion pits at 1300 C. A maximum strength decrease of approximately 33 percent was seen at 1100 and 1300 C after 500 hr exposure to hydrogen. A computer assisted thermodynamic program was also used to predict possible reaction species of SiC and hydrogen.

  10. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50–200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10–50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs

  11. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of hybrid aluminum matrix composite containing boron carbide and Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mahmood; Zulfaqar, Muhammad; Ali, Fahad; Subhani, Tayyab

    2017-07-01

    Hybrid aluminum matrix composites containing particles of boron carbide and quasicrystals were manufactured to explore the combined effect of reinforcements on microstructural evolution and mechanical performance of the composites. The particles were incorporated at a loading of 6 wt% each making a total of 12 wt% reinforcement in pure aluminum. For comparison, two composites containing individually reinforced 12 wt% particles were also prepared along with a reference specimen of pure aluminum. Ball milling technique was employed to mix the composite constituents. The green bodies of composite powders were prepared by uniaxial pressing at room temperature followed by consolidation by pressureless sintering under inert atmosphere. The microstructural characterization was performed using scanning electron microscopy while phase identification was carried out by X-ray diffraction. The mechanical characterization was performed by Vickers hardness and compression tests. Hybrid composites showed increased compressive properties while the composites containing solely quasicrystals demonstrated improved hardness. The increase in mechanical performance was related to the microstructural evolution due to the presence and uniform dispersion of binary particles.

  12. A Review of Metal Injection Molding- Process, Optimization, Defects and Microwave Sintering on WC-Co Cemented Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbudin, S. N. A.; Othman, M. H.; Amin, Sri Yulis M.; Ibrahim, M. H. I.

    2017-08-01

    This article is about a review of optimization of metal injection molding and microwave sintering process on tungsten cemented carbide produce by metal injection molding process. In this study, the process parameters for the metal injection molding were optimized using Taguchi method. Taguchi methods have been used widely in engineering analysis to optimize the performance characteristics through the setting of design parameters. Microwave sintering is a process generally being used in powder metallurgy over the conventional method. It has typical characteristics such as accelerated heating rate, shortened processing cycle, high energy efficiency, fine and homogeneous microstructure, and enhanced mechanical performance, which is beneficial to prepare nanostructured cemented carbides in metal injection molding. Besides that, with an advanced and promising technology, metal injection molding has proven that can produce cemented carbides. Cemented tungsten carbide hard metal has been used widely in various applications due to its desirable combination of mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. Moreover, areas of study include common defects in metal injection molding and application of microwave sintering itself has been discussed in this paper.

  13. Thermal Treatment Dependence of the Electronic Structure of Thin Film Amorphous Boron Carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, M. S.; Sandstrom, J.; Boyko, T.; Moewes, A.; Pokhodnya, K. I.; Li, W.; Oyler, N. A.; Caruso, A. N.

    2011-03-01

    Boron-rich semiconducting solids are important materials for next generation direct conversion solid state neutron detectors. However, rigorous understanding of the fundamental properties of these solids is drastically lacking and required before optimization of the neutron detectors may occur. To partially resolve this inadequacy, we have studied and compared the electronic and local physical structure relationship of thins films of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (a-B5 C:Hx) deposited by PECVD and quasicrystalline technical boron carbide (B4 C:Cy) deposited by RF MS. In an attempt to understand the near Fermi edge structure in slightly modified local environments, x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies (XAS/XES), ultraviolet photoemission, x-ray photoemission, and solid state NMR were collected at 300 K on films thermally treated from 300 to 1100 K. The electronic structure studies reveal a unique alteration of π * and σ * states and overall chemical reduction for the 600 K and above annealed films. The solid state NMR, in comparison with reference samples, reveals a slow ordering progression; this allows us to describe the relationship between intra- and inter-icosahedral carbon on the overall electronic structure.

  14. Synthesis, characterization and thermoelectric properties of metal borides, boron carbides and carbaborides; Synthese, Charakterisierung und thermoelektrische Eigenschaften ausgewaehlter Metallboride, Borcarbide und Carbaboride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guersoy, Murat

    2015-07-06

    This work reports on the solid state synthesis and structural and thermoelectrical characterization of hexaborides (CaB{sub 6}, SrB{sub 6}, BaB{sub 6}, EuB{sub 6}), diboride dicarbides (CeB{sub 2}C{sub 2}, LaB{sub 2}C{sub 2}), a carbaboride (NaB{sub 5}C) and composites of boron carbide. The characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction methods and Rietveld refinements based on structure models from literature. Most of the compounds were densified by spark plasma sintering at 100 MPa. As high-temperature thermoelectric properties the Seebeck coefficients, electrical conductivities, thermal diffusivities and heat capacities were measured between room temperature and 1073 K. ZT values as high as 0.5 at 1273 K were obtained for n-type conducting EuB{sub 6}. High-temperature X-ray diffraction also confirmed its thermal stability. The solid solutions Ca{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}B{sub 6}, Ca{sub x}Ba{sub 1-x}B{sub 6} and Sr{sub x}Ba{sub 1-x}B{sub 6} (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1) are also n-type but did not show better ZT values for the ternary compounds compared to the binaries, but for CaB{sub 6} the values of the figure of merit (ca. 0.3 at 1073 K) were significantly increased (ca. 50 %) compared to earlier investigations which is attributed to the densification process. Sodium carbaboride, NaB{sub 5}C, was found to be the first p-type thermoelectric material that crystallizes with the hexaboride-structure type. Seebeck coefficients of ca. 80 μV . K{sup -1} were obtained. Cerium diboride dicarbide, CeB{sub 2}C{sub 2}, and lanthanum diboride dicarbide, LaB{sub 2}C{sub 2}, are metallic. Both compounds were used as model compounds to develop compacting strategies for such layered borides. Densities obtained at 50 MPa were determined to be higher than 90 %. A new synthesis route using single source precursors that contain boron and carbon was developed to open the access to new metal-doped boron carbides. It was possible to obtain boron carbide, but metal-doping could not be

  15. New approach to the synthesis of nanocrystalline boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herth, Simone; Joost, William J; Doremus, Robert H; Siegel, Richard W

    2006-04-01

    The use of nanoparticles in ceramic matrix composites provides lower sintering temperatures and higher densities at a given temperature than common coarse-grained materials. Nanocrystalline B4C was synthesized by an inexpensive carbothermal reduction method using carbon black and B2O3 as precursor. Full conversion was achieved at 1623 K for annealing times of 480 minutes or with a large excess of B2O3 and oxidation of the remaining carbon after 30 minutes of annealing. The average particle size of the synthesized B4C powder was 260 nm, which was reduced to 70 nm after separation of the small particle fraction from the larger particles by sedimentation. A mixture of the as-prepared powder and commercial coarse-grained B4C yielded an increase of the density of low temperature hot pressed samples by 25% in comparison to pure commercial B4C. Possible chemical reactions and mechanisms in the synthesis of B4C were examined with the Gibbs free energies of reactions. The most likely reaction was the reduction of B2O3 vapor at the surfaces of the carbon particles after its vapor transport from the liquid B2O3. An observed reduction of B4C yield above 1623 K was probably caused by loss of B2O3 vapor from the reaction mixture.

  16. Observation of 'hidden' planar defects in boron carbide nanowires and identification of their orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhe; Cao, Baobao; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Youfei; Li, Deyu; Xu, Terry T

    2014-01-15

    The physical properties of nanostructures strongly depend on their structures, and planar defects in particular could significantly affect the behavior of the nanowires. In this work, planar defects (twins or stacking faults) in boron carbide nanowires are extensively studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results show that these defects can easily be invisible, i.e., no presence of characteristic defect features like modulated contrast in high-resolution TEM images and streaks in diffraction patterns. The simplified reason of this invisibility is that the viewing direction during TEM examination is not parallel to the (001)-type planar defects. Due to the unique rhombohedral structure of boron carbide, planar defects are only distinctive when the viewing direction is along the axial or short diagonal directions ([100], [010], or 1¯10) within the (001) plane (in-zone condition). However, in most cases, these three characteristic directions are not parallel to the viewing direction when boron carbide nanowires are randomly dispersed on TEM grids. To identify fault orientations (transverse faults or axial faults) of those nanowires whose planar defects are not revealed by TEM, a new approach is developed based on the geometrical analysis between the projected preferred growth direction of a nanowire and specific diffraction spots from diffraction patterns recorded along the axial or short diagonal directions out of the (001) plane (off-zone condition). The approach greatly alleviates tedious TEM examination of the nanowire and helps to establish the reliable structure-property relations. Our study calls attention to researchers to be extremely careful when studying nanowires with potential planar defects by TEM. Understanding the true nature of planar defects is essential in tuning the properties of these nanostructures through manipulating their structures.

  17. Observation of ‘hidden’ planar defects in boron carbide nanowires and identification of their orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The physical properties of nanostructures strongly depend on their structures, and planar defects in particular could significantly affect the behavior of the nanowires. In this work, planar defects (twins or stacking faults) in boron carbide nanowires are extensively studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results show that these defects can easily be invisible, i.e., no presence of characteristic defect features like modulated contrast in high-resolution TEM images and streaks in diffraction patterns. The simplified reason of this invisibility is that the viewing direction during TEM examination is not parallel to the (001)-type planar defects. Due to the unique rhombohedral structure of boron carbide, planar defects are only distinctive when the viewing direction is along the axial or short diagonal directions ([100], [010], or 1¯10) within the (001) plane (in-zone condition). However, in most cases, these three characteristic directions are not parallel to the viewing direction when boron carbide nanowires are randomly dispersed on TEM grids. To identify fault orientations (transverse faults or axial faults) of those nanowires whose planar defects are not revealed by TEM, a new approach is developed based on the geometrical analysis between the projected preferred growth direction of a nanowire and specific diffraction spots from diffraction patterns recorded along the axial or short diagonal directions out of the (001) plane (off-zone condition). The approach greatly alleviates tedious TEM examination of the nanowire and helps to establish the reliable structure–property relations. Our study calls attention to researchers to be extremely careful when studying nanowires with potential planar defects by TEM. Understanding the true nature of planar defects is essential in tuning the properties of these nanostructures through manipulating their structures. PMID:24423258

  18. Boron carbide coatings for enhanced performance of radio-frequency antennas in magnetic fusion energy devices. Final report [SBIR[STTR] Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepper, C Christopher

    2002-02-25

    This DOE STTR program has produced a new technology for efficient deposition of dense boron carbide films. Such films can be used as protective coatings; they are resistant to most acids and compatible with high temperatures (over 2000{deg}C). This new technology is based on a vacuum arc discharge using boron carbide cathode as the solid feed material. This avoids the use of boron-based feedstock gases, most of which are toxic or explosive. It is superior to plasma-arc spraying, which makes low-density (porous) films and potentially more economical than magnetron sputtering, due to the low sputtering rate for boron carbide.

  19. Synthesis of low carbon boron carbide powder using a minimal time processing route: Thermal plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinna Mishra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Boron carbide powder was synthesized by thermal plasma reduction of boric acid in presence of graphite with a very minimal processing time. Subsequently, the as-synthesized products were leached to minimize the impurities content. Based on the results of X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, the effect of leaching on phase purity and crystallinity was studied. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to identify the chemical composition which highlighted the absence of the BO bonding in the deconvoluted B 1s core-level spectrum. Finally, the temperature dependent thermal conductivity behavior of the leached materials was analyzed and presented.

  20. Analysis of a boron-carbide-drum-controlled critical reactor experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, W. T.

    1972-01-01

    In order to validate methods and cross sections used in the neutronic design of compact fast-spectrum reactors for generating electric power in space, an analysis of a boron-carbide-drum-controlled critical reactor was made. For this reactor the transport analysis gave generally satisfactory results. The calculated multiplication factor for the most detailed calculation was only 0.7-percent Delta k too high. Calculated reactivity worth of the control drums was $11.61 compared to measurements of $11.58 by the inverse kinetics methods and $11.98 by the inverse counting method. Calculated radial and axial power distributions were in good agreement with experiment.

  1. Atomistic explanation of shear-induced amorphous band formation in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Cheng, Tao

    2014-08-29

    Boron carbide (B4C) is very hard, but its applications are hindered by stress-induced amorphous band formation. To explain this behavior, we used density function theory (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor) to examine the response to shear along 11 plausible slip systems. We found that the (0111)/ slip system has the lowest shear strength (consistent with previous experimental studies) and that this slip leads to a unique plastic deformation before failure in which a boron-carbon bond between neighboring icosahedral clusters breaks to form a carbon lone pair (Lewis base) on the C within the icosahedron. Further shear then leads this Lewis base C to form a new bond with the Lewis acidic B in the middle of a CBC chain. This then initiates destruction of this icosahedron. The result is the amorphous structure observed experimentally. We suggest how this insight could be used to strengthen B4C.

  2. Modeling and simulation of boron-doped nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin film by a field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Liming; Chen, Youping; Lee, James D

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the application of a multiscale field theory in modeling and simulation of boron-doped nanocrystalline silicon carbide (B-SiC). The multiscale field theory was briefly introduced. Based on the field theory, numerical simulations show that intergranular glassy amorphous films (IGFs) and nano-sized pores exist in triple junctions of the grains for nanocrystalline B-SiC. Residual tensile stress in the SiC grains and compressive stress on the grain boundaries (GBs) were observed. Under tensile loading, it has been found that mechanical response of 5 wt% boron-SiC exhibits five characteristic regimes. Deformation mechanism at atomic scale has been revealed. Tensile strength and Young's modulus of nanocrystalline SiC were accurately reproduced.

  3. Transport properties of boron-doped single-walled silicon carbide nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.T.; Ding, R.X.; Song, J.X.

    2011-01-01

    The doped boron (B) atom in silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNT) can substitute carbon or silicon atom, forming two different structures. The transport properties of both B-doped SiCNT structures are investigated by the method combined non-equilibrium Green's function with density functional theory (DFT). As the bias ranging from 0.8 to 1.0 V, the negative differential resistance (NDR) effect occurs, which is derived from the great difficulty for electrons tunneling from one electrode to another with the increasing of localization of molecular orbital. The high similar transport properties of both B-doped SiCNT indicate that boron is a suitable impurity for fabricating nano-scale SiCNT electronic devices.

  4. Microscopic origin of the composition-dependent change of the thermal conductivity in boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.; Howard, I.A.; Green, T.A.; Beckel, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    Large grain polycrystalline boron carbides have a high-temperature thermal conductivity which changes from being characteristic of a crystal to being glass-like as the carbon content is reduced from its maximal value. We relate this phenomenon, to compositional changes within the three-atom intericosahedral chains. With a reduction of the carbon concentration from its maximal concentration (20%), a carbon atom within some of the three-atoms (CBC) intericosahedral chains is replaced by a boron atom, thereby producing CBB chains. We estimate that the CBB chains are significantly softer than the CBC chains. Thus, with this reduction of carbon content the intericosahedral chains are inhomogeneously softened. This suppresses the coherent transport of heat through the chains. The remaining thermal transport occurs incoherently through vibrationally inequivalent structural units, i.e. ''phonon hopping.''

  5. Silicon doped boron carbide nanorod growth via a solid-liquid-solid process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei-Qiang

    2006-03-01

    Here we report the synthesis of silicon doped boron carbide (Si-doped B4C) nanorods via a solid reaction using activated carbon, boron, and silicon powder as reactants. These nanorods have been studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry. The diameter of Si-doped B4C nanorods ranges from 15to70nm. The length of Si-doped B4C nanorods is up to 30μm. NixCoyBz nanoparticles are used as catalysts for the growth of Si-doped B4C nanorods. A solid-liquid-solid growth mechanism is proposed.

  6. Enhanced Densification of PM Steels by Liquid Phase Sintering with Boron-Containing Master Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattur Sundaram, Maheswaran; Surreddi, Kumar Babu; Hryha, Eduard; Veiga, Angela; Berg, Sigurd; Castro, Fransisco; Nyborg, Lars

    2018-01-01

    Reaching high density in PM steels is important for high-performance applications. In this study, liquid phase sintering of PM steels by adding gas-atomized Ni-Mn-B master alloy was investigated for enhancing the density levels of Fe- and Mo- prealloyed steel powder compacts. The results indicated that liquid formation occurs in two stages, beginning with the master alloy melting (LP-1) below and eutectic phase formation (LP-2) above 1373 K (1100 °C). Mo and C addition revealed a significant influence on the LP-2 temperatures and hence on the final densification behavior and mechanical properties. Microstructural embrittlement occurs with the formation of continuous boride networks along the grain boundaries, and its severity increases with carbon addition, especially for 2.5 wt pct of master alloy content. Sintering behavior, along with liquid generation, microstructural characteristics, and mechanical testing revealed that the reduced master alloy content from 2.5 to 1.5 wt pct (reaching overall boron content from 0.2 to 0.12 wt pct) was necessary for obtaining good ductility with better mechanical properties. Sintering with Ni-Mn-B master alloy enables the sintering activation by liquid phase formation in two stages to attain high density in PM steels suitable for high-performance applications.

  7. Phase Contrast Imaging of Damage Initiation During Ballistic Impact of Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Brian; Tonge, Andrew; Ramos, Kyle; Rigg, Paulo; Iverson, Adam; Schuman, Adam; Lorenzo, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    For several decades, flash X-ray imaging has been used to perform time-resolved investigations of the response of ceramics under ballistic impact. Traditional absorption based contrast offers little insight into the early initiation of inelastic deformation mechanisms and instead typically only shows the gross deformation and fracture behavior. In the present work, we employed phase contrast imaging (PCI) at the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, to investigate crack initiation and propagation following the impact of copper penetrators into boron carbide targets. These experiments employed a single-stage propellant gun to launch small-scale (0.6 mm diameter by 3 mm long) pure copper impactors at velocities ranging from 0.9 to 1.9 km/s into commercially available boron carbide targets that were 8 mm on a side. At the lowest striking velocities the penetrator undergoes dwell or interface defeat and the target response is consistent with the cone crack formation at the impact site. At higher striking velocities there is a distinct transition to massive fragmentation leading to the onset of penetration.

  8. Computational Design of Epoxy/ Boron Carbide Nanocomposites for Radiation Shielding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejagam, Karteek; Galehdari, Nasim; Espinosa, Ingrid; Deshmukh, Sanket A.; Kelkar, Ajit D.

    An individual working in industries that include nuclear power plants, healthcare industry, and aerospace are knowingly or unknowingly exposed to radiations of different energies. Exposure to high-energy radiations such as α/ β particle emissions or gamma ray electromagnetic radiations enhances the health risks that can lead to carcinogenesis, cardiac problems, cataracts, and other acute radiation syndromes. The best possible solution to protect one from the exposure to radiations is shielding. In the present study, we have developed a new algorithm to generate a range of different structures of Diglycidyl Ether of Bisphenol F (EPON 862) and curing agent Diethylene Toluene Diamine (DETDA) resins with varying degrees of crosslinking. 3, 5, and 10 weight percent boron carbide was employed as filling materials to study its influence on the thermal and mechanical properties of composite. We further conduct the reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations to investigate the effect of radiation exposure on the structural, physical, and mechanical properties of these Epoxy/Boron Carbide nanocomposites. Where possible the simulation results were compared with the experimental data.

  9. Dynamic Failure and Fragmentation of a Hot-Pressed Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Tomoko; Vargas-Gonzalez, Lionel; LaSalvia, Jerry; Hogan, James David

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates the failure and fragmentation of a hot-pressed boron carbide during high rate impact experiments. Four impact experiments are performed using a composite-backed target configuration at similar velocities, where two of the impact experiments resulted in complete target penetration and two resulted in partial penetration. This paper seeks to evaluate and understand the dynamic behavior of the ceramic that led to either the complete or partial penetration cases, focusing on: (1) surface and internal failure features of fragments using optical, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy, and (2) fragment size analysis using state-of-the-art particle-sizing technology that informs about the consequences of failure. Detailed characterization of the mechanical properties and the microstructure is also performed. Results indicate that transgranular fracture was the primary mode of failure in this boron carbide material, and no stress-induced amorphization features were observed. Analysis of the fragment sizes for the partial and completely penetrated experiments revealed a possible correlation between larger fragment sizes and impact performance. The results will add insight into designing improved advanced ceramics for impact protection applications.

  10. Evolution of thermo-physical properties and annealing of fast neutron irradiated boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosset, Dominique; Kryger, Bernard; Bonal, Jean-Pierre; Verdeau, Caroline; Froment, Karine

    2018-03-01

    Boron carbide is widely used as a neutron absorber in most nuclear reactors, in particular in fast neutron ones. The irradiation leads to a large helium production (up to 1022/cm3) together with a strong decrease of the thermal conductivity. In this paper, we have performed thermal diffusivity measurements and X-ray diffraction analyses on boron carbide samples coming from control rods of the French Phenix LMFBR reactor. The burnups range from 1021 to 8.1021/cm3. We first confirm the strong decrease of the thermal conductivity at the low burnup, together with high microstructural modifications: swelling, large micro-strains, high defects density, and disordered-like material conductivity. We observe the microstructural parameters are highly anisotropic, with high micro-strains and flattened coherent diffracting domains along the (00l) direction of the hexagonal structure. Performing heat treatments up to high temperature (2200 °C) allows us to observe the material thermal conductivity and microstructure restoration. It then appears the thermal conductivity healing is correlated to the micro-strain relaxation. We then assume the defects responsible for most of the damage are the helium bubbles and the associated stress fields.

  11. Ignition relevant ablator response of boron carbide and high-density carbon driven by multiple shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisbrey, Shon T.; Baker, Kevin; Celliers, Peter; Dittrich, Tom; Moore, Alastair; Wu, Kuang Jen; Kervin, Peggy; Hurricane, Omar

    2013-10-01

    The attainment of self-propagating fusion burn in an inertial confinement target at the National Ignition Facility will require the use of an ablator with high rocket-efficiency and ablation pressure. The current ablation material, a glow-discharge polymer (GDP), does not couple as efficiently as simulations indicated to the multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environment created by laser power profile. In an effort to evaluate the performance of other possible ablators that could be suitable for achieving self-propagating fusion burn we have inferred the ablation performance of two possible ablators, boron carbide and high-density carbon, by measuring the shock speed of induced shocks while subjecting the ablators to a multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environment similar to a generic three-shock ignition drive. We present the platform used, velocity measurements used to infer the ablation response, and matching simulations to show the relative performance of boron carbide and high-density carbon with a general comparison to current performance of the currently used glow-discharge polymer ablator. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-640519.

  12. The role of free carbon in the transport and magnetic properties of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, A.K.; Beuneu, F.; Zuppiroli, L.; Beauvy, M.

    1984-01-01

    Boron carbide is a ceramic which has a wide field of application because of its mechanical and nuclear properties. This material is difficult to characterise due to the presence of different levels of disorder and inhomogeneities which are found in the usual available samples. The transport and magnetic properties of several samples of boron carbide have been measured from liquid helium to room temperature as a function of temperature and composition. We have attempted to attribute the different features of these properties to the different levels of disorder. The role of free carbon, in form of thin layers of graphite within the disordered semi-conducting matrix, was investigated in particular details, because it was either ignored or neglected by others. Free carbon is found to dominate the D.C. transport when its concentration is larger than 5%; while the principal features of the electron spin resonance (E.S.R.) line show a dominance of free carbon when the concentration is larger than 3.5%. Below these concentrations conductivities as well as spin relaxation rates do not depend very much on free carbon; neither these have been found to be correlated in a simple way to the stoichiometry. (author)

  13. Density functional theory (DFT) studies of hydrogen rich solids and boron carbide under extreme conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamp, Andrew James

    Since the first prediction that compressed hydrogen would metallize in 1935 and the further prediction that the metallic allotrope would be a superconductor at high temperatures, metallic hydrogen has been termed the "holy grail" of high-pressure science. A tremendous amount of theoretical and experimental research has been carried out, with the ultimate goal of metallizing hydrogen via the application of external pressure. It has been previously proposed that doping hydrogen with another element can lower the pressure at which metallization occurs. A number of experimental and theoretical studies have investigated doping hydrogen by either a group XIII or XIV element. Experiments in diamond anvil cells have illustrated that it is indeed possible to synthesize hydrogen-rich phases under conditions of extreme pressures, and SiH4 (H2)2, GeH4(H2) n, and Xe(H2)n have been shown to behave as true compounds. The focus herein is on the theoretical exploration of hydrogen-rich phases with novel stoichiometries, which contain a dopant element up to pressures of 350 GPa. In particular, the alkali-metal and alkaline Earth metal polyhydrides (MHn where n > 1) have been considered. Within this thesis the XtalOpt evolutionary algorithm was employed in order to complete this work, and predict the most stable structures of cesium and beryllium polyhydrides under pressure. In addition, we explore the possibility of mixing excess hydrogen with an electronegative element, iodine and phosphorus. The phases found are examined via detailed first principles calculations. In addition, because of its outstanding hardness, thermodynamic stability, low density, electronic properties, thermal stability, and high melting point boron carbide has many uses: i.e. as a refractory material, in abrasive powders and ballistics, as a neutron radiation absorbent, and in electronic applications. However, little is known about the behavior of boron carbide when under the external stress of pressure. The

  14. Irradiation creep of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide at low neutron fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, T.; Shimoda, K.; Kondo, S.; Hinoki, T.; Ozawa, K.; Katoh, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The irradiation creep behavior of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide was investigated using the bend stress relaxation method under neutron irradiation up to 1.9 dpa. The creep deformation was observed at all temperatures ranging from 380 to 1180°C mainly from the irradiation creep but with the increasing contributions from the thermal creep at higher temperatures. The apparent stress exponent of the irradiation creep slightly exceeded unity, and instantaneous creep coefficient at 380 to 790°C was estimated to be ∼1 × 10 -5 [MPa -1 dpa -1 ] at ∼0.1 dpa and 1 × 10 -7 to 1 × 10 -6 [MPa -1 dpa -1 ] at ∼1 dpa. The irradiation creep strain appeared greater than that for the high purity SiC. Microstructural observation and data analysis indicated that the grain-boundary sliding associated with the secondary phases contributes to the irradiation creep at 380–790°C to 0.01–0.11 dpa. (author)

  15. Formation of boron nitride coatings on silicon carbide fibers using trimethylborate vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Mengjiao; Zhou, Tong; He, Jing; Chen, Lifu, E-mail: lfchen@xmu.edu.cn

    2016-09-30

    High quality boron nitride (BN) coatings have been grown on silicon carbide (SiC) fibers by carbothermal nitridation and at atmospheric pressure. SiC fibers were first treated in chlorine gas to form CDC (carbide-derived carbon) film on the fiber surface. The CDC-coated SiC fibers were then reacted with trimethylborate vapor and ammonia vapor at high temperature, forming BN coatings by carbothermal reduction. The FT-IR, XPS, XRD, SEM, TEM and AES were used to investigate the formation of the obtained coatings. It has been found that the obtained coatings are composed of phase mixture of h-BN and amorphous carbon, very uniform in thickness, have smooth surface and adhere well with the SiC fiber substrates. The BN-coated SiC fibers retain ∼80% strength of the as-received SiC fibers and show an obvious interfacial debonding and fiber pullout in the SiC{sub f}/SiOC composites. This method may be useful for the large scale production of high quality BN coating on silicon carbide fiber.

  16. Improved green-light-emitting pyrotechnic formulations based on tris(2,2,2-trinitroethyl)borate and boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapötke, Thomas M; Krumm, Burkhard; Rusan, Magdalena; Sabatini, Jesse J

    2014-08-28

    Green-light-emitting pyrotechnic compositions based on tris(2,2,2-trinitroethyl)borate (TNEB) and boron carbide have been investigated. The best performing formulations were found to be insensitive to various ignition stimuli, and exhibited very high spectral purities and luminosities compared to previously reported green-light-emitting formulations.

  17. High-pressure phase transition makes B4.3C boron carbide a wide-gap semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hushur, Anwar; Manghnani, Murli H; Werheit, Helmut; Dera, Przemyslaw; Williams, Quentin

    2016-02-03

    Single-crystal B4.3C boron carbide is investigated through the pressure-dependence and inter-relation of atomic distances, optical properties and Raman-active phonons up to ~70 GPa. The anomalous pressure evolution of the gap width to higher energies is striking. This is obtained from observations of transparency, which most rapidly increases around 55 GPa. Full visible optical transparency is approached at pressures of  >60 GPa indicating that the band gap reaches ~3.5 eV; at high pressure, boron carbide is a wide-gap semiconductor. The reason is that the high concentration of structural defects controlling the electronic properties of boron carbide at ambient conditions initially decreases and finally vanishes at high pressures. The structural parameters and Raman-active phonons indicate a pressure-dependent phase transition in single-crystal (nat)B4.3C boron carbide near 40 GPa, likely related to structural changes in the C-B-C chains, while the basic icosahedral structure appears to be less affected.

  18. Lightweight graphene nanoplatelet/boron carbide composite with high EMI shielding effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang Tan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight graphene nanoplatelet (GNP/boron carbide (B4C composites were prepared and the effect of GNPs loading on the electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding effectiveness (SE has been evaluated in the X-band frequency range. Results have shown that the EMI SE of GNP/B4C composite increases with increasing the GNPs loading. An EMI SE as high as 37 ∼ 39 dB has been achieved in composite with 5 vol% GNPs. The high EMI SE is mainly attributed to the high electrical conductivity, high dielectric loss as well as multiple reflections by aligned GNPs inside the composite. The GNP/B4C composite is demonstrated to be promising candidate of high-temperature microwave EMI shielding material.

  19. Electronic metal-support interaction enhanced oxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Colleen; Smith, Graham T.; Inwood, David W.; Leach, Andrew S.; Whalley, Penny S.; Callisti, Mauro; Polcar, Tomas; Russell, Andrea E.; Levecque, Pieter; Kramer, Denis

    2017-06-01

    Catalysing the reduction of oxygen in acidic media is a standing challenge. Although activity of platinum, the most active metal, can be substantially improved by alloying, alloy stability remains a concern. Here we report that platinum nanoparticles supported on graphite-rich boron carbide show a 50-100% increase in activity in acidic media and improved cycle stability compared to commercial carbon supported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure analysis confirm similar platinum nanoparticle shapes, sizes, lattice parameters, and cluster packing on both supports, while x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy demonstrate a change in electronic structure. This shows that purely electronic metal-support interactions can significantly improve oxygen reduction activity without inducing shape, alloying or strain effects and without compromising stability. Optimizing the electronic interaction between the catalyst and support is, therefore, a promising approach for advanced electrocatalysts where optimizing the catalytic nanoparticles themselves is constrained by other concerns.

  20. Enhanced mechanical properties of nanocrystalline boron carbide by nanoporosity and interface phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhav Reddy, K; Guo, J J; Shinoda, Y; Fujita, T; Hirata, A; Singh, J P; McCauley, J W; Chen, M W

    2012-01-01

    Ceramics typically have very high hardness, but low toughness and plasticity. Besides intrinsic brittleness associated with rigid covalent or ionic bonds, porosity and interface phases are the foremost characteristics that lead to their failure at low stress levels in a brittle manner. Here we show that, in contrast to the conventional wisdom that these features are adverse factors in mechanical properties of ceramics, the compression strength, plasticity and toughness of nanocrystalline boron carbide can be noticeably improved by introducing nanoporosity and weak amorphous carbon at grain boundaries. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that the unusual nanosize effect arises from the deformation-induced elimination of nanoporosity mediated by grain boundary sliding with the assistance of the soft grain boundary phases. This study has important implications in developing high-performance ceramics with ultrahigh strength and enhanced plasticity and toughness.

  1. Structural stability of boron carbide under pressure proven by spectroscopic studies up to 73 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuvashova, Irina [Material Physics and Technology at Extreme Conditions, Laboratory of Crystallography, University of Bayreuth (Germany); Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth (Germany); Gasharova, Biliana; Mathis, Yves-Laurent [IBPT, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Dubrovinsky, Leonid [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth (Germany); Dubrovinskaia, Natalia [Material Physics and Technology at Extreme Conditions, Laboratory of Crystallography, University of Bayreuth (Germany)

    2017-11-17

    Being a material of choice for lightweight armor applications, boron carbide has been intensively studied. Its behavior under pressure was investigated using both theoretical and experimental methods, such as powder X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy. As there is a discrepancy in experimental observations, in the presented work we studied vibrational properties of commercially available, ''nearly stoichiometric'' B{sub 4}C using IR and Raman spectroscopy up to 73 GPa. No phase transitions were found in the entire pressure range. Our results are at odds with the recent report of a phase transition in B{sub 4.3}C at about 40 GPa. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Pressure dependence of the refractive index of diamond, cubic silicon carbide and cubic boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzaretti, N. M.; da Jornada, J. A. H.

    1996-09-01

    The pressure dependence of the refractive index of diamond, cubic boron nitride and cubic silicon carbide, was measured up to 9 GPa by an interferometric method using the diamond anvil cell. A least-square fit yields the following values for ( {1}/{n}) ( {dn }/{dP }): - 3.6 × 10 -4GPa -1 for diamond, -3.2 × 10 -4GPa -1 for c-BN and, for 3CSiC, -8.3 × 10 -4GPa -1. These results were used to investigate, for the first time under pressure, general empirical relationships between refractive index and energy gap found in the literature. The volume dependence of the electronic polarizability, α, of these compounds was determined through the Lorentz-Lorenz approach. The obtained linear behavior of α for the three cases was correlated to previous results for the pressure dependence of the transverse effective charge, e T∗.

  3. New insights into the enigma of boron carbide inverse molecular behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dera, Przemyslaw; Manghnani, Murli H.; Hushur, Anwar; Hu, Yi; Tkachev, Sergey

    2014-07-01

    Equation of state and compression mechanism of nearly stoichiometric boron carbide B4C were investigated using diamond anvil cell single crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique up to a maximum quasi-hydrostatic pressure of 74.0(1) GPa in neon pressure transmitting medium at ambient temperature. No signatures of structural phase transitions were observed on compression. Crystal structure refinements indicate that the icosahedral units are less compressible (13% volume reduction at 60 GPa) than the unit cell volume (18% volume reduction at 60 GPa), contrary to expectations based on the inverse molecular behavior hypothesis, but consistent with spectroscopic evidence and first principles calculations. The high-pressure crystallographic refinements reveal that the nature of the chemical bonds (two, versus three centered character) has marginal effect on the bond compressibility and the compression of the crystal is mainly governed by the force transfer between the rigid icosahedral structural units.

  4. Electronic metal-support interaction enhanced oxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Colleen; Smith, Graham T; Inwood, David W; Leach, Andrew S; Whalley, Penny S; Callisti, Mauro; Polcar, Tomas; Russell, Andrea E; Levecque, Pieter; Kramer, Denis

    2017-06-22

    Catalysing the reduction of oxygen in acidic media is a standing challenge. Although activity of platinum, the most active metal, can be substantially improved by alloying, alloy stability remains a concern. Here we report that platinum nanoparticles supported on graphite-rich boron carbide show a 50-100% increase in activity in acidic media and improved cycle stability compared to commercial carbon supported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure analysis confirm similar platinum nanoparticle shapes, sizes, lattice parameters, and cluster packing on both supports, while x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy demonstrate a change in electronic structure. This shows that purely electronic metal-support interactions can significantly improve oxygen reduction activity without inducing shape, alloying or strain effects and without compromising stability. Optimizing the electronic interaction between the catalyst and support is, therefore, a promising approach for advanced electrocatalysts where optimizing the catalytic nanoparticles themselves is constrained by other concerns.

  5. Hot isostatic pressing of silicon nitride with boron nitride, boron carbide, and carbon additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieskowski, Diane M.; Sanders, William A.

    1989-01-01

    Si3N4 test bars containing additions of BN, B4C, and C, were hot isostatically pressed in Ta cladding at 1900 and 2050 C to 98.9 percent to 99.5 percent theoretical density. Room-temperature strength data on specimens containing 2 wt pct BN and 0.5 wt pct C were comparable to data obtained for Si3N4 sintered with Y2O3, Y2O3 and Al2O3, or ZrO2. The 1370 C strengths were less than those obtained for additions of Y2O3 or ZrO2 but greater than those obtained from a combination of Y2O3 and Al2O3. SEM fractography indicated that, as with other types of Si3N4, room-temperature strength was controlled by processing flaws. The decrease in strength at 1370 C was typical of Si3N4 having an amorphous grain-boundary phase. The primary advantage of nonoxide additions appears to be in facilitating specimen removal from the Ta cladding.

  6. Low temperature pressureless immediate sintering of novel nanostructured WC/Co/NiCrSiB-alloy cemented carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Amel-Farzad, H.; Taheri-Nassaj, E.; Meertens, D.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Tavabi, A. H.

    2017-01-01

    A novel nanostructured cemented carbide formed from WC-5%Co-20%BNi2 brazing alloy is described. During sintering, the BNi2 alloy is infiltrated into a green compact of WC-5%Co at 1050-1100 {\\deg}C for 2-60 minutes. Perfect wetting behavior and a zero contact angle are achieved after only 40 s. Relative densities of 98.5% and 100% and microhardness values of above 1500HV1 and 1800HV1 are obtained after 2 and 30 minutes, respectively. A change in mean particle size of about 600 nm in the precur...

  7. Prediction of superstrong τ-boron carbide phase from quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi

    2017-03-01

    Searching for ultrahard materials is of great interest in scientific research and for industrial applications. Boron carbide (B4C ) is one of the hardest known materials, but its Vickers hardness (30 GPa) is much less than diamond (115 GPa) and cubic boron nitride (48 GPa). A new B4C phase with twinlike character, denoted as τ -B4C , is characterized using density functional theory. This τ -B4C is based on the Cmcm orthorhombic space group and is slightly less stable than the known rhombohedral B4C (R -B4C ) by 3.87 meV /B4C . Resulting shear deformation along the least stress slip system shows that τ -B4C has an ideal shear strength of 45.1 GPa, which is 15.6% higher than R -B4C , suggesting that τ -B4C is much stronger than R -B4C . However, under biaxial shear deformation to mimic indentation stress conditions, the critical shear stress for τ -B4C is 28.8 GPa, which is similar to that of R -B4C (28.5 GPa), indicating that the intrinsic hardness is similar for these two phases. The failure mechanism of the τ -B4C is the deconstruction of the icosahedra arising from the B-C bond breaking within the icosahedron. It may be worth exploring how to synthesize τ -B4C experimentally because of its high strength.

  8. Bare and boron-doped cubic silicon carbide nanowires for electrochemical detection of nitrite sensitively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Liqin; Hou, Xinmei; Chen, Junhong; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2016-04-25

    Fabrication of eletrochemical sensors based on wide bandgap compound semiconductors has attracted increasing interest in recent years. Here we report for the first time electrochemical nitrite sensors based on cubic silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires (NWs) with smooth surface and boron-doped cubic SiC NWs with fin-like structure. Multiple techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to characterize SiC and boron-doped SiC NWs. As for the electrochemical behavior of both SiC NWs electrode, the cyclic voltammetric results show that both SiC electrodes exhibit wide potential window and excellent electrocatalytic activity toward nitrite oxidation. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) determination reveals that there exists a good linear relationship between the oxidation peak current and the concentration in the range of 50-15000 μmoL L(-1) (cubic SiC NWs) and 5-8000 μmoL L(-1) (B-doped cubic SiC NWs) with the detection limitation of 5 and 0.5 μmoL L(-1) respectively. Compared with previously reported results, both as-prepared nitrite sensors exhibit wider linear response range with comparable high sensitivity, high stability and reproducibility.

  9. The effects of surface finish and grain size on the strength of sintered silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Y. H.; Kim, Y. W.; Lee, J. G.; Kim, C. H.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of surface treatment and microstructure, especially abnormal grain growth, on the strength of sintered SiC were studied. The surfaces of sintered SiC were treated with 400, 800 and 1200 grit diamond wheels. Grain growth was induced by increasing the sintering times at 2050 C. The beta to alpha transformation occurred during the sintering of beta-phase starting materials and was often accompanied by abnormal grain growth. The overall strength distributions were established using Weibull statistics. The strength of the sintered SiC is limited by extrinsic surface flaws in normal-sintered specimens. The finer the surface finish and grain size, the higher the strength. But the strength of abnormal sintering specimens is limited by the abnormally grown large tabular grains. The Weibull modulus increases with decreasing grain size and decreasing grit size for grinding.

  10. Design of boron carbide-shielded irradiation channel of the outer irradiation channel of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 using MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrefah, R G; Sogbadji, R B M; Ampomah-Amoako, E; Birikorang, S A; Odoi, H C; Nyarko, B J B

    2011-01-01

    The MCNP model for the Ghana Research Reactor-1 was redesigned to incorporate a boron carbide-shielded irradiation channel in one of the outer irradiation channels. Extensive investigations were made before arriving at the final design of only one boron carbide covered outer irradiation channel; as all the other designs that were considered did not give desirable results of neutronic performance. The concept of redesigning a new MCNP model, which has a boron carbide-shielded channel is to equip the Ghana Research Reactor-1 with the means of performing efficient epithermal neutron activation analysis. After the simulation, a comparison of the results from the original MCNP model for the Ghana Research Reactor-1 and the new redesigned model of the boron carbide shielded channel was made. The final effective criticality of the original MCNP model for the GHARR-1 was recorded as 1.00402 while that of the new boron carbide designed model was recorded as 1.00282. Also, a final prompt neutron lifetime of 1.5245 × 10(-4)s was recorded for the new boron carbide designed model while a value of 1.5571 × 10(-7)s was recorded for the original MCNP design of the GHARR-1. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of repressing of briquettes at high hydrostatic pressures on fine structure of carbide fraction in compacts and sintered BK10 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernyj, Yu.F.; Mikhajlenko, G.P.; Labinskaya, N.G.; Vangengeim, S.D.; Fal'kovskij, V.A.; Lavrukhina, L.I.

    1977-01-01

    The effect was studied of the repressing at high hydrostatic pressures of preforms of hard alloy powder mixture with different degree of fineness on changes in fine structure of the carbide phase of compacts and the VK10 sintered alloy. X-ray diffraction method was used. Sufficient widening of diffraction lines of the WC phase in compacts and in a sintered alloy with the increase in hydrostatic pressure testifies to the fact of the production of more inperfect carbide substructure mainly due to fragmentation subgrains. The effect of processing pressure manifests itself to a greater extent in compacts of the coarse-ground mixture; in the sintered alloy the repressing pressure effect ''is being smoothed'' to some extent. The density of dislocation in the compacts and the sintered alloy were evaluated quantatively depending on the hydrostatic pressure values during processing of preforms

  12. Growth and Physical Structure of Amorphous Boron Carbide Deposited by Magnetron Sputtering on a Silicon Substrate with a Titanium Interlayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Caniello

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multilayer amorphous boron carbide coatings were produced by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on silicon substrates. To improve the adhesion, titanium interlayers with different thickness were interposed between the substrate and the coating. Above three hundreds nanometer, the enhanced roughness of the titanium led to the growth of an amorphous boron carbide with a dense and continuing columnar structure, and no delamination effect was observed. Correspondingly, the adhesion of the coating became three time stronger than in the case of a bare silicon substrate. Physical structure and microstructural proprieties of the coatings were investigated by means of a scan electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The adhesion of the films was measured by a scratch tester.

  13. Influence of Grain Growth Inhibitors and Powder Size on the Properties of Ultrafine and Nanostructured Cemented Carbides Sintered in Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Aleksandrov Fabijanić

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The influence of grain growth inhibitors and powder size on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ultrafine and nanostructured cemented carbides was researched. Three different WC powders, with an addition of different type and content of grain growth inhibitors GGIs, VC and Cr3C2 and with dBET grain sizes in the range from 95 to 150 nm were selected as starting powders. Four different mixtures with 6 and 9 wt. % Co were prepared. The consolidated samples are characterized by different microstructural and mechanical properties with respect to the characteristics of starting powders. Increased sintering temperatures led to microstructural irregularities in the form of a discontinuous WC growth, carbide agglomerates and abnormal grain growth as a consequence of coalescence via grain boundary elimination. The addition of 0.45% Cr3C2 contributed to microstructure homogeneity, reduced discontinuous and continuous grain growth, and increased Vickers hardness by approximately 70 HV and fracture toughness by approximately 0.15 MN/m3/2. The reduction of the starting powder to a real nanosize of 95 nm resulted in lower densities, and significant hardness increase, with a simultaneously small increase in fracture toughness. The consolidation of real nanopowders (dBET < 100 nm solely by conventional sintering in hydrogen without isostatic pressing is not preferred.

  14. Preparation of silicon carbide/carbon fiber composites through high-temperature spark plasma sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Ghasali

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the potentials of spark plasma sintering (SPS integrated with high temperature process that can enable sintering of SiC/Cf composites without any sintering aids. The random distribution of carbon fibers was obtained through mixing composite components in ethanol by using a shaker mill for 10 min. The corresponding sintering process was carried out at 1900 and 2200 °C with 50 MPa pressure applied at maximum temperature. The results showed that 89 ± 0.9 and 97 ± 0.8% of the theoretical density can be obtained for sintering temperatures of 1900 and 2200 °C, respectively. The densification curves were plotted to monitor sintering behavior with punch displacement changes. The appropriate bonding between SiC particles and carbon fibers was detected using FE-SEM for sample which was sintered at 2200 °C. The clear maximum in hardness (2992 ± 33 Vickers, bending strength (427 ± 26 MPa and fracture toughness (4.2 ± 0.3 MPa m1/2 were identified for sample sintered at 2200 °C. XRD investigations supposed that SiC and carbon were the only crystalline phases in both sintered samples.

  15. Investigation of thickness dependent composition of boron carbide thin films by resonant soft x-ray reflectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, P. N.; Gupta, R. K.; Saravanan, K.; Bose, A.; Joshi, S. C.; Ganguli, T.; Rai, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    Boron carbide thin films of different thicknesses deposited by ion beam sputtering were studied. The deposited films were characterized by grazing incidence hard x-ray reflectivity (GIXR), resonant soft x-ray reflectivity (RSXR), x-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), resonant Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RRBS), and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). An in-depth profile of the chemical elements constitute the films is reconstructed based on analysis of ref...

  16. Influence of binders on infrared laser ablation of powdered tungsten carbide pressed pellets in comparison with sintered tungsten carbide hardmetals studied by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hola, Marketa [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology and Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 2, CZ 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Otruba, Vitezslav [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology and Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 2, CZ 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kanicky, Viktor [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology and Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 2, CZ 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: viktork@chemi.muni.cz

    2006-05-15

    Laser ablation (LA) was studied as a sample introduction technique for the analysis of powdered and sintered tungsten carbides (WC/Co) by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The possibility to work with powdered and compact materials with close chemical composition provided the opportunity to compare LA sampling of similar substances in different forms that require different preparation procedures. Powdered WC/Co precursors of sintered hardmetals were prepared for the ablation as pressed pellets with and without powdered silver as a binder, while sintered hardmetal blocks were embedded into a resin to obtain discs, which were then smoothed and polished. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operated at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with a pulse frequency of 10 Hz and maximum pulse energy of 220 mJ was used. A single lens was used for the laser beam focusing. An ablation cell (14 cm{sup 3}) mounted on a PC-controlled XY-translator was connected to an ICP spectrometer Jobin Yvon 170 Ultrace (laterally viewed ICP, mono- and polychromator) using a 1.5-m tubing (4 mm i.d.). Ablation was performed in a circular motion (2 mm diameter). Close attention was paid to the study of the crater parametres depending on hardness, cohesion and Ag binder presence in WC/Co samples. The influence of the Co content on the depth and structure of the ablation craters of the binderless pellets was also studied. Linear calibration plots of Nb, Ta and Ti were obtained for cemented WC/Co samples, binderless and binder-containing pellets. Relative widths of uncertainty intervals about the centroids vary between {+-} 3% and {+-} 7%, and exceptionally reach a value above 10%. The lowest determinable quantities (LDQ) of Nb, Ta and Ti calculated from the calibration lines were less than 0.5% (m/m). To evaluate the possibility of quantitative elemental analysis by LA-ICP-OES, two real sintered WC/Co samples and two real samples of powdered WC/Co materials were analysed

  17. Boron carbide, B13-xC2-y (x = 0.12, y = 0.01)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sologub, Oksana; Michiue, Yuichi; Mori, Takao

    2012-01-01

    Boron carbide phases exist over a widely varying compos­itional range B12+xC3-x (0.06 x Boron icosa­hedra are inter­connected by C atoms via their BEq atoms, forming layers parallel to (001), while the B12 units of the adjacent layers are linked through inter­icosa­hedral BP—BP bonds. The unique B atom (BC) connects the two C atoms of adjacent layers, forming a C—B—C chain along [001]. Depending on the carbon concentration, the carbon and BP sites exhibit mixed B/C occupancies to varying degrees; besides, the BC site shows partial occupancy. The decrease in carbon content was reported to be realized via an increasing number of chainless unit cells. On the basis of X-ray single-crystal refinement, we have concluded that the unit cell of the given boron-rich crystal contains following structural units: [B12] and [B11C] icosa­hedra (about 96 and 4%, respectively) and C—B—C chains (87%). Besides, there is a fraction of unit cells (13%) with the B atom located against the triangular face of a neighboring icosa­hedron formed by BEq (B2) thus rendering the formula B0.87(B0.98C0.02)12(B0.13C0.87)2 for the current boron carbide crystal. PMID:22904703

  18. Boron carbide, B(13-x)C(2-y) (x = 0.12, y = 0.01).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sologub, Oksana; Michiue, Yuichi; Mori, Takao

    2012-08-01

    Boron carbide phases exist over a widely varying compos-itional range B(12+x)C(3-x) (0.06 x Boron icosa-hedra are inter-connected by C atoms via their B(Eq) atoms, forming layers parallel to (001), while the B(12) units of the adjacent layers are linked through inter-icosa-hedral B(P)-B(P) bonds. The unique B atom (B(C)) connects the two C atoms of adjacent layers, forming a C-B-C chain along [001]. Depending on the carbon concentration, the carbon and B(P) sites exhibit mixed B/C occupancies to varying degrees; besides, the B(C) site shows partial occupancy. The decrease in carbon content was reported to be realized via an increasing number of chainless unit cells. On the basis of X-ray single-crystal refinement, we have concluded that the unit cell of the given boron-rich crystal contains following structural units: [B(12)] and [B(11)C] icosa-hedra (about 96 and 4%, respectively) and C-B-C chains (87%). Besides, there is a fraction of unit cells (13%) with the B atom located against the triangular face of a neighboring icosa-hedron formed by B(Eq) (B2) thus rendering the formula B(0.87)(B(0.98)C(0.02))(12)(B(0.13)C(0.87))(2) for the current boron carbide crystal.

  19. Surface impurity removal from DIII-D graphite tiles by boron carbide grit blasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.L.; Hollerbach, M.A.; Holtrop, K.L.; Kellman, A.G.; Taylor, P.L.; West, W.P.

    1993-11-01

    During the latter half of 1992, the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics (GA) underwent several modifications of its interior. One of the major tasks involved the removal of accumulated metallic impurities from the surface of the graphite tiles used to line the plasma facing surfaces inside of the tokamak. Approximately 1500 graphite tiles and 100 boron nitride tiles from the tokamak were cleaned to remove the metallic impurities. The cleaning process consisted of several steps: the removed graphite tiles were permanently marked, surface blasted using boron carbide (B 4 C) grit media (approximately 37 μm. diam.), ultrasonically cleaned in ethanol to remove loose dust, and outgassed at 1000 degrees C. Tests were done using, graphite samples and different grit blaster settings to determine the optimum propellant and abrasive media pressures to remove a graphite layer approximately 40-50 μm deep and yet produce a reasonably smooth finish. EDX measurements revealed that the blasting technique reduced the surface Ni, Cr, and Fe impurity levels to those of virgin graphite. In addition to the surface impurity removal, tritium monitoring was performed throughout the cleaning process. A bubbler system was set up to monitor the tritium level in the exhaust gas from the grit blaster unit. Surface wipes were also performed on over 10% of the tiles. Typical surface tritium concentrations of the tiles were reduced from about 500 dpm/100 cm 2 to less than 80 dpm/100 cm 2 following the cleaning. This tile conditioning, and the installation of additional graphite tiles to cover a high fraction of the metallic plasma facing surfaces, has substantially reduced metallic impurities in the plasma discharges which has allowed rapid recovery from a seven-month machine opening and regimes of enhanced plasma energy confinement to be more readily obtained. Safety issues concerning blaster operator exposure to carcinogenic metals and radioactive tritium will also be addressed

  20. THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND MAGNESIUM SIZE ON LOW TEMPERATURE MAGNESIOTHERMIC SYNTHESIS OF NANO STRUCTURES BORON CARBIDE BY MESOPOROUS CARBON (CMK-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Amin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Boron carbide was synthesized using Mesoporous Carbon CMK-1, Boron oxide, and magnesiothermic reduction process. The Effects of temperature and magnesium grain size on the formation of boron carbide were studied using nano composite precurser containg mesoporous carbon. Samples were leached in 2M Hydrochloric acid to separate Mg, MgO and magnesium-borat phases. SEM, XRD and Xray map analysis were caried out on the leached samples to characterize the  boron carbide. results showed that the reaction efficiency developed in samples with weight ratio of B2O3:C:Mg = 11:1.5:12, by increasing the temperature from 550 to 650 °C and magnesium powder size from 0.3 m to 3 m.

  1. Optical constants of magnetron-sputtered boron carbide thin films from photoabsorption data in the range 30 to 770 eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufli, Regina; Aquila, Andrew L; Salmassi, Farhad; Fernández-Perea, Mónica; Gullikson, Eric M

    2008-09-01

    This work discusses the experimental determination of the optical constants (refractive index) of DC-magnetron-sputtered boron carbide films in the 30-770 eV photon energy range. Transmittance measurements of three boron carbide films with thicknesses of 54.2, 79.0, and 112.5 nm were performed for this purpose. These are believed to be the first published experimental data for the refractive index of boron carbide films in the photon energy range above 160 eV and for the near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure regions around the boron K (188 eV), carbon K (284.2 eV), and oxygen K (543.1 eV) absorption edges. The density, composition, surface chemistry, and morphology of the films were also investigated using Rutherford backscattering, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and extreme ultraviolet reflectance measurements.

  2. Densification of silicon and zirconium carbides by a new process: spark plasma sintering; Densification des carbures de silicium et de zirconium par un procede innovant: le spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillard, F

    2006-12-15

    Materials research for suitable utilization in 4. generation nuclear plants needs new ways to densify testing components. Two carbides, silicon and zirconium carbide seems to be the most suitable choice due to their mechanical, thermal and neutron-transparency properties against next nuclear plant specifications. Nevertheless one main difficulty remains, which is densifying them even at high temperature. Spark Plasma Sintering a new metal-, ceramic- and composite-sintering process has been used to densify both SiC and ZrC. Understanding bases of mass transport mechanisms in SPS have been studied. Composites and interfaces have been processed and analyzed. This manuscript reports original results on SiC and ZrC ceramics sintered with commercial powder started, without additives. (author)

  3. Improvements of Thermal, Mechanical, and Water-Resistance Properties of Polybenzoxazine/Boron Carbide Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdani, Noureddine; Derradji, Mehdi; Wang, Jun; Mokhnache, El-Oualid; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2016-09-01

    Novel kinds of nanocomposites based on bisphenol A-aniline based polybenzoxazine matrix P(BA-a) and 0 wt.%-20 wt.% boron carbide (B4C) nanoparticles were produced and their properties were evaluated in terms of the nano-B4C content. The thermal conductivity of the P(BA-a) matrix was improved approximately three times from 0.18 W/m K to 0.86 W/m K at 20 wt.% nano-B4C loading, while its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was deceased by 47% with the same nanofiller content. The microhardness properties were significantly improved by adding the B4C nanoparticles. At 20 wt.% of nano-B4C content, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) revealed a marked increase in the storage modulus and the glass transition temperature ( T g) of the nanocomposites, reaching 3.9 GPa and 204°C, respectively. Hot water uptake tests showed that the water-resistance of the polybenzoxazine matrix was increased by filling with nano-B4C nano-filler. The morphological analysis reflected that the improvements obtained in the mechanical and thermal properties are related to the uniform dispersion of the nano-B4C particles and their strong adhesion to the P(BA-a) matrix.

  4. Neutron shielding behavior of thermoplastic natural rubber/boron carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat Zali, Nurazila; Yazid, Hafizal; Megat Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid

    2018-01-01

    Many shielding materials have been designed against the harm of different types of radiation to the human body. Today, polymer-based lightweight composites have been chosen by the radiation protection industry. In the present study, thermoplastic natural rubber (TPNR) composites with different weight percent of boron carbide (B4C) fillers (0% to 30%) were fabricated as neutron shielding through melt blending method. Neutron attenuation properties of TPNR/B4C composites have been investigated. The macroscopic cross section (Σ), half value layer (HVL) and mean free path length (λ) of the composites have been calculated and the transmission curves have been plotted. The obtained results show that Σ, HVL and λ greatly depend on the B4C content. Addition of B4C fillers into TPNR matrix were found to enhance the macroscopic cross section values thus decrease the mean free path length (λ) and half value layer (HVL) of the composites. The transmission curves exhibited that the neutron transmission of the composites decreased with increasing shielding thickness. These results showed that TPNR/B4C composites have high potential for neutron shielding applications.

  5. Characterizing the Effect of Laser Power on Laser Metal Deposited Titanium Alloy and Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinlabi, E. T.; Erinosho, M. F.

    2017-11-01

    Titanium alloy has gained acceptance in the aerospace, marine, chemical, and other related industries due to its excellent combination of mechanical and corrosion properties. In order to augment its properties, a hard ceramic, boron carbide has been laser cladded with it at varying laser powers between 0.8 and 2.4 kW. This paper presents the effect of laser power on the laser deposited Ti6Al4V-B4C composites through the evolving microstructures and microhardness. The microstructures of the composites exhibit the formation of α-Ti phase and β-Ti phase and were elongated towards the heat affected zone. These phases were terminated at the fusion zone and globular microstructures were found growing epitaxially just immediately after the fusion zone. Good bondings were formed in all the deposited composites. Sample A1 deposited at a laser power of 0.8 kW and scanning speed of 1 m/min exhibits the highest hardness of HV 432 ± 27, while sample A4 deposited at a laser power of 2.0 kW and scanning speed of 1 m/min displays the lowest hardness of HV 360 ± 18. From the hardness results obtained, ceramic B4C has improved the mechanical properties of the primary alloy.

  6. Phase transitions of boron carbide: Pair interaction model of high carbon limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Sanxi; Huhn, W. P.; Widom, M.

    2015-09-01

    Boron Carbide exhibits a broad composition range, implying a degree of intrinsic substitutional disorder. While the observed phase has rhombohedral symmetry (space group R 3 bar m), the enthalpy minimizing structure has lower, monoclinic, symmetry (space group Cm). The crystallographic primitive cell consists of a 12-atom icosahedron placed at the vertex of a rhombohedral lattice, together with a 3-atom chain along the 3-fold axis. In the limit of high carbon content, approaching 20% carbon, the icosahedra are usually of type B11 Cp, where the p indicates the carbon resides on a polar site, while the chains are of type C-B-C. We establish an atomic interaction model for this composition limit, fit to density functional theory total energies, that allows us to investigate the substitutional disorder using Monte Carlo simulations augmented by multiple histogram analysis. We find that the low temperature monoclinic Cm structure disorders through a pair of phase transitions, first via a 3-state Potts-like transition to space group R3m, then via an Ising-like transition to the experimentally observed R 3 bar m symmetry. The R3m and Cm phases are electrically polarized, while the high temperature R 3 bar m phase is nonpolar.

  7. The improvement of wave-absorbing ability of silicon carbide fibers by depositing boron nitride coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fang; Zhang, Litong; Yin, Xiaowei; Liu, Yongsheng; Cheng, Laifei

    2013-04-01

    This work investigated electromagnetic wave (EMW) absorption and mechanical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) fibers with and without boron nitride (BN) coating by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). The dielectric property and EM shielding effectiveness of SiC fiber bundles before and after being coated by BN were measured by wave guide method. The EM reflection coefficient of SiC fiber laminates with and without BN coating was determined by model calculation and NRL-arc method, respectively. Tensile properties of SiC fiber bundles with and without BN coating were tested at room temperature. Results show that SiC fibers with BN coating had a great improvement of EMW absorbing property because the composites achieved the impedance matching. BN with the low permittivity and dielectric loss contributed to the enhancive introduction and reduced reflection of EMW. The tensile strength and Weibull modulus of SiC fiber bundles coated by BN increased owing to the decrease of defects in SiC fibers and the protection of coating during loading.

  8. Direct deposition of cubic boron nitride films on tungsten carbide-cobalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teii, Kungen; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2012-10-24

    Thick cubic boron nitride (cBN) films in micrometer-scale are deposited on tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) substrates without adhesion interlayers by inductively coupled plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) using the chemistry of fluorine. The residual film stress is reduced because of very low ion-impact energies (a few eV to ∼25 eV) controlled by the plasma sheath potential. Two types of substrate pretreatment are used successively; the removal of surface Co binder using an acid solution suppresses the catalytic effect of Co and triggers cBN formation, and the surface roughening using mechanical scratching and hydrogen plasma etching increases both the in-depth cBN fraction and deposition rate. The substrate surface condition is evaluated by the wettability of the probe liquids with different polarities and quantified by the apparent surface free energy calculated from the contact angle. The surface roughening enhances the compatibility in energy between the cBN and substrate, which are bridged by the interfacial sp(2)-bonded hexagonal BN buffer layer, and then, the cBN overlayer is nucleated and evolved easier.

  9. Sintering of B4C by pressureless liquid phase sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Rosa Maria da; Melo, Francisco Cristovao Lourenco de

    2009-01-01

    The effect of three different sintering additive systems on densification of boron carbide powder was investigated. The sintering additives were Al 2 O 3 :Y 2 O 3 , AlN:Y 2 O 3 and BN:Y 2 O 3 compositions. Powder mixtures were prepared with 10 vol% of sintering aids following conventional powder technology processes. Samples were sintered by pressureless sintering at 2050 deg C/30min in argon atmosphere. Sintered samples were compared to a sintered B 4 C without sintering additive. Samples were characterized by XRD to analyze the crystalline phases after sintering and SEM to observe the microstructure and the second phase distribution. YB 4 and YB 2 C 2 were identified in all samples, indicating a reaction between Y 2 O 3 , B 4 C and B 2 O 3 present at the B 4 C particle surface. The best densification result was achieved with Al 2 O 3 :Y 2 O 3 additive system, showing 92.0 % of theoretical density, low porosity and 15.2 % of linear shrinkage. But this sample showed the highest weight loss. (author)

  10. Non-catalytic facile synthesis of superhard phase of boron carbide (B13C2) nanoflakes and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sky Shumao; Su, Liap Tat; Guo, Jun; Vasylkiv, Oleg; Borodianska, Hanna; Xi, Zhu; Krishnan, Gireesh M; Su, Haibin; Tokl, Alfred I Y

    2012-01-01

    Boron Carbide is one the hardest and lightest material that is also relatively easier to synthesis as compared to other superhard ceramics like cubic boron nitride and diamond. However, the brittle nature of monolithic advanced ceramics material hinders its use in various engineering applications. Thus, strategies that can toughen the material are of fundamental and technological importance. One approach is to use nanostructure materials as building blocks, and organize them into a complex hierarchical structure, which could potentially enhance its mechanical properties to exceed that of the monolithic form. In this paper, we demonstrated a simple approach to synthesize one- and two-dimension nanostructure boron carbide by simply changing the mixing ratio of the initial compound to influence the saturation condition of the process at a relatively low temperature of 1500 degrees C with no catalyst involved in the growing process. Characterization of the resulting nano-structures shows B13C2, which is a superhard phase of boron carbide as its hardness is almost twice as hard as the commonly known B4C. Using ab-initio density functional theory study on the elastic properties of both B12C3 and B13C2, the high hardness of B13C2 is consistent to our calculation results, where bulk modulus of B13C2 is higher than that of B4C. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of the nanoflakes also reveals high density of twinning defects which could potentially inhibit the crack propagation, leading to toughening of the materials.

  11. Effect of SiC Nanowhisker on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of WC-Ni Cemented Carbide Prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyong Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine tungsten carbide-nickel (WC-Ni cemented carbides with varied fractions of silicon carbide (SiC nanowhisker (0–3.75 wt.% were fabricated by spark plasma sintering at 1350°C under a uniaxial pressure of 50 MPa with the assistance of vanadium carbide (VC and tantalum carbide (TaC as WC grain growth inhibitors. The effects of SiC nanowhisker on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the as-prepared WC-Ni cemented carbides were investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that during spark plasma sintering (SPS Ni may react with the applied SiC nanowhisker, forming Ni2Si and graphite. Scanning electron microscopy examination indicated that, with the addition of SiC nanowhisker, the average WC grain size decreased from 400 to 350 nm. However, with the additional fractions of SiC nanowhisker, more and more Si-rich aggregates appeared. With the increase in the added fraction of SiC nanowhisker, the Vickers hardness of the samples initially increased and then decreased, reaching its maximum of about 24.9 GPa when 0.75 wt.% SiC nanowhisker was added. However, the flexural strength of the sample gradually decreased with increasing addition fraction of SiC nanowhisker.

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Nano Boron Nitride Reinforced Magnesium Composites Produced by the Microwave Sintering Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Gupta

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, magnesium composites with nano-size boron nitride (BN particulates of varying contents were synthesized using the powder metallurgy (PM technique incorporating microwave-assisted two-directional sintering followed by hot extrusion. The effect of nano-BN addition on the microstructural and the mechanical behavior of the developed Mg/BN composites were studied in comparison with pure Mg using the structure-property correlation. Microstructural characterization revealed uniform distribution of nano-BN particulates and marginal grain refinement. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE value of the magnesium matrix was improved with the addition of nano-sized BN particulates. The results of XRD studies indicate basal texture weakening with an increase in nano-BN addition. The composites showed improved mechanical properties measured under micro-indentation, tension and compression loading. While the tensile yield strength improvement was marginal, a significant increase in compressive yield strength was observed. This resulted in the reduction of tension-compression yield asymmetry and can be attributed to the weakening of the strong basal texture.

  13. Hydrothermal development and characterization of the wear-resistant boron carbide from Pandanus: a natural carbon precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saritha Devi, H. V.; Swapna, M. S.; Ambadas, G.; Sankararaman, S.

    2018-04-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a prominent semiconducting material that finds applications in the field of science and technology. The excellent physical, thermal and electronic properties make it suitable as ceramic armor, wear-resistant, lens polisher and neutron absorber in the nuclear industry. The existing methods of synthesis of boron carbide involve the use of toxic chemicals that adversely affect the environment. In the present work, we report for the first time the use of the hydrothermal method, for converting the cellulose from Pandanus leaves as the carbon precursor for the synthesis of B4C. The carbon precursor is changed into porous functionalized carbon by treating with sodium borohydride (NaBH4), followed by treating with boric acid to obtain B4C. The samples are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, Raman, photoluminescent and Ultraviolet-Visible absorption spectroscopy. The formation of B4C from natural carbon source— Pandanus presents an eco-friendly, economic and non-toxic approach for the synthesis of refractory carbides.

  14. Production and mechanical properties of sintered carbides (hard steels WC-Co)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batalha, G.F.

    1987-09-01

    Densification and mechanical characteristics or WC-Co Cemented Carbides, were investigated by dilatometry, Hardness and bending tests, as a function of the two principal micro-structural parameters: the cobalt content and the particle size of carbide crystals. Vickers hardness of the studied compositions showed a linear variation with the increase of the cobalt content. By three point bending, the transverse rupture strenght increases with cobalt content, however, for larger grain size reaches a maximum, eventually reduced by brittle phases and incomplete dispersion. The results of brittle facture tests were statistically analised and fitted better to the 'Weakest Link Model' (Weibull distribution) than the 'Chain Model' (Gaussian distribution). (author) [pt

  15. Comparative analysis on surface property in anodic oxidation polishing of reaction-sintered silicon carbide and single-crystal 4H silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xinmin; Tu, Qunzhang; Deng, Hui; Jiang, Guoliang; He, Xiaohui; Liu, Bin; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    For effective machining of difficult-to-machine materials, such as reaction-sintered silicon carbide (RS-SiC) and single-crystal 4H silicon carbide (4H-SiC), a novel polishing technique named anodic oxidation polishing was proposed, which combined with the anodic oxidation of substrate and slurry polishing of oxide. By scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) observation and atomic force microscopy analysis, both the anodic oxidation behaviors of RS-SiC and 4H-SiC were investigated. Through comparison of the surfaces before and after hydrofluoric acid etching of the oxidized samples by the scanning white light interferometry (SWLI) measurement, the relationships between oxidation depth and oxidation time were obtained, and the calculated oxidation rate for RS-SiC was 5.3 nm/s and that for 4H-SiC was 5.8 nm/s based on the linear Deal-Grove model. Through anodic oxidation polishing of RS-SiC substrate and 4H-SiC substrate, respectively, the surface roughness rms obtained by SWLI was improved to 2.103 nm for RS-SiC and to 0.892 nm for 4H-SiC. Experimental results indicate that anodic oxidation polishing is an effective method for the machining of RS-SiC and 4H-SiC samples, which would improve the process level of SiC substrates and promote the application of SiC products in the fields of optics, ceramics, semiconductors, electronics, and so on.

  16. Manufacture of sintered bricks of high density from beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pointud, R.; Rispal, Ch.; Le Garec, M.

    1959-01-01

    Beryllium oxide bricks of nuclear purity 100 x 100 x 50 and 100 x 100 x 100 mm of very high density (between 2.85 and 3.00) are manufactured by sintering under pressure in graphite moulds at temperatures between 1,750 and 1,850 deg. C, and under a pressure of 150 kg/cm 2 . The physico-chemical state of the saw material is of considerable importance with regard to the success of the sintering operation. In addition, a study of the sintering of a BeO mixture with 3 to 5 per cent of boron introduced in the form of boric acid, boron carbide or elementary boron shows that high densities can only be obtained by sintering under pressure. For technical reasons of manufacture, only the mixture based on boron carbide is used. The sintering is carried out in graphite moulds at 1500 deg. C under 150 kg/cm 2 pressure, and bricks can be obtained with density between 2,85 and 2,90. Laboratory studies and the industrial manufacture of various sinters are described in detail. (author) [fr

  17. Characterization of boron carbide particulate reinforced in situ copper surface composites synthesized using friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiskumar, R., E-mail: sathiscit2011@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Murugan, N., E-mail: murugan@cit.edu.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, V V College of Engineering, Tisaiyanvilai, 627 657 Tamil Nadu (India); Vijay, S.J., E-mail: vijayjoseph@karunya.edu [Centre for Research in Metallurgy (CRM), School of Mechanical Sciences, Karunya University, Coimbatore, 641 114 Tamil Nadu (India)

    2013-10-15

    Friction stir processing has evolved as a novel solid state technique to fabricate surface composites. The objective of this work is to apply the friction stir processing technique to fabricate boron carbide particulate reinforced copper surface composites and investigate the effect of B{sub 4}C particles and its volume fraction on microstructure and sliding wear behavior of the same. A groove was prepared on 6 mm thick copper plates and packed with B{sub 4}C particles. The dimensions of the groove was varied to result in five different volume fractions of B{sub 4}C particles (0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 vol.%). A single pass friction stir processing was done using a tool rotational speed of 1000 rpm, travel speed of 40 mm/min and an axial force of 10 kN. Metallurgical characterization of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites was carried out using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The sliding wear behavior was evaluated using a pin-on-disk apparatus. Results indicated that the B{sub 4}C particles significantly influenced the area, dispersion, grain size, microhardness and sliding wear behavior of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites. When the volume fraction of B{sub 4}C was increased, the wear mode changed from microcutting to abrasive wear and wear debris was found to be finer. Highlights: • Fabrication of Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composite by friction stir processing • Analyzing the effect of B{sub 4}C particles on the properties of Cu/B4C surface composite • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles reduced the area of surface composite. • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles enhanced the microhardness and wear rate. • B{sub 4}C particles altered the wear mode from microcutting to abrasive.

  18. Origins of discontinuous grain growth during liquid phase sintering of WC-Co cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiner, M.; Schmitt, T.; Lux, B.; Lassner, E.

    1984-07-01

    The origins of discontinuous grain growth of fine grained WC powders (about 1 ..mu..m average grain size) with Co binder occurring during liquid phase sintering were studied. The results indicate that small amounts of coarse grained WC powder added to fine grained WC-Co mixtures, which otherwise do not show local grain coarsening during liquid phase sintering, produce enhanced local grain growth of the WC crystals. Effects of milling conditions and sintering temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties, such as transverse rupture strength and hardness, were determined. As already observed in previous studies trace elements in blue oxide can have an important effect on the average grain size and grain size distribution of the WC-powder. Also the considerable influence on the sintering behaviour of such powders described here can be traced back to such impurities. It is shown that phosphorus decreases the melting temperature of the WC-Co system and a heterogeneous distribution of it promotes discontinuous grain growth. Contrary to this, carbon heterogeneities in fine grained WC powders did not cause any discontinuous grain growth at all.

  19. Atomic structure of icosahedral B4C boron carbide from a first principles analysis of NMR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, F; Vast, N; Pickard, C J

    2001-08-20

    Density functional theory is demonstrated to reproduce the 13C and 11B NMR chemical shifts of icosahedral boron carbides with sufficient accuracy to extract previously unresolved structural information from experimental NMR spectra. B4C can be viewed as an arrangement of 3-atom linear chains and 12-atom icosahedra. According to our results, all the chains have a CBC structure. Most of the icosahedra have a B11C structure with the C atom placed in a polar site, and a few percent have a B (12) structure or a B10C2 structure with the two C atoms placed in two antipodal polar sites.

  20. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  1. Boron carbide, B13-xC2-y (x = 0.12, y = 0.01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Sologub

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Boron carbide phases exist over a widely varying compositional range B12+xC3-x (0.06 < x < 1.7. One idealized structure corresponds to the B13C2 composition (space group R-3m and contains one icosahedral B12 unit and one linear C—B—C chain. The B12 units are composed of crystallographically distinct B atoms BP (polar, B1 and BEq (equatorial, B2. Boron icosahedra are interconnected by C atoms via their BEq atoms, forming layers parallel to (001, while the B12 units of the adjacent layers are linked through intericosahedral BP—BP bonds. The unique B atom (BC connects the two C atoms of adjacent layers, forming a C—B—C chain along [001]. Depending on the carbon concentration, the carbon and BP sites exhibit mixed B/C occupancies to varying degrees; besides, the BC site shows partial occupancy. The decrease in carbon content was reported to be realized via an increasing number of chainless unit cells. On the basis of X-ray single-crystal refinement, we have concluded that the unit cell of the given boron-rich crystal contains following structural units: [B12] and [B11C] icosahedra (about 96 and 4%, respectively and C—B—C chains (87%. Besides, there is a fraction of unit cells (13% with the B atom located against the triangular face of a neighboring icosahedron formed by BEq (B2 thus rendering the formula B0.87(B0.98C0.0212(B0.13C0.872 for the current boron carbide crystal.

  2. Injection molding of silicon carbide capable of being sintered without pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller-Zell, A.; Schwarzmeier, R.

    1984-01-01

    The most suitable SiC mass for injection molding of SiC articles (for subsequent pressureless sintering) consisted of beta SiC 84, a wax mixture 8, and polyethylene or polystyrene 8 parts. The most effective method for adding the binders was by dissolving them in a solvent and subsequent evaporation. The sequence of component addition was significant, and all parameters were optimized together rather than individually.

  3. Growth of boron doped hydrogenated nanocrystalline cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) films by Hot Wire-CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawbake, Amit [School of Energy Studies, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007 (India); Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Mayabadi, Azam; Waykar, Ravindra; Kulkarni, Rupali; Jadhavar, Ashok [School of Energy Studies, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007 (India); Waman, Vaishali [Modern College of Arts, Science and Commerce, Shivajinagar, Pune 411 005 (India); Parmar, Jayesh [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Bhattacharyya, Somnath [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, IIT Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ma, Yuan‐Ron [Department of Physics, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China); Devan, Rupesh; Pathan, Habib [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India); Jadkar, Sandesh, E-mail: sandesh@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Boron doped nc-3C-SiC films prepared by HW-CVD using SiH{sub 4}/CH{sub 4}/B{sub 2}H{sub 6}. • 3C-Si-C films have preferred orientation in (1 1 1) direction. • Introduction of boron into SiC matrix retard the crystallanity in the film structure. • Film large number of SiC nanocrystallites embedded in the a-Si matrix. • Band gap values, E{sub Tauc} and E{sub 04} (E{sub 04} > E{sub Tauc}) decreases with increase in B{sub 2}H{sub 6} flow rate. - Abstract: Boron doped nanocrystalline cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) films have been prepared by HW-CVD using silane (SiH{sub 4})/methane (CH{sub 4})/diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}) gas mixture. The influence of boron doping on structural, optical, morphological and electrical properties have been investigated. The formation of 3C-SiC films have been confirmed by low angle XRD, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) analysis whereas effective boron doping in nc-3C-SiC have been confirmed by conductivity, charge carrier activation energy, and Hall measurements. Raman spectroscopy and HR-TEM analysis revealed that introduction of boron into the SiC matrix retards the crystallanity in the film structure. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and non contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) results signify that 3C-SiC film contain well resolved, large number of silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystallites embedded in the a-Si matrix having rms surface roughness ∼1.64 nm. Hydrogen content in doped films are found smaller than that of un-doped films. Optical band gap values, E{sub Tauc} and E{sub 04} decreases with increase in B{sub 2}H{sub 6} flow rate.

  4. Influence of Boron Carbide Reinforcement on Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Base Composite Prepared by Stir and Squeeze Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahraa Fadhil

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum metal matrix composites reinforced by ceramic particles have a wide acceptance in engineering applications due to their mechanical and physical properties. The present work aims at investigating the effect of B4C particles ons ome mechanical and physical properties of Al –base matrix. All samples were prepared by two-step stir casting method with squeezing the melt during its solidification. Aluminum metal matrix samples of 2wt%Mg with (0,2,4,and 6wt% ofB4C particles were prepared. The effect of such additions of these particles on hardness, tensile properties were investigated, also the microstructures were analyzed using optical microscopic and (SEM-EDS analysis. The results showed a maximum increase of (53% in Brinel's hardness by adding 6% of boron carbide, while the yield stress, tensile strength and the modulus of elasticity were increased by 11%, 51% , and 51% respectively due to add 4% of boron carbide. The SEM-EDS analyses confirm the presence of B4C particles within the Al-base matrix. The microscopic tests indicated the homogenous dispersion of the addition of 4wt% B4C.

  5. Fabrication and tribological response of aluminium 6061 hybrid composite reinforced with bamboo char and boron carbide micro-fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chethan, K. N.; Pai, Anand; Keni, Laxmikant G.; Singhal, Ashish; Sinha, Shubham

    2018-02-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) have a wide scope of industrial applications and triumph over conventional materials due to their light weight, higher specific strength, good wear resistance and lower coefficient of thermal expansion. The present study aims at establishing the feasibility of using Bamboo charcoal particulate and boron carbide as reinforcements in Al-6061 alloy matrix and to investigate their effect on the wear of composites taking into consideration the interfacial adhesion of the reinforcements in the alloy. Al-6061 alloy was chosen as a base metallic alloy matrix. Sun-dried bamboo canes were used for charcoal preparation with the aid of a muffle furnace. The carbon content in the charcoal samples was determined by EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy). In present study, stir casting technique was used to prepare the samples with 1%, 2%, and 3% weight of bamboo charcoal and boron carbide with Al-6061. The fabricated composites were homogenised at 570°C for 6 hours and cooled at room temperature. Wear studies were carried out on the specimens with different speed and loads. It was found that wear rate and coefficient of friction decreased with increase in the reinforcement content.

  6. Effect of hot isostatic pressing on the properties of sintered alpha silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, G. K.; Moore, T. J.; Millard, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    Two lots of alpha silicon carbide were isostatically hot-pressed under 138 MPa for 2 h in Ar at temperatures up to 2200 C. Nearly theoretically dense specimens resulted. Hot isostatic pressing increased both room-temperature strength and 1200 C strength, and resulted in improved reliability. One lot of material which was pressed at 2200 C showed increases of about 20 percent in room-temperature strength and about 50 percent in 1200 C flexural strength; the Weibull modulus improved about 100 percent.

  7. Particle rearrangement during liquid phase sintering of several carbide-metal combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppmann, W.J.; Petzow, G.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the influence of mutual solubility of the components on total rearrangement shrinkage. The explanation for large differences in rearrangement shrinkage of the carbide compacts investigated in this work may be as follows: In systems with negligible intersolubility and hence pronounced surface roughness the mechanical activation energy necessary for massive regrouping cannot be supplied and therefore only very small rearrangement shrinkage is observed. On the other hand those systems with large intersolubility and hence rapid particle smoothening undergo severe rearrangement because the mechanical activation energy for this process can be easily supplied by the energy gained during densification

  8. Quantitative analysis of WC grain shape in sintered WC-Co cemented carbides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mikael; Wahnström, Göran; Allibert, Colette; Lay, Sabine

    2005-02-18

    The morphology of WC grains is examined by ab initio calculations, and by transmission electron microscopy in a WC-Co cemented carbide. Two compositions are studied to determine the effect of carbon chemical potential on the shape development. The WC grains are found to be truncated triangles, and the grain morphology is adequately reproduced by the ab initio calculations. The energy difference between the two types of grain facets is shown to be due to the formation of stronger bonds with more covalent character between low coordinated W and Co atoms at one type of facet.

  9. Characterization and evaluation of boron carbide for plate-impact conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmquist, T. J.; Johnson, G. R.

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the response of boron carbide (B 4 C) to high-velocity impact. The authors previously characterized this material in 1999, using the Johnson-Holmquist [AIP Conf. Proc. 309, 981 (1994)] (JH-2) model. Since then, there have been additional experimental data presented in the literature that better describe the hydrostatic pressure (including a phase change). In addition, a series of plate-impact experiments (one-dimensional, uniaxial strain) that used configurations that produced either a shock, a shock release, or a shock reshock was performed. These experiments provide material behavior regarding the damage, failed strength, and hydrostat for which previously there has been little or no data. Constitutive model constants were obtained for the Johnson-Holmquist-Beissel [J. Appl. Phys. 94, 1639 (2003)] model using some of these plate-impact experiments. Computations of all the experiments were performed and analyzed to better understand the material response. The analysis provided the following findings: (1) The material fails and loses strength when the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) is exceeded. (2) The material has significant strength after failure and gradually increases as the pressure increases. (3) The shear modulus does not degrade when the material fails (as has been postulated), but rather increases. (4) When the material is reloaded from an initial shocked (failed) state, the loading appears to be elastic, indicating the material is not on the yield surface after failure. To provide more insight into the behavior of B 4 C, the strength versus pressure response was compared to that of silicon carbide (SiC). The strength of SiC increases as the pressure increases beyond the HEL, probably due to pressure hardening or strain hardening. It appears that B 4 C does not experience any hardening effects and fails at the HEL. Although the HEL for B 4 C is higher than that of SiC, the hardening ability of SiC produces a similar maximum strength

  10. The bulk and interfacial electronic and chemical structure of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Marcus Sky

    The chemical and electronic structure, as related to the surface, interface and bulk of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (a-BxC:H y), is of interest in neutron detection and microelectronics. This dissertation investigates the chemical and electronic structure of semiconducting thin-film a-BxC:Hy grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of ortho-carborane (1,2-C2B10H12). Experimental methods used include: x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies (XPS/UPS) and x-ray absorption/emission spectroscopies (XAS/XES). These methods were used to investigate the chemical species, bonding and hybridizations, and band gaps of a-BxC:Hy prepared or treated under varying conditions. Additionally, a detailed examination of the formation of Schottky barriers was implemented. Throughout this dissertation the chemical structure was studied. One study was to understand various growth conditions. The effects of the PECVD growth parameters were evaluated by comparing changes in atomic percentages (at.%'s) between thin-films from various substrate temperatures. Additionally, detailed studies of the photoelectron core level under two different growth conditions were undertaken to evaluate the effects of pre-/post- argon ion etching (Ar+) for the following: the chemical structural change for both an as grown (AG) and in-situ thermal treatment (500°C), and post Ar+ etch of samples thermally treated ranging from as grown to 850°C. The as grown and in-situ treated samples were used in conjunction to determine the formation of the Schottky barrier. The electronic structure was determined by the changes within the valence band of the thermally treated samples and formation of Schottky barrier. Thermally treated samples (as grown to 850°C) were further evaluated with respect to their occupied and unoccupied electronic states. The atomic percentage gave a stoichiometry range for a-B xC:Hy (given as x=1.5 to 3.0 with y= decreases with thermal treatment and Oz: z

  11. Microstructural Characterization and Influence of Ceramography Method on the Microhardness of Sintering Agents Added Silicon Carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Danilo Corrêa; Saleiro, Gisele Teixeira; Matias, Philipe Cardoso; Gomes, Alaelson Vieira; Ramos, Vitor; Campos, José Brant Brant de; Melo, Francisco Cristovão Lourenço de; Lima, Eduardo Sousa

    2017-01-01

    This study carried out the microstructural characterization, by light microscopy, of sintered SiC in the presence of liquid phase at temperatures of 1800, 1850 and 1900 ºC, added with Al2O3 and Y2O3 as well with Al2O3-YAG composite in the proportions of 5, 10 and 15% by weight. It was possible to observe the formation of microstructural patterns resulting from the heterogeneous segregation of the additives, such observation is associated to the pulling of additives during the initial stage of...

  12. Friction stir surfacing of cast A356 aluminium–silicon alloy with boron carbide and molybdenum disulphide powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Srinivasu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Good castability and high strength properties of Al–Si alloys are useful in defence applications like torpedoes, manufacture of Missile bodies, and parts of automobile such as engine cylinders and pistons. Poor wear resistance of the alloys is major limitation for their use. Friction stir processing (FSP is a recognized surfacing technique as it overcomes the problems of fusion route surface modification methods. Keeping in view of the requirement of improving wear resistance of cast aluminium–silicon alloy, friction stir processing was attempted for surface modification with boron carbide (B4C and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 powders. Metallography, micro compositional analysis, hardness and pin-on-disc wear testing were used for characterizing the surface composite coating. Microscopic study revealed breaking of coarse silicon needles and uniformly distributed carbides in the A356 alloy matrix after FSP. Improvement and uniformity in hardness was obtained in surface composite layer. Higher wear resistance was achieved in friction stir processed coating with carbide powders. Addition of solid lubricant MoS2 powder was found to improve wear resistance of the base metal significantly.

  13. Microstructural designs of spark-plasma sintered silicon carbide ceramic scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Román-Manso, B.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Concentrated ceramic inks based on β-SiC powders, with different amounts of Y2O3 and Al2O3 as sintering aids, are developed for the adequate production of SiC scaffolds, with different patterned morphologies, by the Robocasting technique. The densifi cation of the as-produced 3D structures, previously heat treated in air at 600 ºC for the organics burn-out, is achieved with a Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS furnace. The effects of the amount of sintering additives (7 - 20 wt. % and the size of the SiC powders (50 nm and 0.5 μm on the processing of the inks, microstructure, hardness and elastic modulus of the sintered scaffolds, are studied. The use of nano-sized β-SiC powders significantly restricts the attainable maximum solids volume fraction of the ink (0.32 compared to 0.44 of the submicron-sized powders-based ink, involving a much larger porosity of the green ceramic bodies. Furthermore, reduced amounts of additives improve the mechanical properties of the ceramic skeleton; particularly, the stiffness. The grain size and specific surface area of the starting powders, the ink solids content, green porosity, amount of sintering additives and SPS temperatures are the main parameters to be taken into account for the production of these SiC cellular ceramics.Se han fabricado andamiajes de carburo de silicio (SiC usando la técnica de “Robocasting”, a partir de tintas cerámicas conteniendo β-SiC y distintas cantidades de Y2O3 and Al2O3, como aditivos de sinterización. La densificación de las estructuras tridimensionales, previamente calcinadas a 600 ºC para eliminar los aditivos orgánicos, se realizó en un horno de “Spark Plasma Sintering” (SPS. Se analizó el efecto de la cantidad de aditivos de sinterización (7-20 % en peso y del tamaño de partícula inicial del polvo de SiC (50 nm y 0.5 μm en el procesado de las tintas, en la microestructura, la dureza y el módulo elástico de las estructuras sinterizadas. El uso de polvo

  14. Deterioration of yttria-stabilized zirconia by boron carbide alone or mixed with metallic or oxidized Fe, Cr, Zr mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bremaecker, A.; Ayrault, L.; Clément, B.

    2014-08-01

    In the frame of severe accident conditions (PHEBUS FPT3 test), different experiments were carried out on the interactions of 20% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and 20% ceria-stab zirconia with boron carbide or its oxidation products (B2O3): either tests under steam between 1230° and 1700 °C with B4C alone or B4C mixed with metals, either tests under Ar with boron oxide present in a mixture of iron and chromium oxides. In all cases an interaction was observed with formation of intergranular yttrium borate. At 1700 °C boron oxide is able to “pump out” the Y stabiliser from the YSZ grains but also some trace elements (Ca and Al) and to form a eutectic containing YBO3 and yttrium calcium oxy-borate (YCOB). At the same time a substantial swelling (“bloating”) of the zirconia happens, qualitatively similar to the foaming of irradiated fuel in contact with a Zr-melt. In all samples the lowering of the Y (or Ce)-content in the YSZ grains is so sharp that in the interaction layers zirconia is no longer stabilized. This is important when YSZ is envisaged as simulant of UO2 or as inert matrix for Am-transmutation.

  15. Zirconium Carbide Produced by Spark Plasma Sintering and Hot Pressing: Densification Kinetics, Grain Growth, and Thermal Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xialu Wei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Spark plasma sintering (SPS has been employed to consolidate a micron-sized zirconium carbide (ZrC powder. ZrC pellets with a variety of relative densities are obtained under different processing parameters. The densification kinetics of ZrC powders subjected to conventional hot pressing and SPS are comparatively studied by applying similar heating and loading profiles. Due to the lack of electric current assistance, the conventional hot pressing appears to impose lower strain rate sensitivity and higher activation energy values than those which correspond to the SPS processing. A finite element simulation is used to analyze the temperature evolution within the volume of ZrC specimens subjected to SPS. The control mechanism for grain growth during the final SPS stage is studied via a recently modified model, in which the grain growth rate dependence on porosity is incorporated. The constant pressure specific heat and thermal conductivity of the SPS-processed ZrC are determined to be higher than those reported for the hot-pressed ZrC and the benefits of applying SPS are indicated accordingly.

  16. Carbon nanotube and in-situ titanium carbide reinforced titanium diboride matrix composites synthesized by reactive spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthiselva, N.S.; Bakshi, Srinivasa R., E-mail: sbakshi@iitm.ac.in

    2016-04-29

    Mechanically milled powder mixtures of Titanium and Boron containing 1, 2, 4 and 6 vol% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) were consolidated by reactive spark plasma sintering resulting in TiB{sub 2}-TiC-CNT hybrid composites. Addition of CNT was found to affect the reaction rate for TiB{sub 2} formation which results in sudden volume shrinkage. Rod shaped TiC were formed due to reaction between Ti and CNT. TiB{sub 2}-TiC-CNT hybrid composites having more than 96% relative density with nanosized TiB{sub 2} grains were obtained. XRD results revealed TiB{sub 2} and TiC as major and minor phases respectively. Unreacted CNT were observed in SEM and TEM. TiB{sub 2}-TiC-CNT composites showed nanohardness of above 25 GPa and elastic modulus of 520 GPa. Indentation fracture toughness was improved by 55% (3.3±0.1 to 5.11±0.6) by the addition of 4 vol% of CNT. The effect of CNT addition on oxidation and co-efficient of thermal expansion is also presented.

  17. A comparative study on carbon, boron-nitride, boron-phosphide and silicon-carbide nanotubes based on surface electrostatic potentials and average local ionization energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D; Behzadi, Hadi

    2013-06-01

    A density functional theory study was carried out to predict the electrostatic potentials as well as average local ionization energies on both the outer and the inner surfaces of carbon, boron-nitride (BN), boron-phosphide (BP) and silicon-carbide (SiC) single-walled nanotubes. For each nanotube, the effect of tube radius on the surface potentials and calculated average local ionization energies was investigated. It is found that SiC and BN nanotubes have much stronger and more variable surface potentials than do carbon and BP nanotubes. For the SiC, BN and BP nanotubes, there are characteristic patterns of positive and negative sites on the outer lateral surfaces. On the other hand, a general feature of all of the systems studied is that stronger potentials are associated with regions of higher curvature. According to the evaluated surface electrostatic potentials, it is concluded that, for the narrowest tubes, the water solubility of BN tubes is slightly greater than that of SiC followed by carbon and BP nanotubes.

  18. Toughening effect of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes and their influence on the sintering behaviour of 3Y-TZP zirconia ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tatarko, Peter; Grasso, S.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Porwal, H.; Kasiarova, M.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Reece, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 7 (2014), s. 1829-1843 ISSN 0955-2219 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 - GLACERCO Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Zirconia * Boron nitride nanotubes * Composite * Spark plasma sintering * Toughening mechanism Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 2.947, year: 2014

  19. The development of microstructure during hydrogenation–disproportionation–desorption–recombination treatment of sintered neodymium-iron-boron-type magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheridan, R.S.; Harris, I.R.; Walton, A., E-mail: a.walton@bham.ac.uk

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen absorption and desorption characteristics of the hydrogenation disproportionation desorption and recombination (HDDR) process on scrap sintered neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) type magnets have been investigated. At each stage of the process, the microstructural changes have been studied using high resolution scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the disproportionation reaction initiates at grain boundaries and triple points and then propagates towards the centre of the matrix grains. This process was accelerated at particle surfaces and at free surfaces produced by any cracks in the powder particles. However, the recombination reaction appeared to initiate randomly throughout the particles with no apparent preference for particle surfaces or internal cracks. During the hydrogenation of the grain boundaries and triple junctions, the disproportionation reaction was, however, affected by the much higher oxygen content of the sintered NdFeB compared with that of the as-cast NdFeB alloys. Throughout the entire HDDR reaction the oxidised triple junctions (from the sintered structure) remained unreacted and hence, remained in their original form in the fine recombined microstructure. This resulted in a very significant reduction in the proportion of cavitation in the final microstructure and this could lend to improved consolidation in the recycled magnets. - Highlights: • Disproportionation reaction initiates at grain boundaries and triple points. • Disproportionation then propagates towards the centre of the matrix grains. • Disproportionation was affected by the high oxygen content of sintered NdFeB. • Oxidised triple points remain unreacted in original form in final HDDR structure. • Significant reduction in the proportion of cavitation in the final microstructure.

  20. The development of microstructure during hydrogenation–disproportionation–desorption–recombination treatment of sintered neodymium-iron-boron-type magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheridan, R.S.; Harris, I.R.; Walton, A.

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen absorption and desorption characteristics of the hydrogenation disproportionation desorption and recombination (HDDR) process on scrap sintered neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) type magnets have been investigated. At each stage of the process, the microstructural changes have been studied using high resolution scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the disproportionation reaction initiates at grain boundaries and triple points and then propagates towards the centre of the matrix grains. This process was accelerated at particle surfaces and at free surfaces produced by any cracks in the powder particles. However, the recombination reaction appeared to initiate randomly throughout the particles with no apparent preference for particle surfaces or internal cracks. During the hydrogenation of the grain boundaries and triple junctions, the disproportionation reaction was, however, affected by the much higher oxygen content of the sintered NdFeB compared with that of the as-cast NdFeB alloys. Throughout the entire HDDR reaction the oxidised triple junctions (from the sintered structure) remained unreacted and hence, remained in their original form in the fine recombined microstructure. This resulted in a very significant reduction in the proportion of cavitation in the final microstructure and this could lend to improved consolidation in the recycled magnets. - Highlights: • Disproportionation reaction initiates at grain boundaries and triple points. • Disproportionation then propagates towards the centre of the matrix grains. • Disproportionation was affected by the high oxygen content of sintered NdFeB. • Oxidised triple points remain unreacted in original form in final HDDR structure. • Significant reduction in the proportion of cavitation in the final microstructure.

  1. Phase Field Theory and Analysis of Pressure-Shear Induced Amorphization and Failure in Boron Carbide Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Clayton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear continuum phase field theory is developed to describe amorphization of crystalline elastic solids under shear and/or pressure loading. An order parameter describes the local degree of crystallinity. Elastic coefficients can depend on the order parameter, inelastic volume change may accompany the transition from crystal to amorphous phase, and transitional regions parallel to bands of amorphous material are penalized by interfacial surface energy. Analytical and simple numerical solutions are obtained for an idealized isotropic version of the general theory, for an element of material subjected to compressive and/or shear loading. Solutions compare favorably with experimental evidence and atomic simulations of amorphization in boron carbide, demonstrating the tendency for structural collapse and strength loss with increasing shear deformation and superposed pressure.

  2. Atomistic Origin of Brittle Failure of Boron Carbide from Large-Scale Reactive Dynamics Simulations: Suggestions toward Improved Ductility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A

    2015-09-04

    Ceramics are strong, but their low fracture toughness prevents extended engineering applications. In particular, boron carbide (B(4)C), the third hardest material in nature, has not been incorporated into many commercial applications because it exhibits anomalous failure when subjected to hypervelocity impact. To determine the atomistic origin of this brittle failure, we performed large-scale (∼200,000  atoms/cell) reactive-molecular-dynamics simulations of shear deformations of B(4)C, using the quantum-mechanics-derived reactive force field simulation. We examined the (0001)/⟨101̅0⟩ slip system related to deformation twinning and the (011̅1̅)/⟨1̅101⟩ slip system related to amorphous band formation. We find that brittle failure in B(4)C arises from formation of higher density amorphous bands due to fracture of the icosahedra, a unique feature of these boron based materials. This leads to negative pressure and cavitation resulting in crack opening. Thus, to design ductile materials based on B(4)C we propose alloying aimed at promoting shear relaxation through intericosahedral slip that avoids icosahedral fracture.

  3. The local physical structure of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide: insights from magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Michelle M; Li, Wenjing; Sky Driver, M; Karki, Sudarshan; Caruso, A N; Oyler, Nathan A

    2011-11-02

    Magic angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques are applied to the elucidation of the local physical structure of an intermediate product in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of thin-film amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (B(x)C:H(y)) from an orthocarborane precursor. Experimental chemical shifts are compared with theoretical shift predictions from ab initio calculations of model molecular compounds to assign atomic chemical environments, while Lee-Goldburg cross-polarization and heteronuclear recoupling experiments are used to confirm atomic connectivities. A model for the B(x)C:H(y) intermediate is proposed wherein the solid is dominated by predominantly hydrogenated carborane icosahedra that are lightly cross-linked via nonhydrogenated intraicosahedral B atoms, either directly through B-B bonds or through extraicosahedral hydrocarbon chains. While there is no clear evidence for extraicosahedral B aside from boron oxides, ∼40% of the C is found to exist as extraicosahedral hydrocarbon species that are intimately bound within the icosahedral network rather than in segregated phases.

  4. Site-specific electron-induced cross-linking of ortho-carborane to form semiconducting boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquale, Frank L.; Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2012-01-01

    Semiconducting boron carbide (B10C2Hx) films have been formed by bombardment of condensed ortho-carborane (closo-1,2-dicarbadodecaborane) multilayers on polycrystalline copper substrates by 200 eV electrons under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The film formation process was characterized by X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies. Electron bombardment results in the cross-linking of the icosahedral units. The cross-linking is accompanied by a shift in the B(1s) binding energy indicating site-specific cross-linking between two boron sites on adjacent carborane icosahedra. An additional shift in valence band binding energies attributed to the surface photovoltage effect is indicative of the formation of a p-type semiconductor. This is the first report of B10C2Hx formation by electron bombardment of condensed films, and the data indicate that this method is a viable route towards formation of ultra-thin films of tailored composition and cross-linkages for emerging nanoelectronics and sensor applications.

  5. Mechanical characterization of cemented carbide WC-6Co (%wt) manufactured by SPS (Spark Plasma Sintering; Caracterizacao mecanica de metal duro WC-6Co (%massa) sinterizado via SPS (Spark Plasma Sintering)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boidi, G.; Tertuliano, A.J.; Machado, I.F., E-mail: guido.boidi@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Mecatronica e Sistemas Mecanicos; Rodrigues, D. [BRATS- Filtros Sinterizados e Pos Metalicos, Cajamar, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    This work aimed to manufacture cemented carbide (WC-6%wtCo) obtained by SPS (Spark Plasma Sintering) process and to carry out the mechanical characterization by hardness and fracture toughness. The material was consolidated at 1100 deg C for different holding times (1 min, 5 min, 10 min), in order to evaluate the densification. A reference sample was also used to be compared to SPS. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were carried out to characterize the microstructural features of the samples and mechanical properties were obtained by hardness measurements (micro and macro) and instrumented indentation. The fracture toughness was calculated with the method of Palmqvist. Best results were found in the material sintered by SPS for 10 minutes of holding time, in which 97% of relative density and about 1600 HV{sub 10} was reached. (author)

  6. Deposition of Multicomponent Chromium Carbide Coatings Using a Non-Conventional Source of Chromium and Silicon with Micro-Additions of Boron

    OpenAIRE

    González Ruíz,Jesús Eduardo; Rodríguez Cristo,Alejandro; Paz Ramos,Adrian; Quintana Puchol,Rafael

    2017-01-01

    The chromium carbide coatings are widely used in the mechanical industry due to its corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In this work, we evaluated a new source of chromium and silicon with micro-additions of boron on the deposition of multi-component coatings of chromium carbides in W108 steel. The coatings were obtained by the pack cementation method, using a simultaneous deposition at 1000 oC for 4h. The coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray energy dispersive spectr...

  7. Valence band offset and Schottky barrier at amorphous boron and boron carbide interfaces with silicon and copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Sean W.; French, Marc; Xu, Guanghai; French, Benjamin; Jaehnig, Milt; Bielefeld, Jeff; Brockman, Justin; Kuhn, Markus

    2013-11-01

    In order to understand the fundamental charge transport in a-B:H and a-BX:H (X = C, N, P) compound heterostructure devices, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been utilized to determine the valence band offset and Schottky barrier present at amorphous boron compound interfaces formed with (1 0 0) Si and polished poly-crystalline Cu substrates. For interfaces formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of a-B4-5C:H on (1 0 0) Si, relatively small valence band offsets of 0.2 ± 0.2 eV were determined. For a-B:H/Cu interfaces, a more significant Schottky barrier of 0.8 ± 0.16 eV was measured. These results are in contrast to those observed for a-BN:H and BP where more significant band discontinuities (>1-2 eV) were observed for interfaces with Si and Cu.

  8. The possibility of the boronizing process on the pressed samples of iron powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Požega Emina D.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of the experimental investigation of the boronizing process on nonsintering iron powder samples (NC100.24, Höganäs, Sweden. Experiments are planned within the limits of applicability of simultaneous sintering at chemical-thermal treatment process (boronizing. The simlex plan of 15 experimental points was used for the experiment, while a polynomial function of fourth degree was employed in the modeling of a mixture composition based on the volume changes, porosity and the depth layer changes. Boronizing was carried out in mixture with born carbide by addition of ammonium bifluoride, ammonium chloride and boron potassium fluoride as activators, by proportion definited plan.

  9. Deposition of multicomponent chromium carbide coatings using a non-conventional source of chromium and silicon with micro-additions of boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Ruiz, Jesus Eduardo, E-mail: jesus.gonzalez@biomat.uh.cu [Biomaterials Center, University of Havana (Cuba); Rodriguez Cristo, Alejandro [Mechanical Plants Company, Road of the Sub-Plan, Farm La Cana, Santa Clara, Villa Clara (Cuba); Ramos, Adrian Paz [Department of Chemistry, Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Quintana Puchol, Rafael [Welding Research Center, Central University Marta Abreu of Las Villas, Villa Clara (Cuba)

    2017-01-15

    The chromium carbide coatings are widely used in the mechanical industry due to its corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In this work, we evaluated a new source of chromium and silicon with micro-additions of boron on the deposition of multi-component coatings of chromium carbides in W108 steel. The coatings were obtained by the pack cementation method, using a simultaneous deposition at 1000 deg for 4 hours. The coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, optical microscopy, microhardness test method and pin-on-disc wear test. It was found that the coatings formed on W108 steel were mainly constituted by (Cr,Fe){sub 23}C{sub 6} , (Cr,Fe){sub 7} C{sub 3} , Cr{sub 5-x}Si{sub 3-x} C{sub x+z}, Cr{sub 3} B{sub 0,44}C{sub 1,4} and (or) Cr{sub 7} BC{sub 4} . The carbide layers showed thicknesses between 14 and 15 μm and maximum values of microhardness between 15.8 and 18.8 GPa. Also, the micro-additions of boron to the mixtures showed statistically significant influence on the thickness, microhardness and abrasive wear resistance of the carbide coatings. (author)

  10. Simultaneous synthesis and consolidation of chromium carbides (Cr3C2, Cr7C3 and Cr23C6) by pulsed electric-current pressure sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Ken; Mitani, Kenichi; Yoshinaka, Masaru; Yamaguchi, Osamu

    2005-01-01

    Chromium carbides (Cr 3 C 2 , Cr 7 C 3 and Cr 23 C 6 ) have been synthesized and consolidated simultaneously from mixtures of Cr and amorphous carbon powders by pulsed electric-current pressure sintering (PECPS). Dense ceramics thus obtained were composed of chromium carbides with a small amount of Cr 2 O 3 , which originates from a trace amount of oxygen adsorbed on the as-received starting Cr powder. Synthesis and consolidation processes, which were observed from their shrinkage curves during PECPS, have been examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy for the powder compacts. Cr 3 C 2 ceramics sintered at 1300 deg. C for 10 min under 30 MPa have a 98.9% of theoretical density and fine structures with a 3.6 μm grain size. They exhibit excellent mechanical properties: a bending strength σ b of 690 MPa, a Vickers hardness H v of 18.9 GPa and a fracture toughness K IC of 7.1 MPa m 1/2

  11. Alkynyl substituted carboranes as precursors to boron carbide thin films, fibers and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.E.; Yang, X.; Hawthorne, M.F.; Mackenzie, J.D.; Thorne, K.J.; Zheng, H.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the use of alkynyl substituted derivatives of o-carborane as precursors to boron containing ceramics is described. These compounds undergo a thermally or photochemically induced polymerization to afford cross linked polyakynyl-o-carborane derivatives. The increase in molecular weight should allow for increased Tg's and the retention of modelled polymer preforms. In this report, these modification reactions are described. In addition, the retention of molded polymer preforms were analyzed after UV exposure and inert atmosphere pyrolysis

  12. Modifications of multi-wall carbon nanotubes with B-containing vapor and their effects on the properties of boron carbide matrix nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herth, S; Miranda, D; Doremus, R H; Siegel, R W

    2008-06-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes were modified by heating them together with elemental boron powder. B4C crystals grew on the surfaces of the nanotubes, and electron diffraction patterns showed an orientation dependence of the surface B4C and the underlying carbon in the nanotubes. There was no reaction of the nanotubes with solid B2O3 alone. Composites of the modified nanotubes in a B4C matrix showed a small increase of density over sintered B4C.

  13. Large-area homogeneous periodic surface structures generated on the surface of sputtered boron carbide thin films by femtosecond laser processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, R.; Oliveira, V.; Oliveira, J.C.; Kubart, T.; Vilar, R.; Cavaleiro, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Large-area LIPSS were formed by femtosecond laser processing B-C films surface. • The LIPSS spatial period increases with laser fluence (140–200 nm). • Stress-related sinusoidal-like undulations were formed on the B-C films surface. • The undulations amplitude (down to a few nanometres) increases with laser fluence. • Laser radiation absorption increases with surface roughness. - Abstract: Amorphous and crystalline sputtered boron carbide thin films have a very high hardness even surpassing that of bulk crystalline boron carbide (≈41 GPa). However, magnetron sputtered B-C films have high friction coefficients (C.o.F) which limit their industrial application. Nanopatterning of materials surfaces has been proposed as a solution to decrease the C.o.F. The contact area of the nanopatterned surfaces is decreased due to the nanometre size of the asperities which results in a significant reduction of adhesion and friction. In the present work, the surface of amorphous and polycrystalline B-C thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering was nanopatterned using infrared femtosecond laser radiation. Successive parallel laser tracks 10 μm apart were overlapped in order to obtain a processed area of about 3 mm 2 . Sinusoidal-like undulations with the same spatial period as the laser tracks were formed on the surface of the amorphous boron carbide films after laser processing. The undulations amplitude increases with increasing laser fluence. The formation of undulations with a 10 μm period was also observed on the surface of the crystalline boron carbide film processed with a pulse energy of 72 μJ. The amplitude of the undulations is about 10 times higher than in the amorphous films processed at the same pulse energy due to the higher roughness of the films and consequent increase in laser radiation absorption. LIPSS formation on the surface of the films was achieved for the three B-C films under study. However, LIPSS are formed under different

  14. Large-area homogeneous periodic surface structures generated on the surface of sputtered boron carbide thin films by femtosecond laser processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, R., E-mail: ricardo.serra@dem.uc.pt [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Oliveira, V. [ICEMS-Instituto de Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais e Superfícies, Avenida Rovisco Pais no 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Avenida Conselheiro Emídio Navarro no 1, 1959-007 Lisbon (Portugal); Oliveira, J.C. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Kubart, T. [The Ångström Laboratory, Solid State Electronics, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Vilar, R. [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Avenida Conselheiro Emídio Navarro no 1, 1959-007 Lisbon (Portugal); Instituto Superior Técnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais no 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Cavaleiro, A. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Large-area LIPSS were formed by femtosecond laser processing B-C films surface. • The LIPSS spatial period increases with laser fluence (140–200 nm). • Stress-related sinusoidal-like undulations were formed on the B-C films surface. • The undulations amplitude (down to a few nanometres) increases with laser fluence. • Laser radiation absorption increases with surface roughness. - Abstract: Amorphous and crystalline sputtered boron carbide thin films have a very high hardness even surpassing that of bulk crystalline boron carbide (≈41 GPa). However, magnetron sputtered B-C films have high friction coefficients (C.o.F) which limit their industrial application. Nanopatterning of materials surfaces has been proposed as a solution to decrease the C.o.F. The contact area of the nanopatterned surfaces is decreased due to the nanometre size of the asperities which results in a significant reduction of adhesion and friction. In the present work, the surface of amorphous and polycrystalline B-C thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering was nanopatterned using infrared femtosecond laser radiation. Successive parallel laser tracks 10 μm apart were overlapped in order to obtain a processed area of about 3 mm{sup 2}. Sinusoidal-like undulations with the same spatial period as the laser tracks were formed on the surface of the amorphous boron carbide films after laser processing. The undulations amplitude increases with increasing laser fluence. The formation of undulations with a 10 μm period was also observed on the surface of the crystalline boron carbide film processed with a pulse energy of 72 μJ. The amplitude of the undulations is about 10 times higher than in the amorphous films processed at the same pulse energy due to the higher roughness of the films and consequent increase in laser radiation absorption. LIPSS formation on the surface of the films was achieved for the three B-C films under study. However, LIPSS are formed under

  15. Surface modification of the hard metal tungsten carbide-cobalt by boron ion implantation; Oberflaechenmodifikation des Hartmetalls Wolframkarbid-Kobalt durch Bor-Ionenimplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrotchek, I.

    2007-09-07

    In the present thesis ion beam implantation of boron is studied as method for the increasement of the hardness and for the improvement of the operational characteristics of cutting tools on the tungsten carbide-cobalt base. For the boron implantation with 40 keV energy and {approx}5.10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} fluence following topics were shown: The incoerporation of boron leads to a deformation and remaining strain of the WC lattice, which possesses different stregth in the different directions of the elementary cell. The maximum of the deformation is reached at an implantation temperature of 450 C. The segregation of the new phases CoWB and Co{sub 3}W was detected at 900 C implantation temperature. At lower temperatures now new phases were found. The tribological characteristics of WC-Co are improved. Hereby the maxiaml effect was measured for implantation temperatures from 450 C to 700 C: Improvement of the microhardness by the factor 2..2.5, improvement of the wear resistance by the factor 4. The tribological effects extend to larger depths than the penetration depth of the boron implantation profile. The detected property improvements of the hard metal H3 show the possibility of a practical application of boron ion implantation in industry. The effects essential for a wer decreasement are a hardening of the carbide phase by deformation of the lattice, a hardening of the cobalt binding material and the phase boundaries because of the formation of a solid solution of the implanted boron atoms in Co and by this a blocking of the dislocation movement and the rupture spreading under load.

  16. On the sintering behaviour of steel bonded TiC-Cr3C2 and TiC-Cr3C2-WC mixed carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojanov, L.G.; Exner, H.E.

    1978-01-01

    Powder mixtures of TiC+Cr 3 C 2 and TiC+Cr 3 C 2 + WC were hot pressed to nearly full density. The lattice parameter of the resulting cubic mixed crystal decreases linearly with increasing additions of Cr 3 C 2 and (Cr 3 C 2 +WC 1:1). Microhardness increases with Cr 3 C 2 content up to 20 wt.%. By addition of WC, microhardness is increased further and reaches a maximum value of approx. 38 000 MN/m 2 for 20 wt.% Cr 3 C 2 and 20 wt.% WC. From these solid solutions powder compositions of Ferro-TiC type were produced by milling with 55 wt.% Fe and 0.4 wt.% C. The sintering behaviour of these powders was studied in a vacuum dilatometer. The pronounced increase of shrinkage by Cr 3 C 2 and higher amounts of Cr 3 C 2 +WC dissolved in TiC previous to binder phase melting is attributed to the increased solubility of the carbide in solid iron. Presintering at 700 0 C in hydrogen has a negative influence on sintering activity and requires much higher temperatures for complete densification during subsequent vacuum sintering. (orig.) [de

  17. Photoluminescence and Raman Spectroscopy Characterization of Boron- and Nitrogen-Doped 6H Silicon Carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Liu, Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen-boron doped 6H-SiC epilayers grown on low off-axis 6H-SiC substrates have been characterized by photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. The photoluminescence results show that a doping larger than 1018 cm-3 is favorable to observe the luminescence and addition of nitrogen is resulting...... in an increased luminescence. A dopant concentration difference larger than 4x1018 cm-3 is proposed to achieve intense photoluminescence. Raman spectroscopy further confirmed the doping type and concentrations for the samples. The results indicate that N-B doped SiC is being a good wavelength converter in white...

  18. Mechanical and wear behaviour of AZ91D magnesium matrix hybrid composite reinforced with boron carbide and graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Aatthisugan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this experimental study, magnesium (AZ91D based boron carbide (B4C and graphite (Gr particle reinforced hybrid composite materials were manufactured by stir casting. The tribological and mechanical properties of these composite materials were investigated. The results of the tests revealed that the graphite reinforced hybrid composites exhibited a lower wear loss compared to the unreinforced AZ91D alloy and AZ91D–B4C composites. It was found that with an increase in the B4C content, the wear resistance increased monotonically with hardness and ultimate tensile strength decreased. This study revealed that the addition of both a hard reinforcement (e.g., B4C and soft reinforcement (e.g., graphite significantly improves the wear resistance of magnesium composites. These entire results designate that the hybrid magnesium composites can be considered as an excellent material where high strength, ultimate tensile strength and wear-resistant components are of major importance, primarily in the aerospace and automotive engineering sectors.

  19. Unique Boron Carbide Nanoparticle Nanobio Interface: Effects on Protein-RNA Interactions and 3-D Spheroid Metastatic Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delong, Robert K; Hurst, Miranda N; Aryal, Santosh; Inchun, Nantipoor K

    2016-05-01

    The effect of boron carbide (B4C) nanoparticles (NP) on protein-RNA complexes and metastatic phenotype of 3-D tumor spheroids was investigated. Characterization was performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), zeta potential (ZP), 2-dimensional fluorescence difference spectroscopy (2-D FDS), gel electrophoresis, MTT, haemolysis and 3-D tumor spheroid assays. TEM showed NP were homogenous (≤50 nm) and spherical in shape. Zeta potential (ζ) of NP (-43.3) shifted upon protein:RNA interaction (+26.9). Protein:RNA complex interaction with NP was confirmed by 2-D FDS, demonstrating excitation/emission blue shift and lowered fluorescence intensity, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), where presence of B4C ablated visualization of the complex. B4C NP cytotoxicity was less than zinc oxide by MTT assay, protected haemolysis and effected 3-D tumor spheroid metastatic phenotype. Nanobio interface of B4C nanoparticles is unique and its anticancer potential may be mediated by altering protein and RNA interactions. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. Densification of boron carbide at relatively low temperatures by hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telle, R.

    1988-01-01

    The poor sinterability of B 4 C limits its widespread application because both high temperatures and high pressures are required for a complete densification. Moreover, B 4 C suffers from a low strength and fracture toughness, possesses, however, a high potential because of its extreme hardness. Reaction hot pressing of B 4 C-WC-TiC-Si-Co mixtures resulting in B 4 C-TiB 2 -W 2 B 5 composites of high density exhibit remarkable mechanical properties. The influence of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) on the microstructure and the mechanical properties is investigated in cooperation with participants of the COST 503 activities and related to the strengthening and toughening mechanisms. Difficulties during densification by HIP arise from the evaporation of adsorbed volatiles as well as from the strong swelling of the powder compact due to the sintering reaction. Several HIP cycle designs were tested in order to prevent the bloating of the capsule and to control internal stresses due to the misfit of the thermal expansion of the entire phases. In comparison to single phase B 4 C ceramics, bending strength was improved to 1030 MPa, K Ic to 5.2 MPa/m, while hardness was comparable with HV1=38 GPa. Wear test were performed and related to the toughening mechanisms. (orig.) With 56 refs., 9 tabs., 64 figs

  1. Hot isostatic compression sintering and spark plasma sintering of silicon carbides nano-particles synthesized at the pilot scale by laser pyrolysis; Frittage par compression isostatique a chaud (CIC) et spark plasma sintering (SPS) de nanoparticules en carbure de silicium (SiC) synthetisees a echelle pilote par pyrolyse laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengeot, C.; Guizard, B.; Tenegal, F. [CEA-Saclay, DRT/ DTNM/LTMEx, batiment 460, 91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Poissonnet, S.; Boulanger, L. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DMN/SRMP, batiment 520, 91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Le Flem, M. [CEA-Saclay, DEN/DMN/SRMA/LA2M, batiment 453, 91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Guillard, F. [CNRS/CEMES - 29, avenue Jeanne Marvig P 4347, 055 Toulouse cedex 4 (France)

    2006-07-01

    Silicon carbide particles (20 nm) synthesized by pilot scale laser pyrolysis and previously compacted at more than 1 GPa with or without sintering additions (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) have been sintered by hot isostatic compression and spark plasma. For the sintered samples without additions, densification rates of about 95% have been obtained by hot isostatic compression whereas by spark plasma sintering, these densification rates are inferior to 80%. In presence of additions, with the two methods it has been possible to densify the materials at values near of 100%. The weaker grain size after sintering have been observed for samples sintered by hot isostatic compression (without additions: about 35 nm and with additions: about 100-200 nm) whereas by spark plasma the grain sizes are typically between 100 nm and 1 {mu}m. An estimation of the basic mechanical properties has revealed an optimum of hardness (25 GPa) for sizes of monocrystalline areas of 200 nm corresponding too to an optimum of fracture toughness (6.5 MPa m{sup 1/2}). (O.M.)

  2. Effect of self-bias on the elemental composition and neutron absorption of boron carbide films deposited by RF plasma enhanced CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bute, A., E-mail: butearundhati@gmail.com [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Jagannath, E-mail: ssai@barc.gov.in [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kar, R., E-mail: rajibkar@barc.gov.in [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Chopade, S.S., E-mail: supriyagindalkar@rediffmail.com [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Desai, S.S., E-mail: ssdesai@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Deo, M.N., E-mail: mndeo@barc.gov.in [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Rao, Pritty, E-mail: praocccm@rediffmail.com [The National Centre for Compositional Characterization of Materials, Hyderabad (India); Chand, N., E-mail: naresh@barc.gov.in [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kumar, S., E-mail: sanjivcccm@rediffmail.com [The National Centre for Compositional Characterization of Materials, Hyderabad (India); Singh, K., E-mail: singhkw@barc.gov.in [Fusion Reactor Material Section, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Patil, D.S., E-mail: dspatil@iitb.ac.in [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Sinha, S., E-mail: ssinha@barc.gov.in [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-10-01

    Boron carbide films are increasingly being investigated for their application in new generation neutron detectors. It is implemented as conversion layer for neutrons and emerging as a potential alternative to {sup 3}He based detectors. This work reports synthesis of boron carbide (B{sub x}C) films from ortho-carborane (o-C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) by radio frequency (RF) plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique. Dependence of chemical composition, stoichiometry and total macroscopic cross section (Σ{sub t}) has been studied as a function of self-bias on the substrate, varied in the range −75 V to −175 V. Films were characterized by 3D optical profilometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), proton elastic backscattering spectrometry (p-EBS), Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). Characterization results show noticeable change in the bulk as well as surface chemical composition, surface morphology and film stoichiometry with self-bias. Neutron transmission measurements exhibit increase in Σ{sub t} from 170.47 cm{sup −1} for −75 V film to 273.38 cm{sup −1} for −175 V film with self-bias. - Highlights: • Boron carbide films were deposited by RF PECVD, varying substrate RF self-bias. • B/C ratio increased with decreasing RF self-bias leading to boron rich B{sub x}C films. • Total macroscopic cross section for neutrons Σ{sub t} is found to increase with self-bias. • Higher bias caused rise in oxygen impurity in films and decrease in film stability.

  3. Carbide/nitride grain refined rare earth-iron-boron permanent magnet and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, R.W.; Branagan, D.J.

    1996-01-23

    A method of making a permanent magnet is disclosed wherein (1) a melt is formed having a base alloy composition comprising RE, Fe and/or Co, and B (where RE is one or more rare earth elements) and (2) TR (where TR is a transition metal selected from at least one of Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Al) and at least one of C and N are provided in the base alloy composition melt in substantially stoichiometric amounts to form a thermodynamically stable compound (e.g. TR carbide, nitride or carbonitride). The melt is rapidly solidified in a manner to form particulates having a substantially amorphous (metallic glass) structure and a dispersion of primary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates. The amorphous particulates are heated above the crystallization temperature of the base alloy composition to nucleate and grow a hard magnetic phase to an optimum grain size and to form secondary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates dispersed at grain boundaries. The crystallized particulates are consolidated at an elevated temperature to form a shape. During elevated temperature consolidation, the primary and secondary precipitates act to pin the grain boundaries and minimize deleterious grain growth that is harmful to magnetic properties. 33 figs.

  4. Hardness depth profile of lattice strained cemented carbide modified by high-energy boron ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Y.; Matsumura, A.; Higeta, K.; Inoue, T.; Shimizu, S.; Motonami, Y.; Sato, M.; Sadahiro, T.; Fujii, K.

    1991-07-01

    The hardness depth profiles of cemented carbides which were implanted with high-energy B + ions have been estimated using a dynamic microhardness tester. The B + implantations into (16% Co)-cemented WC alloys were carried out under conditions where the implantation energies were 1-3 MeV and the fluences 1 × 10 17-1 × 10 18ions/cm 2. The profiles show that the implanted layer becomes harder as fluences are chosen at higher values and there is a peak at a certain depth which depends on the implantation energy. In X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of the implanted surface the broadened refraction peaks of only WC and Co are detected and the increments of lattice strain and of residual stress in the near-surface region are observed. It is supposed that the hardening effect should be induced by an increase in residual stress produced by lattice strain. The hardness depth profile in successive implantation of ions with different energies agrees with the compounded profile of each one of the implantations. It is concluded that the hardness depth profile can be controlled under adequate conditions of implantation.

  5. The reaction of H 2O, O 2 and energetic O 2+ on boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiwara, N.; Jimbou, R.; Saidoh, M.; Michizono, S.; Saito, Y.; Mori, K.; Morita, K.

    1994-09-01

    Reaction of polycrystalline B 4C with energetic O 2+ was investigated mainly using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). For 5 keV O 2+ irradiation, all of the irradiated oxygen was retained up to the fluence of 2 × 10 17 O/cm 2 in a temperature range from RT to 600°C. The areal density of saturated retention was ˜ 3 × 10 17 O/cm 2. The release of the implanted oxygen begins above 600°C and almost all the oxygen desorbs at ˜ 1000°C. The depth profile of oxygen retained at RT had a big maximum around 8 nm, while the depth profile at 600°C had a broad peak near 8 nm. In contrast to the above results by RBS, retained oxygen was hardly measured by Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with Ar + sputtering. This implies that there are at least two types of trapped states: one is the physically trapped state of a gaseous form (CO or O 2) and the other is a chemically bound state (BO bond). It was also found that boron oxide is formed even at RT using simultaneous electron/He + irradiation during H 2O exposure, while the oxygen molecule scarcely reacts with the B 4C surface under the simultaneous irradiation of electron/He +.

  6. Ab initio calculations of mechanical, thermodynamic and electronic structure properties of mullite, iota-alumina and boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Sita Ram

    The alumino-silicate solid solution series (Al 4+2xSi2-2 xO10-x) is an important class of ceramics. Except for the end member (x=0), Al2 SiO5 the crystal structures of the other phases, called mullite, have partially occupied sites. Stoichiometric supercell models for the four mullite phases 3Al2O 3 · 2SiO2 · 2Al 2O3 · SiO2, 4 Al2O3· SiO 2, 9Al2O3 · SiO2, and iota-Al2 O3 (iota-alumina) are constructed starting from experimentally reported crystal structures. A large number of models were built for each phase and relaxed using the Vienna ab initio simulation package (VASP) program. The model with the lowest total energy for a given x was chosen as the representative structure for that phase. Electronic structure and mechanical properties of mullite phases were studied via first-principles calculations. Of the various phases of transition alumina, iota-Al 2O3 is the least well known. In addition structural details have not, until now, been available. It is the end member of the aluminosilicate solid solution series with x=1. Based on a high alumina content mullite phase, a structural model for iota- Al2O3 is constructed. The simulated x-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of this model agrees well with a measured XRD pattern. The iota-Al2 O3 is a highly disordered ultra-low-density phase of alumina with a theoretical density of 2854kg/m3. Using this theoretically constructed model, elastic, thermodynamic, electronic, and spectroscopic properties of iota-Al2 O3 have been calculated and compared it with those of alpha- Al2O3 and gamma- Al2O3. Boron carbide (B4C) undergoes an amorphization under high velocity impacts. The mechanism of amorphization is not clear. Ab initio methods are used to carry out large-scale uniaxial compression simulations on two polytypes of stoichiometric boron carbide (B4C), B 11C-CBC, and B12- CCC where B11C or B12 is the 12-atom icosahedron and CBC or CCC is the three-atom chain. The simulations were performed on large supercells of 180 atoms

  7. Equation of state, adiabatic sound speed, and Grüneisen coefficient of boron carbide along the principal Hugoniot to 700 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratanduono, D. E.; Celliers, P. M.; Braun, D. G.; Sterne, P. A.; Hamel, S.; Shamp, A.; Zurek, E.; Wu, K. J.; Lazicki, A. E.; Millot, M.; Collins, G. W.

    2016-11-01

    A equation of state (EOS) experimental technique that enables the study of thermodynamic derivatives into the TPa regime is described and applied to boron carbide (B4C ). Data presented here are principal Hugoniot sound speed measurements reported using a laser-driven shock platform, providing a means to explore the high-pressure off-Hugoniot response of opaque materials. The extended B4C Hugoniot suggests the presence of a high-pressure phase, as recently predicted by molecular dynamics simulations, adding to the complexity of the existing phase diagram.

  8. Photo-induced site-specific nitridation of plasma-deposited B 10C 2H x films: A new pathway toward post-deposition doping of semiconducting boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Swayambhu; Wilks, Justin; Dowben, Peter A.; Driver, M. Sky; Caruso, A. N.; Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2010-10-01

    We show that dopant impurities can be introduced in a controlled, site-specific manner into pre-deposited semiconducting boron carbide films. B―N bond formation has been characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for semiconducting B 10C 2H x films exposed to vacuum ultraviolet photons in the presence of NH 3. Core level photoemission data indicate that B―NH 2 bonds are formed at B sites bonded to other boron atoms (B―B), and not at boron atoms adjacent to carbon atoms (B―C) or at carbon atom sites. Nitridation obeys diffusion-limited kinetics. These results indicate that dopant species can be introduced in a controlled, site-specific manner into pre-deposited boron carbide films, as opposed to currently required dopant incorporation during the deposition process.

  9. Influence of high sintering pressure on the microhardness and wear resistance of diamond powder and silicon carbide-based composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osipov Oleksandr Sergueevitch

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The work reported on here involved the development of several samples of "diamond-SiC" composite produced under sintering pressures of up to 9.0 GPa at temperatures of up to 1973 7K. The average size of the diamond micropowder crystals used was 40/28 µm. The sintering process was carried out in a 2500-ton hydraulic press equipped with an anvil-type high-pressure device having a toroidal work surface and a central concavity diameter of 20 mm. The microhardness and wear resistance of the samples were found to be dependent on the sintering pressure. The experimental results indicated that the maximum microhardness and minimum wear resistance coefficients of each compact were attained when the pressure applied during sintering exceeded 6.5 GPa. Based on the established values of pressure, this study served to identify the types of devices applicable for the manufacture of composite material inserts for a variety of rock drilling applications.

  10. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, T. J.; Winterbottom, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Work performed to develop silicon carbide materials of high strength and to form components of complex shape and high reliability is described. A beta-SiC powder and binder system was adapted to the injection molding process and procedures and process parameters developed capable of providing a sintered silicon carbide material with improved properties. The initial effort has been to characterize the baseline precursor materials (beta silicon carbide powder and boron and carbon sintering aids), develop mixing and injection molding procedures for fabricating test bars, and characterize the properties of the sintered materials. Parallel studies of various mixing, dewaxing, and sintering procedures have been carried out in order to distinguish process routes for improving material properties. A total of 276 MOR bars of the baseline material have been molded, and 122 bars have been fully processed to a sinter density of approximately 95 percent. The material has a mean MOR room temperature strength of 43.31 ksi (299 MPa), a Weibull characteristic strength of 45.8 ksi (315 MPa), and a Weibull modulus of 8.0. Mean values of the MOR strengths at 1000, 1200, and 14000 C are 41.4, 43.2, and 47.2 ksi, respectively. Strength controlling flaws in this material were found to consist of regions of high porosity and were attributed to agglomerates originating in the initial mixing procedures. The mean stress rupture lift at 1400 C of five samples tested at 172 MPa (25 ksi) stress was 62 hours and at 207 MPa (30 ksi) stress was 14 hours. New fluid mixing techniques have been developed which significantly reduce flaw size and improve the strength of the material. Initial MOR tests indicate the strength of the fluid-mixed material exceeds the baseline property by more than 33 percent.

  11. High hardness BaCb-(BxOy/BN) composites with 3D mesh-like fine grain-boundary structure by reactive spark plasma sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasylkiv, Oleg; Borodianska, Hanna; Badica, Petre; Grasso, Salvatore; Sakka, Yoshio; Tok, Alfred; Su, Liap Tat; Bosman, Michael; Ma, Jan

    2012-02-01

    Boron carbide B4C powders were subject to reactive spark plasma sintering (also known as field assisted sintering, pulsed current sintering or plasma assisted sintering) under nitrogen atmosphere. For an optimum hexagonal BN (h-BN) content estimated from X-ray diffraction measurements at approximately 0.4 wt%, the as-prepared BaCb-(BxOy/BN) ceramic shows values of Berkovich and Vickers hardness of 56.7 +/- 3.1 GPa and 39.3 +/- 7.6 GPa, respectively. These values are higher than for the vacuum SPS processed B4C pristine sample and the h-BN -mechanically-added samples. XRD and electronic microscopy data suggest that in the samples produced by reactive SPS in N2 atmosphere, and containing an estimated amount of 0.3-1.5% h-BN, the crystallite size of the boron carbide grains is decreasing with the increasing amount of N2, while for the newly formed lamellar h-BN the crystallite size is almost constant (approximately 30-50 nm). BN is located at the grain boundaries between the boron carbide grains and it is wrapped and intercalated by a thin layer of boron oxide. BxOy/BN forms a fine and continuous 3D mesh-like structure that is a possible reason for good mechanical properties.

  12. Optical properties of boron carbide near the boron K edge evaluated by soft-x-ray reflectometry from a Ru/B(4)C multilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksenzov, Dmitriy; Panzner, Tobias; Schlemper, Christoph; Morawe, Christian; Pietsch, Ullrich

    2009-12-10

    Soft-x-ray Bragg reflection from two Ru/B(4)C multilayers with 10 and 63 periods was used for independent determination of both real and imaginary parts of the refractive index n = 1 - delta + ibeta close to the boron K edge (approximately 188 eV). Prior to soft x-ray measurements, the structural parameters of the multilayers were determined by x-ray reflectometry using hard x rays. For the 63-period sample, the optical properties based on the predictions made for elemental boron major deviations were found close to the K edge of boron for the 10-period sample explained by chemical bonding of boron to B(4)C and various boron oxides.

  13. Study of the processes of changing the crystal structure of boron carbide after the destruction of a nuclear reactor as a result of earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammadov, Kh.; Mirzayev, M.; Garibov, R.; Allahverdiyev, G.

    2017-01-01

    The territories of the Trans Caucasian Republics are characterized by high seismic activity. Therefore, the occurrence of cases of anthropogenic catastrophe including in the territories of nuclear reactors is not ruled out in case of natural disasters. Studies to create detectors based on B 4 C for recording ''cold'', ''hot'' and ''fast'' neutrons in order to increase the safety of nuclear reactors have been carried out in recent years. The B 4 C crystal structure is highly stable at relatively large intervals of temperature and pressure. The study of the thermo physical properties of samples of boron carbide irradiated with ionizing beams is interesting from the point of view to study of the stability of the structure and the stability of this compound. The thermal properties of B 4 C irradiated with ionizing γ radiation from a 60''Co source were investigated using the differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) methods. Upon irradiation with ionizing γ rays, a discrete change in the energy of the atoms occurs at the sites of the crystal lattice, the formation of active centers (radicals, ions, electrons), defects in the crystal lattice, the evaporation of crystalline hydrates, which are present in small amounts in bulk and crystalline compounds. The melting point of B 2 O 3 is 723 K, for boron 2348 K, for B 4 C 2623 K. The melting enthalpy for B 2 O 3 is 24.6 kJ/mol. With increasing temperature, the heat capacity and entropy of the non irradiated and irradiated B 4 C samples are increased. The nature of the change in the enthalpy and the Gibbs potential with increasing temperature depends on the presence of oxygen upon irradiation and during thermogravimetric analysis in the temperature range 298-1300 K. Changes in the values of thermodynamic functions occur due to the formation (under the influence of ionizing radiation) of excited atoms, active centers, defects in the crystal structure of

  14. Cubic silicon carbide and boron nitride as possible primary pressure calibrants for high pressure and temperature scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, K. K.; Goncharov, A. F.; Tkachev, S. N.; Prakapenka, V.

    2010-12-01

    K. K. Zhuravlev, A. F. Goncharov Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington DC, 20015 V. Prakapenka, S. N. Tkachev CARS, the University of Chicago, Bldg. 434A, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass. Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 Abstract Since its introduction, ruby-based pressure scale (Mao et al., 1986) has been the most commonly used by the high-pressure scientific community. However, it has limited use at elevated temperatures, due to the weakening and broadening of the ruby fluorescence line. The recent developments in the field of high temperature, high pressure physics and geophysics require some alternative pressure scale, which will be capable of measuring pressures at temperatures up to 3000 K. Cubic boron nitride (cBN) was recently (Goncharov et al., 2005) proposed as the possible pressure calibrant. It has been suggested that the simultaneous use of x-ray diffraction to measure density and Brillouin spectroscopy to obtain elastic properties of the crystal can be used to construct the pressure scale independent of any other pressure standards, i.e. cBN can be a primary pressure calibrant. However, the acoustic velocities of cBN are very close to those of diamond and, therefore, are hard to resolve in experiment at high pressures in diamond-anvil cell. Another possible primary pressure calibrant is cubic silicon carbide (SiC-3C). Its density and elastic parameters are quite different from the diamond ones and it is stable over the broad range of temperatures and pressures (up to 1 Mbar). SiC-3C is transparent and allows the use of Brillouin spectroscopy. Additionally, SiC-3C has two strong Raman lines, which can be used for the optical in situ pressure measurements. We report our experimental data on both cBN and SiC-3C and show that they, indeed, can be used in constructing reliable and accurate high-pressure, high-temperature scale. We performed single crystal x-ray diffraction and Brillouin

  15. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide-boron carbide composite pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1994-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide-boron carbide composite pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Boron by Titrimetry 7 to 13 Separation of Boron for Mass Spectrometry 14 to 19 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrometry 20 to 23 Separation of Halides by Pyrohydrolysis 24 to 27 Fluoride by Ion-Selective Electrode 28 to 30 Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 31 to 33 Trace Elements by Emission Spectroscopy 34 to 46 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. (F...

  16. Optimization of Gas Composition Used in Plasma Chemical Vaporization Machining for Figuring of Reaction-Sintered Silicon Carbide with Low Surface Roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rongyan; Yang, Xu; Ohkubo, Yuji; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2018-02-05

    In recent years, reaction-sintered silicon carbide (RS-SiC) has been of interest in many engineering fields because of its excellent properties, such as its light weight, high rigidity, high heat conductance and low coefficient of thermal expansion. However, RS-SiC is difficult to machine owing to its high hardness and chemical inertness and because it contains multiple components. To overcome the problem of the poor machinability of RS-SiC in conventional machining, the application of atmospheric-pressure plasma chemical vaporization machining (AP-PCVM) to RS-SiC was proposed. As a highly efficient and damage-free figuring technique, AP-PCVM has been widely applied for the figuring of single-component materials, such as Si, SiC, quartz crystal wafers, and so forth. However, it has not been applied to RS-SiC since it is composed of multiple components. In this study, we investigated the AP-PCVM etching characteristics for RS-SiC by optimizing the gas composition. It was found that the different etching rates of the different components led to a large surface roughness. A smooth surface was obtained by applying the optimum gas composition, for which the etching rate of the Si component was equal to that of the SiC component.

  17. The influence of hydrogen on the chemical, mechanical, optical/electronic, and electrical transport properties of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordell, Bradley J.; Karki, Sudarshan; Nguyen, Thuong D.; Rulis, Paul; Caruso, A. N.; Paquette, Michelle M.; Purohit, Sudhaunshu S.; Li, Han; King, Sean W.; Dutta, Dhanadeep; Gidley, David; Lanford, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Because of its high electrical resistivity, low dielectric constant (κ), high thermal neutron capture cross section, and robust chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties, amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (a-B x C:H y ) has garnered interest as a material for low-κ dielectric and solid-state neutron detection applications. Herein, we investigate the relationships between chemical structure (atomic concentration B, C, H, and O), physical/mechanical properties (density, porosity, hardness, and Young's modulus), electronic structure [band gap, Urbach energy (E U ), and Tauc parameter (B 1/2 )], optical/dielectric properties (frequency-dependent dielectric constant), and electrical transport properties (resistivity and leakage current) through the analysis of a large series of a-B x C:H y thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition from ortho-carborane. The resulting films exhibit a wide range of properties including H concentration from 10% to 45%, density from 0.9 to 2.3 g/cm 3 , Young's modulus from 10 to 340 GPa, band gap from 1.7 to 3.8 eV, Urbach energy from 0.1 to 0.7 eV, dielectric constant from 3.1 to 7.6, and electrical resistivity from 10 10 to 10 15 Ω cm. Hydrogen concentration is found to correlate directly with thin-film density, and both are used to map and explain the other material properties. Hardness and Young's modulus exhibit a direct power law relationship with density above ∼1.3 g/cm 3 (or below ∼35% H), below which they plateau, providing evidence for a rigidity percolation threshold. An increase in band gap and decrease in dielectric constant with increasing H concentration are explained by a decrease in network connectivity as well as mass/electron density. An increase in disorder, as measured by the parameters E U and B 1/2 , with increasing H concentration is explained by the release of strain in the network and associated decrease in structural disorder. All of these correlations in a

  18. Boron carbides formed by coevaporation of B and C atoms: Vapor reactivity, BxC1-x composition, and bonding structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretti, I.; Gago, R.; Albella, J. M.; Jiménez, I.

    2008-05-01

    Boron carbides (BxC1-x) in thin film form have been synthesized in a high vacuum by coevaporation of B and C atoms from independent sources, allowing a study of the whole composition range from pure B films to pure C films. The relationship between the impinging B/C atomic fluxes and the film composition has been studied, providing information on the chemical reactivity between the B and C vapors. The composition was determined with x-ray emission energy dispersion spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). Finally, the bonding structure of the films has been determined by XANES, showing a change from structures based on B12 -icosahedral units for the B-rich samples to hexagonal-like structures for the C-rich samples. The study shows that the structural transition takes place for xtilde 0.5 .

  19. Titanium carbide-carbon porous nanocomposite materials for radioactive ion beam production: processing, sintering and isotope release properties

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081922; Stora, Thierry

    2017-01-26

    The Isotope Separator OnLine (ISOL) technique is used at the ISOLDE - Isotope Separator OnLine DEvice facility at CERN, to produce radioactive ion beams for physics research. At CERN protons are accelerated to 1.4 GeV and made to collide with one of two targets located at ISOLDE facility. When the protons collide with the target material, nuclear reactions produce isotopes which are thermalized in the bulk of the target material grains. During irradiation the target is kept at high temperatures (up to 2300 °C) to promote diffusion and effusion of the produced isotopes into an ion source, to produce a radioactive ion beam. Ti-foils targets are currently used at ISOLDE to deliver beams of K, Ca and Sc, however they are operated at temperatures close to their melting point which brings target degradation, through sintering and/or melting which reduces the beam intensities over time. For the past 10 years, nanostructured target materials have been developed and have shown improved release rates of the produced i...

  20. Delivery of Cisplatin Anti-Cancer Drug from Carbon, Boron Nitride, and Silicon Carbide Nanotubes Forced by Ag-Nanowire: A Comprehensive Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrjouei, Esmat; Akbarzadeh, Hamed; Shamkhali, Amir Nasser; Abbaspour, Mohsen; Salemi, Sirous; Abdi, Pooya

    2017-07-03

    In this work, liberation of cisplatin molecules from interior of a nanotube due to entrance of an Ag-nanowire inside it was simulated by classical molecular dynamics method. The aim of this simulation was investigation on the effects of diameter, chirality, and composition of the nanotube, as well as the influence of temperature on this process. For this purpose, single walled carbon, boron nitride, and silicon carbide nanotube were considered. In order for a more concise comparison of the results, a new parameter namely efficiency of drug release, was introduced. The results demonstrated that the efficiency of drug release is sensitive to its adsorption on outer surface of the nanotube. Moreover, this efficiency is also sensitive to the nanotube composition and its diameter. For the effect of nanotube composition, the results indicated that silicon carbide nanotube has the least efficiency for drug release, due to its strong drug-nanotube. Also, the most important acting forces on drug delivery are van der Waals interactions. Finally, the kinetic of drug release is fast and is not related to the structural parameters of the nanotube and temperature, significantly.

  1. Contribution to the densification study of silicon and zirconium carbides by an innovating process: the Spark Plasma Sintering; Contribution a l'etude de la densification des carbures de silicium et de zirconium par un procede innovant: le spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allemand, A. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DMN/SRMA/LTMEx), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Guillard, F.; Galy, J. [Centre d' Elaboration de Materiaux et d' Etudes Structurales (CEMES-CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2007-07-01

    In the framework of the CPR ISMIR, the works presented here take up the results of the thesis of F. Guillard defended on december 2006. This thesis has dealt with the Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) technique and more particularly have been studied: 1)the {beta}SiC and ZrC sintering 2)the modelling of ZrC sintering by the SPS technique and 3)the studies of the carbides/oxides interfaces carried out by SPS. Concerning the {beta}SiC and ZrC sintering: the two carbides have been sintered between 1450 and 1950 C with times periods of 10 minutes and pressures between 50 and 150 MPa. These experiments have shown that the way to apply the pressure is of major importance. Moreover, 92% of densification can be reached after 5 minutes in 1850 C for SiC. For ZrC, 95% of densification is reached as soon as 5 minutes in 1750 C. Different correlations between grains size, density and the way to apply pressure are presented. For the SPS modelling of ZrC, two existing models, taking into account the diffusion laws, are used to try to model the SPS. The results are presented and discussed. At last, the SPS allows to make interfaces starting from powders or materials previously sintered. The SiC/ZrC and ZrO{sub 2}/SiC interfaces have been studied. A microstructural study is presented as well as a technique which allows the assembling with no cracks of SiC and ZrC. (O.M.)

  2. Influence of spark plasma sintering conditions on the sintering and functional properties of an ultra-fine grained 316L stainless steel obtained from ball-milled powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, C., E-mail: clement.keller@insa-rouen.fr [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, CNRS-UMR 6634, Université de Rouen, INSA de Rouen, Avenue de l' Université, 76800 Saint-Etienne du Rouvray (France); Tabalaiev, K.; Marnier, G. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, CNRS-UMR 6634, Université de Rouen, INSA de Rouen, Avenue de l' Université, 76800 Saint-Etienne du Rouvray (France); Noudem, J. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie des Matériaux, CNRS-UMR 6508, Université de Caen, ENSICAEN, 7 bd du Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Sauvage, X. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, CNRS-UMR 6634, Université de Rouen, INSA de Rouen, Avenue de l' Université, 76800 Saint-Etienne du Rouvray (France); Hug, E. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie des Matériaux, CNRS-UMR 6508, Université de Caen, ENSICAEN, 7 bd du Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France)

    2016-05-17

    In this work, 316L samples with submicrometric grain size were sintered by spark plasma sintering. To this aim, 316L powder was first ball-milled with different conditions to obtain nanostructured powder. The process control agent quantity and milling time were varied to check their influence on the crystallite size of milled powder. Samples were then sintered by spark plasma sintering using different sets of sintering parameters (temperature, dwell time and pressure). For each sample, grain size and density were systematically measured in order to investigate the influence of the sintering process on these two key microstructure parameters. Results show that suitable ball-milling and subsequent sintering can be employed to obtain austenitic stainless steel samples with grain sizes in the nanometer range with porosity lower than 3%. However, ball-milling and subsequent sintering enhance chromium carbides formation at the sample surface in addition to intragranular and intergranular oxides in the sample as revealed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. It has been shown that using Boron nitride together with graphite foils to protect the mold from powder welding prevent such carbide formation. For mechanical properties, results show that the grain size refinement strongly increases the hardness of the samples without deviation from Hall-Petch relationship despite the oxides formation. For corrosion resistance, grain sizes lower than a few micrometers involve a strong decrease in the pitting potential and a strong increase in passivation current. As a consequence, spark plasma sintering can be considered as a promising tool for ultra-fine grained austenitic stainless steel.

  3. Preparation and Cutting Performance of Boron-Doped Diamond Coating on Cemented Carbide Cutting Tools with High Cobalt Content

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaozhi Liu; Feng Xu; Junhua Xu; Xiaolong Tang; Ying Liu; Dunwen Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond coated cutting tool has excellent cutting performance, it is the most ideal tool for the processing of nonferrous metals and alloys, composites, nonmetallic materials and other difficult-to-machine materials efficiently and accurately. Depositing CVD diamond coating on the cemented carbide with high cobalt content can improve its toughness and strength, therefore, it is very important to research on the preparation technology and cu...

  4. A Comparative Study on SiC-B4C-Si Cermet Prepared by Pressureless Sintering and Spark Plasma Sintering Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahani, P.; Karak, S. K.; Mishra, B.; Chakravarty, D.; Chaira, D.

    2016-06-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC)-boron carbide (B4C) based cermets were doped with 5, 10, and 20 wt pct Silicon (Si) and their sinterability and properties were investigated for conventional sintering at 2223 K (1950 °C) and spark plasma sintering (SPS) at 1623 K (1350 °C). An average particle size of ~3 µm was obtained after 10 hours of milling. There is an enhancement of Vickers microhardness in the 10 wt pct Si sample from 18.10 in conventional sintering to 27.80 GPa for SPS. The relative density, microhardness, and indentation fracture toughness of the composition SiC60(B4C)30Si10 fabricated by SPS are 98 pct, 27.80 GPa, and 3.8 MPa m1/2, respectively. The novelty of the present study is to tailor the wettability and ductility of the cermet by addition of Si into the SiC-B4C matrix. Better densification with improved properties is achieved for cermets consolidated by SPS at lower temperatures than conventional sintering.

  5. Pulse electric current sintering of cubic boron nitride/tungsten carbide–cobalt (cBN/WC–Co) composites: Effect of cBN particle size and volume fraction on their microstructure and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bo, E-mail: xiaoboking@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xianning West Road No. 28, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi Province (China); State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, School of Aerospace Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xianning West Road No. 28, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi Province (China); Qin, Yi [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xianning West Road No. 28, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi Province (China); Jin, Feng [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, School of Aerospace Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xianning West Road No. 28, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi Province (China); Yang, Jian-Feng, E-mail: yang155@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xianning West Road No. 28, Xi' an 710049, Shaanxi Province (China); Ishizaki, Kozo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Cubic boron nitride/tungsten carbide–cobalt (cBN/WC–Co) composites were fabricated by pulse electric current sintering (PECS), using Ni–P as sintering additives to promote low temperature densification. The effect of cBN particle size and volume fraction on the densification, microstructure and mechanical properties of WC–Co composites was investigated. There was no phase transformation from cBN to hBN (hexagonal BN) with low-hardness due to low sintering temperature (1100–1200 °C) and short sintering time. Smaller cBN particle led to lower sinter-ability of the composites due to its high specific surface area. The 30 vol% 10–14 µm cBN/WC–Co composite (P14V30) exhibited high hardness (18.3 GPa, 1200 °C) and high fracture toughness (15.6 MP·m{sup 1/2}, 1000 °C). The high hardness resulted from the homogeneously dispersed cBN particles, which had a good bonding with the WC matrix. Increased fracture toughness was mainly attributed to crack deflection or bridging and pullout of cBN grains.

  6. Boric oxide or boric acid sintering aid for sintering ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawler, H.A.

    1979-01-01

    The invention described relates to the use of liquid sintering aid in processes involving sintering of ceramic materials to produce dense, hard articles having industrial uses. Although the invention is specifically discussed in regard to compositions containing silicon carbide as the ceramic material, other sinterable carbides, for example, titanium carbide, may be utilized as the ceramic material. A liquid sintering aid for densifying ceramic material is selected from solutions of H 3 BO 3 , B 2 O 3 and mixtures of these solutions. In sintering ceramic articles, e.g. silicon carbide, a shaped green body is formed from a particulate ceramic material and a resin binder, and the green body is baked at a temperature of 500 to 1000 0 C to form a porous body. The liquid sintering aid of B 2 O 3 and/or H 3 BO 3 is then dispersed through the porous body and the treated body is sintered at a temperature of 1900 to 2200 0 C to produce the sintered ceramic article. (U.K.)

  7. Submicron-sized boron carbide particles encapsulated in turbostratic graphite prepared by laser fragmentation in liquid medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshie; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2010-08-01

    Submicron-sized B4C spherical particles were obtained by laser fragmentation of large B4C particles dispersed in ethyl acetate. The irradiated surface of large B4C raw particles was heated and melted by laser energy absorption. B4C droplets were then cooled down, and finally B4C spherical particles were obtained. Moreover, each B4C particle obtained was encapsulated in a graphitic layer that is useful for medical functionalization of particles. Thus, obtained B4C particles encapsulated in graphitic layer may have potential uses in boron neutron capture therapy.

  8. Monte carlo simulation of innovative neutron and photon shielding material composing of high density concrete, waste rubber, lead and boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aim-O, P.; Wongsawaeng, D.; Phruksarojanakun, P.; Tancharakorn, S.

    2017-06-01

    High-density concrete exhibits high strength and can perform an important role of gamma ray attenuation. In order to upgrade this material’s radiation-shielding performance, hydrogen-rich material can be incorporated. Waste rubber from vehicles has high hydrogen content which is the prominent characteristic to attenuate neutron. The objective of this work was to evaluate the radiation-shielding properties of this composite material against neutron and photon radiations. Monte Carlo transport simulation was conducted to simulate radiation through the composite material. Am-241/Be was utilized for neutron source and Co-60 for photon source. Parameters of the study included volume percentages of waste rubber, lead and boron carbide and thickness of the shielding material. These designs were also fabricated and the radiation shielding properties were experimentally evaluated. The best neutron and gamma ray shielding material was determined to be high-density concrete mixed with 5 vol% crumb rubber and 5 vol% lead powder. This shielding material increased the neutron attenuation by 64% and photon attenuation by 68% compared to ordinary concrete. Also, increasing the waste rubber content to greater than 5% resulted in a decrease in the radiation attenuation. This innovative composite radiation shielding material not only benefits nuclear science and engineering applications, but also helps solve the environmental issue of waste rubber.

  9. Tungsten-coated nano-boron carbide as a non-noble metal bifunctional electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution and hydrogen evolution reactions in alkaline media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yanhui; Han, Chan; Jia, Shaopei; Zhou, Shuyu; Zang, Jianbing

    2017-12-14

    Herein, tungsten-coated nano-boron carbide (W-WB 4 -WC x /B 4 C) particles were prepared by heating a mixture of B 4 C and W powder using a spark plasma coating (SPC) method. During the discharge treatment process, metal W in the mixture is activated and reacts with B 4 C to form WC x , WB 4 , and graphite nanoribbons. The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) performance of W-WB 4 -WC x /B 4 C is tested in an alkaline solution, and the results show that the W-WB 4 -WC x /B 4 C composite electrocatalyst exhibits a low overpotential of 0.36 V at 10 mA cm -2 for the OER, a small overpotential of -0.19 V (j = 10 mA cm -2 ) for the HER, as well as good stability. The significantly enhanced electrocatalytic performance of the W-WB 4 -WC x /B 4 C composites is attributed to their unique structure, in which WC x and WB 4 not only improve the catalytic activity for the OER and HER, but also effectively anchor the W coating on the substrate.

  10. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of armor grade AA7075 aluminum alloy friction stir weld nugget zone – Effect of post weld heat treatment and addition of boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vijaya Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW of high strength aluminum alloys has been emerged as an alternative joining technique to avoid the problems during fusion welding. In recent times FSW is being used for armor grade AA7075 aluminum alloy in defense, aerospace and marine applications where it has to serve in non uniform loading and corrosive environments. Even though friction stir welds of AA7075 alloy possess better mechanical properties but suffer from poor corrosion resistance. The present work involves use of retrogression and reaging (RRA post weld heat treatment to improve the corrosion resistance of welded joints of aluminum alloys. An attempt also has been made to change the chemical composition of the weld nugget by adding B4C nano particles with the aid of the FSW on a specially prepared base metal plate in butt position. The effects of peak aged condition (T6, RRA and addition of B4C nano particles on microstructure, hardness and pitting corrosion of nugget zone of the friction stir welds of AA7075 alloy have been studied. Even though RRA improved the pitting corrosion resistance, its hardness was slightly lost. Significant improvement in pitting corrosion resistance was achieved with addition of boron carbide powder and post weld heat treatment of RRA.

  11. Influencing factors and kinetics analysis on the leaching of iron from boron carbide waste-scrap with ultrasound-assisted method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Xing, Pengfei; Du, Xinghong; Gao, Shuaibo; Chen, Chen

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the ultrasound-assisted leaching of iron from boron carbide waste-scrap was investigated and the optimization of different influencing factors had also been performed. The factors investigated were acid concentration, liquid-solid ratio, leaching temperature, ultrasonic power and frequency. The leaching of iron with conventional method at various temperatures was also performed. The results show the maximum iron leaching ratios are 87.4%, 94.5% for 80min-leaching with conventional method and 50min-leaching with ultrasound assistance, respectively. The leaching of waste-scrap with conventional method fits the chemical reaction-controlled model. The leaching with ultrasound assistance fits chemical reaction-controlled model, diffusion-controlled model for the first stage and second stage, respectively. The assistance of ultrasound can greatly improve the iron leaching ratio, accelerate the leaching rate, shorten leaching time and lower the residual iron, comparing with conventional method. The advantages of ultrasound-assisted leaching were also confirmed by the SEM-EDS analysis and elemental analysis of the raw material and leached solid samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Tribological and thermal stability study of nanoporous amorphous boron carbide films prepared by pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liza, Shahira; Ohtake, Naoto; Akasaka, Hiroki; Munoz-Guijosa, Juan M.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the thermal stability and the oxidation and tribological behavior of nanoporous a-BC:H films are studied and compared with those in conventional diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. a-BC:H films were deposited by pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition using B(CH3)3 gas as the boron source. A DLC interlayer was used to prevent the a-BC:H film delamination produced by oxidation. Thermal stability of a-BC:H films, with no delamination signs after annealing at 500 °C for 1 h, is better than that of the DLC films, which completely disappeared under the same conditions. Tribological test results indicate that the a-BC:H films, even with lower nanoindentation hardness than the DLC films, show an excellent boundary oil lubricated behavior, with lower friction coefficient and reduce the wear rate of counter materials than those on the DLC film. The good materials properties such as low modulus of elasticity and the formation of micropores from the original nanopores during boundary regimes explain this better performance. Results show that porous a-BC:H films may be an alternative for segmented DLC films in applications where severe tribological conditions and complex shapes exist, so surface patterning is unfeasible.

  13. Tribological and thermal stability study of nanoporous amorphous boron carbide films prepared by pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liza, Shahira; Ohtake, Naoto; Akasaka, Hiroki; Munoz-Guijosa, Juan M

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the thermal stability and the oxidation and tribological behavior of nanoporous a -BC:H films are studied and compared with those in conventional diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. a -BC:H films were deposited by pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition using B(CH 3 ) 3 gas as the boron source. A DLC interlayer was used to prevent the a -BC:H film delamination produced by oxidation. Thermal stability of a -BC:H films, with no delamination signs after annealing at 500 °C for 1 h, is better than that of the DLC films, which completely disappeared under the same conditions. Tribological test results indicate that the a -BC:H films, even with lower nanoindentation hardness than the DLC films, show an excellent boundary oil lubricated behavior, with lower friction coefficient and reduce the wear rate of counter materials than those on the DLC film. The good materials properties such as low modulus of elasticity and the formation of micropores from the original nanopores during boundary regimes explain this better performance. Results show that porous a -BC:H films may be an alternative for segmented DLC films in applications where severe tribological conditions and complex shapes exist, so surface patterning is unfeasible.

  14. Study of boron carbide evolution under neutron irradiation; Contribution a l'etude de l'evolution du carbure de bore sous irradiation neutronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeone, D. [CEA/Saclay, Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie (DMT), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[Universite Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand II, (CNRS), 63 - Aubiere (France)

    1999-07-01

    Owing to its high neutron efficiency, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) is used as a neutron absorber in control rods of nuclear plants. Its behaviour under irradiation has been extensively studied for many years. It now seems clear that brittleness of the material induced by the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li capture reaction is due to penny shaped helium bubbles associated to a high strain field around them. However, no model explains the behaviour of the material under neutron irradiation. In order to build such a model, this work uses different techniques: nuclear microprobe X-ray diffraction profile analysis and Raman and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to present an evolution model of B{sub 4}C under neutron irradiation. The use of nuclear reactions produced by a nuclear microprobe such as the {sup 7}Li(p,p'{gamma}){sup 7}Li reaction, allows to measure lithium profile in B{sub 4}C pellets irradiated either in Pressurised Water Reactors or in Fast Breeder Reactors. Examining such profiles enables us to describe the migration of lithium atoms out of B{sub 4}C materials under neutron irradiation. The analysis of X-ray diffraction profiles of irradiated B{sub 4}C samples allows us to quantify the concentrations of helium bubbles as well as the strain fields around such bubbles.Furthermore Raman spectroscopy studies of different B{sub 4}C samples lead us to propose that under neutron irradiation. the CBC linear chain disappears. Such a vanishing of this CBC chain. validated by NMR analysis, may explain the penny shaped of helium bubbles inside irradiated B{sub 4}C. (author)

  15. MICROSTRUCTURE, THERMO-PHYSICAL, MECHANICAL AND WEAR PROPERTIES OF IN-SITU FORMED BORON CARBIDE - ZIRCONIUM DIBORIDE COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. R. Ch. Murthy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure, thermos-physical, mechanical and wear properties of in-situ formed B₄C- ZrB₂ composite were investigated. Coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity and electrical resistivity of the composite were measured at different temperatures up to 1000 °C in inert atmosphere. Flexural strength was measured up to 900 °C in air. Friction and wear properties have been studied at different loads under reciprocative sliding, using a counter body (ball of cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co at ambient conditions. X-ray diffraction (XRD and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA confirmed the formation of ZrB₂ as the reaction product in the composite. Electrical resistivity was measured as 3.02 x 10-4Ω.m at 1000°C. Thermal conductivity measured at temperatures between 25°C and 1000 °C was in the range of 8 to 10 W/m-K. Flexural strength of the composite decreased with increase in temperature and reached a value of 92 MPa at 900°C. The average value of coefficient of friction (COF was measured as 0.15 at 20 N load and 10 Hz frequency. Increase of load from 5 N to 20 N resulted in decrease in COF from 0.24 to 0.15 at 10 Hz frequency. Specific wear rate data observed was of the order of 10-6 mm³/N-m. Both abrasive and tribo-chemical reaction wear mechanisms were observed on the worn surface of flat and counter body materials. At higher loads (≥10 N a tribo-chemical reaction wear mechanism was dominant.

  16. Sintering of B{sub 4}C powder obtained by a modified carbo-thermal reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, R.M.; Kazumi, M.H.; Goncalves, D.P.; Melo, F.C.L. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA) - Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco, Praca Marechal Eduardo Gomes, 50 Campus do CTA - Vila das Acacias, 12228-904 Sao Jose dos Campos-SP (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    Boron carbide is one of the hardest materials and a highly refractory material that is of great interest for structural, electronic and nuclear applications. B{sub 4}C is commercially manufactured by the carbo-thermal reduction of a mixture of boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in an batch electric arc furnace process. However the carbo-thermal reaction on the stoichiometric starting composition results an excess carbon residue because of the boron loss in the form of B{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Thus, a modified carbo-thermal reaction is applied with an excess B{sub 2}O{sub 3} to compensate the loss and to obtain stoichiometric powders. The aim of this work is to study the sinterability of this powder with the lower carbon residue acting as sintering additive. Pressureless sintering in the temperatures of 1900 deg. C/30 min and 2100 deg. C/30 min in argon atmosphere were applied. The synthesized powders were analysed by XRD and SEM. Density of 94% of theoretical density was achieved for sample prepared with the powder obtained with 50% B{sub 2}O{sub 3} excess synthesized at 1700 deg. C/15 min. (authors)

  17. Optical-optical double resonance, laser induced fluorescence, and revision of the signs of the spin-spin constants of the boron carbide (BC) free radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunahori, Fumie X; Nagarajan, Ramya; Clouthier, Dennis J

    2015-12-14

    The cold boron carbide free radical (BC X (4)Σ(-)) has been produced in a pulsed discharge free jet expansion using a precursor mixture of trimethylborane in high pressure argon. High resolution laser induced fluorescence spectra have been obtained for the B (4)Σ(-)-X (4)Σ(-) and E (4)Π-X (4)Σ(-) band systems of both (11)BC and (10)BC. An optical-optical double resonance (OODR) scheme was implemented to study the finer details of both band systems. This involved pumping a single rotational level of the B state with one laser and then recording the various allowed transitions from the intermediate B state to the final E state with a second laser by monitoring the subsequent E-X ultraviolet fluorescence. In this fashion, we were able to prove unambiguously that, contrary to previous studies, the spin-spin constant λ is negative in the ground state and positive in the B (4)Σ(-) excited state. It has been shown that λ″ < 0 is in fact expected based on a semiempirical second order perturbation theory calculation of the magnitude of the spin-spin constant. The OODR spectra have also been used to validate our assignments of the complex and badly overlapped E (4)Π-X (4)Σ(-) 0-0 and 1-0 bands of (11)BC. The E-X 0-0 band of (10)BC was found to be severely perturbed. The ground state main electron configuration is …3σ(2)4σ(2)5σ(1)1π(2)2π(0) and the derived bond lengths show that there is a 0.03 Å contraction in the B state, due to the promotion of an electron from the 4σ antibonding orbital to the 5σ bonding orbital. In contrast, the bond length elongates by 0.15 Å in the E state, a result of promoting an electron from the 5σ bonding orbital to the 2π antibonding orbitals.

  18. The investigation of the microstructure and mechanical properties of ordered alominide-iron (boron) nanostructures produced by mechanical alloying and sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, S.; Akbari, Gh.; Janghorban, K.; Ghaffari, M.

    In this study, mechanical alloying (MA) of Fe-50Al, Fe-49.5Al-1B, and Fe-47.5Al-5B (at.%) alloy powders and mechanical properties of sintered products of the as-milled powders were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed the addition of B caused more crystallite refinement compared to the B-free powders. To consider the sintering and ordering behaviors of the parts produced from cold compaction of the powders milled for 80 h, sintering was conducted at various temperatures. It was found that the sintering temperature has no meaningful effect on the long-range order parameter. The transformation of the disordered solid solution developed by MA to ordered Fe-Al- (B) intermetallics was a consequence of sintering. Also, the nano-scale structure of the samples was retained even after sintering. The microhardness of pore-free zones of the nanostructured specimens decreased by increasing the sintering temperature. Moreover, the sintering temperature has no effect on the compressive yield stress. However, the fracture strain increased by increasing the sintering temperature. The samples containing 1 at.% B showed more strain to fracture compared with the B-free and 5 at.% B samples.

  19. The Influence of Sintering Temperature of Reactive Sintered (Ti, MoC-Ni Cermets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Jõeleht

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Titanium-molybdenum carbide nickel cermets ((Ti, MoC-Ni were produced using high energy milling and reactive sintering process. Compared to conventional TiC-NiMo cermet sintering the parameters for reactive sintered cermets vary since additional processes are present such as carbide synthesis. Therefore, it is essential to acquire information about the suitable sintering regime for reactive sintered cermets. One of the key parameters is the final sintering temperature when the liquid binder Ni forms the final matrix and vacancies inside the material are removed. The influence of the final sintering temperature is analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties of the material are characterized by transverse rupture strength, hardness and fracture toughness.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7179

  20. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz. 1 µm and. 25 µm, and a sintered silicon ... the sintered silicon carbide was found out to be linked to its previous thermal history. Keywords. Indentation fatigue .... This presence of a grain size effect in the RIF behaviour of the ...

  1. Ternary rare earth metal boride carbides containing two-dimensional boron carbon network: The crystal and electronic structure of R2B4C (R=Tb, Dy, Ho, Er)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhetskyy, Volodymyr; Zheng, Chong; Mattausch, Hansjürgen; Simon, Arndt

    2007-12-01

    The ternary rare earth boride carbides R2B4C (R=Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) have been synthesized by reacting the elements at temperatures between 1800 and 2000K. The crystal structure of Dy2B4C has been determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. It crystallizes in a new structure type in the orthorhombic space group Immm (a=3.2772(6) Å, b=6.567(2) Å, c=7.542(1) Å, Z=2, R1=0.035 (wR2=0.10) for 224 reflections with Io>2σ(Io)). Boron atoms form infinite chains of fused B6 rings in [100] joined with carbon atoms into planar, two-dimensional networks which alternate with planar sheets of rare earth metal atoms. The electronic structure of Dy2B4C was also analyzed using the tight-binding extended Hückel method.

  2. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  3. High-temperature plastic deformation of micro and nano-boron carbide and B4C-based composites prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS): experimental and modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Moshtaghion, Bibi Malmal

    2015-01-01

    Falta resumen y palabras clave Deformación plástica a alta temperatua de carburo de boro microy nanoestructurado y materiales compuestos basados en éste preparados mediante sinterizado por chispa de plasma (SPS): experimentos y modelización. Palabras clave: carburo de boro, deformación plástica, resistencia a la fractura, fluencia a alta temperatura, interacción dislocación-macla. La tesis recogida bajo y este epígrafe, desarrollada y defendida por Bibi Malmal Moshtaghion, pretende ...

  4. Sintering by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and spark plasma sintering (SPS) of silicon carbide (SiC) nano-particles synthesized by laser pyrolysis pilot scale; Frittage par compression isostatique a chaud (CIC) et spark plasma sintering (SPS) de nanoparticules en carbure de silicum (SiC) synthetisees a echelle pilote par pyrolyse laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengeot, C.; Guizard, B.; Tenegal, F. [CEA Saclay (DRT/DTNM/LTMEx), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Poissonnet, S.; Boulanger, L. [CEA Saclay (DEN/DMN/SRMP), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Le Flem, M. [CEA Saclay (DEN/DMN/SRMA/LA2M), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Guillard, F. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS/CEMES), 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2007-07-01

    Pure or with sintering additives (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) SiC nano-particles (20 nm) synthesised by laser pyrolysis at pilot scale were first cold pressed under 1 GPa and then sintered by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). Pure SiC samples densified by HIP have a higher density (95%) than SPS ones (80%). With help of sintering additives, both HIP and SPS samples are near theoretical density. Smaller grain size were observed for HIP pellets (pure {approx}35 nm and with additives {approx}100 to 200 nm). Whereas SPS samples grain size were between 100 nm and 1 m. A primary mechanical properties study demonstrates a hardness (28 GPa) and a toughness (6.5 MPa m{sup 1/2}) optimum when crystallite size is around 200 nm. (authors)

  5. Investigation on microstructural and mechanical properties of B4C–aluminum matrix composites prepared by microwave sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Ghasali

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available B4C reinforced aluminum composites were fabricated by microwave heating of the mixture of B4C (10, 15 and 20 wt% and aluminum powders at 650, 750, 850 and 950 °C. The effect of different amounts of B4C on the microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum matrix was examined. The maximum bending (238 ± 10 MPa and compressive strength (330 ± 10 MPa values were measured for composites sintered at 950 and 750 °C, respectively. The maximum hardness (112 Vickers was measured for Al–20 wt% B4C composite sintered at 850 °C. XRD investigations showed the decomposition of boron carbide and also the formation of Al3BC by heating the composites at 850 °C. SEM micrographs showed uniform distribution of reinforcement particles in Al matrix.

  6. Microstructure and mechanical properties of pressureless sintered B4C- C composite using phenolic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikravan, A.; Baharvandi, H. R.; Jebelli, F. B.; Abdizadeh, H.; Ehsani, N.

    2007-10-01

    Boron carbide is an extremely promising material for a variety of applications that require high hardness and good wear resistance. However, due to the very high sintering temperatures which are required for B4C densification, wide spread use of that is limited. Various solutions have been studied to modifying densification behavior of B4C. Pressureless sintering in the presence of different additives has been tried by researchers. The effect of additives such as TiB2, SiC, Al, B, ZrO2, talc and Si have been evaluated. It was shown that the densification and mechanical properties may be improved with sintering aids. The Effects of phenolic resin additive on the microstructure and mechanical properties of B4C were explained in this study. Experimental composition was batched corresponding from 0 to 10 wt% of the additive. All samples were sintered for 60 minutes at 2150°C. The heating and cooling rates were 10°C/min for all samples. It was found that below 7.5 wt% of phenolic resin additive, the density increased with additive increasing and above that, decreased by phenolic resin addition. Mechanical properties such as fracture toughness, strength and hardness increased as a result of densification enhancement.

  7. Effect of Boron Sinter-Aid on the Microstructure and Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel- TIB2 Composites / Wpływ Dodatku Boru Na Mikrostrukturę I W Łaściwosci Kompozytów Stal Austenityczna-TIB2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulima I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the work, the effect the boron addition on the microstructure and properties of the composites with austenitic steel of matrix was investigated. The composites were consolidated using the high pressure-high temperature (HP-HT method. Two composite types were fabricated, i.e. steel with 8 vol.% TiB2 and steel with 8 vol.% TiB2 and 1 vol.% boron. Density of sintered materials was measured according to the Archimedes principle. Mechanical properties were determined by Vickers microhardness and compression test. The wear resistance was investigeted using ball-on-disc method. The microstructure of composites was analyzed using a scanning electron microscope.

  8. Metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, A.F.

    1988-01-01

    From the viewpoint of general crystal chemistry principles and on the base of modern data the structural chemistry of metal carbides is presented. The classification deviding metal carbides into 4 groups depending on chemical and physical properties is presented. The features of the crystal structure of carbides of alkali alkaline earth, transition, 4 f- and 5f-elements and their effect on physical and chemical properties are considered

  9. Sinterable powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanghi, J.S.; Kasprzyk, M.R.

    1979-01-01

    A description is given of sinterable powders and methods of producing sintered products using such powders. The powders consist of (a) a particulate ceramic material, e.g. SiC, having specified particle size and surface area; (b) a carbon source material, e.g. sugar or a phenol-formaldehyde resin; and (c) a residue from a solution of H 3 BO 3 , B 2 O 3 , or mixtures of these as sintering aid. (U.K.)

  10. Process for the preparation of fine grain metal carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gortsema, F.P.

    1976-01-01

    Fine grain metal carbide powders are conveniently prepared from the corresponding metal oxide by heating in an atmosphere of methane in hydrogen. Sintered articles having a density approaching the theoretical density of the metal carbide itself can be fabricated from the powders by cold pressing, hot pressing or other techniques. 8 claims, no drawings

  11. Fabrication of boron-phosphide neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzsimmons, M.; Pynn, R.

    1997-01-01

    Boron phosphide is a potentially viable candidate for high neutron flux neutron detectors. The authors have explored chemical vapor deposition methods to produce such detectors and have not been able to produce good boron phosphide coatings on silicon carbide substrates. However, semi-conducting quality films have been produced. Further testing is required

  12. CaB(2)C(2): Reinvestigation of a Semiconducting Boride Carbide with a Layered Structure and an Interesting Boron/Carbon Ordering Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Barbara; Schmitt, Konny

    1999-12-27

    Calcium diboride dicarbide, CaB(2)C(2), was synthesized as a crystalline powder and investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffractometry, conductivity measurements, and LMTO band structure calculations. A new structure model was derived, and the crystal structure was refined by Rietveld methods in the tetragonal space group I4/mcm (No. 140, a = 537.33(1) pm and c = 741.55(2) pm, Z = 4). The boron and carbon atoms are well ordered within layers consisting of four- and eight-membered rings. A convincing coloring scheme is proven by the detection of a superstructure reflection. An earlier assignment of the compound into the LaB(2)C(2) structure family (space group P&fourmacr;2c or P4(2)/mmc, respectively) has been shown to be incorrect. LMTO band structure calculations suggest semiconducting behavior for CaB(2)C(2), which has been confirmed by conductivity measurements.

  13. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Repeated indentation fatigue (RIF) experiments conducted on the same spot of different structural ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz. 1 m and 25 m, and a sintered silicon carbide (SSiC) are reported. The RIF experiments were conducted using a Vicker's ...

  14. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suchoń

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE. The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  15. Reactive Sintering of Bimodal WC-Co Hardmetals

    OpenAIRE

    Marek Tarraste; Kristjan Juhani; Jüri Pirso; Mart Viljus

    2015-01-01

    Bimodal WC-Co hardmetals were produced using novel technology - reactive sintering. Milled and activated tungsten and graphite powders were mixed with commercial coarse grained WC-Co powder and then sintered. The microstructure of produced materials was free of defects and consisted of evenly distributed coarse and fine tungsten carbide grains in cobalt binder. The microstructure, hardness and fracture toughness of reactive sintered bimodal WC-Co hardmetals is exhibited. Developed bimodal har...

  16. Influence of Vanadium and Boron Additions on the Microstructure, Fracture Toughness, and Abrasion Resistance of Martensite-Carbide Composite Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Elghazaly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High chromium cast steel alloys are being used extensively in many industrial services where dry or wet abrasion resistance is required. Such steel castings are demanded for cement, stoneware pipes, and earth moving industries. In this research, five steel heats were prepared in 100 kg and one-ton medium frequency induction furnaces and then sand cast in both Y-block and final impact arm spare parts, respectively. Vanadium (0.5–2.5% and boron (120–150 ppm were added to the 18Cr-1.9C-0.5Mo steel heats to examine their effects on the steel microstructure, mechanical properties especially impact, fracture toughness and abrasion resistance. Changes in the phase transformation after heat treatment were examined using inverted, SEM-EDX microscopy; however, the abrasion resistance was measured in dry basis using the real tonnage of crushed and milled stoneware clay to less than 0.1 mm size distribution.

  17. Behaviour of a VVER-1000 fuel element with boron carbide/steel absorber tested under severe fuel damage conditions in the CORA facility (Results of experiment CORA-W2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Schanz, G.; Schumacher, G.; Sepold, L.

    1994-10-01

    The 'Severe Fuel Damage' (SFD) experiments of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK), Federal Republic of Germany, were carried out in the out-of-pile facility 'CORA' as part of the international Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) research. The experimental program was set up to provide information on the failure mechanisms of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel elements in a temperature range from 1200 C to 2000 C and in few cases up to 2400 C. Between 1987 and 1992 a total of 17 CORA experiments with two different bundle configurations, i.e. PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) and BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) bundles were performed. These assemblies represented 'Western-type' fuel elements with the pertinent materials for fuel, cladding, grid spacer, and absorber rod. At the end of the experimental program two VVER-1000 specific tests were run in the CORA facility with identical objectives but with genuine VVER-type materials. The experiments, designated CORA-W1 and CORA-W2 were conducted on February 18, 1993 and April 21, 1993, respectively. Test bundle CORA-W1 was without absorber material whereas CORA-W2 contained one absorber rod (boron carbide/steel). As in the earlier CORA tests the test bundles were subjected to temperature transients of a slow heatup rate in a steam environment. The transient phases of the tests were initiated with a temperature ramp rate of 1 K/s. With these conditions a so-called small-break LOCA was simulated. The temperature escalation due to the exothermal zircon/niobium-steam reaction started at about 1200 C, leading the bundles to maximum temperatures of approximately 1900 C. The thermal response of bundle CORA-W2 is comparable to that of CORA-W1. In test CORA-W2, however, the temperature front moved faster from the top to the bottom compared to test CORA-W1 [de

  18. First Principles Atomistic Model for Carbon-Doped Boron Suboxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Sutherland DG, Van Buuren T, Carlisle JA, Terminello LJ, Himpsel FJ. Photoemission and x - ray -absorption study of boron carbide and its surface thermal...along the C-C chain. If the interstitial dopant is either B or C, a local boron carbide (B4C)-like structure with either a C-B-C or C-C-C chain is...strength, high oxidation resistance (򒱰 °C), and chemical inertness.1–8 However, unlike other high-performance ceramics, boron carbide (B4C) and

  19. Plasma sintering of ferritic steel reinforced with niobium carbide prepared by high energy milling; Sinterizacao a plasma de aco ferritico reforcado com carbeto de niobio preparado por moagem de alta energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Junior, J.F. da; Almeida, E.O.; Gomes, U.U.; Alves Junior, C.; Messias, A.P. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal (Brazil). Lab. de Materiais Ceramicos e Metais Especiais; Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal (Brazil). Lab. de Processamento de Materiais por Plasma

    2010-07-01

    Plasma is an ionized gas where ions are accelerated from anode to cathode surface, where the sample is placed. There are a lot of collisions on cathode surface by ions heating and sintering the sample. High energy milling (HEM) is often used to produce composite particles to be used on powder metallurgy. These particles can exhibit fine particles and high phase dispersion. This present work aim to study ferritic steels reinforced with 3%NbC prepared by HEM and sintered on plasma furnace. Ferritic steel and NbC powders were milled during 5 hours and characterized by SEM, XRD and laser scattering. Then, these composite powders were compacted in a cylindrical steel die and then sintered in a plasma furnace. Vickers microhardness tests and SEM and XRD analysis were performed on sintered samples. (author)

  20. Spark Plasma Sintered AlN-BN Composites and Its Thermal Conductivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao Haiyang, [No Value; Wang Weimin, [No Value; Wang Hao, [No Value; Fu Zhengyi, [No Value

    2008-01-01

    A series of samples of hexagonal boron nitride-aluminum nitride ceramic composites with different amounts of CaF(2) as sintering aid were prepared by spark plasma sintered at 1700-1850 degrees C for 5 min. The addition of CaF(2) effectively lowered the sintering temperature and promoted the

  1. Study of ceramic mixed boron element as a neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail Mustapha; Mohd Reusmaazran Yusof; Md Fakarudin Ab Rahman; Nor Paiza Mohamad Hasan; Samihah Mustaffha; Yusof Abdullah; Mohamad Rabaie Shari; Airwan Affandi Mahmood; Nurliyana Abdullah; Hearie Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Shielding upon radiation should not be underestimated as it can causes hazard to health. Precautions on the released of radioactive materials should be well concerned and considered. Therefore, the combination of ceramic and boron make them very useful for shielding purpose in areas of low and intermediate neutron. A six grades of ceramic tile have been produced namely IMN05 - 5 % boron, IMN06 - 6 % boron, IMN07 - 7 % boron, IMN08 - 8 % boron, IMN09 - 9 % boron, IMN10 - 10 % boron from mixing, press and sintered process. Boron is a material that capable of absorbing and capturing neutron, so that neutron and gamma test were conducted to analyze the effectiveness of boron material in combination with ceramic as shielding. From the finding, percent reduction number of count per minute shows the ceramic tiles are capable to capture neutron. Apart from all the percentage of boron used, 10 % is the most effective shields since the percent reduction indicating greater neutron captured increased. (author)

  2. Reinforcement of tungsten carbide grains by nanoprecipitates in cemented carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingwei; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Haibin; Hou, Chao; Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Xilong

    2016-10-01

    In contrast to the conventional method that obtains a high fracture strength of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) cemented carbides by reducing WC grain size to near-nano or nanoscale, a new approach has been developed to achieve ultrahigh fracture strength by strengthening the WC grains through precipitate reinforcement. The cemented carbides were prepared by liquid-state sintering the in situ synthesized WC-Co composite powders with a little excess carbon and pre-milled Cr3C2 particles having different size scales. It was found that the nanoscale dispersed particles precipitate in the WC grains, which mainly have a coherent or semi-coherent interface with the matrix. The pinning effect of the nanoparticles on the motion of dislocations within the WC grains was observed. The mechanisms for the precipitation of nanoparticles in the WC grains were discussed, based on which a new method to enhance the resistance against the transgranular fracture of cemented carbides was proposed.

  3. New examples of ternary rare-earth metal boride carbides containing finite boron carbon chains: The crystal and electronic structure of RE15B6C20 (RE=Pr, Nd)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhetskyy, Volodymyr; Mattausch, Hansjürgen; Simon, Arndt; Hiebl, Kurt; Ben Yahia, Mouna; Gautier, Régis; Halet, Jean-François

    2008-08-01

    The ternary rare-earth metal boride carbides RE15B6C20 (RE=Pr, Nd) were synthesized by co-melting the elements. They exist above 1270 K. Their crystal structures were determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. Both crystallize in the space group P1¯, Z=1, a=8.3431(8) Å, b=9.2492(9) Å, c=8.3581(8) Å, α=84.72(1)°, β=89.68(1)°, γ =84.23(1)° (R1=0.041 (wR2=0.10) for 3291 reflections with Io>2σ(Io)) for Pr15B6C20, and a=8.284(1) Å, b=9.228(1) Å, c=8.309(1) Å, α=84.74(1)°, β=89.68(1)°, γ=84.17(2)° (R1=0.033 (wR2=0.049) for 2970 reflections with Io>2σ(Io)) for Nd15B6C20. Their structure consists of a three-dimensional framework of rare-earth metal atoms resulting from the stacking of slightly corrugated and distorted square nets, leading to cavities filled with unprecedented B2C4 finite chains, disordered C3 entities and isolated carbon atoms, respectively. Structural and theoretical analyses suggest the ionic formulation (RE3+)15([B2C4]6-)3([C3]4-)2(C4-)2·11ē. Accordingly, density functional theory calculations indicate that the compounds are metallic. Both structural arguments as well as energy calculations on different boron vs. carbon distributions in the B2C4 chains support the presence of a CBCCBC unit. Pr15B6C18 exhibits antiferromagnetic order at TN=7.9 K, followed by a meta-magnetic transition above a critical external field B>0.03 T. On the other hand, Nd15B6C18 is a ferromagnet below TC≈40 K.

  4. Preparation and analysis of uranium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jichang; Song Dianwu; Yang Youqing; Guo Yibai; Cao Yenan

    1988-03-01

    The preparation process of uranium carbides is investigated by using the carbothermic reduction method of uranium dioxide in vacuum. The carbonisation reaction in the mixture of uranium dioxide with graphite begins to take place at the temperature of 1100 deg C. The temperature is measured by a W-Re thermocouple. Then the quantity of carbon, density, porosities and microstructure of the sintered pellets are examined. At the same time, in order to measure the content of uranium monocarbide, those sintered pellets are also indentified by means of X-ray diffraction

  5. Diffusion of Boron in Cobalt Sinters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borowiecka-Jamrozek J.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available W pracy przedstawiono wyniki badan procesu dyfuzji w warstwach powierzchniowych uzyskanych w wyniku nasycenia borem spieków otrzymanych z proszku kobaltu gatunku Co Extrafine. Warstwy otrzymano przy zastosowaniu proszkowej metody borowania opartej na wykorzystaniu mieszaniny o składzie: B4C jako składnik podstawowy stanowiacy zródło boru, (NH4Cl + NaF aktywator i Al2O3 jako wypełniacz. Zachowane były nastepujace parametry procesu: temperatura 950°C, czas 6h i 12h. Badania obejmowały wyznaczenie współczynnika dyfuzji w oparciu o strukture, grubosc uzyskanych i czas nasycenia warstw. Obserwacji naniesionych warstw dokonano za pomoca mikroskopu optycznego Leica DM-4000. Zdjecia ujawniły dwufazowa strukture warstw borkowych. Badania rentgenowskie potwierdziły wystepowanie faz o składzie: CoB i Co2B. Zbudowano model dyfuzji atomów boru w strukturze kobaltu zakładajac dyfuzje reaktywna. Obliczono współczynnik dyfuzji w oparciu o model atomowy dyfuzji wykorzystujac potencjały oddziaływan pomiedzy atomami boru i kobaltu. Otrzymane wyniki porównano z danymi doswiadczalnymi dyfuzji boru w innych materiałach.

  6. The effect of microstructural variation on the mechanical and acoustic properties of silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slusark, Douglas Michael

    Silicon carbide ceramic materials have many beneficial properties which have led to their adoption in various industrial uses, including its application as an armor material. This is due to the high hardness and stiffness of these materials, as well as a low relative density. The homogeneity of the final properties depends upon the processing history of the material. Factors which affect this include the need for high temperatures and sintering additives to achieve densification, as well as the presence of additive agglomerates and pressing artifacts within the green compact. This dissertation seeks to determine the effect which microstructural variability has on the acoustic and mechanical properties of sintered silicon carbide materials. Sample sets examined included commercially produced, pressurelessly sintered tiles, as well as additional, targeted tiles which were specifically produced for evaluation in this study. Production of these targeted samples was carried out such that particular aspects of the microstructure were emphasized. These included tiles which were fired with an excess of boron sintering aid as well as tiles which had been pressed to a reduced green body density and then fired. The sample evaluation procedure which was developed incorporated non destructive evaluation methods, mechanical testing, and both fractographic and image analysis of fractured and polished sections. Non destructive evaluation of the tiles was carried out by Archimedes density and ultrasound scanning at 20 MHz to determine the acoustic attenuation coefficient. Selected samples were chosen for machining into ASTM B-type bend bars on which 4-pt flexure testing was performed. Strength limiting features were designated for each sample set. The correlation between acoustic attenuation coefficient and quasi-static strength was examined both qualitatively and quantitatively. This was done by comparing the primary fracture location of flexure bars to features within the

  7. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Highly Alloyed FeCrMoVC Steel Fabricated by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung-Jin; Jun, Joong-Hwan; Lee, Min-Ha; Shon, In-Jin; Lee, Seok-Jae

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we successfully fabricated highly alloyed FeCrMoVC specimens within 2 min by using the spark plasma sintering (SPS) method. The densities of the sintered specimens were almost identical to their theoretical values. Fine (Mo, V)-rich carbides with lamellar structure were precipitated along the grain boundaries of the as-sintered specimen, whereas relatively large carbides were formed additionally in the transgranular region during the tempering treatment. Compared with the specimen produced by a conventional casting method, the FeCrMoVC specimens from SPS showed smaller grain size with finer carbides and higher hardness values.

  8. Elaboration of silicon carbides nano particles (SiC): from the powder synthesis to the sintered ceramic; Elaboration de ceramiques nanostructurees en carbure de silicium (SiC): de la synthese de poudre a la ceramique frittee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reau, A. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    Materials for the reactor cores of the fourth generation will need materials supporting high temperatures with fast neutrons flux. SiC{sub f}/SiC ceramics are proposed. One of the possible elaboration process is to fill SiC fiber piece with nano particles SiC powder and to strengthen by sintering. The aim of this thesis is to obtain a nano structured SiC ceramic as a reference for the SiC{sub f}/SiC composite development and to study the influence of the fabrication parameters. (A.L.B.)

  9. Silicon carbide as platform for energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syväjärvi, Mikael; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Sun, Jianwu

    and solar cells, and further pursue concepts in materials for thermoelectrics, biofuel cells and supercapacitor research proposals. In fact, there are a number of energy applications which can be based on the SiC materials.- Fluorescent SiC for white LED in general lighting - Cubic SiC for a highly...... efficient solar cell- Cubic SiC for water splitting to generate hydrogen.Further on, we have the following concepts that could be explored- Thermoelectric SiC for electricity generation from heat- Biofuels cells based on carbon electrodes on SiC- Supercapacitors based on sintered SiC and carbon materials......Silicon carbide is emerging as a novel material for a range of energy and environmental technologies. Previously, silicon carbide was considered as a material mainly for transistor applications. We have initiated the use of silicon carbide material towards optoelectronics in general lighting...

  10. Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

    2009-03-10

    This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

  11. Effects of silicon carbide on the phase developments in mullite-carbon ceramic composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatai Olufemi ARAMIDE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the addition of silicon carbide and sintering temperatures on the phases developed, in sintered ceramic composite produced from kaolin and graphite was investigated. The kaolin and graphite of known mineralogical composition were thoroughly blended with 4 and 8 vol % silicon carbide. From the homogeneous mixture of kaolin, graphite and silicon carbide, standard samples were prepared via uniaxial compaction. The test samples produced were subjected to firing (sintering at 1300°C, 1400°C and 1500°C. The sintered samples were characterized for the developed phases using x‐ray diffractometry analysis, microstructural morphology using ultra‐high resolution field emission scanning electron microscope (UHRFEGSEM. It was observed that microstructural morphology of the samples revealed the evolution of mullite, cristobalite and microcline. The kaolinite content of the raw kaolin undergoes transformation into mullite and excess silica, the mullite and the silica phases contents increased with increased sintering temperature. It is also generally observed that the graphite content progressively reduced linearly with increased sintering temperature. It is concluded that silicon carbide acts as anti-oxidant for the graphite, this anti-oxidant effect was more effective at 4 vol % silicon carbide.

  12. Electrical Resistivity, Tribological Behaviour of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Nanoboron Carbide Particles Reinforced Copper Hybrid Composites for Pantograph Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Selvakumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the influence and contribution of multiwalled carbon-nanotube (MWCNT–boron carbide (B4C to the mechanical and tribological properties of copper matrix composites. Different weight fractions of nano- B4C-containing fixed-weight fractions of MWCNT-reinforced copper composites were prepared using the entrenched cold-press sintering method of powder metallurgy. The wear losses of sintered Cu–MWCNT–B4C composites were investigated by conducting sliding tests in a pin-on-disc apparatus. The addition of reinforcements showed enhancements in the hardness and wear properties of the composites due to the uniform dispersion of the secondary reinforcement in the copper matrix and the self-lubricating effect of the MWCNTs. The effects of the nanoparticle distribution in the matrix, the worn surface morphology, and the elemental composition of the composites were characterized using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The electrical resistivity of the fabricated copper hybrid composite preforms was evaluated using a four-point probe tester. Our results highlight the use of experiential reinforcing limits of B4C on the wear and electrical and mechanical behaviour of copper composites.

  13. Sintering and densification; new techniques: sinter forging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winnubst, A.J.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this chapter pressure assisted sintering methods will be described. Attention will mainly be paid to sinter forging as a die-wall free uniaxial pressure sintering technique, where large creep strains are possible. Sinter forging is an effective tool to reduce sintering temperature and time and to obtain a nearly theoretically dense ceramic. In this way grain size in tetragonal zirconia ceramics can be reduced down to 100 nm. Another important phenomenon is the reduction of the number density and size of cracks and flaws resulting in higher strength and improved reliability, which is of utmost importance for engineering ceramics. The creep deformation during sinter forging causes a rearrangement of the grains resulting in a reduction of interatomic spaces between grains, while grain boundary (glassy) phases can be removed. The toughness and in some cases the wear resistance is enhanced after sinter forging as a result of the grain-boundary-morphology improvement. (orig.)

  14. Microstructure and hydrogen dynamics in hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinar, J.; Shinar, R.; Williamson, D. L.; Mitra, S.; Kavak, H.; Dalal, V. L.

    1999-12-01

    Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and deuterium secondary-ion-mass spectrometry (DSIMS) studies of the microstructure and hydrogen dynamics in undoped rf-sputter-deposited (RFS) and undoped and boron-doped electron-cyclotron-resonance-deposited (ECR) hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbides (a-Si1-xCx:H) are described. In the RFS carbides with xcarbides with xBoron doping of the ECR carbides also reduced the bulklike Si-bonded H content, suggesting that it induces nanovoids, consistent with the observed suppression of long-range motion of most of the H and D atoms. However, a small fraction of the H atoms appeared to undergo fast diffusion, reminiscent of the fast diffusion in B-doped a-Si:H.

  15. Boron reclamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.M.

    1980-07-01

    A process to recover high purity 10 B enriched crystalline boron powder from a polymeric matrix was developed on a laboratory basis and ultimately scaled up to production capacity. The process is based on controlled pyrolysis of boron-filled scrap followed by an acid leach and dry sieving operation to return the powder to the required purity and particle size specifications. Typically, the recovery rate of the crystalline powder is in excess of 98.5 percent, and some of the remaining boron is recovered in the form of boric acid. The minimum purity requirement of the recovered product is 98.6 percent total boron

  16. Preliminary investigation of liquid phase sintering in ferrous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.

    1975-04-01

    Liquid phase sintering was utilized to achieve, by a simple compaction and sintering procedure involving short times and moderate temperatures, a virtually full dense high carbon Fe:C alloy and high boron Fe:B alloy. Parameters such as powder characteristics and mixing, compacting pressure, heating program and the liquid phase fraction were found to influence the sintered density. The response of the Fe:C alloy to a heat treatment is reported along with preliminary experiments in the iron base ternary system Fe:W:C. Residual porosities observed in microstructures of certain liquid phase sintered compacts were accounted for by a proposed capillary flow of the liquid phase and a local densification competing against an overall densification. Some general recommendations are made for liquid phase sintering of powder aggregates. 15 fig., 7 tables

  17. Compressive creep of hot pressed silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, C.R.M., E-mail: cosmeroberto@gmail.com [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), Campus Darcy Ribeiro, Brasilia CEP 70736-020, DF (Brazil); Nono, M.C.A. [Instituto de Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE-LAS) (Brazil); Reis, D.A.P.; Hwang, M.K. [Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE) (Brazil)

    2010-07-15

    Silicon carbide has a good match of chemical, mechanical and thermal properties and therefore is considered an excellent structural ceramic for high temperature applications. The aim of the present work is compressive creep evaluation of liquid phase sintered silicon carbide with aluminum and rare earth oxide as sintering aids. Rare earth oxides are possible additives considering their highly refractory remnant grain-boundary phase and lower synthesis costs compared to high purity rare earth. Samples were prepared with silicon carbide powder (90 wt%) and aluminum oxide (5 wt%) plus rare earth oxide (5 wt%) additions. Powders were mixed, milled and hot pressed at 1800 deg. C in argon atmosphere. Compressive creep tests were carried out under stress from 150 to 300 MPa and temperatures from 1300 to 1400 deg. C. At lower creep test temperatures, the obtained stress exponent values were correlated to mechanisms based on diffusion. At intermediate temperatures, grain-boundary sliding becomes operative, accommodated by diffusion. At higher temperatures cavities are discernible. Oxidation reactions and ionic diffusion result on surface oxidized layer, grain-boundary amorphous and intergranular crystalline Al{sub 6}Si{sub 2}O{sub 13}, {delta}-Y{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} and YAG phases. In this case cavitation and amorphous phases redistribution enhance grain-boundary sliding, not accommodated by diffusion. Coalescence occurs at triple point and multigrain-junctions, with subsequent strain rate acceleration and cavitational creep.

  18. Growth of diamond layers on diamond and cBN seeds using iron carbide under high pressure and high temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Li Xun; Hao Zhao Yin; LiuPeng; Li Musen; Zou Guang Tian; Cheng Shu Yu; Cheng Kai Jia

    2002-01-01

    Iron carbide without any graphite was studied under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT); diamond layers were obtained both on diamond and on cubic boron nitride seeds at 5.5 GPa and 1700-1750 K. The results showed that transition-metal carbide was the main intermediate in the course of the transformation from graphite to diamond under HPHT.

  19. Effect of Boron-Doped Diamond Interlayer on Cutting Performance of Diamond Coated Micro Drills for Graphite Machining

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Xuelin; Wang, Liang; Shen, Bin; Sun, Fanghong; Zhang, Zhiming

    2013-01-01

    Thin boron doped diamond (BDD) film is deposited from trimethyl borate/acetone/hydrogen mixture on Co-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) micro drills by using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique. The boron peak on Raman spectrum confirms the boron incorporation in diamond film. This film is used as an interlayer for subsequent CVD of micro-crystalline diamond (MCD) film. The Rockwell indentation test shows that boron doping could effectively improve the adhesive streng...

  20. Hot pressing of nanocrystalline tantalum using high frequency induction heating and pulse plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowicz, J.; Adamek, G.; Sopata, M.; Koper, J. K.; Siwak, P.

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents the results of nanocrystalline powder tantalum consolidation using hot pressing. The authors used two different heating techniques during hot pressing: high-frequency induction heating (HFIH) and pulse plasma sintering (PPS). A comparison of the structure, microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the bulk nanocrystalline tantalum obtained in both techniques was performed. The nanocrystalline powder was made to start from the microcrystalline one using the high-energy ball milling process. The nanocrystalline powder was hot-pressed at 1000 °C, whereas, for comparison, the microcrystalline powder was hot pressed up to 1500 °C for proper consolidation. The authors found that during hot pressing, the powder partially reacts with the graphite die covered by boron nitride, which facilitated punches and powder displacement in the die during densification. Tantalum carbide and boride in the nanocrystalline material was found, which can improve the mechanical properties. The hardness of the HFIH and PPS nanocrystalline tantalum was as high as 625 and 615 HV, respectively. The microstructure was more uniform in the PPS nanomaterial. The corrosion resistance in both cases deteriorated, in comparison to the microcrystalline material, while the PPS material corrosion resistance was slightly better than that of the HFIH one.

  1. Diffusion Boronizing of H11 Hot Work Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurči, Peter; Hudáková, Mária

    2011-10-01

    The H11 hot work tool steel was boronized at various processing parameters, austenitized, quenched, and tempered to a core hardness of 47-48 HRC. Microstructure, phase constitution, and microhardness of boronized layers were investigated. Effect of boronized region on the bulk properties was determined by the Charpy impact test. Structure of boronized regions is formed by the compound layers and diffusion inter-layer. The compound layers consisted of only (Fe,Cr)2B phase, but in the case of longer processing time, they contained also of the (Fe,Cr)B-phase. The inter-layer contained enhanced portion of carbides, formed due to carbon diffusion from the boride compounds toward the substrate. Microhardness of boronized layers exceeded considerably 2000 HV 0.1. However, boronizing led to a substantial lowering of the Charpy impact toughness of the material.

  2. Preparation and Fatigue Properties of Functionally Graded Cemented Carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yong; Liu Fengxiao; Liaw, Peter K.; He Yuehui

    2008-01-01

    Cemented carbides with a functionally graded structure have significantly improved mechanical properties and lifetimes in cutting, drilling and molding. In this work, WC-6 wt.% Co cemented carbides with three-layer graded structure (surface layer rich in WC, mid layer rich in Co and the inner part of the average composition) were prepared by carburizing pre-sintered η-phase-containing cemented carbides. The three-point bending fatigue tests based on the total-life approach were conducted on both WC-6wt%Co functionally graded cemented carbides (FGCC) and conventional WC-6wt%Co cemented carbides. The functionally graded cemented carbide shows a slightly higher fatigue limit (∼100 MPa) than the conventional ones under the present testing conditions. However, the fatigue crack nucleation behavior of FGCC is different from that of the conventional ones. The crack nucleates preferentially along the Co-gradient and perpendicular to the tension surface in FGCC, while parallel to the tension surface in conventional cemented carbides

  3. Seebeck effect of some thin film carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beensh-Marchwicka, G.; Prociow, E.

    2002-01-01

    Several materials have been investigated for high-temperature thin film thermocouple applications. These include silicon carbide with boron (Si-C-B), ternary composition based on Si-C-Mn, fourfold composition based on Si-C-Zr-B and tantalum carbide (TaC). All materials were deposited on quartz or glass substrates using the pulse sputter deposition technique. Electrical conduction and thermoelectric power were measured for various compositions at 300-550 K. It has been found, that the efficiency of thermoelectric power of films containing Si-C base composition was varied from 0.0015-0.034 μW/cmK 2 . However for TaC the value about 0.093 μW/cmK 2 was obtained. (author)

  4. Effect of boron on intergranular hot cracking in Ni-Cr-Fe superalloys containing niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    Solidification mechanisms had a dominant influence on microfissuring behavior of the test group. Carbon modified the Laves formation significantly and showed that one approach to alloy design would be balancing carbide formers against Laves formers. Boron's strong effect on microfissuring can be traced to its potency as a Laves former. Boron's segregation to grain boundaries plays at best a secondary role in microfissuring.

  5. Crystal Chemistry and Magnetism of Ternary Actinoid Boron Carbides UB 1- xC 1+ x and U 1- xMxB 2C with M = Sc, Lu, and Th

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogl, P.; Rupp, B.; Felner, I.; Fischer, P.

    1993-06-01

    Within the homogeneous range of uranium monocarbide UB 1- xC 1+ x, the crystal structures of stoichiometric UBC and of the carbon-rich solid solution UB 0.78C 1.22, have been refined from single-crystal X-ray counter data. From X-ray analysis crystal symmetry in both cases is consistent with the centro-symmetric space group Cmcm and there are no indications of superstructure formation. In contrast to the fully ordered atom arrangement revealed for stoichiometric UBC ( a = 0.35899(4), b = 1.19781(12), c = 0.33474(3) nm), random occupation by boron and carbon atoms is observed for the boron site in UB 0.78C 1.22 ( a = 0.35752(4), b = 1.18584(3), c = 0.33881(4) nm). For 279(278) reflections (|F 0| > 3σ) the obtained reliability factors R x = ∑|ΔF|/∑| F0| were R x = 0.069 for UBC and R x = 0.050 for UB 0.78C 1.22. Neutron powder diffraction experiments at 9 and 295 K unambiguously revealed full occupancy by the nonmetal atoms in UB 0.78C 1.22 and prove the statistical occupation of B and C atoms in the B-sites. For the orthorhombic symmetry Cmcm, refinement was not better than R1 = 0.044. A model calculation in monoclinic symmetry C12/ m1, however, resulted in a significant reduction of the residual value to R1 = 0.030, releasing spatial constraints on the boron atoms. Thus the boron-boron chain in Cmcm (B-B = 0.1874 nm) is dissolved into boron pairs (B-B = 0.1706 nm) which are loosely bound at a distance of 0.2043 nm. The formation of C-B-B-C groups corresponds to the structure types of ThBC and Th 3B 2C 3. The magnetic behavior has been investigated in the temperature range from 4.2 K to 1000 K for UB 1- xC 1+ x (UBC-type) and U 1- xMxB 2C (ThB 2C-type for the high temperature modification and 1-UB 2C-type for the low temperature modification) with U partially substituted by Th or Sc, Lu. From magnetic susceptibilities, the alloys UB 1- xC 1+ x reveal temperature independent paramagnetism with typical intermediate valence fluctuation behavior ( TSF ˜ 350 K

  6. The boron filter for the ROSAT X-ray telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, K.-H.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Snowden, S. L.; Maier, H. J.; Frischke, D.

    1991-05-01

    We have developed multilayered films composed of boron carbide and carbon, which serve as spectral filters in the focal plane of the Wolter type I X-ray telescope on board the X-ray astronomy satellite ROSAT (Röntgensatellit). We describe the manufacturing process and qualification measurements of the filters and present the resulting performance data. Finally the pulse height spectrum of the active star AR Lac observed by ROSAT with and without boron filter will be shown.

  7. Phase-field simulation of liquid phase migration in the WC-Co system during liquid phase sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Kaiming; Zhang, Lijun; Du, Yong [Central South Univ., Changsha (China). State Key Lab. of Powder Metallurgy; Schwarze, Christian; Steinbach, Ingo [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Interdisciplinary Centre for Advanced Materials Simulation

    2016-04-15

    Liquid phase sintering is a process for forming high performance, multiple-phase components from powders. The process includes very complex interactions between various mass transportation phenomena, among which the liquid phase migration represents an important one in the aspect of forming a gradient structure in cemented carbide. In the present work, phase-field simulation of the liquid phase migration phenomenon during liquid phase sintering is performed in the WC-Co based cemented carbide. The simulation results are analyzed and compared with the experimentally determined key factors of microstructural evolution, such as contiguity and liquid phase migration rate. The diffusion-controlled solution-precipitation mechanism of the liquid phase migration process in the cemented carbide system is confirmed from the current simulation result, which provides deeper understanding of the microstructural evolution during the liquid phase migration process. These simulations can offer guidance in preventing the liquid phase migration process during liquid phase sintering of cellular cemented carbide.

  8. White light emission from engineered silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide indirect bandgap semiconductor. The light emission efficiency is low in nature. But this material has very unique physical properties like good thermal conductivity, high break down field etc in addition to its abundance. Therefore it is interesting to engineer its...... light emission property so that to take fully potential applications of this material. In this talk, two methods, i.e. doping SiC heavily by donor-acceptor pairs and making SiC porous are introduced to make light emission from SiC. By co-doping SiC with nitrogen and boron heavily, strong yellow emission...

  9. Effect of {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} Addition on Sintering of {alpha}-Sialon Powder via Carbonthermal Reduction Nitridation of Boron-rich Slag-based Mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Junbin; Jiang Tao; Xue Xiangxin, E-mail: komsae@163.com [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang (China)

    2011-10-29

    With boron-rich slag, silica fume, bauxite chalmette, carbon black and {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} as starting materials, {alpha}-Sialon powders were prepared by carbothermal reduction-nitridation(CRN). Different contents of {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} addition were added to investigate the {alpha}-Sialon formation as a function of {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} addition from boron rich slag based mixture fired at 1480 deg. C for 8 h under N{sub 2} flowing of 0.4 L/min. Phase assembly, microstructure of reaction products were determined by X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscope. The results showed that the main phases of the samples were a-Sialon, h-BN, AlN and small quantity of SiC. With the increasing amount of the {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} addition, the h-BN content remained in a constant and AlN content was running down steadily, while the {alpha}-Sialon content increased gradually. The aspect ratio and the amount of elongated {alpha}-Sialon grains could be tailored by using different amounts of the {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} addition.

  10. ELASTO-PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF COMPOSITE POWDERS WITH LAYERED CARBON AND CARBIDE-FORMING ELEMENT COATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kovalevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coating structure formation under magnetron spraying of titanium and carbon cathodes and combined cathodes, namely cobalt (EP 131 – nickel, tungsten – carbon have been investigated under conditions of carbide separate synthesis within the temperature range of 650–1200 °C. Usage of cobalt and nickel particles as matrix material leads to their rapid thermal expansion under heating during sintering process in the dilatometer. Subsequent plastic deformation of sintered samples provides obtaining a composite powder material that is a composite with framing structure of cobalt, titanium and tungsten carbides in the coatings.

  11. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and X-ray Diffraction of Boron- and Phosphorus-Doped Nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Dolmatov, V. Yu.; Lapchuk, N. M.; Shymanski, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    Powders of boron- and phosphorus-doped detonation nanodiamonds and sintered pellets of non-doped nanodiamond powders were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance and x-ray diffraction. Doping of detonation nanodiamond crystals with boron and phosphorus was demonstrated to be possible. These methods could be used to diagnose diamond nanocrystals doped during shock-wave synthesis.

  12. Preparation and study of the nitrides and mixed carbide-nitrides of uranium and of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselin, F.

    1966-06-01

    A detailed description is given of a simple method for preparing uranium and plutonium nitrides by the direct action of nitrogen under pressure at moderate temperatures (about 400 C) on the partially hydrogenated bulk metal. It is shown that there is complete miscibility between the UN and PuN phases. The variations in the reticular parameters of the samples as a function of temperature and in the presence of oxide have been used to detect and evaluate the solubility of oxygen in the different phases. A study has been made of the sintering of these nitrides as a function of the preparation conditions with or without sintering additives. A favorable but non-reproducible, effect has been found for traces of oxide. The best results were obtained for pure UN at 1600 C (96 per cent theoretical density) on condition that a well defined powder, was used. The criterion used is the integral width of the X-ray diffraction lines. The compounds UN and PuN are completely miscible with the corresponding carbides. This makes it possible to prepare carbide-nitrides of the general formula (U,Pu) (C,N) by solid-phase diffusion, at around 1400 C. The sintering of these carbide-nitrides is similar to that of the carbides if the nitrogen content is low; in particular, nickel is an efficient sintering agent. For high contents, the sintering is similar to that of pure nitrides. (author) [fr

  13. Reaction of uranium and plutonium carbides with nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzelli, R.; Martin, A.; Schickel, R.

    1966-03-01

    Uranium and plutonium carbides react with nitrogen during the grinding process preceding the final sintering. The reaction occurs even in argon atmospheres containing a few percent of residual nitrogen. The resulting contamination is responsible for the appearance of an equivalent quantity of higher carbide in the sintered products; nitrogen remains quantitatively in the monocarbide phase. UC can be transformed completely into nitride under a nitrogen pressure, at a temperature as low as 400 C. The reaction is more sluggish with PuC. The following reactions take places: UC + 0,8 N 2 →> UN 1.60 + C and PuC + 0,5 N 2 → PuN + C. (authors) [fr

  14. Estudo da oxidação de cerâmicas à base de carbeto de silício sinterizado via fase líquida utilizando nitreto de alumínio e óxido de ítrio como aditivos Study of oxidation in liquid phase sintered silicon carbide with addition of aluminum nitride and yttrium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Bondioli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Materiais cerâmicos à base de carbeto de silício foram desenvolvidos através de sinterização via fase líquida usando AlN-Y2O3 como sistema de aditivos. Duas composições foram desenvolvidas utilizando pós de SiC e diferentes teores de AlN e Y2O3. Os pós foram misturados e homogeneizados, secados e subseqüentemente desaglomerados. As misturas do pó foram compactadas por prensagem uniaxial com subseqüente prensagem isostática a frio e os compactos foram sinterizados a 2080 ºC, por 1 h, em atmosfera 0,2 MPa de N2. As amostras sinterizadas foram caracterizadas por difração de raios X e pela sua densidade relativa. O comportamento da oxidação foi investigado e relacionado ao teor de aditivos. Para tanto, as amostras foram submetidas aos ensaios de oxidação em temperaturas de 1200, 1300 e 1400 ºC, ao ar por 120 h. O ganho de massa das amostras foi traçado em função do tempo de exposição, obtendo a evolução da oxidação na superfície das amostras. A composição das fases cristalinas presentes nas superfícies oxidadas foi obtida utilizando difração de raios X. Baseados nos resultados foram determinados os coeficientes de crescimento parabólico da taxa de oxidação referentes a cada composição estudada. Os resultados indicam que as amostras apresentam oxidação com comportamento parabólico em todas as condições, sendo que as amostras contendo menor quantidade de Y2O3 em relação ao AlN apresentaram maior resistência a oxidação quando submetidas a temperatura de 1200 ºC; porém com o aumento da temperatura para 1400 ºC, as amostras contendo maior quantidade de Y2O3 em relação ao AlN apresentaram maior resistência à oxidação, fato relacionado com as fases intergranulares presentes no sistema, após a sinterização.Silicon carbide (SiC ceramics were developed by liquid phase sintering using AlN-Y2O3 as additive. Two compositions were obtained using different AlN-Y2O3 contents. The powders were mixed

  15. Selected Silicon Carbide Reports from Rutgers Materials Center of Excellence Annual Reports, 2010-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    unit at the maximum temperature of 1,950 °C. To achieve maximum density of the samples, about 1% of boron carbide (B4C) and excess C as graphite (B/C...has been detected in the samples. Increased concentrations of free C were observed near the metallurgical-grade edge, similar to the X - ray ... Carbide Reports from Rutgers Materials Center of Excellence Annual Reports, 2010–2011 edited by JW McCauley (Emeritus) Cooperative Agreement

  16. Boron Arsenide and Boron Phosphide for High Temperature and Luminescent Devices. [semiconductor devices - crystal growth/crystal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    The crystal growth of boron arsenide and boron phosphide in the form of bulk crystals and epitaxial layers on suitable substrates is discussed. The physical, chemical, and electrical properties of the crystals and epitaxial layers are examined. Bulk crystals of boron arsenide were prepared by the chemical transport technique, and their carrier concentration and Hall mobility were measured. The growth of boron arsenide crystals from high temperature solutions was attempted without success. Bulk crystals of boron phosphide were also prepared by chemical transport and solution growth techniques. Techniques required for the fabrication of boron phosphide devices such as junction shaping, diffusion, and contact formation were investigated. Alloying techniques were developed for the formation of low-resistance ohmic contacts to boron phosphide. Four types of boron phosphide devices were fabricated: (1) metal-insulator-boron phosphide structures, (2) Schottky barriers; (3) boron phosphide-silicon carbide heterojunctions; and (4) p-n homojunctions. Easily visible red electroluminescence was observed from both epitaxial and solution grown p-n junctions.

  17. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-12-12

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. For example, one aspect relates to a method for making an aerogel comprising boron nitride, comprising: (a) providing boron oxide and an aerogel comprising carbon; (b) heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the aerogel; (c) mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide; and (d) converting at least a portion of the carbon to boron nitride to obtain the aerogel comprising boron nitride. Another aspect relates to a method for making an aerogel comprising boron nitride, comprising heating boron oxide and an aerogel comprising carbon under flow of a nitrogen-containing gas, wherein boron oxide vapor and the nitrogen-containing gas convert at least a portion of the carbon to boron nitride to obtain the aerogel comprising boron nitride.

  18. Effect of Carbon Doping on the Electronic Structure and Elastic Properties of Boron Suboxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    bonding complexity . When one equatorial boron atom neighboring a C-B-C chain is replaced by carbon, a Ce-CO bond forms between the equatorial carbon...Scripta Materialia. 2014;76:9. 8. Wang Z, Zhao Y. In situ pressure Raman spectroscopy and mechanical stability of superhard boron suboxide. Appl Phys...Lett. 2005;86:041911. 9. Nifise E. Study of sintering and structure property relationships in boron suboxide – alkaline earth metal oxide, cobalt

  19. Characterization of Nanometric-Sized Carbides Formed During Tempering of Carbide-Steel Cermets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matus K.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article of this paper is to present issues related to characterization of nanometric-sized carbides, nitrides and/or carbonitrides formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. Closer examination of those materials is important because of hardness growth of carbide-steel cermet after tempering. The results obtained during research show that the upswing of hardness is significantly higher than for high-speed steels. Another interesting fact is the displacement of secondary hardness effect observed for this material to a higher tempering temperature range. Determined influence of the atmosphere in the sintering process on precipitations formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. So far examination of carbidesteel cermet produced by powder injection moulding was carried out mainly in the scanning electron microscope. A proper description of nanosized particles is both important and difficult as achievements of nanoscience and nanotechnology confirm the significant influence of nanocrystalline particles on material properties even if its mass fraction is undetectable by standard methods. The following research studies have been carried out using transmission electron microscopy, mainly selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The obtained results and computer simulations comparison were made.

  20. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  1. Development of Gradient Cemented Carbides Through ICME Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yong; Peng, Yingbiao; Zhang, Weibin; Chen, Weimin; Zhou, Peng; Xie, Wen; Cheng, Kaiming; Zhang, Lijun; Wen, Guanghua; Wang, Shequan

    An integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) including CALPHAD method is a powerful tool for materials process optimization and alloy design. The quality of CALPHAD-type calculations is strongly dependent on the quality of the thermodynamic and diffusivity databases. The development of a thermodynamic database, CSUTDCC1, and a diffusivity database, CSUDDCC1, for cemented carbides is described. Several gradient cemented carbides sintered under vacuum and various partial pressures of N2 have been studied via experiment and simulation. The microstructure and concentration profile of the gradient zones have been investigated via SEM and EPMA. Examples of ICME applications in design and manufacture for different kinds of cemented carbides are shown using the databases and comparing where possible against experimental data, thereby validating its accuracy.

  2. Sintering of nonstoichiometric UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susnik, D.; Holc, J.

    1983-01-01

    Activated sintering of UO 2 pellets at 1100 deg C is described. In CO 2 atmosphere is UO 2 is nonstoichiometric and pellets from active UO 2 powders sinter at 900 deg C to high density. At 1100 deg C the final sintered density is practically achieved at heating on sintering temperature. After reduction and cooling in H 2 atmosphere which is followed sintering in CO 2 the structure is identical to the structured UO 2 pellets sintered at high temperature in H 2 . Density of activated sintered UO 2 pellets is stable, even after additional sintering at 1800 deg C. (author)

  3. Laser Sintered Calcium Phosphate Bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vail, Neil

    1999-01-01

    ...) technology selective laser sintering (SLS). BME has successfully implemented a pilot facility to fabricate calcium phosphate implants using anatomical data coupled with the selective laser sintering process...

  4. A method for sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for sintering, comprising in the following order the steps of: providing a body in the green state or in the pre-sintered state on a support; providing a load on at least one spacer on the support such that the load is located above said body in the green...

  5. Doping of silicon carbide by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimbert, J.

    1999-01-01

    It appeared that in some fields, as the hostile environments (high temperature or irradiation), the silicon compounds showed limitations resulting from the electrical and mechanical properties. Doping of 4H and 6H silicon carbide by ion implantation is studied from a physicochemical and electrical point of view. It is necessary to obtain n-type and p-type material to realize high power and/or high frequency devices, such as MESFETs and Schottky diodes. First, physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide are presented and the interest of developing a process technology on this material is emphasised. Then, physical characteristics of ion implantation and particularly classical dopant implantation, such as nitrogen, for n-type doping, and aluminium and boron, for p-type doping are described. Results with these dopants are presented and analysed. Optimal conditions are extracted from these experiences so as to obtain a good crystal quality and a surface state allowing device fabrication. Electrical conduction is then described in the 4H and 6H-SiC polytypes. Freezing of free carriers and scattering processes are described. Electrical measurements are carried out using Hall effect on Van der Panw test patterns, and 4 point probe method are used to draw the type of the material, free carrier concentrations, resistivity and mobility of the implanted doped layers. These results are commented and compared to the theoretical analysis. The influence of the technological process on electrical conduction is studied in view of fabricating implanted silicon carbide devices. (author)

  6. Pulmonary response, in vivo, to silicon carbide whiskers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, G L; Trently, S A; Wilson, R B

    1993-11-01

    Fischer rats were exposed to silicon carbide whiskers (SiCW), boron carbide whiskers (BCW), silicon carbide platelets (SiCP), or crocidolite asbestos separately administered by intratracheal instillation. SiCW proved to be the most toxic material within the test group. Dramatic increases in alveolar macrophage populations within 1 week of exposure to SiCW persisted for at least 28 days, evidence of the chronic inflammation observed in necropsies during the first months of the study. The most common finding in histological preparations of tissues taken from animals 18 months after exposure to SiCW was a high incidence (frequency > 0.85) of multiple pulmonary granulomas which occasionally occluded airways. Lesions associated with crocidolite were similar to those found with SiCW. Equivalent treatment with BCW and SiCP produced no significant histological changes within 18 months of exposure.

  7. B sub 4 C solid target boronization of the MST reversed-field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Cekic, M.; Fiksel, G.; Hokin, S.A.; Kendrick, R.D.; Prager, S.C.; Stoneking, M.R.

    1992-10-01

    A solid rod of hot-pressed boron carbide is being used as the source of boron during boronization of MST. The most striking result of this procedure is the reduction in oxygen contamination of the plasma (O III radiation, characteristic of oxygen at the edge, falls by about a factor of 3 after boronization.). The radiated power fraction drops to about half its initial value. Particle reflux from the wall is also lowered, making density control simpler. The rod (12.7 mm diameter) is inserted into the edge plasma of normal high-power RFP discharges. B{sub 4}C is ablated from the surface of the rod and deposited in a thin film (a-B/C:H) on the walls and limiters. The energy flux carried by superthermal'' (not runaway'') electrons at the edge of MST appears to enhance the efficient, non-destructive ablation of the boron carbide rod.

  8. B{sub 4}C solid target boronization of the MST reversed-field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Cekic, M.; Fiksel, G.; Hokin, S.A.; Kendrick, R.D.; Prager, S.C.; Stoneking, M.R.

    1992-10-01

    A solid rod of hot-pressed boron carbide is being used as the source of boron during boronization of MST. The most striking result of this procedure is the reduction in oxygen contamination of the plasma (O III radiation, characteristic of oxygen at the edge, falls by about a factor of 3 after boronization.). The radiated power fraction drops to about half its initial value. Particle reflux from the wall is also lowered, making density control simpler. The rod (12.7 mm diameter) is inserted into the edge plasma of normal high-power RFP discharges. B{sub 4}C is ablated from the surface of the rod and deposited in a thin film (a-B/C:H) on the walls and limiters. The energy flux carried by ``superthermal`` (not ``runaway``) electrons at the edge of MST appears to enhance the efficient, non-destructive ablation of the boron carbide rod.

  9. Hydrothermal corrosion of silicon carbide joints without radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Takaaki, E-mail: koyanagit@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Katoh, Yutai; Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kim, Young-Jin [GE Global Research Center, Schenectady, NY 12309 (United States); Kiggans, James O. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hinoki, Tatsuya [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    Hydrothermal corrosion of four types of the silicon carbide (SiC) to SiC plate joints were investigated under pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor relevant chemical conditions without irradiation. The joints were formed by metal diffusion bonding using molybdenum or titanium interlayer, reaction sintering using Ti–Si–C system, and SiC nanopowder sintering. Most of the joints withstood the corrosion tests for five weeks. The recession of the SiC substrates was limited. Based on the recession of the bonding layers, it was concluded that all the joints except for the molybdenum diffusion bond are promising under the reducing environments without radiation. The SiC nanopowder sintered joint was the most corrosion tolerant under the oxidizing environment among the four joints.

  10. Reactive Sintering of Bimodal WC-Co Hardmetals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Tarraste

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bimodal WC-Co hardmetals were produced using novel technology - reactive sintering. Milled and activated tungsten and graphite powders were mixed with commercial coarse grained WC-Co powder and then sintered. The microstructure of produced materials was free of defects and consisted of evenly distributed coarse and fine tungsten carbide grains in cobalt binder. The microstructure, hardness and fracture toughness of reactive sintered bimodal WC-Co hardmetals is exhibited. Developed bimodal hardmetal has perspective for demanding wear applications for its increased combined hardness and toughness. Compared to coarse material there is only slight decrease in fracture toughness (K1c is 14.7 for coarse grained and 14.4 for bimodal, hardness is increased from 1290 to 1350 HV units.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7511

  11. Additive Manufacturing of Dense Hexagonal Boron Nitride Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez Rossy, Andres E [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Elliott, Amy M [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

    2017-05-12

    The feasibility of manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via additive manufacturing techniques was investigated. It was demonstrated that it is possible to hot-extrude thermoplastic filaments containing uniformly distributed boron nitride particles with a volume concentration as high as 60% and that these thermoplastic filaments can be used as feedstock for 3D-printing objects using a fused deposition system. Objects 3D-printed by fused deposition were subsequently sintered at high temperature to obtain dense ceramic products. In a parallel study the behavior of hexagonal boron nitride in aqueous solutions was investigated. It was shown that the addition of a cationic dispersant to an azeotrope enabled the formulation of slurries with a volume concentration of boron nitride as high as 33%. Although these slurries exhibited complex rheological behavior, the results from this study are encouraging and provide a pathway for manufacturing hexagonal boron nitride objects via robocasting.

  12. Problems and possibilities of development of boron nitride ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusanova, L.N.; Romashin, A.G.; Kulikova, G.I.; Golubeva, O.P.

    1988-01-01

    The modern state of developments in the field of technology of ceramics produced from boron nitride is analyzed. Substantial difficulties in production of pure ceramics from hexagonal and wurtzite-like boron nitride are stated as related to the structure peculiarities and inhomogeneity of chemical bonds in elementary crystal cells of various modifications. Advantages and disadvantages of familiar technological procedures in production of boron nitride ceramics are compared. A new technology is suggested, which is based on the use of electroorganic compounds for hardening and protection of porous high-purity boron-nitride die from oxidation, and as high-efficient sintered elements for treatment of powders of various structures and further pyrolisis. The method is called thermal molecular lacing (TML). Properties of ceramics produced by the TML method are compared with characteristics of well-known brands of boron nitride ceramics

  13. XRD analysis and microstructure of milled and sintered V, W, C, and Co powders

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bolokang, AS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available )C solid solution, a rhombohedral V2O3 and new t-type (Cr23C6) carbide were formed after sintering. The possible formation mechanisms behind detected phases are discussed. It is evident that complete MA process depends strongly on the starting compositions...

  14. Shear-induced phase transition of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride to wurtzitic structure at room temperature and lower pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Cheng; Levitas, Valery I.; Zhu, Hongyang; Chaudhuri, Jharna; Marathe, Archis; Ma, Yanzhang

    2012-01-01

    Disordered structures of boron nitride (BN), graphite, boron carbide (BC), and boron carbon nitride (BCN) systems are considered important precursor materials for synthesis of superhard phases in these systems. However, phase transformation of such materials can be achieved only at extreme pressure–temperature conditions, which is irrelevant to industrial applications. Here, the phase transition from disordered nanocrystalline hexagonal (h)BN to superhard wurtzitic (w)BN was found at room tem...

  15. Sintering techniques for microstructure control in ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Andrew T.

    Sintering techniques can be manipulated to enhance densification in difficult to sinter materials and to produce property enhancing microstructures. However, the interplay between materials, sintering techniques, and end properties is not fully understood in many material systems, and some fundamental aspects of sintering such as the nature of the effects of electric fields remains unknown. The processing property relationships were examined in two classes of materials; zirconium diboride ultra high temperature ceramic composites, and all solid lithium-ion battery phosphate materials. Investigation of zirconium diboride ceramics focused on the effects of zirconium carbide as a secondary or tertiary phase in ZrB2 and ZrB2 -- SiC. Addition of zirconium carbide was observed to increase flexural strength of composites up to 590MPa at 50wt% ZrC, significantly higher than the flexural strength of 380MPa observed in similarly prepared ZrB2 -- SiC. This difference was attributed to the absence of CTE mismatch induced residual stresses in the ZrB2 -- ZrC composites. A high temperature reaction between ZrB2 and TiC producing Zr1-xTixB2 -- ZrC composites was discovered and found to enhance densification while reducing the average grain size to as small as 1.4mum, lower than the starting powder size of 1.8mum. While a high flexural strength of 670MPa was observed, a strength dependence on the ZrC grain size indicative of CTE mismatch residual stresses was also seen. Finally, the oxidation and ablation resistance of ZrB2 -- ZrC -- SiC composites as a function of ZrC fraction and ZrC:SiC ratio was investigated. Above 5vol% ZrC, the oxidation and ablation resistance of the composites was significantly reduced due to ZrC oxidation, regardless of SiC content. While ZrC can significantly enhance the mechanical properties of the composite, the volume fraction must be kept low to avoid an undesirable reduction in the oxidation resistance. The influence of applied electrical fields

  16. Sintering of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillat, R.; Pointud, R.

    1955-01-01

    This study had for origin to find a process permitting to manufacture bricks of beryllium oxide of pure nuclear grade, with a density as elevated as possible and with standardized shape. The sintering under load was the technique kept for the manufacture of the bricks. Because of the important toxicity of the beryllium oxide, the general features for the preliminary study of the sintering, have been determined while using alumina. The obtained results will be able to act as general indication for ulterior studies with sintering under load. (M.B.) [fr

  17. Abrasive wear behavior of heat-treated ABC-silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; Lee, Gun Y.; Chen, Da; Ritchie, Robert O.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2002-06-17

    Hot-pressed silicon carbide, containing aluminum, boron, and carbon additives (ABC-SiC), was subjected to three-body and two-body wear testing using diamond abrasives over a range of sizes. In general, the wear resistance of ABC-SiC, with suitable heat treatment, was superior to that of commercial SiC.

  18. Investigation of the structure and properties of boron-containing coatings obtained by electron-beam treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivezhenko, Dina S.; Drobyaz, Ekaterina A.; Bataev, Ivan A.; Chuchkova, Lyubov V.

    2015-10-01

    An investigation of surface-hardened materials obtained by cladding with an electron beam injected into the air atmosphere was carried out. Structural investigations of coatings revealed that an increase in boron carbide concentration in a saturating mixture contributed to a rise of a volume fraction of iron borides in coatings. The maximum hardened depth reached 2 mm. Hardened layers were characterized by the formation of heterogeneous structure which consisted of iron borides and titanium carbides distributed uniformly in the eutectic matrix. Areas of titanium boride conglomerations were detected. It was found that an increase in the boron carbide content led to an enhancement in hardness of the investigated materials. Friction testing against loosely fixed abrasive particles showed that electron-beam cladding of powder mixtures containing boron carbides, titanium, and iron in air atmosphere allowed enhancing a resistance of materials hardened in two times.

  19. Silicon Carbide Printed Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The plan is to design a process that will allow precision fabrication of SiC structures using a sterolithographty printer and an oven process to sinter the material...

  20. Silicon carbide hollow fiber membranes: obtainment and characterization; Membranas de fibra oca de carbeto de silicio: obtencao e caracterizacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, S.S.L.; Ferreira, R.S.B.; Araujo, B.A.; Medeiros, K.M.; Lucena, H.L.; Araujo, E.M., E-mail: sandriely_sonaly@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2016-07-01

    Silicon carbide is a promising material for the production of membranes due to its high melting temperature, thermal shock resistance, excellent mechanical and chemical stability. So, this study aims to characterize silicon carbide membranes in order to apply them in the separation of oil-water. A solution (SiC + PES + 1-Methyl- 2-Pyrrolidone) and through the extrusion technique by immersion precipitation membranes were obtained with hollow fiber geometry was prepared. And then sintered at 1500 ° C. For the characterization analyzes were made XRD, FTIR and SEM to evaluate the morphology and composition of the membranes obtained before and after sintering. (author)

  1. Corrosion behaviour of porous chromium carbide/oxide based ceramics in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Z.; Xin, T.; Chen, W.; Zheng, W.; Guzonas, D.

    2011-01-01

    Porous chromium carbide with a high density of open pores was fabricated by a reactive sintering method. Chromium oxide ceramics were obtained by re-oxidizing the porous chromium carbides formed. Some samples were added with yttria at 5 wt. %, prior to reactive sintering to form porous structures. Corrosion tests in SCW were performed at temperatures ranging from 375 o C to 625 o C with a fixed pressure at around 25∼30 MPa. The results show that chromium carbide is stable in SCW environments at temperatures up to 425 o C, above which disintegration of carbides through oxidation occurs. Porous chromium oxide samples show better corrosion resistance than porous chromium carbide, but disintegrate in SCW at around 625 o C. Among all the samples tested, chromium oxide ceramics with added yttria exhibited much better corrosion resistance compared with the pure chromium carbide/oxides. No evidence of weight change or disintegration of porous chromium oxides with 5 wt % added yttria was observed after exposure at 625 o C in SCW for 600 hours. (author)

  2. Natural precursor based hydrothermal synthesis of sodium carbide for reactor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swapna, M. S.; Saritha Devi, H. V.; Sebastian, Riya; Ambadas, G.; Sankararaman, S.

    2017-12-01

    Carbides are a class of materials with high mechanical strength and refractory nature which finds a wide range of applications in industries and nuclear reactors. The existing synthesis methods of all types of carbides have problems in terms of use of toxic chemical precursors, high-cost, etc. Sodium carbide (Na2C2) which is an alkali metal carbide is the least explored one and also that there is no report of low-cost and low-temperature synthesis of sodium carbide using the eco-friendly, easily available natural precursors. In the present work, we report a simple low-cost, non-toxic hydrothermal synthesis of refractory sodium carbide using the natural precursor—Pandanus. The formation of sodium carbide along with boron carbide is evidenced by the structural and morphological characterizations. The sample thus synthesized is subjected to field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet (UV)—visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman, and photoluminescent (PL) spectroscopic techniques.

  3. Sintering behavior and mechanical properties of a metal injection molded Ti–Nb binary alloy as biomaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Dapeng, E-mail: dpzhao@hotmail.com [College of Biology, Hunan University, 410082 Changsha (China); Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Chang, Keke [RWTH Aachen University, Materials Chemistry, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Ebel, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Nie, Hemin [College of Biology, Hunan University, 410082 Changsha (China); Willumeit, Regine; Pyczak, Florian [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The sintering of the MIM Ti–Nb alloy consists of three steps. • The Nb particles act as diffusion barriers during sintering. • The TiC{sub x} only precipitate in the cooling step during sintering. • The TiC{sub x} hardly influence the sintering process of MIM Ti–Nb alloy. • The MIM Ti–Nb alloy exhibits high strength, low Young’s modulus but poor ductility. - Abstract: Sintering behavior, microstructure and mechanical properties of a Ti–16Nb alloy processed by metal injection molding (MIM) technology using elemental powders were investigated in this work by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), dilatometer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). It was found that from 700 °C to 1500 °C the homogenization and densification process of MIM Ti–16Nb alloy consisted of three steps, i.e., Ti-diffusion-controlled step, Ti–Nb-diffusion step and matrix-diffusion step. Titanium carbide formation was observed in the samples sintered at 1300 °C and 1500 °C, but not in the ones sintered at 900 °C and 1100 °C. The MIM Ti–16Nb specimens sintered at 1500 °C exhibited a good combination of high tensile strength and low Young’s modulus. However, the titanium carbide particles led to poor ductility.

  4. Boron nitride composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2017-02-21

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and one or more borate binders; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and amorphous boron nitride; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material.

  5. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  6. Liquid Phase Sintering of (Ti,Zr)C with WC-Co.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Taoran; Borrajo-Pelaez, Rafael; Hedström, Peter; Blomqvist, Andreas; Borgh, Ida; Norgren, Susanne; Odqvist, Joakim

    2017-01-11

    (Ti,Zr)C powder was sintered with WC-Co following an industrial process, including an isotherm at 1410 °C. A series of interrupted sintering trials was performed with the aim of studying the sintering behavior and the microstructural evolution during both solid-state and liquid-state sintering. Reference samples, using the same elemental compositions but with the starting components TiC and ZrC instead of (Ti,Zr)C, were also sintered. The microstructure was investigated using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It is found that the (Ti,Zr)C phase decomposes into Ti-rich and Zr-rich nano-scale lamellae before the liquid-state of the sintering initiates. The final microstructure consists of the binder and WC as well as two different γ phases, rich in either Ti (γ₁) or Zr (γ₂). The γ₂ phase grains have a core-shell structure with a (Ti,Zr)C core following the full sintering cycle. The major differences observed in (Ti,Zr)C with respect to the reference samples after the full sintering cycle were the referred core-shell structure and the carbide grain sizes; additionally, the microstructural evolution during sintering differs. The grain size of carbides (WC, γ₁, and γ₂) is about 10% smaller in WC-(Ti,Zr)C-Co than WC-TiC-ZrC-Co. The shrinkage behavior and hardness of both composites are reported and discussed.

  7. Liquid Phase Sintering of (Ti,ZrC with WC-Co

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taoran Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available (Ti,ZrC powder was sintered with WC-Co following an industrial process, including an isotherm at 1410 °C. A series of interrupted sintering trials was performed with the aim of studying the sintering behavior and the microstructural evolution during both solid-state and liquid-state sintering. Reference samples, using the same elemental compositions but with the starting components TiC and ZrC instead of (Ti,ZrC, were also sintered. The microstructure was investigated using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It is found that the (Ti,ZrC phase decomposes into Ti-rich and Zr-rich nano-scale lamellae before the liquid-state of the sintering initiates. The final microstructure consists of the binder and WC as well as two different γ phases, rich in either Ti (γ1 or Zr (γ2. The γ2 phase grains have a core-shell structure with a (Ti,ZrC core following the full sintering cycle. The major differences observed in (Ti,ZrC with respect to the reference samples after the full sintering cycle were the referred core-shell structure and the carbide grain sizes; additionally, the microstructural evolution during sintering differs. The grain size of carbides (WC, γ1, and γ2 is about 10% smaller in WC-(Ti,ZrC-Co than WC-TiC-ZrC-Co. The shrinkage behavior and hardness of both composites are reported and discussed.

  8. Morphological analysis and modelling of sintering and of sintered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernot, Jean-Paul

    1982-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of solid phase sintering of metallic powders, and aims at describing as precisely as possible the different involved matter transport mechanisms, first by using a thermodynamic approach to sintering. Sintering diagrams are also used to determine prevailing mechanisms. The microstructure of sintered materials has been studied by using image quantitative analysis, thus by using a morphological approach to sintering. Morphological parameters allow, on the one hand, the evolution of powders during sintering to be followed, and, on the other hand, sintered products to be correctly characterised. Moreover, the author reports the study of the evolution of some physical properties of sintered materials with respect to their microstructure parameters. This leads to the development of a modelling of the behaviour of these materials [fr

  9. Electrophoretic deposits of boron on duralumin plates used for measuring neutron flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, F.M.; Magnier, P.; Finck, C.

    1956-01-01

    Preparation of boron thin film deposits of around 1 mg per cm 2 on duralumin plates with a diameter of 8 cm. The boron coated plates for ionization chambers were originally prepared at the CEA by pulverization of boron carbides on sodium silicates. This method is not controlling precisely enough the quantity of boron deposit. Thus, an electrophoretic method is considered for a better control of the quantity of boron deposit in the scope of using in the future boron 10 which is costly and rare. The method described by O. Flint is not satisfying enough and a similar electrophoretic process has been developed. Full description of the method is given as well as explanation of the use of dried methanol as solvent, tannin as electrolyte and magnesium chloride to avoid alumina formation. (M.P.)

  10. Low sintering temperature glass waste forms for sequestering radioactive iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Krumhansl, James L.; Garino, Terry J.; Ockwig, Nathan W.

    2012-09-11

    Materials and methods of making low-sintering-temperature glass waste forms that sequester radioactive iodine in a strong and durable structure. First, the iodine is captured by an adsorbant, which forms an iodine-loaded material, e.g., AgI, AgI-zeolite, AgI-mordenite, Ag-silica aerogel, ZnI.sub.2, CuI, or Bi.sub.5O.sub.7I. Next, particles of the iodine-loaded material are mixed with powdered frits of low-sintering-temperature glasses (comprising various oxides of Si, B, Bi, Pb, and Zn), and then sintered at a relatively low temperature, ranging from 425.degree. C. to 550.degree. C. The sintering converts the mixed powders into a solid block of a glassy waste form, having low iodine leaching rates. The vitrified glassy waste form can contain as much as 60 wt % AgI. A preferred glass, having a sintering temperature of 500.degree. C. (below the silver iodide sublimation temperature of 500.degree. C.) was identified that contains oxides of boron, bismuth, and zinc, while containing essentially no lead or silicon.

  11. Anode performance of boron-doped graphites prepared from shot and sponge cokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Luo, Ruiying; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Mochida, Isao

    The structures and anode performances of graphitized pristine and boron-doped shot and sponge cokes have been comparatively studied by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and galvanostatic measurement. The results show that high degree of graphitization can be obtained by the substituted boron atom in the carbon lattice, and boron in the resultant boron-doped graphites mainly exist in the form of boron carbide and boron substituted in the carbon lattice. Both of boron-doped graphites from shot and sponge cokes obtain discharge capacity of 350 mAh g -1 and coulombic efficiency above 90%. Apart from commonly observed discharge plateau for graphite, boron-doped samples in this study also show a small plateau at ca. 0.06 V. This phenomenon can be explained that Li ion stores in the site to be void-like spaces that are produced by "molecular bridging" between the edge sites of graphene layer stack with a release of boron atoms substituted at the edge of graphene layer. The effect of the amount of boron dopant and graphitization temperature on the anode performance of boron-doped graphite are also investigated in this paper.

  12. Sintering of Synroc D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, G.

    1982-01-01

    Sintering has been investigated as a method for the mineralization and densification of high-level nuclear defense waste powder. Studies have been conducted on Synroc D composite powder LS04. Optimal densification has been found to be highly dependent on the characteristics of the starting material. Powder subjected to milling, which was believed to reduce the level of agglomeration and possibly particle size, was found to densify better than powder not subjected to this milling. Densities of greater than 95% of theoretical could be achieved for samples sintered at 1150 to 1200 0 C. Mineralogy was found to be as expected for Synroc D for samples sintered in a CO 2 /CO atmosphere where the Fe +2 /Fe +3 ratio was maintained at 1.0 to 5.75. In a more oxidizing, pure CO 2 atmosphere a new phase, not previously identified in Synroc D, was found

  13. Electrocatalysis on tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, R.

    1975-01-01

    General concepts of electrocatalysis, the importance of the equilibrium rest potential and its standardization on polished WC-electrodes, the influence of oxygen in the catalysts upon the oxidation of hydrogen, and the attained results of the hydrogen oxidation on tungsten carbide are treated. (HK) [de

  14. Composite boron nitride neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, M.; Mojaev, E.; Khakhan, O.; Fleider, A.; Dul`kin, E.; Schieber, M.

    2014-09-01

    Single phase polycrystalline hexagonal boron nitride (BN) or mixed with boron carbide (BxC) embedded in an insulating polymeric matrix acting as a binder and forming a composite material as well as pure submicron size polycrystalline BN has been tested as a thermal neutron converter in a multilayer thermal neutron detector design. Metal sheet electrodes were covered with 20-50 μm thick layers of composite materials and assembled in a multi-layer sandwich configuration. High voltage was applied to the metal electrodes to create an interspacing electric field. The spacing volume could be filled with air, nitrogen or argon. Thermal neutrons were captured in converter layers due to the presence of the 10B isotope. The resulting nuclear reaction produced α-particles and 7Li ions which ionized the gas in the spacing volume. Electron-ion pairs were collected by the field to create an electrical signal proportional to the intensity of the neutron source. The detection efficiency of the multilayer neutron detectors is found to increase with the number of active converter layers. Pixel structures of such neutron detectors necessary for imaging applications and incorporation of internal moderator materials for field measurements of fast neutron flux intensities are discussed as well.

  15. SinterHab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousek, Tomáš; Eriksson, Katarina; Doule, Ondřej

    2012-05-01

    This project describes a design study for a core module on a Lunar South Pole outpost, constructed by 3D printing technology with the use of in-situ resources and equipped with a bio-regenerative life support system. The module would be a hybrid of deployable (CLASS II) and in-situ built (CLASS III) structures. It would combine deployable membrane structures and pre-integrated rigid elements with a sintered regolith shell for enhanced radiation and micrometeorite shielding. The closed loop ecological system would support a sustainable presence on the Moon with particular focus on research activities. The core module accommodates from four to eight people, and provides laboratories as a test bed for development of new lunar technologies directly in the environment where they will be used. SinterHab also includes an experimental garden for development of new bio-regenerative life support system elements. The project explores these various concepts from an architectural point-of-view particularly, as they constitute the building, construction and interior elements. The construction method for SinterHab is based on 3D printing by sintering of the lunar regolith. Sinterator robotics 3D printing technology proposed by NASA JPL enables construction of future generations of large lunar settlements with little imported material and the use of solar energy. The regolith is processed, placed and sintered by the Sinterator robotics system which combines the NASA ATHLETE and the Chariot remotely controlled rovers. Microwave sintering creates a rigid structure in the form of walls, vaults and other architectural elements. The interior is coated with a layer of inflatable membranes inspired by the TransHab project. The life-support system is mainly bio-regenerative and several parts of the system are intrinsically multifunctional and serve more than one purpose. The plants for food production are also an efficient part of atmosphere revitalization and water treatment. Moreover

  16. Methods of forming boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  17. High temperature oxidation of carbide-carbon materials of NbC-C, NbC-TiC-C systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afonin, Yu.D.; Shalaginov, V.N.; Beketov, A.R.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of titanium carbide additions on the oxidation of carbide - carbon composition NbC-TiC-C in oxygen under the pressure of 10 mm Hg and in the air at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range 800-1300 deg is studied. It is shown that the region of negative temperature coefficient during oxidation in the system NbC+C is determined by the processes of sintering and polymorphous transformation. The specific character of the oxide film, formed during oxidation of Nbsub(x)Tisub(y)C+C composites is connected with non-equilibrium nature of carbide grain in its composition. Carbon gasification takes place with the formation of carbon dioxide. Composite materials, containing titanium carbide in complex carbide up to 50-83 mol. %, are the most corrosion resisting ones [ru

  18. Strain induced decomposition and precipitation of carbides in a molybdenum–hafnium–carbon alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pöhl, C., E-mail: Christopher.Poehl@unileoben.ac.at [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Lang, D. [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Schatte, J. [PLANSEE SE, Metallwerk-Plansee-Straße 71, 6600 Reutte (Austria); Leitner, H. [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2013-12-05

    Highlights: •We revealed the precipitation mechanism of Hf-carbides in a Mo–Hf–C alloy. •Dislocations and boundaries are acting as heterogeneous nucleation sites. •Strain must be introduced to decompose Mo{sub 2}C which delivers C for the Hf-carbides. •Atom probe reveals early stages of precipitation at dislocations and boundaries. •Carbon enrichment at dislocations and (sub)grain boundaries occurs. -- Abstract: In the present study of a sintered and thermo-mechanically processed Mo–Hf–C (MHC) alloy the strain induced decomposition of Mo–carbides and subsequent precipitation of Hf-carbides was revealed. The microstructural characterization was performed with atom probe tomography (APT), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical light microscopy (OLM). During annealing of deformed conditions it can be shown by TEM analysis that Hf-carbides were preferentially formed on dislocations and occasionally on (sub)grain boundaries. XRD and OLM investigations revealed that the required C for the Hf-carbides was delivered by the decomposition of Mo–carbides which are originally located at former grain boundaries in the as-sintered condition. It has been shown that for this decomposition mechanical strain prior to annealing was required. In the early stages of precipitation APT analyses revealed a significant segregation of C and Hf atoms to dislocations and boundaries. Finally, the authors deduced that due to the dislocation–precipitation interaction the misfit strain was effectively reduced and therefore, the Hf-carbides are located on dislocations and (sub)grain boundaries.

  19. Densification rate and interfacial adhesion of bilayer cemented tungsten carbide and steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojo-kupoluyi, Oluwatosin Job; Tahir, Suraya Mohd; Ariff, Azmah Hanim Mohamed; Baharudin, B.T. Hang Tuah [Univ. Putra Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia). Dept. of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering; Matori, Khamirul Amin [Univ. Putra Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia). Dept. of Physics; Univ. Putra Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia). Inst. of Advanced Technology (ITMA); Shamsul Anuar, Mohd [Univ. Putra Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia). Dept. of Process and Food Engineering

    2017-12-15

    Manufacturing tailored materials is commonly faced with the challenge of shrinkage mismatch between layers resulting in delamination. The effects of sintering temperature and carbon variation on the densification and interfacial bond strength of bilayer cemented tungsten carbide and steel processed through powder metallurgy are analyzed. It is revealed through field-emission scanning electron microscopy images that inter-layer diffusion induced by liquid-phase sintering plays a major role in the densification and bonding of layers. Through dimensional analysis of sintered bilayer specimens, the strain rate of cemented tungsten carbide is observed to surpass that of steel. An enhanced densification rate of 6.1 % and M{sub 6}C (eta carbide) reduction with increased carbon level results in strong interfacial bonding in specimens sintered at 1 280 C. At 1 295 C, diffusion accelerates and the axial and radial shrinkage increase by 14.05 % and 13.35 %, respectively, in 93.8 wt.% WC - 6 wt.% Fe - 0.2 wt.% C and 93.2 wt.% Fe - 6 wt.% WC - 0.8 wt.% C, thereby increasing the tendency for complete delamination.

  20. Influence of Eta-Phase on Wear Behavior of WC-Co Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Formisano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cemented carbides, also known as Widia, are hard metals produced by sintering process and widely used in mechanical machining. They show high cutting capacity and good wear resistance; consequently, they result to be excellent materials for manufacturing cutting tools and sandblast nozzles. In this work, the wear resistance of WC-Co carbides containing Eta-phase, a secondary phase present in the hard metals when a carbon content deficiency occurs, is analyzed. Different mixtures of carbide are prepared and sintered, with different weight percentages of carbon, in order to form Eta-phase and then analyze how the carbon content influences the wear resistance of the material. This characterization is carried out by abrasive wear tests. The test parameters are chosen considering the working conditions of sandblast nozzles. Additional information is gathered through microscopic observations and the evaluation of hardness and microhardness of the different mixtures. The analyses highlight that there is a limit of carbon content below which bad sintering occurs. Considering the mixtures without these sintering problems, they show a wear resistance depending on the size and distribution of the Eta-phase; moreover, the one with high carbon content deficiency shows the best performance.

  1. PREPARATION OF TANTALUM CARBIDE FROM AN ORGANOMETALLIC PRECURSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. SOUZA

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have synthesized an organometallic oxalic precursor from tantalum oxide. This oxide was solubilized by heating with potassium hydrogen sulfate. In order to precipitate Ta2O5.nH2O, the fused mass obtained was dissolved in a sulfuric acid solution and neutralized with ammonia. The hydrated tantalum oxide precipitated was dissolved in an equimolar solution of oxalic acid/ammonium oxalate. The synthesis and the characterization of the tantalum oxalic precursor are described. Pyrolysis of the complex in a mixture of hydrogen and methane at atmospheric pressure was studied. The gas-solid reaction made it possible to obtain tantalum carbide, TaC, in the powder form at 1000oC. The natural sintering of TaC powder in an inert atmosphere at 1400°C during 10 hours, under inert atmosphere made it possible to densify the carbide to 96% of the theoretical value.

  2. Effect of hydrogen on the microstructure of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischman, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of hydrogenation on the microstructure of a pressureless sintered silicon carbide was studied. Samples which were annealed in a 40:60 mole % H 2 :Ar atmosphere at 1400 0 C for 50 hours were microstructurally compared with unannealed samples and samples that had been annealed in a similar manner but using an argon atmosphere. The results were also compared with microstructural results obtained from in situ studies using both hydrogen and argon atmospheres. These results were compared with a thermodynamic model which was constructed using a free energy minimization technique. The observed effects of hydrogenation were surface decarburization and amorphization throughout the silicon carbide material. Other observations include the thermally induced growth of microcrystalline silicon and accelerated amorphization around the silicon microcrystals in samples used in hydrogen in situ studies. An analysis of the microstructure of the reference material was also performed

  3. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  4. Comparative studies on mechanical properties of WC-Co composites sintered by SPS and conventional techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pristinskiy Yuri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spark plasma sintering (SPS is an extremely fast solidification technique for compounds that are difficult to sinter within the material group metals, ceramics, or composites thereof, SPS uses a uniaxial pressure and a very rapid heating cycle to consolidate these materials. With SPS the main benefit is the ability to control the WC grain size due to the short sintering times at high temperature. Additionally, its allows to avoid negative reactions between WC and cobalt and to minimize the formation of undesirable phases in sintered composites. The WC-6wt.% Co cermet prepared by SPS processing achieves the enhanced mechanical properties with the hardness of 18.3 GPa and the fracture toughness of 15.5 MPa·m1/2 in comparison to standard reference tungsten carbide/cobalt material.

  5. Silicon carbide layer structure recovery after ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violin, Eh.E.; Demakov, K.D.; Kal'nin, A.A.; Nojbert, F.; Potapov, E.N.; Tairov, Yu.M.

    1984-01-01

    The process of recovery of polytype structure of SiC surface layers in the course of thermal annealing (TA) and laser annealing (LA) upon boron and aluminium implantation is studied. The 6H polytype silicon carbide C face (0001) has been exposed to ion radiation. The ion energies ranged from 80 to 100 keV, doses varied from 5x10 14 to 5x10 16 cm -2 . TA was performed in the 800-2000 K temperature range. It is shown that the recovery of the structure of silicon carbide layers after ion implantation takes place in several stages. Considerable effect on the structure of the annealed layers is exerted by the implantation dose and the type of implanted impurity. The recovery of polytype structure is possible only under the effect of laser pulses with duration not less than the time for the ordering of the polytype in question

  6. Effect of boron nitride coating on fiber-matrix interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.N.; Brun, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Coatings can modify fiber-matrix reactions and consequently interfacial bond strengths. Commercially available mullite, silicon carbide, and carbon fibers were coated with boron nitride via low pressure chemical vapor deposition and incorporated into a mullite matrix by hot-pressing. The influence of fiber-matrix interactions for uncoated fibers on fracture morphologies was studied. These observations are related to the measured values of interfacial shear strengths

  7. Functional properties of coated by chemical vapour deposition sintered tool materials investigated with use of tribological tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mikuła

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work is to present the results of investigations into the structure and properties of sintered carbides with deposited wear resistant coatings after a tribological test carried out with the method of combined examination of abrasion wear resistance and edge fracture resistance.

  8. A metallic superhard boron carbide: first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mengdong; Yang, Bingchao; Li, Zihe; Hu, Meng; Wang, Qianqian; Cui, Lin; Yu, Dongli; He, Julong

    2015-04-21

    A monoclinic BC3 phase (denoted M-BC3) has been predicted using first principles calculations. The M-BC3 structure is formed by alternately stacking sequences of metallic BC-layers and insulating C atom layers, thus, the structure exhibits two-dimensional conductivity. Its stability has been confirmed by our calculations of the total energy, elastic constants, and phonon frequencies. The pressure of phase transition from graphite-like BC3 to M-BC3 is calculated to be 9.3 GPa, and the theoretical Vickers hardness of M-BC3 is 43.8 GPa, this value indicates that the compound is a potentially superhard material. By comparing Raman spectral calculations of M-BC3 and previously proposed structures with the experimental data, we speculate that the experimentally synthesized BC3 crystal may simultaneously contain M-BC3 and Pmma-b phases.

  9. Characterization of a Boron Carbide Heterojunction Neutron Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    with the high density of gap states split off from the valence band - on the order of 0.1 to 1 per elementary cell (~3×1021 elementary cells cm-3...obtained. Using this value, and the silicon values in Table 7, the Fermi level is given by / / ln ,D A n p i NkT q n         (2) where

  10. High temperature heat capacities and electrical conductivities of boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Tsuneo; Arita, Yuri; Naito, Keiji; Imai, Hisashi

    1991-01-01

    The heat capacities and the electrical conductivities of B x C(x=3, 4, 5) were measured by means of direct heating pulse calorimetry in the temperature range from 300 to 1500 K. The heat capacities of B x C increased with increasing x value. This increase in the heat capacity is probably related to the change of the lattice vibration mode originated from the reduction of the stiffness of the intericosahedral chain accompanied with a change from C-B-C to C-B-B chains. A linear relationship between the logarithm of σT (σ is the electrical conductivity and T is the absolute temperature) of B x C and the reciprocal temperature was observed, indicating the presence of small polaron hopping as the predominant conduction mechanism. The electrical conductivity of B x C also increased with increasing x value (from 4 to 5) due to an increase of the polaron hopping of holes between carbon atoms at geometrically nonequivalent sites, since these nonequivalent sites of carbon atoms were considered to increase in either B 11 C icosahedra or in icosahedral chains with increasing x. The electrical conductivity of B 3 C was higher than that of B 4 C, which is probably due to the precipitation of high-conducting carbon. The thermal conductivity and the thermodynamic quantities of B 4 C were also determined precisely from the heat capacity value. (orig.)

  11. Laser treatment of boron carbide surfaces: Metallurgical and morphological examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S., E-mail: bsilbas@kfupm.edu.sa; Karatas, C.

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Dense layer with fine grains is formed at surface. • Irregular shaped grains and dendrites are formed below dense layer. • Assisting gas forms nitride species (BN and BC{sub 2}N) at surface. • Fracture toughness of treated surface reduces because of high hardness. • Residual stress is compressive and the maximum residual stress is about 0.9 GPa. - Abstract: Laser treatment of B{sub 4}C tile surfaces is carried out under high pressure nitrogen assisting gas environment. Morphological and metallurgical changes in the laser treated layer are examined by incorporating scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Microhardness and fracture toughness of the laser treated surface are determined from the indentation data. Residual stress formed at the treated surface is obtained by using X-ray diffraction technique. It is found that laser treated surface is free from large scale asperities including cracks and voids; however, some locally scattered shallow cavities with 1.5–2 μm widths are formed at the surface because of high temperature processing. Dense layer, consisting of fine grains, and formation of nitride species (BN and BC{sub 2}N) enhance microhardness and lower fracture toughness at the surface. Residual stress formed in the treated layer is compressive and the maximum residual stress is in the order of −0.9 GPa.

  12. Directional amorphization of boron carbide subjected to laser shock compression

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Shiteng; Kad, Bimal; Remington, Bruce A.; LaSalvia, Jerry C.; Wehrenberg, Christopher E.; Behler, Kristopher D.; Meyers, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    When crystalline solids are stressed quasi-statically, dislocation slip, twinning, and phase transformations are the predominant mechanisms to dissipate the imparted elastic energy. Under shock, high hydrostatic and shear stresses promptly build up at the shock front, favoring fast energy dissipation mechanisms. Amorphization, which may only involve localized atomic arrangements, is therefore an additional potential candidate. Shock-induced amorphization has now been reported in various mater...

  13. Liquid phase sintered SiC. Processing and transformation controlled microstructure tailoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Izhevskyi

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure development and phase formation processes during sintering of silicon carbide based materials with AlN-Y2O3, AlN-Yb2O3, and AlN-La2O3 sintering additives were investigated. Densification of the materials occurred by liquid-phase sintering mechanism. Proportion of alpha- and beta-SiC powders in the initial mixtures was a variable parameter, while the molar ratio of AlN/RE2O3, and the total amount of additives (10 vol. % were kept constant. Shrinkage behavior during sintering in interrelation with the starting composition of the material and the sintering atmosphere was investigated by high temperature dilatometry. Kinetics of b-SiC to a-SiC phase transformation during post-sintering heat treatment at temperatures 1900-1950 °C was studied, the degree of phase transformation being determined by quantitative x-ray analysis using internal standard technique. Evolution of microstructure resulting from beta-SiC to alpha-SiC transformation was followed up by scanning electron microscopy on polished and chemically etched samples. Transformation-controlled grain growth mechanism similar to the one observed for silicon nitride based ceramics was established. Possibility of in-situ platelet reinforced dense SiC-based ceramics fabrication with improved mechanical properties by means of sintering was shown.

  14. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of cBN/WCCo composites obtained by the pulse plasma sintering (PPS) method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, A; Rosinski, M; Plocinska, M; Szawlowski, J, E-mail: mihalski@inmat.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-10-29

    The cBN/cemented carbide containing 30vol% of cBN particles was produced using a mixture of a 6wt% Co added-WC powder, with a WC grain size of 0.4 {mu}m and a cBN powder with a grain size ranging from 4 to 40 {mu}m. The mixture was sintered to produce a plate, 20 mm in diameter, 3 mm thick. The sintering processes were conducted at temperature of 1100 deg. C under a load of 100 MPa. The phase composition, density, hardness and micro structure of the sintered parts thus obtained were examined. The fractures through the WCCo/cBN composite showed the cBN particles torn out from the cemented carbide matrix were only few, whereas most of them have cleaved along the fracture plane. This gives evidence that the bond at the WCCo/cBN interface is mechanically strong.

  16. RESEARCH OF INFLUENCE OF ALLOYING BY BORON ON PROPERTIES THE IRON-CARBON ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Kobyakov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that for improvement of physical-mechanical properties of the cast products which have hard usage, the boron carbide, which can be used at carrying out process of thermo-chemical treatment of cast products of iron-carbon alloy, is of great interest.

  17. Development of Cutting Tool Through Superplastic Boronizing of Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhari, Iswadi; Harun, Sunita; Jamlus, Siti Aida; Sabri, Mohd Faizul Mohd

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a cutting tool is developed from duplex stainless steel (DSS) using the superplastic boronizing technique. The feasibility of the development process is studied, and the cutting performances of the cutting tool are evaluated and compared with commercially available carbide and high-speed steel (HSS) tools. The superplastically boronized (SPB) cutting tool yielded a dense boronized layer of 50.5 µm with a surface hardness of 3956 HV. A coefficient of friction value of 0.62 is obtained, which is lower than 1.02 and 0.8 of the carbide and HSS tools. When tested on an aluminum 6061 surface under dry condition, the SPB cutting tool is also able to produce turning finishing below 0.4 µm, beyond the travel distance of 3000 m, which is comparable to the carbide tool, but produces much better results than HSS tool. Through superplastic boronizing of DSS, it is possible to produce a high-quality metal-based cutting tool that is comparable to the conventional carbide tool.

  18. Microstructural Study of Titanium Carbide Coating on Cemented Carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuorinen, S.; Horsewell, Andy

    1982-01-01

    Titanium carbide coating layers on cemented carbide substrates have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural variations within the typically 5µm thick chemical vapour deposited TiC coatings were found to vary with deposit thickness such that a layer structure could...

  19. The mechanism of hard metal TiC-TiNi composite liquid-phase sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    The sintering conditions are investigated for hard alloys on their production from powders of titanium nickelide with particle size of 10-25 μ and titanium carbide with particles of 5-10 μ at temperatures of 1280-1350 deg C under pressure of 0.1 MPa with holding at heat for 180-900 s. The analysis of experimental data shows that optimum sintering conditions are determined by the quantity of a binding phase TiNi. In the systems with a binding phase content no more than 40 % a heterogeneous structure with nonuniform aggregates of TiC and TiNi phases is observed. With increasing a binding phase amount up to 50-70 % and a temperature up to 1350 deg C, titanium nickelide melts and spreads uniformly among carbide grains. This results in a low porosity of the composite material and in an increase of thermodynamic stability of the system [ru

  20. Silicon carbide sewing thread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems provide lightweight thermal insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.